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Sample records for aecl

  1. The AECL operator companion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As CANDU plants become more complex, and are operated under tighter constraints and for longer periods between outages, plant operations staff will have to absorb more information to correctly and rapidly respond to upsets. A development program is underway at AECL to use expert systems and interactive media tools to assist operations staff of existing and future CANDU plants. The complete system for plant information access and display, on-line advice and diagnosis, and interactive operating procedures is called the Operator Companion. A prototype, consisting of operator consoles, expert systems and simulation modules in a distributed architecture, is currently being developed to demonstrate the concepts of the Operator Companion

  2. AECL's plant Information Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The competitiveness of the world-wide energy market is a continual driving force for improvements to CANDU performance and lower operating, maintenance, and administration costs. As in other industries, advanced Information Technologies (IT) are changing the way we work and conduct business. The nuclear industry is no different and there exists strong incentives to improve work processes and provide faster and more flexible access to the information needed to effectively manage and maintain nuclear plant assets. AECL has responded to these forces through the development of a vision of integrated IT systems addressing all phases of nuclear plant development and operations. This includes the initial engineering, design, and construction processes as well as support to the long-term operations and maintenance. Integral to the AECL vision is the need for cost-effective engineering and operational configuration management systems, proactive maintenance processes and systems, and advanced plant surveillance and diagnostics. This paper presents the vision and describes the integrated information systems needed to manage both the design basis and operating plant data systems to ensure the cost-effective, long-term viability of CANDU plants. (author)

  3. AECL annual review 1992 - 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992/93 was a pivotal year for AECL, with the redirection of its strategic plan, the refocussing of its corporate mission, a change in its structural organization to meet new challenges, the contract with South Korea for Wolsong Units 3 and 4 and the Memorandum of Understanding with Saskatchewan. AECL looks forward to the next 12 months as a time of opportunity, confident in the knowledge that they possess the means to succeed. ills

  4. AECL's reliability and maintainability program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's reliability and maintainability program for nuclear generating stations is described. How the various resources of the company are organized to design and construct stations that operate reliably and safely is shown. Reliability and maintainability includes not only special mathematically oriented techniques, but also the technical skills and organizational abilities of the company. (author)

  5. Annual report 1995-1996. AECL research No. AECL-11577

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-01

    Annual report of AECL, the legal name of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Its mandate is to undertake research into nuclear energy and to develop commercial applications for its developments. This annual report presents information on marketing and commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management and nuclear sciences, environmental management and site refurbishment. A financial review is included, along with management responsibility, an Auditor`s report, financial statements, a five-year financial summary, and a list of directors and locations.

  6. Annual report 1997--1998. AECL research number AECL-11964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Annual report of AECL, the legal name of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Its mandate is to undertake research into nuclear energy and to develop commercial applications for its developments. This annual report presents information on marketing and commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management and nuclear sciences, environmental management and site refurbishment. A financial review is included, along with management responsibility, an Auditor's report, financial statements, a five-year financial summary, and a list of directors and locations

  7. Development of advanced ceramics at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has a long history of developing ceramics for nuclear fission and fusion applications. AECL is now applying its multidisciplinary materials R and D capabilities, including unique capabilities in ceramic processing and nondestructive evaluation, to develop advanced ceramic materials for commercial and industrial applications. This report provides an overview of the facilities and programs associated with the development of advanced ceramics at AECL

  8. AECL sees improved earnings potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL (formerly Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) says it has turned the corner in the nuclear generating plant market, and predicts rising profits in the years to come. In its latest five year plan, the Canadian Crown corporation predicts sales revenues over the next four years will triple, to $666 million in 1995/96 from $191 million in the current fiscal year while profit is expected to jump to $39 million from $5 million. Late in 1990, the company signed a $400 million contract to build a second nuclear power plant at Wolsong, in South Korea, and says the South Korean government has expressed an interest in adding two more units to the site, which already has one operating CANDU reactor

  9. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study. AECL research No. AECL-10851

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, J.J.; Smellie, J.A.T. (eds.)

    1994-07-15

    AECL has conducted natural analog studies on the Cigar Lake uranium deposit in northern Saskatchewan since 1984 as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This report provides background information and summarizes the results of the study, emphasizing the analog aspects and the implications of modelling activities related to the performance assessment of disposal concepts for nuclear fuel wastes developed in both Canada and Sweden. The study was undertaken to obtain an understanding of the process involved in, and the effects of, steady-state water-rock interaction and trace-element migration in and around the deposit, including paleo-migration processes since the deposit was formed. To achieve these objectives, databases and models were produced to evaluate the equilibrium thermodynamic codes and databases; the role of colloids, organics, and microbes in transport processes for radionuclides; and the stability of UO2 and the influence of radiolysis on UO2 dissolution and radionuclide migration.

  10. AECL: Changing to meet the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the president of AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.) shares some thoughts on reorganization in general, and the on-going reorganization of AECL in particular. He explains that downsizing and the drive for efficiency are not enough: the organization must be customer-oriented, which means meeting with potential customers and listening to them, as well as thinking about their needs, and planning accordingly. Not only AECL, but the whole Canadian nuclear industry needs to be market-driven and to improve its marketing skills

  11. AECL programs in advanced systems research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL program in advanced systems research is directed in the long term to securing the option of obtaining fissile fuel by electronuclear breeding (accelerator breeder or fusion breeder) and to providing a basis from which AECL might move into stand alone fusion energy if warranted. In the short term the program is directed to reaping benefits from electronuclear technology. This report outlines the main activities and research facilities in both the long-term and short-term subprograms

  12. The AECL reactor development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modem CANDU-PHWR power reactor is the result of more than 50 years of evolutionary design development in Canada. It is one of only three commercially successful designs in the world to this date. The basis for future development is the CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 models. Four of the first type are operating and four more will go an line before the end of this decade. The CANDU 9 is a modernized single-unit version of the twelve large multi-unit plants operated by Ontario Hydro. All of these plants use proven technology which resulted from research, development, design construction, and operating experience over the past 25 years. Looking forward another 25 years, AECL plans to retain all of the essential features that distinguish today's CANDU reactors (heavy water moderation, on-power fuelling simple bundle design, horizontal fuel channels, etc.). The end product of the planned 25-year development program is more than a specific design - it is a concept which embodies advanced features expected from ongoing R and D programs. To carry out the evolutionary work we have selected seven main areas for development: Safety Technology, Fuel and Fuel Cycles, Fuel Channels, Systems and Components, Heavy Water and Tritium Information Technology, and Construction. There are three strategic measures of success for each of these work areas: improved economics, advanced fuel cycle utilization, and enhanced safety/plant robustness. The paper describes these work programs and the overall goals of each of them. (author)

  13. AECL annual review 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formed as a Crown Corporation in 1952, AECL consists of two main divisions: AECL CANDU, based in Missisauga and Montreal, responsible for the development, design, marketing and project management of CANDU nuclear power projects; and AECL Research, with its head office in Ottawa and laboratories in Chalk River, Ontario and Pinawa, Manitoba, which supports CANDU and performs the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their associated technologies. A strategic plan is under development, which will address the issues of market identification, key partnerships, securing the CANDU technology base, export financing and optimum business structure. In 1991/92 operating income was $16.4 million, up from $7.8 million in 1990/91. Good progress was made on goals to revitalize and upgrade AECL employee's skills and productivity. Key goals for AECL CANDU were: launching the Wolsung 2 reactor project in south Korea; closing the timing and product options for Wolsong 3 and 4; securing new business for Cernavoda 1; and attaining an agreement with either Saskatchewan Power Corp. or the New Brunswick Electric Power Commission regarding the timing of their CANDU 3 projects. Some success was achieved in the first three goals; Saskatchewan has chosen not to proceed with its CANDU 3 plant, but negotiations are continuing in New Brunswick. Key goals for AECL Research were: securing an advanced CANDU research and development program outside the CANDU Owners Group; Disposing of remaining non-nuclear technologies by spin-off, licensing or close-out; rationalizing commercial operations to generate increased revenues; and obtaining the Atomic Energy Control Board's approval of the NRU reactor assessment basis document. Progress was made on all goals

  14. AECL annual report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The 1996/1997 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from marketing, commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management, environmental management, financial review and copies of financial statements.

  15. AECL: 60 years of contributing to Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper traces the history of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. For 60 years AECL has contributed world class science and technology to Canada, while assisting Government on policy issues, enabling business innovation and technology transfer, and generating highly qualified workforce for Canadian industry.

  16. AECL's business prospects with China improve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 1994, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) and the China National Nuclear Corp. signed a memorandum of understanding which opens the door for the eventual sale of two 685 MW Candu reactors worth a total of C$3.5-billion

  17. AECL annual report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1996/1997 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from marketing, commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management, environmental management, financial review and copies of financial statements

  18. AECL's support to operating plants world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through their operating records, CANDU reactors have established themselves as a successful and cost-effective source of electricity in Canada and abroad. They have proven to be safe, reliable and economical. A variety of factors have contributed to the enviable CANDU record, such as a sound design based on proven principles supported by effective development programs, along with dedicated plant owners committed to excellence in safely maintaining and operating their plants. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU designer, has continuously maintained a close relationship with owners/operators of the plants in Canada, Argentina, Romania and South Korea. AECL and the plant operators have all benefited from this strengthening relationship by sharing experience and information. CANDU plant operators have been required to respond decisively to the economic realities of downward cost pressures and deregulation. Operating, Maintenance and Administration (OM and A) costs are being given a new focus as plant owners review each cost element to improve the economic returns from their investments. Amongst the three main OM and A constituents, plant maintenance costs are the most variable and have the largest influence on effective plant operations. The correlation between effective plant maintenance and high capacity factors shows clearly the importance of proactive maintenance planning to reduce the frequency and duration of forced plant outages and their negative impacts on plant economics. This paper describes the management processes and organizational structures m AECL that support plant operations and maintenance in operating CANDU plants with cost effective products and services. (author)

  19. AECL experience in fuel channel inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspection of CANDU fuel channels (FC) is performed to ensure safe and economic reactor operation. CANDU reactor FCs have features that make them a unique non-destructive testing (NDT) challenge. The thin, 4 mm pressure-tube wall means flaws down to about 0.1 mm deep must be reliably detected and characterized. This is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than is usually considered of significant concern for steel piping and pressure vessels. A second unique feature is that inspection sensors must operate in the reactor core--often within 20 cm of highly radioactive fuel. Work on inspection of CANDU reactor FCs at AECL dates back over three decades. In that time, AECL staff have provided equipment and conducted or supervised in-service inspections in about 250 FCs, in addition to over 8000 pre-service FCs. These inspections took place at every existing CANDU reactor except those in India and Romania. Early FC inspections focussed on measurement of changes in dimensions (gauging) resulting from exposure to a combination of neutrons, stress and elevated temperature. Expansion of inspection activities to include volumetric inspection (for flaws) started in the mid-1970s with the discovery of delayed hydride cracking in Pickering 3 and 4 rolled joints. Recognition of other types of flaw mechanisms in the 1980s led to further expansion in both pre-service and in-service inspections. These growing requirements, to meet regulatory as well as economic needs, led to the development of a wide spectrum of inspection technology that now includes tests for hydrogen concentration, structural integrity of core components, flaws, and dimensional change. This paper reviews current CANDU reactor FC inspection requirements. The equipment and techniques developed to satisfy these requirements are also described. The paper concludes with a discussion of work in progress in AECL aimed at providing state-of-the-art FC inspection services. (author)

  20. Overview of research reactor operation within AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents information on reactor operations within the Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) today relative to a few years ago, and speculates on future operations. In recent years, the need for Research Company reactors has diminished. This, combined with economic pressures, has led to the shutdown of some of the company's major reactors. However, compliance with the government agenda to privatize government companies in Canada, and a Research Company policy of business development, has led to some offsetting activities. The building of a pool-type 10 MWt MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental) reactor for isotope production will assist in the sale of the AECL isotopes marketing company. A Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication facility and a Tritium Extraction Plant (TEP), both currently under construction, are needed in support of the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor and are in line with business development strategies. The research program demands on NRU stretch many years into the future and the strategies for achieving effective operation of this aging reactor, now 32 years old, are discussed. The repair of the leaking light-water reflector of the NRU reactor is highlighted. The isotope business requires that a second reactor be available for back-up production and the operation of the 42 year old NRX (National Research Experimental) reactor in its present 'hot standby' mode is believed to be unique in the world

  1. Some AECL facilities to relocate in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full-text': Under the terms of memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed by the federal and Saskatchewan governments, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) will relocate its design, engineering and marketing offices for CANDU 3 reactors to Saskatoon. This will mean 115 new high-technology jobs for the city in the first year, which might increase to 140 jobs in the second year. As well, the MOU calls for feasibility studies on the establishment of a nuclear accelerator technology centre with accelerator development and marketing components, a nuclear simulator and training facility, a Slowpoke Energy System business, and other related technology in the areas of medicine, agriculture and industry. The provincial government and AECL will cost-share the new arrangement to a maximum of $20 million each over the four year term of the agreement. The MOU is significantly different from the one signed in September, 1991 in that there is no pre-commitment, or any commitment, on the part of the province to purchase or build a CANDU reactor for nuclear generation, nor will there be any study or discussion of development of a nuclear waste site in the province. (author)

  2. Validation of the AECL response time tester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response time of a nuclear safety (trip) channel is an important safety parameter, and an ISA standard requires nuclear operators to measure the response times of their trip instrumentation. As a major aid to facilitate this measurement, AECL (Chalk River) has designed and built a Response Time Tester (RTT) for pressure and differential-pressure transmitters. The RTT is mostly automated for ease of use, is self-checking, and complies with the requirements of ISA Standard, S67.06. The RTT was first checked for repeatability and self-consistency. Secondly, it was successfully validated against an independent measurement, namely the transfer function as measured using the natural in-service noise. This validation was done using two Bailey transmitters, which had the unfortunate property of having their response times as functions of the testing conditions. In all instances, after correcting for this Bailey nonlinearity, the RTT performance met its accuracy specification of ±(5% + 5 ms). (author)

  3. A bibliography of AECL publications on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Publications on Reactor Safety in CANDU Reactors are listed in this bibliography. The listing is chronological and the accompanying index is by subject. The bibliography will be brought up to date annually. (auth)

  4. The AECL study for an intense neutron - generator (technical details)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL study for an intense neutron-generator has been in progress for two years. Recently the scientific and technical details and the conceptual designs were compiled in a report supporting proposals addressed to AECL's Board of Directors for further work. The compilation is being issued in this form to permit further discussion of the technical aspects. However readers are asked to appreciate that it was written primarily for an AECL audience, and specifically that those chapters giving tentative information about costs, the rate of investment and similar items have been omitted or modified, many references have been made to interim internal reports in order to complete the local documentation, but these references do not imply that the reports themselves can be made generally available. (author)

  5. Verification of the AECL total system performance models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An agreement between Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) defines eight tasks in the study of topics relating to management of radioactive wastes. One task involves the verification of AECL's performance assessment code for their high level waste disposal program. In the agreement this task is given the title: Performance Assessment Technology Exchange. The quality assurance program established by AECL for this code requires that this task be performed. This paper presents an overview of the methods used for code verification and a progress report on the verification of the code. It describes the tools that have been developed to automatically examine code modules, check physical units, and prepare driver routines to exercise every line of code, and verify that it was executed correctly

  6. The AECL study for an intense neutron - generator (technical details)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, G.A.; Tunnicliffe, P.R

    1966-07-01

    The AECL study for an intense neutron-generator has been in progress for two years. Recently the scientific and technical details and the conceptual designs were compiled in a report supporting proposals addressed to AECL's Board of Directors for further work. The compilation is being issued in this form to permit further discussion of the technical aspects. However readers are asked to appreciate that it was written primarily for an AECL audience, and specifically that those chapters giving tentative information about costs, the rate of investment and similar items have been omitted or modified, many references have been made to interim internal reports in order to complete the local documentation, but these references do not imply that the reports themselves can be made generally available. (author)

  7. The year 2000 (Y2k) Programme at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the nuclear industry we make, in total, very extensive use of digital computers and equipment. While use of dates in our application may not be quite so extensive as in other businesses such as banking or insurance, dates are nonetheless employed, and are important in a variety of applications. Furthermore, date-related problems can sometimes propagate into overall system failures or computer crashes. Digital system or digital infrastructure failure can have serious potential consequences in a power plant, utility, or engineering design office. This in turn can have potential impact on public safety or the reliability of power production and delivery of electrical power to the public. A concerted effort is needed, and is underway by nuclear design organizations, and the nuclear utilities in order to identify and fix or avoid the problems in the short time that remains between now and the Year 2000. AECL have a substantial Year 2000 programme underway, addressing both the infrastructure systems at AECL, and AECL's products and services. High priority is placed, in the programme, on assisting AECL's customers with the Year 2000 issue. The programme, and some of the lesson learned to date, are described in this paper. The relationship to equipment vendors' and customers' Year 2000 programs is explained, and the importance of Year 2000 programmes conducted by the customers, to address systems and equipment which are under their control, is highlighted. (authors)

  8. Expert panel on hydrogeology; report to AECL Research (1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1992 AECL Research convened a panel of external hydrogeological experts consisting of P.A. Domenico, G.E. Grisak, and F.W. Schwartz, to review AECL's proposed approach to siting a geological repository in the rocks of the Canadian Shield for the safe disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. In particular the panel was asked to provide its opinion on 1) the soundness of the technical approach developed to characterize the groundwater flow systems for the purpose of selecting a location for a disposal vault, 2) the validity and effectiveness of the geological case study used to demonstrate the performance assessment methodology based on the hydrogeological conditions observed at the Whiteshell Research Area, and 3) the adequacy of the hydrogeological information that AECL proposes to use in its Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) of the disposal concept. This report presents the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the hydrogeology review panel. The report was submitted to AECL Research in 1992 December. (author). 24 refs., 2 tabs., 4 figs

  9. AECL's Experimental Fuel and Materials Test Loops in NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) maintains two experimental fuel and materials test loops, U1 and U2, within the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). These loops operate at conditions typical of CANDU reactors. Each vertical test section (one in U1, two in U2) has the capacity to irradiate a test assembly 3 m in length and 10.16 cm in diameter; equivalent to six CANDU fuel bundles. The assembly is made up of six interchangeable bundles containing experimental fuels or materials test specimens. The fuel bundles can be 'fixed', with elements welded together into a rigid bundle, or 'demountable', where a frame with some fixed elements and element mounting mechanisms facilitate the placement of additional removable fuel elements. The materials test bundle has 30 fuel elements surrounding a 4.0 cm diameter tube. Currently, there are two specimen holder designs which fit within the tube: a ring of six 13.1 mm diameter specimen tubes, and a triangular assembly, 2.9 cm per side. In addition to standard fuel and materials irradiations, AECL has also performed instrumented test irradiations with modified test assemblies in the NRU Loops. The instrumented test irradiations were conducted in the Blowdown Test Facility (BTF; formerly part of U1) which simulated accident scenarios. AECL has recently qualified a new top closure plug for use with chemistry experiments in the loops. The plug provides electrical connections between instruments and the data acquisition hardware, through the pressure boundary, which will facilitate instrumented irradiations. In addition, an online gamma spectrometer is being added to the U2 loop to monitor loop coolant gamma activity and to facilitate fuel defect detection and characterization. The Canadian Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) fuel design will require irradiation testing. The reference fuel design, (Th, Pu)O2 fuel with high Pu content (13%), will require supporting fuel irradiations. AECL plans

  10. Modeling the critical hydrogen concentration in the AECL test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is added to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) to suppress radiolysis and maintain reducing conditions. The minimum hydrogen concentration needed to prevent radiolysis is referred to as the critical hydrogen concentration (CHC). The CHC was measured experimentally in the mid-1990s by Elliot and Stuart in a reactor loop at Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), and was found to be approximately 0.5 scc/kg for typical PWR conditions. This value is well below industry-normal PWR operating levels near 40 scc/kg. Radiation chemistry models have also predicted a low CHC, even below the AECL experimental result. In the last few years some of the radiation chemical kinetic rate constants have been re-measured and G-values have been reassessed by Elliot and Bartels. These new data have been used in this work to revise the models and compare them with AECL experimental data. It is quite clear that the scavenging yields tabulated for high-LET radiolysis by Elliot and Bartels are not appropriate to use in the present context, where track-escape yields are needed to describe the homogeneous recombination kinetics in the mixed radiation field. In the absence of such data for high temperature PWR conditions, we have used the neutron G-values as fitting parameters. Even with this expedient, the model predicts at least a factor of two smaller CHC than was observed. We demonstrate that to recover the reported CHC result, the chemistry of ammonia impurity must be included. - Highlights: ► Hydrogen is added to nuclear reactor cooling loops to prevent radiolysis. ► Tests at AECL were carried out to determine the critical hydrogen concentration. ► Neutron radiolysis G-values need to be modified to understand the results. ► Ammonia impurity needs to be included for quantitative modeling.

  11. Electronic data collection for AECL NRU Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, S., E-mail: kleins@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    An Electronic Data Collection program has been implemented at AECL's National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor to assists in the collection, trending and monitoring of system parameters. Prior to the implementation, daily surveillance was performed by Operators using hardcopy reading sheets. This was not conducive to proactive monitoring of equipment health as there was a significant delay from when the data was recorded to when it was accessible for trending. The electronically collected data allows for close to real-time monitoring of 971 unique instruments and approximately 7,200 data points per day. There are currently over 1,000,000 readings available in the database. (author)

  12. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary examination of records relating to past Chalk River employees provides some reassurance that large numbers of cancer deaths that might be related to occupational radiation exposure do not exist in the groups of employees studied to the end of 1982. The lack of reliable information on deaths of ex-employees who left AECL for other employment prevented the inclusion of this group in this preliminary study. This information will presumably be obtained during the course of the more comprehensive Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. employee health study. 6 refs

  13. Electronic data collection for AECL NRU Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Electronic Data Collection program has been implemented at AECL's National Research Universal (NRU) Reactor to assists in the collection, trending and monitoring of system parameters. Prior to the implementation, daily surveillance was performed by Operators using hardcopy reading sheets. This was not conducive to proactive monitoring of equipment health as there was a significant delay from when the data was recorded to when it was accessible for trending. The electronically collected data allows for close to real-time monitoring of 971 unique instruments and approximately 7,200 data points per day. There are currently over 1,000,000 readings available in the database. (author)

  14. Compendium of the data used with the SYVAC3-CC3 system model. AECL research No. AECL-11013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    AECL is evaluating a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste from CANDU reactors deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. As part of this evaluation, models of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes that could occur in a sealed disposal vault designed to limit transport of contaminants to the accessible environment were developed. The mathematical models of the transport of radionuclides and toxic chemicals from nuclear fuel waste are incorporated into a computer model named the Systems Variability Analysis Code, Generation 3, and Canadian Concept Model, Generation 3 (SYVAC3-CC3). The report presents the data in the master database used by SYVAC3-CC3 for the postclosure assessment of deep geological disposal, derived from a major program of laboratory and field studies conducted by AECL Research over the past 15 years. The data represents characteristics of a hypothetical vault, certain geologic characteristics of the Whiteshell Research Area, and a general surface environment with a human population living a rural lifestyle on a portion of the Canadian Shield in central Canada.

  15. AECL's research and development program in environmental science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's radiological research and development (R and D) program encompasses work on sources of radiation exposure, radionuclide transport through the environment and potential impacts on biota and on human health. The application of the radiation protection knowledge and technology developed in this program provides cradle-to-grave management for CANDU and related nuclear technologies. This document provides an overview of the Environmental Science and Technology (ES and T) program which is one of the technical areas of R and D within the radiological R and D program. The ES and T program uses science from three main areas: radiochemistry, mathematical modelling and environmental assessment. In addition to providing an overview of the program, this summary also gives specific examples of recent technical work in each of the three areas. These technical examples illustrate the applied nature of the ES and T program and the close coupling of the program to CANDU customer requirements. (author)

  16. Some highlights of research and development at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development programs of AECL have as their goal the strengthening of the knowledge and ability necessary to achieve national objectives in the field of nuclear energy. These objectives include a nuclear reactor system appropriate to Canada's industrial capabilities, now realized, and the extension of that system, through scientific and technological development, to serve the nation's needs for the forseeable future. The Company's programs are carefully integrated and focused to use the available funding to maximum advantage. The research facilities on which the program depends are among the best in the world, and support a full spectrum of research from fundamental nuclear physics to full-scale power reactor component irradiation and testing. In this report it has only been possible to high-light some important facets of the programs in each of the principal areas currently employing our energies. (auth)

  17. Rationalization and future planning for AECL's research reactor capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's research reactor capability has played a crucial role in the development of Canada's nuclear program. All essential concepts for the CANDU reactors were developed and tested in the NRX and NRU reactors, and in parallel, important contributions to basic physics were made. The technical feasibility of advanced fuel cycles and of the organic-cooled option for CANDU reactors were also demonstrated in the two reactors and the WR-1 reactor. In addition, an important and growing radio-isotope production industry was established and marketed on a world-wide basis. In 1984, however, it was recognized that a review and rationalization of the research reactor capability was required. The commercial success of the CANDU reactor system had reduced the scope and size of the required development program. Limited research and development funding and competition from other research facilities and programs, required that the scope be reduced to a support basis essential to maintain strategic capability. Currently, AECL, is part-way through this rationalization program and completion should be attained during 1992/93 when the MAPLE reactor is operational and decisions on NRX decommissioning will be made. A companion paper describes some of the unique operational and maintenance problems which have resulted from this program and the solutions which have been developed. Future planning must recognize the age of the NRU reactor (currently 32 years) and the need to plan for eventual replacement. Strategy is being developed and supporting studies include a full technical assessment of the NRU reactor and the required age-related upgrading program, evaluation of the performance characteristics and costs of potential future replacement reactors, particularly the advanced MAPLE concept, and opportunities for international co-operation in developing mutually supportive research programs

  18. AECL experience with low-level radioactive waste technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), as the Canadian government agency responsible for research and development of peaceful uses of nuclear energy, has had experience in handling a wide variety of radioactive wastes for over 40 years. Low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) is generated in Canada from nuclear fuel manufacturers and nuclear power facilities, from medical and industrial uses of radioisotopes and from research facilities. The technologies with which AECL has strength lie in the areas of processing, storage, disposal and safety assessment of LLRW. While compaction and incineration are the predominant methods practised for solid wastes, purification techniques and volume reduction methods are used for liquid wastes. The methods for processing continue to be developed to improve and increase the efficiency of operation and to accommodate the transition from storage of the waste to disposal. Site-specific studies and planning for a LLRW disposal repository to replace current storage facilities are well underway with in-service operation to begin in 1991. The waste will be disposed of in an intrusion-resistant underground structure designed to have a service life of over 500 years. Beyond this period of time the radioactivity in the waste will have decayed to innocuous levels. Safety assessments of LLRW disposal are performed with the aid of a series of interconnected mathematical models developed at Chalk River specifically to predict the movement of radionuclides through and away from the repository after its closure and the subsequent health effects of the released radionuclides on the public. The various technologies for dealing with radioactive wastes from their creation to disposal will be discussed. 14 refs

  19. A study of the mortality of AECL employees. V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been underway since 1980 on the mortality of past and present AECL employees. The study population consists of 13,491 persons, 9997 males and 3494 females, for a total of 262,403.5 person-years at risk. During the period 1950-1985, 1299 deaths occurred in this population. The number of female deaths (121) is too few for detailed analysis, but the 1178 deaths in the male population represent a useful basis for this study. The present report examines mortality patterns in the AECL cohort between 1950 and 1985 by comparing the observed mortality with that expected in the general population for three groups of workers: those with no exposure, those with up to 50 mSv, and those with more than 50 mSv. Comparisons among the three groups of employees are discussed. The number of deaths is fewer than would be expected on the basis of general population statistics for both males who were exposed to ionizing radiation and those who were not exposed. The findings were similar for the 'all cancer' and 'all other deaths' groupings. In the group of exposed males, elevated Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) are seen for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and for buccal cavity, rectum and rectosigmoid junction, and prostate cancers. There are elevated SMRs for lymphatic and myeloid leukemias and for large intestine, prostate, brain and biliary system cancers in the 'unexposed' male group. The number of cases identified in all of these cancers is small and the confidence intervals are wide, such that none of the elevated SMRs is statistically significant. The report compares the findings of this study with those of similar studies published in the past decade. (Author) (28 tabs., 33 refs., 2 figs.)

  20. AECL's underground research laboratory: technical achievements and lessons learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the development of the research program for the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program in the 1970's, the need for an underground facility was recognized. AECL constructed an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for large-scale testing and in situ engineering and performance-assessment-related experiments on key aspects of deep geological disposal in a representative geological environment. Ale URL is a unique geotechnical research and development facility because it was constructed in a previously undisturbed portion of a granitic pluton that was well characterized before construction began, and because most of the shaft and experimental areas are below the water table. The specific areas of research, development and demonstration include surface and underground characterization; groundwater and solute transport; in situ rock stress conditions; temperature and time-dependent deformation and failure characteristics of rock; excavation techniques to minimize damage to surrounding rock and to ensure safe working conditions; and the performance of seals and backfills. This report traces the evolution of the URL and summarizes the technical achievements and lessons learned during its siting, design and construction, and operating phases over the last 18 years. (author)

  1. AECL's experience in MOX fuel fabrication and irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication activities are conducted in the Recycle Fuel Fabrication Laboratories (RFFL) at the Chalk River Laboratories. The RFFl facility is designed to produce experimental quantities of CANDU MOX fuel for reactor physics tests or demonstration irradiations. From 1979 to 1987, several MOX fuel fabrication campaigns were run in the RFFl, producing various quantities of fuel with different compositions. About 150 bundles, containing over three tonnes of MOX, were fabricated in the RFFL before operations in the facility were suspended. In late 1987, the RFFL was placed in a state of active standby, a condition where no fuel fabrication activities are conducted, but the monitoring and ventilation systems in the facility are maintained. Currently, a project to rehabilitate the RFFL and resume MOX fuel fabrication is underway. The initial campaign will consist of the production of thirty-eight 37-element (U, Pu)O2 bundles containing 0.3 wt.% Pu in Heavy Element (H.E.) destined for physics tests in the zero-power ZED-2 reactor. An overview of AECL's MOX fuel irradiation program will be given. Post-irradiation examination results of (U,Pu)O2 bundles irradiated to burnups ranging from 18 to 49 GWd/te H.E. in the Nuclear Power Demonstration reactor are highlighted. The results demonstrated the excellent performance of CANDU MOX fuel to high burnup, at power ratings up to 45 kW/m. The paper also outlines the status of current MOX fuel irradiation tests, including the irradiation of various (U, Pu)O2 and (Th, Pu)O2 bundles. (author). 2 refs, 9 figs, 5 tabs

  2. DEMONSTRATION SOLIDIFICATION TESTS CONDUCTED ON RADIOACTIVELY CONTAMINATED ORGANIC LIQUIDS AT THE AECL WHITESHELL LABORATORIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL, Whiteshell Laboratory (WL) near Pinawa Manitoba, Canada, was established in the early 1960's to carry out AECL research and development activities for higher temperature versions of the CANDU(regsign) reactor. The initial focus of the research program was the Whiteshell Reactor-1 (WR-1) Organic Cooled Reactor (OCR) that began operation in 1965. The OCR program was discontinued in the early 1970's in favor of the successful heavy-water-cooled CANDU system. WR-1 continued to operate until 1985 in support of AECL nuclear research programs. A consequence of the Federal government's recent program review process was AECL's business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at the Whiteshell Laboratories and to consolidate its' activities at the Chalk River Laboratories. As a result, AECL received government concurrence in 1998 to proceed to plan actions to achieve closure of WL. The planning actions now in progress address the need to safely and effectively transition the WL site from an operational state, in support of AECL's business, to a shutdown and decommissioned state that meets the regulatory requirements for a licensed nuclear site. The decommissioning program that will be required at WL is unique within AECL and Canada since it will need to address the entire research site rather than individual facilities declared redundant. Accordingly, the site nuclear facilities are being systematically placed in a safe shutdown state and planning for the decommissioning work to place the facilities in a secure monitoring and surveillance state is in progress. One aspect of the shutdown activities is to deal with the legacy of radioactively contaminated organic liquid wastes. Use of a polymer powder to solidify these organic wastes was identified as one possibility for improved interim storage of this material pending final disposition

  3. Coupling of Wims-AECL and Origen-S for depletion calculations - 357

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the more powerful tools for isotope depletion calculations in neutron-irradiated material is the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) module ORIGEN-S, maintained and developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. ORIGEN-S takes as input, in addition to a material description, a problem-dependent cross section library in which relative reaction rates for each nuclear process have been pre-evaluated. Creating different libraries for different stages of burnup, and for different materials, allows the 'point' code phenomenology of ORIGEN-S to be extended to more complicated geometries. To this end, AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) has coupled its successful 2-D neutron transport solver WIMS-AECL 2.5d to ORIGEN-S to create the coupled code 'WOBI' (WIMS-ORIGEN Burnup Integration). This code has been validated against PIE (post irradiation examination) results for CANDUTM reactors and for light-water reactors, and is extensively used at AECL to calculate exit compositions and decay heats for high and low enriched uranium fuels at the NRU (National Research Universal) research reactor located at the Chalk River Laboratories. In addition, because of the significantly expanded list of reactions available in ORIGEN-S, WOBI is more useful for advanced fuel cycle studies than WIMS-AECL alone. This paper discusses the validation results, and verification of WOBI against simple WIMS-AECL and ORIGEN-S stand-alone models. (authors)

  4. Evaluation of ENDF/B-VI library with WIMS-AECL/RFSP Code system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The object of this research is the evaluation of the cross-section charicteristics of ENDF/B-VI WIMS-AECL library against ENDF/B-V library previously used in the validation of WIMS-AECL code. validation of WIMS-AECL code had been carried out through the Phase-B post simulation of Wolsong Units 2, 3 and 4 before. Discrepancies between the calculated and measured values were thought to be mainly from observation errors and partly from the ENDF/B-V library. Till now, there had been various validation calculations for ENDF/B-VI library in the field of PWR but not in CANDU-PHWR. We herein, evaluated the ENDF/B-VI WIMS-AECL library for Wolsong Unit 4 by comparing the results with previous ones of ENDF/B-V for the same reactor unit with same WIMS/RFSP code system. It can be summarized that the Phase-B post simulation results of WIMS/RFSP with ENDF/B-VI are better than those of ENDF/B-V, because of less difference between calculated and measured values. There must be further study with different core conditions, however, for the exact evaluation of ENDF/B-VI WIMS-AECL library including calculations of many other physical parameters and the treatment of isotopes which is not in ENDF/B-VI but in ENDF/B-V

  5. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL Research will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the concept for review by a Panel through the federal environmental assessment and review process (EARP). In accordance with AECL Research's mandate and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the review Panel, AECL Research has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used nuclear fuel waste

  6. AECL's participation in the commissioning of Point Lepreau generating station unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Support from Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) to Point Lepreau during the commissioning program has been in the form of: seconded staff for commissioning program management, preparation of commissioning procedures, and hands-on commissioning of several systems; analysis of test results; engineering service for problem solving and modifications; design engineering for changes and additions; procurement of urgently-needed parts and materials; technological advice; review of operational limits; interpretation of design manuals and assistance with and preparation of submissions to regulatory authorities; and development of equipment and procedures for inspection and repairs. This, together with AECL's experience in the commissioning of other 600 MWe stations, Douglas Point and Ontario Hydro stations, provides AECL with a wide range of expertise for providing operating station support services for CANDU stations

  7. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement on the concept to a federal environmental assessment review panel. In accordance with AECL's mandate, and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the panel, AECL has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach, and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used fuel wastes. 16 refs

  8. Follow-up of AECL employees involved in the decontamination of NRU in 1958

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May 1958 the NRU reactor hall was badly contaminated by a damaged fuel rod that broke apart during its removal from the reactor. Radioactive fission products were spread around the reactor hall and into adjacent areas when a piece of the fuel rod fell into the maintenance pit and burned. AECL staff and others completed the decontamination in 2 1/2 months. This paper reports the results of a follow-up study of the AECL participants. No statistically significant increases in deaths from cancer or other diseases were found in this group

  9. The development, qualification and availability of AECL analytical, scientific and design codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past several years, AECL has embarked on a comprehensive program to develop, qualify and support its key safety and licensing codes, and to make executable versions of these codes available to the international nuclear community. To this end, we have instituted a company-wide Software Quality Assurance (SQA) Program for Analytical, Scientific and Design Computer Programs to ensure that the design, development, maintenance, modification, procurement and use of computer codes within AECL is consistent with today's quality assurance standards. In addition, we have established a comprehensive Code Validation Project (CVP) with the goal of qualifying AECL's 'front-line' safety and licensing codes by 2001 December. The outcome of this initiative will be qualified codes, which are properly verified and validated for the expected range of applications, with associated statements of accuracy and uncertainty for each application. The code qualification program, based on the CSA N286.7 standard, is intended to ensure (1) that errors are not introduced into safety analyses because of deficiencies in the software, (2) that an auditable documentation base is assembled that demonstrates to the regulator that the codes are of acceptable quality, and (3) that these codes are formally qualified for their intended applications. Because AECL and the Canadian nuclear utilities (i.e., Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power, Hydro Quebec and New Brunswick Power) generally use the same safety and licensing codes, the nuclear industry in Canada has agreed to work cooperatively together towards the development, qualification and maintenance of a common set of analysis tools, referred to as the Industry Standard Toolset (IST). This paper provides an overview of the AECL Software Quality Assurance Program and the Code Validation Project, and their associated linkages to the Canadian nuclear community's Industry Standard Toolset initiative to cooperatively qualify and support commonly

  10. Planning a new research reactor for AECL: The MAPLE-MTR concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is assessing its needs and options for future irradiation research facilities. A planning team has been assembled to identify the irradiation requirements for AECL's research programs and compile options for satisfying the irradiation requirements. The planning team is formulating a set of criteria to evaluate the options and will recommend a plan for developing an appropriate research facility. Developing the MAPLE Materials Test Reactor (MAPLE-MTR) concept to satisfy AECL's irradiation requirements is one option under consideration by the planning team. AECL is undertaking this planning phase because the NRU reactor is 35 years old and many components are nearing the end of their design life. This reactor has been a versatile facility for proof testing CANDU components and fuel designs because the CANDU irradiation environment was simulated quite well. However, the CANDU design has matured and the irradiation requirements have changed. Future research programs will emphasize testing CANDU components near or beyond their design limits. To provide these irradiation conditions, the NRU reactor needs to be upgraded. Upgrading and refurbishing the NRU reactor is being considered, but the potentially large costs and regulatory uncertainties make this option very challenging. AECL is also developing the MAPLE-MTR concept as a potential replacement for the NRU reactor. The MAPLE-MTR concept starts from the recent MAPLE-X10 design and licensing experience and adapts this technology to satisfy the primary irradiation requirements of AECL's research programs. This approach should enable AECL to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel design, heat transfer). The preliminary considerations for developing the MAPLE-MTR concept are presented in this report. A summary of AECL's research programs is presented along with their irradiation requirements. This is followed by a description of safety criteria that need to be taken into

  11. Advanced fuel development at AECL: What does the future hold for CANDU fuels/fuel cycles?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines advanced fuel development at AECL. It discusses expanding the limits of fuel utilization, deploy alternate fuel cycles, increase fuel flexibility, employ recycled fuels; increase safety and reliability, decrease environmental impact and develop proliferation resistant fuel and fuel cycle.

