WorldWideScience

Sample records for aerial density profiles

  1. GIS for mapping waterfowl density and distribution from aerial surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, W.I.; Stehn, R.A.; Balogh, G.R.

    1995-01-01

    We modified standard aerial survey data collection to obtain the geographic location for each waterfowl observation on surveys in Alaska during 1987-1993. Using transect navigation with CPS (global positioning system), data recording on continuously running tapes, and a computer data input program, we located observations with an average deviation along transects of 214 m. The method provided flexibility in survey design and data analysis. Although developed for geese nesting near the coast of the Yukon-Kuskokwim Delta, the methods are widely applicable and were used on other waterfowl surveys in Alaska to map distribution and relative abundance of waterfowl. Accurate location data with GIS analysis and display may improve precision and usefulness of data from any aerial transect survey.

  2. On the universality of void density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Ricciardelli, E; Varela, J

    2014-01-01

    The massive exploitation of cosmic voids for precision cosmology in the upcoming dark energy experiments, requires a robust understanding of their internal structure, particularly of their density profile. We show that the void density profile is insensitive to the void radius both in a catalogue of observed voids and in voids from a large cosmological simulation. However, the observed and simulated voids display remarkably different profile shapes, with the former having much steeper profiles than the latter. Sparsity can not be the main reason for this discrepancy, as we demonstrate that the profile can be recovered with reasonable accuracy even with very sparse samples of tracers. On the other hand, the observed profile shows a significant dependence on the galaxy sample used to trace the matter distribution. Samples including low-mass galaxies lead to shallower profiles with respect to the samples where only massive galaxies are used, as faint galaxies live closer to the void centre. We argue that galaxie...

  3. High Density Aerial Image Matching: State-Of and Future Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haala, N.; Cavegn, S.

    2016-06-01

    Ongoing innovations in matching algorithms are continuously improving the quality of geometric surface representations generated automatically from aerial images. This development motivated the launch of the joint ISPRS/EuroSDR project "Benchmark on High Density Aerial Image Matching", which aims on the evaluation of photogrammetric 3D data capture in view of the current developments in dense multi-view stereo-image matching. Originally, the test aimed on image based DSM computation from conventional aerial image flights for different landuse and image block configurations. The second phase then put an additional focus on high quality, high resolution 3D geometric data capture in complex urban areas. This includes both the extension of the test scenario to oblique aerial image flights as well as the generation of filtered point clouds as additional output of the respective multi-view reconstruction. The paper uses the preliminary outcomes of the benchmark to demonstrate the state-of-the-art in airborne image matching with a special focus of high quality geometric data capture in urban scenarios.

  4. Universal density profile for cosmic voids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaus, Nico; Sutter, P M; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2014-06-27

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in ΛCDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing a large radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper [Sutter et al., arXiv:1309.5087 [Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. (to be published)

  5. A SURVEY OF CORONAL CAVITY DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coronal cavities are common features of the solar corona that appear as darkened regions at the base of coronal helmet streamers in coronagraph images. Their darkened appearance indicates that they are regions of lowered density embedded within the comparatively higher density helmet streamer. Despite interfering projection effects of the surrounding helmet streamer (which we refer to as the cavity rim), Fuller et al. have shown that under certain conditions it is possible to use a Van de Hulst inversion of white-light polarized brightness (pB) data to calculate the electron density of both the cavity and cavity rim plasma. In this article, we apply minor modifications to the methods of Fuller et al. in order to improve the accuracy and versatility of the inversion process, and use the new methods to calculate density profiles for both the cavity and cavity rim in 24 cavity systems. We also examine trends in cavity morphology and how departures from the model geometry affect our density calculations. The density calculations reveal that in all 24 cases the cavity plasma has a flatter density profile than the plasma of the cavity rim, meaning that the cavity has a larger density depletion at low altitudes than it does at high altitudes. We find that the mean cavity density is over four times greater than that of a coronal hole at an altitude of 1.2 Rsun and that every cavity in the sample is over twice as dense as a coronal hole at this altitude. Furthermore, we find that different cavity systems near solar maximum span a greater range in density at 1.2 Rsun than do cavity systems near solar minimum, with a slight trend toward higher densities for systems nearer to solar maximum. Finally, we found no significant correlation of cavity density properties with cavity height-indeed, cavities show remarkably similar density depletions-except for the two smallest cavities that show significantly greater depletion.

  6. A Universal Density Profile for Cosmic Voids

    CERN Document Server

    Hamaus, Nico; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2014-01-01

    We present a simple empirical function for the average density profile of cosmic voids, identified via the watershed technique in {\\Lambda}CDM N-body simulations. This function is universal across void size and redshift, accurately describing the entire radial range of scales around void centers with only two free parameters. In analogy to halo density profiles, these parameters describe the scale radius and the central density of voids. While we initially start with a more general four-parameter model, we find two of its parameters to be redundant, as they follow linear trends with the scale radius in two distinct regimes of the void sample, separated by its compensation scale. Assuming linear theory, we derive an analytic formula for the velocity profile of voids and find an excellent agreement with the numerical data as well. In our companion paper, Sutter al. (2014), the presented density profile is shown to be universal even across tracer type, properly describing voids defined in halo- and galaxy distri...

  7. ?Linear Gas Jet with Tailored Density Profile"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KRISHNAN, Mahadevan

    2012-12-10

    Supersonic, highly collimated gas jets and gas-filled capillary discharge waveguides are two primary targets of choice for Laser Plasma Accelerators (LPA) . Present gas jets have lengths of only 2-4 mm at densities of 1-4E19 cm-3, sufficient for self trapping and electron acceleration to energies up to ~150 MeV. Capillary structures 3 cm long have been used to accelerate beams up to 1 GeV. Capillary discharges used in LPAs serve to guide the pump laser and optimize the energy gain. A wall-stabilized capillary discharge provides a transverse profile across the channel that helps guide the laser and combat diffraction. Gas injection via a fast nozzle at one end provides some longitudinal density control, to improve the coupling. Gas jets with uniform or controlled density profiles may be used to control electron bunch injection and are being integrated into capillary experiments to add tuning of density. The gas jet for electron injection has not yet been optimized. Our Ph-I results have provided the LPA community with an alternative path to realizing a 2-3GeV electron bunch using just a gas jet. For example, our slit/blade combination gives a 15-20mm long acceleration path with tunable density profile, serving as an alternative to a 20-mm long capillary discharge with gas injection at one end. In Ph-II, we will extend these results to longer nozzles, to see whether we can synthesize 30 or 40-mm long plasma channels for LPAs.

  8. Plasma Density Distribution Profile in Toroidal Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak is an electrode less toroidal plasma discharge system whichcontains and heats the plasma by using magnetic field and heating system suchas RF and neutral beams respectively. Using the system, tokamak is expectedto be a most advanced facility in fusion reactor concept. The importantparameters in tokamak are plasma current, plasma discharge voltage,temperature and density, plasma density profile and confinement time.However, the facility belonged to this center (P3TM) is very simple thatmeans a toroidal discharge without confinement magnetic filed and anadditional heating. The preceding result showed that it had been obtainedsome important parameters such as plasma current, discharge current, plasmavoltage and induced poloidal magnetic field. While plasma temperature andplasma density and its profile have not been observed. The one of somediagnostics to be used to determine this parameter is a Langmuir probe.Langmuir probe is an oldest diagnostic tool, simple and quite easy to bemade. The most advantage by using this probe is its ability to measure thecurrent locally. In this experiment, the home made Langmuir probe is atungsten wire with 0.8 mm in diameter enveloped by glass tube and inserted intorus tube. The torus is operated at 1 mbar argon gas pressure and 7.5 kVoperating voltage. The power source is a 330006 Maxwell type capacitor with15 micro farad, and charging system is a 825-100 Hipotronics model which canhold 20 kV of voltage and deliver 100 mA of current. The experiment resultshowed that the relative radial density profile has an exponential relationwith the approaching function is nrel ∝ e-0.54r, r isradial position. (author)

  9. Column density profiles of multiphase gaseous haloes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Cameron J.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Agertz, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    We analyse circumgalactic medium (CGM) in a suite of high-resolution cosmological re-simulations of a Milky Way size galaxy and show that CGM properties are quite sensitive to details of star formation-feedback loop modelling. The simulation that produces a realistic late-type galaxy, fails to reproduce existing observations of the CGM. In contrast, simulation that does not produce a realistic galaxy has the predicted CGM in better agreement with observations. This illustrates that properties of galaxies and properties of their CGM provide strong complementary constraints on the processes governing galaxy formation. Our simulations predict that column density profiles of ions are well described by an exponential function of projected distance d: N ∝ e^{-d/h_s}. Simulations thus indicate that the sharp drop in absorber detections at larger distances in observations does not correspond to a `boundary' of an ion, but reflects the underlying steep exponential column density profile. Furthermore, we find that ionization energy of ions is tightly correlated with the scaleheight hs: h_s ∝ E_ion^{0.74}. At z ≈ 0, warm gas traced by low-ionization species (e.g. Mg II and C IV) has hs ≈ 0.03 - 0.07Rvir, while higher ionization species (O VI and Ne VIII) have hs ≈ 0.32 - 0.45Rvir. Finally, the scaleheights of ions in our simulations evolve slower than the virial radius for z ≤ 2, but similarly to the halo scale radius, rs. Thus, we suggest that the column density profiles of galaxies at different redshifts should be scaled by rs rather than the halo virial radius.

  10. Mass Density Profiles of LSB Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    De Blok, W J G; Bosma, A; Rubin, V C; Gaugh, Stacy S. Mc; Bosma, Albert; Rubin, Vera C.

    2001-01-01

    We derive the mass density profiles of dark matter halos that are implied by high spatial resolution rotation curves of low surface brightness galaxies. We find that at small radii, the mass density distribution is dominated by a nearly constant density core with a core radius of a few kpc. For rho(r) ~ r^a, the distribution of inner slopes a is strongly peaked around a = -0.2. This is significantly shallower than the cuspy a < -1 halos found in CDM simulations. While the observed distribution of alpha does have a tail towards such extreme values, the derived value of alpha is found to depend on the spatial resolution of the rotation curves: a ~ -1 is found only for the least well resolved galaxies. Even for these galaxies, our data are also consistent with constant density cores (a = 0) of modest (~ 1 kpc) core radius, which can give the illusion of steep cusps when insufficiently resolved. Consequently, there is no clear evidence for a cuspy halo in any of the low surface brightness galaxies observed.

  11. Galactic cannibalism and CDM density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Nipoti, C; Ciotti, L; Stiavelli, M

    2004-01-01

    Using N-body simulations we show that the process of formation of the brightest cluster galaxy through dissipationless galactic cannibalism can affect the inner cluster dark matter density profile. In particular, we use as realistic test case the dynamical evolution of the galaxy cluster C0337-2522 at redshift z=0.59, hosting in its centre a group of five elliptical galaxies which are likely to be the progenitor of a central giant elliptical. After the formation of the brightest cluster galaxy, the inner cluster dark matter density profile is significantly flatter (logarithmic slope 0.48

  12. Convergence and scatter of cluster density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Diemand, J; Stadel, J; Diemand, Juerg; Moore, Ben; Stadel, Joachim

    2004-01-01

    We present new results from a series of $\\Lambda$CDM simulations of cluster mass halos resolved with high force and mass resolution. These results are compared with recently published simulations from groups using various codes including PKDGRAV, ART, TPM, GRAPE and GADGET. Careful resolution tests show that with 25 million particles within the high resolution region we can resolve to about 0.3\\% of the virial radius and that convergence in radius is proportional to the mean interparticle separation. The density profiles of 28 high resolution clusters obtained with the different codes and from different initial conditions agree very well. The average logarithmic slope at one percent of the virial radius is $\\gamma = 1.29$ with a scatter of $\\pm 0.16$ at all radii. Over the entire resolved regions the density profiles are well fitted by a smooth function that asymptotes to a central cusp $\\rho \\propto r^{-\\gamma}$, where we find $\\gamma=1.16\\pm 0.14$ from the mean of the fits to our six highest resolution clus...

  13. Plasma parameter dependences of the electron density profile in TEXT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multichannel, heterodyne, far-infrared laser interferometer with high spatial and phase resolution is employed on TEXT to characterize the equilibrium density profile for the full range of TEXT discharge parameters. Gaussian and parabolic functional fits with three free parameters are made to the measured profiles and compared. Scaling of the equilibrium density profile shape with plasma current, toroidal magnetic field, and density is clearly observed. By performing a regression analysis on each free parameter for the functional fit, one can construct a set of analytical relations describing the TEXT density profile for steady-state ohmic discharges. The database used to identify these relations contains 50 different discharge conditions

  14. Density profile control in a large diameter, helicon plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmas with peaked radial density profiles have been generated in the world's largest helicon device, with plasma diameters of over 70 cm. The density profiles can be manipulated by controlling the phase of the current in each strap of two multistrap antenna arrays. Phase settings that excite long axial wavelengths create hollow density profiles, whereas settings that excite short axial wavelengths create peaked density profiles. This change in density profile is consistent with the cold-plasma dispersion relation for helicon modes, which predicts a strong increase in the effective skin depth of the rf fields as the wavelength decreases. Scaling of the density with magnetic field, gas pressure, and rf power is also presented

  15. Core fueling to produce peaked density profiles in large tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peaking the density profile increases the usable bootstrap current and the average fusion power density; this could reduce the current drive power and increase the net output of power producing tokamaks. The use of neutral beams and pellet injection to produce peaked density profiles is assessed. We show that with radially ''hollow'' diffusivity profiles (and no particle pinch) moderately peaked density profiles can be produced by particle source profiles which are peaked off-axis. The fueling penetration requirements can therefore be relaxed and this greatly improves the feasibility of generating peaked density profiles in large tokamaks. In particular, neutral beam fueling does not require MeV particle energy. Even with beam voltages of ∼200 keV, however, exceptionally good particle confinement, τp much-gt τE is required to achieve net electrical power generation. In system with no power production requirement (e.g., neutron sources) neutral beam fueling should be capable of producing peaked density profiles in devices as large as ITER. Fueling systems with low energy cost per particle (such as cryogenic pellet injection) must be used in power producing tokamaks when τp ∼ τE. Simulations with pellet injection speeds of 7 km/sec show the peaking factor, neo/left-angle ne right-angle, approaching 2

  16. Electron Density Profile Data Contains Virtual Height/Frequency Pairs from a Profile or Profiles (Composite Months) of Ionograms

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Electron Density Profile, N(h), data set contains both individual profiles and composite months. The data consist of virtual height/frequency pairs from a...

  17. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-01-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with SDSS10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this article we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  18. Void alignment and density profile applied to measuring cosmological parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, De-Chang

    2015-12-01

    We study the orientation and density profiles of the cosmological voids with Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS; Ahn et al.) 10 data. Using voids to test Alcock-Paczynski effect has been proposed and tested in both simulations and actual SDSS data. Previous observations imply that there exist an empirical stretching factor which plays an important role in the voids' orientation. Simulations indicate that this empirical stretching factor is caused by the void galaxies' peculiar velocities. Recently Hamaus et al. found that voids' density profiles are universal and their average velocities satisfy linear theory very well. In this paper, we first confirm that the stretching effect exists using independent analysis. We then apply the universal density profile to measure the cosmological parameters. We find that the void density profile can be a tool to measure the cosmological parameters.

  19. On the density profile of the globular cluster M92

    CERN Document Server

    Di Cecco, A; Varri, A L; Monelli, M; Bertin, G; Bono, G; Stetson, P B; Nonino, M; Buonanno, R; Ferraro, I; Iannicola, G; Kunder, A; Walker, A R

    2013-01-01

    We present new number density and surface brightness profiles for the globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). These profiles are calculated from optical images collected with the CCD mosaic camera MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii-Telescope and with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ground-based data were supplemented with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalog. Special care was taken to discriminate candidate cluster stars from field stars and to subtract the background contamination from both profiles. By examining the contour levels of the number density, we found that the stellar distribution becomes clumpy at radial distances larger than about 13 arcminutes, and there is no preferred orientation of contours in space. We performed detailed fits of King and Wilson models to the observed profiles. The best-fit models underestimate the number density inside the core radius. Wilson models better represent the observations, in particular in the outermost cluster regions: t...

  20. Measurements of electron density profiles using an angular filter refractometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberberger, D., E-mail: dhab@lle.rochester.edu; Ivancic, S.; Hu, S. X.; Boni, R.; Barczys, M.; Craxton, R. S.; Froula, D. H. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14636 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    A novel diagnostic technique, angular filter refractometry (AFR), has been developed to characterize high-density, long-scale-length plasmas relevant to high-energy-density physics experiments. AFR measures plasma densities up to 10{sup 21} cm{sup −3} with a 263-nm probe laser and is used to study the plasma expansion from CH foil and spherical targets that are irradiated with ∼9 kJ of ultraviolet (351-nm) laser energy in a 2-ns pulse. The data elucidate the temporal evolution of the plasma profile for the CH planar targets and the dependence of the plasma profile on target radius for CH spheres.

  1. The virialization density of peaks with general density profiles under spherical collapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We calculate the non-linear virialization density, Δc, of halos under spherical collapse from peaks with an arbitrary initial and final density profile. This is in contrast to the standard calculation of Δc which assumes top-hat profiles. Given our formalism, the non-linear halo density can be calculated once the shape of the initial peak's density profile and the shape of the virialized halo's profile are provided. We solve for Δc for halos in an Einstein de-Sitter and a ΛCDM universe. As examples, we consider power-law initial profiles as well as spherically averaged peak profiles calculated from the statistics of a Gaussian random field. We find that, depending on the profiles used, Δc is smaller by a factor of a few to as much as a factor of 10 as compared to the density given by the standard calculation ( ≈ 200). Using our results, we show that, for halo finding algorithms that identify halos through an over-density threshold, the halo mass function measured from cosmological simulations can be enhanced at all halo masses by a factor of a few. This difference could be important when using numerical simulations to assess the validity of analytic models of the halo mass function

  2. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Popolo, A. Del, E-mail: adelpopolo@oact.inaf.it [Dipartimento di Fisica e Astronomia, University Of Catania, Viale Andrea Doria 6, Catania, 95125 (Italy)

    2014-07-01

    The present paper is an extension and continuation of Del Popolo (2012a) which studied the role of baryon physics on clusters of galaxies formation. In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. As already found in Del Popolo 2012a, the density profiles depend on baryonic fraction, angular momentum, and the angular momentum transferred from baryons to DM through dynamical friction. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003–0.03r{sub 200}, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, α, has a maximum value (including errors) of α = −0.88 in the case of A2390, and minimum value α = −0.14 for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii < 5–10 kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope α, the effective radius, R{sub e}, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius r{sub core}, and R{sub e}. Moreover, the mass in 100 kpc (mainly dark matter) is correlated with the mass inside 5 kpc (mainly baryons). The behavior of the total mass density profile, the DM density profile, and the quoted correlations can be understood in a double phase scenario. In the first dissipative phase the proto-BCG forms, and in the second dissipationless phase, dynamical friction between baryonic clumps (collapsing to the center) and the DM halo flattens the inner slope of the density profile. In simple terms, the large scatter in the inner slope from cluster to cluster, and the anti-correlation among the slope, α and R{sub e} is due to the fact that in order to have a total

  3. Universal void density profiles from simulation and SDSS

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, S; Diego, J M; Iliev, I T; Gottlöber, S; Watson, W A; Yepes, G

    2014-01-01

    We discuss the universality and self-similarity of void density profiles, for voids in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. Voids are identified using a modified version of the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm, with additional selection cuts. We find that voids in simulation are self-similar, meaning that their average rescaled profile does not depend on the void size, or -- within the range of the simulated catalogue -- on the redshift. Comparison of the profiles obtained from simulated and real voids shows an excellent match. The profiles of real voids also show a universal behaviour over a wide range of galaxy luminosities, number densities and redshifts. This points to a fundamental property of the voids found by the watershed algorithm, which can be exploited in future studies of voids.

  4. Ionospheric electron density profile estimation using commercial AM broadcast signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, De; Ma, Hong; Cheng, Li; Li, Yang; Zhang, Yufeng; Chen, Wenjun

    2015-08-01

    A new method for estimating the bottom electron density profile by using commercial AM broadcast signals as non-cooperative signals is presented in this paper. Without requiring any dedicated transmitters, the required input data are the measured elevation angles of signals transmitted from the known locations of broadcast stations. The input data are inverted for the QPS model parameters depicting the electron density profile of the signal's reflection area by using a probabilistic inversion technique. This method has been validated on synthesized data and used with the real data provided by an HF direction-finding system situated near the city of Wuhan. The estimated parameters obtained by the proposed method have been compared with vertical ionosonde data and have been used to locate the Shijiazhuang broadcast station. The simulation and experimental results indicate that the proposed ionospheric sounding method is feasible for obtaining useful electron density profiles.

  5. Constraints on the bottomside electron density profile shape parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IRI (International Reference Ionosphere)-1990 system includes a new option for calculating the bottomside electron density profile shape based on strong dependence of the F2 layer half-density height h0.5 on the F2 layer peak height hmF2. These formulae should be distinct for A class cases when h0.5 belongs to the F2 layer and B class when h0.5 occurs below hmF1. In such cases an influence of the F1 layer significantly distorts the profile shape. 6 refs, 2 figs, 1 tab

  6. Open-cluster density profiles derived using a kernel estimator

    CERN Document Server

    Seleznev, Anton F

    2016-01-01

    Surface and spatial radial density profiles in open clusters are derived using a kernel estimator method. Formulae are obtained for the contribution of every star into the spatial density profile. The evaluation of spatial density profiles is tested against open-cluster models from N-body experiments with N = 500. Surface density profiles are derived for seven open clusters (NGC 1502, 1960, 2287, 2516, 2682, 6819 and 6939) using Two-Micron All-Sky Survey data and for different limiting magnitudes. The selection of an optimal kernel half-width is discussed. It is shown that open-cluster radius estimates hardly depend on the kernel half-width. Hints of stellar mass segregation and structural features indicating cluster non-stationarity in the regular force field are found. A comparison with other investigations shows that the data on open-cluster sizes are often underestimated. The existence of an extended corona around the open cluster NGC 6939 was confirmed. A combined function composed of the King density pr...

  7. GRB afterglow light curves from realistic density profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Mimica, Petar; Giannios, Dimitrios

    2011-01-01

    The afterglow emission that follows gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) contains valuable information about the circumburst medium and, therefore, about the GRB progenitor. Theoretical studies of GRB blast waves, however, are often limited to simple density profiles for the external medium (mostly constant density and power-law R^{-k} ones). We argue that a large fraction of long-duration GRBs should take place in massive stellar clusters where the circumburst medium is much more complicated. As a case s...

  8. Computing the electron density profile from microwave interferometer measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma electron density profile can be deduced by measuring the phase change PSI over the plasma length using a multi-channel microwave interferometer. An APL program originally developed by J.G. Wegrove to calculate this density and which is used on WIIB by E. Wuersching has been changed to provide a faster calculation time as well as modified to allow one to simulate the plasma numerically. The program was also enlarged to investigate various beam properties. The stellarator geometry prohibits the use of parallel probing beams which can be used with tokamaks. Moreover, the plasma cross section is closer to an ellipse than a circle which further complicates evaluation techniques. With the APL program, profiles can be produced quickly while experimental measurements are being taken. However, a FORTRAN translation primarily for use in Grenoble with Wega was made as the programs were further developed to include an error evaluation and an iteration technique in searching for an optimum beam spacing. Calculations using the geometrical configuration foreseen for Wega indicate that mathematical technique used to deduce the density profile from a numerically simulated plasma yielded reasonable profiles even when 20% experimental error on phase measurements was included. There was found to be no unique optimum beam configuration. Dealing with each individual beam, it was found exact focusing is not critical. Assuming a fan-shaped microwave beam instead of an infinitely thin one, introduced an error of approximately 10%. The programs and their use are described in detail here. All are related to the FORTRAN program PROFILE with experimental input values of phase change PSI or PSI values deduced from an assumed density. It gives as output an approximation of the density profile. (orig.)

  9. On the Density Profile of the Globular Cluster M92

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Cecco, A.; Zocchi, A.; Varri, A. L.; Monelli, M.; Bertin, G.; Bono, G.; Stetson, P. B.; Nonino, M.; Buonanno, R.; Ferraro, I.; Iannicola, G.; Kunder, A.; Walker, A. R.

    2013-04-01

    We present new number density and surface brightness profiles for the globular cluster M92 (NGC 6341). These profiles are calculated from optical images collected with the CCD mosaic camera MegaCam at the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope and with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on the Hubble Space Telescope. The ground-based data were supplemented with the Sloan Digital Sky Survey photometric catalog. Special care was taken to discriminate candidate cluster stars from field stars and to subtract the background contamination from both profiles. By examining the contour levels of the number density, we found that the stellar distribution becomes clumpy at radial distances larger than ~13', and there is no preferred orientation of contours in space. We performed detailed fits of King and Wilson models to the observed profiles. The best-fit models underestimate the number density inside the core radius. Wilson models better represent the observations, in particular in the outermost cluster regions: the good global agreement of these models with the observations suggests that there is no need to introduce an extra-tidal halo to explain the radial distribution of stars at large radial distances. The best-fit models for the number density and the surface brightness profiles are different, even though they are based on the same observations. Additional tests support the evidence that this fact reflects the difference in the radial distribution of the stellar tracers that determine the observed profiles (main-sequence stars for the number density, bright evolved stars for the surface brightness). Based in part on data obtained from the ST-ECF Science Archive Facility. This research used the facilities of the Canadian Astronomy Data Centre operated by the National Research Council of Canada with the support of the Canadian Space Agency.

  10. New signal processing technique for density profile reconstruction using reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Ricaud, B. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); CPT UMR 6207, Campus de Luminy, case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France); Briolle, F. [CPT UMR 6207, Campus de Luminy, case 907, F-13288 Marseille (France); CReA, BA 701, F-13306 Salon de Provence (France); Heuraux, S. [IJL-P2M, UMR-CNRS 7198, Universite Henri Poincare, F-54506 Vandoeuvre (France)

    2011-08-15

    Reflectometry profile measurement requires an accurate determination of the plasma reflected signal. Along with a good resolution and a high signal to noise ratio of the phase measurement, adequate data analysis is required. A new data processing based on time-frequency tomographic representation is used. It provides a clearer separation between multiple components and improves isolation of the relevant signals. In this paper, this data processing technique is applied to two sets of signals coming from two different reflectometer devices used on the Tore Supra tokamak. For the standard density profile reflectometry, it improves the initialization process and its reliability, providing a more accurate profile determination in the far scrape-off layer with density measurements as low as 10{sup 16} m{sup -1}. For a second reflectometer, which provides measurements in front of a lower hybrid launcher, this method improves the separation of the relevant plasma signal from multi-reflection processes due to the proximity of the plasma.

  11. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  12. Estimating tropical-forest density profiles from multibaseline interferometric SAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treuhaft, Robert; Chapman, Bruce; dos Santos, Joao Roberto; Dutra, Luciano; Goncalves, Fabio; da Costa Freitas, Corina; Mura, Jose Claudio; de Alencastro Graca, Paulo Mauricio

    2006-01-01

    Vertical profiles of forest density are potentially robust indicators of forest biomass, fire susceptibility and ecosystem function. Tropical forests, which are among the most dense and complicated targets for remote sensing, contain about 45% of the world's biomass. Remote sensing of tropical forest structure is therefore an important component to global biomass and carbon monitoring. This paper shows preliminary results of a multibasline interfereomtric SAR (InSAR) experiment over primary, secondary, and selectively logged forests at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. The profile shown results from inverse Fourier transforming 8 of the 18 baselines acquired. A profile is shown compared to lidar and field measurements. Results are highly preliminary and for qualitative assessment only. Parameter estimation will eventually replace Fourier inversion as the means to producing profiles.

  13. The flat density profiles of massive, and relaxed galaxy clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we studied by means of the SIM introduced in Del Popolo (2009), the total and DM density profiles, and the correlations among different quantities, observed by Newman et al. (2012a,b), in seven massive and relaxed clusters, namely MS2137, A963, A383, A611, A2537, A2667, A2390. Similarly to Newman et al. (2012a,b), the total density profile, in the radius range 0.003 - 0.03$r_{200}$, has a mean total density profile in agreement with dissipationless simulations. The slope of the DM profiles of all clusters is flatter than -1. The slope, $\\alpha$, has a maximum value (including errors) of $\\alpha=-0.88$ in the case of A2390, and minimum value $\\alpha=-0.14$ for A2537. The baryonic component dominates the mass distribution at radii $< 5-10$ kpc, while the outer distribution is dark matter dominated. We found an anti-correlation among the slope $\\alpha$, the effective radius, $R_e$, and the BCG mass, and a correlation among the core radius $r_{core}$, and $R_e$. Moreover, the mass in 100 ...

  14. Density profiles of supernova matter and determination of neutrino parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The flavor conversion of supernova neutrinos can lead to observable signatures related to the unknown neutrino parameters. As one of the determinants in dictating the efficiency of resonant flavor conversion, the local density profile near the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) resonance in a supernova environment is, however, not so well understood. In this analysis, variable power-law functions are adopted to represent the independent local density profiles near the locations of resonance. It is shown that the uncertain matter density profile in a supernova, the possible neutrino mass hierarchies, and the undetermined 1-3 mixing angle would result in six distinct scenarios in terms of the survival probabilities of νe and νe. The feasibility of probing the undetermined neutrino mass hierarchy and the 1-3 mixing angle with the supernova neutrinos is then examined using several proposed experimental observables. Given the incomplete knowledge of the supernova matter profile, the analysis is further expanded to incorporate the Earth matter effect. The possible impact due to the choice of models, which differ in the average energy and in the luminosity of neutrinos, is also addressed in the analysis

  15. Ultrashort pulse reflectometry for electron density profile measurements on SSPX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broadband ultrashort pulse reflectometry (USPR) diagnostic has been developed for measuring electron density profiles of the sustained spheromak physics experiment (SSPX) device. In USPR, an extremely short pulse or chirped wave form is propagated which contains a broad range of frequency components spanning the desired plasma density profile (or a significant fraction thereof). Upon reflection, each frequency component in the incident waveform reflects from a different spatial location (density layer) in the plasma, thus spreading out the reflected wave packet in time. By simultaneously collecting double-pass time delay data at many distinct frequencies, the time delay data may then be inverted to generate plasma density profiles using a single source and a single set of measurements. On SSPX, wideband mixers are utilized to up- and downconvert 6--18 GHz chirp signals to millimeter-wave frequencies (33--158 GHz) to form a 48 channel O-mode reflectometer system. In this article we describe details of the new USPR system installed on the SSPX device and provide preliminary time-of-flight results

  16. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 1017 m−3 and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 1016 m−3; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%

  17. Midplane neutral density profiles in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stotler, D. P., E-mail: dstotler@pppl.gov; Bell, R. E.; Diallo, A.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Podestà, M.; Roquemore, A. L.; Ross, P. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P. O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Scotti, F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Atomic and molecular density data in the outer midplane of NSTX [Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40, 557 (2000)] are inferred from tangential camera data via a forward modeling procedure using the DEGAS 2 Monte Carlo neutral transport code. The observed Balmer-β light emission data from 17 shots during the 2010 NSTX campaign display no obvious trends with discharge parameters such as the divertor Balmer-α emission level or edge deuterium ion density. Simulations of 12 time slices in 7 of these discharges produce molecular densities near the vacuum vessel wall of 2–8 × 10{sup 17 }m{sup −3} and atomic densities ranging from 1 to 7 × 10{sup 16 }m{sup −3}; neither has a clear correlation with other parameters. Validation of the technique, begun in an earlier publication, is continued with an assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated camera image and neutral densities to uncertainties in the data input to the model. The simulated camera image is sensitive to the plasma profiles and virtually nothing else. The neutral densities at the vessel wall depend most strongly on the spatial distribution of the source; simulations with a localized neutral source yield densities within a factor of two of the baseline, uniform source, case. The uncertainties in the neutral densities associated with other model inputs and assumptions are ≤50%.

  18. Advances of reflectometry on Tore-Supra: from edge density profile to core density fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new generation of broadband reflectometers based on solid state components has been installed on Tore-Supra. With reflectometers covering the range 50 to 155 GHz, the whole plasma can be scanned. Two X-mode reflectometers (V and W band) are dedicated to density profile measurements. Diagnostics are operated routinely with an automatic algorithm to reconstruct the density profile. A fast acquisition mode is available to study short time evolution. For turbulence and transport studies, a third reflectometer operating between 105 and 155 GHz measures density fluctuations in the plasma centre. Sensitive to large scales, it can retrieve density perturbation due to MHD modes or broadband turbulence. Lastly, a doppler reflectometer, based on back scattering, is being installed for measuring the poloidal rotation and fluctuations amplitude at higher wave numbers. (authors)

  19. Density profiles of dark matter halos with anisotropic velocity tensors

    OpenAIRE

    Hiotelis, Nicolaos

    2002-01-01

    We present density profiles, that are solutions of the spherical Jeans equation, derived under the following two assumptions: (i) the coarse grained phase-density follows a power-law of radius, rho/(sigma^3) proportional to r^{-alpha}, and (ii) the velocity anisotropy parameter is given by the relation beta_a(r) = beta_1 + 2 beta_2 {(r/r_*)/(1+(r/r_*)^2)} where beta_1, beta_2 are parameters and r_* equals twice the virial radius, r_{vir}, of the system. These assumptions are well motivated by...

  20. PHYSICOCHEMICAL AND PHYTOCHEMICAL PROFILES OF AERIAL PARTS OF LIPPIA NODIFLORA L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sudha and P. Srinivasan*

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lippia nodiflora L. is an important medicinal plant of Verbenaceae family and are used traditionally for several ailments. The present study deals with the detailed physicochemical, fluorescence and phytochemical evaluation of aerial parts of Lippia nodiflora L., in order to explore the authentic plant material suitably for its traditional claims. The physicochemical evaluations and fluorescence analysis were determined as per standard protocols. Phytochemical constituents of dried plant material were carried out by both qualitative and quantitative methods. Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS was used to analyze the phytochemical constituents of the methanol extract. Analysis of physicochemical parameters of the powdered aerial parts showed that total ash was approximately two times more than water insoluble ash and alcohol soluble extractive value was higher than water soluble extractive value. Preliminary phytochemical screening showed the positive result for the presence of flavonoids, steroids, glycosides, alkaloids, terpenoids, tannins and phenolics. Quantitative analysis showed that the methanolic extract consist of high phenolic compounds (98.31 ± 0.004 mg GAE/g followed by total flavonoids (60.88 ±0.001mg QE/g and flavonols (27.46 ± 0.002 mg QE/g. Total tannin and saponin content was found to be 5.97 ± 0.021mg TAE/g and 3.52 ± 0.017mg DE/g respectively. The major chemical components of methanolic extract of L. nodiflora determined by GC-MS were 2, 7-dioxatricyclo [4.3.1.0 (3, 8] decan-4-one (35.75%, stigmasterol (16.86%, benzoic acid, 4-etoxy-, ethyl ester (13.73%, azacyclotridecan-2-one (11.86% and n-hexadecanoic acid (10.12%. The results of the present study provide preliminary referential information of the plant and also serve as an investigative tool for the appropriate identification. The presence of various chemical constituents suggests that this plant exhibit rich phytopharmaceutical importance.

  1. Improving Measurement of Forest Structural Parameters by Co-Registering of High Resolution Aerial Imagery and Low Density LiDAR Data

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huabing; Gong, Peng; Cheng, Xiao; Clinton, Nick; Li, Zengyuan

    2009-01-01

    Forest structural parameters, such as tree height and crown width, are indispensable for evaluating forest biomass or forest volume. LiDAR is a revolutionary technology for measurement of forest structural parameters, however, the accuracy of crown width extraction is not satisfactory when using a low density LiDAR, especially in high canopy cover forest. We used high resolution aerial imagery with a low density LiDAR system to overcome this shortcoming. A morphological filtering was used to ...

  2. PROTON STOPPING POWER OF DIFFERENT DENSITY PROFILE PLASMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Casas

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first instance, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of a ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as a function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  3. Proton Stopping Power of Different Density Profile Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Casas, David; Andreev, Alexander A; Schnürer, Matthias; Morales, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the stopping power of a partially ionized plasma is analyzed by means of free electron stopping and bound electron stopping. For the first one, the RPA dielectric function is used, and for the latter one, an interpolation of high and low projectile velocity formulas is used. The dynamical energy loss of an ion beam inside a plasma is estimated by using an iterative scheme of calculation. The Abel inversion is also applied when we have a plasma with radial symmetry. Finally, we compare our methods with two kind of plasmas. In the first one, we estimate the energy loss in a plasma created by a laser prepulse, whose density is approximated by a piecewise function. For the latter one, a radial electron density is supposed and the stopping is obtained as function of radius from the calculated lateral points. In both cases, the dependence with the density profile is observed.

  4. Electron density spatial profiles of the DCP source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Andrew T.; Miller, Myron H.

    Electron densities are measured in the high current, analytical and intervening zones of a DCP whose operating parameters are systematically varied. Detailed Ne distribution profiles are obtained for various sleeve flow, nebulizer flow, arc current and matrix concentration regimes. Flowing argon is found to establish a thermal pinch in the high current zone and to steepen gradients in plasmas employed for spectrochemical analysis. The distinctive electron density distributions in the DCP are more sensitive to modulation of gas flow variables than to changes in arc current. Magnetic pressure has no discernible role in pinch formation. Electron densities in spectroscopic regions are minimally affected by easily ionized or other matrix constituents at usual analytical concentrations.

  5. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author)

  6. On the (non-)universality of halo density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diemer, Benedikt

    We present a systematic study of the density profiles of dark matter halos in LambdaCDM cosmologies, focusing on the question whether these profiles are "universal", i.e., whether they follow the same functional form regardless of halo mass, redshift, cosmology, and other parameters. The inner profiles (r [special character omitted] R vir) can be described as a function of only mass and concentration, and we thus begin by investigating whether there is a universal, cosmology-independent relation between those two parameters. We propose a model in which concentration is a function only of a halo's peak height and the local slope of the matter power spectrum. This model matches the concentrations in LambdaCDM and scale-free simulations, correctly extrapolates over 16 orders of magnitude in halo mass, and differs significantly from all previously proposed models at high masses and redshifts. We find that the outer profiles (r [special character omitted] Rvir) are remarkably universal across redshifts when radii are rescaled by R200m, whereas the inner profiles are most universal in units of R200c, highlighting that universality depends upon the definition of the halo boundary. Furthermore, we discover that the profiles exhibit significant deviations from the supposedly universal analytic formulae previously suggested in the literature, such as the NFW and Einasto forms. In particular, the logarithmic slope of the profiles of massive or rapidly accreting halos steepens more sharply than predicted around r ≈ R200m, where the steepness increases with increasing peak height or mass accretion rate. We propose a new, accurate fitting formula that takes these dependencies into account. Finally, we demonstrate that the profile steepening corresponds to the caustic at the apocenter of infalling matter on its first orbit. We call the location of the caustic the splashback radius, Rsp, and propose this radius as a new, physically motivated definition of the halo boundary. We

  7. Momentum densities and Compton profiles of alkali-metal atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is assumed that the dynamics of valence electrons of alkali-metal atoms can be well accounted for by a quantum-defect theoretic model while the core electrons may be supposed to move in a self-consistent field. This model is used to study the momentum properties of atoms from 3Li to 37Rb. The numerical results obtained for the momentum density, moments of momentum density and Compton profile are found to be in good agreement with the results of more detailed configuration-interaction calculations for the atom 3Li. Similar results for 11Na, 19K and 37Rb are compared with the corresponding Hartree-Fock-Roothan values only, for want of data from other realistic calculations. (author)

  8. Formation of current density profile in tilted current sheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Petrukovich

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate Cluster observations of strongly tilted sheets (flapping events in the magnetotail. In accordance with the simple model of slip deformation (vertical differential displacement of neighboring flux tubes, the Jy current density component in the tilted sheet remains constant and equal to that in the horizontal undisturbed sheet. However, a substantial Jz component appears proportional to the local sheet tilt. Slip-type variations, having smaller scale than the full crossing, locally change the tilt and Jz and may thus create a variety of non-classical (bifurcated, asymmetric etc current density profiles.

  9. Scattering length density profile of Ni film under controlled corrosion: A study in neutron reflectometry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Surendra Singh; A K Poswal; S K Ghosh; Saibal Basu

    2008-11-01

    We report the density depth profile of an as-deposited Ni film and density profile for the same film after controlled electrochemical corrosion by chloride ions, measured by unpolarized neutron reflectometry. The neutron reflectometry measurement of the film after corrosion shows density degradation along the thickness of the film. The density profile as a function of depth, maps the growth of pitting and void networks due to corrosion. The profile after corrosion shows an interesting peaking nature.

  10. Gene expression profiling in peanut using high density oligonucleotide microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burow Mark

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcriptome expression analysis in peanut to date has been limited to a relatively small set of genes and only recently has a significant number of ESTs been released into the public domain. Utilization of these ESTs for oligonucleotide microarrays provides a means to investigate large-scale transcript responses to a variety of developmental and environmental signals, ultimately improving our understanding of plant biology. Results We have developed a high-density oligonucleotide microarray for peanut using 49,205 publicly available ESTs and tested the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues. To identify putatively tissue-specific genes and demonstrate the utility of this array for expression profiling in a variety of peanut tissues, we compared transcript levels in pod, peg, leaf, stem, and root tissues. Results from this experiment showed 108 putatively pod-specific/abundant genes, as well as transcripts whose expression was low or undetected in pod compared to peg, leaf, stem, or root. The transcripts significantly over-represented in pod include genes responsible for seed storage proteins and desiccation (e.g., late-embryogenesis abundant proteins, aquaporins, legumin B, oil production, and cellular defense. Additionally, almost half of the pod-abundant genes represent unknown genes allowing for the possibility of associating putative function to these previously uncharacterized genes. Conclusion The peanut oligonucleotide array represents the majority of publicly available peanut ESTs and can be used as a tool for expression profiling studies in diverse tissues.

  11. Computing 1-D atomic densities in macromolecular simulations: the Density Profile Tool for VMD

    CERN Document Server

    Giorgino, Toni

    2013-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have a prominent role in biophysics and drug discovery due to the atomistic information they provide on the structure, energetics and dynamics of biomolecules. Specialized software packages are required to analyze simulated trajectories, either interactively or via scripts, to derive quantities of interest and provide insight for further experiments. This paper presents the Density Profile Tool, a package that enhances the Visual Molecular Dynamics environment with the ability to interactively compute and visualize 1-D projections of various density functions of molecular models. We describe how the plugin is used to perform computations both via a graphical interface and programmatically. Results are presented for realistic examples, all-atom bilayer models, showing how mass and electron densities readily provide measurements such as membrane thickness, location of structural elements, and how they compare to X-ray diffraction experiments.

  12. Column Density Profiles of Multi-Phase Gaseous Halos

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Cameron J; Agertz, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    We present a suite of high-resolution cosmological galaxy re-simulations of a Milky-Way size halo with variety of star-formation and feedback models to investigate the effects of the specific details of the star formation-feedback loop modeling on the observable properties of the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We show that properties of the CGM are quite sensitive to the details of star formation-feedback loop. The simulation which produces a very realistic late-type central galaxy fails to reproduce existing observations of CGM. At the same time, variations of parameters of star formation recipe or feedback modeling, such as cosmic rays feedback, brings predicted CGM in better agreement with observations. The simulations show that the column density profiles of ions arising in such gas are well described by an exponential function of the impact parameter. Ions with higher ionization energy have more extended profiles with the scale height of the exponential distribution scaling as a power law of the ionization...

  13. Advances of the density profile reflectometry on TORE SUPRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clairet, F.; Bottereau, C.; Chareau, J. M.; Sabot, R.

    2003-03-01

    Significant improvements have been achieved in the performances of the broadband reflectometry for the density profile measurements on Tore Supra. The frequency range of the former 50-75 GHz X-mode reflectometer has been extended with an additional device operating between 75 and 110 GHz. Both setups have ultrafast sweeping capabilities allowing full band measurements in 20 μs. The heterodyne detection and the intermediate frequency system have been upgraded to record beat frequencies up to 100 MHz with a signal to noise ratio of about 40 dB. The in phase and quadrature-type phase detection system (IQ detector) provides sine and cosine components of the received signal for a separate measurement of the phase and the amplitude. A new fast data acquisition system in Versa Module Europa format has been developed. It allows sampling frequency up to 200 MHz with 32 Mo memory capabilities per channel and 10 bit resolution digitizers. Edge profile measurements are now available for a wide range of toroidal magnetic fields (from 3 to 4 T).

  14. In vitro anticariogenic effects of aerial parts of Potentilla recta and its phytochemical profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczyk, Michał; Wiater, Adrian; Pleszczyńska, Małgorzata

    2011-03-01

    This study, for the first time, investigated the in vitro inhibitory effects of Potentilla recta extracts and subfractions obtained with solvents of different polarity (aqueous, 50% ethanol, diethyl ether, ethyl acetate and n-butanol) against cariogenic Streptococcus spp. strains. It was found that the tested samples inhibited the growth of oral streptococci. Furthermore, all five P. recta preparations exhibited an inhibitory effect on water-insoluble α-(1→3)-,α-(1→6)-linked glucan (mutan) and artificial dental plaque formation. The ethyl acetate fraction showed the highest antibiofilm activities especially against S. sobrinus GCM 20381, with minimum mutan and biofilm inhibition concentrations of 6.25 and 25 µg/mL, respectively. The phytochemical profile of active constituents in the investigated samples was analysed. The high polyphenolics (total phenol, phenolic acids, tannins, proantocyanidins, flavonoids) content were found. The ethyl acetate fraction showed the highest concentration of total polyphenol content which may correlate with the high cariogenic activity of this subfraction. The results demonstrate that P. recta extracts and subfractions could become useful supplements for pharmaceutical products as new anticariogenic agents in a wide range of oral care products. Further studies are necessary to clarify the precise bioactive constituents of P. recta responsible for the anticariogenic properties. PMID:20677176

  15. Surface density profile and surface tension of the one-component classical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density profile and the interfacial tension of two classical plasmas in equilibrium at different densities are evaluated in the square-density-gradient approximation. For equilibrium in the absence of applied external voltage, the profile is oscillatory in the higher-density plasma and the interfacial tension is positive. The amplitude and phase of these oscillations and the magnitude of the interfacial tension are related to the width of the background profile. Approximate representations of the equilibrium profile by matching of its asymptotic forms are analyzed. A comparison with computer simulation data and a critical discussion of a local-density theory are also presented. (author)

  16. Evolution of Characteristic Quantities for Dark Matter Halo Density Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Romano-Diaz, E; Heller, C; Faltenbacher, A; Jones, D; Shlosman, I; Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Hoffman, Yehuda; Heller, Clayton; Faltenbacher, Andreas; Jones, Daniel; Shlosman, Isaac

    2006-01-01

    We investigate the effect of an assembly history on the evolution of dark matter (DM) halos of 10^{12} Msun/h using Constrained Realizations of random Gaussian fields. Five different realizations of a DM halo with distinct merging histories were constructed and evolved. Our main results are: A halo evolves via a sequence of quiescent phases of a slow mass accretion intermitted by violent episodes of major mergers. In the quiescent phases, the density is well fitted by an NFW profile, the inner scale radius Rs and the mass enclosed within it remain constant, and the virial radius (Rvir) grows linearly with the expansion parameter "a". Within each quiescent phase the concentration parameter ("c") scales as "a", and the mass accretion history (Mvir) is well described by the Tasitsiomi etal. fitting formula. In the violent phases the halos are not in a virial equilibrium and both Rs and Rvir grow discontinuously. The violent episodes drive the halos from one NFW dynamical equilibrium to another. The final structu...

  17. Measuring protoplanetary disk gas surface density profiles with ALMA

    CERN Document Server

    McPartland, Jonathan P Williams Conor

    2016-01-01

    The gas and dust are spatially segregated in protoplanetary disks due to the vertical settling and radial drift of large grains. A fuller accounting of the mass content and distribution in disks therefore requires spectral line observations. We extend the modeling approach presented in Williams & Best (2014) to show that gas surface density profiles can be measured from high fidelity 13CO integrated intensity images. We demonstrate the methodology by fitting ALMA observations of the HD 163296 disk to determine a gas mass, Mgas = 0.048 solar masse, and accretion disk characteristic size Rc = 213au and gradient gamma = 0.39. The same parameters match the C18O 2--1 image and indicates an abundance ratio [13CO]/[C18O] of 700 independent of radius. To test how well this methodology can be applied to future line surveys of smaller, lower mass T Tauri disks, we create a large 13CO 2--1 image library and fit simulated data. For disks with gas masses 3-10 Jupiter masses at 150pc, ALMA observations with a resolutio...

  18. CO2 laser diagnostics for measurements of the plasma density profile and plasma density fluctuations on LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A CO2 laser based diagnostics complimentary to the existing FIR interferometer is proposed. It combines interferometry for plasma density profile measurement under conditions of large density gradients, and both imaging and scattering techniques for observation of plasma fluctuations. Two-colour interferometer with a slablike probe beam and a single multichannel linear detector array provide observation of plasma density profile and density fluctuations at two locations along the probe beam. Basic characteristics of the diagnostics are considered as well as some effects that include dispersion and are critical for two colour imaging technique. The results of the bench-top experiments with the prototype of the interferometer are presented. (author)

  19. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    OpenAIRE

    Sonu Sen; Meenu Asthana Varshney; Dinesh Varshney

    2014-01-01

    In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have num...

  20. Capturing vertical profiles of aerosols and black carbon over the Indian Ocean using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. E. Corrigan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of the vertical distribution of aerosol properties provide essential information for generating more accurate model estimates of radiative forcing and atmospheric heating rates compared with employing remotely sensed column averaged properties. A month long campaign over the Indian Ocean during March 2006 investigated the interaction of aerosol, clouds, and radiative effects. Routine vertical profiles of aerosol and water vapor were determined using autonomous unmanned aerial vehicles equipped with miniaturized instruments. Comparisons of these airborne instruments with established ground-based instruments and in aircraft-to-aircraft comparisons demonstrated an agreement within 10%.