  12. Co-operative projects with AECL in the fields of hydrogeology and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers collaborative study with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited on geological aspects of waste disposal in crystalline rocks. A field test of the sinusoidal hydraulic pressure pulse method was carried out at the URL site to try to define hydraulic properties of major horizontal fractures. The trials were generally successful and observable sine and square wave signals were transmitted. Owing to the limited scale of the programme, and some equipment problems, the results proved difficult to interpret, although the speed and flexibility of the method was demonstrated. A second aspect of collaboration was to be the field comparison of the AECL and NERC/BGS borehole geochemical probes. In the event, the AECL probe development programme was curtailed and a Swedish design selected for purchase. Effort thus switched to technical comparison of the SGAB probe with the NERC/BGS design. Since both are still at various development points the collaboration was limited to technical exchange. The results are presented. (author)

  13. Microbial analysis of the buffer/container experiment at AECL's underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buffer/Container Experiment (BCE) was carried out at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for 2.5 years to examine the in situ performance of compacted buffer material in a single emplacement borehole under vault-relevant conditions. During decommissioning of this experiment, numerous samples were taken for microbial analysis to determine if the naturally present microbial population in buffer material survived the conditions (i.e., compaction, heat and desiccation) in the BCE and to determine which group(s) of microorganisms would be dominant in such a simulated vault environment. Such knowledge will be very useful in assessing the potential effects of microbial activity on the concept for deep disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste, proposed by AECL. 46 refs., 31 tabs., 35 figs

  14. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analyses are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  15. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analysis are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  16. AECL strategy for surface-based investigations of potential disposal sites and the development of a geosphere model for a site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whitaker, S.H.; Brown, A.; Davison, C.C.; Gascoyne, M.; Lodha, G.S.; Stevenson, D.R.; Thorne, G.A.; Tomsons, D. [AECL Research, Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa, MB (Canada)

    1994-05-01

    The objective of this report is to summarize AECL`s strategy for surface-based geotechnical site investigations used in screening and evaluating candidate areas and candidate sites for a nuclear fuel waste repository and for the development of geosphere models of sites. The report is one of several prepared by national nuclear fuel waste management programs for the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) to provide international background on site investigations for SKB`s R and D programme on siting.The scope of the report is limited to surface-based investigations of the geosphere, those done at surface or in boreholes drilled from surface. The report discusses AECL`s investigation strategy and the methods proposed for use in surface-based reconnaissance and detailed site investigations at potential repository sites. Site investigations done for AECL`s Underground Research Laboratory are used to illustrate the approach. The report also discusses AECL`s strategy for developing conceptual and mathematical models of geological conditions at sites and the use of these models in developing a model (Geosphere Model) for use in assessing the performance of the disposal system after a repository is closed. Models based on the site data obtained at the URL are used to illustrate the approach. Finally, the report summarizes the lessons learned from AECL`s R and D program on site investigations and mentions some recent developments in the R and D program. 120 refs, 33 figs, 7 tabs.

  17. Validation of MCNP and WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP for ACR-1000 applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bromley, Blair P.; Adams, Fred P.; Zeller, Michael B.; Watts, David G.; Shukhman, Boris V.; Pencer, Jeremy [AECL - Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper gives a summary of the validation of the reactor physics codes WIMS-AECL, DRAGON, RFSP and MCNP5, which are being used in the design, operation, and safety analysis of the ACR-1000{sup R}. The standards and guidelines being followed for code validation of the suite are established in CSA Standard N286.7-99 and ANS Standard ANS-19.3-2005. These codes are being validated for the calculation of key output parameters associated with various reactor physics phenomena of importance during normal operations and postulated accident conditions in an ACR-1000 reactor. Experimental data from a variety of sources are being used for validation. The bulk of the validation data is from critical experiments in the ZED-2 research reactor with ACR-type lattices. To supplement and complement ZED-2 data, qualified and applicable data are being taken from other power and research reactors, such as existing CANDU{sup R} units, FUGEN, NRU and SPERT research reactors, and the DCA critical facility. MCNP simulations of the ACR-1000 are also being used for validating WIMS-AECL/ DRAGON/RFSP, which involves extending the validation results for MCNP through the assistance of TSUNAMI analyses. Code validation against commissioning data in the first-build ACR-1000 will be confirmatory. The code validation is establishing the biases and uncertainties in the calculations of the WIMS-AECL/DRAGON/RFSP suite for the evaluation of various key parameters of importance in the reactor physics analysis of the ACR-1000. (authors)

  18. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  19. Implementing the AECL decommissioning quality assurance program at the Chalk River and Whiteshell Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the approach and progress in developing, implementing and maintaining a quality assurance (QA) program for decommissioning at the nuclear facilities managed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Decommissioning activities conducted by AECL are varied in nature, so the QA program must provide adequate flexibility, while maintaining consistency with accepted quality standards. Well-written documentation adhering to the applicable decommissioning standards is a key factor. Manager commitment and input during the writing of the documentation are also important to ensure relevance of the QA program and effectiveness of implementation. Training in the use of the quality assurance plan and procedures is vital to the understanding of the QA program. Beyond the training aspect there is a need for the quality assurance program to be supported by a QA subject expert who is able to advise the group in implementing the Quality Program with consistency over the range of decommissioning work activities and to provide continual assessment of the quality assurance program for efficiency and effectiveness, with a concomitant continuous improvement process. (author)

  20. Decommissioning information management in decommissioning planning and operations at AECL (Ref 5054)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the AECL Decommissioning program has grown over the past few years, particularly with regard to long-term planning, so has its need to manage the records and information required to support the program. The program encompasses a diverse variety of facilities, including prototype and research reactors, fuel processing facilities, research laboratories, waste processing facilities, buildings, structures, lands and waste storage areas, many of which have changed over time. The decommissioning program involves planning, assessing, monitoring and executing projects to decommission the facilities. The efficient and effective decommissioning planning, assessment, monitoring and execution for the facilities and projects are dependent on a sound information base, upon which decisions can be made. A vital part of this Information Base is the ongoing management of historical facility records, including decommissioning records, throughout the full life cycle of the facilities. This paper describes AECL's and particularly DP and O's approach to: 1) Establishing a decommissioning records and information framework, which identifies what records and information are relevant to decommissioning, prioritizing the decommissioning facilities, identifying sources of relevant information and providing a user-friendly, electronic, search and retrieval tool for facility information accessible to staff. 2) Systematically, gathering, assessing, archiving and identifying important information and making that information available to staff to support their ongoing decommissioning work. 3) Continually managing and enhancing the records and information base and its support infrastructure to ensure its long-term availability. 4) Executing special information enhancement projects, which transform historic records into information for analysis. (author)

  1. Radiochemistry Lab Decommissioning and Dismantlement. AECL, Chalk River Labs, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) was originally founded in the mid 1940's to perform research in radiation and nuclear areas under the Canadian Defense Department. In the mid 50's The Canadian government embarked on several research and development programs for the development of the Candu Reactor. AECL was initially built as a temporary site and is now faced with many redundant buildings. Prior to 2004 small amounts of Decommissioning work was in progress. Many reasons for deferring decommissioning activities were used with the predominant ones being: 1. Reduction in radiation doses to workers during the final dismantlement, 2. Development of a long-term solution for the management of radioactive wastes in Canada, 3. Financial constraints presented by the number of facilities shutdown that would require decommissioning funds and the absence of an approved funding strategy. This has led to the development of a comprehensive decommissioning plan that is all inclusive of AECL's current and legacy liabilities. Canada does not have a long-term disposal site; therefore waste minimization becomes the driving factor behind decontamination for decommissioning before and during dismantlement. This decommissioning job was a great learning experience for decommissioning and the associated contractors who worked on this project. Throughout the life of the project there was a constant focus on waste minimization. This focus was constantly in conflict with regulatory compliance primarily with respect to fire regulations and protecting the facility along with adjacent facilities during the decommissioning activities. Discrepancies in historical documents forced the project to treat every space as a contaminated space until proven differently. Decommissioning and dismantlement within an operating site adds to the complexity of the tasks especially when it is being conducted in the heart of the plant. This project was very successful with no lost time accidents in over one hundred

  2. AECL R and D's role in promoting nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear renaissance has created new opportunities for new technology development and has also brought along the challenge of meeting the growing demand of trained personnel in the nuclear science and engineering. Towards meeting this challenge, AECL R and D organization is actively promoting and supporting the creation of nuclear research capabilities at the universities and also effectively leveraging the R and D at the universities. It has also put in place several new initiatives to attract and develop the talented young people for careers in nuclear science and engineering. This paper describes various interactions and collaborations with the universities that supports the nuclear R and D at the universities and develop highly qualified personnel for the future nuclear R and D needs. (author)

  3. Distributed fuel-management computation using RFSP, WIMS-AECL and PVM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) software package was used to build an interface between RFSP and WIMS-AECL to enable history-based, local-parameter reactor fuel-management simulations in which batches of lattice-cell transport and burnup calculations can be made in parallel. The interface is based on the master/slave crowd-computation model. For slave computers numbering from one to twenty, the overhead spent by the one master preparing input for the slaves and processing their outputs was observed to be small in comparison with the computing time spent by the slaves themselves. Anticipating the availability of a much larger network of slaves in the future, two potential computational bottlenecks that might arise are described, and possible remedies for them are outlined. (author)

  4. Development and qualification of AECL computer codes for ACR safety analysis applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade, AECL has developed and rigorously implemented a software Quality Assurance Program to ensure that its analytical, scientific and design computer codes meet the required standards for software used in safety analyses. This paper provides an overview of the computer programs used in Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) safety analysis, including their purpose and linkages, and assessments of their applicability in the safety analyses of the ACR design. The paper also reviews the key elements of the Software Quality Assurance program applied in development and validation of these computer programs for ACR application including the computer code change control process and the documentation produced to support the qualification of the computer codes. (author)

  5. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cigar Lake uranium deposit is located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The 1.3-billion-year-old deposit is located at a depth of about 450 m below surface in a water-saturated sandstone at the unconformity contact with the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The Cigar Lake deposit has many features that parallel those being considered within the Canadian concept for disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The study of these natural structures and processes provides valuable insight toward the eventual design and site selection of a nuclear fuel waste repository. The main feature of this analog is the absence of any indication on the surface of the rich uranium ore 450 m below. This indicates that the combination of natural barriers has been effective in isolating the uranium ore from the surface environment. More specifically, the deposit provides analog information relevant to the stability of UO2 fuel waste, the performance of clay-based barriers, radionuclide migration, colloid formation, radiolysis, fission-product geochemistry and general aspects of water-rock interaction. The main geochemical studies on this deposit focus on the evolution of groundwater compositions in the deposit and on their redox chemistry with respect to the uranium, iron and sulphide systems. Since 1984, through cooperation from the owners of the Cigar Lake deposit, analog studies have been conducted. AECL, with support from Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group, initiated international participation in 1989 through collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and, more recently, with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report gives the results of the various studies carried out during the 3-year collaboration between AECL and SKB, as well as a summery of the LANL study. It provides detailed information on the generated databases and models, and integrates this information into conclusions for use in safety

  6. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cigar Lake uranium deposit is located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The 1.3-billion-year-old deposit is located at a depth of about 450 m below surface in a water-saturated sandstone at the unconformity contact with the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The uranium mineralization, consisting primarily of uraninite (UO2), is surrounded by a clay-rich halo in both sandstone and basement rocks, and remains extremely well preserved and intact. The average grade of the mineralization is ∼ 8 wt.% U; locally grades are as high as ∼ 55 wt.%U. The Cigar lake deposit has many features that parallel those being considered within the Canadian concept for disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Specifically, the deposit provides analog information relevant to the stability of UO2 fuel waste, the performance of clay-based barriers, radionuclide migration, colloid formation, radiolysis, fission-product geochemistry and general aspects of water-rock interaction. The main geochemical studies on this deposit focus on the evolution of groundwater compositions in the deposit and on their redox chemistry with respect to the uranium, iron and sulphide systems. Since 1984, through cooperation from the owners of the Cigar lake deposit, analog studies have been conducted. AECL, with support from Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group, initiated international participation in 1989 through collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and, more recently, with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report gives the results of the various studies carried out during the 3-year collaboration between AECL and SKB, as well as a summary of the LANL study. It provides detailed information on the generated databases and models, and integrates this information into conclusions for use in safety assessment of the Canadian, Swedish and United States disposal concepts. 15 refs., 25 figs., 55 tabs

  7. AECL review of CANDU 6 design in light of the Ontario Hydro nuclear IIPA technical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the spring of 1997, Ontario Hydro (OH) conducted an Independent, Integrated Performance Assessment (IIPA) to address long-standing management, process and equipment issues within the Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) organization and its multi-unit CANDU stations. This review included six Safety System Functional Inspections (SSFIs) on: Bruce A Emergency Coolant Injection System; Bruce B Service Water Systems; Darlington Compressed Air Systems; Pickering Electrical Distribution Systems; Fire Protection (Programmatic); In-Service Environmental Qualification Program (Programmatic). Overall, the OHN inspections found that 'the design of the CANDU plant is robust and plant hardware (including equipment and materials), for the most part, is adequately reliable.' However, the SSFIs also identified a number of deficiencies in the areas of management, control of design/engineering, operations, training, maintenance, testing and quality assurance. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has undertaken an in-depth review of all design-related issues to assess their applicability and impact on the current CANDU 6 design. The AECL review has determined that equipment/design and programmatic deficiencies identified at the OLIN plants have been addressed in the current CANDU 6 design through an effective design feedback process and the application of modem codes and standards that were not in place during the design of the early OHN stations. Many of the design-related SSFI findings can be attributed to inadequate configuration management and the impact of unauthorized design modifications. Problems in these areas can arise at any nuclear station and prevention requires adherence to quality engineering procedures and documentation processes. (author)

  8. Studies on groundwater flow and radionuclide migration at underground environments. Final report of collaboration research between JAERI and AECL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Hiromichi; Nagao, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Tetsuji [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) conducted a collaboration program Phase II with the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) from 1994 to 1998. The program was started to contribute the establishment of safety assessment methodology for the geological disposal of high-level radioactive wastes on the basis of the results from the Phase I program (1987-1993). The Phase II program consisted of following experimental items: (1) radionuclide migration experiments for quarried blocks (1m x 1m x 1m) of granite with natural fracture under in-situ geochemical conditions at 240 m level of Underground Research Laboratory of AECL; (2) study on the effects of dissolved organic materials extracted from natural groundwaters on radionuclide migration; (3) study on groundwater flow using environmental isotopes at two different geologic environments; (4) development of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport model for heterogeneous geological media. The mobility of radionuclides was retarded in the fracture by the deep geological conditions and the fracture paths. The groundwater humic substances with high molecular size were enhanced for the mobility of radionuclides in the sand and granitic media due to the complexation. The application of {sup 36}Cl and {sup 129}I for the analysis on the long-term groundwater flow can be validated on the basis of investigation at the URL site. Moreover, the geostatistical model for the analysis on groundwater flow and radionuclide migration was developed, and was able to describe the groundwater flow and the migration of environmental tracers at AECL sites. This report summaries the results of the Phase II program between JAERI and AECL. (author)

  9. The contribution of AECL CommercialProducts to nuclear medicine and radiation processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the technology of the uses of radiation equipment and radioisotopes, in which field Canada has long been a world leader. AECL CommercialProducts has pioneered many of the most important applications. The development and sale of Co-60 radiation teletherapy units for cancer treatment is a familiar example of such an application, and CommercialProducts dominates the world market. Another such example is the marketing of Mo-99, which is produced in the reactors at Chalk River, and from which the short-lived daughter Tc-99 is eluted as required for use in in-vivo diagnosis. New products coming into use for this purpose include Tl-201, I-123, Ga-67 and In-111, all produced in the TRIUMF cyclotron in Vancouver, while I-125 continues to be in demand for in-vitro radioimmunoassays. Radioisotopes continue to play an important part in manufacturing, where their well-known uses include controlling thickness, contents, etc., in production, and industrial radiography. The application of large industrial irradiators for the sterilization of medical products is now a major world industry for which Commercial Products is the main manufacturer. Isotopes are also used in products such as smoke detectors. Isotopes continue to find extensive use as tracers, both in industrial applications and in animal and plant biology studies. Some more recent uses include pest control by the 'sterile male' technique and neutron activation and delayed neutron counting in uranium assay. (auth)

  10. Retrofit of AECL CAN6 seals into the Pickering shutdown cooling pumps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing mechanical seals in the shutdown cooling (SDC) pumps at the eight-unit Pickering Nuclear Generating Station have caused at least seven forced outages in the last fifteen years. The SDC pumps were originally intended to run only during shutdowns, mostly at low pressure, except for short periods during routine testing of SDC isolation valves while the plant is operating at full pressure to verify that the emergency core injection system is available. Unfortunately, in practice, some SDC pumps must be run much more frequently than this to prevent overheating or freezing of components in the system while the plant is at power. This more severe service has decreased seal lifetime from about 8000 running hours to about 3000 running hours. Rather than tackling the difficult task of eliminating on-power running of the pumps, Pickering decided to install a more robust seal design that could withstand this. Through the process of competitive tender, AECL's CAN6 seal was chosen. This seal has a successful history in similarly demanding conditions in boiling water reactors in the USA. To supplement this and demonstrate there would be no 'surprises,' a 2000-hour test program was conducted. Testing consisted of simulating all the expected conditions, plus some special tests under abnormal conditions. This has given assurance that the seal will operate reliably in the Pickering shutdown cooling pumps. (author)

  11. Maintenance based design and equipment reliability for AECL's advanced CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe how the elements of AECL's Maintenance Based Design will enable the Advanced CANDU Reactor to sustain high equipment reliability and capacity factors over the 60-year design life of the plant. The elements of Maintenance Based Design are; 1-Design Reliable Systems,Structures and Components (SSCs); 2-Select and Procure Reliable Components; 3-Incorporate Monitoring Capabilities and Facilities for SSCs; 4-Develop Maintenance Strategies and Programs for SSCs; 5-Apply Lessons Learned From Previous Plants; 6-Incorporate Maintainability and Event Free Features in the Design; 7-Provide Enhanced Maintenance Management Information and Tools to the Customer; 8-Optimize Chemistry and Materials in the Design. All these elements will be discussed with a detailed focus on the following; Design Reliable SSCs Using the techniques outlined in INPO AP-913, Equipment Reliability Process Description, each CANDU system that has caused any station past unavailability is analyzed as part of the ACR design in order to identify the critical components and any Single Points of Vulnerability (SPVs). All SPVs are then analyzed further in order to determine if they can be practically designed out or otherwise mitigated by the design. Developing Maintenance Strategies and Programs for SSCs Equipment degradation begins as soon as a component is manufactured and accelerates during initial commissioning and eventual operation. In order to sustain high levels of equipment reliability a maintenance strategy must be developed during the design phase and be ready for implementation before the start of commissioning. This maintenance strategy is developed for all critical components using the techniques of INPO AP-913 and other best industry practices. The strategy can be expanded and customized in conjunction with a future owner. Specific examples from the current ACR-1000 design will be used to show how these elements are being implemented.

  12. Current status of the waste identification program at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of routine operating waste by Waste Management and Decommissioning (WM and D) at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) is supported by the Waste Identification (WI) Program. The principal purpose of the WI Program is to minimize the cost and the effort associated with waste characterization and waste tracking, which are needed to optimize waste handling, storage and disposal. The major steps in the WI Program are: (1) identify and characterize the processes that generate the routine radioactive wastes accepted by WM and D - radioisotope production, radioisotope use, reactor operation, fuel fabrication, et cetera (2) identify and characterize the routine blocks of waste generated by each process or activity - the initial characterization is based on inference (process knowledge) (3) prepare customized, template data sheets for each routine waste block - templates contain information such as package type, waste material, waste type, solidifying agent, the average non-radiological contaminant inventory, the average radiological contaminant inventory, and the waste class (4) ensure generators 'use the right piece of paper with the right waste' when they transfer waste to WM and D - that is they use the correct template data sheets to transfer routine wastes, by: identifying and marking waste collection points in the generator's facility; ensuring that generators implement effective waste collection/segregation procedures; implementing standard procedures to transfer waste to WM and D; and, auditing waste collection and segregation within a generator's facility (5) determine any additional waste block characterization requirements (is anything needed beyond the original characterization by process knowledge?) This paper describes the WI Program, it provides an example of its implementation, and it summarizes the current status of its implementation for both CRL and non-CRL waste generators. (author)

  13. AECL strategy for surface-based investigations of potential disposal sites and the development of a geosphere model for a site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to summarize AECL's strategy for surface-based geotechnical site investigations used in screening and evaluating candidate areas and candidate sites for a nuclear fuel waste repository and for the development of geosphere models of sites. The report is one of several prepared by national nuclear fuel waste management programs for the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) to provide international background on site investigations for SKB's R and D programme on siting.The scope of the report is limited to surface-based investigations of the geosphere, those done at surface or in boreholes drilled from surface. The report discusses AECL's investigation strategy and the methods proposed for use in surface-based reconnaissance and detailed site investigations at potential repository sites. Site investigations done for AECL's Underground Research Laboratory are used to illustrate the approach. The report also discusses AECL's strategy for developing conceptual and mathematical models of geological conditions at sites and the use of these models in developing a model (Geosphere Model) for use in assessing the performance of the disposal system after a repository is closed. Models based on the site data obtained at the URL are used to illustrate the approach. Finally, the report summarizes the lessons learned from AECL's R and D program on site investigations and mentions some recent developments in the R and D program. 120 refs, 33 figs, 7 tabs

  14. Factors controlling the population size of microbes in groundwater from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microbial populations in groundwaters from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) range from 103 to 105 cells/mL. Based on the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate and phosphate content of these waters, populations of about 105 to 107 cells/mL should be possible. Upon storage of groundwater samples, total cell counts generally increase and viable cell counts always increase. A study was undertaken to determine what controls the in situ microbial population size in groundwater and what causes this population to grow upon sampling. Fresh URL groundwater was filter-sterilized, inoculated with small quantities of the unaltered water and incubated in the absence and presence of added nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and glucose). Unfiltered groundwater and R2A growth medium inoculated with unaltered groundwater, were also incubated. Microbial changes over time were followed by total and viable (on R2A medium) cell counts. Results showed that in the absence of any nutrient addition, populations grew to between 5 x 105 to 4 x 106 cells/mL, regardless of the initial size of the population (∼101 to 104 cells/mL), suggesting that nutrients for growth were available in the unamended groundwater. It was hypothesized that the original groundwater population was in 'equilibrium' with the underground environment, which likely included a large population of sessile cells in biofilms on fracture surfaces. Sampling of the groundwater removed the large demand on nutrient supplies by the sessile population which subsequently allowed the planktonic population to grow to a new 'equilibrium' with the available nutrients in the sample bottles. Addition of single nutrients (C, N or P) did not increase cell numbers, suggesting that more than one nutrient is limiting growth. Glucose was used very efficiently aerobically in the presence of both added N and P, but somewhat less under anaerobic conditions. Similar effects were observed in R2A. This confirms a more efficient use of

  15. First experimental results of the thermal behaviour of AECL's CANSTOR spent fuel dry storage module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the first experimental results of the thermal behavior of AECL's CANSTOR spent fuel dry storage module. The CANSTOR module is an air-cooled concrete vault about 22 m long, 8 m wide and 7 m high. It can store 12000 CANDU spent fuel bundles inside 200 baskets which are stacked into two rows of 10 storage cylinders. The first module was built on the site of Hydro-Quebec's Gentilly-2 station during the summer of 1995. Dissipation of the residual heat generated by the spent fuel is a major factor in spent fuel dry storage design and one of the key elements for its licensing. The fuel temperature must be kept below 160 deg C to avoid oxidation. Experiments on a mock-up and calculations showed that the air cooling circuit provides at least 15 deg C margin for the fuel with 6-year cooled fuel subject to the ambient design temperature of 40 deg C. Nevertheless, the Atomic Energy Control Board of Canada (AECB) requested Hydro-Quebec to monitor the temperatures and limit the age of the fuel to more than 8-year cooled. During the construction, fourteen temperature sensors were installed to measure the temperature of the air, concrete and top of storage cylinders. A computer based data acquisition system has been used to collect the data, starting before the first fuel was loaded. The first loading campaign occurred during the fall of 1995, mainly during the months of October and November. The module was half filled with 6000 bundles that had been cooled in the spent fuel bay for more than 8 years, in accordance with the AECB license. No loading was done during the 1995-1996 winter. This provided a few months of data with quasi-constant power dissipation. This paper presents this data and compares it with the calculations used in support of the licensing submission. It is shown that fuel of much less than 8-year cooled could be loaded into the CANSTOR module. (author)

  16. Analysis of the results for the AECL cohort in the IARC study on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in fifteen countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, J.P. [Ponsonby and Associates, Manotick, Ontario (Canada); Gentner, N.E. [Consultant, Petawawa, Ontario (Canada); Osborne, R.V. [Ranasara Consultants Inc., Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-03-31

    Over the last two decades there have been attempts to estimate the risks from occupational exposure in the nuclear industry by epidemiological assessments on cohorts of workers. However, generally low doses and relatively small worker populations have limited the precision of such studies. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved workers from facilities in the USA, UK and AECL. In 2005, IARC completed a further study involving nuclear workers from 15 countries including Canada. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL component, was significantly higher than the cohort as a whole. The work described in this report is an attempt to unravel what might have accounted for the divergence between the results for the AECL cohort and the others.

  17. Analysis of the results for the AECL cohort in the IARC study on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in fifteen countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last two decades there have been attempts to estimate the risks from occupational exposure in the nuclear industry by epidemiological assessments on cohorts of workers. However, generally low doses and relatively small worker populations have limited the precision of such studies. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved workers from facilities in the USA, UK and AECL. In 2005, IARC completed a further study involving nuclear workers from 15 countries including Canada. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL component, was significantly higher than the cohort as a whole. The work described in this report is an attempt to unravel what might have accounted for the divergence between the results for the AECL cohort and the others

  18. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    1999-05-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VI (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2} . For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute k values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in k), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}k on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  19. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  20. An analysis of the AECL/CEC field experiment on the transport of 82Br through a single fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the joint AECL/CEC field experiment performed at the Chalk River test site in Canada in 1983 is presented. A pulse of 82Br tracer was injected into a steady dipole flow field set up in a single fracture between two boreholes 10.6 m apart. A model is presented accounting for dispersal by the dipole flow field and for hydrodynamic dispersion within the fracture. The model is fitted to the experimental data of the breakthrough curve by varying a dispersion length and the water travel time along the line joining the boreholes. In addition, the predicted recovery is compared with an estimate of the actual recovery. Recommendations are made for future experiments. (author)

  1. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  2. ZZ CANDULIB-AECL, Burnup-Dependent ORIGEN-S Cross-Section Libraries for Candu Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1 - Historical background and information: - 28-element fuel cross-section library: Format: Designed for use with the ORIGEN-S isotope generation and depletion code. Materials: Co, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, I, Xe, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Lu, Ta, W, Re, Au, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm. Origin: ENDSF, ENDF/B-IV, -V and -VI Weighting spectrum: determined using WIMS-AECL transport code. - 37-element fuel cross-section library: Format: Designed for use with the ORIGEN-S isotope generation and depletion code. Materials: Co, Ge, As, Se, Br, Kr, Rb, Sr, Y, Zr, Nb, Mo, Tc, Ru, Rh, Pd, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, I, Xe, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Pm, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Lu, Ta, W, Re, Au, Th, Pa, U, Np, Pu, Am, Cm. Origin: ENDSF, ENDF/B-IV, -V and -VI Weighting spectrum: determined using WIMS-AECL transport code. In 1995, updated ORIGEN-S cross-section libraries were created as part of a program to upgrade and standardize the computer codes and nuclear data employed for used fuel characterization. This effort was funded through collaboration between Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the Canadian Nuclear Power Utilities, under the Candu Owners Group (COG). The updated cross sections were generated using the WIMS-AECL lattice code and ENDF/B-V and -VI based data to provide cross section consistency with reactor physics codes. 2 - Application of the data: The libraries in this data collection are designed for characterising used fuel from Candu pressurized heavy water reactors. Two libraries are provided: one for the standard 28-element fuel bundle design, the other for the 37-element fuel bundle design. The libraries were generated for typical reactor operating conditions. The libraries are designed for use with the ORIGEN-S isotope generation and depletion code. 3 - Source and scope of data: The Candu libraries are updated with cross sections from a variety of different sources. Capture

  3. Correction and verification of AECL Bonner Sphere response matrix based on mono-energetic neutron calibration performed at NPL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL Bonner Sphere Spectrometer (BSS) was taken to National Physical Laboratory (NPL) for calibration in mono-energetic neutron fields and bare 252Cf neutron fields. The mono-energetic radiations were performed using ISO-8529 prescribed neutron energies: 0.071, 0.144, 0.565, 1.2, 5 and 17 MeV. A central SP9 proportional counter was also evaluated at the NPL thermal neutron calibration facility in order to assess an effective pressure of 3He inside the counter, i.e. number density of 3He atoms. Based on these measurements and methods outlined by Thomas and Soochak, a new BSS response matrix was generated. The response matrix is then verified by unfolding spectra corresponding to various neutron fields. Those are NPL bare 252Cf source, National Institute of Standards and Technology bare and heavy water moderated 252Cf source and 241AmBe calibration source located at National Research Council. A good agreement was observed with expected neutron fluence rates, as well as derived dosimetric quantities, such as International Commission on Radiological Protection-74 ambient dose equivalent. The AECL BSS response matrix was created based on methods proposed by Wiegel et al., Thomas and Thomas and Soochak. The response matrix was further corrected for the mono-energetic neutron measurements taken and NPL. In order to experimentally verify the response matrix, four neutron measurements were taken at three laboratories: NPL, NIST and NRC. Good agreement with expected values both for integrated neutron fluence and derived dosimetric quantities was observed in all four cases. (authors)

  4. US DOE-AECL cooperative program for development of high-level radioactive waste container fabrication, closure, and inspection techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) plan to initiate a cooperative research program on development of manufacturing processes for high-level radioactive waste containers. This joint program will benefit both countries in the development of processes for the fabrication, final closure in a hot-cell, and certification of the containers. Program activity objectives can be summarized as follows: to support the selection of suitable container fabrication, final closure, and inspection techniques for the candidate materials and container designs that are under development or are being considered in the US and Canadian repository programs; and to investigate these techniques for alternate materials and/or container designs, to be determined in future optimization studies relating to long-term performance of the waste packages. The program participants will carry out this work in a conditional phased approach, and the scope of work for subsequent years will evolve subject to developments in earlier years. The overall term of this cooperative program is planned to run roughly three years. 5 refs., 2 tabs

  5. AECL international standard problem ISP-41 FU/1 follow-up exercise (Phase 1): Containment Iodine Computer Code Exercise: Parametric Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I- concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE (IPSN), IODE (NRIR), IMPAIR (GRS), INSPECT (AEAT), IMOD (AECL) and LIRIC (AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained from intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (authors)

  6. The use of HANDIDET reg-sign non-electric detonator assemblies to reduce blast-induced overpressure at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of aspects of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal are being assessed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in a series of experiments at its Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. One of the major objectives of the work being carried out at the URL is to develop and evaluate the methods and technology to ensure safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. In 1994, AECL excavated access tunnels and a laboratory room for the Quarried Block Fracture Migration Experiment (QBFME) at the 240 Level of the URL. This facility will be used to study the transport of radionuclides in natural fractures in quarried blocks of granite under in-situ groundwater conditions. The experiment is being carried out under a cooperative agreement with the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The excavation of the QBFME access tunnels and laboratory was carried out using controlled blasting techniques that minimized blast-induced overpressure which could have damaged or interrupted other ongoing experiments in the vicinity. The majority of the blasts used conventional long delay non-electric detonators but a number of blasts were carried out using HANDIDET 250/6000 non-electric long delay detonator assemblies and HTD reg-sign non-electric short delay trunkline detonator assemblies. The tunnel and laboratory excavation was monitored to determine the levels of blast-induced overpressure. This paper describes the blasting and monitoring results of the blasts using HANDIDET non-electric detonator assemblies and the effectiveness of these detonators in reducing blast-induced overpressure

  7. Past and future fracturing in AECL Research areas in the superior province of the Canadian Precambrian Shield, with emphasis on the Lac du Bonnet Batholith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The likelihood that future fracturing, arising from geologic causes, could occur in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel waste repository in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield, is examined. The report discusses the possible causes of fracturing (both past and future) in Shield rocks. The report then examines case histories of fracture formation in Precambrian plutonic rocks in AECL's Research Areas, especially the history of the Lac du Bonnet Batholith, in the Whiteshell Area, Manitoba. Initially, fractures can be introduced into intrusive plutonic rocks during crystallization and cooling of an intrusive magma. These fractures are found at all size scales; as late residual magma dyking, hydraulic fracturing by retrograde boiling off of hydrothermal fluids, and, in some cases, through local differential cooling. Subsequent fracturing is largely caused by changes in environmental temperature and stress field, rather than by alteration of the material behaviour of the rock. Pluton emplacement during orogeny is commonly accompanied by uplift and erosional exhumation, altering both the tectonic and the lithostatic stresses, the rock temperature gradient and the pore fluid characteristics

  8. An address by AECL's president

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This complete address given by Reid Morden, the President of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, at the June 1997 meeting of the Canadian Nuclear Association. In his address, Morden discusses Canada's success in at home and abroad. He also corrects myths about nuclear energy

  9. Rock stability considerations for siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. Based on experiences from Aespoe HRL, AECL's URL, tunnelling and mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.D. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Soederhaell, J. [VBB VIAK AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 25 years the international nuclear community has carried out extensive research into the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in hard rocks. In two cases this research has resulted in the construction of dedicated underground research facilities: SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden and AECL's Underground Research Laboratory, Canada. Both laboratories are located in hard rocks considered representative of the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields, respectively. This report is intended to synthesize the important rock mechanics findings from these research programs. In particular the application of these finding to assessing the stability of underground openings. As such the report draws heavily on the published results from the SKB's ZEDEX Experiment in Sweden and AECL's Mine- by Experiment in Canada. The objectives of this report are to: 1. Describe, using the current state of knowledge, the role rock engineering can play in siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. 2. Define the key rock mechanics parameters that should be determined in order to facilitate repository siting and construction. 3. Discuss possible construction issues, linked to rock stability, that may arise during the excavation of the underground openings of a KBS-3 repository. 4. Form a reference document for the rock stability analysis that has to be carried out as a part of the design works parallel to the site investigations. While there is no unique or single rock mechanics property or condition that would render the performance of a nuclear waste repository unacceptable, certain conditions can be treated as negative factors. Outlined below are major rock mechanics issues that should be addressed during the siting, construction and closure of a nuclear waste repository in Sweden in hard crystalline rock. During the site investigations phase, rock mechanics information will be predominately gathered from examination and testing of the rock core and

  10. Rock stability considerations for siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. Based on experiences from Aespoe HRL, AECL's URL, tunnelling and mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 25 years the international nuclear community has carried out extensive research into the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in hard rocks. In two cases this research has resulted in the construction of dedicated underground research facilities: SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden and AECL's Underground Research Laboratory, Canada. Both laboratories are located in hard rocks considered representative of the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields, respectively. This report is intended to synthesize the important rock mechanics findings from these research programs. In particular the application of these finding to assessing the stability of underground openings. As such the report draws heavily on the published results from the SKB's ZEDEX Experiment in Sweden and AECL's Mine- by Experiment in Canada. The objectives of this report are to: 1. Describe, using the current state of knowledge, the role rock engineering can play in siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. 2. Define the key rock mechanics parameters that should be determined in order to facilitate repository siting and construction. 3. Discuss possible construction issues, linked to rock stability, that may arise during the excavation of the underground openings of a KBS-3 repository. 4. Form a reference document for the rock stability analysis that has to be carried out as a part of the design works parallel to the site investigations. While there is no unique or single rock mechanics property or condition that would render the performance of a nuclear waste repository unacceptable, certain conditions can be treated as negative factors. Outlined below are major rock mechanics issues that should be addressed during the siting, construction and closure of a nuclear waste repository in Sweden in hard crystalline rock. During the site investigations phase, rock mechanics information will be predominately gathered from examination and testing of the rock core and mapping of the

  11. AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

    2005-06-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the

  12. Materials research in AECL, Spring 1971

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a summary of materials research at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The topics covered in this report include: some observation on short circuit diffusion; mechanical testing of fuel cladding; stress relaxation experiments; plastic instability in zirconium alloy fuel cladding and pressure tubes; a theoretical study of delayed failure in brittle materials; and, swelling in irradiated U3Si.

  13. AECL research programs in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarizes the current research activities in life sciences in the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-Research Company. The research is carried out at its two main research sites: the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories and the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. The summaries cover the following areas of research: radiation biology, medical biophysics, epidemiology, environmental research and dosimetry. (author)

  14. AECL programs in basic physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the CRNL program of research into the basic properties of atomic nuclei and condensed matter (liquids and solids). Brief descriptions are given of some of the current experimental programs done principally at the NRU reactor and MP tandem accelerator, the associated theoretical studies, and some highlights of past achievements

  15. Experience with the AECL digital console

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State), it is believed that nuclear engineering students should have the opportunity to operate a nuclear reactor, perform experiments with reactor and radiation instrumentation, and perform a series of reactor physics experiments. These activities are done at the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR), a General Atomic Mark III TRIGA reactor. The PSBR, which is part of the Penn State Radiation Science and Engineering Center, is the longest operating university reactor in the US. Through periodic upgrades over its 34-yr lifetime, the facility has enabled the nuclear engineering department to familiarize students with the current instrumentation technology that they would expect to find in industry. The present reactor instrumentation and control system is >25 yr old and is no longer representative of current reactor instrumentation and control technology. The new reactor console was designed to provide the PSBR with safe and reliable operation in four different modes: manual, automatic, square wave, and pulse. It utilizes a reliable hardwired analog system for safety-related functions. All nonsafety-related functions are implemented with computer technology

  16. Materials research in AECL, Spring 1970

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives a summary of materials research at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The topics covered in this report include engineering design with brittle materials, texture and mechanical properties of zirconium alloy tubing, structural damage by ion bombardment, research on silicon carbide, shallow phosphorus diffusion in p-type silicon and scanning electron microscopy. CRNL facilities for the examination of irradiated materials is also discussed

  17. AECL devises new nuclear welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automatic autogenous TIG pipe butt welding equipment has been developed for producing joints in reactor coolant monitoring systems for tubes of between 6 and 25 mm diameter and up to 3 mm wall thickness in stainless steel. The equipment is designed to work on site with power requirements of up to 2.2 KW maximum. A major feature of the design, therefore, was a welding system of sufficiently small size, portability and ruggedness to be able to withstand on-site conditions. Quality control is carried out automatically by a comparison of welding parameters with those of a standard acceptable weld. Details of power source characteristics and welding procedure are given. (author)

  18. AECL research programs in systems chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research programs in Systems Chemistry are aimed at preserving the integrity of the many working systems in CANDU reactors and at minimizing chemistry-induced problems such as radiation field growth or fouling of surfaces. The topics of main concern are the chemistry and corrosion of steam generators, for it is in this general area that the potential for serious problems is very real

  19. The AECL research and development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research and development program of the Atomic Energy of Canada Research Company is briefly described. Goals and objectives are emphasized, some recent highlights are given and the importance of technology transfer is discussed. A short representative bibliography is included. (auth)

  20. AECL's excavation stability study - summary of observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Excavation Stability Study (ESS) was conducted at the 420 Level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) to evaluate stability and the extent of excavation damage in tunnels as a function of tunnel geometry and orientation, geology, and excavation method. A series of ovaloid and circular openings were used to achieve different boundary stress levels and near-field stress distributions to assess the effect of tunnel geometry on damage development. Several of these openings had sections in both granite and granodiorite lithology, providing a comparison of damage in rock types with different strength characteristics. Damage around circular tunnels (one excavated by drill-and-blast, the other by mechanical means) was also investigated. The study.showed that mechanically stable openings can be excavated in the most adverse stress conditions at the 420 Level of the URL. In addition, it was shown that tunnel stability is sensitive to tunnel shape, variations in geology, and to some extent, the excavation method. Findings of the study are relevant in developing design criteria, and in assessing the feasibility of constructing large ovaloid openings in adverse stress conditions. This report summarizes the preliminary observations related to tunnel stability and excavation damage. (author). 8 refs., 7 tabs., 23 figs

  1. Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Labs: Reuse and Licence Termination of a Number of Facilities at the Chalk River Labs to Allow for Refurbishment of the Site. Annex A. I-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Labs is located along the Ottawa River in Ontario, Canada, approximately 200 km north-west of Ottawa. The site began construction in 1944 following the expropriation of approximately 1 500 ha of land. A number of research reactors were constructed at the site along with numerous nuclear labs, hot cells and administrative facilities in support of the research and development work planned for the site. The principal occupants of the Chalk River site are AECL employees with a strong presence from National Resources Canada (NRC) and other small research groups. The site is undergoing substantial changes with an emphasis on minimizing the impact of increasing the builtup area footprint in conjunction with site upgrades and new build projects. To accomplish this task, a number of refurbishment and decommissioning projects were planned. Decommissioning projects were initiated to make room for new development through a number of initiatives. The decommissioning mandate includes the removal of a select group of original deteriorating facilities to make room for new construction and to decommission other facilities to facilitate redevelopment and reuse of the available space. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issues nuclear licences. The licensees must demonstrate that it is safe to continue operations of the nuclear site and request a renewal of their licence. CNSC will issue a new operating licence for a specific period of time at which the licensee must demonstrate that it is safe to proceed with a licence renewal. A request to terminate a licensable activity must be submitted to the CNSC. Upon approval to proceed, it must be demonstrated that the licensable activities have ceased and the facility has been appropriately decommissioned. Licence termination requires a demonstration that the land or previous activities presents a low risk and that the process can be used to support redevelopment because it results in a scrutinized

  2. Microbial analysis of the buffer/container experiment at AECL`s Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hamon, C.J.; Haveman, S.A.; Delaney, T.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs; Pedersen, K.; Ekendahl, S.; Jahromi, N.; Arlinger, J.; Hallbeck, L. [Univ. of Goeteborg, (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Daumas, S.; Dekeyser, K. [Guiges Recherche Appliquee en Microbiologie, Aix-en-Provence, (France)

    1996-05-01

    The Buffer/Container experiment was carried out for 2.5 years to examine the in-situ performance of compacted buffer material in a single emplacement borehole under vault-relevant conditions. During decommissioning of this experiment, numerous samples were taken for microbial analysis to determine if the naturally present microbial population in buffer material survived to conditions and to determine which groups of microorganisms would be dominant in such a simulated vault environment. Microbial analyses were initiated within 24 hour of sampling for all types of samples taken. The culture results showed an almost universal disappearance of viable microorganisms in the samples taken from near the heater surface. The microbial activity measurements confirmed the lack of viable organisms with very weak or no activity measured in most of these samples. Generally, aerobic heterotrophic culture conditions gave the highest mean colony-forming units (CFU) values at both 25 and 50 C. Under anaerobic conditions, and especially at 50 C, lower mean CFU values were obtained. In all samples analyzed, numbers of sulfate reducing bacteria were less than 1000 CFU/g dry material. Methanogens were either not present or were found in very low numbers. Anaerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria were found in higher numbers in most sample types with sufficient moisture. The statistical evaluation of the culture data demonstrated clearly that the water content was the variable limiting the viability of the bacteria present, and not the temperature. 68 refs, 35 figs, 37 tabs.

  3. Safety re-assessment of AECL test and research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited currently has four operating engineering test/research reactors of various sizes and ages; a new isotope-production reactor Maple-X10, under construction at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL), and a heating demonstration reactor, SDR, undergoing high-power commissioning at Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE). The company is also performing design studies of small reactors for hot water and electricity production. The older reactors are ZED-2, PTR, NRX, and NRU; these range in age from 42 years (NRX) to 29 years (ZED-2). Since 1984, limited-scope safety re-assessments have been underway on three of these reactors (ZED-2, NRX AND NRU). ZED-2 and PTR are operated by the Reactor Physics Branch; all other reactors are operated by the respective site Reactor Operations Branches. For the older reactors the original safety reports produced were entirely deterministic in nature and based on the design-basis accident concept. The limited scope safety re-assessments for these older reactors, carried out over the past 5 years, have comprised both quantitative probabilistic safety-assessment techniques, such as event tree and fault analysis, and/or qualitative techniques, such as failure mode and effect analysis. The technique used for an individual assessment was dependent upon the specific scope required. This paper discusses the types of analyses carried out, specific insights/recommendations resulting from the analysis, and the plan for future analysis. In addition, during the last four years safety assessments have been carried out on the new isotope-, heat-, and electricity-producing reactors, as part of the safety design review, commissioning and licensing activities

  4. AECL's progress in developing the DUPIC fuel fabrication process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) fuel can be used directly in CANDU reactors without the need for wet chemical reprocessing or reenrichment. Considerable experimental progress has been made in verifying the practicality of this fuel cycle, including hot-cell experiments using spent PWR fuels and out-cell trials using surrogate fuels. This paper describes the current status of these experiments. (author)

  5. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Health Study formally began in April 1980. The purpose of the study is to determine the causes of death among a population of radiation workers and to compare this information with data available for the causes of death in the general population. The study population and the implementation are briefly discussed. The aim of the study is to determine the real occupational risk of being a radiation worker. 3 refs

  6. Processing of LLRW arising from AECL nuclear research centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation of nuclear research reactors and laboratories results in the generation of a wide variety of solid and liquid radioactive wastes. This paper describes practical experience with processing of low-level radioactive wastes at two major nuclear research centres in Canada

  7. AECL programs for new applications for nuclear energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports the activities of the New Applications Steering Committee (NASC) of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. The NASC is intended to develop future RβD programs, and more specifically to promote certain existing ideas that have not yet become part of established programs, stimulate new idaas, identify needs and opportunities for RβD, evaluate proposals for RβD programs, initiate action on new ideas, and provide feedback to a staff who may be expected to generate ideas. Major areas and technologies that have been studied by the NASC and are covered in this report include oil substitution by nuclear heat and by electricity, energy storage and the role of hydrogen, nuclear energy in liquid fuel production, assessment of Canadian energy resources, and computer modelling of energy systems

  8. Improved CANDU fuel performance. A summary of previous AECL publications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel defect rate in CANDU power reactors has been very low (0.06%) since 1972. Most defects were caused by power ramping. The two measures taken to reduce the defect rate, by about an order of magnitude, were changes in the fuelling schemes and the introduction of thin coatings of graphite on the inside surface of the Zircaloy fuel cladding. Power ramping tests have demonstrated that graphite layers, and also baked poly-dimethyl-siloxane layers, between the UO2 pellets and Zircaloy cladding, increase the tolerance of fuel to power ramps. These designs are termed graphite CANLUB and siloxane CANLUB; fuel performance depends on coating parameters such as thickness, wear resistance and on environmental and thermal conditions during the curing of coatings. (author)

  9. Evolution of archiving approaches, AECL, Canada. Annex II-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is unlikely that CD based archives will work well for long term (over ten years) archives due to ever-changing PC software and upgrading of equipment. Stand-alone and proprietary software should be avoided for long term archival projects. Documents should be archived to multiple page TIFF or PDF file format for long term storage, to ensure that the complete document remains intact. Regular and ongoing inspections and assessment of long term record archives should be performed to ensure the readability, access and usability of records

  10. Reorganization of AECL and the future marketing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. Engineering Co. has been reorganized to support the new emphasis on foreign sales of CANDU reactors. Much has been learned from reactor sales to Argentina, Korea, and Romania, but Canada needs to sell one 600 MWe reactor a year in order to avoid a decline in its nuclear industry. (LL)

  11. Two-dimensional analytical well model with applications to groundwater flow and convective transport modelling in the geosphere. AECL research No. AECL-10880

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, T.; Nakka, B.W.

    1994-12-31

    This report documents the mathematical development of an analytical well model for describing steady groundwater flow in an idealized, confined aquifer intersected by a withdrawal well. The aquifer comprises a low-dipping fracture zone. The model is useful for making simple quantitative estimates of contaminant transport along groundwater pathways in the fracture zone to the well from an underground source that intercepts the fracture zone. The report outlines the assumptions and method used to derive an exact analytical solution and presents expressions for calculating quantities such as streamlines, hydraulic head, well capacity, and contaminant concentrations in the well water. The report also presents the results of applying the model to a site-specific conceptual model of an area in southeast Manitoba. Predictions based on site-specific parameters and boundary conditions are presented graphically.

  12. Predicting the effects of microbial activity on the corrosion of copper nuclear fuel waste disposal containers. AECL research No. AECL-11598

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, F.; Stroes-Gascoyne, S.

    1996-12-31

    Microbially influenced corrosion of copper nuclear fuel waste containers may occur in a disposal vault buried in granitic rock. The extent and diversity of microbial activity in the vault is expected to be limited initially because of the aggressive conditions produced by gamma radiation, elevated temperatures, and desiccation of the clay-based buffer in which the containers will be emplaced. This paper presents new evidence regarding the claim that a virtually sterile zone will be created around the container, and describes experiments studying the effects of remote sulphate-reducing bacteria activity on the long-term corrosion of the container. A method for predicting the consequences for the container lifetime is also presented.

  13. Effect of thermal stresses on progressive rock failure at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal-mechanical behaviour of the rock mass is an important consideration in assessing concepts for deep underground disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The effects of thermal loading on the progressive failure of sparsely fractured granite were investigated in the Heated Failure Tests, conducted in situ at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). Testing was carried out in four stages to assess the effects of drilling/heating sequence (i.e., loading path), borehole interaction and confining pressure on the development of an excavation damaged zone (EDZ) around a series of 600-mm-diameter observation boreholes. Acoustic emission (AE) activity was found to correlate well with damage development. Results of the tests show that the extent of the EDZ is influenced mainly by the magnitudes of the radial and tangential stresses generated at the periphery of the opening by the combined thermal-mechanical loading. However, the thermal-mechanical loading sequence was also found to affect EDZ development. (author)

  14. Microbial analysis of the buffer/container experiment at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buffer/Container experiment was carried out for 2.5 years to examine the in-situ performance of compacted buffer material in a single emplacement borehole under vault-relevant conditions. During decommissioning of this experiment, numerous samples were taken for microbial analysis to determine if the naturally present microbial population in buffer material survived to conditions and to determine which groups of microorganisms would be dominant in such a simulated vault environment. Microbial analyses were initiated within 24 hour of sampling for all types of samples taken. The culture results showed an almost universal disappearance of viable microorganisms in the samples taken from near the heater surface. The microbial activity measurements confirmed the lack of viable organisms with very weak or no activity measured in most of these samples. Generally, aerobic heterotrophic culture conditions gave the highest mean colony-forming units (CFU) values at both 25 and 50 C. Under anaerobic conditions, and especially at 50 C, lower mean CFU values were obtained. In all samples analyzed, numbers of sulfate reducing bacteria were less than 1000 CFU/g dry material. Methanogens were either not present or were found in very low numbers. Anaerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria were found in higher numbers in most sample types with sufficient moisture. The statistical evaluation of the culture data demonstrated clearly that the water content was the variable limiting the viability of the bacteria present, and not the temperature. 68 refs, 35 figs, 37 tabs

  15. Post-irradiation examination of the 37M fuel bundle at Chalk River Laboratories (AECL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Daniels, T. [Ontario Power Generation, Pickering, Ontario (Canada); Montin, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-03-15

    The modified (-element (37M) fuel bundle was designed by Ontario Power Generation (OPG) to improve Critical Heat Flux (CHF) performance in ageing pressure tubes. A modification of the conventional 37-element fuel bundle design, the 37M fuel bundle allows more coolant flow through the interior sub-channels by way of a smaller central element. A demonstration irradiation (DI) of thirty-two fuel bundles was completed in 2011 at OPG's Darlington Nuclear Generating Station to confirm the suitability of the 37M fuel bundles for full core implementation. In support of the DI, fuel elements were examined in the Chalk River Laboratories Hot Cells. Inspection activities included: Bundle and element visual examination; Bundle and element dimensional measurements; Verification of bundle and element integrity; and Internal Gas Volume Measurements. The inspection results for 37M were comparable to that of conventional 37-element CANDU fuel. Fuel performance parameters of the 37M DI fuel bundle and fuel elements were within the range observed for similarly operated conventional 37-element CANDU fuel. Based on these Post Irradiation Examination (PIE) results, 37M fuel performed satisfactorily. (author)

  16. Remote robotic inspection of irregular surfaces on the inner diameter of the AECL NRU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeller, B., E-mail: bzeller@eclipsescientific.com [Eclipse Scientific Ltd., Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Lombardi, L., E-mail: llombardi@utex.com [Utex Scientific Instruments, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Cyr, P., E-mail: pcyr@eclipsescientific.com [Eclipse Scientific Ltd., Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Mair, H.D., E-mail: dmair@utex.com [Utex Scientific Instruments, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Ginzel, R., E-mail: rginzel@eclipsescientific.com [Eclipse Scientific Ltd., Waterloo, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    In May of 2009, the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor was forced to shut down after a small heavy water leak. In 2009-2010 repairs were performed in order to restart medical isotope production mid-August 2010. Since the NRU vessel's return to service, a series of periodic inspections is required to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Eclipse Scientific in collaboration with Utex Scientific Instruments and Liburdi Automation developed the NDE inspection system for the In-Service Inspection program of the NRU vessel. In addition to the difficult environmental, delivery and inspection circumstances the inspection team was faced with the problem of doing an immersion inspection of the inside surface of the reactor vessel through a small 120 mm access port at a distance of more than 10 m to the inspection area at the bottom of the reactor. The vessel was built over 50 years ago and as the inner surface was modified by the repair program during the forced outage, there were no accurate drawings of the inner surface of the vessel that an automated system could rely upon. Eclipse Scientific in collaboration with Liburdi Automation developed a robotic arm designed to enter from the remote access port to deploy the Phased Array and Eddy Current Array inspection heads into the reactor vessel. The motion control and data acquisition system was developed in collaboration with Utex Scientific Instruments using their Inspection Ware software. This paper will highlight the challenges faced in the development of an inspection system capable of using ultrasonic signals to learn a surface and, using this acquired surface topography, effectively and safely deploy and articulate the different inspection heads required to perform the In-Service Inspection of the NRU vessel. (author)

  17. Information Exchange among COG Member Stations, Utility/AECL Design and External Nuclear Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the COG Information Exchange Program the mandate of which reads: 'To promote the safety reliability and excellence of CANDU plants worldwide by facilitating the sharing of operating experience amongst the members of COG'. To fulfill its mandate the COG operates Information Exchange Program which: 1. Provides a user-friendly facility, COGNET, for staff of COG member organizations to communicate with each other and with external stations, utilities and organizations on topics applicable to CANDU operation, safety, maintenance, design and performance; 2. Offers one-stop shopping for information applicable to the design, operation, maintenance, safety and performance of CANDU's; 3. Reports and compares the performance of all CANDU stations; 4. Organizes opportunities for individuals involved with the operation of CANDU's to meet with their peers and with CANDU industry experts to share operating experience; 5. Facilitates the identification of generic CANDU problems which leads to the addressing of these problems by others through co-operative projects, designer feedback and R and D programs. The paper has the following content: 1. COGNET; 1.1. COGNET Message Forums; 1.2. COGNET Operations Forums; 1.3. COGNET Private Messages; 2. Report Databases and Library; 2.1. REPEX (Technical Reports); 2.2. PCN (CANDU Plant Modifications); 2.3. SEREX (CANDU Station Events); 2.4. INPO (International Events); 3. CANDU Performance; 3.1. COG NEWSLETTERS; 3.2. Performance Indicators; 4. Workshops; 4.1. COG Workshops

  18. OE Management at Research Technology Operations, Chalk River Laboratories, AECL, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief description of nuclear facility. A nuclear installation consisting of a 130 MW research reactor and 13 licensed nuclear facilities, staffed by ∼2600 employees, on three distinct sites. Main activities include: (1) Reactor development; (2) CRL nuclear operations; (3) Research and development; (4) Isotope production; (5) Waste management and decommissioning. Overview of OE arrangements. A centralized OE group that is permanently resourced and trained to support the organization. The group is spread over two time zones and supported by a cadre of permanently dedicated OE coordinators and action tracking coordinators throughout the organization

  19. Remote robotic inspection of irregular surfaces on the inner diameter of the AECL NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May of 2009, the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor was forced to shut down after a small heavy water leak. In 2009-2010 repairs were performed in order to restart medical isotope production mid-August 2010. Since the NRU vessel's return to service, a series of periodic inspections is required to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Eclipse Scientific in collaboration with Utex Scientific Instruments and Liburdi Automation developed the NDE inspection system for the In-Service Inspection program of the NRU vessel. In addition to the difficult environmental, delivery and inspection circumstances the inspection team was faced with the problem of doing an immersion inspection of the inside surface of the reactor vessel through a small 120 mm access port at a distance of more than 10 m to the inspection area at the bottom of the reactor. The vessel was built over 50 years ago and as the inner surface was modified by the repair program during the forced outage, there were no accurate drawings of the inner surface of the vessel that an automated system could rely upon. Eclipse Scientific in collaboration with Liburdi Automation developed a robotic arm designed to enter from the remote access port to deploy the Phased Array and Eddy Current Array inspection heads into the reactor vessel. The motion control and data acquisition system was developed in collaboration with Utex Scientific Instruments using their Inspection Ware software. This paper will highlight the challenges faced in the development of an inspection system capable of using ultrasonic signals to learn a surface and, using this acquired surface topography, effectively and safely deploy and articulate the different inspection heads required to perform the In-Service Inspection of the NRU vessel. (author)

  20. Load following testing by AECL in collaboration with the Institute for Nuclear Research in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests are planned to confirm and demonstrate that the load following (LF) operation of CANDU reactors would have no deleterious effect on fuel performance. Current operating experience with LF has not identified any new limiting criteria for LF operation. Thus far, fission-gas release and sheath strains have been consistent with those of baseline operation. As part of the collaboration under the Romania-Canada Memorandum for Cooperation in research and development of nuclear energy and technology, one of the areas of focus is LF experiments at the Institute for Nuclear Research (SCN) in Pitesti, Romania, where both in-reactor and out-reactor testing will be performed. This paper describes the irradiation and post-irradiation examination facilities at SCN in Pitesti, the operational experience with power-cycling testing performed in-reactor, and a description of the ongoing in-reactor testing in the SCN TRIGA reactor. This paper also describes the out-reactor test methodology and test matrix that will be used in the SCF tests at SCN. (author)

  1. Verification and characterization of continuum behavior of fractured rock at AECL Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purposes of this study are to determine when a fracture system behaves as a porous medium and what the corresponding permeability tensor is. A two-dimensional fracture system model is developed with density, size, orientation, and location of fractures in an impermeable matrix as random variables. Simulated flow tests through the models measure directional permeability, K/sub g/. Polar coordinate plots of 1/√K/sub g/, which are ellipses for equivalent anistropic homogeneous porous media, are graphed and best fit ellipses are calculated. Fracture length and areal density were varied such that fracture frequency was held constant. The examples showed the permeability increased with fracture length. The modeling techniques were applied to data from the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.'s Underground Research Laboratory facility in Manitoba, Canada by assuming the fracture pattern at the surface persists at depth. Well test data were used to estimate the aperture distribution by both correlating and not correlating the aperture with fracture length. The permeability of models with uncorrelated length and aperture were smaller than those for correlated models. A Monte Carlo type study showed that analysis of steady state packer tests consistently underestimate the mean aperture. Finally, a three-dimensional model in which fractures are discs randomly located in space, interactions between the fractures are line segments, and the solution of the steady state flow equations is based on image theory was discussed

  2. Summary of geoscience work at the AECL research site near Atikokan, Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1979 June, geolgical, geophysical and hydro-geological investigations have been conducted at Research Area 4 north of Atikokan, Ontario as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. Composition, shape and internal structure of the Eye-Dashwa pluton were the subjects of regional field studies. Detailed research concentrated on the detection and characterization of surface and subsurface fractures within a 400-m x 800-m grid area, where five boreholes were drilled to depths of between 200 m and 1100 m. Fracture zones in the area were readily detected by surface mapping, ground very low frequency electromagnetic (VLF-EM) surveys and borehole logging. Borehole logs, downhole tube-wave seismic surveys, and thermal and television logging were successful in detecting open fractures in boreholes

  3. IFPE/AECL-BUNDLE, Fission Gas Release and Burnup Analysis, PHWR Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description: Prototype Candu Fuel bundles for the CANDU6 (bundle NR) and Bruce (bundle JC) reactors were irradiated in the NRU experimental reactor at Chalk River Laboratories in experimental loop facilities under typical Candu reactor conditions, except that they were cooled using light water. NEA-1596/01 - Description: Bundle JC was a prototype 37-element fuel bundle for the Bruce-A Ontario Hydro reactors. This pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) design utilizes a heavy water moderator and pressurize heavy water coolant. For irradiation in the NRU reactor, the centre fuel element was removed and replaced by a central tie rod for irradiation purposes in the vertical test section. Coolant for the test was pressurized light water under typical PHWR conditions of 9 to 10.5 MPa and 300 deg. C. The fuel elements used 1.55 wt% U-235 in U uranium dioxide fuel and were clad with Zircaloy-4 material. The bundles' elements were coated with a graphite coating. The fuel is somewhat atypical of 37 element-type fuel since the length to diameter ratio (l/d) is large (1.73) due to the pellets being ground down from a OD of 14.3 mm to 12.12 mm. The outer element burnup averaged approximately 640 MWh/kgU on discharge. Outer element powers varied between 57 kW/m near the beginning of life and 23 kW/m at discharge. Due to the long irradiation, the bundle experienced 153 short shutdowns, and 129 longer duration shutdowns. No element instrumentation was used during the irradiation. However, the bundle was subjected to extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) that included dimensional changes, fission gas release, fuel burnup analysis, and metallography that included grain size measurement. NEA-1596/02 - Description: Bundle NR was a prototype 37-element fuel bundle for the Candu 600 reactor. This pressurized heavy water reactor (PHWR) design utilizes a heavy water moderator and pressurized heavy water coolant. For irradiation in the NRU reactor, the centre fuel element was removed and replaced by a central tie rod for irradiation purposes in the vertical test section. Coolant for the test was pressurized light water under typical PHWR conditions of approximately 9 to 10.5 MPa and 300 deg. C. The fuel elements used 1.41 wt% U-235 enriched UO2 fuel pellets and were clad with Zircaloy-4 material. The inner sheath surface was coated with a graphite layer. Three types of pellet-stack-to-end-cap geometries were used for the outer elements: a 350 mm3 plenum insert (six elements), a 580 mm3 plenum insert (six elements), and no plenum insert (six elements). Intermediate and inner element rings had no plenum insert. Outer element burnups reached average measured burnups of 235 MWh/kgU. Outer element powers were steady during the irradiation and ranged between 58 and 62 kW/m during the irradiation. No element instrumentation was used during the irradiation. However, the bundle was subjected to extensive post-irradiation examination (PIE) that included dimensional changes, fission gas release, and fuel burnup analysis

  4. Load following testing by AECL in collaboration with the Institute for Nuclear Research in Romania

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palleck, S.J.; Sim, K.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Gheorghiu, C. [Institute of Nuclear Research (Romania)

    2001-07-01

    Tests are planned to confirm and demonstrate that the load following (LF) operation of CANDU reactors would have no deleterious effect on fuel performance. Current operating experience with LF has not identified any new limiting criteria for LF operation. Thus far, fission-gas release and sheath strains have been consistent with those of baseline operation. As part of the collaboration under the Romania-Canada Memorandum for Cooperation in research and development of nuclear energy and technology, one of the areas of focus is LF experiments at the Institute for Nuclear Research (SCN) in Pitesti, Romania, where both in-reactor and out-reactor testing will be performed. This paper describes the irradiation and post-irradiation examination facilities at SCN in Pitesti, the operational experience with power-cycling testing performed in-reactor, and a description of the ongoing in-reactor testing in the SCN TRIGA reactor. This paper also describes the out-reactor test methodology and test matrix that will be used in the SCF tests at SCN. (author)

  5. Nuclear research centres in the 21st century: An AECL perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear energy programme of Canada started at Chalk River Laboratories with the setting up of Zero Energy Experimental Site in 1945. One of the early research reactors of Canada, the National Research Universal (NRU) continues to provide 70% of the world requirement of isotopes for medical and industrial applications. A CANDU prototype (208 MW(e)) came on line in 1967 and based on this concept, Canada has a large nuclear power programme. The role of nuclear research centres has evolved with time starting with strategic research in the initial phases through to implementation of technology, building and supporting industry, and carrying out advanced technology development. Most of these centres have important assets in terms of licensed sites, trained personnel, research reactors, shielded facilities and expertise for handling large quantities of radioactivity and high tech laboratories for advanced R and D. These centres would, therefore, continue to play an important role in emission free and economic energy generation, nuclear medicine, food irradiation and industrial applications. Nuclear research centres in different countries are at various stages of development and have many unique features. However, there are generic issues and much will be gained by developing a shared vision for the future and implementing programmes in a collaborative manner. (author)

  6. Technical summary of AECL's Mine-by Experiment phase I: Excavation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first phase of the Mine-by Experiment was conducted at the 420 Level of the Underground Research Laboratory (URL) to investigate the response induced in the rock mass by excavating a 3.5-m-diameter circular tunnel using a non-explosive technique. The main objective of the experiment was to study the processes involved in progressive failure and the development of excavation-induced damage around underground openings. To this end, state-of-the-art geomechanical and geophysical instrumentation was used to monitor the excavation of the 46-m-long Mine-by Experiment test tunnel. The results from the experiment show that progressive failure in compressive regions around the tunnel initiates at stresses about 50% of the rock strength measured in uniaxial compression tests in the laboratory. The difference between the laboratory and in situ behaviour is attributed to complex stress changes that occur during excavation of the tunnel, especially in the vicinity of the advancing face. These effects are not simulated in standard laboratory tests. Numerical modelling and in situ characterization studies were conducted to establish the extent and characteristics of the damaged zone around the test tunnel. As part of this study, in situ stresses and material properties were established through back analysis of measured displacements and strains. Using these boundary conditions, it was shown that the damaged zone was limited to within 1 m of the original tunnel perimeter. The characteristics of the damaged zone, however, were found to be highly variable around the tunnel, and were dependent on the nature of the stress concentrations, geology, stress magnitudes and orientations and, to a lesser extent, the excavation method and sequence. (author) 136 refs., 14 tabs., 103 figs

  7. Technical assistance to AECL: electron beam welding of thick-walled copper containers for nuclear fuel waste disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of Phase Two of the copper electron beam welding project for the final closure of copper containers for nuclear fuel waste disposal. It has been demonstrated that single pass, electron beam square butt welds (depth of weld penetration > 25 mm) can be made without preheat in both electrolytic tough-pitch copper and oxygen-free copper plates. The present results show that oxygen-free copper exhibits better weldability than the electrolytic tough-pitch copper in terms of weld penetration and vulnerability to weld defects such as gas porosity, erratic metal overflow and blow holes. The results of ultrasonic inspection studies of the welds are also discussed

  8. The five year report of the Tunnel Sealing Experiment: an international project of AECL, JNC, ANDRA and WIPP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, N.A.; Cournut, A.; Dixon, D. (and others)

    2002-07-01

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was conducted to address construction and performance issues of full-scale seals for potential application to deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. The TSX was performed by an international partnership representing Japan, France, the United States and Canada. The experiment was installed at the 420-m depth of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory in the granite rock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. The experiment involved the construction of two full-scale tunnel seals at either end of a single excavation. One seal was an assembly of pre-compacted sand-bentonite blocks and the second seal was a single cast of Low-Heat High-Performance concrete. The objective of the TSX was to assess the applicability of technologies for construction of practicable concrete and bentonite bulkheads; to evaluate the performance of each bulkhead; and to identify and document the parameters that affect that performance. This report documents the construction and operation of the experiment over its first five years. During this period, the experiment was designed, tunnels were excavated, and the seals were constructed. The sand-filled region between the two bulkhead seals was filled and pressurized with water to 800 and 2000 kPa. A tracer test was conducted at a tunnel pressure of 800 kPa to assess the solute transport characteristics of full-scale tunnel seals. The most important outcome from the TSX is that functional full-scale repository seals can be constructed using currently available technology. Factors identified as potentially affecting seal performance included: excavation method and minimizing the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); keying bulkheads into the rock to interrupt the EDZ; compacted sand-bentonite placement method; treatment of clay bulkhead-rock interface; rate of clay saturation compared with the rate of water pressurization; clay bulkhead volume expansion; the resealing properties of bentonite; concrete heat of hydration; concrete shrinkage; grouting of the both EDZ and the concrete-rock interface; cracking of the concrete and debonding of the concrete-rock interface. The conclusions arising from the TSX are directly applicable to either tunnel or shaft seals constructed in potential host rock environments under consideration for radioactive waste disposal, and the results have direct application to the repository sealing programs of the participating countries. (author)

  9. The five year report of the Tunnel Sealing Experiment: an international project of AECL, JNC, ANDRA and WIPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tunnel Sealing Experiment (TSX) was conducted to address construction and performance issues of full-scale seals for potential application to deep geological repositories for radioactive waste. The TSX was performed by an international partnership representing Japan, France, the United States and Canada. The experiment was installed at the 420-m depth of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory in the granite rock of the Precambrian Canadian Shield. The experiment involved the construction of two full-scale tunnel seals at either end of a single excavation. One seal was an assembly of pre-compacted sand-bentonite blocks and the second seal was a single cast of Low-Heat High-Performance concrete. The objective of the TSX was to assess the applicability of technologies for construction of practicable concrete and bentonite bulkheads; to evaluate the performance of each bulkhead; and to identify and document the parameters that affect that performance. This report documents the construction and operation of the experiment over its first five years. During this period, the experiment was designed, tunnels were excavated, and the seals were constructed. The sand-filled region between the two bulkhead seals was filled and pressurized with water to 800 and 2000 kPa. A tracer test was conducted at a tunnel pressure of 800 kPa to assess the solute transport characteristics of full-scale tunnel seals. The most important outcome from the TSX is that functional full-scale repository seals can be constructed using currently available technology. Factors identified as potentially affecting seal performance included: excavation method and minimizing the excavation damaged zone (EDZ); keying bulkheads into the rock to interrupt the EDZ; compacted sand-bentonite placement method; treatment of clay bulkhead-rock interface; rate of clay saturation compared with the rate of water pressurization; clay bulkhead volume expansion; the resealing properties of bentonite; concrete heat of hydration; concrete shrinkage; grouting of the both EDZ and the concrete-rock interface; cracking of the concrete and debonding of the concrete-rock interface. The conclusions arising from the TSX are directly applicable to either tunnel or shaft seals constructed in potential host rock environments under consideration for radioactive waste disposal, and the results have direct application to the repository sealing programs of the participating countries. (author)

  10. Papers presented by A.E.C.L. to the International Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Conference of the Canadian Nuclear Association was held in Toronto, Ontario, Canada on May 25-27, 1964. There were six papers presented by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. The titles were: I. Canada - A Nuclear Power Plant Supplier, by J.L. Gray; II. Nuclear Power Development in Canada and Other Countries, by W.B. Lewis; III. The Development and Some Applications of Cobalt-60 Irradiators, by R.F. Errington; IV. The Definition and Achievement of Development Targets for the Canadian Power Reactor Program, by A.J. Mooradian; V. Recent Applications of Tracers in the Physical Sciences in Canada, by R.H. Betts and J.A. Davies; and, VI. Economic Comparison of Oyster Creek, Nine Mile Point and CANDU-type Stations under Canadian Conditions, by G.A. Pon and R.L. Beck.