    Aerosol absorption optical depths measured directly using the unmanned aircraft differed from columnar AERONET sun-photometer results by only 20%. Measurements of total particle concentration, particle size distributions, aerosol absorption and black carbon concentrations are presented along with the trade wind thermodynamic structure from the surface to 3000 m above sea level. Early March revealed a well-mixed layer up to the cloud base at 500 m above mean seal level (m a.s.l., followed by a decrease of aerosol concentrations with altitude. The second half of March saw the arrival of a high altitude plume existing above the mixed layer that originated from a continental source and increased aerosol concentrations by more than tenfold, yet the surface air mass showed little change in aerosol concentrations and was still predominantly influenced by marine sources. Black carbon concentrations at 1500 m above sea level increased from 70 ng/m³ to more than 800 ng/m³ with the arrival of this polluted plume. The absorption aerosol optical depth increased from as low as 0.005 to as much as 0.035 over the same period. The spectral dependence of the aerosol absorption revealed an absorption Angstrom exponent of 1.0, which is typical of an aerosol with

  1. Ground-State Density Profiles of One-Dimensional Bose Gases with Anisotropic Transversal Confinement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAO Ya-Jiang

    2011-01-01

    We investigate the ground-state density distributions of interacting one-dimensional Bose gases with anisotropic transversal confinement.Combining the exact ground state energy density of homogeneous bose gases with local density approximation,we determine the density distribution in each interacting regime for different anisotropic parameters.It is shown that the transversal anisotropic parameter changes the density distribution obviously,and the observed density profiles on each orientation exhibit a difference of a factor.

  2. Visualizing and Quantifying Vineyard Canopy LAI Using an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV Collected High Density Structure from Motion Point Cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L. R. Jensen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the use of structure from motion (SfM, a computer vision technique, to model vine canopy structure at a study vineyard in the Texas Hill Country. Using an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV and a digital camera, 201 aerial images (nadir and oblique were collected and used to create a SfM point cloud. All points were classified as ground or non-ground points. Non-ground points, presumably representing vegetation and other above ground objects, were used to create visualizations of the study vineyard blocks. Further, the relationship between non-ground points in close proximity to 67 sample vines and collected leaf area index (LAI measurements for those same vines was also explored. Points near sampled vines were extracted from which several metrics were calculated and input into a stepwise regression model to attempt to predict LAI. This analysis resulted in a moderate R2 value of 0.567, accounting for 57 percent of the variation of LAISQRT using six predictor variables. These results provide further justification for SfM datasets to provide three-dimensional datasets necessary for vegetation structure visualization and biophysical modeling over areas of smaller extent. Additionally, SfM datasets can provide an increased temporal resolution compared to traditional three-dimensional datasets like those captured by light detection and ranging (lidar.

  3. Statistics of cosmic density profiles from perturbation theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bernardeau, Francis; Codis, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    The joint probability distribution function (PDF) of the density within multiple concentric spherical cells is considered. It is shown how its cumulant generating function can be obtained at tree order in perturbation theory as the Legendre transform of a function directly built in terms of the initial moments. In the context of the upcoming generation of large-scale structure surveys, it is conjectured that this result correctly models such a function for finite values of the variance. Detailed consequences of this assumption are explored. In particular the corresponding one-cell density probability distribution at finite variance is computed for realistic power spectra, taking into account its scale variation. It is found to be in agreement with $\\Lambda$-CDM simulations at the few percent level for a wide range of density values and parameters. Related explicit analytic expansions at the low and high density tails are given. The conditional (at fixed density) and marginal probability of the slope -- the de...

  4. Response of temperature and density profiles to heat deposition profile and its impact on global scaling in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy confinement and heat transport of net current-free NBI-heated plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed with an emphasis on density dependence. Although the apparent density dependence of the energy confinement time has been demonstrated in a wide parameter range in LHD, the loss of this dependence has been observed in the high density regime under the specific condition. Broad heat deposition due to off-axis alignment and shallow penetration of neutral beams degrades the global energy confinement while the local heat transport maintains a clear temperature dependence lying between Bohm and gyro-Bohm characteristics. The central heat deposition inclines towards an intrinsic density dependence like τE ∝(n-bare/P)0.6 from the saturated state. The broadening of the temperature profile due to the broad heat deposition profile contrasts with the invariant property which has observed widely as profile consistency and stiffness in tokamak experiments. (author)

  5. Response of temperature and density profiles to heat deposition profile and its impact on global scaling in LHD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy confinement and heat transport of net current-free NBI-heated plasmas in the Large Helical Device (LHD) are discussed with an emphasis on density dependence. Although the apparent density dependence of the energy confinement time has been demonstrated in a wide parameter range in LHD, the loss of this dependence has been observed in the high density regime under the specific condition. Broad heat deposition due to off-axis alignment and shallow penetration of neutral beams degrades the global energy confinement while the local heat transport maintains a clear temperature dependence lying between Bohm and gyro-Bohm characteristics. The central heat deposition inclines towards an intrinsic density dependence like τE∝(n-barse/P)0.6 from the saturated state. The broadening of the temperature profile due to the broad heat deposition profile contrasts with the invariant property which has observed widely as profile consistency and stiffness in tokamak experiments. (author)

  6. Factors influencing the density profiles of granular flux in a two-dimensional inclined channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO DeSong; ZHOU Ying; ZHANG XunSheng; TANG XiaoWei

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional dilute granular flow on a smooth incline bounded by rough sidewalls is investigated experimentally, and the transverse density profiles of granular flux (ξ=pv) across the channel are measured. The results show that the transverse density profiles of granular flux are symmetric about the channel center and that the density of granular flux near the boundary is clearly lower than that of the center. There is a critical width of channel Wc for the transition of the density of granular flux. The density of granular flux near the boundary decays with the increasing of inclination (sinθ) of the channel.

  7. Factors influencing the density profiles of granular flux in a two-dimensional inclined channel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The two-dimensional dilute granular flow on a smooth incline bounded by rough sidewalls is investigated experimentally, and the transverse density profiles of granular flux (ξ = ρ v) across the channel are measured. The results show that the transverse density profiles of granular flux are symmetric about the channel center and that the density of granular flux near the boundary is clearly lower than that of the center. There is a critical width of channel Wc for the transition of the density of granular flux. The density of granular flux near the boundary decays with the increasing of inclination (sinθ ) of the channel.

  8. Kernel density estimation of a multidimensional efficiency profile

    CERN Document Server

    Poluektov, Anton

    2014-01-01

    Kernel density estimation is a convenient way to estimate the probability density of a distribution given the sample of data points. However, it has certain drawbacks: proper description of the density using narrow kernels needs large data samples, whereas if the kernel width is large, boundaries and narrow structures tend to be smeared. Here, an approach to correct for such effects, is proposed that uses an approximate density to describe narrow structures and boundaries. The approach is shown to be well suited for the description of the efficiency shape over a multidimensional phase space in a typical particle physics analysis. An example is given for the five-dimensional phase space of the $\\Lambda_b^0\\to D^0p\\pi$ decay.

  9. Measurement of electron density profiles by soft X-ray tomography on the RTP tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomographic diagnosis of the soft x-ray emissivity profile is a powerful method for studying several plasma parameters. The x-ray emissivity is a complicated function of plasma quantities like the electron density and temperature, and the impurity content in the plasma. These quantities can be studied separately provided that information is available on the remaining parameters. Soft x-ray emissivity profiles have already been used successfully in other machines to determine local values of impurity densities and the effective charge Zeff. In the RTP tokamak the electron density profile has been inferred from a modelling of the x-ray emissivity in situations where information is available on the electron temperature profile, the value of Zeff, and the relative proportion of the impurities. The method can be useful for the study of hollow density profiles that cannot be properly reconstructed by Abel inversion of interferometer or reflectometer data. (author) 7 refs., 2 figs

  10. X-mode broadband reflectometric density profile measurements on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reflectometric density profiles are obtained on DIII-D which are in good agreement with Thomson profiles, but only with the use of fast sweeps. The large changes in plasma profile which occur between ohmic and H-mode operation are observed to change the plasma VSWR. The system is still under development: by adding an additional 50-75 GHz BWO and mixers, the present system will be reconfigured to act as a correlation reflectometer, while still retaining the capability to measure density profiles. These alterations are currently underway, and it is hoped to obtain preliminary data by the time of the EPS conference. (author) 7 refs., 3 figs

  11. Calculation of density profiles in tandem mirrors fueled by pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have modified the LLNL radial transport code TMT to model reactor regime plasmas, fueled by pellets. The source profiles arising from pellet fueling are obtained from existing pellet ablation models. Because inward radial diffusion due to inverted profiles must compete with trapping of central cell ions in the transition region for tandem mirrors, pellets must penetrate fairly far into the plasma. In fact, based on our radial calculations, a pellet with a velocity of 10 km/sec cannot sustain the central flux tubes; a velocity more like 100 km/sec will be necessary. We also find that the central cell radial diffusion must exceed classical by about a factor of 100

  12. New signal processing technique for density profile reconstruction using reflectometry

    OpenAIRE

    Clairet, F.; Ricaud, B.; Briolle, F.; Heuraux, S.; Bottereau, C.

    2011-01-01

    Reflectometry profile measurement requires an accurate determination of the plasma reflected signal. Along with a good resolution and a high signal to noise ratio of the phase measurement, adequate data analysis is required. A new data processing based on time-frequency tomographic representation is used. It provides a clearer separation between multiple components and improves isolation of the relevant signals. In this paper, this data processing technique is applied to two sets of signals c...

  13. Density surface fitting to estimate the abundance of humpback whales based on the NASS-95 and NASS- 2001 aerial and shipboard surveys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles GM Paxton

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Generalized additive models (GAMs with spatially referenced covariates were fitted to data collected during the 1995 and 2001 Icelandic (shipboard and aerial and Faroese (shipboard only components of the North Atlantic Sightings Surveys (NASS-95 and NASS-2001. The shipboard surveys extended from the east coast of Greenland, around Iceland, down to an area along the west coast ofIreland (in 1995 and to the north of the United Kingdom (in 2001. In contrast, the aerial surveys were limited to Icelandic coastal waters only. The aim of the analysis was to predict density, and hence abundance, of humpback whales throughout the survey regions and also to establish if there was any evidence that humpback whale density was related to sea surface temperature or depth.Fitting GAMs to the 1995 data proved problematic and so various subsets of the data were used in an attempt to improve the model fitting. Such difficulties did not occur with the 2001 data. Confidence intervals (CIs for the abundance estimates were estimated using bootstrap sampling methods.The estimated humpback whale abundance for the region covered by the aerial and shipboard surveys in 1995 was 10,521 (95% CI: 3,716–24,636 using all available data and 7,625 (3,641–22,424 if survey blocks with 0 sightings around the Faroes and south of 60˚ N where no humpback whales were detected were excluded from the analysis. The estimate for the total survey region in 2001 was 14,662 (9,441–29,879. The high upper bounds of the confidence intervals were thought to be caused by a paucity of effort over wide areas of the survey leading to interpolation. Overall, the uncertainty associated with these abundance estimates was approximately equal to, or greater than, that associated with a stratified distance analysis. Given these wide CIs the evidence for a substantial difference in abundance between years was equivocal. However there was evidence to suggest that humpback whales congregated in

  14. Dependence of the outer density profiles of halos on their mass accretion rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a systematic study of the density profiles of ΛCDM halos, focusing on the outer regions, 0.1 < r/R vir < 9. We show that the median and mean profiles of halo samples of a given peak height exhibit significant deviations from the universal analytic profiles discussed previously in the literature, such as the Navarro-Frenk-White and Einasto profiles, at radii r ≳ 0.5R 200m. In particular, at these radii the logarithmic slope of the median density profiles of massive or rapidly accreting halos steepens more sharply than predicted. The steepest slope of the profiles occurs at r ≈ R 200m, and its absolute value increases with increasing peak height or mass accretion rate, reaching slopes of –4 and steeper. Importantly, we find that the outermost density profiles at r ≳ R 200m are remarkably self-similar when radii are rescaled by R 200m. This self-similarity indicates that radii defined with respect to the mean density are preferred for describing the structure and evolution of the outer profiles. However, the inner density profiles are most self-similar when radii are rescaled by R 200c. We propose a new fitting formula that describes the median and mean profiles of halo samples selected by their peak height or mass accretion rate with accuracy ≲ 10% at all radii, redshifts, and masses we studied, r ≲ 9R vir, 0 < z < 6, and M vir > 1.7 × 1010 h –1 M ☉. We discuss observational signatures of the profile features described above and show that the steepening of the outer profile should be detectable in future weak-lensing analyses of massive clusters. Such observations could be used to estimate the mass accretion rate of cluster halos.

  15. Structure, histochemistry and phytochemical profile of the bark of the sobol and aerial stem of Tontelea micrantha (Celastraceae - Hippocrateoideae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIA OLÍVIA MERCADANTE-SIMÕES

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The bark of the underground stem of Tontelea micrantha (Mart. ex. Schult. A. C. Sm., a native Brazilian Cerrado species, is used in folk medicine for treating kidney ailments. The structures of the underground and the aerial stems were examined and their barks were analyzed for the presence of secondary metabolites. Bark fragments were processed according to conventional techniques in plant anatomy and their chemical compositions examined using histochemical and phytochemical tests, thin layer chromatography, and high-efficiency liquid chromatography. The underground stem is a sobol with unusual cambial activity. Laticifers that secrete terpenoids were present in the cortex and phloem of both organs and can contribute to the identification of the species in field. Druses were present in both barks, but mono-crystals were only observed in the sobol. Tannins, flavonoids, alkaloids, and terpenoids occurred in both types of bark, but carotenoids were only detected in the sobol. The similarities between these two organs indicate that the aerial stem bark has potential medicinal use and represents a plausible alternative to harvesting the sobol, which could contribute to the preservation of natural populations of this species.

  16. On the density profile of dark matter substructure in gravitational lens galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Vegetti, Simona

    2014-01-01

    We consider three extensions of the Navarro, Frenk and White (NFW) profile and investigate the intrinsic degeneracies among the density profile parameters on the gravitational lensing effect of satellite galaxies on highly magnified Einstein rings. In particular, we find that the gravitational imaging technique can be used to exclude specific regions of the considered parameter space, and therefore, models that predict a large number of satellites in those regions. By comparing the lensing degeneracy with the intrinsic density profile degeneracies, we show that theoretical predictions based on fits that are dominated by the density profile at larger radii may significantly over- or underestimate the number of satellites that are detectable with gravitational lensing. Finally, using the previously reported detection of a satellite in the gravitational lens system JVAS B1938+666 as an example, we derive for this detected satellite values of r_max and v_max that are, for each considered profile, consistent withi...

  17. Reconstruction of Neutral Hydrogen Density Profiles in HANBIT Magnetic Mirror Device Using Bayesian Probability Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is the main constitute of plasmas in HANBIT magnetic mirror device, therefore, measurement of the emission from excited levels of hydrogen atoms is an important diagnostic tool. From the emissivity of Hα radiation one can derive quantities such as the neutral hydrogen density and the source rate. An unbiased and consistent probability theory based approach within the framework of Bayesian inference is applied to the reconstruction of Hα emissivity profiles and hydrogen neutral density profiles in HANBIT magnetic mirror device

  18. Absolute density-profile tomography of molecular beams using multiphoton ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe an approach for the absolute density measurement of rotationally symmetric molecular beams via multiphoton ionization. This simple single-projection tomographic technique requires only knowledge of the spatial intensity profile and ionization characteristics of the focused laser beam that probes the pulsed molecular jet. Multiphoton ionization (MPI) of a xenon beam allowed tomographic reconstruction of a two-dimensional density profile with a peak density of (4.2±0.4)x1018 m-3, which was compared with the theoretical predictions of the sudden freeze model. An analytic solution to the Abel transform is derived for Gaussian projected density profiles which greatly simplifies the reconstruction of the absolute radial density. MPI is sufficiently general that this technique can be readily applied to atomic beams with a broad range of chemistries.

  19. Simulation of density profile peaking and energy and particle transport in the IOC regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The evolution of the density profile in improved Ohmic confinement (IOC) discharges of ASDEX and its correlation with the local particle and energy transport are investigated by computer simulations. Electron and ion heat diffusivities χe and χi, diffusion coefficient D and inward drift velocity vin and their scalings in different confinement regimes are presented. The observed better energy and particle confinement is explained by a 2 to 3 times reduction of χe and D correlated with the density scale length. This agrees with the measured diffusion coefficient and with χe being coupled to D which has been found in all confinement regimes. The existence of lower limits for these diffusivities is shown. The enhancement factor for χi in relation to the neoclassical value is found to be 1.4 and constant in time. Simulation of the measured density profiles yields a time-independent vin/D and requires a feedback-controlled fuelling rate. One pre-requisite for density profile peaking is the reduction of the particle source. Simulations with constant gas feed and particle source yield no profile peaking during the density plateau. At a given line averaged density, two steady-state solutions for the density profile are obtained corresponding to high and low refuelling rates. (author) 14 refs., 4 figs

  20. Comparison of JET and DIII-D temperature and density profile shapes and their parametric dependencies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goal was to develop a scaling expression which adequately describes profiles in existing tokamaks and which could be used to predict plasma profile shapes and magnitudes for future devices (such as ITER and TPX) without the need for a plasma transport model. This paper presents a multi-machine feasibility study of this goal. We present an initial assessment of an effort to derive an empirical expression for the normalized plasma electron temperature and electron density profile in terms of global quantities. (Global variables were used since they allowed a large enough database to be assembled for this statistical study.) Data from both JET and DIII-D were obtained in a single-null configuration with an expanded boundary divertor. The density profile parameterization indicates that as the plasma current is increased, the ne profile broadens and the edge gradient increases; this is consistent with JET and DIII-D operations. The Te profile broadens as the RF power is deposited farther off-axis. For both Te and ne profiles, the DIII-D profiles are more peaked than the JET profiles. The probable ITER profiles are discussed. 3 figs

  1. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation

  2. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I. Processing procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation

  3. 2D electron density profile measurement in tokamak by laser-accelerated ion-beam probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of Heavy Ion Beam Probe (HIBP) diagnostic has been proposed, of which the key is to replace the electrostatic accelerator of traditional HIBP by a laser-driven ion accelerator. Due to the large energy spread of ions, the laser-accelerated HIBP can measure the two-dimensional (2D) electron density profile of tokamak plasma. In a preliminary simulation, a 2D density profile was reconstructed with a spatial resolution of about 2 cm, and with the error below 15% in the core region. Diagnostics of 2D density fluctuation is also discussed

  4. A phenomenological model of the muon density profile on the ground of very inclined air showers

    OpenAIRE

    Dembinski, Hans; Billoir, Pierre; Deligny, Olivier; Hebbeker, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Ultra-high energy cosmic rays generate extensive air showers in Earth's atmosphere. A standard approach to reconstruct the energy of an ultra-high energy cosmic rays is to sample the lateral profile of the particle density on the ground of the air shower with an array of surface detectors. For cosmic rays with large inclinations, this reconstruction is based on a model of the lateral profile of the muon density observed on the ground, which is fitted to the observed muon densities in individu...

  5. Transport simulations of a density limit in radiation-dominated tokamak discharges: Profile effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density limit observed in tokamak experiments is thought to be due to a radiative collapse of the current channel. A transport code coupled with an MHD equilibrium routine is used to determine the detailed, self-consistent evolution of the plasma profiles in tokamak discharges with radiated power close to or equalling the input power. The present work is confined to ohmic discharges in steady state. It is found that the shape of the density profile can have a significant impact on the variation of the maximum electron density with plasma current. Analytic calculations confirm this result. 41 refs., 9 figs

  6. Profiles of temperature and density based on extremes at 5, 10, 20, 30 and 40 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, A. J.; Tattelmann, P.; Marcos, F. A.

    1985-01-01

    Information on the vertical distribution of expected extremes of temperature and density are required for the design and operation of systems traversing the atmosphere. Such data are particularly important at altitudes from the surface to approximately 80 km for developing all types of airborne vehicles ranging from helicopters and airplanes to sophisticated aerospace systems. Vertical profiles of temperature and density have been developed based on 1- and 10-percent hot and cold temperatures and 1- and 10- percent high and low densities occurring during the most severe month at the worst locations for which reliable upper-air data are available. The model profiles, from the surface to 80 km, are based on extremes that occur at 5, 10, 20, 30, and 40 km. There are 20 profiles for extreme temperatures (5 levels by 4 percentiles) that include associated densities, and 20 analogous profiles for extreme densities including associated temperatures. Consequently, a set of realistic profiles (rather than envelopes) of temperature and density, associated with extremes at each of 5 specified levels in the troposphere and stratosphere, are now available for altitudes up to 80 km.

  7. Reduction of the density profile of a field-reversed configuration plasma from detailed interferometric measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, S.; Kiso, Y.; Goto, S.; Ishimura, T.

    1989-06-01

    In order to obtain a detailed density profile of a field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma, fast-response multichannel heterodyne quadrature interferometers are constructed. Using these interferometers and assuming a rigid-body radial shift motion of the plasma, a spatially fine-grained line integrated density (∫ n dl) profile at its axial midplane is measured. A radial density profile n(r) is reduced from spline fitting of ∫ n dl. The n(r) is found to be nearly an even function of u(=r2/R2-1, R is the magnetic axis radius) as expected. The n(r) is also obtained by the fitting of a line integral of a model n(r) consisting of a modified rigid rotor (RR) profile which can describe the density steepening near the separatrix of the FRC plasma. When the plasma is fat (xs =separatrix radius/coil inner radius=0.63), the density profile is very near to the RR profile itself given by sech2 (Ku), where K is a constant. When the plasma is slender (xs =0.43), the modification is somewhat pronounced. In both cases n(r) at r=R is flatter but near to the RR profile, and the scale length of the density gradient at the separatrix is about twice the ion gyroradius. Detailed error analyses of the fitting parameters are done to show the range of allowed profiles. Although the fitting is accomplished very well (root-mean-square excursion of the fitted ∫ n dl from the measured one is from 1.9% to 2.5%), much variation of n(r) is still possible.

  8. Theory for planetary exospheres: II. Radiation pressure effect on exospheric density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Beth, Arnaud; Toublanc, Dominique; Dandouras, Iannis; Mazelle, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The planetary exospheres are poorly known in their outer parts, since the neutral densities are low compared with the instruments detection capabilities. The exospheric models are thus often the main source of information at such high altitudes. We present a new way to take into account analytically the additional effect of the radiation pressure on planetary exospheres. In a series of papers, we present with an Hamiltonian approach the effect of the radiation pressure on dynamical trajectories, density profiles and escaping thermal flux. Our work is a generalization of the study by Bishop and Chamberlain (1989). In this second part of our work, we present here the density profiles of atomic Hydrogen in planetary exospheres subject to the radiation pressure. We first provide the altitude profiles of ballistic particles (the dominant exospheric population in most cases), which exhibit strong asymmetries that explain the known geotail phenomenon at Earth. The radiation pressure strongly enhances the densities c...

  9. Multiple scattering corrections for density profile unfolding from Compton scattering signals in reflection geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, a mathematical procedure was reported to unfold the density profile of wood panels from the measurement of the integrated scatter signal that contains prevalently the Compton component. An experimental device (patent claimed) has been used for these measurements. It uses reflection geometry to maximize the Compton signal. The influence of multiple scattering (MS) is not negligible as has been estimated using the Monte Carlo code MCSHAPE3D. However, Monte Carlo computations are time consuming. Therefore, in practice, the MS correction is computed off-line for few thicknesses of the specimen assuming known composition and density. Then, an original 2D interpolation algorithm is used to apply the MS correction to an arbitrary thickness scatterer, in order to improve the precision of the unfolded density profile in real time at the production line. The MS corrected density profiles are in good agreement with direct measurements performed with other means

  10. Self-similarity and universality of void density profiles in simulation and SDSS data

    CERN Document Server

    Nadathur, S; Diego, J M; Iliev, I T; Gottlöber, S; Watson, W A; Yepes, G

    2014-01-01

    The stacked density profile of cosmic voids in the galaxy distribution provides an important tool for the use of voids for precision cosmology. We study the density profiles of voids identified using the ZOBOV watershed transform algorithm in realistic mock luminous red galaxy (LRG) catalogues from the Jubilee simulation, as well as in void catalogues constructed from the SDSS LRG and Main Galaxy samples. We compare different methods for reconstructing density profiles scaled by the void radius and show that the most commonly used method based on counts in shells and simple averaging is statistically flawed as it underestimates the density in void interiors. We provide two alternative methods that do not suffer from this effect; one based on Voronoi tessellations is also easily able to account from artefacts due to finite survey boundaries and so is more suitable when comparing simulation data to observation. Using this method we show that voids in simulation are exactly self-similar, meaning that their avera...

  11. Improved density profile measurements in the C-2U advanced beam-driven FRC plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Michael; Deng, B. H.; Schroeder, Jon; Settles, Greg; Kinley, John; Gota, Hiroshi; Thompson, Matt; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The goal of Tri Alpha Energy's C-2U experiment is to demonstrate FRC sustainment via neutral beam injection. Accurate equilibrium profiles are essential for determining optimum operating regimes and studying physics phenomena. Electron density profiles in C-2 were measured by a CO2/HeNe laser interferometer. All C-2 chords were located below the machine axis causing difficulties due to spatial under-sampling in case of vertical plasma motion. As part of C-2U, additional chords were added above the axis and a complimentary 4-chord far-infrared (FIR) interferometer was developed. The FIR system is based on 2 HCOOH lasers optically pumped by a CO2 laser. This upgrade allowed for higher density resolution and broad spectral bandwidth. Results of improved density profile measurement will be presented, including fast ion effects. Plasma wobble is also characterized via density centroid measurements.

  12. Density and impurity profile behaviours in HL-2A tokamak with different gas fuelling methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Zheng-Ying; Zhou Yan; Li Wei; Feng Bei-Bin; Sun Ping; Dong Chun-Feng; Liu Yi; Hong Wen-Yu; Yang Qing-Wei; Ding Xuan-Tong; Duan Xu-Ru

    2009-01-01

    The electron density profile peaking and the impurity accumulation in the HL-2A tokamak plasma are observed when three kinds of fuelling methods are separately used at different fuelling particle locations.The density profile becomes more peaked when the line-averaged electron density approaches the Greenwald density limit nG and,consequently,impurity accumulation is often observed.A linear increase regime in the density range ne<0.6nG and a saturation regime in ne>0.6nG are obtained.There is no significant difference in achieved density peaking factor fne between the supersonic molecular beam injection (SMBI) and gas puffing into the plasma main chamber.However,the achieved fne is relatively low,in particular,in the case of density below 0.7nG,when the working gas is puffed into the divertor chamber.A discharge with a density as high as 1.2nG,i.e.ne=1.2nG,can be achieved by SMBI just after siliconization as a wall conditioning.The metallic impurities,such as iron and chromium,also increase remarkably when the impurity accumulation happens.The mechanism behind the density peaking and impurity accumulation is studied by investigating both the density peaking factor versus the effective collisionality and the radiation peaking versus density peaking.

  13. Density profiles of dark matter halos in an improved Secondary Infall model

    CERN Document Server

    Del Popolo, A; Recami, E; Spedicato, E

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we calculate the density profiles of virialized halos both in the case of structure evolving hierarchically from a scale-free Gaussian delta-field having a power spectrum P(k)=A k^n in a Omega=1 Universe and in the case of the CDM model, by using a modified version of Hoffman & Shaham's (1985) (hereafter HS) and Hoffman's (1988) model. We suppose that the initial density contrast profile around local maxima is given by the mean peak profile introduced by Bardeen et al. (1986) (hereafter BBKS), and is not just proportional to the two-point correlation function, as assumed by HS. We show that the density profiles, both for scale-free Universes and the CDM model, are not power-laws but have a logarithmic slope that increases from the inner halo to its outer parts. Both scale-free, for n >=-1, and CDM density profiles are well approximated by Navarro et al. (1995, 1996, 1997) profile. The radius a, at which the slope alpha=-2, is a function of the mass of the halo and in the scale-free models al...

  14. Density profile reconstruction methods using dispersive effects in pulse radar reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Density profiles can be deduced from time of flight measurement for different frequencies of the probing wave. Pulse radar reflectometry allows time of flight measurements at only few discrete frequencies (typically about 10 frequencies), which can lead to a bad profile reconstruction. In order to improve the profile determination, it is proposed here to use a dispersive effect of higher order, namely the pulse broadening. As dispersive effects decrease when the pulse spatial length becomes larger, there is an optimal length for the probing pulse which leads to a minimal reflected pulse length. Additional information deduced from the optimal pulse length can be used for the density profile reconstruction. Moreover, as the reflected pulse length is minimal, the error on the time of flight measurement is minimized. It is shown that usual methods of profile reconstruction (piecewise method or Abel inversion) can be improved by using both time of flight and optimal pulse length measurements. The role of density fluctuations on pulse reflectometry measurements is also discussed. Their effect on the time of flight and optimal pulse length measurements remains small as long as the fluctuation position is far away from the cutoff layer. The distortion of the pulse shape becomes signification when the density fluctuations are close to the cutoff layer. Then, time of flight and pulse broadening measurements can be so perturbed that any profile reconstruction method fails. (authors)

  15. Density profile reconstruction methods using dispersive effects in pulse radar reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hacquin, S.; Heuraux, S. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionises, Universite Henri Poincare de Nancy-1 Unite CNRS 7040, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Leclert, G. [Universite de Provence, Aix-Marseille 1, LPIIM, UMR 6633 CNRS, 13 (France)

    1999-09-15

    Density profiles can be deduced from time of flight measurement for different frequencies of the probing wave. Pulse radar reflectometry allows time of flight measurements at only few discrete frequencies (typically about 10 frequencies), which can lead to a bad profile reconstruction. In order to improve the profile determination, it is proposed here to use a dispersive effect of higher order, namely the pulse broadening. As dispersive effects decrease when the pulse spatial length becomes larger, there is an optilength for the probing pulse which leads to a minimal reflected pulse length. Additional information deduced from the optimal pulse length can be used for the density profile reconstruction. Moreover, as the reflected pulse length is minimal, the error on the time of flight measurement is minimized. It is shown that usual methods of profile reconstruction (piecewise method or Abel inversion) can be improved by using both time of flight and optimal pulse length measurements. The role of density fluctuations on pulse reflectometry measurements is also discussed. Their effect on the time of flight and optimal pulse length measurements remains small as long as the fluctuation position is far away from the cutoff layer. The distortion of the pulse shape becomes signification when the density fluctuations are close to the cutoff layer. Then, time of flight and pulse broadening measurements can be so perturbed that any profile reconstruction method fails. (authors)

  16. Measurement of the density profile of pure and seeded molecular beams by femtosecond ion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Congsen; Janssen, Maurice H M

    2015-02-01

    Here, we report on femtosecond ion imaging experiments to measure the density profile of a pulsed supersonic molecular beam. Ion images are measured for both a molecular beam and bulk gas under identical experimental conditions via femtosecond multiphoton ionization of Xe atoms. We report the density profile of the molecular beam, and the measured absolute density is compared with theoretical calculations of the centre line beam density. Subsequently, we discuss reasons accounting for the differences between measurements and calculations and propose that strong skimmer interference is the most probable cause for the differences. Furthermore, we report on experiments measuring the centre line density of seeded supersonic beams. The femtosecond ion images show that seeding the heavy Xe atom at low relative seed fractions (1%-10%) in a light carrier gas like Ne results in strong relative enhancements of up to two orders of magnitude. PMID:25725826

  17. Reconstruction of edge density profiles on Large Helical Device using ultrashort-pulse reflectometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Yuya; Mase, Atsushi; Kogi, Yuichiro; Tokuzawa, Tokihiko; Kawahata, Kazuo; Nagayama, Yoshio; Hojo, Hitoshi

    2008-10-01

    Reflectometry has been expected to be one of the key diagnostics to measure density profiles. We have applied an ultrashort-pulse reflectometry (USPR) system to Large Helical Device in the National Institute for Fusion Science. Wide frequency band system is required to obtain wide density profile since an incident wave is reflected at the density layer corresponding to its cutoff frequency. The reflectometry utilizes an impulse with less than 30 ps pulse width as a source. Since the bandwidth of an impulse has an inverse relation to the pulse width, we can cover the frequency range of micro- to millimeter waves (18-40 GHz) with a single source. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight (TOF) signals for each frequency component of an impulse reflected from the corresponding cutoff layer. We utilize the signal record analysis (SRA) method to reconstruct the density profiles from the TOF signal. The effectiveness of the SRA method for the profile reconstruction is confirmed by a simulation study of the USPR using a finite-difference time domain method. PMID:19044596

  18. Earth-mass haloes and the emergence of NFW density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Angulo, Raul E; Ludlow, Aaron; Bonoli, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    We report results from simulations of neutralino dark matter ($\\chi$DM) haloes. We follow them from their emergence at one earth mass to a final mass of a few percent solar. We show that the density profiles of the first haloes are well described by a $\\sim r^{-1.5}$ power-law. As haloes grow in mass, their density profiles evolve significantly. In the central regions, they become shallower and reach on average $\\sim r^{-1}$, the asymptotic form of an NFW profile. However, the profile of individual haloes can show non-monotonic density slopes, and be shallower than $-1$ in some cases. We investigate the transformation of cuspy power-law profiles using a series of non-cosmological simulations of equal-mass mergers. Contrary to previous findings, we observe that temporal variations in the gravitational potential caused by mergers lead to a shallowing of the inner profile, an effect which is stronger for shallower initial profiles and for mergers that involve a higher number of systems. Depending on the merger d...

  19. Real time reconstruction of 3-D electron density distribution over Europe with TaD profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutiev, Ivan; Marinov, Pencho; Belehaki, Anna

    2015-04-01

    TaD (TSM-assisted Digisonde) profiler, developed on the base of Topside Sounder Model (TSM), provides vertical electron density profile (EDP) from the bottom of ionosphere up to the GNSS orbit heights over Digisonde sounding stations. TaD EDP uses the bottomside profile provided by Digisonde software and extends it above the F layer peak by representing O+ distribution by α-Chapman formula and H+ distribution by a single exponent. The profile above F layer peak takes the topside scale height HT and transition height hT from TSM and plasmasphere scale height Hp defined as a function of HT. All these profile parameters are adjusted to the current conditions by comparing the profile integral with measured GNSS TEC. The latter is taken from GNSS TEC maps produced by Royal Observatory of Belgium in the area (35˚, 60˚)N and (-15˚, 25˚)E. Maps of foF2 and hmF2 are produced in the same area on the base of DIAS (European Digital Upper Atmosphere Server) network of Digisonde stations and TaD profiles are calculated at all grid nodes (1˚x1˚) on latitude and longitude. Electron density at any point of the 3-D space is then obtained by simple interpolation between nodes. Possible use of reconstruction technique to GNSS applications is demonstrated by calculating the distribution of electron density along various ray paths of GNSS signals.

  20. Comparative study of the electron density profiles in the compact torus plasma merging experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following two previous papers on the comparative studies of the electron density distributions for a single compact torus (CT) and a spherical tokamak (ST), and for the a single ST and a merged ST, a comparative study on the dynamics of the electron density profile and after the CT and ST plasma merging process was performed. The sharpness of the peak in the electron density profile around the mid-plane just after the merging of CT with a low safety factor (q value) such as RFP or spheromak is found to be related to the speed of the magnetic axis during the plasma merging process. It is also found that the electron density gradient near the plasma edge in a high q ST is larger than that of a low q CT. High q ST is found to be provided with the magnetic structure which is able to sustain a large thermal pressure by a strong j x B force. Despite these differences in the electron density profile between CT and ST during merging, the confinement characteristics evaluated from the number of electrons confined within the magnetic separatrix after the completion of the merging is almost similar between in the merging CT and in the merging ST. For all configurations, the electron density profiles after the completion of the merging are analogous to those of the corresponding single configuration produced without the merging process. (author)

  1. Limits on the power-law mass and luminosity density profiles of elliptical galaxies from gravitational lensing systems

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Shuo; Yao, Meng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-01-01

    We use 118 strong gravitational lenses observed by the SLACS, BELLS, LSD and SL2S surveys to constrain the total mass profile and the profile of luminosity density of stars (light-tracers) in elliptical galaxies up to redshift $z \\sim 1$. Assuming power-law density profiles for the total mass density, $\\rho=\\rho_0(r/r_0)^{-\\alpha}$, and luminosity density, $\

  2. Real-time control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tokamak concept currently is the most promising approach to future power generation by controlled thermonuclear fusion. The spatial distribution of the particle density in the toroidally confined fusion plasma is of particular importance. This thesis work therefore focuses on the question as to what extent the shape of the density profile can be actively controlled by a feedback loop in the fusion experiment ASDEX Upgrade. There are basically two essential requirements for such feedback control of the density profile, which has been experimentally demonstrated within the scope of this thesis work: On the one hand, for this purpose the density profile must be continuously calculated under real-time constraints during a plasma discharge. The calculation of the density profile is based on the measurements of a sub-millimeter interferometer, which provides the line-integrated electron density along 5 chords through the plasma. Interferometric density measurements can suffer from counting errors by integer multiples of 2π when detecting the phase difference between a probing and a reference beam. As such measurement errors have severe impact on the reconstructed density profile, one major part of this work consists in the development of new readout electronics for the interferometer, which allows for detection of such measurement errors in real-time with high reliability. A further part of this work is the design of a computer algorithm which reconstructs the spatial distribution of the plasma density from the line-integrated measurements. This algorithm has to be implemented on a computer which communicates the measured data to other computers in real-time, especially to the tokamak control system. On the other hand, a second fundamental requirement for the successful implementation of a feedback controller is the identification of at least one actuator which enables a modification of the density profile. Here, electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) has been

  3. Interplay between density profile and zonal flows in drift kinetic simulations of slab ITG turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on 4-dimensional drift kinetic simulations of the slab branch of the Ion Temperature Gradient driven turbulence in a cylinder. In the non-linear regime, the system is found to relax preferentially either via heat transport or via mean sheared flows, depending on the density profile. A strong density gradient appears to be stabilizing both linearly, by increasing the instability threshold, and non linearly, by activating sheared flows. This impedes the relaxation of the profiles and sustains a pressure transport barrier. (author)

  4. Interplay between density profile and zonal flows in drift kinetic simulations of slab ITG turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on 4-dimensional drift kinetic simulations of the slab branch of the Ion Temperature Gradient driven turbulence in a cylinder. In the non-linear regime, the system is found to relax preferentially either via heat transport or via mean sheared flows, depending on the density profile. A strong density gradient appears to be stabilizing both linearly, by increasing the instability threshold, and non linearly, by activating sheared flows. This impedes the relaxation of the profiles and sustains a pressure transport barrier. (authors)

  5. Accuracy of Automatic Density Profile Measurements with FM-CW Reflectometry on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jorge; Emilia Manso, Maria; Nunes, Fernando; Varela, Paulo; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2000-10-01

    Reflectometry is a radar technique that uses robust and compact equipment (requiring reduced access to the machine), to measure the density profile in fusion plasmas with both high spatial and temporal resolutions. In addition it can provide information about plasma turbulence, MHD activity, ELMs, Marfes, TAE modes, etc. Due to the above advantages, reflectometry is foreseen to play a major role on next fusion devices, namely it has been proposed for plasma position control on ITER-FEAT, based on a set of poloidal distributed edge density profile measurements. This is a new challenge for reflectometry that has to be proven on present fusion experiments.

  6. Density profiles of loose and collapsed cohesive granular structures generated by ballistic deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadau, Dirk; Herrmann, Hans J.

    2011-03-01

    Loose granular structures stabilized against gravity by an effective cohesive force are investigated on a microscopic basis using contact dynamics. We study the influence of the granular Bond number on the density profiles and the generation process of packings, generated by ballistic deposition under gravity. The internal compaction occurs discontinuously in small avalanches and we study their size distribution. We also develop a model explaining the final density profiles based on insight about the collapse of a packing under changes of the Bond number.

  7. THE DENSITY PROFILES OF MASSIVE, RELAXED GALAXY CLUSTERS. I. THE TOTAL DENSITY OVER THREE DECADES IN RADIUS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Treu, Tommaso; Sand, David J. [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Nipoti, Carlo [Astronomy Department, University of Bologna, via Ranzani 1, I-40127 Bologna (Italy); Richard, Johan [CRAL, Observatorie de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, 9 Avenue Ch. Andre, F-69561 Saint Genis Laval Cedex (France); Jullo, Eric, E-mail: anewman@astro.caltech.edu [Laboratoire d' Astrophysique de Marseille, Universite d' Aix-Marseille and CNRS, UMR7326, 38 rue F. Joliot-Curie, F-13388 Marseille Cedex 13 (France)

    2013-03-01

    Clusters of galaxies are excellent locations to probe the distribution of baryons and dark matter (DM) over a wide range of scales. We study a sample of seven massive (M {sub 200} = 0.4-2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} M {sub Sun }), relaxed galaxy clusters with centrally located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at z = 0.2-0.3. Using the observational tools of strong and weak gravitational lensing, combined with resolved stellar kinematics within the BCG, we measure the total radial density profile, comprising both dark and baryonic matter, over scales of {approx_equal} 3-3000 kpc. We present Keck spectroscopy yielding seven new spectroscopic redshifts of multiply imaged sources and extended stellar velocity dispersion profiles of the BCGs. Lensing-derived mass profiles typically agree with independent X-ray estimates within {approx_equal} 15%, suggesting that departures from hydrostatic equilibrium are small and that the clusters in our sample (except A383) are not strongly elongated or compressed along the line of sight. The inner logarithmic slope {gamma}{sub tot} of the total density profile measured over r/r {sub 200} = 0.003-0.03, where {rho}{sub tot}{proportional_to}r{sup -{gamma}{sub t}{sub o}{sub t}}, is found to be nearly universal, with a mean ({gamma}{sub tot}) = 1.16 {+-} 0.05(random){sup +0.05} {sub -0.07} (systematic) and an intrinsic scatter {sigma}{sub {gamma}} < 0.13 (68% confidence). This is further supported by the very homogeneous shape of the observed velocity dispersion profiles, which are mutually consistent after a simple scaling. Remarkably, this slope agrees closely with high-resolution numerical simulations that contain only DM, despite the significant contribution of stellar mass on the scales we probe. The Navarro-Frenk-White profile characteristic of collisionless cold DM is a better description of the total mass density at radii {approx}> 5-10 kpc than that of DM alone. Hydrodynamical simulations that include baryons, cooling, and

  8. The Density Profiles of Massive, Relaxed Galaxy Clusters: I. The Total Density Over 3 Decades in Radius

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Andrew B; Ellis, Richard S; Sand, David J; Nipoti, Carlo; Richard, Johan; Jullo, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Clusters of galaxies are excellent locations to probe the distribution of baryons and dark matter over a wide range of scales. We study a sample of 7 massive, relaxed galaxy clusters with centrally-located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) at z=0.2-0.3. Using the observational tools of strong and weak gravitational lensing, combined with resolved stellar kinematics within the BCG, we measure the total radial density profile, comprising both dark and baryonic matter, over scales of \\sim3-3000 kpc. Lensing-derived mass profiles typically agree with independent X-ray estimates within \\sim15%, suggesting that departures from hydrostatic equilibrium are small and that the clusters in our sample (except A383) are not strongly elongated along the line of sight. The inner logarithmic slope gamma_tot of the total density profile measured over r/r200=0.003-0.03, where rho_tot \\sim r^(-gamma_tot), is found to be nearly universal, with a mean = 1.16 +- 0.05 (random) +0.05-0.07 (systematic) and an intrinsic scatter of &l...

  9. Simulations of broadband short-pulse reflectometry for diagnosing plasma density and magnetic-field profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical simulations of the use of ultra-short-pulse reflectometry to diagnose plasma density and magnetic-field profiles are presented. Numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations are used to model the propagation of ordinary modes into a plasma from whose reflected signals' time-of-flight (group delay) as a function of frequency is deduced the electron density profile. Similar methods are used to simulate the propagation and reflection of extraordinary waves, from which is deduced the magnetic-field profile if the electron density is already known (the cutoff relation for the extraordinary mode depends jointly on the electron density and the magnetic field). The simulation results presented here demonstrate that the determination of plasma density and magnetic-field profiles from ultra-short-pulse reflectometry is relatively robust. In order to use more realistic plasma and magnetic-field configurations in the reflectometry simulations as well as to be able to simulate, assess, and tune the performance of the diagnostic in the experimental configurations of interest, O-mode and X-mode reflectometry simulation packages have been merged into the CORSICA comprehensive plasma modelling framework. Examples of CORSICA reflectometry simulations of the DIII-D tokamak and the SSPX spheromak being built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. (author)

  10. On the measure of dislocation densities from diffraction line profiles: A comparison with discrete dislocation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work the accuracy and range of applicability of peak broadening models, from which dislocation densities can be extracted, is studied. For that purpose dislocation microstructures are generated via a discrete dislocation dynamics method and the internal elastic strains within the simulated volume are calculated. Diffraction peaks are generated from the simulations and a whole pattern line profile analysis method based on the Wilkens model is used to quantify the dislocation densities associated with the simulated microstructures. The work is applied to the case of face-centered cubic crystals deforming in coplanar slip. The accuracy of the analytical models is quantified by considering realistic three-dimensional microstructures containing curved dislocations with a specified distribution. The dependence and sensitivity of the analytical models upon dislocation density and long-range order are investigated. It was found that, provided the distribution of dislocations is rather homogeneous, line profile analysis provides fairly accurate predictions of the dislocation density.

  11. Determination of the heat-transfer coefficient and current density profile of gas-discharge plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution of gas temperature in a cylindrical discharge tube is theoretically investigated in respect of heat transfer due to gas thermal conduction and heat exchange with surrounding medium. Based on the obtained results the facilities for experimental determination of the heat-transfer coefficient of gas-discharge plasma and radial profiles of the electron density, discharge current density and radiants are shown

  12. Role of substituents on the reactivity and electron density profile of diimine ligands: A density functional theory based study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bhakti S Kulkarni; Deepti Mishra; Sourav Pal

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we study the reactivity of diimines like 2, 2'-bipyridine, 1, l0-phenanthroline and 1, 2, 4-triazines using density-based reactivity descriptors. We discuss the enhancement or diminution in the reactivity of these ligands as a function of two substituent groups, namely methyl (-CH3) group and phenyl (-C6H5) group. The global reactivity descriptors explain the global affinity and philicity of these ligands, whereas the local softness depicts the particular site selectivity. The inter-molecular reactivity trends for the same systems are analysed through the philicity and group philicity indices. The -donor character of these ligands is quantified with the help of electron density profile. In addition, the possible strength of interaction of these ligands with metal ions is supported with actual reaction energies of Ru-L complexes.

  13. Gravitational Lensing by Dark Matter Halos with Non-universal Density Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, T J

    2004-01-01

    The statistics of gravitational lensing can provide us with a very powerful probe of the mass distribution of matter in the universe. By comparing predicted strong lensing probabilities with observations, we can test the mass distribution of dark matter halos, in particular, the inner density slope. In this letter, unlike previous work that directly models the density profiles of dark matter halos semi-analytically, we generalize the density profiles of dark matter halos from high-resolution N-body simulations by means of generalized Navarro-Frenk-White (GNFW) models of three populations with slopes, $\\alpha$, of about -1.5, -1.3 and -1.1 for galaxies, groups and clusters, respectively. This approach is an alternative and independent way to examine the slopes of mass density profiles of halos. We present calculations of lensing probabilities using these GNFW profiles for three populations in various spatially flat cosmological models with a cosmological constant $\\Lambda$. It is shown that the compound model ...

  14. Fingerprints of the initial conditions on the density profiles of cold and warm dark matter haloes

    CERN Document Server

    Polisensky, E

    2015-01-01

    We use N-body simulations of dark matter haloes in cold dark matter (CDM) and a large set of different warm dark matter (WDM) cosmologies to demonstrate that the spherically averaged density profile of dark matter haloes has a shape that depends on the power spectrum of matter perturbations. Density profiles are steeper in WDM but become shallower at scales less than one percent of the virial radius. Virialization isotropizes the velocity dispersion in the inner regions of the halo but does not erase the memory of the initial conditions in phase space. The location of the observed deviations from CDM in the density profile and in phase space can be directly related to the ratio between the halo mass and the filtering mass and are most evident in small mass haloes, even for a 34 keV thermal relic WDM. The rearrangement of mass within the haloes supports analytic models of halo structure that include angular momentum. We also find evidence of a dependence of the slope of the inner density profile in CDM cosmolo...

  15. Mars Global Surveyor Radio Science Electron Density Profiles: Interannual Variability and Implications for the Neutral Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougher, S. W.; Engel, S.; Hinson, D. P.; Murphy, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Radio Science (RS) experiment employs an ultrastable oscillator aboard the spacecraft. The signal from the oscillator to Earth is refracted by the Martian ionosphere, allowing retrieval of electron density profiles versus radius and geopotential. The present analysis is carried out on five sets of occultation measurements: (1) four obtained near northern summer solstice (Ls = 74-116, near aphelion) at high northern latitudes (64.7-77.6N), and (2) one set of profiles approaching equinox conditions (Ls = 135- 146) at high southern latitudes (64.7-69.1S). Electron density profiles (95 to 200 km) are examined over a narrow range of solar zenith angles (76.5-86.9 degrees) for local true solar times of (1) 3-4 hours and (2) 12.1 hours. Variations spanning 1-Martian year are specifically examined in the Northern hemisphere.