  11. Some rock mechanics laboratory testing related to the construction and operation of AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In preparation for and in support of the geomechanical investigations during the Construction and Operating Phases of the URL, considerable rock mechanics laboratory testing work has been conducted over a range of conditions. The main objectives of the laboratory testing programs are twofold: (1) to provide a rock properties database for the URL rock mass for input into numerical models and the design of in situ experiments; (ii) to study the behaviours of the rocks under the repository conditions when they are subjected to changes in stress, temperature, humidity and other time-dependent factors. This paper discusses some testing programs undertaken in the Mining, Laboratories - Nepean (formerly known as Mining Research Laboratories, CANMET) of Natural Resources Canada. Particular emphasis is placed on relating the laboratory-scale behaviour of the rock samples to the in situ behaviour of the rock mass. (author)

  12. Data base for a CANDU-PHW operating on a once-through, slightly enriched uranium cycle (AECL-6594)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report, prepared for INFCE, gives data for an extrapolated 1000 MW(e) CANDU-PHW design operating on a once-through fuel cycle with a feed fuel of slightly enriched uranium - 1.2 weight % U-235 in uranium. The effects of varying fuel enrichment, maximum channel power, and economic parameters are also discussed

  13. List of publications 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This list includes all the scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - reports, reprints of journal articles, and translations - issued from 1986 April to 1987 December. Together with the earlier cumulative lists (AECL-5000, AECL-5001, AECL-5002, AECL--5003, AECL--5004, AECL--5005), it provides a complete catalogue of publications in the AECL-series. In the future, lists will be produced at twelve month intervals. The titles and other bibliographic information are arranged in several categories, each devoted to a broad subject area. In addition, each document is identified with an AECL number (for example, AECL-12345) which should be used in ordering reports and making enquiries

  14. N286.7-99, A Canadian standard specifying software quality management system requirements for analytical, scientific, and design computer programs and its implementation at AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical, scientific, and design computer programs (referred to in this paper as 'scientific computer programs') are developed for use in a large number of ways by the user-engineer to support and prove engineering calculations and assumptions. These computer programs are subject to frequent modifications inherent in their application and are often used for critical calculations and analysis relative to safety and functionality of equipment and systems. N286.7-99(4) was developed to establish appropriate quality management system requirements to deal with the development, modification, and application of scientific computer programs. N286.7-99 provides particular guidance regarding the treatment of legacy codes

  15. 1993 Annual progress report for subsidiary agreement No. 2 (1991--1996) between AECL and US/DOE for a radioactive waste management technical co-operative program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    A coordinated research program on radioactive waste disposal is being carried out by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the US Department of Energy. This annual report describes progress in the following eight studies: Fundamental materials investigations; In-situ stress determination; Development of a spent fuel dissolution model; Large block tracer test--Experimental testing of retardation models; Laboratory and field tests of in-situ hydrochemical tools; Cigar Lake--Analogue study, actinide and fission product geochemistry; Performance assessment technology exchange; and Development of multiple-well hydraulic test and field tracer test methods.

  16. AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

    2005-08-01

    This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

  17. Analysis of flow-induced vibration of heat exchanger and steam generator tube bundles using the AECL computer code PIPEAU-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PIPEAU-2 is a computer code developed at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories for the flow-induced vibration analysis of heat exchanger and steam generator tube bundles. It can perform this analysis for straight and 'U' tubes. All the theoretical work underlying the code is analytical rather than numerical in nature. Highly accurate evaluation of the free vibration frequencies and mode shapes is therefore obtained. Using the latest experimentally determined parameters available, the free vibration analysis is followed by a forced vibration analysis. Tube response due to fluid turbulence and vortex shedding is determined, as well as critical fluid velocity associated with fluid-elastic instability

  18. 1993 Annual progress report for subsidiary agreement No. 2 (1991--1996) between AECL and US/DOE for a radioactive waste management technical co-operative program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coordinated research program on radioactive waste disposal is being carried out by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and the US Department of Energy. This annual report describes progress in the following eight studies: Fundamental materials investigations; In-situ stress determination; Development of a spent fuel dissolution model; Large block tracer test--Experimental testing of retardation models; Laboratory and field tests of in-situ hydrochemical tools; Cigar Lake--Analogue study, actinide and fission product geochemistry; Performance assessment technology exchange; and Development of multiple-well hydraulic test and field tracer test methods

  19. Prospecting for success in the American market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Technologies is a US subsidiary of AECL originally set up to obtain licensing of CANDU reactors in the US, as well as to market technology. AECL Technologies has been successful in marketing digital control technology and software development, and also design and consulting services. Dry storage of spent fuel represents a large future opportunity. AECL hopes to sell CANDU reactors in the USA after the turn of the century. AECL Technologies did about $4.2 million worth of business in 1991

  20. Technology transfer from Canadian nuclear laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada has developed a unique nuclear power system, the CANDU reactor. AECL - Research Company (AECL-RC) has played a key role in the CANDU program by supplying its technology to the reactor's designers, constructors and operators. This technology was transferred from our laboratories to our sister AECL companies and to domestic industries and utilities. As CANDUs were built overseas, AECL-RC made its technology available to foreign utilities and agencies. Recently the company has embarked on a new transfer program, commercial R and D for nuclear and non-nuclear customers. During the years of CANDU development, AECL-RC has acquired the skills and technology that are especially valuable to other countries embarking on their own nuclear programs. This report describes AECL-RC's thirty years' experience with the transfer of technology

  1. List of publications: April 1981 to March 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. issued from April 1981 to March 1982 are listed in ten broad categories. Each entry includes the AECL report series number, author(s), title, journal citation (if a reprint), pagination, issue date, and price. There are indexes by AECL and other report numbers, and authors. Directions for ordering AECL reports and a list of depository libraries are appended

  2. List of publications: April 1982 to March 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. issued from April 1982 to March 1983 are listed in ten broad categories. Each entry includes the AECL report series number, author(s), title, journal citation (if a reprint), pagination, issue date, and price. There are indexes by AECL and other report numbers, and authors. Directions for ordering AECL reports and a list of depository libraries are appended

  3. A compilation of subsurface hydrogeologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains a continuation of the fracture data for the research sites discussed in Volume 1 which have been studied in sufficient detail to allow for analysis. The sites discussed in this volume are the following: Climax Granite Nevada Test Site; OCRD Room, Colorado School of Mines; Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina; Oracle, Arizona; Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), Hanford, Washington Underground Research Laboratory, AECL, Canada; Atikokan Research Area, AECL; Chalk River Research Area, AECL; Whiteshell Research Area, AECL. Other sources of information have been included where sufficient site specific geologic and hydrogeologic information is provided

  4. An accident involving transport of radioactive materials, Canada 1994 March

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL-Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) located at Chalk River, Ontario, routinely ships radioisotopes in bulk to Nordion International Inc. in Kanata, Ontario. On 1994 March 22, an AECL vehicle carrying three packages containing radioisotopes collided with a tractor trailer carrying steel, approximately 15 km east of the Chalk River Laboratories. The AECL-CRL emergency response plan was activated. A series of post-accident meetings were held to evaluate the effectiveness of the plan and to address any identified deficiencies. AECL-CRL is continuing to work towards addressing the identified deficiencies. (author). 2 figs

  5. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography is an up-date to AECL-6186(Rev 3), 1952-1982, 'Radioactive Waste Management in Canada AECL Publications and Other Literature' compiled by Dianne Wallace. Canadian publications from outside contractors concerning the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program are included in addition to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited reports and papers. 252 refs

  6. Annual report 1993-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Established in 1952 as a Crown corporation, AECL reports to Parliament through the Ministry of Natural Resources. Its mandate is to undertake research into nuclear energy and prepare and develop its commercial applications. AECL's mission is to secure the maximum economic benefit for Canada from CANDU technology and associated research and development - the CANDU business. AECL's accomplishments include the development of products and services which, through diligent marketing efforts, are now in use worldwide. The corporation's world-renowned flagship product, the CANDU reactor, currently satisfies 16% of Canada's electricity requirements and is a key component of the energy programs in five other countries. AECL's vision over the next 20 years is to: be a world-leading supplier of full-scope nuclear power capability; be a long-term business with at least a quarter share of the emerging global market for the next generation of nuclear power plants; have a comprehensive ongoing research program to: maintain at the highest levels the performance and safety of operating CANDU plants; advance the CANDU technology and the science that underlies it; develop knowledge on the health effects of radiation and on the safety and environmental impacts of nuclear reactor operation. AECL currently employees 4000 people. With headquarters in Ottawa, AECL operates two research laboratories, one in Ontario and one in Manitoba, and engineering and design offices in Ontario, Quebec, Saskatchewan, and New Brunswick, as well as offices abroad. AECL has a subsidiary, AECL Technologies Inc., situated in Washington, DC

  7. Qualification plan for the Genmod-PC computer program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genmod-PC is an internal dosimetry code that uses Microsoft Windows operating system, and that currently calculates radionuclide doses and intakes for an adult male. This report provides a plan for specifying the quality assurance measures that conform to the recommendations of the Canadian Standards Association, as well as AECL procedural requirements for a legacy computer program developed at AECL. (author)

  8. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1989-1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990, after a comprehensive industry review, the Canadian government announced that steps would be taken to revitalize the nuclear industry. Canada's nuclear utilities made a commitment to bear a large share of the cost of nuclear research and development. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) reported its first financial loss in twelve years, as anticipated at the start of the year. Four of the 20 CANDU reactors operating worldwide were in the top ten based on lifetime performance. By year-end one foreign and two domestic utilities had announced their intention to build more CANDU units. The federal government has agreed to stabilize AECL's research funding at 1989-90 levels ($31.5 million above levels planned in 1985), has authorized AECL to negotiate with New Brunswick to build Point Lepreau-2 as the prototype for the CANDU-3 reactor, and has allowed the restructuring of AECL so utility and private sector investors can become equity partners in AECL CANDU

  9. Nuclear industry perspectives: change and challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The President and Chief Executive Officer of AECL discusses the prospects for new reactor sales and other business. Future sales of CANDU reactors to a number of countries, especially, Korea, China and Turkey, are distinctly possible. Another area of possible opportunity is the use of CANDU to burn plutonium from the curtailed weapons programs of the US and the former USSR. AECL is looking to replace its single operating research reactor, namely NRU. Recently, AECL has submitted an environmental impact statement for its concept for permanent disposal of used fuel

  10. Learning from experience. Feedback to design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has been the designer of 25 commercial scale CANDU reactors now in operation, with more under construction. AECL has taken the evolutionary approach in developing its current designs, the CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 Nuclear Power Plants. An integral part of this approach is to emphasize feedback of experience to the designers, in a continuous improvement process. AECL has implemented a formal process of gathering and responding to feedback from: NPP operation, construction and commissioning; regulatory input; R and D results: as well as paying close attention to market input. A number of recent examples of design improvement via this feedback process are described

  11. Radioactive waste management in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This bibliography is a review of the Canadian literature on radioactive waste management from 1953 to the present. It incorporates the references from the previous AECL--6186 revisions, and adds the current data and some of the references that had been omitted. Publications from outside organizations of concern to the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Program are included in addition to AECL Research reports and papers. This report is intended as an aid in the preparation of the Concept Assessment Document and is complementary to AECL Research's internal document-ready references on the MASS-11 word processing systems

  12. Progress in developing the concept for the irradiation research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the 16th annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference, AECL presented the case for replacing the NRU reactor with an Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) to test CANDU fuels and materials and to perform advanced materials research using neutrons. AECL developed a cost estimate of $500 million for the reference IRF concept, and estimated that it would require 87 months to complete. AECL has initiated a pre-project program to develop the IRF concept and to minimize uncertainties related to feasibility and licensability, and to examine options for reducing the overall project cost before project implementation begins. (author) 10 refs., 2 figs

  13. Progress in developing the concept for the irradiation research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the 16th annual Canadian Nuclear Society conference, AECL presented the case for replacing the NRU reactor with an Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) to test CANDU fuels and materials and to perform advanced materials research using neutrons. AECL developed a cost estimate of $500 million for the reference IRF concept, and estimated that it would require 87 months to complete. AECL has initiated a pre-project program to develop the IRF concept to minimize uncertainties related to feasibility and licensability, and to examine options for reducing the overall project cost before project implementation begins. (author)

  14. Nuclear fuel waste disposal in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for disposing of Canada's nuclear fuel waste and is submitting it for review under the Federal Environmental Assessment and Review Process. During this review, AECL intends to show that careful, controlled burial 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield is a safe and feasible way to dispose of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The concept has been assessed without identifying or evaluating any particular site for disposal. AECL is now preparing a comprehensive report based on more than 10 years of research and development

  15. Restructuring of the Canadian nuclear industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Issues of structural change pertaining to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are discussed. AECL is responsible for the CANDU design, construction and engineering program as well as Canada's nuclear research and development programs, along with Ontario Hydro, a provincially owned electric power utility. Restructuring of these two organizations will have significant impacts on the entire nuclear industry because of the major role they play in the industry. The roles and structures of AECL and Ontario Hydro are described, the trends forcing restructuring of these two organizations and efforts underway to adapt them to the 'new realities'. (R.P.)

  16. Nuclear fuel activities in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuel activities in Canada are considered in the presentation on the following directions: Canadian utility fuel performance; CANDU owner's group fuel programs; AECL advanced fuel program (high burnup fuel behaviour and development); Pu dispositioning (MOX) activities. 1 tab

  17. Korea signs for 2nd CANDU at Wolsong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sale of a second CANDU 6 reactor to Korea for the Wolsong site is discussed in relation to nuclear power in Korea, the Korean economy generally, Canadian trade with Korea, and cooperation between AECL and KAERI

  18. Integrated plant information technology design support functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This technical report was written as a result of Integrated Plant Information System (IPIS) feasibility study on CANDU 9 project which had been carried out from January, 1994 to March, 1994 at AECL (Atomic Energy Canada Limited) in Canada. From 1987, AECL had done endeavour to change engineering work process from paper based work process to computer based work process through CANDU 3 project. Even though AECL had a lot of good results form computerizing the Process Engineering, Instrumentation Control and Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Computer Aided Design and Drafting, and Document Management System, but there remains the problem of information isolation and integration. On this feasibility study, IPIS design support functionality guideline was suggested by evaluating current AECL CAE tools, analyzing computer aided engineering task and work flow, investigating request for implementing integrated computer aided engineering and describing Korean request for future CANDU design including CANDU 9. 6 figs. (Author)

  19. A compilation of subsurface hydrogeologic data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the storage coefficient, porosity, compressibility and fracture data for the research sites discussed in Volume 1 which have been studied in sufficient detail to allow for analysis. These sites are the following: Stripa Mine, Sweden; Finnsjon, Kamlunge, Fjallveden, Gidea, Svartboberget, Sweden; Olkiluoto, Loviisa, Lavia, Finland; Climax Granite Nevada Test Site; OCRD Room, Colorado School of Mines; Savannah River Plant, Aiken, South Carolina; Oracle, Arizona; Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), Hanford, Washington; Underground Research Laboratory, AECL, Canada; Atikokan Research Area, AECL; Chalk River Research Area, AECL; Whiteshell Research Area, AECL. Other sources of information have been included where sufficient site specific geologic and hydrogeologic information is provided. The fracture data for the first three of the sites listed above are contained in this volume. The fracture data for the remaining research research sites are discussed in Volume 4

  20. Fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL publications, from the open literature, on fuels and fuel cycles used in CANDU reactors are listed in this bibliography. The accompanying index is by subject. The bibliography will be brought up to date periodically

  1. A study on the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) Employee Health Study commenced in 1980 July following the issue of a Company-Wide General Notice of 1980 April by the President of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mr. James Donnelly. The study was set up to determine the causes of death of the AECL study population as compared to a similar group in the general population and to determine if there is a relationship between cause of death and occupational exposure to ionising radiation. Previous AECL reports have outlined how the study has been set up and implemented. The purpose of this report is to describe the reasons for and the methods of upgrading the data base for the AECL Employee Health Study. Some description of procedures used during the first linkage and recommendations for future linkages are included

  2. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1988 covers: Research Company; CANDU Operations; Radiochemical Company; Medical Products Division; The Future; Financial Sections; Board of Directors and Officers; and AECL locations

  3. New applications of radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Radiochemical Company of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. is developing new uses for radioisotpes. This paper discusses three of them. The first is positron emission tomography. AECL, together with the Montreal Neurological Institute, has developed a new PET scanner, the Therascan 3128. A second area of interest is radiopharmaceuticals, which AECL is beginning to produce in patient-ready form. Finally, investigations are being carried out into the use of cobalt 60 gamma sources as food and waste irradiators

  4. Annual report 1994-1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Established in 1952 as a Crown corporation, AECL reports to Parliament through the Ministry of Natural Resources. Its mandate is to undertake research into nuclear energy and prepare and develop its commercial applications. AECL's objective is to secure the maximum economic benefit for Canada from CANDU technology and the associated research and development. AECL's accomplishments include the development of products and services which are now in use worldwide. The corporation's world-renowned flagship product, the CANDU reactor, supplies almost one-fifth of Canada's electricity requirements and is an important component of the energy programs in five other countries. Building upon these achievements, AECL continues to consolidate its position as a world-leading supplies of full-scope nuclear power capabilities with expectations to capture a substantial share of the emerging global nuclear power market. The immediate goals are to meet the customers' requirements in the delivery of current projects, to ensure that operating CANDU stations continue to maintain a high level of performance, to secure further CANDU sales, to garner increased revenues from further commercialization of CANDU technology, and to serve the Government of Canada's nuclear policy initiatives. AECL currently employs 3900 people in a variety of locations, including two major research laboratories located in Ontario and Manitoba, as well as business, engineering and design offices in Ottawa, Toronto, Montreal, Saskatoon and Fredericton. AECL has two subsidiaries, AECL Technologies Inc., in Washington, DC, and AECL Technologies B.V., in the Hague, Netherlands, and maintains a significant presence in South Korea, as well as several smaller offices in other countries

  5. Lasers for inertial confinement fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains a discussion of the advances that have taken place in the development of lasers for inertial confinement fusion research since the AECL Laser Fusion Working Party study (AECL-4840) in 1973. It is intended primarily as input to the current Fusion Status Study Group but also as general background information for the Laser Fusion Progress section of the Physics Advanced Systems Study Committee. (auth)

  6. An integrated pip stress analysis and pipe support design environment for the CANDU 3 project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The promise of significant labour cost savings prompted AECL to automate the CANDU reactor piping systems design. By using a combination of commercial and AECL-developed computer-aided engineering software, the effort required to perform two key tasks, pipe stress analysis and support design, was reduced significantly. This paper describes the integrated piping design environment developed for the CANDU 3 project and benefits derived from its use

  7. Canada enters the nuclear age: a technical history of Atomic Energy of Canada limited as seen from its research laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technical history of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited written by sixteen of Canada's pioneering nuclear scientists, Canada Enters the Nuclear Age focuses on Canada's nuclear program at AECL's laboratories at Chalk River, Ontario and Whiteshell, Manitoba between the years 1943 and 1985. Topics include the organization and operations of AECL's laboratories, nuclear safety and radiation protection, radioisotopes, basic research, development of the CANDU reactor, and management of radioactive wastes. 7 tabs., 132 figs

  8. Progress reports on SCWR-related development projects from Chinese universities for FY2008-2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada is participating in the international cooperative forum on system research for two designs (supercritical water-cooled reactor, SCWR, and Very High Temperature Reactor, VHTR) of the Gen-IV nuclear reactor. The forum is referred to as the Generation-IV International Forum (or GIF). The Canadian effort focuses mainly on the SCWR. Among various GIF participants, Canada is the leader of this design and has interest mainly on the pressure-tube type reactor, which is a natural extension of the existing CANDU reactor. Several critical research areas (such as material, chemistry, thermalhydraulics, instability, critical flow, etc.) have been identified in the system-research plan for supporting the SCWR design. Collaborative projects have been established between AECL and universities in China to expedite the CANDU SCWR design. These projects focus on research areas beyond the current scope of the AECL and the NSERC/NRCan/AECL collaborative research and development (CRD) project. AECL supports these projects directly and is contributing (in-kind) the results and findings to the Canadian national program. The collaboration between AECL and Chinese universities began in 2007 July. Most projects cover the duration of three years. The Chinese universities submit their annual progress reports each year prior to the project renewal. The objective of this report is to summarize the progress on collaborative projects between AECL and Chinese universities (namely the Tsinghua University, Shanghai Jiaotong University, and Xi'an Jiaotong University) over the duration of 2008 July to 2009 June. (author)

  9. Nuclear energy. Unmasking the mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Standing Committee on Energy, Mines and Resources of the House of Commons of Canada undertook a study of the economics of nuclear power in Canada. This is its report on the evidence it heard. It found that maintaining the nuclear power option is vital to Canada's interests. The Committee recommended that: the schedule for establishing a commercial high-level radioactive waste repository be advanced; the basic insurance coverage on nuclear facilities be raised; the federal government increase its financial support of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL); AECL expand its research and development activities, including non-nuclear R and D; AECL be allowed to hold a minority interest in any component of AECL that is privatized; any new entity created by privatization from AECL be required to remain under Canadian control; the Atomic Energy Control Act be altered to allow the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to recover costs through licensing fees and user charges, while the AECB's parliamentary appropriation is increased to offset remaining costs of operations; membership on the AECB be increased from one to five full-time members, retaining the present four part-time members; the AECB hold its hearings in public; the name of the AECB be changed so it is more readily distinguishable from AECL; the AECB establish an office of public information; and that federal and provincial governments cooperate more closely to identify opportunities where more efficient use of electricity could be achieved and to promote those measures that can attain the greatest economic efficiency

  10. Annual report 1997-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) was established in 1952 as a Crown Corporation and reports to parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. As an annual report, financial statements are an integral element, financial analysis and review are also ongoing. AECL is very active in marketing the science culture which is key to public understanding and acceptance of the nuclear industry. In commercial operations, the CANDU is still the flagship to be marketed in many countries. AECL is the main producer of medical isotopes for the global market. AECL and MDS Nordion signed agreements to secure the ongoing supply of isotopes and to build and operate two MAPLE reactors at the Chalk River site. Activities at AECL are focused on improved economics, further enhanced safety systems and fuel cycle flexibility in the research and product development programs. Waste management and nuclear sciences i e. health and environmental sciences are ongoing studies. Site refurbishment focuses on replacing and refurbishing major facilities to meet business needs

  11. Annual report 1997-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) was established in 1952 as a Crown Corporation and reports to parliament through the Minister of Natural Resources. As an annual report, financial statements are an integral element, financial analysis and review are also ongoing. AECL is very active in marketing the science culture which is key to public understanding and acceptance of the nuclear industry. In commercial operations, the CANDU is still the flagship to be marketed in many countries. AECL is the main producer of medical isotopes for the global market. AECL and MDS Nordion signed agreements to secure the ongoing supply of isotopes and to build and operate two MAPLE reactors at the Chalk River site. Activities at AECL are focused on improved economics, further enhanced safety systems and fuel cycle flexibility in the research and product development programs. Waste management and nuclear sciences i e. health and environmental sciences are ongoing studies. Site refurbishment focuses on replacing and refurbishing major facilities to meet business needs.

  12. Progress report, physics and health sciences, physics section, 1986 January 01 - June 30

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two progress reports PR-PHS-P-1 (AECL-9262) and PR-PHS-HS-1 (AECL-9263) are continuations of the former series in Physics, PR-P-142, (AECL-9103) and in Health Sciences, PH-HS-20 (AECL-9102). The new series have been initiated to take into account the reorganization of the Research Company effective 1986 February 1. It is intended to issue the reports semi-annually on June 30 and December 31 covering the previous six months. The new series cover the same areas as before except that the Accelerator Physics Branch and the Mathematics and Computation Branch activities are no longer included in Physics, and the activities of the Medical Biophysics Branch at Whiteshell are now included in Health Sciences. The latest progress report on the Medical Biophysics work appeared in the WNRE report PR-WHS-73. This report (AECL-9262) covers the research, business and commercial activities of Nuclear Physics, TASCC Operations, Neutron and Solid State Physics, Theoretical Physics and the Fusion Office

  13. The development of CANDU technology and training at the institute for advanced engineering in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacBeth, M.J.; Cho, U.Y. [Electrical Power Systems, Institute for Advanced Engineering (Korea, Republic of); Muzumdar, A.P. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (Canada)

    1998-07-01

    This paper presents an overview of the cooperative agreement between the Institute for Advanced Engineering (IAE) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to facilitate the transfer of CANDU technology in South Korea. This paper will present those AECL technology program activities worked on by IAE staff with AECL support along with the associated issues which these activities addressed and the expertise nature of this work. The training methods utilized and an assessment of their success will be discussed to show the potential applicability of these methods to the nuclear power industry staff of other countries. The spin-off cooperative work initiated with other Korean organizations as part of this initiative will also be considered. (author)

  14. CANDU 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU nuclear power system is under continuous review by AECL in order to advance the CANDU concept in a manner that will assure competitiveness in both current and future markets. Over the past three years development effort has featured the CANDU 300, a CANDU nuclear generating station with a net output in the range of 320 MW9e) to 380 MW(e). At the outset AECL recognized that coal-fired power plants would be the primary competition for the CANDU advantages such as the use of natural uranium fuel and on-power refuelling, while enhancing capacity factor, reducing man-rem exposure, reducing capital cost, and minimizing construction schedules. AECL believes that the resulting CANDU 300 nuclear generating station will have substantial appeal to many utilities, in both developed and developing countries. The key features of the CANDU 300 are presented here, with particular attention to the station layout, construction methods, and construction schedules

  15. MAPLE reactors for the secure supply of medical isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  16. The Maple reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MDS Nordion supplies the majority of the world's reactor-produced medical isotopes. These isotopes are currently produced in the NRU reactor at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). Medical isotopes and related technology are relied upon around the world to prevent, diagnose and treat disease. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada will continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion contracted AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper describes the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site, and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  17. Ensuring reliable medical isotope supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the role of MDS Nordion and AECL in ensuring a reliable global supply of medical isotopes. The First part of the paper discusses the uses of medical isotopes, their importance to the medical community, and the benefits to patients of a secure supply of medical isotopes. The second part describes the role of the NRU reactor and the future role of the MAPLE reactors and New Processing Facility being commissioned at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories for production of medical isotopes to meet the world market demand for the next 40 years. MDS Nordion is the world's leading supplier of medical isotopes. These isotopes are used to conduct some 34,000 nuclear medicine procedures performed every day around the world, such as determining the severity of heart disease, the spread of cancer, and diagnosing brain disorders. These medical isotopes are currently produced primarily by AECL in the NRU reactor at Chalk River, Ontario, Canada. (author)

  18. Developing the MAPLE materials test reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAPLE-MTR is a new multipurpose research facility being planned by AECL Research as a possible replacement for the 35-year-old NRU reactor. In developing the MAPLE-MTR concept, AECL is starting from the recent design and licensing experience with the MAPLE-X10 reactor. By starting from technology developed to support the MAPLE-X10 design and adapting it to produce a concept that satisfies the requirements of fuel channel materials testing and fuel irradiation programs, AECL expects to minimize the need for major advances in nuclear technology (e.g., fuel, heat transfer). Formulation of the MAPLE-MTR concept is at an early stage. This report describes the irradiation requirements of the research areas, how these needs are translated into design criteria for the project and elements of the preliminary design concept

  19. Nuclear medicine tomorrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this Workshop was to discuss and promote future nuclear medicine applications. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is determined to assist in this role. A major aim of this gathering was to form an interface that was meaningful, representative of the two entities, and above all, on-going. In the opening address, given by Mr. J. Donnelly, President of AECL, this strong commitment was emphasized. In the individual sessions, AECL participants outlined R and D programs and unique expertise that promised to be of interest to members of the nuclear medicine community. The latter group, in turn, described what they saw as some problems and needs of nuclear medicine, especially in the near future. These Proceedings comprise the record of the formal presentations. Additionally, a system of reporting by rapporteurs insured a summary of informal discussions at the sessions and brought to focus pertinent conclusions of the workshop attendees

  20. Epp names new interim execs to head Atomic Energy Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Energy Minister Jake Epp has named Mrs. Marnie Paiken as acting chairman and Bruce Howe as acting president of AECL (formerly Atomic Energy Canada Ltd.), the federal Crown corporation charged with the development and utilization of nuclear energy. Both appointments were made necessary by the resignations of Robert Ferchat as chairman and Stanley Hatcher as president, each citing deep differences in their respective approaches to the management of the corporation. Mrs. Paiken has been a member of AECL's board since 1985, and previously served as acting chairman from March 1989 to July 1990. Howe has been deputy minister of the federal energy department since 1988, a position he will retain while carrying out his duties as president of AECL. A search has begun to find permanent replacements

  1. Canadian Food Irradiation Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) began work on the irradiation of potatoes in 1956, using spent fuel rods as the radiation source. In 1958 the first Gammacell 220, a self-contained irradiator, was designed and manufactured by AECL, and cobalt-60 was then used exclusively in the food irradiation programme. In 1960 the first food and drug clearance was obtained for potatoes. The next stage was to demonstrate to the potato industry that cobalt-60 was a safe, simple and reliable tool, and that irradiation would inhibit sprouting under field conditions. A mobile irradiator was designed and produced by AECL in 1961 to carry out this pilot-plant programme. The irradiator was mounted on a fully-equipped road trailer and spent the 1961/1962 season irradiating one million pounds of potatoes at various points in Eastern Canada. In 1965 the first commercial food irradiator was designed and built by AECL for Newfield Products, Ltd. Whilst the potato programme was under way, AECL initiated co-operative programmes with Canadian food research laboratories, using additional Gammacells. In 1960, AECL constructed an irradiation facility in a shielded room at its own plant in Ottawa for the irradiation of larger objects, such as sides of pork and stems of bananas. During 1963 the mobile irradiator, already a most useful tool, was made more versatile when its source strength was increased and it was equipped with a product cooling system and van air conditioning. Following these modifications, the unit was employed in California for the irradiation of a wide spectrum of fruits at the United States Department of Agriculture Station in Fresno. The Gammacell, mobile irradiator, shielded-room facility, the commercial food irradiator and some of the main food programmes are described in detail. There is an increasing amount of interest in irradiation by the food industry, and prospects are encouraging for future installations. (author)

  2. Proceedings of the workshop on applied mathematics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Workshop on Applied Mathematics was held at the Cockcroft Centre, Deep River, Ontario, 1992 February 7-8. The purpose of the workshop was to provide a forum for applied mathematicians to survey the use and to discuss the future of applied mathematics at AECL Research. There were 57 participants at the workshop A total of eight 30-minute and 25 15-minute talks were presented describing mathematical techniques used in the whole range of activities at AECL Research, from numerical simulation of fluid flow through eddy current testing to quantum algebra and accelerator physics

  3. New build CANDU in Canada - development and application of information management systems for latest construction technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the wake of recent events representing growing nuclear energy interest in Canada, AECL and Hitachi are sharing each other's expertise as each company has its own unique and unrivalled capability in managing new build construction projects. This paper addresses some of the key strategies used to execute successfully a New CANDU build project, by focusing on recent developments and implementations in the construction and project management fields and by highlighting the use of cutting edge information technology. These strategies are designed to achieve and maximize their benefit to the New Build CANDU project team, to AECL/Hitachi as well as customers, partners and suppliers. (author)

  4. A study of the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited Employee Health Study is a program that was established in 1980 to determine, over the long term, the causes of death in a population consisting of some 14 000 AECL employees and past employees. In a previous report (AECL-6813) the steps taken to set up the study were described. The present report is a description of the way in which the study was implemented, and includes discussion of some recent developments that have had a bearing on epidemiological studies of the health of radiation workers

  5. New opportunities from nuclear R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a new initiative within Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), the intention to look for spin-off business opportunities from main-line research and development. In 1982 AECL began encouraging ideas for spin-off applications. Some problems were encountered: the reluctance of staff to divert attention from the CANDU program; resource allocation; difficulties in getting market input; and difficulties in deciding what to license and what to retain as an in-house business opportunity. Successes have come in the areas of using CANDU technology in LWRs, SLOWPOKE reactors, industrial accelerators, stable isotope production, intelligent sensing systems, and deuterated lucite for fibre optics. (L.L.)