  16. Monte Carlo Simulations of Density Profiles for Hard-Sphere Chain Fluids Confined Between Surfaces

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Covering a wide range of bulk densities, density profiles for hard-sphere chain fluids (HSCFs) with chain length of 3,4,8,20,32 and 64 confined between two surfaces were obtained by Monte Carlo simulations using extended continuum configurational-bias (ECCB) method. It is shown that the enrichment of beads near surfaces is happened at high densities due to the bulk packing effect, on the contrary, the depletion is revealed at low densities owing to the configurational entropic contribution. Comparisons with those calculated by density functional theory presented by Cai et al. indicate that the agreement between simulations and predictions is good. Compressibility factors of bulk HSCFs calculated using volume fractions at surfaces were also used to test the reliability of various equations of state of HSCFs by different authors.

  17. Damping of supernova neutrino transitions in stochastic shock-wave density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Fogli, G L; Mirizzi, A; Montanino, D

    2006-01-01

    Supernova neutrino flavor transitions during the shock wave propagation are known to encode relevant information not only about the matter density profile but also about unknown neutrino properties, such as the mass hierarchy (normal or inverted) and the mixing angle theta_13. While previous studies have focussed on "deterministic" density profiles, we investigate the effect of possible stochastic matter density fluctuations in the wake of supernova shock waves. In particular, we study the impact of small-scale fluctuations on the electron (anti)neutrino survival probability, and on the observable spectra of inverse-beta-decay events in future water-Cherenkov detectors. We find that such fluctuations, even with relatively small amplitudes, can have significant damping effects on the flavor transition pattern, and can partly erase the shock-wave imprint on the observable time spectra, especially for sin^2(theta_13) > O(10^-3).

  18. Disks in a narrow channel jammed by gravity and centrifuge: profiles of pressure, mass density and entropy density

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work investigates jammed granular matter under conditions that produce heterogeneous mass distributions on a mesoscopic scale. We consider a system of identical disks that are confined to a narrow channel, open at one end and closed off at the other end. The disks are jammed by the local pressure in a gravitational field or centrifuge. All surfaces are hard and frictionless. We calculate the profiles of pressure, mass density and entropy density on a mesoscopic length scale under the assumption that the jammed states are produced by random agitations of uniform intensity along the channel. These profiles exhibit trends and features governed by the balancing of position-dependent forces and potential energies. The analysis employs a method of configurational statistics that uses interlinking two-disk tiles as the fundamental degrees of freedom. Configurational statistics weighs the probabilities of tiles according to competing potential energies associated with gravity and centrifugation. Amendments account for the effects of the marginal stability of some tiles due to competing forces. (paper)

  19. Real-time control of the current density profile in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we describe experiments illustrating a multi-variable model-based technique whose purpose is to control the current and pressure profiles in tokamak with internal transport barriers. This method uses a truncated singular value decomposition of a linearized model operator and offers the potentiality of retaining the distributed character of the current and heat diffusion. We begin with the simplest, lumped-parameter version of this technique, it is shown that with only one actuator, a satisfactory control of the safety factor profile (q-profile) can be achieved within the accessible one-parameter family of profiles, i.e with a steady state offset between the requested profile and the achieved one which is minimum in the least square sense. The first experiments using a multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) controller to control the q-profile with 3 heating and current drive actuators, namely neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonant heating and lower hybrid current drive, are reported. In the last part we present a simulation of the simultaneous control of plasma current density and pressure profile by using a state space method to obtain a linear mode of plasma dynamics

  20. Real-time control of the current density profile in JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreau, D. [Efda-Jet-Csu, Culham Fusion Centre, Abingdon, OX (United Kingdom); Moreau, D.; Litaudon, X.; Mazon, D.; Joffrin, E.; Laborde, L.; Lennholm, M.; Tresset, G.; Zabeo, L. [Association Euratom-CEA Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Crisanti, F.; Albanese, R.; Ariola, M.; Pironti, A.; Pericolf-Ridolfini, V.; Riva, M. [Association Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione Centro Ricerche Energia Frascati (Italy); Vries, P. de [Association Euratom-Fom, TEC Cluster, Neuwegein (Netherlands); Felton, R.; Zastrow, K.D. [Association Euratom-Ukaea, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom); Murari, A. [Association Euratom-ENEA, Consorzio RFX, Padova (Italy); Tala, T. [Association Euratom-Tekes, Helsinki University of Technology (Finland)

    2004-07-01

    In this paper we describe experiments illustrating a multi-variable model-based technique whose purpose is to control the current and pressure profiles in tokamak with internal transport barriers. This method uses a truncated singular value decomposition of a linearized model operator and offers the potentiality of retaining the distributed character of the current and heat diffusion. We begin with the simplest, lumped-parameter version of this technique, it is shown that with only one actuator, a satisfactory control of the safety factor profile (q-profile) can be achieved within the accessible one-parameter family of profiles, i.e with a steady state offset between the requested profile and the achieved one which is minimum in the least square sense. The first experiments using a multiple-input and multiple-output (MIMO) controller to control the q-profile with 3 heating and current drive actuators, namely neutral beam injection, ion cyclotron resonant heating and lower hybrid current drive, are reported. In the last part we present a simulation of the simultaneous control of plasma current density and pressure profile by using a state space method to obtain a linear mode of plasma dynamics.

  1. Impact of baryon physics on dark matter structures: a detailed simulation study of halo density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Duffy, Alan R; Kay, Scott T; Vecchia, Claudio Dalla; Battye, Richard A; Booth, C M

    2010-01-01

    The back-reaction of baryons on the dark matter halo density profile is of great interest, not least because it is an important systematic uncertainty when attempting to detect the dark matter. Here, we draw on a large suite of high resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, to systematically investigate this process and its dependence on the baryonic physics associated with galaxy formation. The inclusion of baryons results in significantly more concentrated density profiles if radiative cooling is efficient and feedback is weak. The dark matter halo concentration can in that case increase by as much as 30 (10) per cent on galaxy (cluster) scales. The most significant effects occur in galaxies at high redshift, where there is a strong anti-correlation between the baryon fraction in the halo centre and the inner slope of both the total and the dark matter density profiles. If feedback is weak, isothermal inner profiles form, in agreement with observations of massive, early-type galaxies. However, we ...

  2. Measurement of the current density profile in the Alcator C tokamak using lithium pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-speed lithium pellets have been injected into Alcator C tokamak plasmas in order to measure the internal magnetic field, and thus current density profiles. In the pellet ablation cloud, intense visible line radiation from the Li+ ion (λ∼5485 A, 1s2s 3S-1s2p 3P) is polarized due to the Zeeman effect, and measurement of the polarization angle yields the direction of the total local magnetic field. A ''snap shot'' of the q profile is obtained as the pellet penetrates from the edge into the center of the discharge, in a time of about 300 μs. The spatial resolution of the measurement is about 1 cm. At a toroidal field of BT=10 T, the emission in the unshifted π component of the Zeeman triplet is more than 80% polarized, and q profiles have been obtained. The pellets are perturbative (left-angle Δne right-angle/left-angle ne right-angle ∼1), but the total pellet penetration time is at least a factor of 1000 smaller than the classical skin time. It can thus be anticipated that the current density profile should not be perturbed significantly during the time of the measurement. With some relatively straightforward modifications and refinements, precision approaching 10% for the measurement of q profiles should be achievable. The technique appears viable, using Li, as long as the toroidal field is approx-gt 4 T

  3. Bone mineral density and the relationship between lipid profile and bone mineral density in the rats administered juniperus communis linn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship of Juniperus Communis Lynn. with the bone mineral density in the rats fed with a high cholesterol (1%) diet. Thirty five Wistar albino rats weighed approximately 250-300 were used in this study. The rats are divided in five groups of seven each. Groups I and II were administered 0.5 ml of 0.5% Sodium Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (SCMC), while Groups II, IV and V administered 0.5 ml of juniperus communis linn dissolved in 25, 50, 100 mg/kg. Group I and Group II were fed with normal pellets while the other four groups were fed with pellets containing 1% cholesterol. Levels of lipid profile and High Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol (HDL-C) were defined in all the groups. Furthermore, bone mineral density (B M D) of the animals were obtained with DEXA scanner. BMD values of the rats did not show a different among the groups. Significant negative correlations were determined between BMD measurements and LDL-C levels in all groups connected with dose of Juniperus Communis oil. However, this relationship was not linear. (author)

  4. Evolution of density profiles in high-z galaxies: compaction and quenching inside-out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tacchella, Sandro; Dekel, Avishai; Carollo, C. Marcella; Ceverino, Daniel; DeGraf, Colin; Lapiner, Sharon; Mandelker, Nir; Primack, Joel R.

    2016-05-01

    Using cosmological simulations, we address the interplay between structure and star formation in high-redshift galaxies via the evolution of surface density profiles. Our sample consists of 26 galaxies evolving in the redshift range z = 7 - 1, spanning the stellar mass range (0.2-6.4) × 1010 M⊙ at z = 2. We recover the main trends by stacking the profiles in accordance to their evolution phases. Following a wet compaction event that typically occurs when the stellar mass is ˜109.5 M⊙ at z ˜ 2-4, the gas develops a cusp inside the effective radius, associated with a peak in star formation rate (SFR). The SFR peak and the associated feedback, in the absence of further gas inflow to the centre, marks the onset of gas depletion from the central 1 kpc, leading to quenching of the central SFR. An extended, star-forming ring that forms by fresh gas during the central quenching process shows as a rising specific SFR (sSFR) profile, which is interpreted as inside-out quenching. Before quenching, the stellar density profile grows self-similarly, maintaining its log-log shape because the sSFR is similar at all radii. During the quenching process, the stellar density saturates to a constant value, especially in the inner 1 kpc. The stellar mass and SFR profiles deduced from observations show very similar shapes, consistent with the scenario of wet compaction leading to inside-out quenching and the subsequent saturation of a dense stellar core. We predict a cuspy gas profile during the blue nugget phase, and a gas-depleted core, sometimes surrounded by a ring, in the post-blue nugget phase.

  5. A two-dimensional regularization algorithm for density profile evaluation from broadband reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broadband reflectometry is a current technique that uses the round-trip group delays of reflected frequency-swept waves to measure density profiles of fusion plasmas. The main factor that may limit the accuracy of the reconstructed profiles is the interference of the probing waves with the plasma density fluctuations: plasma turbulence leads to random phase variations and magneto hydrodynamic activity produces mainly strong amplitude and phase modulations. Both effects cause the decrease, and eventually loss, of signal at some frequencies. Several data processing techniques can be applied to filter and/or interpolate noisy group delay data obtained from turbulent plasmas with a single frequency sweep. Here, we propose a more powerful algorithm performing two-dimensional regularization (in space and time) of data provided by multiple consecutive frequency sweeps, which leads to density profiles with improved accuracy. The new method is described and its application to simulated data corrupted by noise and missing data is considered. It is shown that the algorithm improves the identification of slowly varying plasma density perturbations by attenuating the effect of fast fluctuations and noise contained in experimental data. First results obtained with this method in ASDEX Upgrade tokamak are presented. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  6. Assessment of precision in ionospheric electron density profiles retrieved by GPS radio occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, P.; de la Torre, A.; Hierro, R.; Llamedo, P.

    2014-12-01

    The Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) is a six satellite radio occultation mission that was launched in April 2006. The close proximity of these satellites during some months after launch provides a unique opportunity to evaluate the precision of Global Positioning System (GPS) radio occultation (RO) retrievals of ionospheric electron density from nearly collocated and simultaneous observations. RO data from 30 consecutive days during July and August 2006 are divided into ten groups in terms of daytime or nighttime and latitude. In all cases, the best precision values (about 1%) are found at the F peak height and they slightly degrade upwards. For all daytime groups, it is seen that electron density profiles above about 120 km height exhibit a substantial improvement in precision. Nighttime groups are rather diverse: in particular, the precision becomes better than 10% above different levels between 120 and 200 km height. Our overall results show that up to 100-200 km (depending on each group), the uncertainty associated with the precision is in the order of the measured electron density values. Even worse, the retrieved values tend sometimes to be negative. Although we cannot rely directly on electron density values at these altitudes, the shape of the profiles could be indicative of some ionospheric features (e.g. waves and sporadic E layers). Above 200 km, the profiles of precision are qualitatively quite independent from daytime or latitude. From all the nearly collocated pairs studied, only 49 exhibited a difference between line of sight angles of both RO at the F peak height larger than 10°. After analyzing them we find no clear indications of a significant representativeness error in electron density profiles due to the spherical assumption above 120 km height. Differences in precision between setting and rising GPS RO may be attributed to the modification of the processing algorithms applied to rising cases

  7. Tokamak plasma self-organization and possibility to have the peaked density profile in ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extrapolation from to-day tokamaks to ITER dimension hitherto remain to be very far. We can't do such extrapolation with the help of scaling built without deep understanding of the physical processes. The main process in the turbulent plasma is its self-organization. Transport coefficients may be changed in plasma in a wide range by changing of the instabilities level. This permit plasma to build the most stable under given external impacts energy distribution profile, i.e., plasma pressure self-consistent profile. This process cannot be realized only in the regions, where the turbulent transport value is not enough for the p(r) regulation. The enhanced grad p appears here. We call these regions 'transport barriers'. The plasma pressure self-consistent profile and transport barriers are two main factors, which determine the plasma pressure profile. At T-10 tokamak the phenomenon of plasma pressure self-consistent profile was investigated and it was shown that normalized plasma pressure does not depend on any plasma parameters if we normalize the minor radius to the radius rc = (IR/kB)1/2, ρ r/rc, k is plasma elongation coefficient, I plasma current, R major radius and B magnetic field strength. In this case p(ρ)/p(0) practically the same for T-10 and JET if in given shot there was not pronounced ITB. The process of p(ρ) restoration very fast and links to plasma minor radius equilibrium. Now we can predict the self-consistent pressure profile for ITER, which can be changed by ITB formation only. As we expect in ITER the peaked power deposition profile, and so the peaked temperature profile, we can conclude that density profile will be flat even in the low-collisionality case. (author)

  8. Quantum Hall states of atomic Bose gases: Density profiles in single-layer and multilayer geometries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe the density profiles of confined atomic Bose gases in the high-rotation limit, in single-layer and multilayer geometries. We show that, in a local-density approximation, the density in a single layer shows a landscape of quantized steps due to the formation of incompressible liquids, which are analogous to fractional quantum Hall liquids for a two-dimensional electron gas in a strong magnetic field. In a multilayered setup we find different phases, depending on the strength of the interlayer tunneling t. We discuss the situation where a vortex lattice in the three-dimensional condensate (at large tunneling) undergoes quantum melting at a critical tunneling tc1. For tunneling well below tc1 one expects weakly coupled or isolated layers, each exhibiting a landscape of quantum Hall liquids. After expansion, this gives a radial density distribution with characteristic features (cusps) that provide experimental signatures of the quantum Hall liquids

  9. Dwarf galaxy dark matter density profiles inferred from stellar and gas kinematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new constraints on the density profiles of dark matter (DM) halos in seven nearby dwarf galaxies from measurements of their integrated stellar light and gas kinematics. The gas kinematics of low-mass galaxies frequently suggest that they contain constant density DM cores, while N-body simulations instead predict a cuspy profile. We present a data set of high-resolution integral-field spectroscopy on seven galaxies and measure the stellar and gas kinematics simultaneously. Using Jeans modeling on our full sample, we examine whether gas kinematics in general produce shallower density profiles than are derived from the stars. Although two of the seven galaxies show some localized differences in their rotation curves between the two tracers, estimates of the central logarithmic slope of the DM density profile, γ, are generally robust. The mean and standard deviation of the logarithmic slope for the population are γ = 0.67 ± 0.10 when measured in the stars and γ = 0.58 ± 0.24 when measured in the gas. We also find that the halos are not under-concentrated at the radii of half their maximum velocities. Finally, we search for correlations of the DM density profile with stellar velocity anisotropy and other baryonic properties. Two popular mechanisms to explain cored DM halos are an exotic DM component or feedback models that strongly couple the energy of supernovae into repeatedly driving out gas and dynamically heating the DM halos. While such models do not yet have falsifiable predictions that we can measure, we investigate correlations that may eventually be used to test models. We do not find a secondary parameter that strongly correlates with the central DM density slope, but we do find some weak correlations. The central DM density slope weakly correlates with the abundance of α elements in the stellar population, anti-correlates with H I fraction, and anti-correlates with vertical orbital anisotropy. We expect, if anything, the opposite of these

  10. TIDAL STIRRING OF DISKY DWARFS WITH SHALLOW DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES: ENHANCED TRANSFORMATION INTO DWARF SPHEROIDALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazantzidis, Stelios [Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Lokas, Ewa L. [Nicolaus Copernicus Astronomical Center, 00-716 Warsaw (Poland); Mayer, Lucio, E-mail: stelios@mps.ohio-state.edu [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zuerich, CH-8057 Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2013-02-20

    According to the tidal stirring model, late type, rotationally supported dwarfs resembling present day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dwarf spheroidals (dSphs) via interactions with Milky-Way-sized hosts. We perform collisionless N-body simulations to investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes {gamma} of the dwarf DM density profiles ({rho}{proportional_to}r {sup -{gamma}}). For a given orbit inside the primary galaxy, rotationally supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like distributions ({gamma} = 0.2) and mild density cusps ({gamma} = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles ({gamma} = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dIrrs highlighting tidal stirring as a plausible model for the Local Group (LG) morphology-density relation. When {gamma} < 1, a single pericentric passage can induce dSph formation and disky dwarfs on low-eccentricity or large-pericenter orbits are able to transform; these new results allow tidal stirring to explain virtually all known dSphs across a wide range of distances from their hosts. A subset of disky dwarfs initially embedded in DM halos with shallow density profiles are eventually disrupted by the primary; those that survive as dSphs are generally on orbits with lower eccentricities and/or larger pericenters compared to those of typical cold dark matter satellites. The latter could explain the peculiar orbits of several LG dSphs such as Fornax, Leo I, Tucana, and Cetus.

  11. Tidal Stirring of Disky Dwarfs with Shallow Dark Matter Density Profiles: Enhanced Transformation into Dwarf Spheroidals

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    (Abridged) The origin of dSphs in the Local Group (LG) remains an enigma. The tidal stirring model posits that late-type, rotationally-supported dwarfs resembling present-day dwarf irregular (dIrr) galaxies can transform into dSphs via interactions with Milky Way-sized hosts. Using collisionless N-body simulations, we investigate for the first time how tidal stirring depends on the dark matter (DM) density distribution in the central stellar region of the progenitor disky dwarf. Specifically, we explore various asymptotic inner slopes gamma of the dwarf DM density profiles (rho \\propto r^{-gamma} as r -> 0). For a given orbit inside the primary, rotationally-supported dwarfs embedded in DM halos with core-like density distributions (gamma = 0.2) and mild density cusps (gamma = 0.6) demonstrate a substantially enhanced likelihood and efficiency of transformation into dSphs compared to their counterparts with steeper DM density profiles (gamma = 1). Such shallow DM distributions are akin to those of observed dI...

  12. Ultrashort high quality electron beam from laser wakefield accelerator using two-step plasma density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we first use the rf linac injector mechanism to generate ultrashort high quality electron beam from laser wakefield accelerator (LWFA) with two-step plasma density profile successfully. We incorporate the physics principle in the conventional rf linac injector into the LWFA by using two-step plasma density to decrease the wavelength of the wakefield in plasma. Using this mechanism, we observe a ultrashort high quality electron beam (the rms energy spread is 1.9%, and the rms bunch length is 2 fs) in the simulation. The ultrashort intense terahertz coherent radiation (200 MW, 2 fs) can be generated with the proposed laser wakefield accelerator.

  13. Testing the gas mass density profile of galaxy clusters with distance duality relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Zheng, Xiaogang; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-03-01

    In this paper, assuming the validity of distance duality relation, η = DL(z)(1 + z)-2/DA(z) = 1, where DA(z) and DL(z) are the angular and the luminosity distance, respectively, we explore two kinds of gas mass density profiles of clusters: the isothermal β model and the non-isothermal double-β model. In our analysis, performed on 38 massive galaxy clusters observed by Chandra (within the redshift range of 0.14 confidence level (CL). However, current accuracy of the data does not allow to distinguish between the two models for the gas-density distribution at a significant level.

  14. Quasiquadrature interferometer for plasma density radial profile measurements: Achieving ten channel operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A quadrature interferometer designed to measure radial electron density profiles in a long (3 m) small bore (2.8 cm) plasma tube, and described previously in this journal, has been further developed to have ten simultaneously operating channels. Achieving multichannel operation was essential to the accurate measurement of radial electron density profiles and required the design, fabrication, and implementation of two closely matched optical polished quartz tube sections. The first polished cylinder forms the cross tube scene beam window and is used as a sleeve to join ceramic tube sections that comprise the bulk of the 3-m plasma tube. The second matched cylindrical section is placed in the interferometer reference beam to compensate for the strong negative lens affects of the cylindrical scene beam window. Design criteria for the cylindrical tube sections is discussed, the plasma tube assembly technique is given, and typical ten channel data is presented for a laser heated 3-m-long theta-pinch

  15. Graphics processing unit-assisted density profile calculations in the KSTAR reflectometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seong-Heon; Oh, Dong Keun

    2014-11-01

    Wavelet transform (WT) is widely used in signal processing. The frequency modulation reflectometer in the KSTAR applies this technique to get the phase information from the mixer output measurements. Since WT is a time consuming process, it is difficult to calculate the density profile in real time. The data analysis time, however, can be significantly reduced by the use of the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU), with its powerful computing capability, in WT. A bottle neck in the KSTAR data processing exists in the data input and output (IO) process between the CPU and its peripheral devices. In this paper, the details of the WT implementation assisted by a GPU in the KSTAR reflectometer are presented and the consequent performance improvement is reported. The real time density profile calculation from the reflectometer measurements is also discussed.

  16. Reconstruction and analysis of temperature and density spatial profiles inertial confinement fusion implosion cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss several methods for the extraction of temperature and density spatial profiles in inertial confinement fusion implosion cores based on the analysis of the x-ray emission from spectroscopic tracers added to the deuterium fuel. The ideas rely on (1) detailed spectral models that take into account collisional-radiative atomic kinetics, Stark broadened line shapes, and radiation transport calculations, (2) the availability of narrow-band, gated pinhole and slit x-ray images, and space-resolved line spectra of the core, and (3) several data analysis and reconstruction methods that include a multi-objective search and optimization technique based on a novel application of Pareto genetic algorithms to plasma spectroscopy. The spectroscopic analysis yields the spatial profiles of temperature and density in the core at the collapse of the implosion, and also the extent of shell material mixing into the core. Results are illustrated with data recorded in implosion experiments driven by the OMEGA and Z facilities

  17. Modeling of the upper transition height from the topside electron density profiles

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Truhlík, Vladimír; Třísková, Ludmila; Bilitza, D.; Kotov, D.; Benson, R. F.; Chu, P.; Wang, Y.; Bogomaz, O. V.; Domnin, I. F.

    Bangkok: COSPAR/URSI IRI Working Group and Faculty of Engineering (KMITL), 2015. s. 760. [International Reference Ionosphere 2015 (IRI-2015) Workshop /18./.. 02.11.2015-13.11.2015, Bangkok] Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : plasmasphere * inner magnetosphere * electron density profiles Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics http://www.iri2015.kmitl.ac.th/downloads/IRI2015_TechnicalProgram.pdf

  18. Suppression of Rayleigh-Taylor instability in Z-pinch loads with tailored density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A load structure with a tailored density profile which delays the onset of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability development in imploding Z-pinches by inverting acceleration of the magnetic field/plasma interface was proposed and studied numerically. This approach makes it possible to start gas-puff implosions from large radii (like 8 cm) and produce a significant K-shell yield with current pulse duration of 250 ns and longer. (author). 3 figs., 7 refs

  19. The heliospheric neutral hydrogen density profile in the presence of a solar wind shock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, P.; Judge, D. L.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of a postulated nearby solar wind shock on the radial density profile of the cold inflowing neutral hydrogen atoms is studied. It is found that a nearby solar wind shock strongly affects the neutral hydrogen breeze. Model calculation reveals that the strongly perturbed hydrogen atom distribution beyond a solar wind shock can be remotely detected by observation of the radial dependence of the backscattered UV glow from the deep space probes Pioneer 10/11 and Voyager 1/2.

  20. The principles of a new method of determining ion beam profile density distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theoretical basis of a technique to determine the spatial density flux distribution in non-uniform ion beams is described. The technique relies on the mapping of the flux distribution into fluence collected distributions when the flux is translated at variable prescribed velocity relative to a series of ion collectors. The method determines the spatial moments of the flux distribution and does not require collector dimensions to be small with respect to the ion beam profile dimensions. (author)

  1. Inter-ELM evolution of the edge current density profile on the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sudden decrease of plasma stored energy and subsequent power deposition on the first wall of a tokamak device due to edge localised modes (ELMs) is potentially detrimental to the success of a future fusion reactor. Understanding and control of ELMs is critical for the longevity of these devices and also to maximise their performance. The commonly accepted picture of ELMs posits a critical pressure gradient and current density in the plasma edge, above which coupled magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) peeling-ballooning modes are driven unstable. Much analysis has been presented in recent years on the spatial and temporal evolution of the edge pressure gradient. However, the edge current density has typically been overlooked due to the difficulties in measuring this quantity. In this thesis, a novel method of current density recovery is presented, using the equilibrium solver CLISTE to reconstruct a high resolution equilibrium utilising both external magnetic and internal edge kinetic data measured on the ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) tokamak. The evolution of the edge current density relative to an ELM crash is presented, showing that a resistive delay in the buildup of the current density is unlikely. An uncertainty analysis shows that the edge current density can be determined with an accuracy consistent with that of the kinetic data used. A comparison with neoclassical theory demonstrates excellent agreement between the current density determined by CLISTE and the calculated profiles. Three ELM mitigation regimes are investigated: Type-II ELMs, ELMs suppressed by external magnetic perturbations (MPs), and Nitrogen seeded ELMs. In the first two cases, the current density is found to decrease as mitigation onsets, indicating a more ballooning-like plasma behaviour. In the latter case, the flux surface averaged current density can decrease while the local current density increases, thus providing a mechanism to suppress both the peeling and ballooning modes.

  2. Role of Density Profiles for the Nonlinear Propagation of Intense Laser Beam through Plasma Channel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonu Sen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work role of density profiles for the nonlinear propagation of intense laser beam through plasma channel is analyzed. By employing the expression for the dielectric function of different density profile plasma, a differential equation for beamwidth parameter is derived under WKB and paraxial approximation. The laser induces modifications of the dielectric function through nonlinearities. It is found that density profiles play vital role in laser-plasma interaction studies. To have numerical appreciation of the results the propagation equation for plasma is solved using the fourth order Runge-Kutta method for the initial plane wave front of the beam, using boundary conditions. The spot size of the laser beam decreases as the beam penetrates into the plasma and significantly adds self-focusing in plasma. This causes the laser beam to become more focused by reduction of diffraction effect, which is an important phenomenon in inertial confinement fusion and also for the understanding of self-focusing of laser pulses. Numerical computations are presented and discussed in the form of graphs for typical parameters of laser-plasma interaction.

  3. Current density profile and electron beam localization measurements using carbon pellets on T-10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The letter presents experimental evidence and an analysis of two phenomena arising during carbon pellet ablation - a toroidal trajectory deflection and enhanced localized ablation in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) current drive regime. A model developed for describing the toroidal deflection of a carbon pellet in a tokamak shows that the trajectory curvature is sensitive to the current density. Photography of the pellet trajectory is used as a diagnostic for the determination of the local current density in an ohmically heated plasma. Directly measured current profiles using pellets are in reasonable agreement with that obtained using the Spitzer conductivity, and current density fluctuations have been observed that are probably associated with magnetic islands. It is shown that in the ECR current drive regime on T-10, energetic electrons probably stimulated by the microwave power are located in a narrow zone (2 cm thickness in the radial direction) with sharp boundaries. (author). Letter-to-the-editor. 7 refs, 5 figs

  4. LETTER: Current density profile and electron beam localization measurements using carbon pellets on T-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egorov, S. M.; Kuteev, B. V.; Miroshnikov, I. V.; Mikhailenko, A. A.; Sergeev, V. Yu.; Ushakov, S. N.; Bagdasarov, A. A.; Chistyakov, V. V.; Elizavetin, D. Yu.; Vasin, N. L.

    1992-11-01

    The authors present experimental evidence and an analysis of two phenomena arising during carbon pellet ablation-a toroidal trajectory deflection and enhanced localized ablation in the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) current drive regime. A model developed for describing the toroidal deflection of a carbon pellet in a tokamak shows that the trajectory curvature is sensitive to the current density. Photography of the pellet trajectory is used as a diagnostic for the determination of the local current density in an ohmically heated plasma. Directly measured current profiles using pellets are in reasonable agreement with that obtained using the Spitzer conductivity, and current density fluctuations have been observed that are probably associated with magnetic islands. It is shown that in the ECR current drive regime on T-10, energetic electrons probably stimulated by the microwave power are located in a narrow zone (2 cm thickness in the radial direction) with sharp boundaries

  5. Error analysis of Abel retrieved electron density profiles from radio occultation measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Yue

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This letter reports for the first time the simulated error distribution of radio occultation (RO electron density profiles (EDPs from the Abel inversion in a systematic way. Occultation events observed by the COSMIC satellites are simulated during the spring equinox of 2008 by calculating the integrated total electron content (TEC along the COSMIC occultation paths with the "true" electron density from an empirical model. The retrieval errors are computed by comparing the retrieved EDPs with the "true" EDPs. The results show that the retrieved NmF2 and hmF2 are generally in good agreement with the true values, but the reliability of the retrieved electron density degrades in low latitude regions and at low altitudes. Specifically, the Abel retrieval method overestimates electron density to the north and south of the crests of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA, and introduces artificial plasma caves underneath the EIA crests. At lower altitudes (E- and F1-regions, it results in three pseudo peaks in daytime electron densities along the magnetic latitude and a pseudo trough in nighttime equatorial electron densities.

  6. Tidal Stirring of Satellites with Shallow Density Profiles Prevents Them from Being Too Big to Fail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Mayer, Lucio; Quinn, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    The “too big to fail” problem is revisited by studying the tidal evolution of populations of dwarf satellites with different density profiles. The high-resolution cosmological ΛCDM “ErisMod” set of simulations is used. These simulations can model both the stellar and dark matter components of the satellites, and their evolution under the action of the tides of a Milky Way (MW)-sized host halo at a force resolution better than 10 pc. The stronger tidal mass loss and re-shaping of the mass distribution induced in satellites with γ = 0.6 dark matter density distributions, as those resulting from the effect of feedback in hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxy formation, are sufficient to bring the circular velocity profiles in agreement with the kinematics of MW’s dSphs. In contrast, in simulations in which the satellites retain cusps at z = 0 there are several “massive failures” with circular velocities in excess of the observational constraints. Various sources of deviations in the conventionally adopted relation between the circular velocity at the half-light radius and the one-dimensional line of sight velocity dispersions are found. Such deviations are caused by the response of circular velocity profiles to tidal effects, which also varies depending on the initially assumed inner density profile and by the complexity of the stellar kinematics, which include residual rotation and anisotropy. In addition, tidal effects naturally induce large deviations in the stellar mass–halo mass relation for halo masses below 109 M ⊙, preventing any reliable application of the abundance matching technique to dwarf galaxy satellites.

  7. Measurements of edge density profiles on TdeV using the injection of laser-ablated lithium atoms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abel, G.; Stansfield, B.; Michaud, D.; Ross, G.G.; Lachambre, J.L.; Gauvreau, J.L. [Centre canadien de fusion magnetique, Varennes, Quebec, J3X1S1 (CANADA)

    1997-01-01

    An atom injector using laser blow off of lithium is installed on TdeV to obtain the radial edge profile of electron density near the throat of the top divertor. The profile is reconstructed from the emissivity of the LiI (2p{sup 2}P{r_arrow}2s{sup 2}S) transition at 670.8 nm. A short review of the diagnostic is given describing the experimental setup, the measurement procedures, and the density profile reconstruction method. Effects of plasma biasing on the edge electron density profile and the response of the edge profile to the line-average central electron density are shown to illustrate the diagnostic capabilities. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  8. Effect of current density profile on q(a) limit in non-circular tokamak TNT-A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of the current density profile on the limit of the safety factor q(a) in the non-circular tokamak TNT-A is described in this paper. The safety factor q(a) is measured by magnetic probes and one-turn loops. The current density profile is estimated from the shape of the plasma boundary with an equilibrium code. A gas puffing system and pulse forming network (PFN) circuit for the Joule current are used to control the profile. The limit of q(a) increases from 2.6 to 4.0 as the current density profile becomes flatter and the current density profile parameter enters the unstable region for the m = 3 and 4 external kink modes. This limit of q(a) determines one of the boundary of the operational stable region in TNT-A. (author)

  9. Optimal design of reflectometer density profile measurements using a radar systems approach (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reflectometry is an attractive and versatile diagnostic technique that can address a wide range of measurement needs on fusion devices. However, progress in the area of profile measurement has been hampered by the lack of a well-understood basis for the optimum design and implementation of such systems. Such a design basis is provided by the realization that reflectometer systems utilized for density profile measurements are in fact specialized forms of radar systems. In this article five criteria are introduced by which reflectometer systems can be systematically designed for optimal performance: range resolution, spatial sampling, turbulence immunity, bandwidth optimization, and the need for adaptive data processing. Many of these criteria are familiar from radar systems analysis, and are applicable to reflectometry after allowance is made for differences stemming from the nature of the plasma target. These criteria are utilized to critically evaluate current reflectometer density profile techniques and indicate improvements that can impact current and next step devices, such as ITER.copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  10. Recent measurements of electron density profiles of plasmas in PLADIS I, a plasma disruption simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak disruption simulation experiments are being conducted at the University of New Mexico (UNM) using the PLADIS I plasma gun system. PLADIS I is a high power, high energy coaxial plasma gun configured to produce an intense plasma beam. First wall candidate materials are placed in the beam path to determine their response under disruption relevant energy densities. An optically thick vapor shield plasma has been observed to form above the target surface in PLADIS I. Various diagnostics have been used to determine the characteristics of the incident plasma and the vapor shielding plasma. The cross sectional area of the incident plasma beam is a critical characteristic, as it is used in the calculation of the incident plasma energy density. Recently, a HeNe interferometer in the Mach-Zehnder configuration has been constructed and used to probe the electron density of the incident plasma beam and vapor shield plasma. The object beam of the interferometer is scanned across the plasma beam on successive shots, yielding line integrals of beam density on different chords through the plasma. Data from the interferometer is used to determine the electron density profile of the incident plasma beam as a function of beam radius. This data is then used to calculate the effective beam area. Estimates. of beam area, obtained from other diagnostics such as damage targets, calorimeter arrays and off-axis measurements of surface pressure, will be compared with data from the interferometer to obtain a better estimate of the beam cross sectional area

  11. Density profile of a line plasma generated by laser ablation for laser wakefield acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An elongated line plasma generated by a laser ablation of an aluminum target was investigated, which can be used in the laser wakefield acceleration (LWFA) by employing ultra-intense laser pulse through the longitudinal direction of the plasma. To generate a uniform and long plasma channel along the propagation of ultra-intense laser pulse (main pulse), a cylindrical lens combined with a biprism was used to shape the intensity of a ns Nd:YAG laser (pre-pulse) on the Al target. A uniformity of laser intensity can be manipulated by changing the distance between the biprism and the target. The density profile of the plasma generated by laser ablation was measured using two interferometers, indicating that a 3-mm long uniform line plasma with a density of 6 × 1017 cm−3 could be generated. The density with main pulse was also measured and the results indicated that the density would increase further due to additional ionization of the plasma by the main ultra-intense laser pulse. The resulting plasma density, which is a crucial parameter for the LWFA, can be controlled by the intensity of the pre-pulse, the time delay between the pre- and main pulse, and the distance of the main pulse from the target surface

  12. Analysis of density limit with radial profile of electric field in helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The study of the plasma confinement physics is the urgent task of nuclear fusion research. The phenomena of the density limit control how the plasma performance is achievable. In tokamaks, the properties of the confinement and the density limit are dictated. In helical plasmas, attention has been paid to the phenomena of the density limit. The helical plasmas have an additional freedom in magnetic geometry, which is utilized to investigate the transport mechanisms. The density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas were examined with the analytic point model. Since the radial electric field determined by the ambipolar condition in a non-axisymmetric system is known to affect the confinement property significantly, theoretical analysis of the density limit including the radiation loss in helical plasmas is necessary with the effect of the ambipolar radial electric field in a set of transport equations. To examine the density limit for the thermal stability in helical plasmas, we add the term of the radiation loss rate of the energy to the temporal equation of the electron temperature in a set of one-dimensional transport equations. The radiative loss of the line emission from the impurity ions has a temperature dependence that the loss increases if the temperature gets lower. The combined mechanism of the transport and the radiation loss of the energy is discussed. The dependence of the electron temperature profile on the electron heating is studied when the radiative cooling rate is included in a set of the transport equations to examine the density limit in helical plasmas. The parameter dependence of the critical density is derived, when the effect of the radial electric field is included. The sharp decrease of the electron temperature is shown near the edge. This is because the radiative loss rate rapidly increases at the low temperature. The phenomenon like the transition near the edge in the Er profile is obtained. The value of the turbulent

  13. Density profiles in the raise and peel model with and without a wall; physics and combinatorics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We consider the raise and peel model of a one-dimensional fluctuating interface in the presence of an attractive wall. The model can also describe a pair annihilation process in disordered unquenched media with a source at one end of the system. For the stationary states, several density profiles are studied using Monte Carlo simulations. We point out a deep connection between some profiles seen in the presence of the wall and in its absence. Our results are discussed in the context of conformal invariance (c = 0 theory). We discover some unexpected values for the critical exponents, which are obtained using combinatorial methods. We have solved known (Pascal's hexagon) and new (split-hexagon) bilinear recurrence relations. The solutions of these equations are interesting in their own right since they give information on certain classes of alternating sign matrices

  14. Molybdenum density profiles on C-Mod using FAC generated cooling curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinke, M.

    2005-10-01

    For tokamaks with high-Z plasma facing components, maintaining a low impurity content is necessary to produce high quality, repeatable discharges. A GENeral Impurity Emissivity (GENIE) method is outlined for determining impurity profiles using experimental spectroscopy data, an impurity transport code, and the atomic physics package, Flexible Atomic Code (FAC). Modular programming is emphasized in order to make the method extendable to arbitrary impurities, diagnostic sets and tokamaks. Development of GENIE is ongoing, but a necessary first step is to verify FAC. A testing stage of GENIE that ignores transport is demonstrated and the results are validated against the published molybdenum cooling-curve generated using HULLAC. Bolometry and Thomson scattering data are used to determine molybdenum density profiles on Alcator C-Mod using the Mo cooling-curve. Instances where this method fails are shown as well to illustrate the need for a more advanced version of GENIE that generates and uses charge state distributions that assume transport.

  15. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  16. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process

  17. Galaxy density profiles and shapes -- II. selection biases in strong lensing surveys

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, Rachel; Keeton, Charles R

    2008-01-01

    [Abridged] Many current and future astronomical surveys will rely on samples of strong gravitational lens systems to draw conclusions about galaxy mass distributions. We use a new strong lensing pipeline (presented in Paper I of this series) to explore selection biases that may cause the population of strong lensing systems to differ from the general galaxy population. Our focus is on point-source lensing by early-type galaxies with two mass components (stellar and dark matter) that have a variety of density profiles and shapes motivated by observational and theoretical studies of galaxy properties. We seek not only to quantify but also to understand the physics behind selection biases related to: galaxy mass, orientation and shape; dark matter profile parameters such as inner slope and concentration; and adiabatic contraction. We study how all of these properties affect the lensing Einstein radius, total cross-section, quad/double ratio, and image separation distribution. We find significant (factors of seve...

  18. Iterative noise removal from temperature and density profiles in the TJ-II Thomson scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, G., E-mail: gonzalo.farias@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Dormido-Canto, S., E-mail: sebas@dia.uned.es [Departamento de Informática y Automática, UNED, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Vega, J., E-mail: jesus.vega@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Santos, M., E-mail: msantos@ucm.es [Departamento de Arquitectura de Computadores y Automática, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I., E-mail: ignacio.pastor@ciemat.es [Asociación EURATOM/CIEMAT para Fusión, Avd. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Fingerhuth, S., E-mail: sebastian.fingerhuth@ucv.cl [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile); Ascencio, J., E-mail: j_ascencio21@hotmail.com [Pontificia Universidad Católica de Valparaíso, Av. Brasil 2147, Valparaíso (Chile)

    2014-05-15

    TJ-II Thomson Scattering diagnostic provides temperature and density profiles of plasma. The CCD camera acquires images that are corrupted with some kind of noise called stray-light. This noise degrades both image contrast and measurement accuracy, which could produce unreliable profiles of the diagnostic. So far, several approaches have been applied in order to decrease the noise in the TJ-II Thomson scattering images. Since the presence of the noise is not global but located in some particular regions of the image, advanced processing techniques are needed. However such methods require of manual fine-tuning of parameters to reach a good performance. In this contribution, an iterative image processing approach is applied in order to reduce the stray light effects in the images of the TJ-II Thomson scattering diagnostic. The proposed solution describes how the noise can be iteratively reduced in the images when a key parameter is automatically adjusted during the iterative process.

  19. Advances in reflectometric density profile measurements on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Significant improvements have been achieved in the accuracy and reliability of broadband frequency-swept (FM) reflectometer measurements on DIII-D. This has been achieved through several improvements, the most important of which has been the application of digital complex demodulation (CDM) analysis software, which can extract signal phase with subfringe accuracy. Using this new analysis technique, results from the broadband FM system look very promising: reflectometer measurements show excellent agreement with Thomson profiles in Ohmic and H-mode plasmas, and good agreement with Thomson data in L-mode. Clear resolution of the steep edge density profile in H-mode plasmas, where very small phase shifts are involved, confirm the accuracy of the system calibration and performance

  20. Transport simulations of ITER with broad density profiles and high radiative fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.

    1995-08-01

    Special versions of the 1.5-D BALDUR predictive transport code are used to explore the confinement in the ignited ITER EDA by self-consistent calculations. The code computes 2-D equilibria and solves 1-D transport equations in the bulk and scrape-off layer with empirical transport coefficients for the ohmic, L and ELMy H mode regimes. The emphasis is on scenarios with flat density profiles and high, fixed radiative power in the main chamber due to the seeded impurities argon and neon. It is shown that self-sustained steady state thermonuclear burn is achieved for 370 s and is compatible with the flat density profiles and strong radiative cooling. The necessary local energy and particle transport are presented. In the argon and neon scenarios, the required radiation corrected energy confinement times are 4.1 and 3.5 s, respectively, which are achievable according to the ITER ELMy H mode scaling. The advantage of neon originates from its smaller radiative loss within the separatrix of 37% of the total radiation in the main chamber, compared with 60% in the case of argon. A significant radiative loss from the confinement zone, mainly by bremsstrahlung, cannot be avoided. It raises the required energy confinement time and is the price to be paid for reduction of the divertor heat load by radiative cooling in the main chamber. In steady state, a helium fraction of 5% is computed. The fractions of helium, argon and neon and the resulting fuel dilution are considerably lower than with peaked density profiles

  1. Near-Infrared Properties of Moderate-Redshift Galaxy Clusters: Luminosity Functions and Density Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muzzin, Adam; Yee, H.K.C.; /Toronto U., Astron. Dept.; Hall, Patrick B.; /York U., Canada; Ellingson, E.; /Colorado U., CASA; Lin, Huan; /Fermilab

    2006-12-01

    We present K-band imaging for 15 of the Canadian Network for Observational Cosmology (CNOC1) clusters. The extensive spectroscopic dataset available for these clusters allows us to determine the cluster K-band luminosity function and density profile without the need for statistical background subtraction. The luminosity density and number density profiles can be described by NFW models with concentration parameters of c{sub l} = 4.28 {+-} 0.70 and c{sub g} = 4.13 {+-} 0.57 respectively. Comparing these to the dynamical mass analysis of the same clusters shows that the galaxy luminosity and number density profiles are similar to the dark matter profile, and are not less concentrated like in local clusters. The luminosity functions show that the evolution of K. over the redshift range 0.2 < z < 0.5 is consistent with a scenario where the majority of stars in cluster galaxies form at high-redshift (z{sub f} > 1.5) and evolve passively thereafter. The best-fit for the faint-end slope of the luminosity function is {alpha} = -0.84 {+-} 0.08, which indicates that it does not evolve between z = 0 and z = 0.3. Using Principal Component Analysis of the spectra we classify cluster galaxies as either star-forming/recently-star-forming (EM+BAL) or non-star forming (ELL) and compute their respective luminosity functions. The faint-end slope of the ELL luminosity function is much shallower than for the EM+BAL galaxies at z = 0.3, and suggests the number of faint ELL galaxies in clusters decreases by a factor of {approx} 3 from z = 0 to z = 0.3. The redshift evolution of K* for both EM+BAL and ELL types is consistent with a passively evolving stellar population formed at high-redshift. Passive evolution in both classes, as well as the total cluster luminosity function, demonstrates that the bulk of the stellar population in all bright cluster galaxies is formed at high-redshift and subsequent transformations in morphology/color/spectral-type have little effect on the total stellar

  2. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    OpenAIRE

    P. Y. Mukhtarov; D. V. Pancheva

    1996-01-01

    A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km) model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles) absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h)-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulatio...

  3. Intense laser beam propagating in a plasma channel with flat-bottom leaky density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The propagation characteristics of an intense laser beam in a preformed plasma channel with the flat-bottom leaky density profile are investigated in detail. The evolution equation of the laser spot size is derived by employing variational technique. Seven propagation modes of the laser spot size are identified and some numerical results are presented. By comparison, we find that the results in this Letter may be more realistic since the flat-bottom leaky plasma channel comes closer to the practical plasma channel.

  4. Measurement of edge density profiles of Large Helical Device plasmas using an ultrashort-pulse reflectometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokota, Y; Mase, A; Kogi, Y; Bruskin, L G; Tokuzawa, T; Kawahata, K

    2008-05-01

    We report here on the application of an ultrashort-pulse reflectometer (USPR) to Large Helical Device in National Institute for Fusion Science. An impulse with picosecond pulse width is used as a source in an USPR. Since the bandwidth of a source is inversely related to the pulse width, we can utilize the frequency range of microwave to millimeter-wave by using wide band transmission lines. The density profiles can be reconstructed by collecting time-of-flight signal of each frequency component of an impulse reflected from each cutoff layer. Remote control system using super science information network has been introduced to the present USPR system. PMID:18513099

  5. Reflectometry: a reliable and sensitive plasma diagnostic for density profile and turbulence measurements on Tore-Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of four reflectometers has been installed on Tore-Supra to measure the density profiles and the properties of density fluctuations with good spatial resolution. Fast swept X-mode reflectometers covering the range 50 to 155 GHz provide reliable and accurate measurements of the whole density profile from the edge on the outer side up to the core on the high field side even during large and fast profile evolution. Precise evaluation of the density profile is crucial for particle transport studies. A particular feature, a local peaking, has been observed in the core during ohmic discharge. Density fluctuations are measured with three different techniques. The classical fixed frequency method looks at large scale fluctuations (kr -1) and is highly sensitive. It measures the radial profile of fluctuations and can detect density perturbation associated to high frequency perturbations like the Alfven modes. A new method has been validated to measure the radial profile of small scale density fluctuations from fast FM-CW phase reflected signal. This method could also retrieve the radial wavenumber spectrum. The last method Doppler reflectometry is based on back scattering. It measures the poloidal rotation and fluctuations amplitude at different poloidal wave numbers (3 θ -1). This collection of diagnostics achieves complementary measurements from the low to the high field side of the discharge and from large to small scale. (authors)

  6. Study of the stability of Z-pinch implosions with different initial density profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousskikh, A. G.; Zhigalin, A. S.; Labetskaya, N. A.; Chaikovsky, S. A.; Yushkov, G. Yu. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Oreshkin, V. I.; Batrakov, A. V. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tomsk Polytechnic University, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Baksht, R. B. [Institute of High Current Electronics of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Tel-Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-05-15

    Stability of metal-puff Z pinches was studied experimentally. Experiments were carried out on a facility producing a load current up to 450 kA with a rise time of 450 ns. In a metal-puff Z pinch, the plasma shell is produced due to evaporation of the electrode material during the operation of a vacuum arc. In the experiment to be reported, a single-shell and a shell-on-jet pinch load with magnesium electrodes were used. Two-dimensional, 3 ns gated, visible-light images were taken at different times during the implosion. When the shell was formed from a collimated plasma flow with small radial divergence, Rayleigh–Taylor (RT) instability typical of gas-puff implosions was recorded. The RT instability was completely suppressed in a mode where the initial density distribution of the shell approached a tailored density profile [A. L. Velikovich et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 853 (1996)].

  7. Core Temperature and Density Profiles from Multispectral Imaging of ICF Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a multiple monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic using an array of pinholes coupled to a multilayer Bragg mirror, and we have used this diagnostic to obtain unique multispectral imaging data of inertial-confinement fusion implosion plasmas. Argon dopants in the fuel allow emission images to be obtained in the Ar He-b and Ly-b spectral regions, and these images provide data on core temperature and density profiles. We have analyzed these data to obtain quasi-three-dimensional maps of electron temperature and scaled electron density within the core for several cases of drive symmetry, and we observed a two-lobed structure evolving for increasingly prolate-asymmetric drive. This structure is invisible in broad-band x-ray images. Future work will concentrate on hydrodynamics simulations for comparison with the data

  8. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilous, A. V.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Keane, E. F.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Stappers, B. W.; Malofeev, V. M.; Sobey, C.; Breton, R. P.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Karastergiou, A.; Michilli, D.; Osłowski, S.; Sanidas, S.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zarka, P.; Grießmeier, J.-M.; Serylak, M.; Bell, M. E.; Broderick, J. W.; Eislöffel, J.; Markoff, S.; Rowlinson, A.