  6. Econometric analysis and energy substitution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its long-term assessment of new applications for nuclear energy, AECL is becoming acquainted with the techniques of mathematical modelling as used in the areas of energy and economics. Early in 1980, a contract was arranged with DataMetrics Limited of Calgary to prepare an econometric model of the manufacturing sector for Ontario, and to provide AECL with all the information necessary to understand the theory, derivation, and use of the model. This report summarizes the results of this exercise

  7. Fuels for Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes some statements and remarks concerning the uranium silicide fuels for which there is significant fabrication in AECL, irradiation and defect performance experience; description of two Canadian high flux research reactors which use high enrichment uranium (HEU) and the fuels currently used in these reactors; limited fabrication work done on Al-U alloys to uranium contents as high as 40 wt%. The latter concerns work aimed at AECL fast neutron program. This experience in general terms is applied to the NRX and NRU designs of fuel

  8. Value added services to CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade or so, nuclear power plants, just like other types of electricity generating plants, have been facing a number of challenges. Depending on the operating environment of the utility, these challenges are forcing plant owners to examine all facets of the operating costs. Privatization, deregulation and economics of alternative electricity generation methods are exerting enormous pressure on nuclear power plants to streamline costs and improve their operational performance. CANDU reactors are no exception to these forces and face similar pressures. In particular, operating plants that are contemplating plant life extensions are being required to clearly demonstrate the economics of continued operation over other forms of power generation available to the utility. Improvement of capacity factors has the effect of increasing the revenues from the plant and as these revenues increase, the fixed portion of the plant costs including OM and A costs become a smaller percentage of the total revenues. Similar results can be achieved by aiming to reduce the plant OM and A costs. In reality, most well-planned intervention schemes directed at reducing OM and A costs tend to also increase the plant availability. Following plant turnover after commissioning, AECL has been supporting the CANDU owners and utilities with an assortment of products and services dealing with plant operations and outage management issues. AECL has taken the lead in arranging specialized resources, products and services by teaming with other complementary organizations to provide a complete suite of services. Recent examples of such support to operating CANDU plants will be described in the paper. AECL is responding to this changing business environment in two important ways. First, AECL is changing from simply providing a service to its clients towards providing value, something much more important. To this end, AECL is looking to other organizations to form alliances, partnerships and

  9. List of publications 1994 January - 1995 December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's mandate is to undertake research into nuclear energy and from that develop commercial applications. Its objective is to secure the maximum economic benefit for Canada from CANDU technology and the associated research and development. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document fists our publications for 1994-95. (author)

  10. Advances in PHWR design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent advances by AECL in improved performance, cost reduction and safety improvement of CANDU reactors are described. Topics include: computer-aided design tools, up-front licensing, site utilization, plant life management, construction techniques, plant control, safety-critical software, advanced fuels, human-machine interface, heat sinks, radiation protection, feedback to design, emergency core cooling and probabilistic safety assessment

  11. Progress report. Physics and Health Sciences, Health Sciences Section (1988 July 01 - December 31)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The screening assay for inherited variations in radiosensitivity has been tested. The object is to determine whether those individuals whose cells are abnormally radiosensitive are in fact prone to cancer. Follow-up of the health of radiation workers at AECL continues. As noted in the Hare report (Ontario Nuclear Safety Review), 'epidemiological analysis of the exposed workers of AECL ... shows cancer mortality to be below that in the general public'. These studies are being extended in order to ensure that the initial conclusions remain valid with up-to-date information. A new, very sensitive thermoluminescent material has been adapted for use in AECL dosimetry. The new material results in a much improved performance for measuring small doses and in addition, for accurate dose estimates of low energy beta rays. Much of the work of the Environmental Research Branch concerns modelling. In the atmosphere, our work on atmospheric plume dispersion and metabolic modelling has led naturally to AECL staff contributing to the high profile international study, BIOMOVS. Similarly, the release of a small quantity of tritiated heavy water provided an excellent opportunity to test our model of surface water flow in the Ottawa River. This rather simple model provided a surprisingly accurate prediction, and gave the best estimate of the total release. Finally, continuing analysis of Twin Lakes tracer data is making significant contributions to our very sophisticated model of groundwater flow in porous, heterogeneous media. Conversion of this model to run under NOS/VE on the new Cyber 990 computer is essentially complete

  12. Computer-aided engineering for Qinshan CANDU projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author briefly describes AECL's work in applying computer-aided engineering tools to the Qinshan CANDU Project. The main emphases will be to introduce the major CADD software tools and their use in civil design, process design and EI and C design. Other special software tools and non-CADD tools and their applications are also briefly introduced

  13. Progress report - Physical and Environmental Sciences - Physics Division. 1994 January 1 to December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report marks the change from biannual to annual reports recording technical developments in Physics Division. During this period, AECL has continued with its restructuring program, with Physics Division now included in an expanded Physical and Environmental Sciences Unit. The Division itself remains unchanged, with major activities on neutron scattering, the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and developments and applications of accelerator technology. (author)

  14. Disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1978, the governments of Canada and Ontario established the Nuclear Fuel Waste Management program. As of the time of the conference, the research performed by AECL was jointly funded by AECL and Ontario Hydro through the CANDU owners' group. Ontario Hydro have also done some of the research on disposal containers and vault seals. From 1978 to 1992, AECL's research and development on disposal cost about C$413 million, of which C$305 was from funds provided to AECL by the federal government, and C$77 million was from Ontario Hydro. The concept involves the construction of a waste vault 500 to 1000 metres deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield. Used fuel (or possibly solidified reprocessing waste) would be sealed into containers (of copper, titanium or special steel) and emplaced (probably in boreholes) in the vault floor, surrounded by sealing material (buffer). Disposal rooms might be excavated on more than one level. Eventually all excavated openings in the rock would be backfilled and sealed. Research is organized under the following headings: disposal container, waste form, vault seals, geosphere, surface environment, total system, assessment of environmental effects. A federal Environmental Assessment Panel is assessing the concept (holding public hearings for the purpose) and will eventually make recommendations to assist the governments of Canada and Ontario in deciding whether to accept the concept, and how to manage nuclear fuel waste. 16 refs., 1 tab., 3 figs

  15. List of publications 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1990

  16. TASCC newsletter volume 9 no. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A newsletter produced by Chalk River's Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron Facility. Included in this July issue of TASCC is an update of the facility, submission of report by the Program Advisory Committee, government program review begins at AECL, awards to TASCC personnel and a listing of July's experiments. 2 figs

  17. Legacy program acquires special equipment for CRL spent fuel. Canadian arm of Rolls Royce delivers unique machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Six years ago the federal government accepted its responsibility for the radioactive waste that has resulted from the six decades of nuclear research and development conducted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and its predecessor operator of the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) the National Research Council (1944 - 1952). Nuclear research and development and, particularly, reactor operation at CRL has resulted in outdated and unused research facilities and buildings and a wide variety of buried and stored radioactive waste. In 2006 the federal government established the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) with an initial funding of $520 million. The mandate of the NLLP is to deal with the radioactive waste arising from the nuclear research and development program of AECL and also prototype reactors in which it was involved. The timeline for the NLLP extends several decades into the future. The NLLP is implemented through a partnership of Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and AECL. NRCan is responsible for policy direction and oversight, while AECL is responsible for program implementation and all licences, facilities and lands. About 70 percent of the liabilities from AECL activities are at CRL. Other sites that will be restored under the NLLP are: the Whiteshell Laboratories and Underground Research Laboratory in Manitoba; NPD and Douglas Point reactors in Ontario; and the Gentilly 1 reactor in Quebec. (author)

  18. An approach to neutronics analysis of candu reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to tackle the problem of neutronics analysis of CANDU reactors. Until now CANDU reactors have been analysed by the methods developed at AECL and CGE using mainly receipe methods. Relying on multigroup transport codes GAM-GATHER in combination with diffusion code CITATION a package of codes is established to use it for survey as well as production purposes. (authors)

  19. Third international conference on CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These proceedings contain full texts of all 49 papers from the ten sessions and the banquet address. The sessions were on the following subjects: International experience and programs; Fuel behaviour and operating experience; Fuel modelling; Fuel design; Advanced fuel and fuel cycle technology; AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The individual papers have been abstracted separately

  20. List of publications, 1989 January - December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This list includes all the scientific and technical publications of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. This includes both technical reports and reprints of journal articles and conference proceedings issued from 1989 January to 1989 December. The titles and other bibliographic information are arranged in several categories, each devoted to a broad subject area. In addition, each document is identified with an AECL number

  1. Nuclear technology for global markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy fuels the future. It powers economic and social advances that drive the progress of nations. In Canada, we've been in the business of nuclear energy for fifty years. Our CANDU reactors are consistently in the world's top ten for lifetime performance. Established in 1952 by the Canadian Government, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) leads Canada's nuclear export industry which comprises the utilities operating CANDU plants, private sector consulting engineering and construction companies and more than 100 large, medium and small manufacturers and equipment suppliers. AECL-led activities are anticipated to contribute $3.5 billion to Canada's gross domestic product (GDP) over the next five years. Moreover, between 1962 and 1992, the Canadian nuclear industry contributed at least $23 billion to Canada's GDP, with substantive economic benefits in electricity and other goods and services. AECL develops and markets CANDU power reactors and MAPLE research reactors, supplies power and research reactor support services, and offers radioactive waste management products and services. An important component of AECL's success has been its ability to transfer technology to clients. The CANDU reactor comprises components that can be manufactured in other countries, under appropriate agreements. (author)

  2. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, annual report, 1995-1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1996 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of Parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from Marketing and Commercial Operation, Product Development, i e.CANDU and Research Reactors, CANDU research, Waste Management, Environmental Management, Financial Review and also included are copies of the financial statements

  3. Annual report, 1978-79

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities of AECL for the year ending March 31, 1979 are described. Progress in research, production and marketing of radioisotopes, heavy water manufacture, and construction of CANDU reactors is discussed. The company was restructured in 1978. Hearings on nuclear issues meant that more attention was paid to public affairs. A financial statement is included. (L.L.)

  4. A short history of the CANDU nuclear power system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a short historical summary of the evolution of the CANDU nuclear power system with emphasis on the roles played by Ontario Hydro and private sector companies in Ontario in collaboration with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). (author). 1 fig., 61 refs

  5. Eddy current manual, volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report on eddy current testing is divided into three sections: (a) Demonstration of Basic Principles, (b) Practical (Laboratory) Tests and, (c) Typical Certification Questions. It is intended to be used as a supplement to ΣEddy Current Manual, Volume 1Σ (AECL-7523) during CSNDT Foundation Level II and III courses

  6. AELIB user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is an updatable manual for users of AELIB, the AECL Library of FORTRAN-callable routines for the CRNL CDC 6600/CYBER 170 system. It provides general advice on the use of this library and detailed information on the selection and usage of particular library routines

  7. Nuclear has good market news, but exposure limits cause worry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Just as Canada's nuclear power generating industry got a needed shot in the arm earlier this month with reports that AECL CANDU was interested in building Indonesia's first nuclear power plant, the country's uranium mining industry took an unwanted shot in the head over planned tightening of limits covering radiation exposure for miners

  8. List of publications 1993 January - December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1993. (author)

  9. MARS - a multidetector array for reaction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposal for MARS, a Multidetector Array for Reaction Studies is presented. MARS consists of a large, high-vacuum vessel enclosing an array of 128 scintillation detectors for use in studies of heavy-ion collisions at TASCC. The instrument will be funded and owned jointly by AECL and NSERC

  10. Pressure tube life management in CANDU-6 nuclear plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operating parameters of pressure tube in CANDU-6 reactor, the relation between pressure tube life and plant life improvement of pressure tube by AECL in past years were summarized, and the factors affecting pressure tube life, idea and main measures of pressure tube life management in QINSHAN CANDU-6 power plant introduced

  11. List of publications 1991 January-December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1991

  12. Improvement of antifungal and antibacterial antibiotic producing strain of Bacillus subtilis AFCI-69 by radiation and chemical mutagens. Part of a coordinated programme on radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma radiation was used to select higher antibiotic yield mutants of Bacillus subtilis AECL 69. The test organisms were Aspergillus niger RAGENI 70 and Staphylococcus aureus 6571 (16) N.C.T.C. Searches for fermentation, purification and characterization of antibiotics of parent strain and its mutants were carried out

  13. Radioactive waste management in Canada: a bibliography of published literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the increased interest in the management of radioactive wastes, a need has been felt for a listing of Canadian publications in this field. Over one hundred AECL reports and other Canadian papers are included as well as a list of selected international conferences on the topic. (author)

  14. Detection of defects in logs using computer assisted tomography (CAT) scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL have performed a preliminary feasibility study on the applicability of computer assisted tomographic techniques to detect the internal structure of logs. Cross sections of three logs have been obtained using a medical CAT scanner. The results show that knots, rot and growth rings are easily recognized in both dry and wet logs

  15. List of publications. 1992 January - December

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is engaged in research and development related to the peaceful applications of nuclear energy. Specifically, the company's mission is to perform the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their related technologies for the maximum benefit of Canada. Among our most important products are scientific reports, publications and conference presentations. This document lists our publications for 1992. (author)

  16. CFFTP journal volume 8 no. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short journal article from Canadian Fusion Fuels Technology Project (CFFTP) highlighting the AECL Tritium Laboratory expansion, the advanced tritium course and the fluid seminar for industry. The research and development news on breeder blanket design and compact toroid fuelling gun and educational program news on CFFTP fusion fellowship awards, fusion seminars at McMaster University and the CFFTP student awards program

  17. Proceedings of the international conference on nuclear structure at high angular momentum and the workshop on large gamma-ray detector arrays. Conference summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of the conference/workshop is being published in two volumes. Abstracts of all contributed papers are contained in volume 1. The final proceedings will be published as volume 2 under the same report number (AECL--10613), and will contain expanded versions of abstracts submitted by registered participants together with the invited and contributed talks

  18. Twenty plus years of underground research at Canada's URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) addressed the needs of Canada's Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program with a comprehensive research and development program of geologic characterization and large-scale geotechnical experiments in granite. This program contributed to the technical acceptance in 1998 of an Environmental Impact Statement to move forward in the development of a deep geologic repository for used CANDU fuel in the crystalline rock of the Canadian Shield. The URL is presently in its final R and D phase, closure. The URL is now 25-years old and is closing. The URL R and D program has met most of its objectives and will continue to do so by capturing valuable information pertaining to its sealing and closure. AECL has 30 years of R and D experience in used-fuel characterization, metallurgy, geosciences and geo-engineering. These comprehensive, multidisciplinary and integrated R and D programs have led to a technically robust concept for a used CANDU fuel deep geologic repository. The NWMO is moving forward based on the technologies pioneered by AECL and the international community. AECL continues to service the NWMO's R and D programs by means of surface-based laboratory and office studies and by participating, under the NWMO's auspices, in international underground research facility programs. AECL's staff have a wealth of experience in solute transport, rock-mass characterization, excavation design and engineered-barrier design within a wide variety of scientific and engineering disciplines. Separate to the service provided to Canada's NWMO, the expert geotechnical R and D capabilities of AECL are being provided via service contracts to a number of international customers. The key messages from this paper are not just that a great deal of important scientific work has been performed at the URL to date, but that AECL's experienced staff are still going strong and continue to play an important role in Canada and internationally. The URL provided

  19. Integrated assessment approach to ensure removal of decay heat with RCW out of service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the unusual event that Recirculated Cooling Water System of a CANDU NPP is drained for maintenance or generally incapacitated and the reactor is in the Guaranteed Shutdown State, an alternative source of cooling water is required to remove decay heat. For the Cernavoda Unit 1 NPP, CNE-PROD assessed and proposed a novel arrangement to address this issue, prepared a design, and requested AECL to assess the proposed approach. As part of the assessment, AECL developed and performed an integrated approach that brought together a variety of design, operational, maintenance and safety considerations. First, a simplified hydraulic analysis was performed, the heat removal requirements of the system were reviewed and alternative heat sinks were evaluated. Then, the maintenance and operational implications were considered in detail, using AECL's Systematic Assessment of Maintenance (SAM) process. This included a detailed assessment of failure modes of interest and associated effects (Failure Modes and Effects Analysis). This assessment included consideration of the impact on operational chemistry. In addition, the safety implications (potential for human error and safety consequences of failure) were reviewed. Based upon the system requirements, hydraulic assessment, and maintenance review, several alternatives or improvements to the CNE-PROD proposal were developed. In addition, a number of operational suggestions, as well as additional concerns and considerations were identified. Finally, potential alternative solutions were looked at based upon previous AECL experience. This paper will describe the novel CNE-PROD arrangement and provide an overview of the integrated assessment approach taken by AECL (using Plant Life Management technologies) to evaluate the proposed arrangement and to identify additional considerations. (author)

  20. Romanian-Canadian joint program for qualification of FCN as a CANDU fuel supplier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RENEL (Romania Power Authority), the co-ordinator of Romanian Nuclear Program, have decided to improve, starting 1990 the existing capability to produce CANDU nuclear fuel at FCN Pitesti. The objective of the program was defined with AAC (AECL - ANSALDO Consortium) for the qualification of FCN fuel plant according to Canadian Z299.2 standard. The Qualification Program was performed under AAC Work Order C-003. The co-ordination was assumed by AECL, as overall Design Authority. ZPI (Zircatec Precision Industries Inc., Canada), were designated to supply technical assistance, equipments and know how where necessary. After a preliminary verification of the FCN fuel plant, including the processes and system investigation, performed under AECL and ZPI assistance, the Qualification Program was defined in all details. The upgrading of documentation on all aspects required by Z299.2 was performed. Few processes needed to be reconsidered and equipment was delivered by ZPI or other suppliers. This includes mainly welding equipments and special inspection equipments. Health Physics was practically fully reconsidered. New equipment and practice were adapted to provide adequate control on health conditions. Every manufacturing and inspection process was checked to determine their performance during a Qualification Run based on acceptance criteria which have been established in the Qualification Plan. Manufacturing Demonstration Run was an important step to prove that all plant functions have been accomplished during the fabrication of 200 fuel bundles. These bundles have been fully accepted and 66 of them have been loaded in the first charge of Unit 1 Cemavoda NPS. The surveillance and audit actions made by AECL and ZPI during this period confirmed the FCN capability to operate an adequate system meeting the to required quality assurance standard. The very open attitude of AECL, Zircatec and FCN staff have stimulated the progress of the project and a successful achievement of the

  1. Defining criteria for cemented waste produced from legacy liquids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has several hundred cubic metres of legacy radioactive waste stored in underground tanks at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site in Chalk River, Ontario. As part of a larger campaign to reduce its legacy liabilities, AECL intends to remove and immobilize this waste using a cementation system. AECL plans to hire an external contractor to design and operate a cementation skid to remove and condition the liquid wastes. Clear and measurable waste form criteria must be determined and provided to the contractor in order for the contractor to demonstrate that a safe and stable waste form has been produced. AECL has reviewed industry-standard test methods and best practices related to cementation of liquid nuclear wastes. Where suitable, these test methods and practices have been incorporated into Product Performance Criteria. An extensive test program has been performed to obtain cement formulations for the legacy wastes; the resulting sample cemented wastes have been tested and the results compared to the Product Performance Criteria. Modifications to the criteria have been made as required based on knowledge gained during this process. In addition, since no industry standards had previously been identified to measure homogeneity, 3 potential test methods have been identified. Regardless of the amount of testing performed and the stringency of the performance criteria, some risk remains that the waste will deteriorate over time. However, by performing a rigorous review of industry practice and an extensive series of tests under various conditions, AECL believes that it has addressed the risks in a reasonable and prudent manner and has selected the appropriate Product Performance Criteria to achieve a safe and stable waste product

  2. Public opinion research in Canada: Incorporating the messages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and use of nuclear technology in Canada, similar to other countries, has been influenced by public perceptions that are often based on limited information. Most individuals find it challenging to decide among the apparent conflicting claims and allegations related to nuclear power. To meet the challenges of public acceptance, AECL develops and implements strategies designed to increase awareness and understanding of the issues associated with nuclear technology. AECL's public communication programs have evolved over several decades. This reflects the changing nature of public concerns related to nuclear energy. With ever increasing requirements for public involvement in the decision-making process, AECL has designed and successfully implemented effective communication and consultation processes to build and maintain public support for nuclear projects. Public communication programs have also been developed and implemented by the provincial utilities that own and operate CANDU reactors, by the Canadian Nuclear Association and by the Canadian Nuclear Society. Often public education and information programs have been a collaborative effort involving a number of the key stakeholders in Canada's nuclear industry. AECL's public communication initiatives are designed to address the fears and myths surrounding the nuclear industry. The company is committed to providing information on its programs and it responds in a timely fashion to requests from the public. Due to the highly competitive nature of the nuclear industry, there is some proprietary information that is restricted and cannot be released. Consultations with the shareholder and with other key stakeholders on communication plans are an integral component of the design and implementation process. AECL public affairs staff provides advice and assistance to various government and industry communication committees. (author)

  3. Transport modeling of sorbing tracers in artificial fractures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keum, Dong Kwon; Baik, Min Hoon; Park, Chung Kyun; Cho, Young Hwan; Hahn, Phil Soo

    1998-02-01

    This study was performed as part of a fifty-man year attachment program between AECL (Atomic Energy Canada Limited) and KAERI. Three kinds of computer code, HDD, POMKAP and VAMKAP, were developed to predict transport of contaminants in fractured rock. MDDM was to calculate the mass transport of contaminants in a single fracture using a simple hydrodynamic dispersion diffusion model. POMKAP was to predict the mass transport of contaminants by a two-dimensional variable aperture model. In parallel with modeling, the validation of models was also performed through the analysis of the migration experimental data obtained in acrylic plastic and granite artificial fracture system at the Whiteshell laboratories, AECL, Canada. (author). 34 refs., 11 tabs., 76 figs.

  4. Design features of Candu 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-two nuclear generating units with an aggregate installed capacity of 19,119 MWe worldwide are equipped with heavy water moderated and cooled pressure tube reactors of the Canadian Candu line. The list includes nine reactors of the 700 MWe category, and twelve reactors of the 900 MWe category in the Candu 6 series. On the basis of the 900 MWe units, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) developed the advanced Candu 9 series by evolution. This series has been designed for a service life of sixty years. The use of modular, simplified units and systems in the Candu 9 design is to shorten the planning and construction phase, increase safety, and improve plant operation. AECL will offer this reactor on the world market, first to its customers in (South) Korea, which is one of the reasons why the safety parameters have been chosen especially under the aspect of seismic characteristics. (orig.)

  5. Next generation CANDU plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors systems featuring horizontal fuel channels and heavy water moderator will continue to evolve, supported by AECL's strong commitment to comprehensive R and D programs. There are three key CANDU development strategic thrusts: improved economics, fuel cycle flexibility, and enhanced safety operation based on design feedback. Therefore, CANDU reactor products will continue to evolve by incorporating further improvements and advanced features that will be arising from our CANDU Technology R and D programs in areas such as heavy water and tritium, control and instrumentation, fuel and fuel cycles, systems and equipment and safety and constructability. Progressive CANDU development will continue in AECL to enhance the medium size product - CANDU 6, and to evolve the larger size product - CANDU 9. The development of features for CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 is carried out in parallel. Developments completed for one reactor size can then be applied to the other design with minimum costs and risk. (author)

  6. Tunney's Pasture decommissioning project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's Tunney's Pasture facility located in Ottawa was used for research, production and worldwide shipping of radioisotopes. After 30 years of operation, it was shut down in 1984, and decommissioned in two phases. During the first phase, which began in 1985 and lasted until 1987, staff moving to the new Kanata facility, now the property of Nordion International, removed the bulk of the equipment. After a three year period of storage under surveillance, AECL in 1990 initiated the second phase of decommissioning, which was completed in August 1993. In January 1994, the AECB unconditionally released the facility for unrestricted use. The paper provides an overview of the second phase of decommissioning, and a summary of a few lessons learned. 4 figs

  7. Management of experimental and exotic fuels by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) has been engaged in nuclear research and development at its Chalk River Laboratories since the 1940's. During this time, a wide variety of irradiated research reactor and experimental fuels have been stored in a variety of storage facilities. Some of these fuels are of unique composition and configuration, and some fuels have been degraded as a result of research activities. In preparing decommissioning plans for these storage facilities, AECL has developed a strategy that identifies how each type of fuel will be dispositioned in the future. The goal of this strategy is to ensure that the fuels are maintained in a safe stable state until a repository for these fuels becomes available. This paper describes the current storage facilities, options considered for long-term fuel management, and the strategy selected to manage these fuels. (author)

  8. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  9. Two routes to solving the Mo/Tc isotope crisis: direct production of Tc-99m and isotope separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruth, T.J. [TRIUMF, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); BC Cancer Agency, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This presentation discusses the two routes to solving the Mo/Tc isotope crisis. The first approach is the direct production of Tc-99m and the second approach is for isotope separation. Tc-99m is most widely used radionuclide for nuclear medicine procedures in the world and accounts for >70% of all procedures. A generator is a device used to extract one nuclide from another. Half life and chemical properties of Mo 99 and Tc 99m are exploited to separate them in the generator. Currently AECL/MDS Nordion supply 40% of world demand and able to handle 80%. Aecl runs the (130 MW) NRU reactor with LEU fuel and HEU targets (HEU is highly enriched uranium and is weapons grade uranium)

  10. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilborn, J. [Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  11. Update on Canada's fuel waste management program: preparing for the environmental review of the concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Program was established in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is responsible for developing and assessing a concept to dispose of nuclear fuel wastes in plutonic rocks of the Canadian Shield. A series of engineered and natural barriers will isolate the nuclear fuel waste from the biosphere. The ultimate choice of methods, materials, and designs will depend on the site chosen, availability, cost, and practicality. AECL has submitted the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the concept for review by the Environmental Assessment Panel appointed by the federal Minister of the Environment. Three reasons for implementing the concept if accepted are as follows: to show environmental leadership by reducing the burden on future generation, to foster public confidence in nuclear energy, and to forestall 'inaction by default'. 19 refs

  12. Human health considerations in the assessment of Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1978, AECL was mandated by the government of Ontario and the federal government to find a permanent disposal solution for spent nuclear fuels. Canada opted for disposal in plutonic rocks of the Canadian shield. The Canadian concept calls for disposal in crystalline rocks at a depth of 500 to 1000 m below the surface. The spent fuel would be contained in a canister, the canister would be emplaced in a vault containing clay-based buffer materials, and the cavity would be backfilled and sealed with natural materials. A Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel was formed in 1992 to assess the concept for disposal of the spent fuel. In this paper a brief discussion of the human health impacts of the proposed concept is presented. Our assessment is based on the information provided by AECL, namely, the main EIS document, a summary and nine other supporting documents

  13. Development and implementation of a construction environmental protection program at a solid radioactive waste management facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Refurbishment of ageing nuclear stations has great economic and environmental benefits, including reduced greenhouse gas emissions. The Government of New Brunswick (NB) decided in 2005 to refurbish the Point Lepreau Generating Station with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) as the general contractor. The project includes construction of additional radioactive waste management facilities. AECL developed, for the construction project, an environmental protection program to comply with commitments made during the environmental assessment process, and regulatory requirements. The program covers detailed environmental plans, training courses, and engagement of consultants to provide training and conduct monitoring of the construction activities. Construction related environmental effects have been successfully mitigated and the monitoring results indicate compliance with all environmental requirements. (author)

  14. Chernobyl - a Canadian technical perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report we present the design review done to date in Canada by AECL. From the Canadian point of view it covers: 1) relevant information on the Chernobyl design and the accident, both as presented by the Soviets at the Post-Accident Review Meeting (PARM) held in Vienna from August 25-29, 1986, and as deduced from publicly available Soviet documentation; and 2) details of AECL's technical review of the CANDU PHWR (Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor) against the background of the Chernobyl accident, and implications of the Chernobyl accident. Reviews of operational aspects are underway by the Canadian electrical utilities and a review by the Canadian regulatory agency (the Atomic Energy Control Board) is near completion

  15. Nuclear platform research and development - 2008-09 highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Platform R and D Program has lead responsibility for the maintenance and further development of the CANDU intellectual property covering the safety, licensing and design basis for nuclear facilities. The Nuclear Platform R and D Program is part of the Research and Technology Operation (RTO) unit of AECL and is managed through the Research and Development division, which has responsibility for maintaining and enhancing the knowledge and technology base. The RTO is also responsible for managing AECL's nuclear facilities and infrastructure (including laboratories and R and D facilities), the nuclear waste management program and other legacy liabilities (e.g., decommissioning) to demonstrate and grow shareholder value. The Nuclear Platform also provides the technology base from which new products and services can be developed to meet customer needs (including ACR and commercial products and services). (author)

  16. Annual report 1998-1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Annual Report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 1999 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1998-1999. The Activities covered in this Report include the CANDU Reactor Business, with excellent progress reported on the construction of two 700 MWe-class CANDU reactors in Qinshan, China. In the Republic of Korea, Wolsong Unit entered into commercial operation and Wolsong Unit 4 achieved sustained nuclear reaction. The Report also covers AECL's R and D and Waste Management programs. In the R and D section, the report outlines the development of the CANFLEX fuel bundle, Fuel Channels, Reactor Safety, Code Validation, Fuels and Fuel Cycles as well as Heavy Water production. Progress in the Waste Management program is also discussed

  17. A forward looking company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article is an excerpt of an interview with David A. Christian, Senior Vice President-Nuclear and Chief Nuclear Officer, Dominion Generation conducted at NEI's Nuclear Energy Assembly in New Orleans, Louisiana on 13 May 2004. It highlights the company's energy diversity, and in particular, activities related to early-site permits and possible future plans for nuclear power plant development in the U.S. The interview touches on questions related to the Consortium (composed of Dominion, AECL Technologies, the U.S. subsidiary of AECL, Hatachi America and Bechtel Power Corp.) and the DOE financial support involved (approximately 50%) along with comments related to job impacts, energy security and climate change impacts, human resource issues (particularly about getting high school students interested in jobs related to the nuclear industry) and public policy. The interview ends with a discussion of investment interest and the state of standardization in the industry

  18. Microbial issues pertaining to the Canadian concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research is developing a concept for the permanent disposal of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel has issued a set of guidelines to be used by AECL Research in preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for this concept. These guidelines require that the EIS address a number of microbiological factors and their potential to affect the integrity of the multiple barrier system on which the disposal concept is based. This report formulates a number of views and positions on microbiological factors that could influence the performance of a disposal vault in plutonic rock. Microbiological factors discussed include the presence and survival of microbes, biofilms, corrosion, biodegradation (of emplaced materials), gas production, geochemical changes, radionuclides migration, colloid formation, mutation, pathogens and methylation. Not all issues can be fully resolved with the current state of knowledge. Studies being performed to underscore and strengthen current knowledge are briefly discussed. (author). 92 refs., 1 tab

  19. Microbial studies in the Canadian nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed a concept for permanent geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste in Canada. An accelerated program was initiated in 1991 to address and quantify the potential effects of microbial action on the integrity of the disposal concept's multiple barrier system. This microbial program focuses on answering specific questions in areas such as the survival of bacteria in compacted clay-based buffer materials under relevant radiation and desiccation conditions; mobility of microbes in compacted buffer materials; the potential for microbially-influenced corrosion of containers; microbial gas production in backfill material; introduction of nutrients as a result of vault excavation and operation; the presence and activity of microbes in deep granitic groundwaters; and the effects of biofilms on radionuclide migration in the geosphere. This paper summarizes the current research activities at AECL in these areas. (author)

  20. A study of the health of the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the status of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.'s health study of its present and past employees, and is a description of the steps which have been taken up to the time of writing. During the design phase there was a shift in the emphasis of the study. What was originally proposed as a study of mortality in a population of radiation workers, related spacifically to radiation exposure, has become a study of mortality data for all AECL employees. The interest in mortality as a function of occupational radiation expksure remains, but it is recognized that the data available to the study will probably be inadequate for the definition of a dose-effect relationship, although it will be useful in conjuction with other similar studies. The importance of cancer incidence is recognized, and the possibility of linking the AECL data to that contained in the National Cancer Incidence Reporting System is being pursued

  1. The disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste: public involvement and social aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the activities undertaken to provide information to the public about the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program as well as the opportunities for public involvement in the direction and development of the disposal concept through government inquiries and commissions and specific initiatives undertaken by AECL. Public viewpoints and the major issues identified by the public to be of particular concern and importance in evaluating the acceptability of the concept are described. In addition, how the issues have been addressed during the development of the disposal concept or how they could be addressed during implementation of the disposal concept are presented. There is also discussion of public perspectives of risk, the ethical aspects of nuclear fuel waste disposal, and public involvement in siting a nuclear fuel waste disposal facility. The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program is funded jointly by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group. (author)

  2. Electron processing of fibre-reinforced advanced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced composites, such as carbon-fibre-reinforced epoxies, are used in the aircraft, aerospace, sporting goods, and transportation industries. Though thermal curing is the dominant industrial process for advanced composites, electron curing of similar composites containing acrylated epoxy matrices has been demonstrated by our work. The main attraction of electron processing technology over thermal technology is the advantages it offers which include ambient temperature curing, reduced curing times, reduced volatile emissions, better material handling, and reduced costs. Electron curing technology allows for the curing of many types of products, such as complex shaped, those containing different types of fibres and up to 15 cm thick. Our work has been done principally with the AECL's 10 MeV, 1 kW electron accelerator; we have also done some comparative work with an AECL Gammacell 220. In this paper we briefly review our work on the various aspects of electron curing of advanced composites and their properties. (Author)

  3. Development of nuclear fuel. Development of CANDU advanced fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to develop CANDU advanced fuel, the agreement of the joint research between KAERI and AECL was made on February 19, 1991. AECL conceptual design of CANFLEX bundle for Bruce reactors was analyzed and then the reference design and design drawing of the advanced fuel bundle with natural uranium fuel for CANDU-6 reactor were completed. The CANFLEX fuel cladding was preliminarily investigated. The fabricability of the advanced fuel bundle was investigated. The design and purchase of the machinery tools for the bundle fabrication for hydraulic scoping tests were performed. As a result of CANFLEX tube examination, the tubes were found to be meet the criteria proposed in the technical specification. The dummy bundles for hydraulic scoping tests have been fabricated by using the process and tools, where the process parameters and tools have been newly established. (Author)

  4. Collaborative approach in developing a small supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint Research and Development (R and D) project between University of Saskatchewan and Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is being established to develop a concept of the small Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) for power generation and process heat in remote areas. This project will be led by professors at the university and supported by technology experts from AECL. It integrates student training with a significant contribution to the reactor concept development. Students from various disciplines will combine results from physics, fuel, thermalhydraulic, control, material, and chemistry analyses to develop the core and fuel channel configurations and fuel design. This project would enhance the R and D expertise and capability of University of Saskatchewan and facilitate training of highly qualified persons (HQPs) for nuclear and non-nuclear industries at Saskatchewan and in Canada. (author)

  5. Continuous improvement of pump seals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pump seal reliability continues to be an area needing improvement and ongoing vigilance. Methods have been developed for identifying and assessing factors relating to seal performance, selecting the most relevant ones for a specific station, and then focusing on the most significant aspects and how to improve. Discussion invariably addresses maintenance practices, seal design, monitoring capabilities, operating conditions, transients, and pump and motor design. Success in reliability improvement requires ongoing dialogue among the station operators, pump manufacturers and seal designers. AECL CAN-seals lead the nuclear industry in reliability and seal life. They effectively save operators millions of dollars in outage time and person-rem. This paper describes some of the significant developments in AECL's ongoing program in seal R and D, as well as recent new installations following the most demanding seal qualification programs to date. (author)

  6. Safety and licensing program for the proposed irradiation research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) proposes to replace NRU with a dual-purpose irradiation-research facility (IRF) to test Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) fuels and materials and to perform materials research using neutrons. The reference IRF concept was estimated to cost $500 million and would require 87 months to complete. Approval of the IRF project is not expected to occur before 1997, and a favorable decision will be influenced by the estimated cost and confidence in the estimate. Accordingly, AECL has initiated a preproject program that includes code validation, analysis, development and testing, safety and licensing, and concept design activities to reduce uncertainties in the reference IRF project cost and schedule, and to develop cost and schedule reductions

  7. Program of experiments for the operating phase of the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Underground Research Laboratory (URL) is one of the major research and development facilities that AECL Research has constructed in support of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The URL is a unique geotechnical research facility constructed in previously undisturbed plutonic rock, which was well characterized before construction. The site evaluation and construction phases of the URL project have been completed and the operating phase is beginning. A program of operating phase experiments that address AECL's objectives for in situ testing has been selected. These experiments were subjected to an external peer review and a subsequent review by the URL Experiment Committee in 1989. The comments from the external peer review were incorporated into the experiment plans, and the revised experiments were accepted by the URL Experiment Committee. Summaries of both reviews are presented. The schedule for implementing the experiments and the quality assurance to be applied during implementation are also summarized. (Author) (9 refs., 11 figs.)

  8. Environmental scan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trends in current affairs and public policy that emerged in 1988 are analyzed to provide a tool for Atomic Energy of Canada's decision makers. This issue provides a general overview of the economic and energy environments; and international review of nuclear policies, equipment orders, and trends that will position Canada and AECL within the global nuclear community; a precis of Canadian public opinion polls on economic, environmental and energy issues; a summary of major trends identifies by Canadian opinion leaders from the public and private sectors; a review of opinions and recommendations of influential Canadian policy institutes; a report on government policies and actions that affect AECL directly or indirectly; an analysis of new coverage by print and electronic media; a review of anti-nuclear organizations; and conclusions and recommendations

  9. WLUP burnable absorber isotopic influence on coolant void reactivity in an ACR lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ACRTM-1000 is the topmost nuclear power reactor promoted by AECL during the next years as a response to increasing competitiveness in the nuclear energy market. Recent AECL innovations allowed overriding for the first time the main CANDU drawback - the positive Coolant Void Reactivity (CVR). The solution was using of burnable absorbers in the central element (CE) whose radius was significantly increased. The paper's goal is to evaluate the isotopic influence on CVR and, as result, on nuclear safety when the central element is filled one by one with the most common oxide of burnable isotopes from the IAEA updated WIMS library (WLUP). The isotopes taken into account are: Dysprosium, Hafnium, Gadolinium, Erbium and Holmium. A comparison between CVRs given at the using of above lanthanides and their suitability to be used in the central element design is illustrated in the paper. (authors)

  10. Technology transfer: The CANDU approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The many and diverse technologies necessary for the design, construction licensing and operation of a nuclear power plant can be efficiently assimilated by a recipient country through an effective technology transfer program supported by the firm long term commitment of both the recipient country organizations and the supplier. AECL's experience with nuclear related technology transfer spans four decades and includes the construction and operation of CANDU plants in five countries and four continents. A sixth country will be added to this list with the start of construction of two CANDU 6 plants in China in early 1997. This background provides the basis for addressing the key factors in the successful transfer of nuclear technology, providing insights into the lessons learned and introducing a framework for success. This paper provides an overview of AECL experience relative to the important factors influencing technology transfer, and reviews specific country experiences. (author)

  11. Electron-processing technology: a promising application for the viscose industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In marketing its IMPELA[reg] line of high-power, high-throughput industrial accelerators, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is working with viscose (rayon) companies world-wide to integrate electron-processing technology as part of the viscose manufacturing process. The viscose industry converts cellulose wood pulp into products such as staple fiber, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. This multibillion dollar industry is currently suffering from high production costs, and is facing increasingly stringent environmental regulations. The use of electron-treated pulp can significantly lower production costs and can provide equally significant environmental benefits. This paper describes our current understanding of the benefits of using electron-treated pulp in this process, and AECL's efforts in developing this technology

  12. Electron-processing technology: a promising application for the viscose industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In marketing its IMPELA line of high-power, high-throughput industrial accelerators, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is working with viscose (rayon) companies world-wide to integrate electron-processing technology as part of the viscose manufacturing process. The viscose industry converts cellulose wood pulp into products such as staple fiber, filament, cord, film, packaging, and non-edible sausage casings. This multibillion dollar industry is currently suffering from high production costs, and is facing increasingly stringent environmental regulations. The use of electron-treated pulp can significantly lower production costs and can provide equally significant environmental benefits. This paper describes our current understanding of the benefits of using electron-treated pulp in this process, and AECL's efforts in developing this technology. (author)

  13. Whiteshell labs closure: crisis or opportunity?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L. Simpson, Mayor, Local Government District of Pinawa, Manitoba, described the impacts and public concerns produced by a hastily planned and executed withdrawal of the primary employer from a dependent company town. The Whiteshell Laboratories of the Crown corporation Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) were established in Eastern Manitoba in 1963, and Pinawa was created 15 kilometres away. Located in a provincial park region, Pinawa has also become a popular holiday cottage area with 20 000 residents inside a 30-minute radius. In 1995, the AECL Reactor Safety Research Program was moved to Chalk River, and the Nuclear Waste Management Program (NWMP) was left in limbo. Commercial negotiations to go on operating business on the site broke down. The town of Pinawa, the major stakeholder, was kept at arm's length from all discussions. (author)

  14. Validation of the ORIGEN-S code for predicting radionuclide inventories in used CANDU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety assessment being conducted by AECL Research for the concept of deep geological disposal of used CANDU UO2 fuel requires the calculation of radionuclide inventories in the fuel to provide source terms for radionuclide release. This report discusses the validation of selected actinide and fission-product inventories calculated using the ORIGEN-S code coupled with the WIMS-AECL lattice code, using data from analytical measurements of radioisotope inventories in Pickering CANDU reactor fuel. The recent processing of new ENDF/B-VI cross-section data has allowed the ORIGEN-S calculations to be performed using the most up-to-date nuclear data available. The results indicate that the code is reliably predicting actinide and the majority of fission-product inventories to within the analytical uncertainty. ((orig.))

  15. Benefit of chromium in reducing the rates of flow accelerated corrosion of carbon steel outlet feeders in CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the mid 1990's, wall thinning of outlet feeders due to flow accelerated corrosion (FAC) was recognized as an active mechanism in the outlet feeders of CANDU reactors. To address wall thinning of outlet feeders in new reactor construction and refurbishment projects, AECL introduced a minimum Cr concentration in its specification for the SA-106 carbon steel feeder pipe. The effectiveness of Cr in reducing FAC was subsequently demonstrated in in-reactor and out-reactor loops at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. More recently, wall-thinning rates have been determined from wall thickness data collected from outlet feeders, containing a specified minimum Cr concentration, installed in the Point Lepreau Generating Station in 2001. This paper presents the FAC rates determined from in-service outlet feeders and compares the rates with data from previous in-reactor and out-reactor test loops, highlighting the consistency observed in results from the three sources. (author)

  16. Learning from experience: feedback to CANDU design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's main product line is based on two single unit CANDU nuclear power plant designs; CANDU 6 and CANDU 9, each of which is based on successfully operating CANDU plants. AECL's CANDU development program is based upon evolutionary improvement. The evolutionary design approach ensures the maximum degree of operational provenness. It also allows successful features of today's plants to be retained while incorporating improvements as they develop to the appropriate level of design maturity. A key component of this evolutionary development is a formal process of gathering and responding to feedback from: NPP operation, construction and commissioning; regulatory input; equipment supplier input; R and D results; market input. The progresses for gathering and implementing the experience feedback and a number of recent examples of design improvements from this feedback process are described in the paper. (author)

  17. Annual report 1998-1999

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This is the Annual Report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 1999 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1998-1999. The Activities covered in this Report include the CANDU Reactor Business, with excellent progress reported on the construction of two 700 MWe-class CANDU reactors in Qinshan, China. In the Republic of Korea, Wolsong Unit entered into commercial operation and Wolsong Unit 4 achieved sustained nuclear reaction. The Report also covers AECL's R and D and Waste Management programs. In the R and D section, the report outlines the development of the CANFLEX fuel bundle, Fuel Channels, Reactor Safety, Code Validation, Fuels and Fuel Cycles as well as Heavy Water production. Progress in the Waste Management program is also discussed.

  18. OCR - a western Canadian success story

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water cooled CANDU power reactor has been a most satisfactory choice for electricity generation in Ontario. However, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has continued to explore variants to the standard CANDU PHWR which could enhance its efficiency, safety and/or economics. Replacement of heavy water with an organic liquid in the cooling circuit appears to offer benefits in operating efficiency, radiation exposure to operators, and cost. In the 1960's AECL built a 40 MW(t) organic cooled test reactor at its Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE) in Pinawa, Manitoba. The WR-1 reactor at WNRE reached full power in late 1965. Since that time it has exceeded all expectations. Radiation degradation of the coolant has not impeded operation in any way. Coolant flammability has not been a problem. The organic coolant has been shown to have real advantages

  19. Power and the future generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this keynote address, the author, who was acting president of AECL at the time of the conference, emphasizes the importance of nuclear energy to Canada, and its future importance to the developing countries. In 1992, nuclear energy supplied 15% of Canada's electricity, employed 30,000 people in Canada, created at least 10,000 jobs in other sectors, generated federal tax revenues of C$700 million, and by supplanting coal and gas imports saved about C$1 billion. Export sales prospects in China, Korea, Turkey, the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand are indicated. AECL is presently undergoing reorganization for greater efficiency. A public opinion poll indicated about 70% Canadian public support for nuclear energy

  20. Annual health, safety and environmental performance report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the safety and environmental record of the operations of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) during 1992. an introduction highlights the results and describes the facilities and organizational systems. Subsequent sections indicate the performance of the company with respect to personnel radiation exposures, occupational injuries, the handling of wastes and the release of materials into the environment. Programs in health, safety and environmental protection are presented, along with site remediation and emergency preparedness practices

  1. The Qinshan phase III project-a successful model of sino-canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Qinshan Phase III (CANDU) Project, the largest-scale cooperative project between China and Canada, was completed in 2003 well in advance of the schedule and 10% under budget. The Third Qinshan (Phase III) Nuclear Power Plant (TQNPP) was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 20, 2003, 43 days and 115 days ahead of schedule respectively. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 months from First Concrete to Criticality - a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods, electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management and control. New design and construction techniques were introduced by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools has benefited TQNPC in its subsequent plant operation, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China as well as enhancing their opportunities internationally. Excellent co-operation and teamwork within the integrated TQNPC/AECL Commissioning Team with well documented QA program, process and procedures also contributed to the remarkable success of the Project. AECL's initial assessment, based on lessons learned, showed that the project schedule could readily be reduced to 66 months and the capital costs reduced by 25% for a replication project. AECL is building on this experience and successful results of TQNPP in its Advanced CANDU ReactorTM (ACRTM)**design. (authors)

  2. Annual health, safety and environmental performance report for 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the safety and environmental record of the operations of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) during 1992. An introduction highlights the results and describes the facilities and organizational systems. Subsequent sections indicate the performance of the company with respect to personnel radiation exposures, occupational injuries, the handling of wastes and the release of materials into the environment. Programs in health, safety and environmental protection are presented, along with site remediation and emergency preparedness practices

  3. Validation of the COBRA code for dry out power calculation in CANDU type advanced fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern Laboratories perform a full scale CHF testing of the CANFLEX bundle under AECL request. This experiment is modeled with the COBRA IV HW code to verify it's capacity for the dry out power calculation . Good results were obtained: errors below 10 % with respect to all data measured and 1 % for standard operating conditions in CANDU reactors range . This calculations were repeated for the CNEA advanced fuel CARA obtaining the same performance as the CANFLEX fuel. (author)

  4. Field test of wireless sensor network in the nuclear environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are appealing options for the health monitoring of nuclear power plants due to their low cost and flexibility. Before they can be used in highly regulated nuclear environments, their reliability in the nuclear environment and compatibility with existing devices have to be assessed. In situ electromagnetic interference tests, wireless signal propagation tests, and nuclear radiation hardness tests conducted on candidate WSN systems at AECL Chalk River Labs are presented. The results are favourable to WSN in nuclear applications. (author)

  5. Upgrading the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a nearly two-year long detailed review, AECL Research decided that its NRU research reactor will complete its mission around the turn of the century. The company's original intentions for major refurbishment have been revised and upgrading work will now mainly comprise add-ons to existing systems - so that research projects and isotope production schedules can be met - and procedure modifications to ensure continued safe operation. (Author)

  6. Comments on nuclear reactor safety in Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chalk River Technicians and Technologists Union representing 500 technical employees at the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories of AECL submit comments on nuclear reactor safety to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review. Issues identified by the Review Commissioner are addressed from the perspective of both a labour organization and experience in the nuclear R and D field. In general, Local 1568 believes Ontario's CANDU nuclear reactors are not only safe but also essential to the continued economic prosperity of the province

  7. The Cigar Lake analog study: An international R ampersand D project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides background information and summarizes the results of AECL's analog study on the Cigar Lake uranium deposit. This R ampersand D project includes national and international cooperation with many organizations directly or indirectly involved in nuclear waste management research. The emphasis is on the analog aspects of this deposit and the implications of modelling activities related to the environmental and safety assessment of the Canadian disposal concept for nuclear fuel waste

  8. Reactor coolant pump seals: improving their performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large CANDU plants are benefitting from transient-resistant four-year reliable reactor coolant pump seal lifetimes, a direct result of AECL's 20-year comprehensive seal improvement program involving R and D staff, manufacturers, and plant designers and operators. An overview of this program is presented, which covers seal modification design, testing, post-service examination, specialized maintenance and quality control. The relevancy of this technology to Light Water Reactor Coolant Pump Seals is also discussed

  9. Proposed Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. 99Mo waste calcination process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), at its Chalk River Laboratory, generates from 3000 to 5000 L/year of high-level fissile waste solution from the production of 99Mo. In this Mo process, highly enriched uranium (93 wt % 235U, total uranium basis) contained in uranium-aluminum alloy target rods is irradiated to produce the 99Mo product. The targets are removed from the reactor and dissolved in a mercury nitrate-catalyzed reaction with nitric acid. The 99Mo product is then recovered by passing the solution through an alumina (Al2O3) column. During discussions with personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) on September 10, 1992, the ORNL-developed technology formerly applied to the solidification of aqueous uranium waste (Consolidated Edison Uranium Solidification Program or CEUSP) was judged potentially applicable to the AECL 99Mo waste. Under a Work-for-Others contract (no. ERD-92-1132), which began May 24, 1993, ORNL was tasked to determine the feasibility of applying the CEUSP (or a similar) calcination process to solidify AECL's 99Mo waste for > 30 years of safe dry storage. This study was to provide sufficient detailed information on the applicability of a CEUSP-type waste solidification process to allow AECL to select the process which best suited its needs. As with the CEUSP process, evaporation of the waste and a simultaneously partial destruction of acid by reaction with formaldehyde followed by in situ waste can thermal denitration waste was chosen as the best means of solidification. Unlike the CEUSP material, the 99Mo waste has a considerable number of problem volatile and semivolatile constituents which must be recovered in the off-gas treatment system. Mercury removal before calcination was seen as the best option

  10. Human Reliability Analysis in Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant%秦山第三核电厂人因可靠性分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张力; 戴立操; 赵明; 曾春; 宋明海; 彭晓春

    2012-01-01

    Human reliability analysis (HRA) is an important component of probabilistic safety assessment (PSA). The design HRA was conducted by AECL and the technique was oversimplified. In order to make HRA represent the operational state of Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Plant more realistically, HRA was re-analyzed, to which dependence between events was added. On the basis of a comparison on internationally prevailing HRA techniques, a standardized THERP+HCR technique was adopted. Compared with AECL results, the updated is basically consistent with AECL analysis, while rationality and accuracy are obviously improved and results are more truthful%人因可靠性分析(HRA)是概率安全评价(PSA)的重要组成部分.秦山第三核电厂(简称秦山三核)初版HRA由加拿大原子能公司(AECL)完成,其采用的HRA方法为简化的ASEP-HRA.为获得更符合秦山三核运行状态实际的HRA结论,本工作对秦山三核重新进行了HRA分析,并增加了事件间的相关性分析.在对国际HRA方法比较研究的基础上,秦山三核HRA采用了规范化的THERP+HCR分析方法.新分析所得数据与AECL数据比较分析结果表明,新分析与AECL的分析判断基本一致,但在合理性和准确性方面较原分析有明显提高,分析结论更符合秦山三核实际.

  11. The back end of the fuel cycle and CANDU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU reactor operators have benefited from several advantages of the CANDU system and from AECL's experience, with regard to spent fuel handling, storage and disposal. AECL has over 20 years experience in development and application of medium-term storage and research and development on the disposal of used fuel. As a result of AECL's experience, short-term and medium-term storage and the associated handling of spent CANDU fuel are well proven and economic, with an extremely high degree of public and environmental protection. In fact, both short-term (water-pool) and medium-term (dry canister) storage of CANDU fuel are comparable or lower in cost per unit of energy than for PWRs. Both pool storage and dry spent fuel storage are fully proven, with many years of successful, safe operating experience. AECL's extensive R and D on the permanent disposal of spent-fuel has resulted in a defined concept for Canadian fuel disposal in crystalline rock. This concept was recently confirmed as ''technically acceptable'' by an independent environmental review panel. Thus, the Canadian program represents an international demonstration of the feasibility and safety of geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Much of the technology behind the Canadian concept can be adapted to permanent land-based disposal strategies chosen by other countries. In addition, the Canadian development has established a baseline for CANDU fuel permanent disposal costs. Canadian and international work has shown that the cost of permanent CANDU fuel disposal is similar to the cost of LWR fuel disposal per unit of electricity produced. (author)

  12. The new business model for nuclear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New nuclear development will require new business models that ensure maximum risk mitigation for the plant owner and rate payers. To deliver this model, AECL has joined with leading members of the nuclear industry to form Team CANDU. This presentation will introduce contracting structures that have been used by Team CANDU members to reduce plant delivery risk in an ongoing record of successful project completions over the last decade. (author)

  13. CANDU plant life management - An integrated approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated approach to plant life management has been developed for CANDU reactors. Strategies, methods, and procedures have been developed for assessment of critical systems structures and components and for implementing a reliability centred maintenance program. A Technology Watch program is being implemented to eliminate 'surprises'. Specific work has been identified for 1998. AECL is working on the integrated program with CANDU owners and seeks participation from other CANDU owners

  14. A registry for the study of the health of radiation workers employed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors to be considered in formulating a study of the health of radiation workers are discussed, and a proposal is made for the establishment of such a study in relation to the employees of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. By setting up a registry of AECL radiation workers, data could be accumulated suitable for the long-term followup of their health, and for preparing periodic interim reports on mortality and morbidity. (author)

  15. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis

  16. Implementation and ongoing development of a comprehensive program to deal with Canada's nuclear legacy liabilities - 16039

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from 60 years of nuclear research and development carried out on behalf of Canada by the National Research Council (1944 to 1952) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL, 1952 to present). These liabilities are located at AECL research and prototype reactor sites, and consist of shutdown reactors, research facilities and associated infrastructure, a wide variety of buried and stored waste, and contaminated lands. In 2006, the Government of Canada adopted a new long-term strategy to deal with the nuclear legacy liabilities and initiated a five-year, $520 million (Canadian dollars) start-up phase, thereby creating the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The objective of the long-term strategy is to safely and cost-effectively reduce risks and liabilities based on sound waste management and environmental principles in the best interests of Canadians. The five-year plan is directed at addressing health, safety and environmental priorities, accelerating the decontamination and demolition of shutdown buildings, and laying the groundwork for future phases of the strategy. It also includes public consultation to inform the further development of the strategy and provides for continued care and maintenance activities at the sites. The NLLP is being implemented through a Memorandum of Understanding between Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and AECL whereby NRCan is responsible for policy direction and oversight, including control of funding, and AECL is responsible for carrying out the work and holding and administering all licences, facilities and lands. The paper summarizes achievements during the first three years of program implementation in the areas of decommissioning and dismantling; waste recovery and environmental restoration; the construction of enabling facilities to analyze, handle and store the legacy waste; and, planning for the long-term management of the radioactive waste. (authors)

  17. Canadian experience with spin-offs from nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The innovation process introduced into AECL's research laboratories is described, with its achievements in increased commercial and spin-off businesses. In particular, the role of the champion or entrepreneur is emphasized in the manner in which he/she interacts within a dedicated team to pursue each opportunity. Examples are provided of several commercial and business development opportunities resulting from the background research programs

  18. The formation and characteristics of hydride blisters in c.w. Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the IAEA, a consultants' meeting was arranged in Vienna, 1994 July 25-29, at which a Canadian delegation, consisting of AECL and Ontario Hydro Technologies personnel, presented information on their knowledge of the behaviour of hydride blisters in Zircaloy-2 pressure tubes. This document contains the 10 papers presented by the Canadian delegation to the meeting. It is believed that they represent a good reference document on hydride blister phenomena

  19. Organic coolant summary report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the development of the use of organic liquids, specifically the terphenyls, as heat transfer mediums in nuclear reactors. All phases of the development program are covered, including the choice of coolant, decomposition, coolant reprocessing, physical properties, fouling, heat transfer, and corrosion. Few experimental results are given, but rather the emphasis is on summarizing the state of the art as it exists within AECL at the end of 1973. (Author)

  20. A review of the prospects for fusion breeding of fissile material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the result of an eight month study by the AECL Fusion Status Study Group. The objectives of this study were to review the current status of fusion research, to evaluate the neutronic performance of various fusion-breeder systems, and to assess the economic and technological outlook for the fusion breeder as a source of fissile material to support CANDU reactors operating on the thorium fuel cycle

  1. Field test of wireless sensor network in the nuclear environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, L., E-mail: lil@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Wang, Q.; Bari, A. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Deng, C.; Chen, D. [Univ. of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, Sichuan (China); Jiang, J. [Univ. of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Alexander, Q.; Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are appealing options for the health monitoring of nuclear power plants due to their low cost and flexibility. Before they can be used in highly regulated nuclear environments, their reliability in the nuclear environment and compatibility with existing devices have to be assessed. In situ electromagnetic interference tests, wireless signal propagation tests, and nuclear radiation hardness tests conducted on candidate WSN systems at AECL Chalk River Labs are presented. The results are favourable to WSN in nuclear applications. (author)

  2. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  3. Update on seamless calandria tube development and qualification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is undertaking the qualification of the production of seamless calandria tubes as replacement components for installation in reactors during retubing. Seamless tube prototypes made from Zircaloy-2 possessing a suitable crystallographic texture have been shown to be significantly stronger than seam-welded tubes under both rising pressure and sustained pressure conditions in a simulated reactor loading. This paper describes the seamless calandria tube development program and current status. (author)

  4. Specifications for reactor physics experiments on CANFLEX-RU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is to describe reactor physics experiments to be performed in the ZED-2 reactor to study CANFLEX-RU fuel bundles in CANDU-type fuel channels. The experiments are to provide benchmark quality validation data for the computer codes and associated nuclear databases used for physics calculations, in particular WIMS-AECL. Such validation data is likely to be a requirement by the regulator as condition for licensing a CANDU reactor based on an enriched fuel cycle

  5. Marketing CANDU internationally

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The market for CANDU reactor sales, both international and domestic, is reviewed. It is reasonable to expect that between five and ten reactors can be sold outside Canada before the end of the centry, and new domestic orders should be forthcoming as well. AECL International has been created to market CANDU, and is working together with the Canadian nuclear industry to promote the reactor and to assemble an attractive package that can be offered abroad. (L.L.)

  6. Design verification of the CANFLEX fuel bundle - quality assurance requirements for mechanical flow testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the design verification program for the new fuel bundle, a series of out-reactor tests was conducted on the CANFLEX 43-element fuel bundle design. These tests simulated current CANDU 6 reactor normal operating conditions of flow, temperature and pressure. This paper describes the Quality Assurance (QA) Program implemented for the tests that were run at the testing laboratories of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Korea Atomic energy Research Institute (KAERI). (author)

  7. A compendium of the data used with the SYVAC3-CC3 system model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is evaluating a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste from Canada's CANDU reactors deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. As part of this evaluation, AECL has developed models of the physicals, chemical, geological and biological processes that could occur in a sealed accessible environment over thousands of years. The mathematical models of the transport of radionuclides and toxic chemicals from nuclear fuel waste to the environment are incorporated into a computer model named the SYstems Variability Analysis Code, generation 3, and Canadian Concept model, generation 3 (SYVAC3-CC3). This report reproduces the data in the master database used by SYVAC3-CC3 for the postclosure assessment of deep laboratory and field studies conducted by AECL Research over the past fifteen years, including the investigations at an Underground Research Laboratory excavated to a depth of 450 meters in a large granitic batholith within the Whiteshell Research area near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba; conceptual engineering studies; detailed analyses of specific features, events and processes; and published literature. The data represent characteristics of a hypothetical vault, certain geological characteristics of the Whiteshell Research area, and a general surface environment with a human population living a rural lifestyle on a portion of the Canadian Shield in central Canada. The data are stored in a master database, which is used with a suite of computer programs to create the input data files used by SYVAC3-CC3. (author). 19 refs., 11 tabs., 2 figs

  8. Designing for maintainability: use of operating experience and feedback to improve performance of the ACR-1000; detailing the specific case of power operated valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL, ACR-1000 is being designed to achieve high lifetime capacity factor, low unplanned forced outages and short planned outages once per 3 years. In order to achieve this target extensive use is made of operating experience and industry feedback to improve the plant design. There is also a target to operate and maintain the plant with less staff than current CANDU power plants. The design will accommodate improvements in staff productivity. While the focus is set on the targets above there is also one more objective, to contain the capital cost of the new plants. AECL and partners are designing the ACR-1000 plant using a number of initiatives that are client driven [e.g. through COG]. This paper outlines the use of industry feedback in general with specific details for Power Operated Valves (POVs). The nuclear industry has promoted that the basis for good operation and maintenance is best achieved by building in improvements in the initial design. AECL has endorsed this philosophy and feedback is central to the design of the ACR-1000. (author)

  9. Assessment of the WIMS-D5 applicability to CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop a WIMS/CANDU code for a lattice calculation on the basis of WIMS-D5 code for the safety analysis of CANDU reactors. To assess the WIMS-D5 applicability to a CANDU reactor, a lattice model was developed For CANDU-6 reactors at the Wolsong site. As for the benchmark of the code validation, the code-to-code comparison was performed between the WIMS-D5 code with both the 69- and 172-energy groups of ENDF/B-VI nuclear data library and the WIMS-AECL code with the 89-energy group. The comparison studies of the reactor physics parameters such as void reactivity', coolant/fuel/moderator temperature coefficients were conducted with the change of the internal isotopic composition due to the fuel burning-up using both WIMS-AECL and POWDERPUFS-V (PPV) codes. The results show that the present results between the WIMS-D5 code and WIMS-AECL code agreed well with those of the PPV at the beginning of the fuel horn-up phase. As burning-up progresses, the results of WIMS-D5 show a large deviation from those of PPV for CANDU 6 reactors. (author)

  10. Advancing global health through innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada's role in the supply of radioisotopes for healthcare applications is unparalleled anywhere else in the world. The NRU reactor, owned and operated by AECL, is the world's major manufacturer of reactor based isotopes. Our cyclotron facilities at the University of British Columbia, TRIUMF facilities, produce unique isotopes for medical research and treatment. CANDU power reactors operated by Hydro Quebec, Bruce Power and Ontario Power Generation are a key source of cobalt-60 production for use in the sterilization of single use medical products. Most of the innovation today is in medical applications of radioisotope technology. Every day, some 34,000 medical procedures take place using medical isotopes supplied by MDS Nordion. Sustaining this daily supply stream of medical isotopes around the world requires a complex combination of production, processing, and timely delivery of high quality isotopes. The NRU reactor, which has played a key role in supplying medical isotopes to date, has been in operation for over 40 years. Replacing this aging reactor has been a priority for MDS Nordion in order to assure the global nuclear medicine community that Canada can continue to be a dependable supplier of medical isotopes. MDS Nordion commissioned AECL to construct two MAPLE reactors dedicated to the production of medical isotopes. The MDS Nordion Medical Isotope Reactor (MMIR) project started in September 1996. This paper provides an update on the MAPLE reactors that AECL has built at its CRL site and will operate for MDS Nordion. (author)

  11. Update on Canada's nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) was launched in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, AECL has been developing and assessing a generic concept to dispose of nuclear fuel waste in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. The disposal concept has been referred for review under the Environmental Assessment and Review Process. AECL will submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to an Environmental Assessment Panel, which was appointed in late 1989. Hearings will be held in areas that have a particular interest in the concept and its application. At the end of the review, the Panel will make recommendations as to the acceptability of the concept and the course of future action. The federal government will decide on the next steps to be taken. In the spring of 1990 public open houses were held to tell prospective participants how to enter the process. Sessions designed to assist the Panel in determining the scope of the EIS took place in the autumn of 1990. In June 1991 the Panel issued for comment a set of draft guidelines for the EIS. More than 30 groups and individuals submitted comments. The final guidelines were issued in March 1992, and AECL expects to submit its EIS to the Panel in 1993. If the concept review is completed by 1995 and if the concept is approved, disposal could begin some time after 2025. (L.L.) (12 refs.)

  12. Update on Canada's fuel waste management program. Preparing for the environmental review of the concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program (CNFWMP) was established in 1978 as a joint initiative by the governments of Canada and Ontario. Under the program, AECL is responsible for developing and assessing a concept to dispose of nuclear fuel wastes in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. Ontario Hydro has advanced the technologies for interim storage and transportation of used fuel. The aim of the concept is to isolate the used fuel waste from the biosphere by a series of engineered and natural barriers. During the past fourteen years, AECL has carried out detailed studies on each component of this barrier system. A robust concept has been developed, with options for the choice of materials and designs for the different components. The disposal concept is being reviewed under the Environmental Assessment and Review Process (EARP). AECL is the 'Proponent' for this review, and will submit an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) describing the disposal concept. The EIS has been written to respond to guidelines issued by the Environmental Assessment Panel responsible for carrying out the review. The future direction of the CNFWMP will depend on the recommendations of the Panel and on the resulting governmental decisions on the appropriate next steps. If the concept review is completed by 1996, as currently expected, and the concept is approved, the many steps that would be involved with siting and construction of a disposal facility, mean that disposal would not begin before about 2025. (J.P.N.)

  13. International standard problem (ISP) no. 41 follow up exercise: Containment iodine computer code exercise: parametric studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I- concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE(IPSN), IODE(NRIR), IMPAIR(GRS), INSPECT(AEAT), IMOD(AECL) and LIRIC(AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained front intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility, (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (author)

  14. CANDU spent fuel dry storage interim technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU heavy water reactor is developed by Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) it has 40 years of design life. During operation, the reactor can discharge a lot of spent fuels by using natural uranium. The spent fuel interim storage should be considered because the spent fuel bay storage capacity is limited with 6 years inventory. Spent fuel wet interim storage technique was adopted by AECL before 1970s, but it is diseconomy and produced extra radiation waste. So based on CANDU smaller fuel bundle dimension, lighter weight, lower burn-up and no-critical risk, AECL developed spent fuel dry interim storage technique which was applied in many CANDU reactors. Spent fuel dry interim storage facility should be designed base on critical accident prevention, decay heat removal, radiation protection and fissionable material containment. According to this introduction, analysis spent fuel dry interim storage facility and equipment design feature, it can be concluded that spent fuel dry interim storage could be met with the design requirement. (author)

  15. Overview of the Government of Canada Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program - 13551

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from more than 60 years of nuclear research and development carried out on behalf of Canada. The liabilities are located at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario and Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba, as well as three shutdown prototype reactors in Ontario and Quebec that are being maintained in a safe storage state. Estimated at about $7.4 billion (current day dollars), these liabilities consist of disused nuclear facilities and associated infrastructure, a wide variety of buried and stored waste, and contaminated lands. In 2006, the Government of Canada adopted a long-term strategy to deal with the nuclear legacy liabilities and initiated a five-year, $520 million start-up phase, thereby creating the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The Government of Canada renewed the NLLP in 2011 with a $439-million three-year second phase that ends March 31, 2014. The projects and activities carried out under the Program focus on infrastructure decommissioning, environmental restoration, improving the management of legacy radioactive waste, and advancing the long-term strategy. The NLLP is being implemented through a Memorandum of Understanding between Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and AECL whereby NRCan is responsible for policy direction and oversight, including control of funding, and AECL is responsible for implementing the program of work and holding and administering all licences, facilities and lands. (authors)

  16. Documentation and post-irradiation examination of Canadian nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canadian nuclear fuels includes fuels irradiated in CANDU power stations by our utilities and experimental fuels irradiated in the AECL-RC research reactors. Both types of fuel are documented with fabrication records, irradiation histories and power burnup logs. Many of these documents are generated by computer allowing individual fuel bundles and elements to be tracked from their delivery at the reactor to their final storage. Post-irradiation examination of our fuels takes place in underwater bays near the reactors and in shielded hot cells at AECL-Research Company (AECL-RC) laboratories using specialized equipment and techniques. Included in the fuel inspection procedures is a computer file for keeping examination records and a quality control system for shielded cell work. Most of the techniques, systems, codes and equipment used in documentation and in post-irradiation examination are illustrated in the report by three actual fuel irradiations, an experimental test in our research reactors, high burnup fuel from the Bruce reactor and fuel from a failed Pickering fuel channel

  17. 1979-80 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. added a fifth semi-autonomous unit, Atomic Energy of Canda International Company, in June 1979, to assist in the company's pursuit of world wide acceptance of the CANDU system. Evaluations of reactor safety following the Three Mile Island accident, public hearings in Ontario, and the report of the Porter Commission all reaffirm the safety of Canadian nuclear power plants. Continuing efforts were made to bring information on nuclear power to the public. AECL continued to participate in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation; INFCE findings confirm the competitiveness of the CANDU reactor. Emphasis in the AECL research program was on safety, safeguards, health effects of radiation, waste management and new applications for nuclear power. The Radiochemical Company had sales of $49 million, with 97% of its business being in the export market. The Engineering Company is working on eight major projects totalling 12000 MW(e) as well as providing consulting service for the CANDU stations already in operation. The Chemical Company produced over 5000000 kg of heavy water. AECL revenues were $497.1 million in 1979, an increase of 41.6 percent over the previous year. Research and development expenditures increased 2 percent to $127.2 million. Net income for the year increased to $11.2 million from $5.2 million for the previous year. (LL)

  18. A human reliability assessment screening method for the NRU upgrade project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Research Universal (NRU) reactor is a 130MW, low pressure, heavy water cooled and moderated research reactor. The reactor is used for research, both in support of Canada's CANDU development program, and for a wide variety of other research applications. In addition, NRU plays an important part in the production of medical isotopes, e.g., generating 80% of worldwide supplies of Molybdenum-99. NRU is owned and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), and is currently undergoing upgrading as part of AECL's continuing commitment to operate their facilities in a safe manner. As part of these upgrades both deterministic and probabilistic safety assessments are being carried out. It was recognized that the assignment of Human Error Probabilities (HEPs) is an important part of the Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) studies, particularly for a facility whose design predates modern ergonomic practices, and which will undergo a series of backfitted modifications whilst continuing to operate. A simple Human Reliability Assessment (HRA) screening method, looking at both pre- and post-accident errors, was used in the initial safety studies. However, following review of this method within AECL and externally by the regulator, it was judged that benefits could be gained for future error reduction by including additional features, as later described in this document. The HRA development project consisted of several stages; needs analysis, literature review, development of method (including testing and evaluation), and implementation. This paper discusses each of these stages in further detail. (author)

  19. Annual report, 1990-1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the beginning of the 1990/91 fiscal year the government of Canada announced that it would maintain the CANDU nuclear option, increase R and D funding for AECL Research, and authorize the start of negotiations to build a prototype CANDU 3 reactor. Later in the year AECL signed contracts with the Korea Electric Power Corporation to supply a second CANDU reactor for the Wolsung site. Consolidated net income was $7.8 million, after a $10.2 million loss in 1990. Revenue from nuclear power operations increased 11 percent to $187 million, with a 23 percent increase in the contribution from nuclear supply and services. Research and development expenditures rose to $293 million in 1991 from $259 million in 1990. The increase was mainly in cost-shared work on waste management, safety, health and environmental programs. Cost recovery revenue, principally from Ontario Hydro, increased to $87 million, reducing the federal government's share to 53 percent compared to 87 percent in 1985. Federal funding of R and D has been maintained at the 1990 level. The net expense of R and D operations was reduced to $11.0 million compared to $22.6 million in the previous year. Cash flow from all sources amounted to $47.9 million, leaving AECL with adequate working capital for the next year. In the future higher capital investment than previously anticipated will be required for waste management facilities associated with commercial isotope production. All figures are given in Canadian dollars

  20. Vendor provision for operations and maintenance : a route to nuclear excellence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU pressurized heavy water design has been established over three decades of operation. Historically CANDU has been developed by a successful partnership between AECL, the designer and developer, and the operating utilities. Maintaining good performance of a nuclear power plant is primarily the responsibility of the owner operator; but there is a common interest between the design organization and the operator in achieving good performance. AECL is emphasizing activities and partnerships to provide engineering and Research and Development (R and D) to reduce operating costs for new plants and support existing plants. Among these are: a comprehensive, structured process to deal with project, operations and other feedback; teams to study issues with impact on capacity factor and OM and A cost and identify initiatives in response; an integrated plant life management program in conjunction with CANDU 6 utilities; and strategic information technology products installed at the plants in support of improved station operation, sponsored by the CANDU Owner's Group. The breadth of these programs gives AECL a unique ability to link between support to operating plants, and the development of improved Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) designs for the future. (author)

  1. Tritium handling experience at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suppiah, S.; McCrimmon, K.; Lalonde, S.; Ryland, D.; Boniface, H.; Muirhead, C.; Castillo, I. [Atomic Energy of Canad Limited - AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Canada has been a leader in tritium handling technologies as a result of the successful CANDU reactor technology used for power production. Over the last 50 to 60 years, capabilities have been established in tritium handling and tritium management in CANDU stations, tritium removal processes for heavy and light water, tritium measurement and monitoring, and understanding the effects of tritium on the environment. This paper outlines details of tritium-related work currently being carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It concerns the CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process for detritiation, tritium-compatible electrolysers, tritium permeation studies, and tritium powered batteries. It is worth noting that AECL offers a Tritium Safe-Handling Course to national and international participants, the course is a mixture of classroom sessions and hands-on practical exercises. The expertise and facilities available at AECL is ready to address technological needs of nuclear fusion and next-generation nuclear fission reactors related to tritium handling and related issues.