    2016-06-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec > 8° and Galactic latitudes |Gb| > 3°, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed for ≥20 min in the contiguous frequency range of 110-188 MHz. Full-Stokes data were recorded. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures (1.5 × 10-3 pc cm-3) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, thechoice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral break, were highly influenced by the spectral coverage of the available flux density measurements. In particular, the inclusion of measurements below 100 MHz appears essential for investigating the low-frequency turnover in the spectra for most of the census pulsars. For several pulsars, we compared the spectral indices from different works and found the typical spread of values to be within 0.5-1.5, suggesting a prevailing underestimation of spectral index errors in the literature. The census observations yielded some unexpected individual source results, as we describe in the paper. Lastly, we will provide this unique sample of wide-band, low-frequency pulse profiles via the European Pulsar Network Database. Tables B.1-B.4 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/591/A134

  9. Mass growth and density profiles of dark matter halos in hierarchical clustering

    CERN Document Server

    Nusser, A; Nusser, Adi; Sheth, Ravi

    1998-01-01

    We develop a model for the growth of dark matter halos and use it to study their evolved density profiles. In this model, halos are spherical and form by quiescent accretion of matter in clumps, called satellites. The halo mass as a function of redshift is given by the mass of the most massive progenitor, and is determined from Monte-Carlo realizations of the merger-history tree. Inside the halo, satellites move under the action of the gravitational force of the halo and a dynamical friction drag force. The associated equation of motion is solved numerically. The energy lost to dynamical friction is transferred to the halo in the form of kinetic energy. As they sink into the halo, satellites continually lose matter as a result of tidal stripping. The stripped matter moves inside the halo free of dynamical friction. The evolved density profiles are steeper than those obtained by assuming that, once they have been accreted onto the parent halo, satellites remain at a fixed distance from the halo center. We find...

  10. Tidal stirring of satellites with shallow density profiles prevents them from being too big to fail

    CERN Document Server

    Tomozeiu, Mihai; Quinn, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The "too big to fail" problem is revisited by studying the tidal evolution of populations of dwarf satellites with different density profiles. The high resolution cosmological $\\rm \\Lambda CDM$ "ErisMod" set of simulations is used. These simulations can model both the stellar and dark matter components of the satellites, and their evolution under the action of the tides of a MW-sized host halo at a force resolution better than 10 pc. The stronger tidal mass loss and re-shaping of the mass distribution induced in satellites with $\\gamma=0.6$ dark matter density distributions, as those resulting from the effect of feedback in hydrodynamical simulations of dwarf galaxy formation, is sufficient to bring the circular velocity profiles in agreement with the kinematics of MW's dSphs. In contrast, in simulations in which the satellites retain cusps at $z=0$ there are several "massive failures" with circular velocities in excess of the observational constraints. Various sources of deviations in the conventionally adop...

  11. Finding evidence for density fluctuation effects on electron cyclotron heating deposition profiles on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookman, M. W., E-mail: brookmanmw@fusion.gat.com; Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, MS 13-505, 3483 Dunhill St, San Diego, CA 92121-1200 (United States); Petty, C. C. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA 92186-5608 (United States)

    2015-12-10

    Theoretical work, computation, and results from TCV [J. Decker “Effect of density fluctuations on ECCD in ITER and TCV,” EPJ Web of Conf. 32, 01016 (2012)] suggest that density fluctuations in the edge region of a tokamak plasma can cause broadening of the ECH deposition profile. In this paper, a GUI tool is presented which is used for analysis of ECH deposition as a first step towards looking for this broadening, which could explain effects seen in previous DIII-D ECH transport studies [K.W. Gentle “Electron energy transport inferences from modulated electron cyclotron heating in DIII-D,” Phys. Plasmas 13, 012311 (2006)]. By applying an FFT to the T{sub e} measurements from the University of Texas’s 40-channel ECE Radiometer, and using a simplified thermal transport equation, the flux surface extent of ECH deposition is determined. The Fourier method analysis is compared with a Break-In-Slope (BIS) analysis and predictions from the ray-tracing code TORAY. Examination of multiple Fourier harmonics and BIS fitting methods allow an estimation of modulated transport coefficients and thereby the true ECH deposition profile. Correlations between edge fluctuations and ECH deposition in legacy data are also explored as a step towards establishing a link between fluctuations and deposition broadening in DIII-D.

  12. Anomalous plasma heating induced by modulation of the current-density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usual plasma heating in a tokamak needs additional heating to reach ignition temperature (approx. 108 K). The method used in the TORTUR III experiment is to induce anomalous plasma resistivity by applying a short (10 microseconds) high-voltage pulse. A sharp rise of the plasma temperature is found almost simultaneously, but this effect, though considerable, is too short-lived to be of interest for a thermonuclear chain reaction. A second pulse gives a second rise of temperature, but this time a slow one, extending over several milliseconds. The mechanism of this delayed heating and the reservoir within the plasma supplying the energy are subjects of investigation in the TORTUR III experiments. Some conclusions concerning the plasma heating mechanism are presented. The conclusion is reached that the application of the high-voltage pulse results in a modulation of the current-density profile: the (normally already peaked) profile sharpens, the current concentrates in the centre of the plasma column. This is a non-equilibrium situation. It relaxes to the noraml current distribution within approximately 2 milliseconds. As long as this relaxation process is not finished, the dissipation is on an enhanced level and anomalous plasma heating is observed. Many plasma parameters are surveyed and evaluated: temperature (both of the ions and the electrons), density, emission spectrum (from microwaves to hard X-rays) and the fluctuation spectrum. Main subject of this report is the measurement and interpretation of the X-rays of the emission spectrum. Experimental results are presented and discussed

  13. Exploration of high-density protein microarrays for antibody validation and autoimmunity profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sjöberg, Ronald; Mattsson, Cecilia; Andersson, Eni; Hellström, Cecilia; Uhlen, Mathias; Schwenk, Jochen M; Ayoglu, Burcu; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-25

    High-density protein microarrays of recombinant human protein fragments, representing 12,412 unique Ensembl Gene IDs, have here been produced and explored. These protein microarrays were used to analyse antibody off-target interactions, as well as for profiling the human autoantibody repertoire in plasma against the antigens represented by the protein fragments. Affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies produced within the Human Protein Atlas (HPA) were analysed on microarrays of three different sizes, ranging from 384 antigens to 21,120 antigens, for evaluation of the antibody validation criteria in the HPA. Plasma samples from secondary progressive multiple sclerosis patients were also screened in order to explore the feasibility of these arrays for broad-scale profiling of autoantibody reactivity. Furthermore, analysis on these near proteome-wide microarrays was complemented with analysis on HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarrays. The HPA recombinant protein microarray with 21,120 antigens and the HuProt™ Human Proteome protein microarray are currently the largest protein microarray platforms available to date. The results on these arrays show that the Human Protein Atlas antibodies have few off-target interactions if the antibody validation criteria are kept stringent and demonstrate that the HPA-produced high-density recombinant protein fragment microarrays allow for a high-throughput analysis of plasma for identification of possible autoantibody targets in the context of various autoimmune conditions. PMID:26417875

  14. Gravitational acceleration and tidal effects in spherical-symmetric density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Caimmi, R

    2015-01-01

    Pure power-law density profiles, $\\rho(r)\\propto r^{b-3}$, are classified in connection with the following reference cases: (i) isodensity, $b=3$, $\\rho=$ const; (ii) isogravity, $b=2$, $g=$ const; (iii) isothermal, $b=1$, $v=[GM(r)/r]^{1/2}=$ const; (iv) isomass, $b=0$, $M=$ const. A restricted number of different families of density profiles including, in addition, cored power-law, generalized power-law, polytropes, are studied in detail with regard to both one-component and two-component systems. Considerable effort is devoted to the existence of an extremum point (maximum absolute value) in the gravitational acceleration within the matter distribution. Predicted velocity curves are compared to the data inferred from observations. Tidal effects on an inner subsystem are investigated and an application is made to globular clusters within the Galaxy. To this aim, the tidal radius is defined by balancing the opposite gravitational forces from the Galaxy and the selected cluster on a special point of the clust...

  15. Density profiles of galaxy groups and clusters from SDSS galaxy-galaxy weak lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Mandelbaum, R; Cool, R J; Blanton, M; Hirata, C M; Brinkmann, J; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uros; Cool, Richard J.; Blanton, Michael; Hirata, Christopher M.; Brinkmann, Jonathan

    2006-01-01

    We present results of a measurement of the shape of the density profile of galaxy groups and clusters traced by 43 335 Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs) with spectroscopic redshifts from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). The galaxies are selected such that they are the brightest within a cylindrical aperture, split into two luminosity samples, and modeled as the sum of stellar and dark matter components. We present a detailed investigation of many possible systematic effects that could contaminate our signal and develop methods to remove them, including a detected intrinsic alignment for galaxies within 100 kpc/h of LRGs which we remove using photometric redshift information. The resulting lensing signal is consistent with NFW profile dark matter halos; the SIS profile is ruled out at the 96 (conservatively) and 99.96 per cent confidence level (CL) for the fainter and brighter lens samples (respectively) when we fit using lensing data between 40 kpc/h and 2 Mpc/h with total signal-to-noise of 19 and 25 for the ...

  16. Speckle measurements of density and temperature profiles in a model gas circuit breaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speckle imaging was used to measure the density and temperature distribution in the arc zone of a model high voltage circuit breaker during the high current phase and under conditions simulating those present during current-zero crossings (current-zero-like arc); the arc was stabilized by a transonic, axial flow of synthetic air. A single probe beam was used; thus, accurate reconstruction was only possible for axially symmetric gas flows and arc channels. The displacement of speckles with respect to a reference image was converted to a line-of-sight integrated deflection angle, which was in turn converted into an axially symmetric refractive index distribution using a multistep process that made use of the inverse Radon transform. The Gladstone–Dale relation, which gives the index of refraction as a function of density, was extended to high temperatures by taking into account dissociation and ionization processes. The temperature and density were determined uniquely by assuming that the pressure distribution in the case of cold gas flow (in the absence of an arc) is not modified significantly by the arc. The electric conductivity distribution was calculated from the temperature profile and compared to measurements of the arc voltage and to previous results published in the literature for similar experimental conditions. (paper)

  17. A LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars: average profiles, dispersion measures, flux densities, and spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Bilous, A; Kramer, M; Keane, E; Hessels, J; Stappers, B; Malofeev, V; Sobey, C; Breton, R; Cooper, S; Falcke, H; Karastergiou, A; Michilli, D; Osłowski, S; Sanidas, S; ter Veen, S; van Leeuwen, J; Verbiest, J; Weltevrede, P; Zarka, P; Grießmeier, J -M; Serylak, M; Bell, M; Broderick, J; Eislöffel, J; Markoff, S; Rowlinson, A

    2015-01-01

    We present first results from a LOFAR census of non-recycled pulsars. The census includes almost all such pulsars known (194 sources) at declinations Dec$> 8^\\circ$ and Galactic latitudes |Gb|$> 3^\\circ$, regardless of their expected flux densities and scattering times. Each pulsar was observed contiguously in the frequency range from 110$-$188 MHz and for $\\geq 20$ minutes, recording full-Stokes data. We present the dispersion measures, flux densities, and calibrated total intensity profiles for the 158 pulsars detected in the sample. The median uncertainty in census dispersion measures ($1.5 \\times 10^{-4}$ pc cm$^{-3}$) is ten times smaller, on average, than in the ATNF pulsar catalogue. We combined census flux densities with those in the literature and fitted the resulting broadband spectra with single or broken power-law functions. For 48 census pulsars such fits are being published for the first time. Typically, the choice between single and broken power-laws, as well as the location of the spectral bre...

  18. The Surface Density Profile of the Galactic Disk from the Terminal Velocity Curve

    CERN Document Server

    McGaugh, Stacy S

    2015-01-01

    The mass distribution of the Galactic disk is constructed from the terminal velocity curve and the mass discrepancy-acceleration relation. Mass models numerically quantifying the detailed surface density profiles are tabulated. For $R_0 = 8$ kpc, the models have stellar mass $5 < M_* < 6 \\times 10^{10}$ M$_{\\odot}$, scale length $2.0 \\le R_d \\le 2.9$ kpc, LSR circular velocity $222 \\le \\Theta_0 \\le 233$ km s$^{-1}$, and solar circle stellar surface density $34 \\le \\Sigma_d(R_0) \\le 61$ M$_{\\odot}$ pc$^{-2}$. The present inter-arm location of the solar neighborhood may have a somewhat lower stellar surface density than average for the solar circle. The Milky Way appears to be a normal spiral galaxy that obeys scaling relations like the Tully-Fisher relation, the size-mass relation, and the disk maximality-surface brightness relation. The stellar disk is maximal, and the spiral arms are massive. The bumps and wiggles in the terminal velocity curve correspond to known spiral features (e.g., the Centaurus A...

  19. Speckle measurements of density and temperature profiles in a model gas circuit breaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoller, P. C.; Panousis, E.; Carstensen, J.; Doiron, C. B.; Färber, R.

    2015-01-01

    Speckle imaging was used to measure the density and temperature distribution in the arc zone of a model high voltage circuit breaker during the high current phase and under conditions simulating those present during current-zero crossings (current-zero-like arc); the arc was stabilized by a transonic, axial flow of synthetic air. A single probe beam was used; thus, accurate reconstruction was only possible for axially symmetric gas flows and arc channels. The displacement of speckles with respect to a reference image was converted to a line-of-sight integrated deflection angle, which was in turn converted into an axially symmetric refractive index distribution using a multistep process that made use of the inverse Radon transform. The Gladstone-Dale relation, which gives the index of refraction as a function of density, was extended to high temperatures by taking into account dissociation and ionization processes. The temperature and density were determined uniquely by assuming that the pressure distribution in the case of cold gas flow (in the absence of an arc) is not modified significantly by the arc. The electric conductivity distribution was calculated from the temperature profile and compared to measurements of the arc voltage and to previous results published in the literature for similar experimental conditions.

  20. Stellar density profile and mass of the Milky Way Bulge from VVV data

    CERN Document Server

    Valenti, E; Gonzalez, O A; Minniti, D; Alonso-Garcia, J; Marchetti, E; Hempel, M; Renzini, A; Rejkuba, M

    2015-01-01

    We present the first stellar density profile of the Milky Way bulge reaching latitude $b=0^\\circ$. It is derived by counting red clump stars within the colour\\--magnitude diagram constructed with the new PSF-fitting photometry from VISTA Variables in the V\\'\\i a L\\'actea (VVV) survey data. The new stellar density map covers the area between $|l|\\leq 10^\\circ$ and $|b|\\leq 4.5^\\circ$ with unprecedented accuracy, allowing to establish a direct link between the stellar kinematics from the Giraffe Inner Bulge Spectroscopic Survey (GIBS) and the stellar mass density distribution. In particular, the location of the central velocity dispersion peak from GIBS matches a high overdensity in the VVV star count map. By scaling the total luminosity function (LF) obtained from all VVV fields to the LF from Zoccali et al.(2003), we obtain the first fully empirical estimate of the mass in stars and remnants of the Galactic bulge. The Milky Way bulge stellar mass within ($|b|<9.5^\\circ$, $|l|<10^\\circ$) is $2.0\\pm0.3\\ti...

  1. Emission spectra from super-critical rippled plasma density profiles illuminated by intense laser pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-order harmonic emission from the interaction of intense femtosecond laser pulses with super-critical plasmas characterized by a rippled density profile at the vacuum-plasma interface has been observed from particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations. A plasma simulation box several laser wavelengths in extent was prepared with a rippled density of a fraction of a laser wavelength. Emission spectra at the very initial stage of the interaction were recorded with spectral characteristics dissimilar to those previously reported in the literature. The reflected light spectra were characterized by a strong emission at the plasma line and by a series of harmonics at multiples of the ripple frequency. Harmonic spectra were obtained for different values of the plasma ripple frequency. In all cases the harmonics were emitted at the precise multiple harmonic number of the ripple frequency. Another important feature apparent from the simulations was that the emission peaks appeared to havea complex structure as compared with those for unrippled plasmas. For the cases when the plasma was rippled the peaks that corresponded to the multiples of the rippled density typically showed a double peak for the first few harmonics. The reflected emission plots for the main laser pulse showed strong emission at the plasma frequency and at multiples of that frequency as reported by the authors in the literature. (Author)

  2. Profiling and elucidation of the phenolic compounds in the aerial parts of Gynura bicolor and G. divaricata collected from different Chinese origins

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jian; Mangelinckx, Sven; Lu, Han; Wang, Zheng-tao; Li, Wei-Lin; De Kimpe, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    Gynura bicolor and G. divaricata are not only known to be nutritive as cultured vegetables, but also beneficial as folk medicines in East Asia. As demonstrated by the current phytochemical knowledge, the genus Gynura is a promising source of phenolics with multiple medicinal activities. To expand this phytochemical knowledge, the phenolic secondary metabolites of G. bicolor and G. divaricata were studied. From the aerial parts of these two species, collected in five different Chinese location...

  3. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ˜16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  4. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Miyamoto, Kenji; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki

    2016-02-01

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles. PMID:26932019

  5. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiratsuka, Junichi, E-mail: hiratsuka.junichi@jaea.go.jp; Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Umeda, Naotaka; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Yoshida, Masafumi; Nishikiori, Ryo; Ichikawa, Masahiro; Watanabe, Kazuhiro; Tobari, Hiroyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Miyamoto, Kenji [Naruto University of Education, 748 Nakashima, Takashima, Naruto-cho, Naruto-shi, Tokushima 772-8502 (Japan)

    2016-02-15

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles.

  6. Measurement of heat load density profile on acceleration grid in MeV-class negative ion accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand the physics of the negative ion extraction/acceleration, the heat load density profile on the acceleration grid has been firstly measured in the ITER prototype accelerator where the negative ions are accelerated to 1 MeV with five acceleration stages. In order to clarify the profile, the peripheries around the apertures on the acceleration grid were separated into thermally insulated 34 blocks with thermocouples. The spatial resolution is as low as 3 mm and small enough to measure the tail of the beam profile with a beam diameter of ∼16 mm. It was found that there were two peaks of heat load density around the aperture. These two peaks were also clarified to be caused by the intercepted negative ions and secondary electrons from detailed investigation by changing the beam optics and gas density profile. This is the first experimental result, which is useful to understand the trajectories of these particles

  7. Understanding of the density profile shape, electron heat transport and internal transport barriers observed in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper several transport phenomena are described and explained through the properties of micro-instabilities. Linear and quasi-linear theory are used, which give a reasonable qualitative description of the relatively weak turbulent state of the plasma core. The paper deals with the following phenomena: density peaking, electron heat transport, density pump-out, reactor density profiles, stabilisation of the ion temperature gradient mode in transport barriers. (author)

  8. AMRMS Aerial survey database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — An aerial monitoring program was conducted during the period 1962 - 2003 in cooperation with aerial spotters working for the commercial purse seine fleet. Flights...

  9. Profiles of gamma-ray and magnetic data for aerial surveys over parts of the Western United States from longitude 108 to 126 degrees W. and from latitude 34 to 49 degrees N.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, Joseph S.

    1995-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains images generated from geophysical data, software for displaying and analyzing the images and software for displaying and examining profile data from aerial surveys flown as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The images included are of gamma-ray data (uranium, thorium, and potassium channels), Bouguer gravity data, isostatic residual gravity data, aeromagnetic anomalies, topography, and topography with bathymetry. This publication contains image data for the conterminous United States and profile data for the conterminous United States within the area longitude 108 to 126 degrees W. and latitude 34 to 49 degrees N. The profile data include apparent surface concentrations of potassium, uranium, and thorium, the residual magnetic field, and the height above the ground. The images on this CD-ROM include graytone and color images of each data set, color shaded-relief images of the potential-field and topographic data, and color composite images of the gamma-ray data. The image display and analysis software can register images with geographic and geologic overlays. The profile display software permits the user to view the profiles as well as obtain data listings and export ASCII versions of data for selected flight lines.

  10. Evolution of density and velocity profiles of matter in large voids

    CERN Document Server

    Tsizh, Maksym

    2016-01-01

    We analyse the evolution of cosmological perturbations which leads to the formation of large voids in the distribution of galaxies. We assume that perturbations are spherical and all components of the Universe - radiation, matter and dark energy - are continuous media with ideal fluid energy-momentum tensors, which interact only gravitationally. Equations of the evolution of perturbations in the comoving to cosmological background reference frame for every component are obtained from equations of conservation and Einstein's ones and are integrated by modified Euler method. Initial conditions are set at the early stage of evolution in the radiation-dominated epoch, when the scale of perturbation is mush larger than the particle horizon. Results show how the profiles of density and velocity of matter in spherical voids with different overdensity shells are formed.

  11. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golian, Y.; Dorranian, D., E-mail: d.dorranian@gmail.com [Laser Laboratory, Plasma Physics Research Center, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Aslaninejad, M., E-mail: m.aslaninejad@ipm.ir [Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (IPM), School of Particles and Accelerators, P.O. Box 19395-5531, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-01-15

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch.

  12. Diffuse scattering provides material parameters and electron density profiles of biomembranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully hydrated stacks of DOPC lipid bilayer membranes generate large diffuse x-ray scattering that corrupts the Bragg peak intensities that are used in conventional biophysical structural analysis, but the diffuse scattering actually contains more information. Using an efficient algorithm for fitting extensive regions of diffuse data to classical smectic liquid crystalline theory we first obtain the compressional modulus B=1013 erg/cm4, which involves interactions between membranes, and the bending modulus Kc=8x10-13 erg of the membranes. The membrane form factor F(qz) is then obtained for most values of qz up to 0.8 A-1. The electron density profile ρ(z) is obtained by fitting models to F(qz). Constraining the models to conform to other measurements provides structural quantities such as area A=72.1±0.5 A2 per lipid at the interface

  13. Size distribution and radial density profile of synaptic vesicles by SAXS and light scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castorph, Simon; Salditt, Tim [Institute for X-ray Physics, Goettingen (Germany); Holt, Matthew; Jahn, Reinhard [Max Plank Institute for Biophysical Chemistry, Goettingen (Germany); Sztucki, Michael [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France)

    2008-07-01

    Synaptic vesicles are small membraneous organelles within the nerve terminal, encapsulating neurotransmitters by a lipid bilayer. The transport of the neurotransmitter, the fusion at the plasma membrane, and the release of the stored neurotransmitters into the synaptic cleft are since long know as essential step in nerve conduction of the chemical synapse. A detailed structural view of these molecular mechanisms is still lacking, not withstanding the enormous progress in the field during recent years. From measurements and quantitative fitting of small angle X-ray scattering curves and dynamic light scattering the averaged structural properties of synaptic vesicles can be determined. We present SAXS measurements and fits revealing the width of the size distribution function and details of the radial scattering length profile of synaptic vesicles from rat brain. Representative values for the inner and outer radius and the size polydispersity as well as the density and width of the outer protein layer are obtained.

  14. Whittaker functions in beam driven plasma wakefield acceleration for a plasma with a parabolic density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model for the interaction of charged particle beams and plasma for a linear wakefield generation in a parabolic plasma channel is presented. The density profile has the maximum on the axis. A Gaussian proton beam is employed to excite the plasma wakefield in the channel. We have built a thorough analytical model and solved the governing equations for the wakefield acceleration of a charged particle beam. The longitudinal and radial wakefields are expressed by Whittaker functions, and for certain parameters of plasma and the beam, their behaviours in longitudinal and radial directions are investigated. It is observed that the radial electric field generated by the bunch increases with the distance behind the bunch

  15. Effect of Control Blade History, and Axial Coolant Density and Burnup Profiles on BWR Burnup Credit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ade, Brian J [ORNL; Marshall, William BJ J [ORNL; Martinez-Gonzalez, Jesus S [ORNL

    2015-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have initiated a multiyear project to investigate the application of burnup credit (BUC) for boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel in storage and transportation systems (often referred to as casks) and spent fuel pools (SFPs). This work is divided into two main phases. The first phase investigated the applicability of peak reactivity methods currently used in SFPs to transportation and storage casks and the validation of reactivity calculations and spent fuel compositions within these methods. The second phase focuses on extending BUC beyond peak reactivity. This paper documents the analysis of the effects of control blade insertion history, and moderator density and burnup axial profiles for extended BWR BUC.

  16. Measurements of neutral density profiles using a deuterium Balmer-alpha diagnostic in the C-2 FRC plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In C-2 field-reversed configuration (FRC) device, low neutral density outside the FRC separatrix is required to minimize the charge exchange loss of fast particles. Titanium gettering is used in C-2 to reduce the wall recycling and keep the neutral density low in plasma edge. The measurements of neutral density radial profile are desirable to understand the plasma recycling and the effects of titanium gettering. These measurements are also needed to study the interaction of neutral beams with FRC plasma and confinement of fast ions. Diagnostic based on absolute deuterium Balmer-alpha (D-alpha) radiation measurements is developed and deployed on C-2 device to measure the radial profile of neutral density. Simultaneous measurements of electron density and temperature are done using CO2 interferometer, Thomson scattering, and triple probes diagnostics along with absolute D-alpha radiation. Abel inversion was performed to get the time dependent radial profile of the local D-alpha emission density. Neutral density profiles are obtained under different machine conditions of titanium deposition.

  17. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies

  18. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Bauk, Sabar; Hashim, Rokiah; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz

    2015-04-01

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ2 value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ2 value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  19. Determination of CT number and density profile of binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora spp. particleboards using computed tomography imaging and electron density phantom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yusof, Mohd Fahmi Mohd, E-mail: mfahmi@usm.my; Hamid, Puteri Nor Khatijah Abdul; Tajuddin, Abdul Aziz [School of Physics, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Bauk, Sabar [School of Distance Education, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia); Hashim, Rokiah [School of Industrial Technologies, Universiti Sains Malaysia, 11800 Penang (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Plug density phantoms were constructed in accordance to CT density phantom model 062M CIRS using binderless, pre-treated and tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. particleboards. The Rhizophora Spp. plug phantoms were scanned along with the CT density phantom using Siemens Somatom Definition AS CT scanner at three CT energies of 80, 120 and 140 kVp. 15 slices of images with 1.0 mm thickness each were taken from the central axis of CT density phantom for CT number and CT density profile analysis. The values were compared to water substitute plug phantom from the CT density phantom. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest value of CT number to water substitute at 80 and 120 kVp CT energies with χ{sup 2} value of 0.011 and 0.014 respectively while the binderless Rhizphora Spp. gave the nearest CT number to water substitute at 140 kVp CT energy with χ{sup 2} value of 0.023. The tannin-based Rhizophora Spp. gave the nearest CT density profile to water substitute at all CT energies. This study indicated the suitability of Rhizophora Spp. particleboard as phantom material for the use in CT imaging studies.

  20. A "Universal" Density Profile for the Outer Stellar Halos of Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Dolag, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The outer stellar halos of galaxies contain vital information about the formation history of galaxies, since the relaxation timescales in the outskirts are long enough to keep the memory, while the information about individual formation events in the central parts has long been lost due to mixing, star formation and relaxation. To unveil some of the information encoded in these faint outer halo regions, we study the stellar outskirts of galaxies selected from a fully hydrodynamical high resolution cosmological simulation, called Magneticum. We find that the density profiles of the outer stellar halos of galaxies over a broad mass range can be well described by an Einasto profile. For a fixed total mass range, the free parameters of the Einasto fits are closely correlated. Galaxies which had more (dry) merger events tend to have lesser curved outer stellar halos, however, we find no indication that the amount of curvature is correlated with galaxy morphology. The Einasto-like shape of the outer stellar halo de...

  1. The Density Profiles of Massive, Relaxed Galaxy Clusters: II. Separating Luminous and Dark Matter in Cluster Cores

    CERN Document Server

    Newman, Andrew B; Ellis, Richard S; Sand, David J

    2012-01-01

    We present stellar and dark matter (DM) density profiles for a sample of 7 massive, relaxed galaxy clusters derived from strong and weak gravitational lensing and resolved stellar kinematic observations within the centrally-located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). In Paper I of the series, we demonstrated that the total density profile derived from these data, which span 3 decades in radius, is consistent with numerical DM-only simulations at radii \\gtrsim 5-10 kpc, despite the significant contribution of stellar material in the core. Here we decompose the inner mass profiles of these clusters into stellar and dark components. Parametrizing the DM density profile as a power law rho_DM \\sim r^{-\\beta} on small scales, we find a mean slope = 0.50 +- 0.10 (random) +0.14-0.13 (systematic). Alternatively, cored Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with = 1.14 +- 0.13 (rand.) +0.14-0.22 (sys.) provide an equally good description. These density profiles are significantly shallower than canonical NFW models at radi...

  2. Beam Matching to a Plasma Wakefield Accelerator Using a Ramped Density Profile at the Plasma Boundary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, K.A.; Clayton, C.E.; Huang, C.; Johnson, D.K.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Mori, W.B.; Zhou, M.; /UCLA; Barnes, C.D.; Decker, F.J.; Hogan, M.J.; Iverson, R.H.; Krejcik, P.; O' Connell, C.L.; Siemann, R.; Walz, D.R.; /SLAC; Deng, S.; Katsouleas, T.C.; Muggli, P.; Oz, E.; /Southern California U.

    2006-02-17

    An important aspect of plasma wake field accelerators (PWFA) is stable propagation of the drive beam. In the under dense plasma regime, the drive beam creates an ion channel which acts on the beam as a strong thick focusing lens. The ion channel causes the beam to undergo multiple betatron oscillations along the length of the plasma. There are several advantages if the beam size can be matched to a constant radius. First, simulations have shown that instabilities such as hosing are reduced when the beam is matched [1]. Second, synchrotron radiation losses are minimized when the beam is matched. Third, an initially matched beam will propagate with no significant change in beam size in spite of large energy loss or gain. Coupling to the plasma with a matched radius can be difficult in some cases. This paper shows how an appropriate density ramp at the plasma entrance can be useful for achieving a matched beam. Additionally, the density ramp is helpful in bringing a misaligned trailing beam onto the drive beam axis. A plasma source with boundary profiles useful for matching has been created for the E-164X PWFA experiments at SLAC.

  3. Production of fine structures in type III solar radio bursts due to turbulent density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic reconnection events in the corona release energetic electron beams along open field lines, and the beams generate radio emission at multiples of the electron plasma frequency fp to produce type III solar radio bursts. Type III bursts often exhibit irregularities in the form of flux modulations with frequency and/or local temporal advances and delays, and a type IIIb burst represents the extreme case where a type III burst is fragmented into a chain of narrowband features called striae. Remote and in situ spacecraft measurements have shown that density turbulence is ubiquitous in the corona and solar wind, and often exhibits a Kolmogorov power spectrum. In this work, we numerically investigate the effects of one-dimensional macroscopic density turbulence (along the beam direction) on the behavior of type III bursts, and find that this turbulence produces stria-like fine structures in the dynamic spectra of both fp and 2 fp radiation. Spectral and temporal fine structures in the predicted type III emission are produced by variations in the scattering path lengths and group speeds of radio emission, and in the locations and sizes of emitting volumes. Moderate turbulence levels yield flux enhancements with much broader half-power bandwidths in fp than 2 fp emission, possibly explaining the often observed type IIIb-III harmonic pairs as being where intensifications in 2 fp radiation are not resolved observationally. Larger turbulence levels producing trough-peak regions in the plasma density profile may lead to broader, resolvable intensifications in 2 fp radiation, which may account for the type IIIb-IIIb pairs that are sometimes observed.

  4. Comparison of high latitude electron density profiles obtained with the GPS radio occultation technique and EISCAT measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Stolle

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available To obtain a comprehensive view on high latitude processes by applying different observation techniques, the SIRCUS campaign was initiated in 2001/2002. This paper compares electron density profiles derived from CHAMP radio occultation data and those measured with the EISCAT facility. Since ionospheric profiling with the help of space-based received GPS is a relatively new technique, validations with established independent instruments are of crucial need. We present 28 profiling events for quasi-statistical analyses, which occurred during the SIRCUS campaigns and describe some of them in more detail. We found out that the majority of profile comparisons in electron density peak value and height, as well as in TEC, lie within the error ranges of the two methods. Differences in the ionospheric quantities do not necessarily occur when the locations of the occultation and of the radar site show considerable distances. Differences are more pronounced when the ionosphere is remarkably structured.

  5. Optimal Density Profile of the Plasma Layer Shielded by a Conducting Surface for the Absorption of Electromagnetic Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王舸; 曹金祥; 宋法伦

    2003-01-01

    Based on the Born approximation, we reduce the approximate analysis solution to the normal and oblique incident electromagnetic wave scattering from the weakly ionized plasma layer shielded by a conducting surface. The solution is closely related to the density profile of the plasma layer. Employing the self-consistent base function, we yield the optimal density profile for the nonuniform plasma layer with the frequencies of incident electromagnetic waves ranging from 4-10 GHz. Numerical studies illustrate the optimal density profile can "survive" wide ranges of the plasma parameters. Different from the validity condition for the Wenzell-Kramers-Brillouin-Jeffreys (WKBJ) approximation, the Born approximation is feasible even if the scale length is smaller than the wavelength.Therefore, the Born approximation is universal against the scattering problem from the weakly ionized plasma.

  6. Validation of ionospheric electron density profiles inferred from GPS occultation observations of the GPS/MET experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Todd Mori

    In April of 1995, the launch of the GPS Meteorology Experiment (GPS/MET) onboard the Orbview-1 satellite, formerly known as Microlab-1, provided the first technology demonstration of active limb sounding of the Earth's atmosphere with a low Earth orbiting spacecraft utilizing the signals transmitted by the satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS). Though the experiment's primary mission was to probe the troposphere and stratosphere, GPS/MET was also capable of making radio occultation observations of the ionosphere. The application of the GPS occultation technique to the upper atmosphere created a unique opportunity to conduct ionospheric research with an unprecedented global distribution of observations. For operational support requirements, the Abel transform could be employed to invert the horizontal TEC profiles computed from the L1 and L2 phase measurements observed by GPS/MET into electron density profiles versus altitude in near real time. The usefulness of the method depends on how effectively the TEC limb profiles can be transformed into vertical electron density profiles. An assessment of GPS/MET's ability to determine electron density profiles needs to be examined to validate the significance of the GPS occultation method as a new and complementary ionospheric research tool to enhance the observational databases and improve space weather modeling and forecasting. To that end, simulations of the occultation observations and their inversions have been conducted to test the Abel transform algorithm and to provide qualitative information about the type and range of errors that might be experienced during the processing of real data. Comparisons of the electron density profiles inferred from real GPS/MET observations are then compared with coincident in situ measurements from the satellites of Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and ground-based remote sensing from digisonde and incoherent scatter radar facilities. The principal focus of

  7. Relationship between habitat, densities and metabolic profile in brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bagliacca

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Some habitat traits and haematic parameters were studied to understand the relationships between the hare densities, habitat characteristics and physiological and nutritional condition of the animals. A total of 33 protected areas, reserved for wild game reproduction, located in the Province of Florence (Central Italy, were monitored during a 2-year period. In each protected area the hares were submitted to census. The habitat features of the protected areas were studied and the following parameters were categorised: altitude; cleared-land/total-land ratio; main exposure; main ground composition; water availability; main slope; anthropogenic presence; predator presence; wooded borders; presence of trees and shrubs; surveillance against hunting; demographic predator control; kind of cultivation; unharvested crops for game. After the census the hares were captured for translocation outside in “free” hunting areas. During capture the hares were put in darkened, wooden capture-boxes and remained inside for a variable period of time (10min to 3h. A sample of 3 to 7 hares, captured per year and per each protected area, were removed from the boxes (physically restrained, with covered eyes for blood sample collection, sex, age and live weight determination. The following analyses were performed on frozen plasma samples: ALanine aminoTransferase (ALT, ASpartate aminoTransferase (AST, glucose, cholesterol, Blood Urea Nitrogen (BUN, Ca, P, Mg, Na, K, and Cl concentrations. The relationship between hare density and habitat characteristics was analysed by single regressions analysis. Then the habitat characteristics were subjected to multivariate analysis in relationship to hare body condition. The haematic parameters were analysed by least square means considering habitat traits, animal density, age and sex, as main categorical factors, interaction sex*age, and “pregnant and non-reproducing” nested within sex. Results showed that the highest density

  8. Bootstrap current simulations with experimental LHD plasma density and temperature profiles, energy scattering and finite orbit width

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bootstrap current calculations with the neoclassical SPBSC and VENUS+δf codes have been performed on experimental Large Helical Device (LHD, NIFS, Japan) configurations with different magnetic axis positions and simplified plasma density and temperature profiles. In this paper, we use experimentally obtained electron density and temperature profiles for the LHD discharges no.61863 and no.82582 to compute the corresponding magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium states and collisional frequency. An improved collisional operator has been implemented into the VENUS+δf code. The comparison between the measured LHD bootstrap current and that expected from neoclassical simulations is discussed. (author)

  9. A reflectometer 22 - 110 GHZ for the measurement of electron density profiles on the Tokamak Tore Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microwave system built for the Tore Supra Tokamak, in order to measure electron density profiles is described. The new reflectometer covers the frequency range 22 to 110 GHZ using ordinary and extraordinary waves. Density measurements in the range of 6 X 10 12 cm-3 to 1014 cm-3. In the microwaves studies and tests, special care was taken to reduce the levels of all parasitic reflections. Cavity resonance due to spurious mode trapping was identified. The procedure for the obtention of the profiles is summarized

  10. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field

  11. Measurement of a density profile of a hot-electron plasma in RT-1 with three-chord interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, H.; Yano, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Nishiura, M.; Morikawa, J.; Kawazura, Y.; Nogami, T.; Yamasaki, M. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2015-02-15

    The electron density profile of a plasma in a magnetospheric dipole field configuration was measured with a multi-chord interferometry including a relativistic correction. In order to improve the accuracy of density reconstruction, a 75 GHz interferometer was installed at a vertical chord of the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) device in addition to previously installed ones at tangential and another vertical chords. The density profile was calculated by using the data of three-chord interferometry including relativistic effects for a plasma consisting of hot and cold electrons generated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECH). The results clearly showed the effects of density peaking and magnetic mirror trapping in a strongly inhomogeneous dipole magnetic field.

  12. Probing Our Heliospheric History: Constructing A Density Profile Of The LISM In The Sun's Rearview Mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Katherine; Redfield, S.

    2011-01-01

    In the course of our motion through the Galaxy, the Solar System has encountered many interstellar environments of varying characteristics. ISM density variations spanning six orders of magnitude are commonly seen throughout the general Galactic environment, and a sufficiently dense cloud within this range has the potential to compress the heliosphere to within one Astronomical Unit. We present a reconstruction of the density profile for the clouds we have most recently passed through based on high-resolution optical spectra towards nearby stars. The data were obtained with the Harlan J Smith 2.7-meter telescope coudé spectrograph at McDonald Observatory. Observations were made of interstellar NaI and CaII doublet absorption towards 49 bright stars along the historical path of solar motion in our orbit around the center of the Galaxy. Spectra were taken of stars out to a distance of 480 parsecs, with a median separation distance of 5 parsecs between adjacent stars. No absorption is seen out to a distance of 120 pc (consistent with the Local Bubble), but a complex collection of absorbers (up to 10 components) is seen in stars between 130 and 480 pc. A possible link between our local interstellar environment, cosmic rays, and our planetary climate has long been a subject of interest to members of the astronomical community. Compression of the heliosphere (one of our three cosmic ray shields) due to passage through a dense interstellar cloud could have drastic effects on Earth's climate: global cooling (atmospheric dust deposition), weather patterns (cloud nucleation), and evolution (DNA mutations). A timescale of interaction with each ISM component in this path can be constructed and ultimately compared with Earth's geologic record.

  13. THE DENSITY PROFILES OF MASSIVE, RELAXED GALAXY CLUSTERS. II. SEPARATING LUMINOUS AND DARK MATTER IN CLUSTER CORES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Andrew B.; Ellis, Richard S. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Treu, Tommaso; Sand, David J., E-mail: anewman@astro.caltech.edu [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    We present stellar and dark matter (DM) density profiles for a sample of seven massive, relaxed galaxy clusters derived from strong and weak gravitational lensing and resolved stellar kinematic observations within the centrally located brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs). In Paper I of the series, we demonstrated that the total density profile derived from these data, which span three decades in radius, is consistent with numerical DM-only simulations at radii {approx}> 5-10 kpc, despite the significant contribution of stellar material in the core. Here, we decompose the inner mass profiles of these clusters into stellar and dark components. Parameterizing the DM density profile as a power law {rho}{sub DM}{proportional_to}r {sup -{beta}} on small scales, we find a mean slope ({beta}) = 0.50 {+-} 0.10(random){sup +0.14} {sub -0.13}(systematic). Alternatively, cored Navarro-Frenk-White (NFW) profiles with (log r {sub core}/kpc) = 1.14 {+-} 0.13{sup +0.14} {sub -0.22} provide an equally good description. These density profiles are significantly shallower than canonical NFW models at radii {approx}< 30 kpc, comparable to the effective radii of the BCGs. The inner DM profile is correlated with the distribution of stars in the BCG, suggesting a connection between the inner halo and the assembly of stars in the central galaxy. The stellar mass-to-light ratio inferred from lensing and stellar dynamics is consistent with that inferred using stellar population synthesis models if a Salpeter initial mass function is adopted. We compare these results to theories describing the interaction between baryons and DM in cluster cores, including adiabatic contraction models and the possible effects of galaxy mergers and active galactic nucleus feedback, and evaluate possible signatures of alternative DM candidates.

  14. EVIDENCE FOR GENTLY SLOPING PLASMA DENSITY PROFILES IN THE DEEP CORONA: TYPE III OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Type III radio bursts are produced near the local electron plasma frequency fp and near its harmonic 2fp by fast electrons ejected from the solar active regions and moving through the corona and solar wind. The coronal bursts have dynamic spectra with frequency rapidly falling with time, the typical duration being about 1-3 s. In the present paper, 37 well-defined coronal type III radio bursts (25-450 MHz) are analyzed. The results obtained substantiate an earlier statement that the dependence of the central frequency of the emission on time can be fitted to a power-law model, f(t) ∝ (t - t0)-α, where α can be as low as 1. In the case of negligible plasma acceleration and conical flow, it means that the electron number density within about 1 solar radius above the photosphere will decrease as r -2, like in the solar wind. For the data set chosen, the index α varies in the range from 0.2 to 7 or bigger, with mean and median values of 1.2 and 0.5, respectively. A surprisingly large fraction of events, 84%, have α ≤ 1.2. These results provide strong evidence that in the type III source regions the electron number density scales as n(r) ∝ (r - r0)-β, with minimum, mean, and median β = 2α of 0.4, 2.4, and 1.0, respectively. Hence, the typical density profiles are more gently sloping than those given by existing empirical coronal models. Several events are found with a wind-like dependence of burst frequency on time. Smaller power-law indices could result from the effects of non-conical geometry of the plasma flow tubes, deceleration of coronal plasma, and/or the curvature of the magnetic field lines. The last effect is shown to be too weak to explain such low power-law indices. A strong tendency is found for bursts from the same group to have similar power-law indices, thereby favoring the hypothesis that they are usually produced by the same source region.

  15. Experimental confirmation of calculated phases and electron density profile for wet native collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, R H; Bartlett, M W; Kurg, T; Sweeny, P R; Hendricks, R W

    1979-01-01

    An experimental procedure is developed to phase the reflections obtained in x-ray diffraction investigations of collagen in native wet tendons. Phosphotungstic acid was used for isomorphous addition in phase determination and was located by electron microscopy. Structure factors (with phases) were obtained from the electron microscopy data for the heavy metal. Structure-factor magnitudes for collagen with and without the heavy metal were obtained from the x-ray diffraction data. The first 10 orders were investigated. Standard Argand diagrams provided two solutions for each of these, except the weak sixth order. In each case, one of the two possible solutions agrees well with the phases proposed on theoretical grounds by Hulmes et al. The present results suggest that their other proposed phases are probably correct. An electron density profile along the unit cell of the fibril is presented that shows a distinct step, as expected on the basis of the hole-overlap model. The overlap region is 48% of the length of the unit cell. Images FIGURE 2 PMID:262416

  16. Reconstruction of the vertical electron density profile based on vertical TEC using the simulated annealing algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chunhua; Yang, Guobin; Zhu, Peng; Nishioka, Michi; Yokoyama, Tatsuhiro; Zhou, Chen; Song, Huan; Lan, Ting; Zhao, Zhengyu; Zhang, Yuannong

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new method to reconstruct the vertical electron density profile based on vertical Total Electron Content (TEC) using the simulated annealing algorithm. The present technique used the Quasi-parabolic segments (QPS) to model the bottomside ionosphere. The initial parameters of the ionosphere model were determined from both International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) (Bilitza et al., 2014) and vertical TEC (vTEC). Then, the simulated annealing algorithm was used to search the best-fit parameters of the ionosphere model by comparing with the GPS-TEC. The performance and robust of this technique were verified by ionosonde data. The critical frequency (foF2) and peak height (hmF2) of the F2 layer obtained from ionograms recorded at different locations and on different days were compared with those calculated by the proposed method. The analysis of results shows that the present method is inspiring for obtaining foF2 from vTEC. However, the accuracy of hmF2 needs to be improved in the future work.

  17. Central depressions in the charge density profiles of the nuclei around $^{46}$Ar

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Jun Ling; Long, Wen Hui

    2015-01-01

    The occurrence of the proton bubble-like structure has been studied within the relativistic Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov (RHFB) and relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov (RHB) theories by exploring the bulk properties, the charge density profiles and single proton spectra of argon isotopes and $N = 28$ isotones. It is found that the RHFB calculations with PKA1 effective interaction, which can properly reproduce the charge radii of argon isotopes and the $Z=16$ proton shell nearby, do not support the occurrence of the proton bubble-like structure in argon isotopes due to the prediction of deeper bound proton orbit $\\pi2s_{1/2}$ than $\\pi1d_{3/2}$. For $N = 28$ isotones, $^{42}$Si and $^{40}$Mg are predicted by both RHFB and RHB models to have the proton bubble-like structure, owing to the large gap between the proton $\\pi2s_{1/2}$ and $\\pi1d_{5/2}$ orbits, namely the $Z=14$ proton shell. Therefore, $^{42}$Si is proposed as the potential candidate of proton bubble nucleus, which has longer life-time than $^{40}$Mg.

  18. Temperature, Abundance, and Mass Density Profiling of the Perseus Galaxy Cluster

    CERN Document Server

    Geringer, Paul; Ulmer, Melville

    2012-01-01

    Detailed temperature and abundance radial profile maps have revealed a significant lack of homogeneity within the Perseus Galaxy cluster. Previous surveys of Perseus with the Suzaku telescope, which has a worse angular resolution and less light collecting area than XMM-Newton, revealed over-densities of X-Ray emission. These results provide evidence that the baryon fraction exceeds the universal average, which we had initially hoped to study. We have yet to confirm or deny the existence of clumping in these regions, which could explain such over-abundance of X-Ray emission. This project offers a framework of efficient, automated processing techniques to "clean" images of noise from the mechanics of the telescope, background radiation from local sources such as the solar wind, and more distant sources such as background AGN. The galaxy cluster studied in this project contains high levels of contamination due to its line-of-sight position close to the dust- and star-filled arms of the Milky Way galaxy. Rigorous...

  19. Assimilating Electron Density Profiles Measured by the Real Time Global Ionospheric Radio Observatory - GIRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinisch, B. W.; Galkin, I. A.

    2009-04-01

    Operational applications of ionospheric models, whether they are first principles or data-driven models, rely on the accuracy of the models during quiet and disturbed conditions. Of course models can correctly describe ionospheric weather only if they assimilate measured ionospheric characteristics and electron density profiles (EDPs). For the "assimilating model" to make correct predictions, the measurements in turn must be accurate and reliable. Ionosondes provide the most accurate vertical EDPs at the site locations but do not cover all parts of the globe. Ionogram-derived EDPs have become the ground truth reference for ionospheric specification, presenting the unrivaled accuracy of the data on continuous demand for validation of alternative ionospheric techniques, including radio occultation, ultraviolet, and tomography. In recent years the digisonde network of ionosondes has grown to eighty stations and is expected to expand to more than 100 stations in the next couple of years. The new Digisonde-4D is running the Automatic Real Time Ionogram Scaler with True height inversion, ARTIST-5. The ARTIST-5 autoscaling program now calculates the EDPs together with density uncertainty limits at each height, making the data products suitable for ingestion in assimilative ionospheric models. In order to specify uncertainty at each height, two boundary profiles, inner and outer, are determined. The inner and outer boundaries reflect the uncertainties of the critical frequencies of each layer, the internal uncertainty of the starting height of the profile, and the uncertainties of the E valley model representation. The actual uncertainties are calculated from a cumulative difference characteristic representing a mismatch between automatically and manually scaled parameters (i.e., foF2, foF1) for the same ionogram. The cumulative differences are determined from statistical analysis of a large amount of ionograms for a specific station. The characteristics of interest are

  20. Expression profiling on high-density DNA grids to detect novel targets in dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gene expression analyzes on a large scale using DNA microarrays is a novel approach to study transcription of thousands of genes in parallel. By comparing gene expression profiles of different cell-types and of cells in different activation, novel regulatory networks will be identified that are unique to a cell-type and hence, important in its biological function. Among the differentially expressed genes many novel drug targets will be found. The Genetic department of the Novartis Research Institute was following this approach to identify novel genes, which are critical in the antigen presenting function of DCs and could become promising drug targets. Drugs that modulate effector functions of DCs towards induction of energy or tolerance in T-cells could be useful in the treatment of chronic inflammatory or autoimmune diseases. By using specific robotics equipment high-density cDNA grids on nylon membranes have been produced for hybridizations with various radioactive labeled DNA probes. By our format, based on 384 well plates and limited by the resolution power of our current image analysis software, 27.648 cDNA clones, bacterial colonies or pure DNA, were spotted on one filter. For RNA profiling, we generated filters containing a collection of genes expressed in peripheral blood DCs or monocytes and characterized by oligonucleotide fingerprinting (ONF) as being differentially expressed. The gene collection contained many unknown genes. Sequence analysis of to date 18.000 cDNA clones led to an estimate of 5.000 non-redundant genes being represented in the collection. 10 % of them are either completely unknown or homologous to rare ESTs (expressed sequence tags) in the public EST database. These clones occurred predominantly in small fingerprint clusters and were therefore assumed to be rarely expressed in DCs or monocytes. Some of those genes may become novel drug targets if their expression is DC specific or induced by external stimuli driving DCs into

  1. Charge-exchange measurements of fully-stripped oxygen and carbon ion radial density profiles in TFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fully-ionized oxygen and carbon ions have been detected in TFR via charge-exchange recombination spectroscopy using a modulated auxiliary neutral beam, thus allowing their radial density profiles to be obtained. An impurity transport numerical code is then used to deduce the impurity transport parameters

  2. Planetary Accretion in the Inner Solar System: Dependence on Nebula Surface Density Profile and Giant Planet Eccentricities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, J. E.; Cassen, P.