  2. Progress report - physical sciences - physics division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the Physics Division. Of special note within the period covered by this report was the successful acceleration of over 75 mA of protons to 600 keV in RFQ1 making it the highest current RFQ in the world. Our electron accelerator expertise has been recognized by the award of one of the R and D 100 awards for the IMPELA (10 MeV 50 kW) machine. Considerable activity was associated with bringing the new dual beam neutron spectrometer DUALSPEC to completion. This instrument has been jointly funded by AECL and NSERC through McMaster University and will be a central component of the national neutron scattering facility at NRU in the 1990's. A major effort was made with the writing of a Project Definition Document for installation of a cold neutron source at the most opportune time

  3. Tritium handling experience at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada has been a leader in tritium handling technologies as a result of the successful CANDU reactor technology used for power production. Over the last 50 to 60 years, capabilities have been established in tritium handling and tritium management in CANDU stations, tritium removal processes for heavy and light water, tritium measurement and monitoring, and understanding the effects of tritium on the environment. This paper outlines details of tritium-related work currently being carried out at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). It concerns the CECE (Combined Electrolysis and Catalytic Exchange) process for detritiation, tritium-compatible electrolysers, tritium permeation studies, and tritium powered batteries. It is worth noting that AECL offers a Tritium Safe-Handling Course to national and international participants, the course is a mixture of classroom sessions and hands-on practical exercises. The expertise and facilities available at AECL is ready to address technological needs of nuclear fusion and next-generation nuclear fission reactors related to tritium handling and related issues

  4. International standard problem (ISP) no. 41 follow up exercise: Containment iodine computer code exercise: parametric studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, J.; Glowa, G.; Wren, J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Ewig, F. [GRS Koln (Germany); Dickenson, S. [AEAT, (United Kingdom); Billarand, Y.; Cantrel, L. [IPSN (France); Rydl, A. [NRIR (Czech Republic); Royen, J. [OECD/NEA (France)

    2001-11-01

    This report describes the results of the second phase of International Standard Problem (ISP) 41, an iodine behaviour code comparison exercise. The first phase of the study, which was based on a simple Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) experiment, demonstrated that all of the iodine behaviour codes had the capability to reproduce iodine behaviour for a narrow range of conditions (single temperature, no organic impurities, controlled pH steps). The current phase, a parametric study, was designed to evaluate the sensitivity of iodine behaviour codes to boundary conditions such as pH, dose rate, temperature and initial I{sup -} concentration. The codes used in this exercise were IODE(IPSN), IODE(NRIR), IMPAIR(GRS), INSPECT(AEAT), IMOD(AECL) and LIRIC(AECL). The parametric study described in this report identified several areas of discrepancy between the various codes. In general, the codes agree regarding qualitative trends, but their predictions regarding the actual amount of volatile iodine varied considerably. The largest source of the discrepancies between code predictions appears to be their different approaches to modelling the formation and destruction of organic iodides. A recommendation arising from this exercise is that an additional code comparison exercise be performed on organic iodide formation, against data obtained front intermediate-scale studies (two RTF (AECL, Canada) and two CAIMAN facility, (IPSN, France) experiments have been chosen). This comparison will allow each of the code users to realistically evaluate and improve the organic iodide behaviour sub-models within their codes. (author)

  5. Control of blast overpressure and vibrations at the Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Research (AECL) has constructed an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) as a facility for research and development in the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. The objectives of the program are to develop and evaluate the technology to ensure safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. Several multidisciplinary experiments and engineering demonstrations are planned for the URL over the next ten years. In 1989, AECL excavated a test room for the Buffer/Container Experiment at the 240 Level. The blasts were designed to limit vibration and overpressure damage because the excavation was located close to existing furnishings and services that were very susceptible to blast-induced vibration and overpressure. An experimental room, which contained sensitive instrumentation, was located within 30 m of the initial blasts. A concrete floor slab, timber curtains and a bulkhead were installed to protect furnishings and services from fly-rock and overpressure. Five of the initial blasts were monitored. This paper describes the results of the monitoring program and the effectiveness of the blast design, floor slab and timber curtains and bulkhead in reducing blast overpressure and vibrations at the blast site. It is shown that greater than a 20-fold reduction in both blast vibrations and air overpressures can be achieved with specific combinations of blast design, installation of timber curtains and construction of a concrete floor slab

  6. Overview of the Government of Canada Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program - 13551

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, D.; McCauley, D. [Natural Resources Canada, Ottawa, Ontario, K1A 0E4 (Canada); Miller, J.; Brooks, S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from more than 60 years of nuclear research and development carried out on behalf of Canada. The liabilities are located at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories in Ontario and Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba, as well as three shutdown prototype reactors in Ontario and Quebec that are being maintained in a safe storage state. Estimated at about $7.4 billion (current day dollars), these liabilities consist of disused nuclear facilities and associated infrastructure, a wide variety of buried and stored waste, and contaminated lands. In 2006, the Government of Canada adopted a long-term strategy to deal with the nuclear legacy liabilities and initiated a five-year, $520 million start-up phase, thereby creating the Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP). The Government of Canada renewed the NLLP in 2011 with a $439-million three-year second phase that ends March 31, 2014. The projects and activities carried out under the Program focus on infrastructure decommissioning, environmental restoration, improving the management of legacy radioactive waste, and advancing the long-term strategy. The NLLP is being implemented through a Memorandum of Understanding between Natural Resources Canada (NRCan) and AECL whereby NRCan is responsible for policy direction and oversight, including control of funding, and AECL is responsible for implementing the program of work and holding and administering all licences, facilities and lands. (authors)

  7. Advanced CANDU reactor technology: competitive design for the nuclear renaissance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed the design for a new generation of CANDU nuclear power plants, the Advance CANDU Reactor or ACR. The ACR combines a set of underlying enabling technologies with well-established successful CANDU features in an optimized design with significantly lower costs. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, an optimized core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. The basic design for the complete reference ACR power plant has now been completed. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference ACR-700 power plant design. The progress of the ACR design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with the enhancement of design margins. AECL expects the detailed design and testing of ACR to be complete and pre-project licensing evaluation carried out to enable regulatory endorsement in key markets by the middle of the decade. (authors)

  8. Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed a suite of technologies for CanduR reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and

  9. Safe operation of the NRU research reactor now and beyond 2021

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mistry, Sunjay [AECL, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    This paper will describe the approach that has been taken by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to ensure that the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor designed in the 1940's continues to remain safe and reliable to operate now and for the near future (2021 and beyond). This paper focuses on two major projects, the NRU Upgrades Project undertaken in the 1990's and the Integrated Safety Review (ISR) resulting in the Integrated Implementation Plan (IIP) that is currently underway. Through the NRU Upgrades Project, AECL was able to identify areas for safety improvement and implement changes in the field. Following the NRU Upgrades Project, AECL was able to demonstrate that for design basis accidents that the reactor was able to meet the four basic safety requirements namely:- · It shall be possible to shut down the reactor and maintain it in that state indefinitely; · The capability of removing decay heat from the fuel during this shut down period shall be maintained; · The confinement structure shall continue to be capable of limiting radioactivity release; and · Continuous monitoring of reactor safety functions shall remain available. The NRU Upgrades Project enabled AECL to continue to operate the NRU reactor beyond the year 2000 but it was recognised in 2008 that if operations were to continue up to and beyond 2021 then another assessment was warranted. This assessment resulted in the ISR project. The ISR project consisted of reviewing the NRU design against current codes and standards and, where applicable, addressing gaps identified. This project identified not only gaps in the analysis basis for NRU, it also identified the need to replace ageing equipment that was reaching the end of its design life. The findings of the ISR project have been captured in the IIP; IIP has enabled AECL to prioritise equipment replacement to enable continued safe and reliable operation of the NRU reactor beyond 2021. The paper demonstrates that, in order to

  10. Safe operation of the NRU research reactor now and beyond 2021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe the approach that has been taken by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to ensure that the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor designed in the 1940's continues to remain safe and reliable to operate now and for the near future (2021 and beyond). This paper focuses on two major projects, the NRU Upgrades Project undertaken in the 1990's and the Integrated Safety Review (ISR) resulting in the Integrated Implementation Plan (IIP) that is currently underway. Through the NRU Upgrades Project, AECL was able to identify areas for safety improvement and implement changes in the field. Following the NRU Upgrades Project, AECL was able to demonstrate that for design basis accidents that the reactor was able to meet the four basic safety requirements namely:- · It shall be possible to shut down the reactor and maintain it in that state indefinitely; · The capability of removing decay heat from the fuel during this shut down period shall be maintained; · The confinement structure shall continue to be capable of limiting radioactivity release; and · Continuous monitoring of reactor safety functions shall remain available. The NRU Upgrades Project enabled AECL to continue to operate the NRU reactor beyond the year 2000 but it was recognised in 2008 that if operations were to continue up to and beyond 2021 then another assessment was warranted. This assessment resulted in the ISR project. The ISR project consisted of reviewing the NRU design against current codes and standards and, where applicable, addressing gaps identified. This project identified not only gaps in the analysis basis for NRU, it also identified the need to replace ageing equipment that was reaching the end of its design life. The findings of the ISR project have been captured in the IIP; IIP has enabled AECL to prioritise equipment replacement to enable continued safe and reliable operation of the NRU reactor beyond 2021. The paper demonstrates that, in order to safely

  11. Summary of the Environmental Impact Statement on the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Summary of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. The proposed concept is a method for geological disposal, based on a system of natural and engineered barriers. The EIS provides information requested by the Environmental Assessment Panel reviewing the disposal concept and presents AECL's case for the acceptability of the concept. The introductory chapter of this Summary provides background information on several topics related to nuclear fuel waste, including current storage practices for used fuel, the need for eventual disposal of nuclear fuel waste, the options for disposal, and the reasons for Canada's focus on geological disposal. Chapter 2 describes the concept for disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Because the purpose of implementing the concept would he to protect human health and the natural environment far into the future, we discuss the long-term performance of a disposal system and present a case study of potential effects on human health and the natural environment after the closure of a disposal facility. The effects and social acceptability of disposal would depend greatly on how the concept was implemented. Chapter 3 describes AECL's proposed approach to concept implementation. We discuss how the public would be involved in implementation; activities that would be undertaken to protect human health, the natural environment, and the socio-economic environment; and a case study of the potential effects of disposal before the closure of a disposal facility. The last chapter presents AECL's Conclusion, based on more than 15 years of research and development, that implementation of the disposal concept represents a means by which Canada can safely dispose of its nuclear fuel waste. This chapter also presents AECL's recommendation that Canada progress toward disposal of its nuclear fuel waste by undertaking the first stage of concept

  12. Considering plant life management influences on new plant design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After operating successfully for more than half their design life, owners of CANDU reactors are now engaging in Plant Life Management (PLiM) activities to ensure not only life attainment, but also life extension. For several years, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) has been working with domestic and offshore CANDU utilities on a comprehensive and integrated CANDU PLiM program that will see existing CANDU plants successfully and reliably operate through their design life and beyond. To support the PLiM program development, a significant level of infrastructure has been, and continues to be, developed at AECL. This includes the development of databases that document relevant knowledge and background to allow for a more accessible and complete understanding of degradation issues and the strategies needed to deal with these issues. As the level of integration with various project, services and R and D activities in AECL increases, this infrastructure is growing to encompass a wider range of design, operations and maintenance details to support comprehensive and quantitative assessment of CANDU stations. With the maturation of the PLiM program, these processes were adapted for application to newer plants. In particular, a fully integrated program was developed that interrelates the design basis, operations, safety, and reliability and maintenance strategies, as applied to meet plant design goals. This has led to the development of the maintenance-based design concept. The various PLiM technologies, developed and applied in the above programs with operating stations, are being modified and tailored to assist with the new plant design processes to assure that ACR- Advanced CANDU Reactor meets its targets for operation, maintenance, and lifetime performance. Currently, the ACR, developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), is being designed with features to increase capacity factors, to reduce the risk of major equipment failures, to improve access to key components

  13. Incomplete data on the Canadian cohort may have affected the results of the study by the International Agency for Research on Cancer on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in 15 countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, J Patrick [Ponsonby and Associates, Manotick, ON (Canada); Gentner, Norman E; Osborne, Richard V, E-mail: osborner@magma.c [Ranasara Consultants Inc., PO Box 1116, Deep River, ON (Canada)

    2010-06-15

    In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved nuclear workers from facilities in the USA, UK and Canada. The only significant, though weak, dose-related associations found were for leukaemia and multiple myeloma. The results for the Canadian cohort, which comprised workers from the facilities of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), were compatible with those for the other national cohorts. In 2005, IARC completed a further study, involving nuclear workers from 15 countries, including Canada. In these results, the dose-related risk for leukaemia was not significant but the prominent finding was a statistically significant excess relative risk per sievert (ERR Sv{sup -1}) for 'all cancers excluding leukaemia'. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL sub-cohort, was significantly higher than the risk estimate for the 15-country cohort as a whole. We have attempted to identify why the results for the AECL cohort were so discrepant and had such a remarkable influence on the 15-country risk estimate. When considering the issues associated with data on the AECL cohorts and their handling, we noted a striking feature: a major change in outcome of studies that involved Canadian nuclear workers occurred concomitantly with the shift to when data from the National Dose Registry (NDR) of Canada were used directly rather than data from records at AECL. We concluded that an important contributor to the considerable upward shift in apparent risk in the 15-country and other Canadian studies that have been based on the NDR probably relates to pre-1971 data and, in particular, the absence from the NDR of the person-years of workers who had zero doses in the calendar years 1956 to 1970. Our recommendation was for there to be a comprehensive evaluation of the risks from radiation in nuclear industry workers in Canada, organisation by organisation, in

  14. Computer based plant display and digital control system of Wolsong NPP Tritium Removal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wolsong Tritium Removal Facility (WTRF) is an AECL-designed, first-of-a-kind facility that removes tritium from the heavy water that is used in systems of the CANDUM reactors in operation at the Wolsong Nuclear Power Plant in South Korea. The Plant Display and Control System (PDCS) provides digital plant monitoring and control for the WTRF and offers the advantages of state-of-the-art digital control system technologies for operations and maintenance. The overall features of the PDCS will be described and some of the specific approaches taken on the project to save construction time and costs, to reduce in-service life-cycle costs and to improve quality will be presented. The PDCS consists of two separate computer sub-systems: the Digital Control System (DCS) and the Plant Display System (PDS). The PDS provides the computer-based Human Machine Interface (HMI) for operators, and permits efficient supervisory or device level monitoring and control. A System Maintenance Console (SMC) is included in the PDS for the purpose of software and hardware configuration and on-line maintenance. A Historical Data System (HDS) is also included in the PDS as a data-server that continuously captures and logs process data and events for long-term storage and on-demand selective retrieval. The PDCS of WTRF has been designed and implemented based on an off-the-self PDS/DCS product combination, the Delta-V System from Emerson. The design includes fully redundant Ethernet network communications, controllers, power supplies and redundancy on selected I/O modules. The DCS provides field bus communications to interface with 3rd party controllers supplied on specialized skids, and supports HART communication with field transmitters. The DCS control logic was configured using a modular and graphical approach. The control strategies are primarily device control modules implemented as autonomous control loops, and implemented using IEC 61131-3 Function Block Diagram (FBD) and Structured

  15. Emergency core cooling system sump chemical effects on strainer head loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical precipitates formed in the recovery water following a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) have the potential to increase head loss across the Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS) strainer, and could lead to cavitation of the ECCS pumps, pump failure and loss of core cooling. AECL, as a strainer vendor and research organization, has been involved in the investigation of chemical effects on head loss for its CANDU® and Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) customers. The chemical constituents of the recovery sump water depend on the combination of chemistry control additives and the corrosion and dissolution products from metals, concrete, and insulation materials. Some of these dissolution and corrosion products (e.g., aluminum and calcium) may form significant quantities of precipitates. The presence of chemistry control additives such as sodium hydroxide, trisodium phosphate and boric acid can significantly influence the precipitates formed. While a number of compounds may be shown to be thermodynamically possible under the conditions assumed for precipitation, kinetic factors play a large role in the morphology of precipitates. Precipitation is also influenced by insulation debris, which can trap precipitates and act as nucleation sites for heterogeneous precipitation. This paper outlines the AECL approach to resolving the issue of chemical effects on ECCS strainer head loss, which included modeling, bench top testing and reduced-scale testing; the latter conducted using a temperature-controlled variable-flow closed-loop test rig that included an AECL Finned Strainer® test section equipped with a differential pressure transmitter. Models of corrosion product release and the effects of precipitates on head loss will also be presented. Finally, this paper discusses the precipitates found in test debris beds and presents a possible method for chemical effects head loss modeling. (author)

  16. CANDU 9 safety improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 9 is a family of single-unit Nuclear Power Plant designs based on proven CANDU concepts and equipment from operating CANDU plants capable of generating 900 MWe to 1300 MWe depending on the number of fuel channel used and the type of fuel, either natural uranium fuel or slightly enriched uranium fuel. The basic design, the CANDU 9 480/NU, uses the 480 fuel channel Darlington reactor and employs Natural Uranium (NU) fuel Darlington, the latest of the 900 MWe Class CANDU plants, consists of four integrated units with a total output of approximately 3740 MWe located in Ontario, Canada. AECL has completed the concept definition engineering for this design, and will be completing the design integration engineering by the end of 1996. AECL's design philosophy is to build-in product improvements in evolutionary from the initial prototype plants, NPD and Douglas Point, to today's operating CANDU's construction projects and advanced designs. CANDU 9 safety design follows the evolutionary path, including simple improvements based on existing well-proven CANDU safety concepts. The CANDU 9 builds on the experience base for the Darlington reference plant, and on AECL's extensive safety design experience with single unit CANDU 6 power plants. The latest CANDU 6 plants are being built in Korea by KEPCO at Wolsong 2,3 and 4. The Safety improvements for the CANDU 9 power plant are intended to provide the owner-operator with increased assurance of reliable, trouble-free operation, with greater safety margin, with improved public acceptance, and with ease of licensibility

  17. Canadian experience in deploying SMRs and plans for future deployment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Climate change, air quality and conventional energy costs are emerging as increasingly important issues. The application of nuclear technology to meet energy requirements is an important potential option to address these issues, particularly for countries where nuclear power plants have not yet been introduced. Since SMRs are far easier to introduce into new national nuclear programs, it is instructive to consider the characteristics that are important for successful implementation. Canada has introduced the CANDU 6 SMR into a number of different countries and operating conditions. In addition to Canada, CANDU 6 SMRs are operating or are under construction in Argentina, Romania, the Republic of Korea, and China. As part of these projects, Canada has assisted with all aspects of the nuclear program, including project financing, regulatory and licensing affairs, establishment of a project and operating infrastructure, localization and technology transfer, cooperative R and D programs, and operations support. While investments in nuclear power are excellent long-term choices, some countries need financing assistance and financial guarantees to launch nuclear projects. AECL's approach is to draw on our project experience, network of partners, and our relationship with the Canadian government to assist with this aspect of a project. For example, for the Qinshan Project in China, AECL involved Bechtel (USA) and Hitachi (Japan) in the project team. For the future, nuclear power designs must respond to demanding requirements. To meet the emerging market requirements related to cost, schedule and project risk, an evolutionary Next Generation CANDU SMR product is being developed. This product builds on the strengths of the current SMR CANDU 6. For the Next Generation CANDU system, AECL has adopted the evolutionary approach, accommodating significant changes to design to significantly improve economics, performance and safety margins, while retaining the essential

  18. Validation of physics and thermalhydraulic computer codes for advanced Candu reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is developing an Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) that is an evolutionary advancement of the currently operating Candu 6 reactors. The ACR is being designed to produce electrical power for a capital cost and at a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current reactor designs. The ACR retains the modular Candu concept of horizontal fuel channels surrounded by a heavy water moderator. However, ACR uses slightly enriched uranium fuel compared to the natural uranium used in Candu 6. This achieves the twin goals of improved economics (via large reductions in the heavy water moderator volume and replacement of the heavy water coolant with light water coolant) and improved safety. AECL has developed and implemented a software quality assurance program to ensure that its analytical, scientific and design computer codes meet the required standards for software used in safety analyses. Since the basic design of the ACR is equivalent to that of the Candu 6, most of the key phenomena associated with the safety analyses of ACR are common, and the Candu industry standard tool-set of safety analysis codes can be applied to the analysis of the ACR. A systematic assessment of computer code applicability addressing the unique features of the ACR design was performed covering the important aspects of the computer code structure, models, constitutive correlations, and validation database. Arising from this assessment, limited additional requirements for code modifications and extensions to the validation databases have been identified. This paper provides an outline of the AECL software quality assurance program process for the validation of computer codes used to perform physics and thermal-hydraulics safety analyses of the ACR. It describes the additional validation work that has been identified for these codes and the planned, and ongoing, experimental programs to extend the code validation as required to address specific ACR design

  19. Maintaining Quality in a Decommissioning Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decommissioning of AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories is Canada's largest nuclear decommissioning project to date. This research laboratory has operated for forty years since it was set up in 1963 in eastern Manitoba as the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment, complete with 60 MW(Th) test reactor, hot cells, particle accelerators, and multiple large-scale research programs. Returning the site to almost complete green state will require several decades of steady work in combination with periods of storage-with-surveillance. In this paper our approach to maintaining quality during the long decommissioning period is explained. In this context, 'quality' includes both regulatory aspects (compliance with required standards) and business aspects (meeting the customers' needs and exceeding their expectations). Both aspects are discussed, including examples and lessons learned. The five years of development and implementation of a quality assurance program for decommissioning the WL site have led to a number of lessons learned. Many of these are also relevant to other decommissioning projects, in Canada and elsewhere: - Early discussions with the regulator can save time and effort later in the process; - An iterative process in developing documentation allows for steady improvements and input throughout the process; - Consistent 2-way communication with staff regarding the benefits of a quality program assists greatly in adoption of the philosophy and procedures; - Top-level management must lead in promoting quality; - Field trials of procedures ('beta testing') ensures they are easy to use as well as useful. Success in decommissioning the Whiteshell Laboratories depends on the successful implementation of a rigorous quality program. This will help to ensure both safety and efficiency of all activities on site, from planning through execution and reporting. The many aspects of maintaining this program will continue to occupy quality practitioners in AECL, reaping

  20. An assessment of prediction methods of CHF in tubes with a large experimental data bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An assessment of prediction methods of CHF in tubes has been carried out using an expanded CHF data bank at Chalk River Laboratories (CRL). It includes eight different CHF look-up tables (two AECL versions and six USSR (or Russian) versions) and three empirical correlations. These prediction methods were developed from relatively large data bases and therefore have a wide range of application. Some limitations, however, were imposed in this study, to avoid any invalid predictions due to extrapolation of these methods. Therefore, these comparisons are limited to the specific data base that is tailored to suit the range of an individual method. This has resulted in a different number of data used in each case. The comparison of predictions against the experimental data is based on the constant inlet-condition approach (i.e., the pressure, mass flux, inlet fluid temperature and tube geometry are the primary parameters). Overall, the AECL tables have the widest range of application. They are assessed with 21 771 data points and the root-mean-square error is only 8.3%. About 60% of these data were used in the development of the AECL tables. The best version of the USSR/Russian CHF table is valid for 13 300 data points with a root-mean-square error of 8.8%. The USSR/Russian table that has the widest range of application covers a total of 18 800 data points, but the error increases to 9.3%. The range of application for empirical correlations, however, are generally much narrower than those covered by the CHF tables. The number of data used to assess these correlations is therefore further limited. Among the tested correlations, the Becker and Persson correlation covers the least amount of data (only 7 499 data points), but has the best accuracy (with a root-mean-square error of 9.71%). 33 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs

  1. Economic viability of Cernavoda project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernavoda project started in 1978, when the CANDU technology procurement contract and other contracts for engineering, technical assistance and procurement were signed with AECL. The works on site started in 1980. In February 1981, a contract was signed with GE - USA and Ansaldo - Italy for balance of plant. After 1989 the concept for project implementation was essentially changed. The completion of Cernavoda NPP Unit-1, established as the first priority by Romanian authorities was implemented by AECL-Ansaldo Consortium (AAC). The objective of the contract signed with AAC consisted in overtaking the management of Cernavoda Unit-1 project, in order to complete, commission and operate the plant for 18 months. The plant was successfully completed, commissioned and commercially operated since December 2, 1996. As concerns Unit-2, only preservation and some remedial works were performed since 1991. In order to support the decision to complete Unit-2, a complete process was initiated: - identification of the activities and associated costs required for plan completion; - plant integration in the utility's least cost development study; - Unit-2 cash flow analysis. A joint RENEL-AECL-ANSALDO team performed a detailed analysis using Cernavoda Unit-1 as reference project and taking advantage of the experience gained during construction, commissioning and operation of the first unit. The least cost power generation development study finalized by SEP and EDF, based on a PHARE funding, ranked Cernavoda Unit-2 on the second place, after two small hydroelectric plants of 53 and 8 Mw e. A cash flow model developed by a RENEL-ANSALDO joint team shows that Cernavoda Unit-2 is an economically feasible project. The financing scenario provides that all resources will be from loans. Other arguments for completion of Cernavoda Unit-2 are: - good performances in operation of Unit-1; - the need to provide jobs for the specialists in the nuclear field; - opportunity for electricity export

  2. The Conflux Fuel bundle: An Economic and Pragmatic Route to the use of Advanced Fuel Cycles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANFLEX1 bundle is being developed jointly by AECL and KAERI as a vehicle for introducing the use of enrichment and advanced fuel cycles in CANDU2 reactors. The bundle design uses smaller diameter fuel elements in the outer ring of a 43-element bundle to reduce the maximum element ratings in a CANDU fuel bundle by 20% compared to the 37-element bundle currently in use. This facilitates burnups of greater than 21,000 MW d/TAU to optimize the economic benefit available from the use of enrichment and advanced fuel cycles. A combination of this lower fuel rating, plus development work underway at Aecl to enhance the thermalhydraulic characteristics of the bundle (including both CHF3 and bundle. This provides extra flexibility in the fuel management procedures required for fuel bundles with higher fissile contents. The different bundle geometry requires flow tests to demonstrate acceptable vibration and fretting behavior of the Conflux bundle. A program to undertake the necessary range of flow tests has started at KAERI, involving the fabrication of the required bundles, and setting up for the actual tests. A program to study the fuel management requirements for slightly enriched (0.9 wt % 235 in total U) Conflux fuel has been undertaken by both Aecl and KAERI staff, and further work has started for higher enrichments. Irradiation testing of the Conflux bundle started in the NUR reactor in 1989, and a second irradiation test is due to start shortly. This paper describes the program, and reviews the status of key parts of the program

  3. Evaluation of spiral wound reverse osmosis for four radioactive waste processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot-scale spiral wound reverse osmosis rig was used to treat four significantly different radioactive waste streams, three of which were generated at the Chalk River Laboratories at AECL. These streams included: 1. A chemical decontamination (CD/DC) waste stream which is routinely treated by the plant-scale membrane system at CRL; 2. Reactor waste which is a dilute radioactive waste stream (containing primarily tritium and organic acids), and it an effluent from the operating reactors at AECL; 3. An ion exchange regenerant waste stream which contains a mixture of stream (1) (CD/DC), blended with secondary waste from ion exchange regeneration; 4. Boric acid simulated waste which is a by-product waste of the PWR reactors. This was the only stream treated that was not generated as a waste liquid at AECL. For the first three streams specified above, reverse osmosis was used to remove chemical and radiochemical impurities from the water with efficiencies usually exceeding 99%. In these three cases the 'permeate' or clean water was the product of the process. In the case of stream 4, reverse osmosis was used in a recovery application for the purpose of recycling boric acid back to the reactor, with the concentrate being the 'product'. Reverse osmosis technology was successfully demonstrated for the treatment of all four streams. Prefiltration and oxidation (with photocatalytic continuous oxidation technology) were evaluated as pretreatment alternatives for streams 1, 2, and 3. The results indicated that the effective crossflow velocity through and membrane vessel was more important in determining the extent of membrane fouling than the specific pretreatment strategy employed. (author)

  4. The application of an integrated approach to design, procurement and construction in reducing overall nuclear power plant costs. Annex 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of its on-going efforts to reduce the cost of CANDU nuclear power plants, AECL has embarked on an integrated approach to design, procurement and construction activities associated with new CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 projects. The approach is predicated on the fact there is a vast quantity of information that needs to be managed and controlled over the life of a nuclear power plant project. Therefore, ensuring the completeness and correctness of all the information needed by all project participants, facilitating sharing of this information amongst the project's participants, and automating the various deliverable production processes offers significant potential not only for overall project cost (and schedule) savings but also for reducing operations and maintenance costs once the plant enters service. Facilitating and indeed of key importance to this approach is the use of a suite of integrated information technology-based engineering, procurement and project control tools used throughout the design, engineering, procurement and construction phases of the project. A unique and important feature of these tools is their high degree of integration both from a work process and a data perspective. Use of these tools is well underway on AECL's Qinshan Project which is realizing significant benefits in cost and schedule. This paper will describe the approach AECL is taking, along with the tools it has both put in place, and those additional items planned for the future along with the cost, schedule and quality benefits that arise from their use. Progress to date on the Qinshan project also will be discussed as well as the expected application to the plant once it has gone into service will also be discussed. (author)

  5. A plan for the modification and assessment of TRAC-PF1/MOD2 for use in analyzing CANDU 3 transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of the review and planning done for the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission to identify the thermal-hydraulic phenomena that could occur in the CANDU 3 reactor design during transient conditions, plan modifications to the TRAC-PF1/MOD2 (TRAC) computer code needed to adequately predict CANDU 3 transient thermal-hydraulic phenomena, and identify an assessment program to verify the ability of TRAC, when modified, to predict these phenomena. This work builds on analyses and recommendations produced by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). To identify the thermal-hydraulic phenomena, a large-break loss-of-coolant accident simulation, performed as part of earlier work by INEL with an Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) thermal-hydraulic computer code (CATHENA), was analyzed in detail. Other accident scenarios were examined for additional phenomena. A group of Los Alamos National Laboratory reactor thermal-hydraulics experts ranked the phenomena to produce a preliminary phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT). The preliminary nature of the PIRT was a result of a lack of direct expertise with the unique processes and phenomena of the CANDU 3. Nonetheless, this PIRT provided an adequate foundation for planning a program of code modifications. We believe that this PIRT captured the most important phenomena and that refinements to the PIRT will mainly produce clarification of the relative importance (ranking) of phenomena. A plan for code modifications was developed based on this PIRT and on information about the modeling methodologies for CANDU-specific phenomena used in AECL codes. AECL thermal-hydraulic test facilities and programs were reviewed and the information used in developing an assessment plan to ensure that TRAC-PF1/MOD2, when modified, will adequately predict CANDU 3 phenomena

  6. ACR fuel storage analysis: finite element heat transfer analysis of dry storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past decade Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has designed and licensed air-cooled concrete structures used as above ground dry storage containers (MACSTOR) to store irradiated nuclear fuel from CANDU plants. A typical MACSTOR 200 module is designed to store 12,000 bundles in 20 storage cylinders. MACSTOR 200 modules are in operation at Gentilly-2 in Canada and at Cernavoda in Romania. The MACSTOR module is cooled passively by natural convection and by conduction through the concrete walls and roof. Currently AECL is designing the Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) with CANFLEX slightly enriched uranium fuel to be used. AECL has initiated a study to explore the possibility of storing the irradiated nuclear fuel from ACR in MACSTOR modules. This included work to consider ways of minimizing footprint both in the spent fuel storage bay and in the dry storage area. The commercial finite element code ANSYS has been used in this study. The FE model is used to complete simulations with the higher heat source using the same concrete structural dimensions to assess the feasibility of using the MACSTOR design for storing the ACR irradiated fuel. This paper presents the results of the analysis. The results are used to confirm the possibility of using, with minimal changes to the design of the storage baskets and the structure, the proven design of the MACSTOR 200 containment to store the ACR fuel bundles with higher enrichment and burnup. This has thus allowed us to confirm conceptual feasibility and move on to investigation of optimization. (author)

  7. Lattice cell and full core physics of internally cooled annular fuel in heavy water moderated reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program is underway at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to develop a new fuel bundle concept to enable greater burnups for PT-HWR (pressure tube heavy water reactor) cores. One option that AECL is investigating is an internally cooled annular fuel (ICAF) element concept. ICAF contains annular cylindrical pellets with cladding on the inner and outer diameters. Coolant flows along the outside of the element and through the centre. With such a concept, the maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating is significantly reduced compared to conventional, solid-rod type fuel. The preliminary ICAF bundle concept considered in this study contains 24 half-metre long internally cooled annular fuel elements and one non-fuelled centre pin. The introduction of the non-fuelled centre pin reduces the coolant void reactivity (CVR), which is the increase in reactivity that occurs on voiding the coolant in accident scenarios. Lattice cell and full core physics calculations of the preliminary ICAF fuel bundle concept have been performed for medium burnups of approximately 18 GWd/tU using WIMS-AECL and reactor fuel simulation program (RFSP). The results will be used to assist in concept configuration optimization. The effects of radial and axial core power distributions, linear element power ratings, refuelling rates and operational power ramps have been analyzed. The results suggest that burnups of greater than 18 GWd/tU can be achieved in current reactor designs. At approximately 18 GWd/tU, expected maximum linear element ratings in a PT-HWR with online-refuelling are approximately 90 kW/m. These conditions would be prohibitive for solid-rod fuel, but may be possible in ICAF fuel given the reduced maximum fuel temperature as a function of linear element rating. (authors)

  8. Atomic solution? The nuclear option is again touted for Alberta's oilsands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As early as the 1950s, nuclear blasts were considered as a potential way to unlock the huge potential contained in northern Alberta's tarsands deposits. A plan, which came close to receiving government sanction, was devised to detonate an atomic device underground to melt the bitumen. Today, public reaction would not permit any revival of such a plan, but a less explosive, modern-day solution is being considered. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL) is promoting a new medium-sized nuclear reactor called the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) for use in the oilsands industry. AECL recently commissioned a$35,000 study into the economics of atomic energy compared to natural gas to produce large amounts of steam that is needed to separate oil from the sand. Preliminary results suggest that nuclear power may be a viable option for oilsand extraction, requiring much less energy than the currently used steam assisted gravity drainage process (SAGD). In addition, nuclear power could solve the problem of projected greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike natural gas-fired cogeneration facilities , nuclear energy does not emit GHGs. The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) is examining the economics of nuclear energy for oilsand extraction. AECL claims the ACR-700 is competitive with the best-advanced gas-fired technology based on projections for 2010 and beyond. It will also move to light water from heavy water cooling by using slightly enriched uranium, thereby extending fuel life and reducing operating costs. Public perception, however, may be the biggest challenge. Opponents argue that storage and disposal of spent fuel rods still needs to be addressed. (author)

  9. Atomic solution? The nuclear option is again touted for Alberta's oilsands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, M.