    2002-01-01

    We present 32 N-body simulations of planetary accretion in the inner Solar System, examining the effect of nebula surface density profile and initial eccentricities of Jupiter and Saturn on the compositions and orbits of the inner planets. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. The surface density profile of NGC 6388 : a good candidate for harboring an intermediate-mass black hole

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzoni, B; Ferraro, F R; Miocchi, P; Valenti, E; Rood, R T

    2007-01-01

    We have used a combination of high resolution (HST ACS-HRC, ACS-WFC, and WFPC2) and wide-field (ESO-WFI) observations of the galactic globular cluster NGC 6388 to derive its center of gravity, projected density profile, and central surface brightness profile. While the overall projected profiles are well fit by a King model with intermediate concentration (c=1.8) and sizable core radius (rc=7"), a significant power law (with slope \\alpha=-0.2) deviation from a flat core behavior has been detected within the inner 1 arcsecond. These properties suggest the presence of a central intermediate mass black hole. The observed profiles are well reproduced by a multi-mass isotropic, spherical model including a black hole with a mass of ~5.7x10^3 Msol.

  4. PROPERTIES OF SATELLITE GALAXIES IN THE SDSS PHOTOMETRIC SURVEY: LUMINOSITIES, COLORS, AND PROJECTED NUMBER DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyze photometric data in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 (SDSS-DR7) to infer statistical properties of faint satellites associated with isolated bright galaxies (Mr r = -14.5, in the projected radial distance range 100 p /kpc vir). The maximum projected distance corresponds to the range 470-660 kpc for the different samples. We have also considered a color cut consistent with the observed colors of spectroscopic satellites in nearby galaxies so that distant redshifted galaxies do not dominate the statistics. We have tested the implementation of this background subtraction procedure using a mock catalog derived from the Millennium simulation semianalytic galaxy catalog based on a Λ cold dark matter model. We find that the method is effective in reproducing the true projected radial satellite number density profile and luminosity distributions, providing confidence in the results derived from SDSS data. We find that the spatial extent of satellite systems is larger for bright, red primaries. Also, we find a larger spatial distribution of blue satellites. For the different samples analyzed, we derive the average number of satellites and their luminosity distributions down to Mr = -14.5. The mean number of satellites depends very strongly on host luminosity. Bright primaries (Mr r r < -20.5) which have less than one satellite per host. We provide Schechter function fits to the luminosity distributions of satellite galaxies where the resulting faint-end slopes equal to 1.3 ± 0.2, consistent with the universal value. This shows that satellites of bright primaries lack an excess population of faint objects, in agreement with the results in the Milky Way and nearby galaxies.

  5. Nanosized magnetisation density profiles in hard-magnetic NdFeCoAl glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nd-Fe-Co-Al alloys have a high glass forming ability and show hard magnetic behavior at room temperature. The aim of the present SANS investigation was to establish structural and magnetic units in the alloys on a nanometer length scale and correlate them with the observed magnetic properties. Nd80Fe20 and Nd60FexCo30-xAl10 cylinders with x=0, 7.5 and 20 have been produced by mold casting with different diameters and have been investigated by SANS, SEM/TEM and magnetization measurements. The microstructure consists of a Nd-rich matrix, a Fe-rich partially amorphous phase and of nanosized Nd particles. The magnetisation show two transition temperatures: Tc1∝40 K corresponds to the ordering of the magnetic moment in the Nd phases and and Tc2∝500 K to the Curie temperature of the Fe-rich phase. The low magnetic scattering contribution has been extracted beside the strong nuclear scattering by using polarized neutrons. It turned out that the Fe-rich phase is essential for the hard magnetic properties of the alloys where the nanoparticles play an important role, while the Fe free alloy is soft magnetic. The magnetization density profile depends on T: Well below Tc1 the local magnetization of the nanosized particles is higher than that of the ferromagnetic matrix while above Tc1 they are paramagnetic and act more efficiently as pinning centers for the magnetic domains, which enhance the coercivity above Tc1

  6. Restricted primitive model for electrical double layers: modified HNC theory of density profiles and Monte Carlo study of differential capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interfacial properties of an ionic fluid next to a uniformly charged planar wall are studied in the restricted primitive model by both theoretical and Monte Carlo methods. The system is a 1:1 fluid of equisized charged hard spheres in a state appropriate to 1M aqueous electrolyte solutions. The interfacial density profiles of counterions and coions are evaluated by extending the hypernetted chain approximation (HNC) to include the leading bridge diagrams for the wall-ion correlations. The theoretical results compare well with those of grand canonical Monte Carlo computations of Torrie and Valleau over the whole range of surface charge density considered by these authors, thus resolving the earlier disagreement between statistical mechanical theories and simulation data at large charge densities. In view of the importance of the model as a testing ground for theories of the diffuse layer, the Monte Carlo calculations are tested by considering alternative choices for the basic simulation cell and are extended so as to allow an evaluation of the differential capacitance of the model interface by two independent methods. These involve numerical differentiation of the mean potential drop as a function of the surface charge density or alternatively an appropriate use of a fluctuation theory formula for the capacitance. The results of these two Monte Carlo approaches consistently indicate an initially smooth increase of the diffuse layer capacitance followed by structure at large charge densities, this behaviour being connected with layering of counterions as already revealed in the density profiles reported by Torrie and Valleau. (author)

  7. Electromagnetic wave speed in polar ice: Validation of the CMP technique with high resolution dielectric-profiling and gamma-density measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Eisen, Olaf; Nixdorf, Uwe; Wilhelms, Frank; Miller, Heinrich

    2002-01-01

    The accuracy of the traveltime-velocity and traveltime-depth profile derived from ground-penetrating radar (GPR) common-midpoint (CMP) surveys at different frequencies is investigated for the first time ever by direct comparison with the profile calculated from high resolution dielectric-profiling (DEP) ice core data.In addition, we compare two traveltime profiles calculated from ice core density data by means of different dielectrical mixture models with the DEP based profile.CMP surveys wer...

  8. Flavonoid and phenolic acid profile by LC-MS/MS and biological activity of crude extracts from Chenopodium hybridum aerial parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolak, I; Olech, M; Galanty, A; Załuski, D; Grabowska, K; Sobolewska, D; Michalik, M; Nowak, R

    2016-08-01

    Extracts from leaves and stems of Chenopodium hybridum were characterised for the presence and quantity of flavonoids and phenolic acids by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Five flavonoids and eight phenolic acids were detected for the first time in aerial parts of this plant species, the most abundant compounds being rutin (2.80 μg/g DW), 3-kaempferol rutinoside (2.91 μg/g DW), 4-OH-benzoic (1.86 μg/g DW) and syringic acids (2.31 μg/g DW). Extracts were tested for anti-inflammatory/antiarthritic, antihyaluronidase and cytotoxic activities against human prostate cancer (Du145, PC3) and melanoma cell lines (A375, HTB140 and WM793) of different malignancy. None of the extracts protected bovine serum albumin from heat-induced denaturation. Antihyaluronidase effect at the tested concentration was higher than standard naringenin. Cytotoxic activity was generally low with an exception of the extract from the leaves, which was found most effective against prostate Du145 cell line with 98.28 ± 1.13% of dead cells at 100 μg/mL. PMID:26810568

  9. Assessment studies on the inversion of satellite to satellite electron content to obtain electron density profiles in the ionosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron content data, obtained by satellite-to-satellite occultations of radio signals can lead to height profiles of electron density by discrete inversion. Since there is no possibility to verify such profiles by means of other measurements (practically never measurements at the same time and same location) it was necessary to simulate occultation scenarios by means of an ionosphere model to obtain a large number of comparisons sufficient for investigations on a statistical basis. The obtained electron contents were inverted and compared with electron density height profiles, obtained with the same ionospheric model for the occultation point. The differences between these profiles were investigated (difference between the F2-peak maxima, the height of the maxima, the shape of the topside and bottom side ionosphere). Since simulations were done for chosen locations (250 randomly spread on the globe) for every month and every second hour and for two solar activity levels (HSA and LSA), a whole year was 'covered'. Investigations were made to find out when, where and under which circumstances inversions of occultation data give good or poor results. For some parameters (especially for the height of the peak) clear decisions could be done, for other parameters (peak electron density value) no time dependence of the quality of the results was found. It seems that a possible appearing horizontal gradient of the electron density is the problem because a separation into different latitudinal regions made the results clearer, i.e. for middle latitudes also the quality of the resulting peak electron density has a clear time dependence whereas at low latitudes the results are quite poorer (equatorial anomaly). An improvement of the inversion procedure to involve the horizontal gradient was tried and more or less satisfying. (author)

  10. Limits on the power-law mass and luminosity density profiles of elliptical galaxies from gravitational lensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Shuo; Biesiada, Marek; Yao, Meng; Zhu, Zong-Hong

    2016-09-01

    We use 118 strong gravitational lenses observed by the SLACS, BOSS emission-line lens survey (BELLS), LSD and SL2S surveys to constrain the total mass profile and the profile of luminosity density of stars (light tracers) in elliptical galaxies up to redshift z ˜ 1. Assuming power-law density profiles for the total mass density, ρ = ρ0(r/r0)-α, and luminosity density, ν = ν0(r/r0)-δ, we investigate the power-law index and its first derivative with respect to the redshift. Using Monte Carlo simulations of the posterior likelihood taking the Planck's best-fitting cosmology as a prior, we find γ = 2.132 ± 0.055 with a mild trend ∂γ/∂zl = -0.067 ± 0.119 when α = δ = γ, suggesting that the total density profile of massive galaxies could have become slightly steeper over cosmic time. Furthermore, similar analyses performed on sub-samples defined by different lens redshifts and velocity dispersions indicate the need of treating low-, intermediate- and high-mass galaxies separately. Allowing δ to be a free parameter, we obtain α = 2.070 ± 0.031, ∂α/∂zl = -0.121 ± 0.078 and δ = 2.710 ± 0.143. The model in which mass traces light is rejected at >95 per cent confidence, and our analysis robustly indicates the presence of dark matter in the form of a mass component that is differently spatially extended than the light. In this case, intermediate-mass elliptical galaxies (200 km s-1 <σap ≤ 300 km s-1) show the best consistency with the singular isothermal sphere as an effective model of galactic lenses.

  11. Grain structure and dislocation density measurements in a friction stir welded aluminum alloy using x-ray peak profile analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Wan Chuck [ORNL; Balogh, Levente [Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary; Ungar, Prof Tomas [Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary; Choo, Hahn [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    The dislocation density and grain structure of a friction stir welded 6061-T6 aluminum alloy was determined as a function of distance from the weld centerline using high-resolution micro-beam x-ray diffraction. The results of the x-ray peak profile analysis show that the dislocation density is about 1.2 x 10^14 m-2 inside and 4.8 x 10^14 m-2 outside of the weld region. The average subgrain size is about 180 nm in both regions. Compared to the base material, the dislocation density was significantly decreased in the dynamic recrystallized zone of the friction stir welds, which is a good correlation with the TEM observations. The influence of the dislocation density on the strain hardening behavior during tensile deformation is also discussed.

  12. Tokamak plasma self-organization and the possibility to have the peaked density profile in ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Razumova, K. A.; Andreev, V. F.; Kislov, A. Y.; Kirneva, N. A.; Lysenko, S. E.; Pavlov, Y. D.; Shafranov, T. V.; Donne, A. J. H.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Spakman, G. W.; R. Jaspers,; Kantor, M.; Walsh, M.

    2009-01-01

    The self-organization of a tokamak plasma is a fundamental turbulent plasma phenomenon, which leads to the formation of a self-consistent pressure profile. This phenomenon has been investigated in several tokamaks with different methods of heating. It is shown that the normalized pressure profile ha

  13. Characterizing intra-annual density fluctuations using fine-spatial resolution blue intensity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babst, Flurin; Wright, William; Szejner, Paul; Wells, Leon; Belmecheri, Soumaya; Monson, Russell

    2016-04-01

    Rapidly rising evaporative demand threatens forests in semi-arid areas around the world, but the timing of stem growth response to drought is often coarsely known. This is partly due to a shortage of sub-annual growth records, particularly outside the Mediterranean region where most intra-annual density fluctuation (IADF) chronologies are based. We anticipate that an automated, cost-effective, and easily implementable method to characterize IADFs could foster more widespread development of sub-annual chronologies. Here, we applied a peak detection algorithm to fine-spatial resolution blue intensity (BI) profiles of Ponderosa pine tree rings from two sites located in neighboring mountain ranges in southern Arizona (~300 m elevation difference). This automated procedure proved reliable to isolate and characterize IADFs, thus offering an efficient and objective alternative to visual identification. Out of seven investigated BI parameters, peak height, width, and area showed satisfactory chronology statistics. We assessed the response of these BI and radial growth parameters to six monthly-resolved climate variables and to the onset date of the North American summer monsoon (NAM). The NAM is an atmospheric mode that provides a clear time marker for the termination of a pre-summer drought period (May-June) causing regular IADFs in trees growing near the dry margin of their distribution range. We observed divergent water limitation at the two sites, despite comparable site characteristics. Radial growth at the lower-elevation site depended mainly on winter precipitation, whereas the higher site relied on spring and monsoon precipitation. The pre-summer drought period indeed promoted IADFs in early ring portions at both sites. Yet, IADFs at the higher site were only formed, if spring was sufficiently humid to assume enough radial growth. Late-position IADFs were caused by a weak monsoon and additionally promoted by favorable conditions towards the end of the growing

  14. Density and x-ray emission profile relationships in highly ionized high-Z laser-produced plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a benchmark measurement of the electron density profile in the region where the electron density is 1019 cm–3 and where the bulk of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission occurs from isotropically expanding spherical high-Z gadolinium plasmas. It was found that, due to opacity effects, the observed EUV emission is mostly produced from an underdense region. We have analyzed time-resolved emission spectra with the aid of atomic structure calculations and find the multiple ion charge states around 18+ during the laser pulse irradiation

  15. Testing the interaction of dark energy to dark matter through the analysis of virial relaxation of clusters Abell Clusters A586 and A1689 using realistic density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Delliou, Morgan Le

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between dark energy and dark matter is probed through deviation from the virial equilibrium for two relaxed clusters: A586 and A1689. The evaluation of the virial equilibrium is performed using realistic density profiles. The virial ratios found for the more realistic density profiles are consistent with the absence of interaction.

  16. Design of an X-mode swept frequency modulation reflectometer for the measurement of KSTAR plasma density profiles (invited)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An X-mode swept frequency modulation (FM) reflectometry system has been designed to measure the electron density profiles of the 'initial' KSTAR plasma. Fast swept HTO oscillators are employed to avoid density fluctuation effects, and frequency quadruplers are utilized to expand the HTO frequency range of 8-18 GHz to completely cover the X-mode cutoff frequency range of 33-66 GHz. The system can also be utilized to measure the edge profiles of the 'Day One' KSTAR plasma by either switching from X- to O-mode reflectometry or by employing higher frequency millimeter-wave components and retaining the X-mode reflectometry configuration. To facilitate engineering design and optimization, a 3D drawing tool is utilized to effectively deal with any technical problems that may happen under actual KSTAR conditions. Details of the KSTAR FM reflectometry system are described together with important design issues

  17. Density profiles from the Alouette 1, 2 and ISIS 1, 2 topside sounder instrument on CD-ROM and WWW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A data base was assembled that includes all the topside electron density profiles from the Alouette and ISIS topside sounder missions that were archived at the National Space Science Data Center. The 176,622 profiles constitute a unique data resource for the modeling of the topside ionosphere covering more than one solar cycle from 1962 to 1979. This data set is more than 4 times the amount of data originally used by Bent and his colleagues for building the BENT topside model (Bent et al., 1972) that is still widely used for specifications of topside electron densities. The topside model in the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) is based on an analytical evaluation of the Bent model and its underlying database. The original binary data sets were decoded at NSSDC and converted to a common ASCII data format (see APPENDIX). The data are available online on NSSDCs anonymous ftp site (ftp://nssdcftp.gsfc.nasa.gov/spacecraft_data/) or can be provided on 1 CD-ROM. It is worth noting that there is an effort underway at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center (R. Benson, PI) to digitize a large number of the original analog telemetry tapes. As of January 2000 more than 300,000 ionograms have been made available online in digital form (data access and project description at http://nssdc/space/isis/isis-status.html). A follow-on project (B. Reinisch, PI) is now working on the automated scaling and inversion of these ionograms into electron density profiles. (author)

  18. Development of a fast solid-state high-resolution density profile reflectometer system on the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new fast-sweep, broadband frequency-modulated reflectometer on the DIII-D tokamak has produced routine, reliable density profiles with high spatial (≤1 cm) and temporal resolution (∼100 μs). The system utilizes a solid-state microwave source and an active quadrupler, covering the full Q-band (33 endash 50 GHz) and providing high output power (20 endash 60 mW). The rf source frequency is linearized using an arbitrary function generator and the temperature of the source is actively controlled to reduce rf frequency drifts. The system hardware allows the rf frequency to be swept fullband in 10 μs, but, due to digitization limits, the sweep time used currently is 75 endash 100 μs. The reliability of the reconstructed profiles was improved by a combination of fast frequency sweep, which reduces density fluctuation effects on the measurements, and advanced signal analysis based on digital complex demodulation, which improves phase accuracy. The fast-sweep system has resolved fast-changing edge density profiles during edge localized modes with unprecedented resolution. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  19. Cross-correlation Weak Lensing of SDSS galaxy Clusters II: Cluster Density Profiles and the Mass--Richness Relation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, David E.; Sheldon, Erin S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Rozo, Eduardo; Koester, Benjamin P.; Frieman, Joshua A.; McKay, Timothy A.; Evrard, August E.; Becker, Matthew; Annis, James

    2007-09-28

    We interpret and model the statistical weak lensing measurements around 130,000 groups and clusters of galaxies in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey presented by Sheldon et al. (2007). We present non-parametric inversions of the 2D shear profiles to the mean 3D cluster density and mass profiles in bins of both optical richness and cluster i-band luminosity. Since the mean cluster density profile is proportional to the cluster-mass correlation function, the mean profile is spherically symmetric by the assumptions of large-scale homogeneity and isotropy. We correct the inferred 3D profiles for systematic effects, including non-linear shear and the fact that cluster halos are not all precisely centered on their brightest galaxies. We also model the measured cluster shear profile as a sum of contributions from the brightest central galaxy, the cluster dark matter halo, and neighboring halos. We infer the relations between mean cluster virial mass and optical richness and luminosity over two orders of magnitude in cluster mass; the virial mass at fixed richness or luminosity is determined with a precision of {approx} 13% including both statistical and systematic errors. We also constrain the halo concentration parameter and halo bias as a function of cluster mass; both are in good agreement with predictions from N-body simulations of LCDM models. The methods employed here will be applicable to deeper, wide-area optical surveys that aim to constrain the nature of the dark energy, such as the Dark Energy Survey, the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope and space-based surveys.

  20. A long-term study on the deletion criterion of questionable electron density profiles caused by ionospheric irregularities - COSMIC radio occultation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, G.; Brahmanandam, P. S.; Chu, Y. H.

    2016-06-01

    The crucial assumption made in the retrieval of radio-occultated atmospheric parameters is the spherical symmetry of the atmospheric refractive index, which implies that no horizontal gradient of the refractive index exists along the spherical shell. Nevertheless, the presence of density irregularities will lead to scintillation and multipath effects that often create highly fluctuating and random electron density profiles. In this study, it is proposed a reliable data quality control (QC) approach to remove questionable electron density profiles (due to the presence of ionospheric irregularities) retrieved using the COSMIC radio occultation (RO) technique based on two parameters, namely, the gradient and fluctuation of the topside density profile. Statistics of seven years density profiles (July 2006-May 2013) are presented by determining the aforementioned parameters for every density profile. The main advantage of this data QC is that it uses COSMIC RO electron density profiles retrieved from the slant total electron content (TEC) that is estimated from the excess phases of the GPS L1 and L2 frequencies only to delete the questionable profiles, instead of relying on any model and other observations. A systematic criterion has been developed based on the statistics to relinquish the so-called questionable density profiles. The computed gradients and fluctuations of the topside ionosphere electron density profiles have shown a few important features including, solar activity dependency and pronounced variations in between around +40° and -40° latitudes. After the removal of questionable profiles, both peak densities and heights of the ionosphere F layer are presented globally in different seasons of years during 2007 and 2012 that revealed several important features.

  1. The large-scale correlations of multicell densities and profiles: implications for cosmic variance estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codis, Sandrine; Bernardeau, Francis; Pichon, Christophe

    2016-08-01

    In order to quantify the error budget in the measured probability distribution functions of cell densities, the two-point statistics of cosmic densities in concentric spheres is investigated. Bias functions are introduced as the ratio of their two-point correlation function to the two-point correlation of the underlying dark matter distribution. They describe how cell densities are spatially correlated. They are computed here via the so-called large deviation principle in the quasi-linear regime. Their large-separation limit is presented and successfully compared to simulations for density and density slopes: this regime is shown to be rapidly reached allowing to get sub-percent precision for a wide range of densities and variances. The corresponding asymptotic limit provides an estimate of the cosmic variance of standard concentric cell statistics applied to finite surveys. More generally, no assumption on the separation is required for some specific moments of the two-point statistics, for instance when predicting the generating function of cumulants containing any powers of concentric densities in one location and one power of density at some arbitrary distance from the rest. This exact `one external leg' cumulant generating function is used in particular to probe the rate of convergence of the large-separation approximation.

  2. Competitions between Rayleigh-Taylor instability and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability with continuous density and velocity profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, competitions between Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) and Kelvin-Helmholtz instability (KHI) in two-dimensional incompressible fluids within a linear growth regime are investigated analytically. Normalized linear growth rate formulas for both the RTI, suitable for arbitrary density ratio with continuous density profile, and the KHI, suitable for arbitrary density ratio with continuous density and velocity profiles, are obtained. The linear growth rates of pure RTI (γRT), pure KHI (γKH), and combined RTI and KHI (γtotal) are investigated, respectively. In the pure RTI, it is found that the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer (Lρ) reduces the linear growth of the RTI (stabilizes the RTI). In the pure KHI, it is found that conversely, the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer increases the linear growth of the KHI (destabilizes the KHI). It is found that the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer decreases the ''effective'' or ''local'' Atwood number (A) for both the RTI and the KHI. However, based on the properties of γRT∝√(A) and γKH∝√(1-A2), the effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer therefore has a completely opposite role on the RTI and the KHI noted above. In addition, it is found that the effect of the finite thickness of the velocity shear layer (Lu) stabilizes the KHI, and for the most cases, the combined effects of the finite thickness of the density transition layer and the velocity shear layer (Lρ=Lu) also stabilize the KHI. Regarding the combined RTI and KHI, it is found that there is a competition between the RTI and the KHI because of the completely opposite effect of the finite thickness of the density transition layer on these two kinds of instability. It is found that the competitions between the RTI and the KHI depend, respectively, on the Froude number, the density ratio of the light fluid to the heavy one, and the

  3. Broadening of the Spectral Atomic Lines Analysis in High Density Argon Corona Plasma by Using Voigt Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nur, M.; Bonifaci, N.; Denat, A.; Atrazhev, V. M.

    2015-06-01

    Studies of spectrum emission from high density argon plasma corona has been done. The analysis of the boardening of spectral atomic lines of Ar-I profile has been curried out by using an empirical approximation based on a Voigt profile. Full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the spectral-lines of 763.5 nm has been determined from atmospheric pressure until liquid state. The study liquid argon was curried out in a variation of temperature from K to 151.2 K and hydrostatics pressure from 2.1 MPa to 6.4 MPa. These pressure gives the densities N∞ (i.e. density very far from ionization zone) a variation from 1.08 1022 to 2.11 1022 cm-3. FWHM of Voigt approximation (Wv) of the line 763,5 nm of 'Ar I for: the emission lamp very low pressure (Wv = 0,160 nm) and our corona discharge at a pressure of MPa (Wv = 0,67 nm) and at a pressure of 9,5 MPa (Wv = 1,16 nm). In gas, corona plasma has been generated from 0.1 MPa to 9.5 MPa. We found that the broadening spectral line increase by increasing densities both for. the spectral-lines of 763.5 nm and 696.5 nm. We concluded that broadening of spectrum cause of Van der Waals force.

  4. Edge electron density profiles and fluctuations measured by two-dimensional beam emission spectroscopy in the KSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Y. U., E-mail: yunam@nfri.re.kr; Wi, H. M. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Zoletnik, S.; Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics, Budapest (Hungary); Kovácsik, Ákos [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest Technical University, Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-11-15

    Beam emission spectroscopy (BES) system in Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) has recently been upgraded. The background intensity was reduced from 30% to 2% by suppressing the stray lights. This allows acquisition of the relative electron density profiles on the plasma edge without background subtraction from the beam power modulation signals. The KSTAR BES system has its spatial resolution of 1 cm, the temporal resolution of 2 MHz, and a total 32 channel (8 radial × 4 poloidal) avalanche photo diode array. Most measurements were done on the plasma edge, r/a ∼ 0.9, with 8 cm radial measurement width that covers the pedestal range. High speed density profile measurements reveal temporal behaviors of fast transient events, such as the precursors of edge localized modes and the transitions between confinement modes. Low background level also allows analysis of the edge density fluctuation patterns with reduced background fluctuations. Propagation of the density structures can be investigated by comparing the phase delays between the spatially distributed channels.

  5. Determination of 2-dimensional temperature and density profiles of a plasma in the Auburn torsatron via computer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early studies of the magnetic surfaces of the Auburn Torsatron indicated the presence of an X-point in the magnetic surfaces. Both theoretical calculations and experimental verification were performed in these studies. The plasma density distribution is believed to be determined by these magnetic surfaces. The 2-dimensional relative plasma density and electron temperature profiles over a cross-section of the plasma will verify that the X-point does have an influence on the distribution of the plasma. An electric double probe is used to measure the electron temperature and relative density at pre-defined points inside the plasma. The probe is on a moveable platform which is motor driven and positioned by a computer

  6. Equilibrium studies of skin-like pressure and current-density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the last few years considerable attention has been devoted to the study of turbulent heating as a heating method for large plasma volumes. In TORTUR - and other related experiments - the application of a heating pulse leads to anomalous heating without macroscopic plasma deformation. Immediately after the heating pulse is applied, the discharge is usually characterized by hollow pressure and current profiles that at the end of the pulse have filled up and have evolved into normal tokamak-like parabolic profiles. Since the plasma properties are such that, even on the μs timescale, MHD equilibrium can be established, we investigated the properties of a class of MHD equilibria that give rise to such characteristic pressure and current profiles. For this investigation a computer code for toroidal ideal MHD equilibria was rewritten and improved. The improvement of the code consists in employing a Moebius transformation, which maps the plane of the cross-section onto a plane in which the magnetic axis coincides with the origin of the coordinate system. This results in a code that can easily handle concave pressure and current profiles. The profiles obtained by means of this code show good agreement with the experimentally measured ones. The use of the mapping has resulted in a code with an improvement of convergence for high-beta cases

  7. Retrieval of effective leaf area index (LAIe) and leaf area density (LAD) profile at individual tree level using high density multi-return airborne LiDAR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi; West, Geoff

    2016-08-01

    As an important canopy structure indicator, leaf area index (LAI) proved to be of considerable implications for forest ecosystem and ecological studies, and efficient techniques for accurate LAI acquisitions have long been highlighted. Airborne light detection and ranging (LiDAR), often termed as airborne laser scanning (ALS), once was extensively investigated for this task but showed limited performance due to its low sampling density. Now, ALS systems exhibit more competing capacities such as high density and multi-return sampling, and hence, people began to ask the questions like-"can ALS now work better on the task of LAI prediction?" As a re-examination, this study investigated the feasibility of LAI retrievals at the individual tree level based on high density and multi-return ALS, by directly considering the vertical distributions of laser points lying within each tree crown instead of by proposing feature variables such as quantiles involving laser point distribution modes at the plot level. The examination was operated in the case of four tree species (i.e. Picea abies, Pinus sylvestris, Populus tremula and Quercus robur) in a mixed forest, with their LAI-related reference data collected by using static terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). In light of the differences between ALS- and TLS-based LAI characterizations, the methods of voxelization of 3D scattered laser points, effective LAI (LAIe) that does not distinguish branches from canopies and unified cumulative LAI (ucLAI) that is often used to characterize the vertical profiles of crown leaf area densities (LADs) was used; then, the relationships between the ALS- and TLS-derived LAIes were determined, and so did ucLAIs. Tests indicated that the tree-level LAIes for the four tree species can be estimated based on the used airborne LiDAR (R2 = 0.07, 0.26, 0.43 and 0.21, respectively) and their ucLAIs can also be derived. Overall, this study has validated the usage of the contemporary high density multi

  8. Particle acceleration at oblique shocks and discontinuities of the density profile

    OpenAIRE

    Gieseler, U. D. J.; Kirk, J. G.; Gallant, Y.A.; Achterberg, A.

    1999-01-01

    In the theory of diffusive acceleration at oblique shock fronts the question of the existence of a discontinuity of energetic particle density is contentious. The resolution of this problem is interesting from a theoretical point of view, and potentially for the interpretation of observations of particle densities at heliospheric shocks and of high-resolution radio observations of the rims of supernova remnants. It can be shown analytically that an isotropic particle distribution at a shock f...

  9. Electron density profiles in the quiet lower ionosphere based on the results of modeling and experimental data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Barabash

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical PGI (Polar Geophysical Institute model for the quiet lower ionosphere has been applied for computing the ionization rate and electron density profiles in the summer and winter D-region at solar zenith angles less than 80° and larger than 99° under steady state conditions. In order to minimize possible errors in estimation of ionization rates provided by solar electromagnetic radiation and to obtain the most exact values of electron density, each wavelength range of the solar spectrum has been divided into several intervals and the relations between the solar radiation intensity at these wavelengths and the solar activity index F10.7 have been incorporated into the model. Influence of minor neutral species (NO, H2O, O, O3 concentrations on the electron number density at different altitudes of the sunlit quiet D-region has been examined. The results demonstrate that at altitudes above 70 km, the modeled electron density is most sensitive to variations of nitric oxide concentration. Changes of water vapor concentration in the whole altitude range of the mesosphere influence the electron density only in the narrow height interval 73–85 km. The effect of the change of atomic oxygen and ozone concentration is the least significant and takes place only below 70 km.

    Model responses to changes of the solar zenith angle, solar activity (low–high and season (summer–winter have been considered. Modeled electron density profiles have been evaluated by comparison with experimental profiles available from the rocket measurements for the same conditions. It is demonstrated that the theoretical model for the quiet lower ionosphere is quite effective in describing variations in ionization rate, electron number density and effective recombination coefficient as functions of solar zenith angle, solar activity and season. The model may be used for solving inverse tasks, in particular, for

  10. Evaluation of hydrogen atom density in the plasma core region based on the Balmer-α line profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, M.; Sawada, K.; Fujii, K.; Hasuo, M.; Morita, S.

    2011-02-01

    The Balmer-α line profile is measured with high wavelength resolution for a discharge in the Large Helical Device. The line profile is regarded as a superposition of continuously varying Doppler broadened components and is expressed as the Laplace transform. Numerical Laplace inversion of the measured line profile gives the distribution function of line emissivity in terms of atom temperature. The temperature dependence of the line emissivity is interpreted as spatial dependence so that the ionization rate and atom density of neutral hydrogen are determined. The temperature range of the detected atoms extends beyond 2 keV which corresponds to a penetration depth of about 1 m in the plasma, or the location at ρ ~ 0.3, where ρ is the normalized minor radius. The atom density of approximately 1013 m-3 is derived in the plasma core region which is more than four orders smaller than that at the plasma boundary. Calculation of neutral transport with a Monte-Carlo simulation code gives satisfactory consistency with the experimental results.

  11. Evaluation of hydrogen atom density in the plasma core region based on the Balmer-α line profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Balmer-α line profile is measured with high wavelength resolution for a discharge in the Large Helical Device. The line profile is regarded as a superposition of continuously varying Doppler broadened components and is expressed as the Laplace transform. Numerical Laplace inversion of the measured line profile gives the distribution function of line emissivity in terms of atom temperature. The temperature dependence of the line emissivity is interpreted as spatial dependence so that the ionization rate and atom density of neutral hydrogen are determined. The temperature range of the detected atoms extends beyond 2 keV which corresponds to a penetration depth of about 1 m in the plasma, or the location at ρ ∼ 0.3, where ρ is the normalized minor radius. The atom density of approximately 1013 m-3 is derived in the plasma core region which is more than four orders smaller than that at the plasma boundary. Calculation of neutral transport with a Monte-Carlo simulation code gives satisfactory consistency with the experimental results.

  12. The variation of rotation curve shapes as a signature of the effects of baryons on dark matter density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook, Chris B.

    2015-12-01

    Rotation curves of galaxies show a wide range of shapes, which can be paramaterized as scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax , i.e. the ratio of the rotation velocity measured at 1 kpc and the maximum measured rotation velocity. We examine whether the observed scatter can be accounted for by combining scatters in disc scalelengths, the concentration-halo mass relation, and the M⋆-Mhalo relation. We use these scatters to create model galaxy populations; when housed within dark matter haloes that have universal, Navarro, Frenk & White density profiles, the model does not match the lowest observed values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and has too little scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax compared to observations. By contrast, a model using a mass-dependent dark matter profile, where the inner slope is determined by the ratio of M⋆/Mhalo, produces galaxies with low values of Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax and a much larger scatter, both in agreement with observation. We conclude that the large observed scatter in Vrot(1 kpc)/Vmax favours density profiles that are significantly affected by baryonic processes. Alternative dark matter core formation models such as self-interacting dark matter may also account for the observed variation in rotation curve shapes, but these observations may provide important constraints in terms of core sizes, and whether they vary with halo mass and/or merger history.

  13. The Variation of Rotation Curve Shapes as a Signature of the Effects of Baryons on Dark Matter Density Profiles

    CERN Document Server

    Brook, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Rotation curves of galaxies show a wide range of shapes, which can be paramaterized as scatter in Vrot(1kpc)/Vmax i.e.the ratio of the rotation velocity measured at 1kpc and the maximum measured rotation velocity. We examine whether the observed scatter can be accounted for by combining scatters in disc scale-lengths, the concentration-halo mass relation, and the Mstar-Mhalo relation. We use these scatters to create model galaxy populations; when housed within dark matter halos that have universal, NFW density profiles, the model does not match the lowest observed values of Vrot(1kpc)/Vmax and has too little scatter in Vrot(1kpc)/Vmax compared to observations. By contrast, a model using a mass dependant dark matter profile, where the inner slope is determined by the ratio of Mstar/Mhalo, produces galaxies with low values of Vrot(1kpc)/Vmax and a much larger scatter, both in agreement with observation. We conclude that the large observed scatter in Vrot(1kpc)/Vmax favours density profiles that are significantl...

  14. In depth fusion flame spreading with a deuterium-tritium plane fuel density profile for plasma block ignition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    B.Malekynia; S.S.Razavipour

    2012-01-01

    Solid-state fuel ignition was given by Chu and Bobin according to the hydrodynamic theory at x =0 qualitatively.A high threshold energy flux density,i.e.,E* =4.3 x 1012 J/m2,has been reached.Recently,fast ignition by employing clean petawatt-picosecond laser pulses was performed.The anomalous phenomena were observed to be based on suppression of prepulses.The accelerated plasma block was used to ignite deuterium-tritium fuel at solid-state density.The detailed analysis of the thermonuclear wave propagation was investigated.Also the fusion conditions at x ≠ 0 layers were clarified by exactly solving hydrodynamic equations for plasma block ignition.In this paper,the applied physical mechanisms are determined for nonlinear force laser driven plasma blocks,thermonuclear reaction,heat transfer,electron-ion equilibration,stopping power of alpha particles,bremsstrahlung,expansion,density dependence,and fluid dynamics.New ignition conditions may be obtained by using temperature equations,including thc dcnsity profile that is obtained by the continuity equation and expansion velocity.The density is only a function of x and independent of time.The ignition energy flux density,E*t,for the x ≠ 0 layers is 1.95 × 1012 J/m2.Thus threshold ignition energy in comparison with that at x =0 layers would be reduced to less than 50 percent.

  15. RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN ANATOMICAL FEATURES AND INTRA-RING WOOD DENSITY PROFILES IN Gmelina arborea APPLYING X-RAY DENSITOMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tomazelo-Filho

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Four annual tree-rings (2 of juvenile wood and 2 of mature wood were sampled from fast-growth plantations ofGmelina arborea in two climatic conditions (dry and wet tropical in Costa Rica. Each annual tree-ring was divided in equal parts ina radial direction. For each part, X-ray density as well as vessel percentage, length and width fiber, cell wall thickness and lumendiameter were measured. Wood density and profile patterns of cell dimension demonstrated inconsistency between juvenile andmature wood and climatic conditions. The Pearson correlation matrix showed that intra-ring wood density was positively correlatedwith the cell wall thickness and negatively correlated with vessel percentage, fiber length, lumen diameter and width. The forwardstepwise regressions determined that: (i intra-ring wood density variation could be predicted from 76 to 96% for anatomicalvariation; (ii cell wall thickness was the most important anatomical feature to produce intra-ring wood density variation and (iii thevessel percentage, fiber length, lumen diameter and width were the second most statically significant characteristics to intra-ring wooddensity, however, with low participation of the determination coefficient of stepwise regressions.

  16. SPECTRUM - a computer algorithm to derive the flux-energy spectrum of precipitating particles from EISCAT electron density profiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three major improvements are included. First the new algorithm includes the time rate of change of ionisation. This can be measured on a time scale of a few seconds with the EISCAT radar during auroral precipitation. Second, the fixed energies of the incident electron beams assumed in the UNTANGLE program are replaced by energies which are calculated according to the altitudes at which measurements are made. Thus the energy resolution and energy interval included in the derived spectra are determined in a physically reasonable way by the altitude resolution and the altitude interval of the electron density measurements. Third, the equations relating the incident fluxes at each energy to the electron density at each altitude are written in matrix form which allows them to be solved using standard numerical algorithms. A possibility to fit proton fluxes rather than electron fluxes is also included. A companion program (PROFILE) which calculates ionisation rate or equilibrium electron density profiles for user-defined monoenergetic or Maxwellian particle precipitation has also been developed. (author)

  17. Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Instrumentation for Rapid Aerial Photo System

    CERN Document Server

    Adiprawita, Widyawardana; Semibiring, Jaka

    2008-01-01

    This research will proposed a new kind of relatively low cost autonomous UAV that will enable farmers to make just in time mosaics of aerial photo of their crop. These mosaics of aerial photo should be able to be produced with relatively low cost and within the 24 hours of acquisition constraint. The autonomous UAV will be equipped with payload management system specifically developed for rapid aerial mapping. As mentioned before turn around time is the key factor, so accuracy is not the main focus (not orthorectified aerial mapping). This system will also be equipped with special software to post process the aerial photos to produce the mosaic aerial photo map

  18. Sub-aerial tailings deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sub-aerial technique involves the systematic deposition of tailings in thin layers and allowing each layer to settle, drain and partially air dry prior to covering with a further layer. Underdrainage produces densities in excess of those achieved by sub-aqueous deposition and any air-drying serves to preconsolidate each layer with a resulting further increase in density. The low permeability of the tailings surface resulting from this deposition technique results in high runoff coefficients and, by decanting the runoff component of direct precipitation, a net evaporation condition can be achieved even in high rainfall areas. An underdrainage system prevents the build-up of excess pore-pressures within the tailings mass and at decommissioning the tailings are fully consolidated and drained thereby eliminating the possibility of any long term seepage. This paper presents a general description of these design concepts, and details of two projects where the concepts have been applied

  19. Quality Control Usage in High-Density Microarrays Reveals Differential Gene Expression Profiles in Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas-Ruiz, Vanessa; Moreno, Jose; Jacome-Lopez, Karina; Zentella-Dehesa, Alejandro; Juarez-Mendez, Sergio

    2016-01-01

    There are several existing reports of microarray chip use for assessment of altered gene expression in different diseases. In fact, there have been over 1.5 million assays of this kind performed over the last twenty years, which have influenced clinical and translational research studies. The most commonly used DNA microarray platforms are Affymetrix GeneChip and Quality Control Software along with their GeneChip Probe Arrays. These chips are created using several quality controls to confirm the success of each assay, but their actual impact on gene expression profiles had not been previously analyzed until the appearance of several bioinformatics tools for this purpose. We here performed a data mining analysis, in this case specifically focused on ovarian cancer, as well as healthy ovarian tissue and ovarian cell lines, in order to confirm quality control results and associated variation in gene expression profiles. The microarray data used in our research were downloaded from ArrayExpress and Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and analyzed with Expression Console Software using RMA, MAS5 and Plier algorithms. The gene expression profiles were obtained using Partek Genomics Suite v6.6 and data were visualized using principal component analysis, heat map, and Venn diagrams. Microarray quality control analysis showed that roughly 40% of the microarray files were false negative, demonstrating over- and under-estimation of expressed genes. Additionally, we confirmed the results performing second analysis using independent samples. About 70% of the significant expressed genes were correlated in both analyses. These results demonstrate the importance of appropriate microarray processing to obtain a reliable gene expression profile. PMID:27268623

  20. Update of the Venus density and temperature profiles at high altitude measured by SOIR on board Venus Express

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieux, A.; Vandaele, A. C.; Bougher, S. W.; Drummond, R.; Robert, S.; Wilquet, V.; Chamberlain, S.; Piccialli, A.; Montmessin, F.; Tellmann, S.; Pätzold, M.; Häusler, B.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    The SOIR instrument on board Venus Express regularly sounds the Venus atmosphere using the solar occultation technique. The density and temperature profiles are inferred from SOIR spectra recorded in the infrared. The method has been described in a previous publication (Mahieux et al., 2012. J. Geophys. Res. 117. doi:10.1029/2012JE004058.). This paper is devoted to the update of the VAST (Venus Atmosphere from SOIR measurements at the Terminator) compilation that was initiated in the above cited work, which gives the mean CO2 number density and temperature profiles for different latitude bins. The method has been improved and has been applied to more data. The new compilation which is given on the same latitudinal grid now distinguishes between the two sides of the terminator. The compilation also confirms the main thermal layering characteristics that were identified in the earlier version: the succession of a warm layer (230±30 K, 1-σ standard deviation) at a pressure level of 3.2×10-7 mbar (~140 km), a very cold layer (125±32 K) at 2.5×10-5 mbar (~123 km), a warm layer (204±17 K) at 0.01 mbar (~102 km) and finally a colder layer at 0.4 mbar (171±34 K, ~87 km). The layering of all the temperature profiles is explained by radiative rather than dynamical processes. The temporal temperature variation is larger than the mean latitudinal temperature variation. VAST is compared with temperature profiles obtained from other Venus Express instruments, VeRa and SPICAV-UV, and ground based measurements.

  1. Space charge profiles in low density polyethylene samples containing a permittivity/conductivity gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bambery, K.R.; Fleming, R.J.; Holbøll, Joachim

    2001-01-01

    Laser induced pressure pulse space charge measurements were made on 1.5 mm thick plaques of high purity low density polyethylene equipped with vacuum-evaporated aluminium electrodes. Temperature differences up to 20 °C were maintained across the samples, which were subjected to dc fields up to 1...

  2. A UNIVERSAL POWER-LAW PROFILE OF PSEUDO-PHASE-SPACE DENSITY-LIKE QUANTITIES IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Kyu-Hyun, E-mail: chae@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-10

    We study profiles of mass density, velocity dispersion (VD), and a combination of both using ∼2000 nearly spherical and rotation-free Sloan Digital Sky Survey galaxies. For observational stellar mass density ρ{sub *}(r), we consider a range of dark matter (DM) distribution ρ{sub DM}(r) and VD anisotropy β(r) to investigate radial stellar VD σ{sub *r}(r) using the spherical Jeans equation. While mass and VD profiles vary appreciably depending on DM distribution and anisotropy, the pseudo-phase-space density-like combination ρ(r)/σ{sub ⋆r}{sup 3}(r) with total density ρ(r) = ρ{sub *}(r) + ρ{sub DM}(r) is nearly universal. In the optical region, the negative logarithmic slope has a mean value of (χ) ≈ 1.86-1.90 with a galaxy-to-galaxy rms scatter of ≈0.04-0.06, which is a few times smaller than that of ρ(r) profiles. The scatter of χ can be increased by invoking wildly varying anisotropies that are, however, less likely because they would produce too large a scatter of line of sight VD profiles. As an independent check of this universality, we analyze stellar orbit-based dynamical models of 15 early-type galaxies (ETGs) of the Coma cluster provided by J. Thomas. Coma ETGs, with σ{sub *r}(r) replaced by the rms velocity of stars v {sub *rms}(r) including net rotation, exhibit a similar universality with a slope of χ = 1.93 ± 0.06. Remarkably, the inferred values of χ for ETGs match well the slope ≈1.9 predicted by N-body simulations of DM halos. We argue that the inferred universal nature of ρ(r)/σ{sub ⋆r}{sup 3}(r) cannot be fully explained by equilibrium alone, implying that some astrophysical factors conspire and/or it reflects a fundamental principle in collisionless formation processes.

  3. Electron density profile at the interfaces of bulk heterojunction solar cells and its implication on the S-kink characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusain, Abhay; Singh, Surendra; Chauhan, A. K.; Saxena, Vibha; Jha, P.; Veerender, P.; Singh, Ajay; Varde, P. V.; Basu, Saibal; Aswal, D. K.; Gupta, S. K.

    2016-02-01

    The efficiency of a bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cell critically depends upon quality of its interfaces. The imperfect interfaces can lead to S-kink in the current-voltage characteristics that reduce the efficiency of BHJ solar cells. In this letter, using PCDTBT:PCBM based BHJ solar cells, we demonstrate that non-destructive X-ray reflectivity is powerful technique to estimate the electron density profile across the BHJ solar cells. A direct correlation is observed between the enhanced electron density at PEDOT:PSS/PCDTBT:PCBM interface and appearance of S-kink in J-V characteristics, which is also supported by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Kelvin probe measurements.

  4. ELM Suppression through density profile modification with lithium wall coatings in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduction or elimination of edge localized modes (ELMs) while maintaining high confinement is essential for future fusion devices, e.g. the ITER. An ELM-free regime was recently obtained in the National Spherical Torus Experiment, following lithium (li) evaporation onto the plasma facing components. Edge stability calculations indicate that the pre-li discharges were unstable to low-n peeling/ballooning modes, while broader pressure profiles stabilized the post-li discharges. Normalized energy confinement increased by 50% post-li, with no sign of ELMs up to the global stability limit

  5. Core and Wing Densities of Asymmetric Coronal Spectral Profiles: Implications for the Mass Supply of the Solar Corona

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsourakos, S.; Klimchuk, J. A.; Young, P. R.

    2014-01-01

    Recent solar spectroscopic observations have shown that coronal spectral lines can exhibit asymmetric profiles, with enhanced emissions at their blue wings. These asymmetries correspond to rapidly upflowing plasmas at speeds exceeding approximately equal to 50 km per sec. Here, we perform a study of the density of the rapidly upflowing material and compare it with that of the line core that corresponds to the bulk of the plasma. For this task, we use spectroscopic observations of several active regions taken by the Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer of the Hinode mission. The density sensitive ratio of the Fe(sub XIV) lines at 264.78 and 274.20 Angstroms is used to determine wing and core densities.We compute the ratio of the blue wing density to the core density and find that most values are of order unity. This is consistent with the predictions for coronal nanoflares if most of the observed coronal mass is supplied by chromospheric evaporation driven by the nanoflares. However, much larger blue wing-to-core density ratios are predicted if most of the coronal mass is supplied by heated material ejected with type II spicules. Our measurements do not rule out a spicule origin for the blue wing emission, but they argue against spicules being a primary source of the hot plasma in the corona. We note that only about 40% of the pixels where line blends could be safely ignored have blue wing asymmetries in both Fe(sub XIV) lines. Anticipated sub-arcsecond spatial resolution spectroscopic observations in future missions could shed more light on the origin of blue, red, and mixed asymmetries.

  6. Induced change of critical current density profile in Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb Josephson junctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to induce spatial modulation of critical current density in niobium based Josephson devices by using a selective thermal annealing is reported. By depositing a carbon film onto selected region of the Josephson element it is possible to induce a localized heating, with a spatial resolution less than 1 μm, exploiting the much higher absorbance coefficient of carbon than the niobium one. The effectiveness of such technique is demonstrated by experimental measurement of the critical current vs. magnetic field, measured at T = 4.2 K, showing that the change of critical current density occurs only in the region corresponding to the absorber film area. Furthermore, the theoretical behaviour, by modelling a suitable step-like junction barrier shape, has been carried out to fit the experimental data in order to verify the selective modulation of critical current. This technique can be very useful in view of quantum computing experiments, Majorana fermions detection and superconducting magnetic sensors.

  7. A method for evaluating models that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the density profiles

    OpenAIRE

    de Almeida, Álefe O. F.; Piattella, Oliver F.(Departamento de Física, UFES, Vitória, ES, Brazil); Rodrigues, Davi C.

    2016-01-01

    There are some approaches, either based on General Relativity (GR) or modified gravity, that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the matter density of the corresponding galaxy, and this procedure would either indicate a partial or a complete elimination of dark matter in galaxies. Here we review these approaches, clarify the difficulties on this inverted procedure, present a method for evaluating them, and use it to test two specific approaches that are based on GR: the Cooperstock-Tieu (CT)...

  8. Relationship between habitat, densities and metabolic profile in brown hares (Lepus europaeus Pallas)

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Bagliacca; Marco Ferretti; Antonio Lavazza; Gisella Paci

    2010-01-01

    Some habitat traits and haematic parameters were studied to understand the relationships between the hare densities, habitat characteristics and physiological and nutritional condition of the animals. A total of 33 protected areas, reserved for wild game reproduction, located in the Province of Florence (Central Italy), were monitored during a 2-year period. In each protected area the hares were submitted to census. The habitat features of the protected areas were studied and the following pa...

  9. Correlation of scanning-tunneling-microscope image profiles and charge-density-wave amplitudes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scanning-tunneling-microscope (STM) studies of 4Hb-TaS2 and 4Hb-TaSe2 at 4.2 K show systematic correlation between the charge-density-wave (CDW) amplitude and the STM deflection. The 4Hb phases have both weak and strong CDW's in the trigonal prismatic and octahedral sandwiches, respectively. Scans on opposite faces of the same cleave allow a comparison of the STM response to the two types of CDW

  10. Citrus reticulata’s Peels Modulate Blood Cholesterol Profile and IncreaseBone Density of Ovariectomized Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Adelina

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hormon Replacement Therapy is a common therapy for estrogen deficiency but in other side it will increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Another alternative therapy which relatively more safe is using phytoestrogen. The Citrus reticulata’s peel contain flavanone and polimethoxyflavone which are suspected to give estrogenic effect, therefore it is potential to be used as phytoestrogen.The purpose of this study was to examine the estrogenic effect of Citrus reticulata’s peel extract in modulation of bone density and blood cholesterol profile of ovariectomized rats (OVX, an animal model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Thirty six 7-weeks-old female Sprague Dawley rats were assigned to six groups: a SO group, an OVX group, an OVX+CMCNa group, an OVX+extract dose 500 mg/kgBW group, an OVX+extract dose 1000 mg/kgBW group, and an OVX+estradiol group. After 7 weeks, the rats were killed then blood and femoral were collected immediately. The rontgenogram indicated that extract and estradiol administration increase the bone density. And the data analysis with Oneway ANOVA test ,followed by Shceffé test (P 0.05 showed that extract can improve blood cholesterol profile in dose depend manner. These results suggest a possible role of Citrus reticulata’s peel extract as women’s health agent because of its beneficial effects on bone and lipids.

  11. Aerial radiation survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aerial gamma spectrometry surveys are the most effective, comprehensive and preferred tool to delimit the large area surface contamination in a radiological emergency either due to a nuclear accident or following a nuclear strike. The airborne survey apart from providing rapid and economical evaluation of ground contamination over large areas due to larger ground clearance and higher speed, is the only technique to overcome difficulties posed by ground surveys of inaccessible region. The aerial survey technique can also be used for searching of lost radioactive sources, tracking of radioactive plume and generation of background data on the Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) of nuclear installations

  12. Self-consistent electron density profiles in short pulse, 1.054 μm laser-heated plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter uses a one-dimensional Eulerian fluid code to calculate the influence of radiation pressure for the case of a short (picosecond) neodymium laser pulse obliquely incident onto a planar target. Topics covered include hydrodynamics, electrodynamics, and ionization. In the short pulse regime, where the amount of plasma expansion during the period of substantial heating is small compared to the plasma diameter, the one-dimensional time-dependent magneto-hydrodynamic equations effectively describe the heating and expansion processes of the plasma corona. Predictions are made for the behavior of plasma dynamics by solving the quasi-stationary equation for the laser electric field, thus showing the difference between p- and s-polarized light at oblique incidence. Substantial density profile modification (profile steepening) is shown to occur even at intensities as low as 1013 W/cm2 in the case of p-polarization. Plasma parameters such as temperature, reflectivity and profile modification are shown to agree with experimental data. An equation for an electromagnetic wave propagating in an inhomogeneous plasma is derived in the appendix

  13. Measurements of Electron Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2013-10-01

    Knowing spatial profiles of electron density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (n Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) was deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. Plasmas were produced from flat CH targets illuminated by Nike KrF laser with total energies up to 1 kJ of 0.5 ~ 1 nsec FWHM pulses. The GIR resolved ne up to 3 ×1021 /cm3 in space taking 2D snapshot images of probe laser (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. The individual beamlet transmittances were also measured for Te estimation. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera simultaneously detected light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay instabilities. The measured spatial profiles are compared with simulation results from the FAST3D radiation hydrocode and their effects on the LPI observations are investigated. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and performed at Naval Research Laboratory.

  14. Field amplification, vortex formation, and electron acceleration in a plasma protoshock: effect of asymmetric density profile

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, Gareth C; Drury, Luke O'C

    2011-01-01

    Gamma ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to originate from highly relativistic jets. The fireball model predicts internal shocks in the jets, causing magnetic field to be amplified and particles to be accelerated. We model the effects of an asymmetric density configuration for an internal plasma collision in a quasi-parallel magnetic field. We measured electron acceleration and found that a tenuous population of electrons is accelerated to Lorentz factors of \\sim 300 - close to energy equipartition with ions. We found that the filaments did not remain static, but were deflected by the Lorentz force and rolled up into small vortices, which themselves merge to form a larger current vortex.

  15. Theory for the asymmetry in the auroral ionization density profile for the generation of auroral infrasonic waves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traveling pressure waves with periods from 10 to 100 seconds are generated in the lower ionosphere by auroral electrojet current filaments as they move supersonically in an equatorward direction. The infrasonic waves produced by the auroral motions propagate to the ground as highly directional bow waves that can be detected by infrasonic microphones on the surface. There is an asymmetry in the reception of auroral infrasonic waves (AIW) with respect to whether the auroral arcs are moving equatorward to poleward. In the literature it is suggested that the asymmetry may be due to anisotropic propagation conditions along the acoustic ray path from the E-region, where AIW are produced, to the surface. Some intrinsic property of the AIW generation mechanism itself has also been suggested as a possible explanation. In this thesis anisotropic propagation is eliminated as the cause of the AIW reception asymmetry. Theoretical calculations, beginning with a model of an auroral precipitation region, are presented to show that there can be a significant difference in the transverse ionization density profiles between an auroral arc that is moving equatorward and an arc that is moving poleward, for a given equatorward-directed E-region ambient electric field. The calculation has been accomplished by solving the equations of motion and continuity for the cross-sectional ionization density profile associated with the transverse motion of a filamentary auroral electrojet. Thus, it is shown that there is an asymmetry in the ionization profiles associated with moving arcs, and in their coupling, that is related to the relative direction of motion of the arc with respect to the ambient electric field, and that it is this asymmetry that is probably the cause of the observed AIW reception asymmetry

  16. Density profile peaking in JET H-mode plasmas: experiments versus linear gyrokinetic predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As an independent complement to previous studies (Weisen et al 2005 Nucl. Fusion 45 L1-4, Weisen et al 2006 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 48 A457-66, Angioni et al 2007 Nucl. Fusion 47 1326-35), density peaking in the JET tokamak was investigated on the dataset, comprising virtually all H-mode experiments performed in 2006-2007. Unlike previous studies, this work focuses on low collisionality data as most representative of reactor conditions. The study confirms that collisionality is the most important parameter governing density peaking in H-mode, followed by the NBI particle flux and/or the Ti/Te temperature ratio. For the first time in JET a modest, albeit significant dependence of peaking on internal inductance, or magnetic shear is seen. The experimental behaviour is compared with an extensive database of linear gyrokinetic calculations using the GS2 code. The predictions from GS2 simulations based on the highest linear growth rate mode are in good agreement with experimental observations. They are also corroborated by initial results from the non-linear code GYRO.

  17. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100–120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3 × 109 cm s−1, depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  18. Spatial profiles of electron and metastable atom densities in positive polarity fast ionization waves sustained in helium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherford, Brandon R.; Xiong, Zhongmin; Barnat, E. V.; Kushner, Mark J.

    2014-09-01

    Fast ionization waves (FIWs), often generated with high voltage pulses over nanosecond timescales, are able to produce large volumes of ions and excited states at moderate pressures. The mechanisms of FIW propagation were experimentally and computationally investigated to provide insights into the manner in which these large volumes are excited. The two-dimensional structure of electron and metastable densities produced by short-pulse FIWs sustained in helium were measured using laser-induced fluorescence and laser collision-induced fluorescence diagnostics for times of 100-120 ns after the pulse, as the pressure was varied from 1 to 20 Torr. A trend of center-peaked to volume-filling to wall-peaked electron density profiles was observed as the pressure was increased. Instantaneous FIW velocities, obtained from plasma-induced emission, ranged from 0.1 to 3 × 109 cm s-1, depending on distance from the high voltage electrode and pressure. Predictions from two-dimensional modeling of the propagation of a single FIW correlated well with the experimental trends in electron density profiles and wave velocity. Results from the model show that the maximum ionization rate occurs in the wavefront, and the discharge continues to propagate forward after the removal of high voltage from the powered electrode due to the potential energy stored in the space charge. As the pressure is varied, the radial distribution of the ionization rate is shaped by changes in the electron mean free path, and subsequent localized electric field enhancement at the walls or on the centerline of the discharge.

  19. The control of plasma density profile in Tore Supra. Comparison of different fueling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behaviour of a reactor-class plasma when fuelled using the existing techniques (gas puffing, supersonic molecular beam injection and pellet injection) is still very difficult to foresee. The present work has been initiated on Tore Supra in order to extrapolate the consequences of the different fuelling systems on ITER. Two main topics have been studied: the comparison of the plasma behaviour when fuelled using the different techniques at high Greenwald density fractions and the study of the homogenization following a pellet injection (main fuelling technique for ITER burning plasmas). The experiments at high Greenwald density fractions performed on Tore Supra showed that the plasma behaviour is very dependent on the fuelling method. The plasma energy confinement is following the scaling laws determined at low density when fuelled using pellet injection. which is better than for gas puffing and SMBI. both inducing a significant confinement loss. This behaviour is nor related to a transport modification: the ratio between effective diffusion and convection is similar to the pellet case. The difference between these shots is related only to the position of the matter source (at the edge for gas and close to the center for pellets). The study concerning the homogenization phenomena following a pellet injection aims mainly to study the ∇B-drift effect that expels the mater deposited by a pellet toward the low field side. A new phenomenon. which appears to be particularly important for the ∇B-drift during low field side injections. was then discovered: the influence of magnetic surfaces with an integer-valued safety factor (q). When the mater drifting toward low field side crosses an integer q surface. it experiences an important braking effect which stops the drift motion. It implies that the pellet material is mainly deposited on the last integer q surface crossed by the pellet during its injection. This study allows also to determine that the

  20. Recreational football improves bone mineral density and bone turnover marker profile in elderly men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helge, Eva Wulff; Rostgaard Andersen, Thomas; Schmidt, Jakob Friis;

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of recreational football and resistance training on bone mineral density (BMD) and bone turnover markers (BTMs) in elderly men. Twenty-six healthy sedentary men (age 68.2 ± 3.2 years) were randomized into three groups: football (F; n = 9) and resistance training (R; n...... < 0.001) than at baseline, respectively. After 12 months, CTX-1 showed a main effect of 43% (P < 0.05). In R and C, BMD and BTM remained unchanged. In conclusion, 4 months of recreational football for elderly men had an osteogenic effect, which was further developed after 12 months, whereas resistance...

  1. A method for evaluating models that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the density profiles

    CERN Document Server

    de Almeida, Álefe O F; Rodrigues, Davi C

    2016-01-01

    There are some approaches, either based on General Relativity (GR) or modified gravity, that use galaxy rotation curves to derive the matter density of the corresponding galaxy, and this procedure would either indicate a partial or a complete elimination of dark matter in galaxies. Here we review these approaches, clarify the difficulties on this inverted procedure, present a method for evaluating them, and use it to test two specific approaches that are based on GR: the Cooperstock-Tieu (CT) and the Balasin-Grumiller (BG) approaches. Using this new method, we find that neither of the tested approaches can satisfactorily fit the observational data without dark matter. The CT approach results can be significantly improved if some dark matter is considered, while for the BG approach no usual dark matter halo can improve its results.

  2. Global SAXS data analysis for multilamellar vesicles: Evolution of the scattering density profile (SDP) model

    CERN Document Server

    Heftberger, Peter; Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Rappolt, Michael; Amenitsch, Heinz; Kucerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John; Pabst, Georg

    2013-01-01

    We adapted the highly successful scattering density pro?le (SDP) model, which is used to jointly analyze small angle x-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). By using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone x-ray data. Important structural parameters, such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. Results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and x-ray data. The addition of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data to the analysis improved lipid backbone information, but did not improve, within experimental uncertainties, the structural information regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  3. The Co-Evolution of Total Density Profiles and Central Dark Matter Fractions in Simulated Early-Type Galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Naab, Thorsten; Burkert, Andreas; Hirschmann, Michaela; Hoffmann, Tadziu L; Johansson, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    We present evidence from cosmological hydrodynamical simulations for a co-evolution of the slope of the total (dark and stellar) mass density profiles, gamma_tot, and the dark matter fractions within the half-mass radius, f_DM, in early-type galaxies. The relation can be described as gamma_tot = A f_DM + B and holds for all systems at all redshifts. We test different feedback models and find that the general trend is independent of the assumed feedback processes and is set by the decreasing importance of dissipative processes towards lower redshifts and for more massive systems. Early-type galaxies are smaller, more concentrated, have lower dark matter fractions and steeper total density slopes at high redshifts and at lower masses for a given redshift. The values for A and B change distinctively with the assumed feedback model, and thus this relation can be used as a test for feedback models. A similar correlation exists between gamma_tot and the stellar mass surface density Sigma_*. The model with weak stel...

  4. Profile of cortisol, glycaemia, and blood parameters of American Bullfrog tadpoles Lithobates catesbeianus exposed to density and hypoxia stressors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia C. Teixeira

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate alterations to the physiological profile (cortisol, glycaemia, and blood parameters of Lithobates catesbeianus caused by the stressors density and hypoxia. The organisms were in the prometamorphosis stage and exposed to different tadpole densities: 1 tadpole/L (T1, 5 tadpoles/L (T2, and 10 tadpoles/L (T3 for 12 days. The blood was collected through the rupture of the caudal blood vessel and collected under normoxia (immediate collection and hypoxia (after 15 minutes of air exposure conditions. Cortisol levels rose on the fourth and eighth days of treatment and returned to basal levels by the end of the experiment. The stressor mechanisms tested did not affect glycaemia. White blood cells (total number of lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils showed a significant difference at the twelfth day of the experiment when compared with the start of the experiment. We concluded that, under controlled conditions, a density of up to 10 tadpoles/L and air exposure for 15 minutes did not cause harmful physiological alterations during the experimental period. The answer to these stressors maybe was in another hormonal level (corticosterone.

  5. Weak lensing density profiles and mass reconstructions of the galaxy clusters Abell 1351 and Abell 1995

    CERN Document Server

    Holhjem, K; Dahle, H

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the present work is to study the overall mass distribution of the galaxy clusters Abell 1351 and Abell 1995 using weak gravitational lensing. These clusters have got a very different mass structure and dynamical state, and are the two extremes from a larger sample of 38 X-ray luminous clusters of similar size and redshift. We measure shear values of faint background galaxies and correct for PSF anisotropies using the KSB+ method. Two-dimensional mass maps of the clusters are created using a finite-field mass reconstruction algorithm, and verified with aperture mass statistics. The masses inferred from the reconstructions are compared to those obtained from fitting spherically symmetric SIS- and NFW-models to the tangential shear profiles. We discuss the NFW concentration parameters in detail. From the mass reconstructions we infer M200-masses of 11.7 +/- 3.1 * 10^14 h_70^-1 Msun and 10.5 +/- 2.7 * 10^14 h_70^-1 Msun for Abell 1351 and Abell 1995, respectively. About 3' north-east of the main mass p...

  6. Aerial radiometric surveys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main characteristics of aerial radiometric surveys in the Argentine Republic concerning to uranium and other radiactive elements search, are described. This paper is divided into three chapters: the first concerns with the fundaments of gammametric surveys; the second, with the data processing and the third with the interpretation of the results. (Author)

  7. Aerial Perspective Artistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Linda

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a lesson centering on aerial perspective artistry of students and offers suggestions on how art teachers should carry this project out. This project serves to develop students' visual perception by studying reproductions by famous artists. This lesson allows one to imagine being lured into a landscape capable of captivating…

  8. Persistent Aerial Tracking

    KAUST Repository

    Mueller, Matthias

    2016-04-13

    In this thesis, we propose a new aerial video dataset and benchmark for low altitude UAV target tracking, as well as, a photo-realistic UAV simulator that can be coupled with tracking methods. Our benchmark provides the rst evaluation of many state of-the-art and popular trackers on 123 new and fully annotated HD video sequences captured from a low-altitude aerial perspective. Among the compared trackers, we determine which ones are the most suitable for UAV tracking both in terms of tracking accuracy and run-time. We also present a simulator that can be used to evaluate tracking algorithms in real-time scenarios before they are deployed on a UAV "in the field", as well as, generate synthetic but photo-realistic tracking datasets with free ground truth annotations to easily extend existing real-world datasets. Both the benchmark and simulator will be made publicly available to the vision community to further research in the area of object tracking from UAVs. Additionally, we propose a persistent, robust and autonomous object tracking system for unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) called Persistent Aerial Tracking (PAT). A computer vision and control strategy is applied to a diverse set of moving objects (e.g. humans, animals, cars, boats, etc.) integrating multiple UAVs with a stabilized RGB camera. A novel strategy is employed to successfully track objects over a long period, by \\'handing over the camera\\' from one UAV to another. We integrate the complete system into an off-the-shelf UAV, and obtain promising results showing the robustness of our solution in real-world aerial scenarios.

  9. Direct evaluation of spatio-temporal change in current density profile applied to a discharge with neo-classical tearing mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analytical method to evaluate spatio-temporal change in the current density profile directly from the motional Stark effect (MSE) diagnostic is applied to a discharge, where a neo-classical tearing mode (NTM) appeared and was stabilized by electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). The analysis cleary shows a spatially localized decrease in current density at the magnetic island location, implying a decrease in bootstrap current due to a flattening of the pressure profile within the island. When the NTM is stabilized after the start of the ECCD application, as increase in current density at the island location is observed. (author)

  10. Can we measure the slopes of density profiles in dwarf spheroidal galaxies?

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalczyk, Klaudia; Kazantzidis, Stelios; Mayer, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Using collisionless N-body simulations of dwarf galaxies orbiting the Milky Way (MW) we construct realistic models of dwarf spheroidal (dSph) galaxies of the Local Group. The dwarfs are initially composed of stellar disks embedded in dark matter haloes with different inner density slopes and are placed on an eccentric orbit typical for MW subhaloes. After a few Gyr of evolution the stellar component is triaxial as a result of bar instability induced by tidal forces. Observing the simulated dwarfs along three principal axes of the stellar component we create mock data sets and determine the their half-light radii and line-of-sight velocity dispersions. Using the estimator proposed by Wolf et al. we calculate masses within half-light radii. The masses obtained this way are over(under)estimated by up to a factor of two when the line of sight is along the longest (shortest) axis of the stellar component. We then divide the initial stellar distribution into an inner and outer population and trace their evolution i...

  11. Effects of density profile and multi-species target on laser-heated thermal-pressure-driven shock wave acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The shock wave acceleration of ions driven by laser-heated thermal pressure is studied through one-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation and analysis. The generation of high-energy mono-energetic protons in recent experiments (D. Haberberger et al., 2012 Nat. Phys. 8 95) is attributed to the use of exponentially decaying density profile of the plasma target. It does not only keep the shock velocity stable but also suppresses the normal target normal sheath acceleration. The effects of target composition are also examined, where a similar collective velocity of all ion species is demonstrated. The results also give some reference to future experiments of producing energetic heavy ions. (electromagnetism, optics, acoustics, heat transfer, classical mechanics, and fluid dynamics)

  12. Modelling of the plasma environment surrounding 67P: the effect of the convective electric field on ion density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beth, Arnaud; Galand, Marina; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2016-04-01

    By following comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko along its orbit, Rosetta during its cruise is offering us the unique opportunity to understand the complex evolution of the comet with its environment. Although the coma is not bound at the surface, its photo-ionisation by solar extreme ultraviolet radiation creates a complex plasma environment which interacts with and is influenced by the solar wind. We consider the critical role played by collisionless processes (e.g. the effect of external electric and magnetic fields) in shaping the resulting ionospheric density profiles. In particular, the photo-ionisation of sublimated water molecules leads to the production of H_2O^+. These new ions are subjected to the electromagnetic environment of the solar wind in which they are born. In particular, the convective electric field Econv associated with the component of the solar wind flow perpendicular to the interplanetary magnetic field (i.e. Econv≈-vSWwedgeB) will strongly influence the dynamics of new ions and electrons and thus their density profiles around the comet. To lowest order that field can be described by the generalized Ohm's law of MHD. However, the small scales associated with 67P must be taken into consideration. We show that the convective electric field plays a key-role in the distribution of ions in the vicinity of the comet and in their transport. In particular, the physical size of the comet should be considered and the comet should not be reduced to a point source in the model. Finally, we will discuss the establishment of an induced ambipolar electric field on the ionospheric plasma to counteract the effect of Econv.

  13. HIGH-RESOLUTION DARK MATTER DENSITY PROFILES OF THINGS DWARF GALAXIES: CORRECTING FOR NONCIRCULAR MOTIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a new method to remove the impact of random and small-scale noncircular motions from H I velocity fields in (dwarf) galaxies in order to better constrain the dark matter properties for these objects. This method extracts the circularly rotating velocity components from the H I data cube and condenses them into a so-called bulk velocity field. We derive high-resolution (∼0.2 kpc) rotation curves of IC 2574 and NGC 2366 based on bulk velocity fields derived from The H I Nearby Galaxy Survey obtained at the Very Large Array. We compare the bulk velocity field rotation curves with those derived from the traditional intensity-weighted mean velocity fields and find significant differences. The bulk velocity field rotation curves are significantly less affected by noncircular motions and constrain the dark matter distribution in our galaxies, allowing us to address the discrepancy between the inferred and predicted dark matter distribution in galaxies (the 'cusp/core' problem). Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey 3.6 μm data, which are largely unaffected by dust in these systems, as well as ancillary optical information, are used to separate the contribution of the baryons from the total matter content. Using stellar population synthesis models, assuming various sets of metallicity and star-formation histories, we compute stellar mass-to-light ratios for the 3.6 μm and 4.5 μm bands. Using our predicted value for the 3.6 μm stellar mass-to-light ratio, we find that the observed dark matter distributions of IC 2574 and NGC 2366 are inconsistent with the cusp-like dark matter halo predicted by Λ Cold Dark Matter models, even after corrections for noncircular motions. This result also holds for other assumptions about the stellar mass-to-light ratio. The distribution of dark matter within our sample galaxies is best described by models with a kpc-sized constant-density core.

  14. AERIAL RADIOLOGICAL SURVEYS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measuring terrestrial gamma radiation from airborne platforms has proved to be a useful method for characterizing radiation levels over large areas. Over 300 aerial radiological surveys have been carried out over the past 25 years including U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, commercial nuclear power plants, Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program/Uranium Mine Tailing Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP/UMTRAP) sites, nuclear weapons test sites, contaminated industrial areas, and nuclear accident sites. This paper describes the aerial measurement technology currently in use by the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) for routine environmental surveys and emergency response activities. Equipment, data-collection and -analysis methods, and examples of survey results are described

  15. Handbook for aerial radiological monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This handbook provides technical and operational guidance for conducting aerial radiological surveys. It is used in the training of aerial radiological monitors. Aerial monitors should also review this handbook periodically and use it as a reference in exercises and emergency operations. Detailed descriptions of aerial survey techniques, operational procedures, and the use of specialized survey equipment are given. These three sections provide the essentials. However, the planning and execution of aerial surveys are complex; and for most effective operations, an aerial survey team (pilot and monitor) also needs to be familiar with (a) the overall monitoring system, (b) the unique contributions which aerial survey can provide, and (c) the principles affecting the success of aerial survey operations. The DCPA Handbook for Radiological Monitors provides a brief description of the overall radiological monitoring system and the functions required of it. Section I outlines (a) the relationship of aerial survey to the monitoring system, (b) the major contributions to be expected from aerial survey operations, (c) personnel requirements, and (d) aircraft selection and their organization for use. Technical principles and concepts affecting survey operations are discussed in Section II

  16. CERN: an aerial view

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    On 30th January, when CERN still resembled a winter wonderland, a helicopter with a photographer on board took off on an aerial tour. One sunny morning at the end of January, when the area was waking up to an overnight snowfall, a helicopter took off from the Meyrin site with a CERN photographer on board. CERN has been the subject of aerial photographs ever since its creation. Although its appearance has changed over the years, the Laboratory has aged well. The aerial photographs taken during its fifty-year history bear witness to its expansion, showing how a handful of buildings and a first accelerator have blossomed into an entire machine complex. Let's take to the skies and have a look at some of the photos taken on this crisp January morning: a sight for sore eyes! In the foreground, Building 40 on the Meyrin site is recognisable from its magnet shape.On the right of the Route de Meyrin (crossing the photo diagonally), next to Point 1, the work on the Globe of Innovation, which got underway at the beg...

  17. Microwave device on the basis of a barrel resonator for determining the average density and the density profile in plasma formations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A microwave resonator device for measuring the plasma density is described. A method is proposed for determining the radial distribution function of the plasma density by measuring a shift of resonance frequencies for two oscillation modes. According to experimental results, the device is suitable for measuring the plasma density in the range 109-1011 cm-3

  18. Spatial density profile of electrons near the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterointerface revealed by time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The depth profile of the electron density near the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterointerface has been studied by means of time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. A broad blue PL band is observed at 2.9 eV, originating from the two-carrier radiative recombination of interface-induced electrons and photoexcited holes. The PL lifetime of LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterointerface is dominated by the three-carrier Auger recombination of electrons and holes and is sensitive to electron density. We tuned the probing depth by changing the excitation photon energy and evaluated the carrier-density profile using the relation between the carrier density and the PL lifetime. Our non-contact probe method based on PL spectroscopy indicates that the carriers are confined within several nanometers in depth near the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 heterostructures

  19. Assessing variation in the radial profile of sap flux density in Pinus species and its effect on daily water use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Chelcy R; McGuire, Mary Anne; Mitchell, Robert J; Teskey, Robert O

    2004-03-01

    We monitored sap flux density (v) diurnally in nine mature southeastern pine (Pinus spp.) trees with a thermal dissipation probe that spanned the sapwood radius. We found the expected pattern of high v near the cambium and decreasing v with depth toward the center of the tree; however, the pattern was not constant within a day or between trees. Radial profiles of trees were steeper earlier in the day and became less steep later in the day. As a result, time-dependent changes in the shape of the radial profile of v were sometimes correlated with daily changes in evaporative demand. As the radial profile became less steep, the inner xylem contributed relatively more to total tree sap flow than it did earlier in the day. We present a 3-parameter Gaussian function that can be used to describe the radial distribution of v in trees. Parameters in the function represent depth in the xylem from the cambium, maximum v, depth in the xylem where maximum v occurs, and the rate of radial change in v with radial depth (beta). Values of beta varied significantly between trees and with time, and were sometimes correlated with air vapor pressure deficit (D). We hypothesize that this occurred during periods of high transpiration when the water potential gradient became great enough to move water in the inner sapwood despite its probable high hydraulic resistance. We examined discrepancies among estimates of daily water use based on single-point, two-point and multi-point (i.e., every 20 mm in the sapwood) measurements. When radial distribution of v was not considered, a single-point measurement resulted in errors as large as 154% in the estimate of daily water use relative to the estimate obtained from a multi-point measurement. Measuring v at two close sample points (10 and 30 mm) did not improve the estimate; however, estimates derived from v measured at two distant sample points (10 and 70 mm) significantly improved the estimate of daily water use, although errors were as great

  20. Aerial survey estimates of fallow deer abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogan, Peter J.; Gates, Natalie B.; Lubow, Bruce C.; Pettit, Suzanne

    2012-01-01

    Reliable estimates of the distribution and abundance of an ungulate species is essential prior to establishing and implementing a management program. We used ground surveys to determine distribution and ground and aerial surveys and individually marked deer to estimate the abundance of fallow deer (Dama dama) in north-coastal California. Fallow deer had limited distribution and heterogeneous densities. Estimated post-rut densities across 4 annual surveys ranged from a low of 1.4 (SE=0.2) deer/km2 to a high of 3.3 (se=0.5) deer/km2 in a low density stratum and from 49.0 (SE=8.3) deer/km2 to 111.6 deer/km2 in a high density stratum. Sightability was positively influenced by the presence of white color-phase deer in a group and group size, and varied between airial and ground-based observers and by density strata. Our findings underscore the utility of double-observer surveys and aerial surveys with individually marked deer, both incorporating covariates to model sightability, to estimate deer abundance.

  1. Aerial in situ survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2001 a detailed exploration of soil contamination took place in the mountainous region Hruby Jesenik located in northeastern part of the Czech Republic. This region was selected for the higher contamination of 137Cs after Chernobyl accident. For monitoring of an area about 100km2 aerial monitoring system IRIS (located on board of helicopter MI-17) was used. The parameters of measurement were: flight height above ground 80 m, speed 100 km/h, distance of flight lines 250 m, intervals of spectra recording 1s. For more detailed exploration of ground contamination in this area complementary ground-based mobile group measurements were performed. (author)

  2. The density profiles of N2(A3Σu+) and N2(a′Σu-) in the Pink Afterglow of the DC nitrogen flowing discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The N2 flowing post-discharge is studied by optical emission spectroscopy. • The N2(C) and N2+(B) relative densities were measured along the post-discharge. • A kinetic numerical model fits the N2(C) and N2+(B) densities in the afterglow. • The model calculates a coefficient used to obtain the N2(A) and N2(a′) densities. • Coefficient and the measured N2(C) density provide the N2(A) and N2(a′) densities. - Abstract: We have studied by optical emission spectroscopy (OES) the afterglow of a nitrogen DC flowing discharge in such experimental conditions that the Pink Afterglow (PA) was present in the post-discharge. The spectra were recorded in the range of 360–435 nm. The emissions of the second positive system of the nitrogen molecules concerning the transitions N2(C3Πu, v) → N2(B3Πg, v′) with Δv = −2 and the emissions of the first negative system concerning the transitions N2+(B2Σu+,v)→N2+(X2Σg+,v′) with Δv = −1 were utilized to furnish the relative density of the N2(C3Πu, 0 ⩽ v ⩽ 4) and the N2+(B2Σu+,0⩽v⩽6) populations from that we have estimated the total density of the N2(C3Πu) and N2+(B2Σu+) electronic states. A kinetic numerical model was constructed for modeling the nitrogen post-discharge. The density profiles of the electronic states N2(C3Πu) and N2+(B2Σu+) obtained experimentally were fitted by the calculated density profiles furnished by the model. In this sense, we have calibrated the numerical model that will be employed in the calculation of the coefficients applied in the estimation of the N2(A3Σu+) and N2(a′Σu-) density profiles. We have developed a method of combined application of the OES and numerical modeling which permits the estimation of the N2(A3Σu+) and N2(a′Σu-) density profiles from the measured density of the N2(C3Πu) state corrected by the calculated coefficients. The estimated density profiles are compared to the calculated ones generated by the kinetic model. The N2

  3. Gas density and X-ray surface brightness profiles of clusters of galaxies from dark matter halo potentials beyond the isothermal beta model

    CERN Document Server

    Suto, Y; Makino, N; Suto, Yasushi; Sasaki, Shin; Makino, Nobuyoshi

    1998-01-01

    We describe a theoretical framework to compute the cluster gas distribution in hydrostatic equilibrium embedded in a class of spherical dark matter halo potentials. Unlike the conventional isothermal $\\beta$-model, the present method provides a physical basis to directly probe the shape of dark matter halo from the observed X-ray surface brightness and temperature profiles of clusters of galaxies. Specifically, we examine the extent to which the resulting gas density and X-ray surface brightness profiles are sensitive to the inner slope of the dark matter halo density and other more realistic effects including the self-gravity of the gas and the polytropic equation of state. We also discuss a practical strategy to apply the present methodology to the actual cluster profiles from future X-ray observations.

  4. Dislocation density and Burgers vector population in fiber-textured Ni thin films determined by high-resolution X-ray line profile analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csiszár, Gábor; Pantleon, Karen; Alimadadi, Hossein; Ribárik, Gábor; Ungár, Tamás

    2012-01-01

    Nanocrystalline Ni thin films have been produced by direct current electrodeposition with different additives and current density in order to obtain 〈100〉, 〈111〉 and 〈211〉 major fiber textures. The dislocation density, the Burgers vector population and the coherently scattering domain size...... distribution are determined by high-resolution X-ray diffraction line profile analysis. The substructure parameters are correlated with the strength of the films by using the combined Taylor and Hall-Petch relations. The convolutional multiple whole profile method is used to obtain the substructure parameters...... in the different coexisting texture components. A strong variation of the dislocation density is observed as a function of the deposition conditions....

  5. Classification of X-ray solar flares regarding their effects on the lower ionosphere electron density profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. P. Grubor

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The classification of X-ray solar flares is performed regarding their effects on the Very Low Frequency (VLF wave propagation along the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The changes in propagation are detected from an observed VLF signal phase and amplitude perturbations, taking place during X-ray solar flares. All flare effects chosen for the analysis are recorded by the Absolute Phase and Amplitude Logger (AbsPal, during the summer months of 2004–2007, on the single trace, Skelton (54.72 N, 2.88 W to Belgrade (44.85 N, 20.38 E with a distance along the Great Circle Path (GCP D≈2000 km in length.

    The observed VLF amplitude and phase perturbations are simulated by the computer program Long-Wavelength Propagation Capability (LWPC, using Wait's model of the lower ionosphere, as determined by two parameters: the sharpness (β in 1/km and reflection height (H' in km. By varying the values of β and H' so as to match the observed amplitude and phase perturbations, the variation of the D-region electron density height profile Ne(z was reconstructed, throughout flare duration. The procedure is illustrated as applied to a series of flares, from class C to M5 (5×10−5 W/m2 at 0.1–0.8 nm, each giving rise to a different time development of signal perturbation.

    The corresponding change in electron density from the unperturbed value at the unperturbed reflection height, i.e. Ne(74 km=2.16×108 m−3 to the value induced by an M5 class flare, up to Ne(74 km=4×1010 m−3 is obtained. The β parameter is found to range from 0.30–0.49 1/km and the reflection height H' to vary from 74–63 km. The changes in Ne(z during the flares, within height range z=60 to 90 km are determined, as well.

  6. LoCuSS: THE MASS DENSITY PROFILE OF MASSIVE GALAXY CLUSTERS AT z = 0.2 {sup ,}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okabe, Nobuhiro; Umetsu, Keiichi [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics (ASIAA), P. O. Box 23-141, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Smith, Graham P. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Takada, Masahiro [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU, WPI), University of Tokyo, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Futamase, Toshifumi, E-mail: okabe@asiaa.sinica.edu.tw, E-mail: gps@star.sr.bham.ac.uk [Astronomical Institute, Tohoku University, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8578 (Japan)

    2013-06-01

    We present a stacked weak-lensing analysis of an approximately mass-selected sample of 50 galaxy clusters at 0.15 < z < 0.3, based on observations with Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We develop a new method for selecting lensed background galaxies from which we estimate that our sample of red background galaxies suffers just 1% contamination. We detect the stacked tangential shear signal from the full sample of 50 clusters, based on this red sample of background galaxies, at a total signal-to-noise ratio of 32.7. The Navarro-Frenk-White model is an excellent fit to the data, yielding sub-10% statistical precision on mass and concentration: M{sub vir}=7.19{sup +0.53}{sub -0.50} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} h{sup -1} M{sub sun}, c{sub vir}=5.41{sup +0.49}{sub -0.45} (c{sub 200}=4.22{sup +0.40}{sub -0.36}). Tests of a range of possible systematic errors, including shear calibration and stacking-related issues, indicate that they are subdominant to the statistical errors. The concentration parameter obtained from stacking our approximately mass-selected cluster sample is broadly in line with theoretical predictions. Moreover, the uncertainty on our measurement is comparable with the differences between the different predictions in the literature. Overall, our results highlight the potential for stacked weak-lensing methods to probe the mean mass density profile of cluster-scale dark matter halos with upcoming surveys, including Hyper-Suprime-Cam, Dark Energy Survey, and KIDS.

  7. From slant column densities to trace gas profiles: Post processing data from the new MAX-DOAS network in Mexico City

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, M. M.; Stremme, W.; Rivera, C. I.; Arellano, E. J.; Grutter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The new MAX-DOAS network in Mexico City provides results of O4, HCHO and NO2 slant column densities (SCD). Here, we present a new numerical code developed to retrieve gas profiles of NO2 and HCHO using radiative transfer simulations. We present first results of such profiles from the MAX-DOAS station located at UNAM campus. The code works in two steps: First, the O4 slant column density information is used to retrieve an aerosol profile. As an a-priori aerosol profile, we use averaged ceilometer data measured at UNAM and scaled to the total optical depth provided by the Aeronet data base. In the second step, the retrieved aerosol profile information is used together with the trace gas (HCHO or NO2) SCDs to retrieve the trace gas profiles. The inversion is based on a gauss-newton iteration scheme and uses constrained least square fitting with either optimal estimation or Tihkonov regularization. For the latter, the regulation matrix is currently constructed from the discrete first derivative operator. The forward model uses the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. The inputs to VLIDORT are calculated using temperature and pressure information from daily radiosounde measurements and aerosol single scattering optical depths and asymmetry factors from the Aeronet data base for Mexico City. For the gas absorption cross sections we use the same values as were used for the SCD calculation from the recorded spectra using QDOAS. Besides demonstrating the functionality of the algorithm showing profile retrievals of simulated SCDs with added random noise, we present HCHO and NO2 profiles retrieved from SCDs calculated from the MAX-DOAS measurements at UNAM campus at selected days.

  8. Morphing unmanned aerial vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research on aircraft morphing has exploded in recent years. The motivation and driving force behind this has been to find new and novel ways to increase the capabilities of aircraft. Materials advancements have helped to increase possibilities with respect to actuation and, hence, a diversity of concepts and unimagined capabilities. The expanded role of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) has provided an ideal platform for exploring these emergent morphing concepts since at this scale a greater amount of risk can be taken, as well as having more manageable fabrication and cost requirements. This review focuses on presenting the role UAVs have in morphing research by giving an overview of the UAV morphing concepts, designs, and technologies described in the literature. A presentation of quantitative information as well as a discussion of technical issues is given where possible to begin gaining some insight into the overall assessment and performance of these technologies. (topical review)

  9. Characterization of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Phillips, L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.

    2011-10-01

    Previous experiments with Nike KrF laser (λ = 248 nm , Δν ~ 1 THz) observed LPI signatures near quarter critical density (nc / 4) in CH plasmas, however, detailed measurement of the temperature (Te) and density (ne) profiles was missing. The current Nike LPI campaign will perform experimental determination of the plasma profiles. A side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR) is the main diagnostic to resolve Te and ne in space taking 2D snapshots of probe laser (λ = 266 nm , Δt = 8 psec) beamlets (50 μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at laser peak time. Ray tracing of the beamlets through hydrodynamically simulated (FASTRAD3D) plasma profiles estimates the refractometer may access densities up to ~ 0 . 2nc . With the measured Te and ne profiles in the plasma corona, we will discuss analysis of light data radiated from the plasmas in spectral ranges relevant to two plasmon decay and convective Raman instabilities. Validity of the (Te ,ne) data will also be discussed for the thermal transport study. Work supported by DoE/NNSA and ONR and performed at NRL.

  10. Grain structure and dislocation density measurements in a friction-stir welded aluminum alloy using X-ray peak profile analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Wanchuck [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)], E-mail: woowc@ornl.gov; Balogh, Levente; Ungar, Tamas [Department of General Physics, Eoetvoes University, P.O. Box 32, H-1518 Budapest (Hungary); Choo, Hahn [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN 37996 (United States); Feng, Zhili [Materials Science and Technology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2008-12-20

    The dislocation density and grain structure of a friction-stir welded 6061-T6 aluminum alloy were determined as a function of distance from the weld centerline using high-resolution micro-beam X-ray diffraction. The results of the X-ray peak profile analysis show that the dislocation density is about 1.2 x 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} inside and 4.8 x 10{sup 14} m{sup -2} outside of the weld region. The average subgrain size is about 180 nm in both regions. Compared to the base material, the dislocation density was significantly decreased in the dynamic recrystallized zone of the friction-stir welds, which is in good correlation with the TEM observations. The influence of the dislocation density on the strain hardening behavior during tensile deformation is also discussed.

  11. Profiles of plasma parameters and density of negative hydrogen ions by laser detachment measurements in RF-driven ion sources; Profile der Plasmaparameter und Dichte negativer Wasserstoffionen mittels Laserdetachmentmessungen in HF-angeregten Ionenquellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christ-Koch, Sina

    2007-12-20

    This work shows the application of the Laserdetachment method for spatially resolved measurements of negative Hydrogen/Deuterium ion density. It was applied on a high power low pressure RF-driven ion source. The Laser detachment method is based on the measurement of electron currents on a positively biased Langmuir probe before and during/after a laser pulse. The density ratio of negative ions to electrons can be derived from the ratio of currents to the probe. The absolute density of negative ions can be obtained when the electron density is measured with the standard Langmuir probe setup. Measurements with the Langmuir probe additionally yield information about the floating and plasma potential, the electron temperature and the density of positive ions. The Laser detachment setup had to be adapted to the special conditions of the RF-driven source. In particular the existence of RF fields (1 MHz), high source potential (-20 kV), magnetic fields ({proportional_to} 7 mT) and caesium inside the source had to be considered. The density of negative ions could be identified in the range of n(H{sup -})=1.10{sup 17} 1/m{sup 3}, which is in the same order of magnitude as the electron density. Only the application of the Laser detachment method with the Langmuir probe measurements will yield spatially resolved plasma parameters and H- density profiles. The influence of diverse external parameters, such as pressure, RF-power, magnetic fields on the plasma parameters and their profiles were studied and explained. Hence, the measurements lead to a detailed understanding of the processes inside the source. (orig.)

  12. Comparison of electron density profiles observed in China's low latitude station with that produced by the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI2001)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One month's data of ionograms observed by DPS-4 digisonde in China's low latitude station Hainan (19.4 deg N/109.0 deg E) for the high solar activity year 2002 is used to make a comparison study between the observational electron density profiles and that produced by the newly updated International Reference Ionosphere (IRI2001). The present study showed that for the month studied (April, 2002): (1) When B0-Tab value is used, profiles given by IRI2001 are in poor agreement with the observational results during daytime and nearby midnight hours when standard Ne(h) option is chosen, whereas when the LAY functions version is chosen, IRI2001 produces profiles with erroneous features during evening and nighttime hours, although it produces profiles in a reasonable good agreement with the observational ones during daytime hours. (2) In general, profiles produced by IRI2001 with B0-Gulyaeva choice is in better agreement with observational profiles than when B0-Tab is chosen. When the B0-Gulyaeva and LAY functions version of Ne(h) are both chosen, IRI2001 produced the best results when compared with the observational results. (3) The B0 parameter given by B0-Gulyaeva choice in IRI2001 is much closer to the observed (best fitted) one than that given by the B0-Tab choice is. (author)

  13. High energy emission of GRB 130821A: constraining the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow

    CERN Document Server

    Liang, Yun-Feng; He, Hao-Ning; Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2013-01-01

    GRB 130821A was detected by Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-Wind, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, RHESSI and Mars Odyssey-HEND. Although the data of GRB 130821A are very limited, we show in this work that the high energy gamma-ray emission (i.e., above 100 MeV) alone imposes tight constraint on the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow. The temporal behavior of the high energy gamma-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock synchrotron radiation model and the circum-burst medium likely has a constant-density profile. The Lorentz factor is about a few hundred, similar to other bright GRBs.

  14. High energy emission of GRB 130821A: Constraining the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yun-Feng; Zhou, Bei; He, Hao-Ning; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming [Key laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Tam, Pak-Hin Thomas, E-mail: phtam@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Institute of Astronomy and Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

    2014-02-01

    GRB 130821A was detected by Fermi-GBM/LAT, Konus-WIND, SPI-ACS/INTEGRAL, RHESSI and Mars Odyssey-HEND. Although the data of GRB 130821A are very limited, we show in this work that the high energy γ-ray emission (i.e., above 100 MeV) alone imposes tight constraint on the density profile of the circum-burst medium as well as the initial Lorentz factor of the outflow. The temporal behavior of the high energy γ-ray emission is consistent with the forward shock synchrotron radiation model, and the circum-burst medium likely has a constant-density profile. The Lorentz factor is about a few hundred, similar to other bright GRBs.

  15. Aerial measurements in Finland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkelmann, I.; Thomas, M.; Buchroeder, H.; Brummer, C. [Federal Office for Radiation Protection, Berlin (Germany); Carloff, G. [German Federal Border Police, Grenzschutz-Fliegergruppe, Sankt Augustin (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Aerial measurements were performed to determine the {sup 137}Cs soil contamination in a given region to detect unknown radiation sources and to assess their activity. For these measurements a computerized gamma ray spectrometer, equipped with a high purity Ge-semiconductor detector and a 12 l volume Nal(Tl)-detector was used. HPGe-detector measurements from different altitudes over area I were done to test and re-calibrate the aerial measuring system. The known {sup 137}Cs contamination of (50.7 {+-} 5.2) kBq m{sup -2} could be confirmed by the measured value of (57 {+-} 10) kBq m{sup -2}. the Nal(Tl)-detector was re-calibrated at that site for further {sup 137}Cs measurements over area II. The area II was surveyed from an altitude of about 70 m and at a parallel line distance of 150 m at an flying speed of 100 km h{sup -1} to determine the {sup 137}Cs soil contamination. The measuring time was two seconds for the Nal(Tl)-detector. For the spectra measured with the HPGe-detector, a measuring time of 30 s each was chosen. From the Nal(Tl)-measurements, a mean {sup 137}Cs value of (60 {+-} 20) kBq m{sup -2} was determined with a maximum value of 90 kBq m{sup -2}. The corresponding values measured by HPGe-detector were (70 {+-} 20) kBq m{sup -2} and 120 kBq m{sup -2}, respectively. For the evaluation of the HPGe-spectra a depth distribution parameter {alpha}/{rho} = (0.44 {+-} 0.21) cm{sup 2} g{sup -1} for {sup 137}Cs was used measured from soil samples. From data measured with the Nal(Tl)-detector during flights over area III, three{sup 60}Co-sources and one {sup 137}Cs source could be detected, localized and their activity assessed. By HPGe-detector measurements, only scattered {sup 192}lr radiation was registered. (au).

  16. Modeling aerial refueling operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Allen B., III

    Aerial Refueling (AR) is the act of offloading fuel from one aircraft (the tanker) to another aircraft (the receiver) in mid flight. Meetings between tanker and receiver aircraft are referred to as AR events and are scheduled to: escort one or more receivers across a large body of water; refuel one or more receivers; or train receiver pilots, tanker pilots, and boom operators. In order to efficiently execute the Aerial Refueling Mission, the Air Mobility Command (AMC) of the United States Air Force (USAF) depends on computer models to help it make tanker basing decisions, plan tanker sorties, schedule aircraft, develop new organizational doctrines, and influence policy. We have worked on three projects that have helped AMC improve its modeling and decision making capabilities. Optimal Flight Planning. Currently Air Mobility simulation and optimization software packages depend on algorithms which iterate over three dimensional fuel flow tables to compute aircraft fuel consumption under changing flight conditions. When a high degree of fidelity is required, these algorithms use a large amount of memory and CPU time. We have modeled the rate of aircraft fuel consumption with respect to AC GrossWeight, Altitude and Airspeed. When implemented, this formula will decrease the amount of memory and CPU time needed to compute sortie fuel costs and cargo capacity values. We have also shown how this formula can be used in optimal control problems to find minimum costs flight plans. Tanker Basing Demand Mismatch Index. Since 1992, AMC has relied on a Tanker Basing/AR Demand Mismatch Index which aggregates tanker capacity and AR demand data into six regions. This index was criticized because there were large gradients along regional boundaries. Meanwhile tankers frequently cross regional boundaries to satisfy the demand for AR support. In response we developed continuous functions to score locations with respect to their proximity to demand for AR support as well as their

  17. Results of aerial surveys of migratory birds on NPR-A in 1977 and 1978

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — This report summarizes the results of aerial surveys flown in 1977 and1978 on the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPR-A) to determine densities and...

  18. Local-field effects in current transport through molecular electronic devices: Current density profiles and local non-equilibrium electron distributions

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Yongqiang; Ratner, Mark A.

    2004-01-01

    We analyze non-equilibrium current transport in molecular electronic devices, using as an example devices formed by two terphenyl dithiol molecules attached to gold electrodes. Using a first-principles based self-consistent matrix Green's function method, we show that the spatially resolved current density profiles and local electrochemical potential drops provide valuable information regarding the local field effect on molecular transport, which depend on the internal structure of the molecu...

  19. Energy, contact, and density profiles of one-dimensional fermions in a harmonic trap via non-uniform lattice Monte Carlo

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, C. E.; Anderson, E. R.; Drut, J. E.

    2014-01-01

    We determine the ground-state energy and Tan's contact of attractively interacting few-fermion systems in a one-dimensional harmonic trap, for a range of couplings and particle numbers. Complementing those results, we show the corresponding density profiles. The calculations were performed with a new lattice Monte Carlo approach based on a non-uniform discretization of space, defined via Gauss-Hermite quadrature points and weights. This particular coordinate basis is natural for systems in ha...

  20. Performance of the IRI-2007 Model for Topside Ion Density and Composition Profiles During the 23/24 Solar Minimum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klenzing, J. H.; Simoes, F.; Ivanov, S.; Pfaff, R. F.; Rowland, D. E.; Bilitza, D.; Heelis, R. A.

    2011-01-01

    The recent solar minimum between cycles 23 and 24 was unusually extended and deep, resulting in an ionosphere that is significantly different from that expected based on previous solar minima. The ion density and composition estimates from the Communication/Navigation Outage Forecast System (C/NOFS) satellite are used to evaluate the performance of the IRI-2007 model between 400 and 850 kIn altitude in equatorial regions. The current model is shown to typically overestimate the expected topside density of 0+ and underestimate the density of H+ during 2008 and 2009. The overestimation of ion density by IRI-2007 is found to vary with local time and longitude.

  1. Relativistic self-focusing of ultra-high intensity X-ray laser beams in warm quantum plasma with upward density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a numerical study of high-intensity X-ray laser beam interaction with warm quantum plasma (WQP) are presented. By means of an upward ramp density profile combined with quantum factors specially the Fermi velocity, we have demonstrated significant relativistic self-focusing (RSF) of a Gaussian electromagnetic beam in the WQP where the Fermi temperature term in the dielectric function is important. For this purpose, we have considered the quantum hydrodynamics model that modifies refractive index of inhomogeneous WQPs with the inclusion of quantum correction through the quantum statistical and diffraction effects in the relativistic regime. Also, to better illustration of the physical difference between warm and cold quantum plasmas and their effect on the RSF, we have derived the envelope equation governing the spot size of X-ray laser beam in Q-plasmas. In addition to the upward ramp density profile, we have found that the quantum effects would be caused much higher oscillation and better focusing of X-ray laser beam in the WQP compared to that of cold quantum case. Our computational results reveal the importance of the use of electrons density profile and Fermi speed in enhancing self-focusing of laser beam

  2. Measuring the stellar luminosity function and spatial density profile of the inner 0.5 pc of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Tuan; Ghez, Andrea; Lu, Jessica R.; Morris, Mark R.; Yelda, Sylvana; Martinez, Gregory D.; Peter, Annika H. G.; Wright, Shelley; Bullock, James; Kaplinghat, Manoj; Matthews, K.

    2012-07-01

    We report on measurements of the luminosity function of early (young) and late-type (old) stars in the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way nuclear star cluster as well as the density profiles of both components. The young (~ 6 Myr) and old stars (> 1 Gyr) in this region provide different physical probes of the environment around a supermassive black hole; the luminosity function of the young stars offers us a way to measure the initial mass function from star formation in an extreme environment, while the density profile of the old stars offers us a probe of the dynamical interaction of a star cluster with a massive black hole. The two stellar populations are separated through a near-infrared spectroscopic survey using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser guide star adaptive optics system. This spectroscopic survey is able to separate early-type (young) and late-type (old) stars with a completeness of 50% at K' = 15.5. We describe our method of completeness correction using a combination of star planting simulations and Bayesian inference. The completeness corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars contains significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared to previous surveys with similar depth. In addition, by using proper motion and radial velocity measurements along with anisotropic spherical Jeans modeling of the cluster, it is possible to measure the spatial density profile of the old stars, which has been difficult to constrain with number counts alone. The most probable model shows that the spatial density profile, n(r) propto r-γ, to be shallow with γ = 0.4 ± 0.2, which is much flatter than the dynamically relaxed case of γ = 3/2 to 7/4, but does rule out a 'hole' in the distribution of old stars. We show, for the first time, that the spatial density profile, the black hole mass, and velocity anisotropy can be fit simultaneously to obtain a black hole mass that is consistent with that derived from

  3. The dislocation density and twin-boundary frequency determined by X-ray peak profile analysis in cold rolled magnetron-sputter deposited nanotwinned copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Csiszar, Gabor; Ungar, Tamas [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes University Budapest (Hungary); Balogh, Levente [Department of Materials Physics, Eoetvoes University Budapest (Hungary); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Zhang Xinghang [Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas (United States)

    2011-08-15

    The dislocation density and the average twin boundary frequency is determined quantitatively in as-deposited and cold-rolled nanotwinned Cu thin films by high-resolution X-ray line profile analysis. After cold-rolling the dislocation density increases considerably, whereas the twin boundary frequency decreases only slightly. The physical parameters of the substructure provided by the quantitative X-ray analysis are in agreement with earlier transmission electron microscopy observations. The flow stress of the as-deposited and the cold-rolled films is directly correlated with the average thickness of twin lamellae and the dislocation density by taking into account the Hall-Petch and Taylor type strengthening mechanisms.

  4. Near-surface density profiling of Fe ion irradiated Si (100) using extremely asymmetric x-ray diffraction by variation of the wavelength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, we report on correlations between surface density variations and ion parameters during ion beam-induced surface patterning process. The near-surface density variations of irradiated Si(100) surfaces were investigated after off-normal irradiation with 5 keV Fe ions at different fluences. In order to reduce the x-ray probing depth to a thickness below 5 nm, the extremely asymmetrical x-ray diffraction by variation of wavelength was applied, exploiting x-ray refraction at the air-sample interface. Depth profiling was achieved by measuring x-ray rocking curves as function of varying wavelengths providing incidence angles down to 0°. The density variation was extracted from the deviations from kinematical Bragg angle at grazing incidence angles due to refraction of the x-ray beam at the air-sample interface. The simulations based on the dynamical theory of x-ray diffraction revealed that while a net near-surface density decreases with increasing ion fluence which is accompanied by surface patterning, there is a certain threshold of ion fluence to surface density modulation. Our finding suggests that the surface density variation can be relevant with the mechanism of pattern formation.

  5. The effect of the electron temperature and current density profiles on the plasma current decay in JT-60U disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The plasma current decay during the initial phase of the current quench in JT-60U disruption has been calculated by a disruption simulation code (DINA) using the measured electron temperature Te profile. In the case of fast plasma current decay, Te has a peaked profile immediately after a thermal quench and the Te profile does not change significantly during the initial phase of the current quench. On the other hand, in the case of a slow plasma current decay, the Te profile is broader immediately after the thermal quench, and the Te profile shrinks. The results of the DINA simulation show that the plasma internal inductance Li increases during the initial phase of the current quench, whereas the plasma external inductance Le does not change over time. If the plasma is represented by a simple electrical circuit, the time derivative of Li functions as a resistance on the plasma current decay. It was confirmed that the increase in Li is caused by current diffusion toward the core plasma due to the decrease in Te in the intermediate and edge regions. (paper)

  6. THREE-DIMENSIONAL STELLAR KINEMATICS AT THE GALACTIC CENTER: MEASURING THE NUCLEAR STAR CLUSTER SPATIAL DENSITY PROFILE, BLACK HOLE MASS, AND DISTANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present three-dimensional (3D) kinematic observations of stars within the central 0.5 pc of the Milky Way (MW) nuclear star cluster (NSC) using adaptive optics imaging and spectroscopy from the Keck telescopes. Recent observations have shown that the cluster has a shallower surface density profile than expected for a dynamically relaxed cusp, leading to important implications for its formation and evolution. However, the true 3D profile of the cluster is unknown due to the difficulty in de-projecting the stellar number counts. Here, we use spherical Jeans modeling of individual proper motions and radial velocities to constrain, for the first time, the de-projected spatial density profile, cluster velocity anisotropy, black hole mass (M BH), and distance to the Galactic center (R 0) simultaneously. We find that the inner stellar density profile of the late-type stars, ρ(r)∝r –γ, have a power law slope γ=0.05−0.60+0.29, much more shallow than the frequently assumed Bahcall-Wolf slope of γ = 7/4. The measured slope will significantly affect dynamical predictions involving the cluster, such as the dynamical friction time scale. The cluster core must be larger than 0.5 pc, which disfavors some scenarios for its origin. Our measurement of MBH=5.76−1.26+1.76×106 M ☉ and R0=8.92−0.55+0.58 kpc is consistent with that derived from stellar orbits within 1'' of Sgr A*. When combined with the orbit of S0-2, the uncertainty on R 0 is reduced by 30% (8.46−0.38+0.42 kpc). We suggest that the MW NSC can be used in the future in combination with stellar orbits to significantly improve constraints on R 0

  7. A field calibration of neutron moisture meter and gamma ray density probe in a duplex soil profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field calibrations of two neutron moisture meters and a gamma ray density probe were obtained for the two layers of a duplex soil, sand over clay, in south east South Australia. The technique involved destructive sampling around access tubes set out in a grid pattern in a pine forest. The density probe was found to have a single calibration for both soil layers. The neutron moisture meters yielded calibrations which were different for the sand and clay layers. It is shown that errors associated with the use of each curve decrease when a correction is made for the dry bulk density of the soil layer

  8. The large-scale correlations of multi-cell densities and profiles, implications for cosmic variance estimates

    CERN Document Server

    Codis, Sandrine; Pichon, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    In order to quantify the error budget in the measured probability distribution functions of cell densities, the two-point statistics of cosmic densities in concentric spheres is investigated. Bias functions are introduced as the ratio of their two-point correlation function to the two-point correlation of the underlying dark matter distribution. They describe how cell densities are spatially correlated. They are computed here via the so-called large deviation principle in the quasi-linear regime. Their large-separation limit is presented and successfully compared to simulations for density and density slopes: this regime is shown to be rapidly reached allowing to get sub-percent precision for a wide range of densities and variances. The corresponding asymptotic limit provides an estimate of the cosmic variance of standard concentric cell statistics applied to finite surveys. More generally, no assumption on the separation is required for some specific moments of the two-point statistics, for instance when pre...

  9. Global characteristics of the upper transition height derived from the topside Alouette/ISIS topside sounder electron density profiles, the Formosat-3/COSMIC density profiles and the IRI ion composition model

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Truhlík, Vladimír; Benson, R.; Bilitza, D.; Chu, P.; Richards, P. G.; Třísková, Ludmila; Wang, Y.

    Paříž: COSPAR, 2014 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11123 Institutional support: RVO:68378289 Keywords : electron density * topside ionosphere * upper transition height Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics https://www.cospar-assembly.org/abstractcd/COSPAR-14/abstracts/C4.1-0014-14.pdf

  10. Assessment risk of osteoporosis in Chinese people: relationship among body mass index, serum lipid profiles, blood glucose, and bone mineral density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Rongtao; Zhou, Lin; Li, Zuohong; Li, Qing; Qi, Zhiming; Zhang, Junyong

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship among age, sex, body mass index (BMI), serum lipid profiles, blood glucose (BG), and bone mineral density (BMD), making an assessment of the risk of osteoporosis. Materials and methods A total of 1,035 male and 3,953 female healthy volunteers (aged 41–95 years) were recruited by an open invitation. The basic information, including age, sex, height, weight, waistline, hipline, menstrual cycle, and medical history, were collected by a questionnaire survey and physical examination. Serum lipid profiles, BG, postprandial blood glucose, and glycosylated hemoglobin were obtained after 12 hours fasting. BMD in lumbar spine was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. Results The age-adjusted BMD in females was significantly lower than in males. With aging, greater differences of BMD distribution exist in elderly females than in males (P7.0 mmol/L was lower than in people with BG of ≤7.0 mmol/L (P<0.001). People with serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels of ≥1.56 mmol/L had a greater prevalence of osteoporosis compared with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ≤1.55 mmol/L. Logistic regression with odds ratios showed that no association was found among total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, glycosylated hemoglobin, postprandial blood glucose and BMD. Conclusion The present study further confirmed that factors such as age, sex, weight, BMI, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and diabetes are significant predictors of osteoporosis in the Chinese people. PMID:27445467

  11. Imaging the density profile of a volcano interior with cosmic-ray muon radiography combined with classical gravimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosmic-ray muon radiography has the potential to reveal the density structure of gigantic objects. It utilizes the strong penetration ability of high-energy muons. By measuring the number of muons that travel through a target object, the average density can be calculated along the muon path. Since muons travel in straight paths through matter, specially designed detectors can generate density maps with higher spatial resolution than those obtained with conventional geophysical methods. However, this technique has a few notable limitations in that it can only be applied to near-surface structures above the muon sensor and strongly depends on the characteristics of the local topography. This is due to the fact that almost all cosmic-ray muons arrive only from the upper hemisphere. Geological structures, e.g. volcanoes, that allow for muon detectors to be placed on a slope directly below the point of interest are thus the best candidates for this technique. The drawback of muon radiography that only the horizontally integrated density above the sensor is measured with a time resolution larger than several weeks may be partly remedied by combining its results with gravity data, as they are both sensitive to target density while complementary to each other in several aspects. An example of such a combination is presented: real-time monitoring of magma head height in a volcano conduit. (topical review)

  12. CLASH-VLT: The stellar mass function and stellar mass density profile of the z=0.44 cluster of galaxies MACS J1206.2-0847

    CERN Document Server

    Annunziatella, M; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.; Rosati, P.; Balestra, I.; Presotto, V.; Girardi, M.; Gobat, R.; Grillo, C.; Medezinski, E.; Kelson, D.; Postman, M.; Scodeggio, M.; Brescia, M.; Sartoris, B.; Demarco, R.; Fritz, A.; Koekemoer, A.; Lemze, D.; Lombardi, M.; Bradley, L.; Coe, D.; Donahue, M.; Regös, E.; Umetsu, K.; Vanzella, E.; Infante, L.; Kuchner, U.; Maier, C.; Verdugo, M.; Ziegler, B.

    2014-01-01

    Context. The study of the galaxy stellar mass function (SMF) in relation to the galaxy environment and the stellar mass density profile, rho(r), is a powerful tool to constrain models of galaxy evolution. Aims. We determine the SMF of the z=0.44 cluster of galaxies MACS J1206.2-0847 separately for passive and star-forming (SF) galaxies, in different regions of the cluster, from the center out to approximately 2 virial radii. We also determine rho(r) to compare it to the number density and total mass density profiles. Methods. We use the dataset from the CLASH-VLT survey. Stellar masses are obtained by SED fitting on 5-band photometric data obtained at the Subaru telescope. We identify 1363 cluster members down to a stellar mass of 10^9.5 Msolar. Results. The whole cluster SMF is well fitted by a double Schechter function. The SMFs of cluster SF and passive galaxies are statistically different. The SMF of the SF cluster galaxies does not depend on the environment. The SMF of the passive population has a signif...

  13. Measurements of electron density and temperature profiles in plasma produced by Nike KrF laser for laser plasma instability research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L. Y.

    2015-08-01

    A grid image refractometer (GIR) has been implemented at the Nike krypton fluoride laser facility of the Naval Research Laboratory. This instrument simultaneously measures propagation angles and transmissions of UV probe rays (λ = 263 nm, Δt = 10 ps) refracted through plasma. We report results of the first Nike-GIR measurement on a CH plasma produced by the Nike laser pulse (˜1 ns FWHM) with the intensity of 1.1 × 1015 W/cm2. The measured angles and transmissions were processed to construct spatial profiles of electron density (ne) and temperature (Te) in the underdense coronal region of the plasma. Using an inversion algorithm developed for the strongly refracted rays, the deployed GIR system probed electron densities up to 4 × 1021 cm-3 with the density scale length of 120 μm along the plasma symmetry axis. The resulting ne and Te profiles are verified to be self-consistent with the measured quantities of the refracted probe light.

  14. Numerical computation of gravitational field of infinitely thin axisymmetric disc with arbitrary surface mass density profile and its application to preliminary study of rotation curve of M33

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Toshio

    2016-03-01

    We developed a numerical method to compute the gravitational field of an infinitely thin axisymmetric disc with an arbitrary surface mass density profile. We evaluate the gravitational potential by a split quadrature using the double exponential rule and obtain the acceleration vector by numerically differentiating the potential by Ridder's algorithm. The new method is of around 12 digit accuracy and sufficiently fast because requiring only one-dimensional integration. By using the new method, we show the rotation curves of some non-trivial discs: (i) truncated power-law discs, (ii) discs with a non-negligible centre hole, (iii) truncated Mestel discs with edge softening, (iv) double power-law discs, (v) exponentially damped power-law discs, and (vi) an exponential disc with a sinusoidal modulation of the density profile. Also, we present a couple of model fittings to the observed rotation curve of M33: (i) the standard deconvolution by assuming a spherical distribution of the dark matter and (ii) a direct fit of infinitely thin disc mass with a double power-law distribution of the surface mass density. Although the number of free parameters is a little larger, the latter model provides a significantly better fit. The FORTRAN 90 programs of the new method are electronically available.

  15. Aerial camera auto focusing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Lan, Gongpu; Gao, Xiaodong; Liang, Wei

    2012-10-01

    Before the aerial photographic task, the cameras focusing work should be performed at first to compensate the defocus caused by the changes of the temperature, pressure etc. A new method of aerial camera auto focusing is proposed through traditional photoelectric self-collimation combined with image processing method. Firstly, the basic principles of optical self-collimation and image processing are introduced. Secondly, the limitations of the two are illustrated and the benefits of the new method are detailed. Then the basic principle, the system composition and the implementation of this new method are presented. Finally, the data collection platform is set up reasonably and the focus evaluation function curve is draw. The results showed that: the method can be used in the Aerial camera focusing field, adapt to the aviation equipment trends of miniaturization and lightweight .This paper is helpful to the further work of accurate and automatic focusing.

  16. Improving lipoprotein profiles by liver-directed gene transfer of low density lipoprotein receptor gene in hypercholesterolaemia mice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    HAILONG OU; QINGHAI ZHANG; JIA ZENG

    2016-06-01

    The defect of low density lipoprotein receptor disturbs cholesterol metabolism and causes familial hypercholesterolaemia(FH). In this study, we directly delivered exogenousLdlrgene into the liver of FH model mice (Ldlr − / −) by lentiviral genetransfer system. The results showed that theLdlrgene controlled by hepatocyte-specific human thyroxine-binding globulin(TBG) promoter successfully and exclusively expressed in livers. We found that, although, the content of high density lipopro-tein in serum was not significantly affected by theLdlrgene expression, the serum low density lipoprotein level was reducedby 46%, associated with a 30% and 28% decrease in triglyceride and total cholesterol, respectively, compared to uninjectedLdlr − / −mice. Moreover, the TBG directed expression ofLdlrsignificantly decreased the lipid accumulation in liver andreduced plaque burden in aorta (32%). Our results indicated that the hepatocyte-specific expression ofLdlrgene strikinglylowered serum lipid levels and resulted in amelioration of hypercholesterolaemia.

  17. Modification of the Charlesby law. Pt. 1. Calculated profile of the scission density created in a polymer layer by particle beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For positive resists, the scission density profile versus irradiated depth is based on the development curve. If the value, G for scission yield is known, the profile of the effective energy absorbed in the depth can be calculated - and inversely. The effective energy is taken as the absorbed energy required to actually modify the polymer. In this paper, Charlesby's law, which links the particle dose to the average molecular weight, is used to analyse two cases taken from the litterature: electrons bombarded at 20 keV on PMMA and protons bombarded at 50 keV on PMMA. Charlesby's law proves to be a local law. When the absorbed energy remains constant along the irradiated depth, the law is assumed to yield the same molecular weight as that obtained from GPC analysis of the entire layer. Charlesby's relations is proved to be linear, but is not in agreement with the extrapolated zero-dose value

  18. Mathematical modelling of unmanned aerial vehicles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) UAVs are emerging as requirement of time and it is expected that in next five to ten years, complete air space will be flooded with UAVs, committed in varied assignments ranging from military, scientific and commercial usage. Non availability of human pilot inside UAV necessitates the requirement of an onboard auto pilot in order to maintain desired flight profile against any unexpected disturbance and/or parameter variations. Design of such an auto pilot requires an accurate mathematical model of UAV. The aim of this paper is to present a consolidated picture of UAV model. This paper first consolidates complete 6 DOF Degree of Freedom) equations of motion into a nonlinear mathematical model and its simulation using model parameters of a real UAV. Model is then linearized into longitudinal and lateral modes. State space models of linearized modes are simulated and analyzed for stability parameters. The developed model can be used to design auto pilot for UAV. (author)

  19. Computer simulation of an unmanned aerial vehicle electric propulsion system

    OpenAIRE

    Yourkowski, Joel.

    1996-01-01

    There has been a substantial increase in the use of electric propulsion systems in Unmannned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). However, this area of engineering has lacked the benefits of a dynamic model that could be used to optimize the design. configurations and flight profiles. The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has accurate models for the aerodynamics associated with UAVs. Therefore the proposed electric propulsion model would use the torque and RPM requirements generated by the aerodynamic model...

  20. 1939 Quay County CII Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  1. 1946 Macho Border DDO Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  2. 1936 Curry County AG Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  3. 1954 Lea County DHO Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  4. 1947 Sierra County DEZ Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  5. 1955 Lea County DHO Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  6. 1946 Eddy County DEO Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  7. 1947 Bernalillo County DFC Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  8. Determination of Radial Profiles of Current Density and Effective Mass of Ions of Impurity in Plasma Tokamak by Means of the Discrete Spectrum of Alfven Waves (DAW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The important feature of diagnostics - combined use of experimental methods and the numerical analysis. Serious advantages are simplicity of the experimental equipment and an opportunity of measurement of value of a safety factor in the centre of plasma directly, without any interpolation. Diagnostics is based on experimental measurement of density of plasma and eigenfrequencies of modes of a spectrum DAW, which then is compared to the theoretical spectrum received with the help of specially developed code, serving for identification of modes. The offered method has the time resolution 3 mcs and the spatial resolution is 2 cm. Eigenmodes in plasma are offered to be raised with the help of poloidal loopback antenna. The antenna will be connect from the generating block with the swept of frequency from 0.5 up to 8.5 MHz for 20 ms. The broadband amplifier of the generator on 100 W should provide power of radiation in plasma 6-7 W at a current through the antenna 5 A. Experimental criterion for recognition of a current profile is the set of differences of eigenfrequencies for several pairs of adjacent modes describing value q(0). Identification of modes will be carried out with the help of a code which, besides a class monotonously - falling down profiles, can restore classes of nonmonotonic profiles of the current having one, or two maxima on radius of plasma. Calculations have shown, that offered diagnostics can restore a profile of a current density with accuracy 6 - 9%, and the value q(0) to give out with accuracy not worse 0.7%. (author)

  9. Hematological profile of juvenile European catfish (Silurus glanis reared under different stocking densities in recirculating system conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandita Placinta

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available   The aim of present study was to evaluate the hematological parameters and the absolute number of leukocytes of European catfish (Silurus glanis maintained in different technological conditions induced by applied stocking densities. The experiment was conducted over a period of 32 days. A number of 450 European catfish, with an average weight of 158,9± 0,26 g, were distributed in four rearing units, in order to create different stocking densities as follows: V1- 14,28 kg/m3,  V2 – 28,59 kg/m3, V3 – 42,97 kg/m3 and V4- 57,06 kg/m3. The following hematological parameters were determined: RBC, Ht, Hb, MCV, MCH and MCHC. A decrease of RBC and higher values of MCH and MCHC were observed at V4, while at V1 an increase in RBC and lower MCV, MCH values can be seen. Regarding the absolute number of leukocytes, no significant statistical differences were registered between the applied stocking densities (p>0.05. However, there was a slight increase of leukocyte number with increasing stocking density (240,01 x103cel./mm3 at V4,  respectively 189,64 x103cel./mm3 at V1. It can be concluded from hematological parameters analysis that a stocking density of 60 kg/m3 seems to be out of the optimal range for catfish growth, in current growth conditions.  

  10. A direct dynamical measurement of the Milky Way's disk surface density profile, disk scale length, and dark matter profile at 4 kpc < R < 9 kpc

    CERN Document Server

    Bovy, Jo

    2013-01-01

    We present and apply rigorous dynamical modeling with which we infer unprecedented constraints on the stellar and dark matter mass distribution within our Milky Way (MW), based on large sets of phase-space data on individual stars. Specifically, we model the dynamics of 16,269 G-type dwarfs from SEGUE, which sample 5 < R/kpc < 12 and 0.3 < |Z|/kpc < 3. We independently fit a parameterized MW potential and a three-integral, action-based distribution function (DF) to the phase-space data of 43 separate abundance-selected sub-populations (MAPs), accounting for the complex selection effects affecting the data. We robustly measure the total surface density within 1.1 kpc of the mid-plane to about 5% over the range 4.5< R/kpc < 9. Using metal-poor MAPs with small radial scale lengths as dynamical tracers probes 4.5 < R/kpc < 7, while MAPs with longer radial scale lengths sample 7 < R/kpc < 9. We measure the mass-weighted Galactic disk scale length to be R_d = 2.15+/-0.14 kpc, in agreem...

  11. Human synaptic plasticity gene expression profile and dendritic spine density changes in HIV-infected human CNS cells: role in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkata Subba Rao Atluri

    Full Text Available HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND is characterized by development of cognitive, behavioral and motor abnormalities, and occur in approximately 50% of HIV infected individuals. Our current understanding of HAND emanates mainly from HIV-1 subtype B (clade B, which is prevalent in USA and Western countries. However very little information is available on neuropathogenesis of HIV-1 subtype C (clade C that exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. Therefore, studies to identify specific neuropathogenic mechanisms associated with HAND are worth pursuing to dissect the mechanisms underlying this modulation and to prevent HAND particularly in clade B infection. In this study, we have investigated 84 key human synaptic plasticity genes differential expression profile in clade B and clade C infected primary human astrocytes by using RT(2 Profile PCR Array human Synaptic Plasticity kit. Among these, 31 and 21 synaptic genes were significantly (≥3 fold down-regulated and 5 genes were significantly (≥3 fold up-regulated in clade B and clade C infected cells, respectively compared to the uninfected control astrocytes. In flow-cytometry analysis, down-regulation of postsynaptic density and dendrite spine morphology regulatory proteins (ARC, NMDAR1 and GRM1 was confirmed in both clade B and C infected primary human astrocytes and SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells. Further, spine density and dendrite morphology changes by confocal microscopic analysis indicates significantly decreased spine density, loss of spines and decreased dendrite diameter, total dendrite and spine area in clade B infected SK-N-MC neuroblastoma cells compared to uninfected and clade C infected cells. We have also observed that, in clade B infected astrocytes, induction of apoptosis was significantly higher than in the clade C infected astrocytes. In conclusion, this study suggests that down-regulation of synaptic plasticity genes, decreased dendritic spine density and induction of

  12. Radial profiles of electron density and current components at cathode surface in LaB6 hollow cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15 % - 20 % of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode. (author)

  13. X-ray variability of 104 active galactic nuclei. XMM-Newton power-spectrum density profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Martin, O.; Vaughan, S

    2012-01-01

    AGN, powered by accretion onto SMBHs, are thought to be scaled up versions of Galactic black hole X-ray binaries (BH-XRBs). In the past few years evidence of such correspondence include similarities in the broadband shape of the X-ray variability power spectra, with characteristic bend times-scales scaling with mass. We have performed a uniform analysis of the power spectrum densities (PSDs) of 104 nearby (z

  14. Proteomic Profiling of Recombinant Escherichia coli in High-Cell- Density Fermentations for Improved Production of an Antibody Fragment Biopharmaceutical

    OpenAIRE

    Aldor, Ilana S.; Krawitz, Denise C.; Forrest, William; Chen, Christina; Nishihara, Julie C.; Joly, John C.; Champion, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    By using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, a proteomic analysis over time was conducted with high-cell-density, industrial, phosphate-limited Escherichia coli fermentations at the 10-liter scale. During production, a recombinant, humanized antibody fragment was secreted and assembled in a soluble form in the periplasm. E. coli protein changes associated with culture conditions were distinguished from protein changes associated with heterologous protein expression. Protein sp...

  15. Network-Based Meta-Analyses of Associations of Multiple Gene Expression Profiles with Bone Mineral Density Variations in Women

    OpenAIRE

    He, Hao; Cao, Shaolong; Niu, Tianhua; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Lan; Zeng, Yong; Zhu, Wei; Wang, Yu-Ping; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2016-01-01

    Background Existing microarray studies of bone mineral density (BMD) have been critical for understanding the pathophysiology of osteoporosis, and have identified a number of candidate genes. However, these studies were limited by their relatively small sample sizes and were usually analyzed individually. Here, we propose a novel network-based meta-analysis approach that combines data across six microarray studies to identify functional modules from human protein-protein interaction (PPI) dat...

  16. Is Lipid Profile Associated with Bone Mineral Density and Bone Formation in Subjects with Spinal Cord Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadis Sabour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The association between serum lipids and bone mineral density (BMD has been investigated previously but, up to now, these relationships have not yet been described in spinal cord injury (SCI. We tried to assess the correlation between serum triglyceride (TG, total cholesterol (TC, high-density lipoprotein (HDL, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL and BMD in male subjects with SCI. Methods. Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA was used to assess BMD in femoral neck, trochanter, intertrochanteric zone, and lumbar vertebras. Blood samples were taken to measure serums lipids and bone biomarkers including osteocalcin, cross-linked type I collagen (CTX, and bone alkaline phosphatase (BALP. Partial correlation analysis was used to evaluate the relationships between mentioned measurements after adjustment for weight and age. Results. We found a positive correlation between HDL and femoral neck BMD (P: 0.004, r=0.33. HDL was negatively correlated with osteocalcin (P: 0.017, r=-0.31 which was not in consistency with its relationship with BMD. TC and LDL were not related to CTX, BALP and BMD. Conclusion. This study does not support a strong association between serum lipids and BMD in subjects with SCI. Moreover it seems that positive association between HDL and BMD is not mediated through increased bone formation.

  17. Comparative measurement of electron density and temperature profiles in low-temperature ECR discharges by a lithium atom beam and Thomson scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a method to determine spatially-resolved profiles of the electron temperature T e and density n e in an electron-cyclotron-resonance (ECR) discharge is presented. This technique is based on the observation of line emission from a neutral Li atom beam, which is injected into the plasma and excited by electron collisions. A collisional-radiative model valid for the injected Li atoms is used to predict the emission intensities as function of n e and T e for several lines theoretically. In contrast to the electron temperature regime representative for the edge of tokamak discharges (T e >5 eV), the ECR discharge offers a T e range where selected line intensity ratios strongly depend on the electron temperature. Therefore, a comparison of the measured ratios with the calculated ones yields T e profiles for the first time. The n e measurement is performed as in tokamaks by observing the attenuation of the beam due to ionization in the plasma. We present radial profiles of T e and n e for discharges in argon and xenon under different operating conditions. These results are compared with results obtained by Thomson scattering. Our measurements give evidence for a satisfying agreement between the two methods. (author)

  18. Measurements of Electron Temperature and Density Profiles of Plasmas Produced by Nike KrF Laser for Laser Plasma Instability (LPI) Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaechul; Weaver, J. L.; Obenschain, S. P.; Schmitt, A. J.; Kehne, D. M.; Karasik, M.; Chan, L.-Y.; Serlin, V.; Phillips, L.

    2012-10-01

    ExperimentsfootnotetextJ. Oh, et al, GO5.4, APS DPP (2010).^,footnotetextJ. L. Weaver, et al, GO5.3, APS DPP (2010). using Nike KrF laser observed LPI signatures from CH plasmas at the laser intensities above ˜1x10^15 W/cm^2. Knowing spatial profiles of temperature (Te) and density (ne) in the underdense coronal region (0 Nike LPI experiment, a side-on grid imaging refractometer (GIR)footnotetextR. S. Craxton, et al, Phys. Fluids B 5, 4419 (1993). is being deployed for measuring the underdense plasma profiles. The GIR will resolve Te and ne in space taking a 2D snapshot of probe laser (λ= 263 nm, δt = 10 psec) beamlets (50μm spacing) refracted by the plasma at a selected time during the laser illumination. Time-resolved spectrometers with an absolute-intensity-calibrated photodiode array and a streak camera will simultaneously monitor light emission from the plasma in spectral ranges relevant to Raman (SRS) and two plasmon decay (TDP) instabilities. The experimental study of effects of the plasma profiles on the LPI initiation will be presented.

  19. Effects of atorvastatin and simvastatin on low-density lipoprotein subfraction profile, low-density lipoprotein oxidizability, and antibodies to oxidized low-density lipoprotein in relation to carotid intima media thickness in familial hypercholesterolemia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tits, L.J.H. van; Smilde, T.J.; Wissen, S. van; Graaf, J. de; Kastelein, J.J.P.; Stalenhoef, A.F.H.

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Little is known about the effects of statins on the quality of circulating low-density lipoprotein (LDL) in relation to atherosclerosis progression. METHODS: In a double-blind, randomized trial of 325 patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), we assessed the effects of high-dose

  20. Variability of the bottomside (B0, B1) profile parameters of ionospheric electron density over the lower mid-latitude Cyprus and comparisons with IRI-2012 model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Sampad Kumar; Haralambous, Haris; Mostafa, Md Golam

    2016-07-01

    The present study investigates the variations of the bottomside ionospheric electron density profile thickness (B0) and shape (B1) parameters, deduced from the manually scaled digisonde (DPS-4D) ionograms at the lower mid-latitude Cyprus (Geographic 35°N, 33°E) covering the period 2009-2014. The monthly median hourly values of these parameters during different seasons and solar activity conditions are compared with the International Reference Ionosphere model (IRI-2012) estimations using three different options namely: Bil-2000, Gul-1987, and ABT-2009. To ensure the quiet time profile, the ionograms of the geomagnetically disturbed periods are discarded from the datasets and the storm model in the IRI is intentionally turned off. The statistical studies reveal considerable discrepancies in the observed B0 parameters from the model simulations, though the divergences are minimal around the daytime and during the summer solstice seasons. Nevertheless, B0 with the Gul-1987 option apparently shows closer daytime value during the low solar active summer, whereas the ABT-2009 option manifested relatively better agreement during the high solar active summer months. The characteristic morning, evening, as well as nighttime departure in the model derived B0 parameters are conspicuous in all the seasons in spite of unnoticed perturbations in the B1, suggesting that further improvement in the existing model database is essential with additional in-situ experimental data across the lower mid-latitude region. The important extracts from this study may support in the international efforts of determining the best set of profile parameters for the climatological representation of the ionospheric electron density variation across the globe.

  1. Effect of Stocking Density Stress on the Hematological Profile of Oncorhynchus Mykiss in KashmirTrout Raceways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samina Qadir Charoo

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The present research aimed at the investigation into the effect of stocking density on the hematological response of Oncorhynchus mykiss maintained in flow through condition. The stock having a weight of 520.22 ± 48.20 g and 580.25± 52.2 g were stocked in flow through FRP tanks at the stocking density of 38 kg/m3 and 30 kg/ m3 respectively. The sampling of Oncorhynchus mykiss blood from the four variants before and after the experimental trial allowed determination of hematological indices. Red blood cell counts (RBCc, hematocrit values (Hct, hemoglobin concentration (Hb, mean corpuscular volume (MCV, mean corpuscular hemoglobin (MCH and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC were measured and analyzed, with routine methods used in fish hematology. Differences in hematological parameters were statistically analyzed by Student T test. Physiological stress, induced by maintenance in different technological condition induced by stocking stress, was reflected in the hematological indices (significant increase, p<0.05, RBCc, Hb, Ht, MCV and decrease insignificant, p >0.05 MCH, MCHC with direct implications at the biotechnological level.

  2. Similar Spectral Power Densities Within the Schumann Resonance and a Large Population of Quantitative Electroencephalographic Profiles: Supportive Evidence for Koenig and Pobachenko.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin S Saroka

    Full Text Available In 1954 and 1960 Koenig and his colleagues described the remarkable similarities of spectral power density profiles and patterns between the earth-ionosphere resonance and human brain activity which also share magnitudes for both electric field (mV/m and magnetic field (pT components. In 2006 Pobachenko and colleagues reported real time coherence between variations in the Schumann and brain activity spectra within the 6-16 Hz band for a small sample. We examined the ratios of the average potential differences (~3 μV obtained by whole brain quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG between rostral-caudal and left-right (hemispheric comparisons of 238 measurements from 184 individuals over a 3.5 year period. Spectral densities for the rostral-caudal axis revealed a powerful peak at 10.25 Hz while the left-right peak was 1.95 Hz with beat-differences of ~7.5 to 8 Hz. When global cerebral measures were employed, the first (7-8 Hz, second (13-14 Hz and third (19-20 Hz harmonics of the Schumann resonances were discernable in averaged QEEG profiles in some but not all participants. The intensity of the endogenous Schumann resonance was related to the 'best-of-fitness' of the traditional 4-class microstate model. Additional measurements demonstrated real-time coherence for durations approximating microstates in spectral power density variations between Schumann frequencies measured in Sudbury, Canada and Cumiana, Italy with the QEEGs of local subjects. Our results confirm the measurements reported by earlier researchers that demonstrated unexpected similarities in the spectral patterns and strengths of electromagnetic fields generated by the human brain and the earth-ionospheric cavity.

  3. Similar Spectral Power Densities Within the Schumann Resonance and a Large Population of Quantitative Electroencephalographic Profiles: Supportive Evidence for Koenig and Pobachenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroka, Kevin S; Vares, David E; Persinger, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    In 1954 and 1960 Koenig and his colleagues described the remarkable similarities of spectral power density profiles and patterns between the earth-ionosphere resonance and human brain activity which also share magnitudes for both electric field (mV/m) and magnetic field (pT) components. In 2006 Pobachenko and colleagues reported real time coherence between variations in the Schumann and brain activity spectra within the 6-16 Hz band for a small sample. We examined the ratios of the average potential differences (~3 μV) obtained by whole brain quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) between rostral-caudal and left-right (hemispheric) comparisons of 238 measurements from 184 individuals over a 3.5 year period. Spectral densities for the rostral-caudal axis revealed a powerful peak at 10.25 Hz while the left-right peak was 1.95 Hz with beat-differences of ~7.5 to 8 Hz. When global cerebral measures were employed, the first (7-8 Hz), second (13-14 Hz) and third (19-20 Hz) harmonics of the Schumann resonances were discernable in averaged QEEG profiles in some but not all participants. The intensity of the endogenous Schumann resonance was related to the 'best-of-fitness' of the traditional 4-class microstate model. Additional measurements demonstrated real-time coherence for durations approximating microstates in spectral power density variations between Schumann frequencies measured in Sudbury, Canada and Cumiana, Italy with the QEEGs of local subjects. Our results confirm the measurements reported by earlier researchers that demonstrated unexpected similarities in the spectral patterns and strengths of electromagnetic fields generated by the human brain and the earth-ionospheric cavity. PMID:26785376

  4. Similar Spectral Power Densities Within the Schumann Resonance and a Large Population of Quantitative Electroencephalographic Profiles: Supportive Evidence for Koenig and Pobachenko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saroka, Kevin S.; Vares, David E.; Persinger, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    In 1954 and 1960 Koenig and his colleagues described the remarkable similarities of spectral power density profiles and patterns between the earth-ionosphere resonance and human brain activity which also share magnitudes for both electric field (mV/m) and magnetic field (pT) components. In 2006 Pobachenko and colleagues reported real time coherence between variations in the Schumann and brain activity spectra within the 6–16 Hz band for a small sample. We examined the ratios of the average potential differences (~3 μV) obtained by whole brain quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG) between rostral-caudal and left-right (hemispheric) comparisons of 238 measurements from 184 individuals over a 3.5 year period. Spectral densities for the rostral-caudal axis revealed a powerful peak at 10.25 Hz while the left-right peak was 1.95 Hz with beat-differences of ~7.5 to 8 Hz. When global cerebral measures were employed, the first (7–8 Hz), second (13–14 Hz) and third (19–20 Hz) harmonics of the Schumann resonances were discernable in averaged QEEG profiles in some but not all participants. The intensity of the endogenous Schumann resonance was related to the ‘best-of-fitness’ of the traditional 4-class microstate model. Additional measurements demonstrated real-time coherence for durations approximating microstates in spectral power density variations between Schumann frequencies measured in Sudbury, Canada and Cumiana, Italy with the QEEGs of local subjects. Our results confirm the measurements reported by earlier researchers that demonstrated unexpected similarities in the spectral patterns and strengths of electromagnetic fields generated by the human brain and the earth-ionospheric cavity. PMID:26785376

  5. LoCuSS: The Mass Density Profile of Massive Galaxy Clusters at z=0.2

    CERN Document Server

    Okabe, Nobuhiro; Umetsu, Keiichi; Takada, Masahiro; Futamase, Toshifumi

    2013-01-01

    We present a stacked weak-lensing analysis of a complete and volume-limited sample of 50 massive galaxy clusters at 0.15profile is remarkably smooth, justifying a one-dimensional radial analysis of the cluster mass distribution. The universal Navarro-Frenk-White model gives an excellent fit to the data, returning tight constraints on mass, Mvir=7.19^{+0....

  6. Magnetic Structures and Pressure Profiles in the Plasma Boundary of RFX-mod: High Current and Density Limit in Helical Regimes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: New edge diagnostics and detailed analysis of the magnetic pattern have significantly improved the comprehension of the processes that develop at the boundary of the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) plasma in RFX-mod (a =0.46 m, R = 2 m). An upper critical density threshold nC =0.4 nG (nG Greenwald density) is seen to limit the operational space for the improved Quasi Single Helical (QSH) regime: magnetic topology reconstruction and diagnostic observations suggest this limit as due to helical plasma wall interaction (PWI) in combination with toroidally localized edge density accumulation and cooling. The experimental evidence is provided by a reconstruction of the magnetic topology, the space and time resolved pattern of the floating potential measured at the wall, the plasma shift induced by the dominant (n = -7) toroidal mode, the electron pressure profiles measured by a Thermal Helium Beam (THB) diagnostic and the toroidal plasma flow obtained from Gas Puffing Imaging (GPI) system. In QSH regimes the toroidal modulation of electron pressure, floating potential and radial shift of the dominant mode are mainly determined by a helical PWI, with a source term localized where the dominant mode shift points outwards and a possible stagnation point at the X-points of m = 0 island chain, which is present in the plasma boundary. Such interaction increases with plasma current. The equilibrium between particle source and sink (which depends on wall recycling) does affect the possibility of having a QSH-Multi Helical state transition: the QSH state cannot be maintained beyond a critical density nC =0.4 nG. The possibility to increase nC with proper wall conditioning (e.g. lithization), which would decouple the fluxes from the wall and from the reversal region is under experimental verification. This density limit in the RFP plasma that limits the operational space where QSH is produced has remarkable similarities in the Tokamak H-mode physics whereby the Low to H

  7. Aerial robotic data acquisition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) equipped with sensors for physical and chemical measurements of remote environments, is described. A miniature helicopter airframe is used as a platform for sensor testing and development. The sensor output is integrated with the flight control system for real-time, interactive, data acquisition and analysis. Pre programmed flight missions will be flown with several sensors to demonstrate the cost-effective surveillance capabilities of this new technology. (author) 10 refs

  8. A Cheap Aerial Gas Pipeline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Bolonkin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: At present time gas pipelines are designed from steel and located on ground surface. That is very expensive and building requests a lot of time. Research and utilization of an old author idea: Design of new cheap aerial pipelines, a large flexible tube deployed at high altitude through neutral seas, for delivery of natural (fuel gas, water and other payload over a long distance is delineated. Approach: A lift force of 1 m3 of methane equals approximately 0.5 kg (1 pound. The lightweight film flexible pipeline can be located in air at high altitude and, as such, did not damage the environment. Using the lift force of this pipeline and wing devices payloads of oil, water, or other fluids, or even solids such as coal, cargo, passengers can be delivered cheaply at long distance. Results: Researcher showed: This aerial pipeline dramatically decreased the cost and time of construction relative to conventional pipelines of steel which saved energy and greatly lowers the capital cost of construction. Article contained a computed project for delivery 24 billion m3 of gas and tens of million tons of oil, water or other payload per year. Conclusion: Design of new cheap aerial pipelines, a large flexible tube deployed at high altitude, for delivery of natural (fuel gas, water and other payload over a long distance (neutral sea was delineated. The offered idea an aerial pipe line was researched. It was shown new pipelines radically decreased pipeline cost and construction time. Using the lift force of this pipeline and wing devices payloads of oil, water, or other fluids, or even solids such as coal, cargo, passengers can be delivered cheaply at long distance. This pipeline and wing devices also allowed to delivery the other goods.

  9. Aerial robotic data acquisition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofstetter, K.J.; Hayes, D.W.; Pendergast, M.M. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Corban, J.E. [Guided Systems Technologies, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A small, unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV), equipped with sensors for physical and chemical measurements of remote environments, is described. A miniature helicopter airframe is used as a platform for sensor testing and development. The sensor output is integrated with the flight control system for real-time, interactive, data acquisition and analysis. Pre-programmed flight missions will be flown with several sensors to demonstrate the cost-effective surveillance capabilities of this new technology.

  10. The accretion history of dark matter halos II: The connections with the mass power spectrum and the density profile

    CERN Document Server

    Correa, Camila A; Schaye, Joop; Duffy, Alan R

    2015-01-01

    We explore the relation between the structure and mass accretion histories of dark matter halos using a suite of cosmological simulations. We confirm that the formation time, defined as the time when the virial mass of the main progenitor equals the mass enclosed within the scale radius, correlates strongly with concentration. We provide a semi-analytic model for halo mass history that combines analytic relations with fits to simulations. This model has the functional form, $M(z) = M_{0}(1+z)^{\\alpha}e^{\\beta z}$, where the parameters $\\alpha$ and $\\beta$ are directly correlated with concentration. We then combine this model for the halo mass history with the analytic relations between $\\alpha$, $\\beta$ and the linear power spectrum derived by Correa et al. (2014) to establish the physical link between halo concentration and the initial density perturbation field. Finally, we provide fitting formulas for the halo mass history as well as numerical routines, we derive the accretion rate as a function of halo ma...

  11. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, Kim M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Wrighton, Kelly C. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Piceno, Yvette M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Andersen, Gary L. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); DeSantis, Todd Z. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Williams, Kenneth H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wilkins, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); N' Guessan, A. Lucie [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States); Peacock, Aaron [Haley & Aldrich, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Bargar, John [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States). Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL); Long, Philip E. [Energy and Environment Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA, 99353, USA; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-04-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional capacities of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Information about which community members respond to stimulation can guide the interpretation and development of remediation approaches. To comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns among a suite of samples associated with uranium bioremediation experiments we employed a high-density microarray (PhyloChip). Samples were unstimulated, naturally reducing, or collected during Fe(III) (early) and sulfate reduction (late biostimulation) from an acetate re-amended/amended aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Deep community sampling with PhyloChip identified hundreds-to-thousands of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) present during amendment, and revealed close similarity among highly enriched taxa from drill-core and groundwater well-deployed column sediment. Overall, phylogenetic data suggested stimulated community membership was most affected by a carryover effect between annual stimulation events. Nevertheless, OTUs within the Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing lineages, Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales, were repeatedly stimulated. Less consistent, co-enriched taxa represented additional lineages associated with Fe(III) and sulfate reduction (for example, Desulfovibrionales; Syntrophobacterales; Peptococcaceae) and autotrophic sulfur oxidation (Sulfurovum; Campylobacterales). These data imply complex membership among highly stimulated taxa, and by inference biogeochemical responses to acetate, a non-fermentable substrate.

  12. Detection of Aspens Using High Resolution Aerial Laser Scanning Data and Digital Aerial Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalle Eerikäinen

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim was to use high resolution Aerial Laser Scanning (ALS data and aerial images to detect European aspen (Populus tremula L. from among other deciduous trees. The field data consisted of 14 sample plots of 30 m × 30 m size located in the Koli National Park in the North Karelia, Eastern Finland. A Canopy Height Model (CHM was interpolated from the ALS data with a pulse density of 3.86/m2, low-pass filtered using Height-Based Filtering (HBF and binarized to create the mask needed to separate the ground pixels from the canopy pixels within individual areas. Watershed segmentation was applied to the low-pass filtered CHM in order to create preliminary canopy segments, from which the non-canopy elements were extracted to obtain the final canopy segmentation, i.e. the ground mask was analysed against the canopy mask. A manual classification of aerial images was employed to separate the canopy segments of deciduous trees from those of coniferous trees. Finally, linear discriminant analysis was applied to the correctly classified canopy segments of deciduous trees to classify them into segments belonging to aspen and those belonging to other deciduous trees. The independent variables used in the classification were obtained from the first pulse ALS point data. The accuracy of discrimination between aspen and other deciduous trees was 78.6%. The independent variables in the classification function were the proportion of vegetation hits, the standard deviation of in pulse heights, accumulated intensity at the 90th percentile and the proportion of laser points reflected at the 60th height percentile. The accuracy of classification corresponded to the validation results of earlier ALS-based studies on the classification of individual deciduous trees to tree species.

  13. Telemetry of Aerial Radiological Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Telemetry has been added to National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA's) Aerial Measuring System (AMS) Incident Response aircraft to accelerate availability of aerial radiological mapping data. Rapid aerial radiological mapping is promptly performed by AMS Incident Response aircraft in the event of a major radiological dispersal. The AMS airplane flies the entire potentially affected area, plus a generous margin, to provide a quick look at the extent and severity of the event. The primary result of the AMS Incident Response over flight is a map of estimated exposure rate on the ground along the flight path. Formerly, it was necessary to wait for the airplane to land before the map could be seen. Now, while the flight is still in progress, data are relayed via satellite directly from the aircraft to an operations center, where they are displayed and disseminated. This permits more timely utilization of results by decision makers and redirection of the mission to optimize its value. The current telemetry capability can cover all of North America. Extension to a global capability is under consideration

  14. USDOE aerial radiation monitoring programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EGandG Energy Measurements, Inc. operates the Remote Sensing Laboratory for the United States Department of Energy (USDOE). The Laboratory maintains eleven twin-engine aircraft, helicopters and fixed-wing, as aerial measurement platforms. It has a $23 million annual budget and 214 personnel operating at major facilities in Las Vegas, Nevada, and Washington, D.C. Remote sensing technologies include: large area radiological mapping, high altitude aerial photography, multispectral photography, multispectral aerial scanning, and airborne gas and particulate sampling. The Laboratory has developed a broad variety of remote sensing equipment; its personnel acquire, analyze, and report data to federal and stage agencies. As a major technical resource of the USDOE, the Laboratory plays a key role in the federal response to a radiological emergency, particularly in the establishment of a Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Many sophisticated systems for acquisition and analysis are deployed to a FRMAC, along with an advanced communication system to link the participating local, state, and federal agencies

  15. Aerial Image Series Quality Assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the growing demand for geospatial data, the aerial imagery with high spatial, spectral, and temporal resolution achieves great development. It is imperative to evaluate whether the acquired images are qualified enough, since the further image mosaic asks for strict time consistency and a re-flight involves considerable resources. In this paper, we address the problem of quick aerial image series quality assessment. An image series quality analysis system is proposed, which includes single image quality assessment, image series quality assessment based on the image matching, and offering a visual matching result in real time for human validation when the computer achieves dubious results. For two images, the affine matrix is different for different parts of images, especially for images of wide field. Therefore we calculate transfer matrixes by using even-distributed control points from different image parts with the RANSAC technology, and use the image rotation angle for image mosaic for human validation. Extensive experiments conducted on aerial images show that the proposed method can obtain similar results with experts

  16. Development of an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer for fast density profile measurements of dense plasmas generated by beam-target interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayton, Dan [National Security Technol., LLC, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Berninger, M; Meidinger, A; Stutman, Dan; Valdivia, Maria Pia

    2015-05-01

    For the first time an x-ray Talbot-Lau moire deflectometer is being developed that will use a flash tube source and fast detector for dynamic density gradient measurements. In Talbot-Lau moire deflectometry, an x-ray grating makes an image of itself on a second grating (the Talbot effect) to produce a moire pattern on a detector. The test object is placed between these gratings, with variations in index of refraction changing the pattern. A third grating in front of an incoherent x-ray source produces an array of coherent sources. With a 150 kV x-ray flash tube as the source, the gratings are placed in a glancing angle setup for performance at ~60 keV. The detector is a gated CCD with a fast scintillator for x-ray conversion. This diagnostic, designed for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test facility (DARHT) at Los Alamos National Laboratory, measures the density profile of dense plasma plumes ejected from beam-target interactions. DARHT has two high-current, pulsed, inductive linear electron accelerators with bremsstrahlung targets at the end of each beam line to create 2-D radiographic images of hydrodynamic tests. One multi-pulse accelerator has up to four beam pulses striking the same target within 2 μs. Computer simulations that model target evolution and ejected material between pulses are used to design these targets for optimal radiographic performance; the x-ray deflectometer will directly measure density gradients in the ejected plumes and provide the first experimental constraints to these models. During the first year, currently underway, the diagnostic systems are being designed. In year two, the flash tube and fast detector will be deployed at DARHT for radiographic imaging while the deflectometer is built and tested on the bench with a continuous source. Finally, in year three, the fast deflectometer will be installed on DARHT and density measurements will be performed.

  17. Changes in the High-Latitude Topside Ionospheric Vertical Electron-Density Profiles in Response to Solar-Wind Perturbations During Large Magnetic Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, R. F.; Fainberg, J.; Osherovich, V. A.; Truhlik, V.; Wang, Y.; Arbacher, R. T.

    2011-12-01

    The latest results from an investigation to establish links between solar-wind and topside-ionospheric parameters will be presented including a case where high-latitude topside electron-density Ne(h) profiles indicated dramatic rapid changes in the scale height during the main phase of a large magnetic storm (Dst Web (CDAWeb). Solar-wind data obtained from the NASA OMNIWeb database indicated that the magnetic storm was due to a magnetic cloud. This event is one of several large magnetic storms being investigated during the interval from 1965 to 1984 when both solar-wind and digital topside ionograms, from either Alouette-2, ISIS-1, or ISIS-2, are potentially available.

  18. Self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh Gaussian laser beam in a magnetoplasma with ramp density profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanda, Vikas; Kant, Niti; Wani, Manzoor Ahmad [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144411, Punjab (India)

    2013-11-15

    The early and strong self-focusing of a Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam in magnetoplasma in the presence of density ramp has been observed. Focusing and de-focusing nature of the Hermite-cosh-Gaussian laser beam with decentered parameter and magnetic field has been studied, and strong self-focusing is reported. It is investigated that decentered parameter 'b' plays a significant role for the self-focusing of the laser beam and is very sensitive as in case of extraordinary mode. For mode indices, m = 0, 1, 2, and b = 4.00, 3.14, and 2.05, strong self-focusing is observed. Similarly in case of ordinary mode, for m = 0, 1, 2 and b = 4.00, 3.14, 2.049, respectively, strong self-focusing is reported. Further, it is seen that extraordinary mode is more prominent toward self-focusing rather than ordinary mode of propagation. For mode indices m = 0, 1, and 2, diffraction term becomes more dominant over nonlinear term for decentered parameter b=0. For selective higher values of decentered parameter in case of mode indices m=0, 1, and 2, self-focusing effect becomes strong for extraordinary mode. Also increase in the value of magnetic field enhances the self-focusing ability of the laser beam, which is very useful in the applications like the generation of inertial fusion energy driven by lasers, laser driven accelerators, and x-ray lasers.

  19. High-density PhyloChip profiling of stimulated aquifer microbial communities reveals a complex response to acetate amendment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handley, Kim M.; Wrighton, Kelly E.; Piceno, Y. M.; Anderson, Gary L.; DeSantis, Todd; Williams, Kenneth H.; Wilkins, Michael J.; N' Guessan, A. L.; Peacock, Aaron; Bargar, John R.; Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-06-13

    There is increasing interest in harnessing the functional diversity of indigenous microbial communities to transform and remediate a wide range of environmental contaminants. Understanding the response of communities to stimulation, including flanking taxa, presents important opportunities for optimizing remediation approaches. We used high-density PhyloChip microarray analysis to comprehensively determine community membership and abundance patterns amongst a suite of samples from U(VI) bioremediation experiments. Samples were unstimulated or collected during Fe(III) and sulfate reduction from an acetate-augmented aquifer in Rifle, Colorado, and from laboratory experiments using field-collected materials. Results showed the greatest diversity in abundant SRB lineages was present in naturally-reduced sediment. Desulfuromonadales and Desulfobacterales were consistently identified as the dominant Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacteria (IRB and SRB) throughout acetate amendment experiments. Stimulated communities also exhibited a high degree of functional redundancy amongst enriched flanking members. Not surprisingly, competition for both sulfate and iron was evident amongst abundant taxa, but the distribution and abundance of these ancillary SRB (Peptococcaceae, Desulfovibrionales and Syntrophobacterales), and lineages containing IRB (excluding Desulfobacteraceae) was heterogeneous amongst sample types. Interesting, amongst the most abundant taxa, particularly during sulfate reduction, were Epsilonproteobacteria that perform microaerobic or nitrate-dependant sulfur oxidation, and a number of bacteria other than Geobacteraceae that may enzymatically reduce U(VI). Finally, in depth community probing with PhyloChip determined the efficacy of experimental approaches, notably revealing striking similarity amongst stimulated sediment (from drill cores and in-situ columns) and groundwater communities, and demonstrating that sediment-packed in-situ (down-well) columns served

  20. STELLAR POPULATIONS IN THE CENTRAL 0.5 pc OF THE GALAXY. I. A NEW METHOD FOR CONSTRUCTING LUMINOSITY FUNCTIONS AND SURFACE-DENSITY PROFILES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present new high angular resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the nuclear star cluster surrounding the Milky Way's central supermassive black hole. Using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser-guide-star adaptive optics system, this spectroscopic survey enables us to separate early-type (young, 4-6 Myr) and late-type (old, >1 Gyr) stars with a completeness of 50% down to K' = 15.5 mag, which corresponds to ∼10 M ☉ for the early-type stars. This work increases the radial extent of reported OSIRIS/Keck measurements by more than a factor of three from 4'' to 14'' (0.16 to 0.56 pc), along the projected disk of young stars. For our analysis, we implement a new method of completeness correction using a combination of star-planting simulations and Bayesian inference. We assign probabilities for the spectral type of every source detected in deep imaging down to K' = 15.5 mag using information from spectra, simulations, number counts, and the distribution of stars. The inferred radial surface-density profiles, Σ(R)∝R –Γ, for the young stars and late-type giants are consistent with earlier results (Γearly = 0.93 ± 0.09, Γlate = 0.16 ± 0.07). The late-type surface-density profile is approximately flat out to the edge of the survey. While the late-type stellar luminosity function is consistent with the Galactic bulge, the completeness-corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars has significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared with previous surveys with similar depth. This luminosity function indicates that the corresponding mass function of the young stars is likely less top-heavy than that inferred from previous surveys.

  1. Stellar Populations in the Central 0.5 pc of the Galaxy. I. A New Method for Constructing Luminosity Functions and Surface-density Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, T.; Lu, J. R.; Ghez, A. M.; Morris, M. R.; Yelda, S.; Martinez, G. D.; Wright, S. A.; Matthews, K.

    2013-02-01

    We present new high angular resolution near-infrared spectroscopic observations of the nuclear star cluster surrounding the Milky Way's central supermassive black hole. Using the integral-field spectrograph OSIRIS on Keck II behind the laser-guide-star adaptive optics system, this spectroscopic survey enables us to separate early-type (young, 4-6 Myr) and late-type (old, >1 Gyr) stars with a completeness of 50% down to K' = 15.5 mag, which corresponds to ~10 M ⊙ for the early-type stars. This work increases the radial extent of reported OSIRIS/Keck measurements by more than a factor of three from 4'' to 14'' (0.16 to 0.56 pc), along the projected disk of young stars. For our analysis, we implement a new method of completeness correction using a combination of star-planting simulations and Bayesian inference. We assign probabilities for the spectral type of every source detected in deep imaging down to K' = 15.5 mag using information from spectra, simulations, number counts, and the distribution of stars. The inferred radial surface-density profiles, Σ(R)vpropR -Γ, for the young stars and late-type giants are consistent with earlier results (Γearly = 0.93 ± 0.09, Γlate = 0.16 ± 0.07). The late-type surface-density profile is approximately flat out to the edge of the survey. While the late-type stellar luminosity function is consistent with the Galactic bulge, the completeness-corrected luminosity function of the early-type stars has significantly more young stars at faint magnitudes compared with previous surveys with similar depth. This luminosity function indicates that the corresponding mass function of the young stars is likely less top-heavy than that inferred from previous surveys.

  2. Development of a heterodyne micro-wave reflectometer with ultra-fast sweeping. The study of the plasma turbulence influence on the measurements of electron density profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The density profile of the fusion plasmas can be investigated by the reflectometry diagnostics. The measurement principle is based on the radar techniques which calculate the phase shift of a millimeter wave propagating into the plasma and reflected at a cut-off layer. However, this propagation is perturbed by the plasma turbulence. These phenomena affect the phase delay measurement by not well understood a process. In this work we have tried to find the mechanisms and origin of the turbulence which is responsible for the phase disturbance. We point out the role of collisionality and plasma radiation in controlling the instability and also, demonstrate that the phase delay of the probing wave is very sensitive to the plasma MHD phenomena and is less affected by the micro-turbulence. The second part of this work is the development and the use of a new heterodyne reflectometer. The principal characteristics are given. Its heterodyne detection allows the separation of phase and amplitude information from the detected signal and then to study their contribution to the mechanism of signal perturbation. The use of this reflectometer allows us to point out the following points: - a high dynamic availability, required by the large amplitude drops, often greater than 30 db; - fast sweep operation requirement to 'freeze' the plasma turbulence; - multiple reflection effects which modulate the amplitude and phase of the probing wave if they are not suppressed by filtering the detected signal; - very good localisation of the measurement (of the order of millimeter). The heterodyne reflectometer developed during this work offers several advantages of different distinct reflectometry techniques (fast sweep, absolute and differential phase measurements, heterodyne detection). It could be developed to work over higher frequency range so as to measure density profile over larger radial extension with very high performances. (author)

  3. Aerial Photography and Imagery, Uncorrected, historic aerial imagery; 1931-1990, Published in 2006, Washoe County.

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — This Aerial Photography and Imagery, Uncorrected dataset, was produced all or in part from Hardcopy Maps information as of 2006. It is described as 'historic aerial...

  4. Feasibility study for joint retrieval of air density and ozone concentration profiles in the mesosphere using an ultraviolet limb-scan technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Xia; LU Yao; Lü Daren

    2004-01-01

    For joint retrieval of vertical distributions of both air density and ozone concentration in the mesosphere which are two of the most important atmospheric parameters in this region, a retrieval scheme is suggested by using satellite limb scan observation at two UV wavelengths, i.e. 255 nm and 296 nm. The retrieval scheme is the modification of the direct method by Aruga and Heath with two UV wavelengths and two atmospheric parameters. Feasibility study was made based on simulated limb scan radiances computed with a single scattering radiative transfer algorithms of spherical geometry developed by the present authors and the inversion technique. Results of the simulations show that it is feasible to retrieve air density and ozone concentration vertical distributions on a global basis from satellite UV limb scan over the altitude range of 50 km~ 100 km with a vertical resolution of 1 km. The errors of the inferred profiles by using the joint inversion algorithm are greatly deduced, especially in the upper-mesosphere heights, compared with those by using the single inversion technique with a single wavelength.

  5. Dropsonde System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are assuming more numerous and increasingly important roles in global environmental and atmospheric research. There is a...

  6. The influence of stocking density on growth performance and hematological profile of stellate sturgeon (A. stellatus, Pallas, 1771, reared in an industrial ,, flow-through’’ aquaculture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desimira Maria Dicu Stroe

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available 800x600 The aim of this paper is to evaluate the influence of four different stocking densities, ranging from 18.7 to 28.6 kg m3, on growth performance and welfare of juvenile stellate sturgeons, reared in an industrial ,,flow-through’’ aquaculture system. At the end of 60 days experimental period, a survival rate of 98% and a stocking density that ranged from 32.5 to 39.8 kg m-3 were registered. The physiological state of biological material is characterized by the values ​​of hematological indices, that are not significant from the statistical point of view (p> 0.05, both at the beginning and at the end of experimental period, as well as between experimental variants. To assess the biological material growth performance, feed conversion ratio (FCR, specific growth rate (SGR and profile index were calculated. Regarding the growth performance parameters, better value are encountered at B1 (18.7 kg m-3 and B3 (23.3 kg m-3, appreciable values ​​at B2 (20.4 kg m-3 and low values at B4 (28.6 kg m-3. As conclusion, it can be assert that the initial stocking density of 28.6 kg m-3 is not optimal for rearing juvenile stellate sturgeons in an industrial ,,flow-through’’ aquaculture system. Normal 0 21 false false false RO X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

  7. A Spherical Aerial Terrestrial Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Christopher J.

    This thesis focuses on the design of a novel, ultra-lightweight spherical aerial terrestrial robot (ATR). The ATR has the ability to fly through the air or roll on the ground, for applications that include search and rescue, mapping, surveillance, environmental sensing, and entertainment. The design centers around a micro-quadcopter encased in a lightweight spherical exoskeleton that can rotate about the quadcopter. The spherical exoskeleton offers agile ground locomotion while maintaining characteristics of a basic aerial robot in flying mode. A model of the system dynamics for both modes of locomotion is presented and utilized in simulations to generate potential trajectories for aerial and terrestrial locomotion. Details of the quadcopter and exoskeleton design and fabrication are discussed, including the robot's turning characteristic over ground and the spring-steel exoskeleton with carbon fiber axle. The capabilities of the ATR are experimentally tested and are in good agreement with model-simulated performance. An energy analysis is presented to validate the overall efficiency of the robot in both modes of locomotion. Experimentally-supported estimates show that the ATR can roll along the ground for over 12 minutes and cover the distance of 1.7 km, or it can fly for 4.82 minutes and travel 469 m, on a single 350 mAh battery. Compared to a traditional flying-only robot, the ATR traveling over the same distance in rolling mode is 2.63-times more efficient, and in flying mode the system is only 39 percent less efficient. Experimental results also demonstrate the ATR's transition from rolling to flying mode.

  8. Automated Orientation of Aerial Images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høhle, Joachim

    2002-01-01

    Methods for automated orientation of aerial images are presented. They are based on the use of templates, which are derived from existing databases, and area-based matching. The characteristics of available database information and the accuracy requirements for map compilation and orthoimage...... production are discussed on the example of Denmark. Details on the developed methods for interior and exterior orientation are described. Practical examples like the measurement of réseau images, updating of topographic databases and renewal of orthoimages are used to prove the feasibility of the developed...

  9. THE AERODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF THE PROFILES FOR FLYING WINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile PRISACARIU

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using an un-piloted aerial vector is determined by the aerodynamic characteristics and performances. The design for a tailless unmanned aerial vehicles starts from defining the aerial vector mission and implies o series of geometrical and aerodynamic aspects for stability. This article proposes to remark the aerodynamic characteristics of three profiles used at flying wing airship through 2D software analysis.

  10. Generation of Land Cover Maps Using High-Resolution Multispectral Aerial Cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Höhle, Joachim

    high-density elevations for the automatic generation of land cover maps is discussed by means of a practical example. Imagery of a new aerial camera is used together with advanced software for generation of digital elevation models and for derivation of vegetation maps. These two products are the input......The generation of land cover maps has new advanced tools at its disposal. Besides new aerial cameras also new advanced processing tools are available. Elevations can be derived from images with high density and high positional accuracy. The combination of multispectral high-resolution imagery and...

  11. High-Resolution Sedimentation Rates at IODP Sites U1424 and U1427 since the late Pliocene from spectral-analyzing GRA Bulk Density and RGB Color Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorgas, Thomas; Irino, Tomohisa; Tada, Ryuji

    2016-04-01

    Sedimentation Rates (SRs) for IODP Sites U1424 (lat/lon coordinates: 40o11.40'N, 138o13.90'E; water depth: 2808 mbsl) and U1427 (lat/lon coordinates: 35o57.92'N, 134o26.06'E; water depth: 330 mbsl) were calculated by performing spectral analysis in the depth domain on both RGB color and Gamma-Ray-Attenuation (GRA) bulk density data. Inversion and integration of SRs versus depth from spectral analysis yielded detailed SR profiles in both time and depth domains. Our results show a greater variability in calculated SRs and differed from those established through coarse-scaled biostratigraphy and paleo-magnetic data. Our data analyses produces pulses of distinct high SRs for certain depth/age intervals at both sites, with time lags for such features possibly due to variable oceanographic conditions near-shore for Site U1427 versus those at Site U1424 further offshore. Both GRA and RGB profiles reveal a distinct periodicity in the waveband of Milankovitch cycles and other prominent periodicities in the 10-to-1ky period range. This observation suggests climate variabilities and trends in SRs responding to insolation patterns during the past 1 Myr at both sites and extending to 4.5 Myr for Site U1424. With only few identified eccentricity (100ky) cycle segments throughout the entire normalized spectral amplitude profile, our high-resolution Age-Depth model was tuned to obliquity (41ky) and precessional (19-23ky) cycles to achieving a strong fit with corresponding low-resolution models based on biostratigraphy, paleo-magnetic and, at least for Site U1424, augmenting volcanostratigraphy data. According to our Age-Depth models, relatively low SRs occur when evolutive amplitude spectra are dominated by periods in the range of obliquity and eccentricity. In contrast, significant SR peaks at both sites often occur when strong precessional amplitudes coexist with all other cycles. Lower SRs at Site U1424 have been interpreted to reflect a decrease in diatom flux and relative

  12. Lipid, fatty acid and energy density profiles of white sharks: insights into the feeding ecology and ecophysiology of a complex top predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pethybridge, Heidi R; Parrish, Christopher C; Bruce, Barry D; Young, Jock W; Nichols, Peter D

    2014-01-01

    Lipids are major sources of metabolic energy in sharks and are closely linked to environmental conditions and biological cycles, such as those related to diet, reproduction and migration. In this study, we report for the first time, the total lipid content, lipid class composition and fatty acid profiles of muscle and liver tissue of white sharks, Carcharodon carcharias, of various lengths (1.5-3.9 m), sampled at two geographically separate areas off southern and eastern Australia. Muscle tissue was low in total lipid content (90% of total lipid) and polyunsaturated fatty acids (34±12% of total fatty acids). In contrast, liver was high in total lipid which varied between 51-81% wm and was dominated by triacylglycerols (>93%) and monounsaturated fatty acids (36±12%). With knowledge of total lipid and dry tissue mass, we estimated the energy density of muscle (18.4±0.1 kJ g-1 dm) and liver (34.1±3.2 kJ g-1 dm), demonstrating that white sharks have very high energetic requirements. High among-individual variation in these biochemical parameters and related trophic markers were observed, but were not related to any one biological or environmental factor. Signature fatty acid profiles suggest that white sharks over the size range examined are generalist predators with fish, elasmobranchs and mammalian blubber all contributing to the diet. The ecological applications and physiological influences of lipids in white sharks are discussed along with recommendations for future research, including the use of non-lethal sampling to examine the nutritional condition, energetics and dietary relationships among and between individuals. Such knowledge is fundamental to better understand the implications of environmental perturbations on this iconic and threatened species. PMID:24871223

  13. Adaptive planning of emergency aerial photogrammetric mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fuqiang; Zhu, Qing; Zhang, Junxiao; Miao, Shuangxi; Zhou, Xingxia; Cao, Zhenyu

    2015-12-01

    Aiming at the diversity of emergency aerial photogrammetric mission requirements, complex ground and air environmental constraints make the planning mission time-consuming. This paper presents a fast adaptation for the UAV aerial photogrammetric mission planning. First, Building emergency aerial UAVs mission the unified expression of UAVs model and mechanical model of performance parameters in the semantic space make the integrated expression of mission requirements and low altitude environment. Proposed match assessment method which based on resource and mission efficiency. Made the Adaptive match of UAV aerial resources and mission. According to the emergency aerial resource properties, considering complex air-ground environment and mission requirements constraints. Made accurate design of UAV route. Experimental results show, the method scientific and efficient, greatly enhanced the emergency response rate.

  14. Vertical profiles of specific surface area, thermal conductivity and density of mid-latitude, Arctic and Antarctic snow: relationships between snow physics and climat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domine, F.; Arnaud, L.; Bock, J.; Carmagnola, C.; Champollion, N.; Gallet, J.; Lesaffre, B.; Morin, S.; Picard, G.

    2011-12-01

    We have measured vertical profiles of specific surface area (SSA), thermal conductivity (TC) and density in snow from 12 different climatic regions featuring seasonal snowpacks of maritime, Alpine, taiga and tundra types, on Arctic sea ice, and from ice caps in Greenland and Antarctica. We attempt to relate snow physical properties to climatic variables including precipitation, temperature and its yearly variation, wind speed and its short scale temporal variations. As expected, temperature is a key variable that determines snow properties, mostly by determining the metamorphic regime (temperature gradient or equi-temperature) in conjunction with precipitation. However, wind speed and wind speed distribution also seem to have an at least as important role. For example high wind speeds determine the formation of windpacks of high SSA and high TC instead of depth hoar with lower values of these variables. The distribution of wind speed also strongly affects properties, as for example frequent moderate winds result in frequent snow remobilization, producing snow with higher SSA and lower TC than regions with the same average wind speeds, but with less frequent and more intense wind episodes. These strong effects of climate on snow properties imply that climate change will greatly modify snow properties, which in turn will affect climate, as for example changes in snow SSA modify albedo and changes in TC affect permafrost and the release of greenhouse gases from thawing permafrost. Some of these climate-snow feedbacks will be discussed.

  15. Density Profiles in Sputtered Molybdenum Thin Films and Their Effects on Sodium Diffusion in Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 Photovoltaics: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J.; Glynn, S.; Mansfield, L.; Young, M.; Yan, Y.; Contreras, M.; Noufi, R.; Levi, D.; Terry Jr., F. L.

    2011-07-01

    Molybdenum (Mo) thin films were sputtered onto soda lime glass (SLG) substrates. The main variable in the deposition parameters, the argon (Ar) pressure pAr, was varied in the range of 6 - 20 mTorr. Ex situ spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) was performed to find out that the dielectric functions of the Mo films were strongly dependent on pAr, indicating a consistent and significant decrease in the Mo film density pMo with increasing pAr. This trend was confirmed by high-angle-annular-dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy. Dielectric functions of Mo were then found to be correlated with secondary ion mass spectroscopy profiles of Sodium (Na) in the Cu(InxGa1-x)Se2 (CIGS) layer grown on top of Mo/SLG. Therefore, in situ optical diagnostics can be applied for process monitoring and optimization in the deposition of Mo for CIGS solar cells. Such capability is demonstrated with simulated optical transmission and reflectance of variously polarized incident light, using dielectric functions deduced from SE.

  16. A "no-flow-sensor" wind estimation algorithm for unmanned aerial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Mayer, Stéphanie; Hattenberger, Gautier; Brisset, Pascal; Jonassen, Marius; Reuder, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    A "no-flow-sensor" wind estimation algorithm for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) is presented. It is based on ground speed and flight path azimuth information from the autopilot's GPS system. The algorithm has been tested with the help of the simulation option in the Paparazzi autopilot software using artificial wind profiles. The retrieval accuracy of the predefined profiles by the wind algorithm and its sensitivity to vertical aircraft velocity, diameter of the helical flight pattern and diff...

  17. COCOA: tracking in aerial imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Saad; Shah, Mubarak

    2006-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are becoming a core intelligence asset for reconnaissance, surveillance and target tracking in urban and battlefield settings. In order to achieve the goal of automated tracking of objects in UAV videos we have developed a system called COCOA. It processes the video stream through number of stages. At first stage platform motion compensation is performed. Moving object detection is performed to detect the regions of interest from which object contours are extracted by performing a level set based segmentation. Finally blob based tracking is performed for each detected object. Global tracks are generated which are used for higher level processing. COCOA is customizable to different sensor resolutions and is capable of tracking targets as small as 100 pixels. It works seamlessly for both visible and thermal imaging modes. The system is implemented in Matlab and works in a batch mode.

  18. Handbook of unmanned aerial vehicles

    CERN Document Server

    Vachtsevanos, George

    2015-01-01

    The Handbook of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles is a reference text for the academic and research communities, industry, manufacturers, users, practitioners, Federal Government, Federal and State Agencies, the private sector, as well as all organizations that are and will be using unmanned aircraft in a wide spectrum of applications. The Handbook covers all aspects of UAVs, from design to logistics and ethical issues. It is also targeting the young investigator, the future inventor and entrepreneur by providing an overview and detailed information of the state-of-the-art as well as useful new concepts that may lead to innovative research. The contents of the Handbook include material that addresses the needs and ‘know how’ of all of the above sectors targeting a very diverse audience. The Handbook offers a unique and comprehensive treatise of everything one needs to know about unmanned aircrafts, from conception to operation, from technologies to business activities, users, OEMs, reference sources, conferences, ...

  19. Fuel cells: a real option for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Espasandín, Óscar; Leo, Teresa J; Navarro-Arévalo, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    The possibility of implementing fuel cell technology in Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) propulsion systems is considered. Potential advantages of the Proton Exchange Membrane or Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEMFC) and Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC), their fuels (hydrogen and methanol), and their storage systems are revised from technical and environmental standpoints. Some operating commercial applications are described. Main constraints for these kinds of fuel cells are analyzed in order to elucidate the viability of future developments. Since the low power density is the main problem of fuel cells, hybridization with electric batteries, necessary in most cases, is also explored. PMID:24600326

  20. Aerial Terrain Mapping Using Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahar, K. N.

    2012-08-01

    This paper looks into the latest achievement in the low-cost Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) technology in their capacity to map the semi-development areas. The objectives of this study are to establish a new methodology or a new algorithm in image registration during interior orientation process and to determine the accuracy of the photogrammetric products by using UAV images. Recently, UAV technology has been used in several applications such as mapping, agriculture and surveillance. The aim of this study is to scrutinize the usage of UAV to map the semi-development areas. The performance of the low cost UAV mapping study was established on a study area with two image processing methods so that the results could be comparable. A non-metric camera was attached at the bottom of UAV and it was used to capture images at both sites after it went through several calibration steps. Calibration processes were carried out to determine focal length, principal distance, radial lens distortion, tangential lens distortion and affinity. A new method in image registration for a non-metric camera is discussed in this paper as a part of new methodology of this study. This method used the UAV Global Positioning System (GPS) onboard to register the UAV image for interior orientation process. Check points were established randomly at both sites using rapid static Global Positioning System. Ground control points are used for exterior orientation process, and check point is used for accuracy assessment of photogrammetric product. All acquired images were processed in a photogrammetric software. Two methods of image registration were applied in this study, namely, GPS onboard registration and ground control point registration. Both registrations were processed by using photogrammetric software and the result is discussed. Two results were produced in this study, which are the digital orthophoto and the digital terrain model. These results were analyzed by using the root mean square

  1. FATTY ACIDS PROFILE IN A HIGH CELL DENSITY CULTURE OF ARACHIDONIC ACID-RICH PARIETOCHLORIS INCISA (TREBOUXIOPHYCEAE,CHLOROPHYTA) EXPOSED TO HIGH PFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The changes in arachidonic acid (AA) and fatty acids profiles along the growth curve of Parietochloris incisa, a coccoid snow green alga, were studied in a 2.8 cm light-path flat photobioreactor, exposed to strong photon flux density [PFD, 2400 μEmol/(m2*s)]. Sixteen fatty acids were identified by gas chromatography showing that AA was the dominant fatty acid (33%-41%) followedby linoleic acid (17%-21%). AA content was closely investigated with respect tototal fatty acids (TFA), ash free dry weight (AFDW) of cell mass as well as total culture content. These parameters were influenced significantly in a similar manner by culture growth phase, i.e., slightly decreasing in the lag period, gradually increasing in the logarithmic phase, becoming maximal at the early stationary phase, starting to decrease at the late stationary phase, sharply dropping at the decline phase. The increase in AA per culture volume during the logarithmic phase was not only associated with the increase in AFDW but also connected with a corresponding increase in AA/TFA, TFA/AFDW as well as AA/AFDW. The sharp decrease in AA content of the culture during the decline phase was mainly due to the decrease in AA/TFA, TFA/AFDW and AA/AFDW, although AFDW declined only a smallextent. Maximal AA concentration, obtained at the early stationary phase, was 900 mg/L culture volume, and the average daily net increase of AA during 9 days logarithmic growth was 1.7 g/(m2*day). Therefore, harvesting prior to the declinephase in a batch culture, or at steady state in continuous culture mode seems best for high AA production. The latter possibility was also further confirmed bycontinuous culture with 5 gradients of harvesting rate. ``

  2. Comparison of the fluid dynamic models of solids density profile in a FCC cold riser with aid of gamma-ray transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To measure the axial concentration of the solid component with aid of gamma radiation to compare two fluid dynamic models was the goal of this work. An 241Am radioactive source of a 9 7.4 ·109 Bq intensity and the detector were collimated. A support of the arrangement allows dislocating source and detector in order to scan along of riser axial length. The gamma measurements are taken with a 0.05 m x 0.05 m NaI(Tl) detector associated to a mono and to a multichannel analyser which is provided by a Genie 2000, Canberra software for spectrum evaluation. By integrating the 0.060 MeV photopeak of the 241Am gamma spectrum all the attenuation measurements are taken. The catalyst mass absorption coefficient, μ =331 m2/kg, was determined in a previous experiment. For the solid volumetric fraction about 0.02, in the solid entrance in riser, the fluid dynamic model performances were compared by four different search numeric methods (Quasi-Newton, Hook-Jeeves Pattern Mooves, Rosenbrock Pattern Search and Simplex Procedure) from user-specified regression (Custom loss function) from nonlinear estimation of SIMULINK/MatlabR and Statistica software. In this standard multiple regression type it estimates the regression coefficients by 'finding' those coefficients that minimize the residual variance (sum of squared residuals) around the regression line. Any deviation of an observed score from a predicted score signifies some loss in the accuracy of prediction. The comparison tests between experimental and simulated data showed that the Santana's model was more indicated to simulate the solid axial density profile in a cold flow riser of a FCC pilot unit. (author)

  3. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06{mu}m as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, S. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-04-01

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs.

  4. Application of Thomson scattering at 1.06μm as a diagnostic for spatial profile measurements of electron temperature and density on the TCV tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variable configuration tokamak, TCV, in operation at CRPP since the end of 1991, is a particularly challenging machine with regard to the experimental system that must provide essential information regarding properties of confined plasmas with strongly shaped, non-circular cross-sections. The importance of the energy confinement issue in a machine designed specifically for the investigation of the effect of plasma shape on confinement and stability is self-evident, as is the necessity for a diagnostic capable of providing the profiles of electron temperature and density required for evaluation of this confinement. For TCV, a comprehensive Thomson Scattering (TS) diagnostic was the natural choice, specifically owing to the resulting spatially localized and time resolved measurement. The details of the system installed on TCV, together with the results obtained from the diagnostic comprise the subject matter of this thesis. A first version of the diagnostic was equipped with only ten observation volumes. In this case, adequate spatial resolution can only be maintained if measurements are limited to plasmas located in the upper half of the highly elongated TCV vacuum vessel. The system has recently been upgraded through the addition of a further fifteen observation volumes, together with major technical improvements in the scattered light detection system. This new version now permits TS observations in all TCV plasma configurations, including equilibria produced in the lower and upper halves of the vacuum vessel and the highly elongated plasmas now routinely created. Whilst a description of the new detection system along with some results obtained using the extended set of observation volumes are included, this thesis reports principally on the hardware details of and the interpretation of data from the original, ten observation volume system. (author) figs., tabs., 75 refs

  5. Verification of Potency of Aerial Digital Oblique Cameras for Aerial Photogrammetry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakada, Ryuji; Takigawa, Masanori; Ohga, Tomowo; Fujii, Noritsuna

    2016-06-01

    Digital oblique aerial camera (hereinafter called "oblique cameras") is an assembly of medium format digital cameras capable of shooting digital aerial photographs in five directions i.e. nadir view and oblique views (forward and backward, left and right views) simultaneously and it is used for shooting digital aerial photographs efficiently for generating 3D models in a wide area. For aerial photogrammetry of public survey in Japan, it is required to use large format cameras, like DMC and UltraCam series, to ensure aerial photogrammetric accuracy. Although oblique cameras are intended to generate 3D models, digital aerial photographs in 5 directions taken with them should not be limited to 3D model production but they may also be allowed for digital mapping and photomaps of required public survey accuracy in Japan. In order to verify the potency of using oblique cameras for aerial photogrammetry (simultaneous adjustment, digital mapping and photomaps), (1) a viewer was developed to interpret digital aerial photographs taken with oblique cameras, (2) digital aerial photographs were shot with an oblique camera owned by us, a Penta DigiCAM of IGI mbH, and (3) accuracy of 3D measurements was verified.

  6. Aerial Gamma-Ray Surveys in Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Data generated by aerial sensing of radiation emanating from the earth's surface in Alaska provides general estimates of the geographic distribution of Uranium,...

  7. Douglas County Historical Rectified Aerial Photos 1954

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This raster dataset consists of approximately 200 aerial photographs taken in 1954 in Douglas county, Kansas, United States. The Douglas County Public Works...

  8. Douglas County Historical Rectified Aerial Photos 1937

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This raster dataset consists of approximately 200 aerial photographs taken in 1937 in Douglas county, Kansas, United States. The Douglas County Public Works...

  9. Atlantic Protected Species Assessment Aerial Surveys

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — These data sets include a compilation of aerial line-transect surveys conducted over continental shelf waters of the southeastern U.S. Surveys have been conducted...

  10. Rangeland monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) have great potential for rangeland management applications, such as monitoring vegetation change, developing grazing strategies, determining rangeland health, and assessing remediation treatment effectiveness. UAVs have several advantages: they can be deployed quickly...

  11. Dropsonde System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A small, modular dropsonde launcher is being developed for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). Some critical measurement needs can only be satisfied by in-situ...

  12. Aerial Robotics: a Bird's-Eye View

    OpenAIRE

    Morin, P.; Morin, Pascal; Bidaud, P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience A fter manufacturing, ground transportation and medicine, robotics has now made an incursion in the field of aerial applications. Several domains, such as mapping, shooting, monitoring of indoor and outdoor 3D environments, agriculture and traffic monitoring, surveillance of sensitive areas, structure inspection, handling and carrying of heavy loads, and physical interventions now seek to exploit what are commonly called "drones". While these unmanned aerial vehicles...

  13. Low Cost, Low Profile Steerable SATCOM Antenna Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The small size of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) platforms along with the need to reduce drag to increase flight time creates a need for low-profile antennas. The...

  14. Planning and decision making for aerial robots

    CERN Document Server

    Bestaoui Sebbane, Yasmina

    2014-01-01

    This book provides an introduction to the emerging field of planning and decision making for aerial robots. An aerial robot is the ultimate form of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, an aircraft endowed with built-in intelligence, requiring no direct human control and able to perform a specific task. It must be able to fly within a partially structured environment, to react and adapt to changing environmental conditions and to accommodate for the uncertainty that exists in the physical world. An aerial robot can be termed as a physical agent that exists and flies in the real 3D world, can sense its environment and act on it to achieve specific goals. So throughout this book, an aerial robot will also be termed as an agent.   Fundamental problems in aerial robotics include the tasks of spatial motion, spatial sensing and spatial reasoning. Reasoning in complex environments represents a difficult problem. The issues specific to spatial reasoning are planning and decision making. Planning deals with the trajectory algori...

  15. Two-phased inventory of standing volume in mountain forests with the use of aerial photographs

    OpenAIRE

    Hoxha, Besim

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to elaborate and develop the existing methods used in inventorying lowland forest and adapt them for mountainous forests. The inventory of mountain forests with the use of CIR aerial photographs in this study relied on the implementation of the 3D (three-dimensional) methods and it was characterised by two phases. In the 1st p hase t he auxiliary variables (e.g. crown cover, height of dominant trees, density) were measured on the aerial photographs (355 circular plots). V...

  16. Nose and inlet duct radomes for the firebolt aerial target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoots, L. C.

    Radomes of the Firebolt Aerial Target (AQM-81A) facilitate an uncommon set of operational conditions. The target vehicle is first carried captively. Stones may be dislodged from the runway and impact the Nose or Inlet Duct Radomes with considerable force. The drone has various flight profiles after launch, encompassing levels of MACH 1.2 at 35,000 feet to MACH 4 at 100,000 feet. For flights of 10 minutes, attendant aerothermal loads produce temperature peaks of 680 deg F and 980 deg F for the Nose and Inlet Duct units, respectively. Firebolt is normally retrieved, by helicopter after its parachute deploys, for refurbishment and re-use. Occasionally, sea recovery is effected using flotation gear. Electrically, the Nose Radome accommodates an L-band antenna for the electronic scoring system, and a small circulary polarized X-band horn. The Inlet Duct Radome houses an identical broad-beamed horn.

  17. Acoustic atmospheric tomography using multiple unmanned aerial vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Anthony; Rogers, Kevin; Meade, Joshua; Franklin, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a method for tomographically reconstructing atmospheric temperature profiles and wind velocity fields based on acoustic travel time measurements between two or more Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs). The technique offers mobility and the capacity to monitor hazardous atmospheric environments, otherwise not justifiable on the basis of cost or risk. Simulations, in which the parametric fields of the atmosphere are modelled as a weighted sum of Radial Basis Functions, demonstrate the technique's potential performance envelope. The approach also allows local meteorological measurements made at the UAVs to supplement any time delay observations. This increases the accuracy of the technique, which has potential for practical applications in boundary layer meteorology, the theory of atmospheric turbulence, and wave propagation through a turbulent atmosphere.

  18. Autonomous Collision avoidance for Unmanned aerial systems

    OpenAIRE

    Melega, Marco

    2014-01-01

    Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) applications are growing day by day and this will lead Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in the close future to share the same airspace of manned aircraft.This implies the need for UAS to define precise safety standards compatible with operations standards for manned aviation. Among these standards the need for a Sense And Avoid (S&A) system to support and, when necessary, sub¬stitute the pilot in the detection and avoidance of hazardous situations (e.g. midair collis...

  19. Metrically preserving the USGS aerial film archive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Donald; Longhenry, Ryan

    2013-01-01

    Since 1972, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has provided fi lm-based products to the public. EROS is home to an archive of 12 million frames of analog photography ranging from 1937 to the present. The archive contains collections from both aerial and satellite platforms including programs such as the National High Altitude Program (NHAP), National Aerial Photography Program (NAPP), U.S. Antarctic Resource Center (USARC), Declass 1(CORONA, ARGON, and LANYARD), Declass 2 (KH-7 and KH-9), and Landsat (1972 – 1992, Landsat 1–5).

  20. Kite Aerial Photography - Hué

    OpenAIRE

    Brännström, Andreas; Ericsson, Mattias; Lundqvist, Camilla; Norberg, Micael; Willemark, Alva; Österholm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    The Kite Aerial Photography - Hué project started with the intention from Mattias Ericsson and me Micael Norberg to work artistically on a jointly project with students from di erent art schools and from di erent cultures. We had an idea of building bridges both artistically and culturally. We traveled to Hué in Vietnam in order to explore new ways to collaborate and  nd new artistic meth- ods. We wanted to use kites and send our cameras up in the air to make aerial pictures. We tried to  n...

  1. Advanced Image Processing of Aerial Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodell, Glenn; Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-ur; Hines, Glenn

    2006-01-01

    Aerial imagery of the Earth is an invaluable tool for the assessment of ground features, especially during times of disaster. Researchers at the NASA Langley Research Center have developed techniques which have proven to be useful for such imagery. Aerial imagery from various sources, including Langley's Boeing 757 Aries aircraft, has been studied extensively. This paper discusses these studies and demonstrates that better-than-observer imagery can be obtained even when visibility is severely compromised. A real-time, multi-spectral experimental system will be described and numerous examples will be shown.

  2. Ground cover estimated from aerial photographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbermann, A. H.; Cuellar, J. A.; Wiegand, C. L.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates of per cent ground cover made by ground observers were compared with independent estimates made on the basis of low-altitude (640-1219 m) aerial photographs of the same fields. Standard statistical simple correlation and linear regression analyses revealed a high correlation between the two estimation methods. In crops such as grain, sorghum, corn, and forage sorghum, in which the broadest part of the leaf canopy is near the top of the plant, there was a tendency to overestimate the per cent ground cover from aerial photographs.

  3. Optimal Path Planning for Unmanned Aerial Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Forsmo, Erik Johannes

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is a contribution to the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) project at the Department of Engineering Cybernetics, which is a project where contributions from master students and Phd students will result in an autonomous aerial vehicle. The unmanned vehicle laboratory has its own UAV, the Odin Recce D6 delta-wing aircraft which is to be considered in the overall project. When the UAV is in the air on a mission, one important thing is to ensure that the UAV detects obstacles, such as mou...

  4. Trajectory planning and replanning strategies applied to a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Chamseddine, Abbas; Zhang, Youmin; Rabbath, Camille-Alain; THEILLIOL, DIDIER

    2012-01-01

    This paper considers the problem of trajectory planning/re-planning for a quadrotor unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) system. In the fault-free case, the objective is to find the profile of the trajectory to follow so that the system constraints are not violated. When actuator faults occur, trajectory re-planning changes the nominal trajectory so as to take into consideration the new control limitations induced by the occurred fault. Trajectory re-planning requires information about fault locatio...

  5. 1935 15' Quad #100 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  6. Aerial Survey Units for Harbor Seals in Coastal Alaska

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Aerial surveys of coastal Alaska are the primary method for estimating abundance of harbor seals. A particular challenge associated with aerial surveys of harbor...

  7. 1935 15' Quad #031 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  8. 1935 15' Quad #259 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  9. 1935 15' Quad #098 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  10. 1935 15' Quad #154 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  11. 1935 15' Quad #106 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index - NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  12. US Forest Service Aerial Fire Retardant Hydrographic Avoidance Areas: Aquatic

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map services on the www depicting aerial retardant avoidance areas for hydrographic feature data. Aerial retardant avoidance area for hydrographic feature data...

  13. 1935 15' Quad #130 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  14. 1935 15' Quad #195 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index - AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  15. Index for SCS 1934-1937 Aerial Photography

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  16. 1935 15' Quad #125 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  17. 1935 15' Quad #081 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  18. 1935 15' Quad #032 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  19. 1935 15' Quad #457 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  20. 1935 15' Quad #373 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  1. 1935 15' Quad #172 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  2. 1935 15' Quad #122 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  3. 1935 15' Quad #244 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  4. 1935 15' Quad #060 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  5. 1935 15' Quad #157 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  6. 1949-50 DIO USFS Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  7. 1935 15' Quad #227 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  8. 1935 15' Quad #298 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  9. 1935 15' Quad #132 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  10. 1935 15' Quad #082 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  11. 1935 15' Quad #368 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  12. 1935 15' Quad #466 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  13. 1935 15' Quad #153 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  14. 1935 15' Quad #005 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  15. 1935 15' Quad #200 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  16. 1935 15' Quad #133 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  17. 1935 15' Quad #417 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index - NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  18. 1935 15' Quad #410 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  19. 1935 15' Quad #271 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  20. 1935 15' Quad #343 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  1. 1935 15' Quad #291 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  2. 1935 15' Quad #128 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  3. 1935 15' Quad #127 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  4. 1935 15' Quad #223 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  5. 1935 15' Quad #490 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  6. 1935 15' Quad #345 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  7. 1935 15' Quad #156 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  8. 1935 15' Quad #173 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index - AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  9. 1935 15' Quad #370 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  10. 1935 15' Quad #129 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index - NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  11. 1935 15' Quad #351 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  12. Aerial surveys for beaver in Mackenzie District, Northwest Territories

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Report of the methods, results, and uses of aerial surveys for beaver in a wilderness area. The results of aerial surveys in 1949, 1951 and 1952 have been used to...

  13. 1935 15' Quad #292 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  14. 1935 15' Quad #009 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  15. 1935 15' Quad #249 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  16. 1935 15' Quad #226 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  17. 1935 15' Quad #152 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  18. 1935 15' Quad #243 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  19. 1935 15' Quad #058 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  20. 1935 15' Quad #414 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  1. 1935 15' Quad #033 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  2. 1935 15' Quad #267 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  3. 1935 15' Quad #386 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  4. 1935 15' Quad #037 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  5. US Forest Service Aerial Fire Retardant Avoidance Areas: Terrestrial

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Forest Service, Department of Agriculture — A map service depicting aerial fire retardant avoidance areas delivered as part of the 2011 Nationwide Aerial Application of Fire Retardant on National Forest...

  6. 1935 15' Quad #246 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  7. 1935 15' Quad #268 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  8. 1935 15' Quad #078 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  9. 1935 15' Quad #001 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  10. 1935 15' Quad #371 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  11. 1935 15' Quad #221 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  12. 1935 15' Quad #049 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  13. 1935 15' Quad #195 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index - NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  14. 1947 Dona Ana County DEY Aerial Photo Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial photographs are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The aerial photo inventory contains imagery from various sources that are now archived at the Earth...

  15. 1935 15' Quad #375 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  16. 1935 15' Quad #076 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  17. 1935 15' Quad #075 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  18. 1935 15' Quad #099 Aerial Photo Mosaic Index

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Aerial Photo Reference Mosaics contain aerial photographs that are retrievable on a frame by frame basis. The inventory contains imagery from various sources that...

  19. Aerial treatments in forest protection – research methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowiński Robert Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Treatment effectiveness in forest protection against harmful insects depends not only on pesticide efficacy of the product applied, but also on a number of other factors including assurance that a given insecticide reaches the pest living in the canopy. In the treatments with the use of aerial equipment (silva-aerial it is advisable to consider species and age diversity of protected tree stands. The paper presents research methodology on the assessment of spray structure and density, penetration of spray droplets into the canopy as well as a degree of coverage and incorporation in tree crowns. The methodology proposed takes into account characteristics of the forest area studied and its surroundings, as well as the parameters and equipment of the measurement line. There were determined: operation requirements for the aircraft and its test and registration equipment as well as demands on pilot qualifications, flight performance on the measurement line and weather conditions allowing for conducting test trials. In the paper, there are presented a set of values and mathematical formulas needed for the analyses. Taking into account ecological threats, there were included the methods on evaluation of spray drift of the liquid distributed over the forest.

  20. Using Aerial Hydromulch in Post-fire Chaparral in Southern California: Effectiveness and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlgemuth, P. M.; Beyers, J. L.; Robichaud, P. R.

    2012-12-01

    High severity wildfire can make landscapes susceptible to accelerated erosion that may retard resource recovery. High levels of erosion can also threaten life, property, and infrastructure in downstream human communities. Land managers often use mitigation measures on the burned hillside slopes to control post-fire sediment fluxes both as the first step in post-fire restoration and to protect off-site human developments. Aerial hydromulch, a slurry of paper or wood fiber with tackifiers and other amendments that dries to a permeable crust, is a relatively new erosion control treatment that has not been rigorously field-tested in wildland settings. Concerns have been raised over the ability of aerial hydromulch to reduce hillslope erosion as well as its potential for negative effects on post-fire ecosystem recovery. Since 2007 we have measured sediment fluxes and vegetation development on plots treated operationally with aerial hydromulch and compared them to untreated controls after three separate wildfires in southern California. These study plots, located on steep slopes with coarse upland soils previously covered with dense mixed chaparral vegetation, were monitored with silt fences to trap eroded sediment. Meter-square quadrats were used to measure ground and vegetation cover. Although dependent on rainfall and site characteristics, surface erosion on untreated plots generally attenuated sharply with years since burning. We found that aerial hydromulch did reduce bare ground on the treated plots and that this cover persisted through the first post-fire winter rainy season. For the initial year after a fire, aerial hydromulch reduced hillslope erosion from small and medium rainstorms, but not during an extremely high intensity rainfall event. Hydromulch had no effect on regrowing plant cover, shrub seedling density, or species richness. Thus, in chaparral ecosystems aerial hydromulch appears to be an effective post-fire erosion control measure that is