    2003-03-01

    As early as the 1950s, nuclear blasts were considered as a potential way to unlock the huge potential contained in northern Alberta's tarsands deposits. A plan, which came close to receiving government sanction, was devised to detonate an atomic device underground to melt the bitumen. Today, public reaction would not permit any revival of such a plan, but a less explosive, modern-day solution is being considered. Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is promoting a new medium-sized nuclear reactor called the Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) for use in the oilsands industry. AECL recently commissioned a $35,000 study into the economics of atomic energy compared to natural gas to produce large amounts of steam that is needed to separate oil from the sand. Preliminary results suggest that nuclear power may be a viable option for oilsand extraction, requiring much less energy than the currently used steam assisted gravity drainage process (SAGD). In addition, nuclear power could solve the problem of projected greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Unlike natural gas-fired cogeneration facilities, nuclear energy does not emit GHGs. The Canadian Energy Research Institute (CERI) is examining the economics of nuclear energy for oilsand extraction. AECL claims the ACR-700 is competitive with the best-advanced gas-fired technology based on projections for 2010 and beyond. It will also move to light water from heavy water cooling by using slightly enriched uranium, thereby extending fuel life and reducing operating costs. Public perception, however, may be the biggest challenge. Opponents argue that storage and disposal of spent fuel rods still needs to be addressed. 1 fig.

  10. Country Report Summary: Romania [Project Management in Nuclear Power Plant Construction: Guidelines and Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cernavoda NPP Project was initiated in 1979, with the signature of an Engineering, Procurement and Technology Transfer contract with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Work at site started in 1981 (for Unit 1) and 1982 (for Unit 2). Two different approaches were followed for construction management, with different results in project progress. The initial ambitious programme to build the plant with the Owner assuming the overall responsibility was a political decision intended to increase local participation that proved unrealistic. Economic instability (financing and staffing problems) and lack of competent project management resulted in major project delays. As a result, new completion contracts were signed with AECL and ANSALDO in 1991 and in 2003. Unit 1 and Unit 2 were completed as delayed projects in 1996 and 2007, respectively. The site was initially designed for five 706 MW(e) CANDU 6 units (fuelled by natural uranium, and heavy water cooled and moderated). The successful formula proved to be a joint Project Organization between the Owner and an AECL and ANSALDO Management Team. This organization included all the necessary groups to cover the responsibilities related to construction and commissioning of the units and on to the transfer to commercial operation. It included the Management Directorate, Quality Assurance, Engineering/Quality Surveillance, Construction, Planning, Scheduling and Budget Control, Finance and Accounting, Safety and Licensing, Procurement, Material Management, Training, Commissioning/Operation and Services/Logistics. Participation of the owner personnel in the Management Team, together with the rule of appointing a local deputy for any managerial position occupied by an experienced expat from AECL or Ansaldo ensured a smooth transfer of responsibility for the operation of the plant to the owner.

  11. Health monitoring requirements for CANDU steam generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is developing an equipment health monitoring (EHM) module as part of SMART CANDU development to provide station maintenance personnel with the information required to assess the condition of critical station equipment and to predict when maintenance is required. SMART CANDU is a suite of software applications that is being developed by AECL to help station staff to efficiently and effectively implement their health monitoring and ageing management programs. The EHM application integrates information from all relevant station sources (e.g., on-line instruments, local 'smart' field components, walk-down data, and inspection and monitoring software) on the station local area network and presents the user with a snapshot of the current health of the component of interest. The EHM application also permits staff to be proactive by alerting them to the early warning signs of degraded equipment functionality and to potential equipment failure. User requirements for a steam generator EHM display described in the present work are being developed in consultation with station staff and subject matter experts. The required information is being collected from multiple sources and may include, for example, on-line and grab sample process and chemistry data, inspection results from eddy current and ultrasonic measurements and maintenance information (e.g., chemical cleaning, plugged tubes). These data can be combined with AECL predictive models for steam generator fouling, crevice chemistry, flow induced vibration, etc. to provide station staff with an assessment of current steam generator conditions and help mitigate key degradation mechanisms throughout the life of the CANDU station. (author)

  12. CFD analysis of flow and heat transfer in Canadian supercritical water reactor bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Flow and heat transfer in SCWR fuel bundle design by AECL is studied using CFD. • Bare-rod bundle geometry is tested at 23.5, 25 and 28 MPa using STAR-CCM+ code. • SST k–ω low-Re model was used to study occurrence of heat transfer deterioration. - Abstract: Within the Gen-IV International Forum, AECL is leading the effort in developing a conceptual design for the Canadian SCWR. AECL proposed a new fuel bundle design with two rings of fuel elements placed between central flow tube and the pressure tube. In line with the scope of the conceptual design, the objective of the present CFD work is to aid in developing a bundle heat transfer correlation for the Canadian SCWR fuel bundle design. This paper presents results from an ongoing effort in determining the conditions favorable for occurrence of HTD in the supercritical bundle flows. In the current investigation, bare-rod bundle geometry was tested for the proposed fuel bundle design at 23.5, 25 and 28 MPa using STAR-CCM+ CFD code. Taking advantage of the design symmetry of the fuel bundle, only 1/32 of the computational domain was simulated. The low-Reynolds number modification of SST k–ω turbulence model along with y+ < 1 was used in the simulations. For lower mass flow simulations, the increase of inlet temperature and operational pressure was found effective in reducing the occurrence of HTD. For higher mass flow simulations, normal heat transfer behaviour was observed except for the lower pressure range (23.5 MPa)

  13. Revised delayed neutron data for Pickering NGS B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Revised delayed neutron fractions and constants were calculated specifically for Pickering NGS B using the latest available delayed neutron data for fissionable isotopes, the currently recommended CANDU delayed photoneutron data, and the formulae provided by Laughton. Burnup-dependent number densities of the fissionable isotopes were computed with WIMS-AECL-IST. Validation and assessment of the new fractions and constants was performed by comparison of historical operating data with point kinetics simulation using the new values. Recommendations are made regarding possible improvements to the delayed neutron data. (author)

  14. Leveraging Canada's nuclear infrastructure for medical innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the role that Canada plays in nuclear medicine worldwide. Canada supplies over 75% of the world's Cobalt-60 which sterilizes 45% of all single-use medical supplies in the world. Cobalt-60 teletherapy delivers 45000 cancer treatments daily. It is used in non-destructive testing. Canada also supplies over 50% of the world's medical isotopes. NRU reactor-produced isotopes include Molybdenum 99, iodine 131, Iodine 125, Xenon 133 and Cobalt 60. MDS Nordion maintains a strategic supply agreement with AECL

  15. Can food irradiation boost nutrition in China?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1986, the first of five regional irradiation facilities planned for China opened officially in Shanghai, mainly to process food. Irradiated potatoes, mushrooms, rice, onions, garlic, peanuts, pork sausage, and probably apples, will be introduced in mass marketing trials. Four other demonstration plants for irradiating food are being built near provincial capitals. Food irradiation offers large economic incentives, but transportation is an impediment except near large urban centres. All irradiators, whether mainly for food or not, will be made in China, with the exception of AECL and Swiss participation in two facilities

  16. The balanced scorecard advantage: Driving strategic change into Canada's nuclear laboratory site operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The challenges presented by the size, diversity, complexity and history of the Facilities and Nuclear Operations (FNO) Group at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) required a change to the traditional management approach. As a result, a strategy was adopted that focused on integrating contemporary business practices such as process mapping, activity based management and use of the Balanced Scorecard methodology into the operational culture at CRL. In addition, revitalization of the performance management methods process was undertaken to provide a tool for assessment of business and individual performance. performance. (author)

  17. Management of the installation of a 10 MeV, 50 kW electron-beam irradiator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An IMPELA-10/50 electron-beam irradiator has been installed by AECL Accelerators in Iotron Industries' service centre near Vancouver. Construction of the facility, installation of the accelerator and conveyor, and commissioning to the full rated power of 50 kW were completed in 12 months. Iotron began commercial irradiation immediately and the first continuous operation achieved 250 hours of production in 12 days. The engineering, production and project management organizations and activities to complete the on-schedule installation and commissioning are reviewed. (author). 3 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  18. Monte Carlo Few-Group Constant Generation for CANDU 6 Core Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Seung Yeol Yoo; Hyung Jin Shim; Chang Hyo Kim

    2015-01-01

    The current neutronics design methodology of CANDU-PHWRs based on the two-step calculations requires determining not only homogenized two-group constants for ordinary fuel bundle lattice cells by the WIMS-AECL lattice cell code but also incremental two-group constants arising from the penetration of control devices into the fuel bundle cells by a supercell analysis code like MULTICELL or DRAGON. As an alternative way to generate the two-group constants necessary for the CANDU-PHWR core analys...

  19. Successful completion of the Qinshan phase III nuclear power plant-a successful model for Chinese-Canadian cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents Qinshan CANDU project construction and commissioning experience as well as management strategies and approaches that contributed to the successful completion of the project. The Qinshan phase III (CANDU) nuclear power plant was built in record times: Unit 1 achieved commercial operation on December 31, 2002 and Unit 2 on July 24, 2003, 43 days and 112 days ahead of schedule respectively. The reference plant design is the Wolsong 3 and 4 CANDU-6 units in the Republic of Korea. Improvements in design and construction methods allowed Unit 1 to be constructed in 51.5 Months from First Concrete to Criticality-a record in China for nuclear power plants. The key factors are project management and project management tools, quality assurance, construction methods (including open top construction, heavy lifts and modularization), electronic documentation with configuration control that provides up-to-date on-line information, CADDS design linked with material management, specialized material control including bar coding, and planning. The introduction of new design and construction techniques was achieved by combining conventional AECL practices with working experiences in China. The most advanced tools and techniques for achieving optimum construction quality, schedule and cost were used. Successful application of advanced project management methods and tools will benefit TQNPC in operation of the station, and the Chinese contractors in advancing their capabilities in future nuclear projects in China and enhancing their opportunities internationally. TQNPC's participation in Quality surveillance (QS) activities of nuclear steam plant (NSP) and Balance of Plant (BOP) offshore equipment benefited TQNPC in acquiring knowledge of specific equipment manufacturing processes, which can be applied to similar activities in China. China has established the capability of manufacturing CANDU fuel and becoming self-reliant in fuel supply. Excellent co-operation and

  20. Analysis of the impact of coolant density variations in the high efficiency channel of a pressure tube super critical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pressure Tube (PT) Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) is based on a light water coolant operating at pressures above the thermodynamic critical pressure; a separate low temperature and low pressure moderator. The coolant density changes by an order of magnitude depending on its local enthalpy in the porous ceramic insulator tube. This causes significant changes in the neutron transport characteristics, axially and radially, in the fuel channel. This work performs lattice physics calculations for a 78-element Pu-Th fuel at zero burnup and examines the effect of assumptions related to coolant density in the radial direction of a HEC, using the neutron transport code WIMS-AECL. (author)

  1. BEATRIX-II Program, January 1989--December 1989: ANNEX-III to IEA implementing agreement for a programme of research and development on radiation damage in fusion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    BEATRIX-II is an International Energy Agency (IEA) sponsored collaborative experiment among Japan, Canada, and the United States. The purpose of the experiment is to evaluate the performance of ceramic solid breeder materials in a fast neutron environment. To do this, an in-situ tritium recovery experiment is being conducted in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Hanford site near Richland, Washington, and operated by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Richland, Washington, together with the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) are responsible for conducting the experiment

  2. A general description of the NRX reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRX Reactor structure, equipment and experimental facilities are described. The purpose of the various components is explained using photographs and diagrams as much as possible. Dimensions are given so that the reader can visualize the relative sizes of the components. The report is meant to be an introduction to the NRX Design and Operating Manuals, from which detailed information can be obtained. It is expected that the report will be of value to trainee NRX Reactor Operations personnel and to those persons who require only a general knowledge of the reactor. A bibliography of AECL reports pertaining to NRX is given. (author)

  3. Emergency core cooling system simplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies and development programs at AECL over the last several years have been directed at simplification of the ECC system, with the objective of increasing reliability, reducing cost, and reducing maintenance and testing costs. This work has resulted in a substantial simplification of the ECC system for CANDU 9, including a reduction in the number of valves of over 50% relative to previous plants. This paper reviews the CANDU 9 ECC system design, and reviews the ''one-way'' rupture disc and floating ball seal development programs

  4. Studies of the thermohydraulics of the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) chimney using computational fluid dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is developing a concept for a new Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) that will be used to support ongoing development of CANDU technology and advanced materials research after the NRU reactor shuts down. As part of the IRF Pre-Project Engineering Program, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of the flow patterns and heat transfer within four reactor components - the inlet plenum, reflector tank, chimney, and the pool - were done to support the design. This paper describes the results of the CFD analyses of the IRF chimney. (author)

  5. Fuel burnup characteristics for the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The driver fuel of the NRU research reactor at AECL, Chalk River is a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel alloy of Al-61 wt% U3Si, consisting of particles of U3Si dispersed in a continuous aluminum matrix, with 19.8% U235 in uranium. This paper describes the burnup characteristics for this type of fuel in NRU, including the determination of fuel depletion using the neutronic simulation code TRIAD, comparisons between simulated and measured burnup values, and the regulatory licensing operational average fuel burnup limit. (author)

  6. Calculation and comparisons with measurement of fast neutron fluxes in the material testing facilities of the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRU reactor at Chalk River provides three irradiation facilities to study the effects of fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) on reactor materials for assessing material damage and deformation. The facilities comprise two types of fast neutron rods (Mark 4 and Mark 7), and a Material Test Bundle (MTB) irradiated in a loop site. This paper describes the neutronic simulation of these testing facilities using the WIMS-AECL and TRIAD codes, and comparisons with the fast neutron flux measurements using iron-wire activation techniques. It also provides comparisons of flux levels, neutron spectra, and size limitations of the experimental cavities between these test facilities. (author)

  7. Fuel burnup characteristics for the NRU research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C., E-mail: leungt@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The driver fuel of the NRU research reactor at AECL, Chalk River is a low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel alloy of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si, consisting of particles of U{sub 3}Si dispersed in a continuous aluminum matrix, with 19.8% U235 in uranium. This paper describes the burnup characteristics for this type of fuel in NRU, including the determination of fuel depletion using the neutronic simulation code TRIAD, comparisons between simulated and measured burnup values, and the regulatory licensing operational average fuel burnup limit. (author)

  8. The case and concept for a proposed new Canadian irradiation research facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1957, the NRU reactor has been the key irradiation facility that underpinned the development of the CANDU power reactor, and it has facilitated world-class materials research using neutrons. In 1995, AECL developed a case for replacing NRU with the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) to test CANDU fuels and materials and, to provide facilities for materials research using neutrons. A reference IRF concept with an estimated cost of $500 million and a reference schedule to completion of 87 months was produced. Subsequently, a pre-project program has begun to develop the IRF concept to minimize uncertainties related to feasibility and licensability before project implementation begins

  9. Calculation and comparisons with measurement of fast neutron fluxes in the material testing facilities of the NRU research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leung, T.C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    The NRU reactor at Chalk River provides three irradiation facilities to study the effects of fast neutrons (E> 1 MeV) on reactor materials for assessing material damage and deformation. The facilities comprise two types of fast neutron rods (Mark 4 and Mark 7), and a Material Test Bundle (MTB) irradiated in a loop site. This paper describes the neutronic simulation of these testing facilities using the WIMS-AECL and TRIAD codes, and comparisons with the fast neutron flux measurements using iron-wire activation techniques. It also provides comparisons of flux levels, neutron spectra, and size limitations of the experimental cavities between these test facilities. (author)

  10. Leveraging Canada's nuclear infrastructure for medical innovation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malkoske, G. [MDS Nordion, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    This paper discusses the role that Canada plays in nuclear medicine worldwide. Canada supplies over 75% of the world's Cobalt-60 which sterilizes 45% of all single-use medical supplies in the world. Cobalt-60 teletherapy delivers 45000 cancer treatments daily. It is used in non-destructive testing. Canada also supplies over 50% of the world's medical isotopes. NRU reactor-produced isotopes include Molybdenum 99, iodine 131, Iodine 125, Xenon 133 and Cobalt 60. MDS Nordion maintains a strategic supply agreement with AECL.

  11. An international data base of nuclear concrete containment ageing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ageing of nuclear structures is of special interest because of the extended service life expected of these structures, and the potential impact of their deterioration on safety and reliability. Although there are databases about concrete, they address properties in general, not performance. In 1992, the IAEA, in collaboration with AECL, set out to create a new database that would fill the gap. Functional ageing, i.e. deterioration of leak-tightness, was to be included, not just structural ageing, i.e. deterioration of load-bearing capacity. This paper outlines the project of creating the database

  12. Economics of gamma processing in cobalt-60 irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma processing by cobalt-60 is well established. However, since irradiation of food is relatively new from the commercial point of view, it is important to assess costs of gamma irradiation in the context of food processing. Five different types of AECL-RCC irradiation equipment are examined in terms of their throughputs, and capital and operating costs. Using these figures, costs of irradiation of nine types of food products are presented. In general, these represent about 2-10% of the wholesale cost of these products

  13. Configuration management for CANDU feeder refurbishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canada Deuterium Uranium Reactor CANDU was originally designed to last twenty-five years. In 2005, Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) made the decision to extend the life of the reactor by thirty years. One of the most critical elements of the life extension project was determining how to refurbish the Primary Heat Transport System. It was determined that the refurbishment required replacing the entire length of inlet and outlet feeders, from the end fittings to the header. The use of a robust Configuration Management program would have added significant value to the life extension project. (author)

  14. Developing new products from Canadian nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By 1990, the Federal Government will have reduced its support for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's nuclear R and D from the 1985 level of $200 million, to $100 million (1985 dollars). To meet the need for a broadened funding base, AECL Research Company has been restructured to become more responsive to our sponsors and customers. Although supporting the CANDU nuclear power program remains by far our largest R and D activity, we have put in place a comprehensive process for generating new business and commercial activities. Examples of such business opportunities are presented in the paper

  15. Advances in radiation processing of polymeric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we review recent advances in industrial applications of electron-beam irradiation in the field of polymer processing at the Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment (TRCRE) of JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute), and the Whiteshell Laboratories of AECL Research, Canada. Irradiation of a substrate with ionizing radiation produces free radicals through ionization and excitation events. The subsequent chemistry of these radicals is used in radiation processing as a substitute for conventional processing techniques based on heating and/or the addition of chemicals. The advantages of radiation processing include the formation of novel products with desirable material properties, favourable overall process economics and, often, environmental benefits

  16. Innovation in Nuclear Technology for the Least Product Price and Cost

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In energy markets, costs dominate for all new technology introductions (pressure valves, gas turbines, reactors) both now and far into the future. Technology improves, and costs are reduced as markets are penetrated with the trend following a learning/experience curve (MCE) based on classic economic forces. The curve followed is governed by development costs and market targets, and nuclear systems follow such a curve in order to compete with other technologies and projected future cost for alternate energy initiatives. Funding impacts directly on market penetration and on the ''learning rate.'' The CANDU/AECL development path (experience curve) is a chosen balance between evolution and revolution for a competitive advantage

  17. PLM and the single reactor utility - or how a single reactor utility can face the PLM issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although Gentilly-2 reactor was planned to last for 30 years, its life could be significantly shorter if nothing were done, whereas retubing and refurbishment after, say, 25 years should result in an extension of service life to 45-50 years. In the long run, dimensional changes rather than hydriding may prove to be the pressure tubes' life limiting factor. Hydro Quebec, New Brunswick Power and AECL have an agreement to cooperate in developing a life management program for CANDU-6 reactors. The author expresses the opinion that cost-benefit criteria should be introduced in regulatory decision making. 6 refs., 9 figs

  18. Build your own Candu reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the marketing of Candu reactors, particularly the export trade. Future sales will probably be of the nuclear side of a station only, thus striking a compromise between licensing and 'turnkey' sales. It is suggested that AECL might have made more money in the past had it not given the right to manufacture Candu fuel away to Canadian industry. Future sales to certain potential customers may be limited by the requirement of strict safeguards, which will almost certainly never be relaxed. (N.D.H.)

  19. Review of release models used in source-term codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Throughout this reviews, the limitations of current release models are identified and ways of improving them suggested, By incorporation recent experimental results, recommendations for future release modeling activities can be made. All release under review were compared with respect to the following six items: scenario, assumptions, mathematical formulations, solution method, radioactive decay chain considered, and geometry. The following nine models are considered for review: SOTEC and SCCEX (CNWRA), DOE/INTERA, TSPA (SNL), Vault Model (AECL), CCALIBRE (SKI), AREST (PNL), Risk Assessment (EPRI), TOSPAC (SNL). (author)

  20. Using Fortran modules to design and develop modular reactor analysis software components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a design for heavy and light water property calculation routines using object oriented design techniques. The designed routines are part of a new thermalhydraulics code being developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). We demonstrate how application of object-oriented methodology leads to Fortran modules that use new features of Fortran 95 effectively. We also present performance metrics. This paper contributes in two ways. Firstly, it provides a methodology that can be used to systematically identify objects, assign responsibilities to the objects and establish the interaction among objects. Secondly, it shows how the designs can be communicated using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). (author)

  1. Validation of computer codes used in the safety analysis of Canadian research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has embarked on a validation program for the suite of computer codes that it uses in performing the safety analyses for its research reactors. Current focus is on codes used for the analysis of the two MAPLE reactors under construction at Chalk River but the program will be extended to include additional codes that will be used for the Irradiation Research Facility. The program structure is similar to that used for the validation of codes used in the safety analyses for CANDU power reactors. (author)

  2. Semi-annual status report of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, April 1--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, E.D. [comp.

    1992-02-01

    This report is the eleventh in a series of semi-annual status reports on the research and development program for the safe management and disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. it describes progress achieved in the three major subprograms, engineered systems, natural systems and performance assessment, from 1991 April 1 to September 30. It also gives a brief description of the activities being carried out in preparation for the public and governmental review of the disposal concept. Since 1987, this program has been jointly funded by AECL and Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group (COG).

  3. CANDU nuclear reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has over 40 years of experience in the nuclear field. Over the past 20 years, this unique Canadian nuclear technology has made a worldwide presence, In addition to 22 CANDU reactors in Canada, there are also two in India, one in Pakistan, one in Argentina, four in Korea and five in Romania. CANDU advancements are based on evolutionary plant improvements. They consist of system performance improvements, design technology improvements and research and development in support of advanced nuclear power. Given the good performance of CANOU plants, it is important that this CANDU operating experience be incorporated into new and repeat designs

  4. Facilitating information management and access through process based navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the management of a large nuclear site (such as the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories) with diversified facilities. The issues considered in this paper are quality assurance, regulatory commitments, production requirements and shared understanding. The approach to site operation is based on the Nuclear Energy Institute (NEI) Business Process Model approach. The Nuclear Site Management System, built on a comprehensive structure of shared processes, has gained wide acceptance in AECL and has been instrumental in driving culture change and many improvements into CRL operations

  5. ACR-1000: Operator - based development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has adapted the successful features of CANDU* reactors to establish Generation III+ Advanced CANDU ReactorTM (ACRTM) technology. The ACR-1000TM nuclear power plant is an evolutionary product, starting with the strong base of CANDU reactor technology, coupled with thoroughly-demonstrated innovative features to enhance economics, safety, operability and maintainability. The ACR-1000 benefits from AECL's continuous-improvement approach to design, that enabled the traditional CANDU 6 product to compile an exceptional track record of on-time, on budget product delivery, and also reliable, high capacity-factor operation. The ACR-1000 engineering program has completed the basic plant design and has entered detailed pre-project engineering and formal safety analysis to prepare the preliminary (non-project-specific) safety case. The engineering program is strongly operator-based, and encompasses much more than traditional pre-project design elements. A team of utility-experienced operations and maintenance experts is embedded in the engineering team, to ensure that all design decisions, at the system and the component level, are taken with the owner-operator interest in mind. The design program emphasizes formal review of operating feedback, along with extensive operator participation in program management and execution. Design attention is paid to layout and access of equipment, to component and material selection, and to ensuring maximum ability for on-line maintenance. This enables the ACR-1000 to offer a three-year interval between scheduled maintenance outages, with a standard 21-day outage duration. SMART CANDUTM technology allows on-line monitoring and diagnostics to further enhance plant operation. Modules of the Advanced CANDU SMART technologies are already being back-fitted to current CANDU plants. As well as reviewing the ACR-1000 design features and their supporting background, the paper describes the status of main program

  6. Staff training program of CANDU projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When AECL opened a project office Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training programs were initiated, general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions, and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (author)

  7. Cernavoda project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cernavoda project comprises five 633 MWe CANDU units, Unit 1 being the most advanced, with nearly 60% construction completed (at the time of writing). In 1991 the responsibility to complete Unit 1 and bring it into operation was transferred from RENEL (Regia Autonoma Nationala de Electicitate) to a consortium formed by AECL and Ansaldo. Substantial changes have been made in organization, design responsibility, procurement, budgeting, finance, scheduling, training, etc. A continuous quality assurance program has been introduced. Financing includes Canadian and Italian loans. It is hoped that Unit 1 will achieve criticality before the end of 1994

  8. Hardware replacements and software tools for digital control computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological obsolescence is an on-going challenge for all computer use. By design, and to some extent good fortune, AECL has had a good track record with respect to the march of obsolescence in CANDU digital control computer technology. Recognizing obsolescence as a fact of life, AECL has undertaken a program of supporting the digital control technology of existing CANDU plants. Other AECL groups are developing complete replacement systems for the digital control computers, and more advanced systems for the digital control computers of the future CANDU reactors. This paper presents the results of the efforts of AECL's DCC service support group to replace obsolete digital control computer and related components and to provide friendlier software technology related to the maintenance and use of digital control computers in CANDU. These efforts are expected to extend the current lifespan of existing digital control computers through their mandated life. This group applied two simple rules; the product, whether new or replacement should have a generic basis, and the products should be applicable to both existing CANDU plants and to 'repeat' plant designs built using current design guidelines. While some exceptions do apply, the rules have been met. The generic requirement dictates that the product should not be dependent on any brand technology, and should back-fit to and interface with any such technology which remains in the control design. The application requirement dictates that the product should have universal use and be user friendly to the greatest extent possible. Furthermore, both requirements were designed to anticipate user involvement, modifications and alternate user defined applications. The replacements for hardware components such as paper tape reader/punch, moving arm disk, contact scanner and Ramtek are discussed. The development of these hardware replacements coincide with the development of a gateway system for selected CANDU digital control

  9. Assessment of neutron transport codes for application to CANDU fuel lattices analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok

    1999-08-01

    In order to assess the applicability of WIMS-AECL and HELIOS code to the CANDU fuel lattice analysis, the physics calculations has been carried out for the standard CANDU fuel and DUPIC fuel lattices, and the results were compared with those of Monte Carlo code MCNP-4B. In this study, in order to consider the full isotopic composition and the temperature effect, new MCNP libraries have been generated from ENDF/B-VI release 3 and validated for typical benchmark problems. The TRX-1,2,BAPL-1,2,3 pin -cell lattices and KENO criticality safety benchmark calculations have been performed for the new MCNP libraries, and the results have shown that the new MCNP library has sufficient accuracy to be used for physics calculation. Then, the lattice codes have been benchmarked by the MCNP code for the major physics parameters such as the burnup reactivity, void reactivity, relative pin power and Doppler coefficient, etc. for the standard CANDU fuel and DUPIC fuel lattices. For the standard CANDU fuel lattice, it was found that the results of WIMS-AECL calculations are consistent with those of MCNP. For the DUPIC fuel lattice, however, the results of WIMS-AECL calculations with ENDF/B-V library have shown that the discrepancy from the results of MCNP calculations increases when the fuel burnup is relatively high. The burnup reactivities of WIMS-ACEL calculations with ENDF/B-VI library have shown excellent agreements with those of MCNP calculation for both the standard CANDU and DUPIC fuel lattices. However, the Doppler coefficient have relatively large discrepancies compared with MCNP calculations, and the difference increases as the fuel burns. On the other hand, the results of HELIOS calculation are consistent with those of MCNP even though the discrepancy is slightly larger compared with the case of the standard CANDU fuel lattice. this study has shown that the WIMS-AECL products reliable results for the natural uranium fuel. However, it is recommended that the WIMS

  10. Supporting CANDU operators-CANDU owners group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Owners Group (COG) was formed in 1984 by the Canadian CANDU owning utilities and Atomic Energy of Canada limited (AECL). Participation was subsequently extended to all CANDU owners world-wide. The mandate of the COG organization is to provide a framework for co-operation, mutual assistance and exchange of information for the successful support, development, operation, maintenance and economics of CANDU nuclear electric generating stations. To meet these objectives COG established co-operative programs in two areas: 1. Station Support. 2. Research and Development. In addition, joint projects are administered by COG on a case by case basis where CANDU owners can benefit from sharing of costs

  11. Thorium fuel-cycle studies for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor, its ability to be refuelled while operating at full power, its fuel channel design, and its simple fuel bundle provide an evolutionary path for allowing full exploitation of the energy potential of thorium fuel cycles in existing reactors. AECL has done considerable work on many aspects of thorium fuel cycles, including fuel-cycle analysis, reactor physics measurements and analysis, fuel fabrication, irradiation and PIE studies, and waste management studies. Use of the thorium fuel cycle in CANDU reactors ensures long-term supplies of nuclear fuel, using a proven, reliable reactor technology. (author)

  12. CANDU-6 fuel bundle fabrication and advanced fuels development in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years, China North Nuclear Fuel Corporation (CNNFC) has introduced several modifications to the manufacturing processes and the production line equipment. This has been beneficial in achieving a very high level of quality in the production of fuel bundles. Since 2008 CNNFC has participated in a multi party project with the goal of developing advanced fuels for use in CANDU reactors. Other project team members include the Nuclear Power Institute of China (NPIC), Third Qinshan Nuclear Power Company (TQNPC) and Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd (AECL). This paper will present the improvements developed during the manufacture of natural fuel bundles and advanced fuels. (author)

  13. Validation of micro-depletion method for CANDU® reactors for the core-tracking simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The WIMS-AECL / DRAGON / RFSP reactor physics code set was used to simulate a core tracking scenario, which constitutes more than 400 full-power days. 102 vanadium detectors were used to record the local fluxes. These cases were run by using the micro-depletion method, embedded in the RFSP code. The calculated diffusion flux at the locations of the vanadium detectors were compared with the site measurement data. The average difference between the calculated flux and the measurement was about 2 %. (author)

  14. The CANDU irradiated fuel safeguards sealing system at the threshold of implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of a safeguards containment and surveillance system for the irradiated fuel discharged from CANDU nuclear generating stations has inspired the development of three different sealing technologies. Each seal type utilizes a random seal identity of different design. The AECL Random Coil (ARC) Seal combines the identity and integrity elements in the ultrasonic signature of a wire coil. Two variants of an optical seal have been developed which features identity elements of crystalline zirconium and aluminum. The sealed cap-seal uses a conventional IAEA 'Type X Seal' (wire seal). The essential features and relative merits of each seal design are described

  15. Valve leakage inspection testing and maintenance process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In valve maintenance, packing rings that prevent leakage along the valve stem must periodically be replaced, either during routine maintenance or to correct a leak or valve malfunction. Tools and procedures currently in use for valve packing removal and inspection are generally of limited value due to various access and application problems. A process has been developed by AECL Research that addresses these problems. The process, using incompressible fluid pressure, quickly and efficiently confirms the integrity of the valve backseat, extracts hard-to-remove valve packing sets, and verifies the leak tightness of the repacked valve

  16. The CANDU 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 6 is a modem nuclear power plant designed and developed under the aegis of Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) for domestic use and for export to other countries. This design has successfully met criteria for operation and redundant safety features required by Canada and by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and has an estimable record of performance in all applications to date. Key to this success is a defined program of design enhancement in which changes are made while retaining fundamental features proven by operating experience. Basic design features and progress toward improvements are presented here. (author)

  17. Development and Implementation of a Comprehensive Program to Deal with Canada's Nuclear Legacy Liabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Government of Canada nuclear legacy liabilities have resulted from 60 years of nuclear research and development (R and D) carried out on behalf of Canada by the National Research Council (1944 to 1952) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL, 1952 to present). These liabilities are largely located at AECL research sites, and consist of shutdown research buildings (including several prototype and research reactors), a wide variety of buried and stored wastes, and contaminated lands. The shutdown buildings and contaminated lands need to be safely decommissioned to meet federal regulatory requirements, and long-term solutions need to be developed and implemented for management of the wastes. More than half of the liabilities are the result of Cold War activities during the 1940's, 50's and early 60's. The remaining liabilities stem from R and D for medical isotopes and nuclear reactor technology, as well as national science programs. About 70 percent of the liabilities are located at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) in Ontario, and a further 20 percent are located at AECL's shutdown Whiteshell Laboratories in Manitoba. The remaining 10 percent relate largely to three shutdown prototype reactors in Ontario and Quebec, which were key to the developmental stage of Canada's CANDU reactor technology. The inventory of legacy waste includes spent fuel, high-level, intermediate-level and low-level solid and liquid radioactive waste, and wastes (largely contaminated soils) from site clean-up work across Canada. Most of the wastes are in raw, unconditioned form, and limited characterization information is available for the wastes generated in past decades. In many cases unique and potentially costly solutions will be required to recover, handle and process the wastes. In conclusion: the Government of Canada has initiated a program to deal with nuclear legacy liabilities dating back to the Cold War and the birth of nuclear technologies and medicine in Canada. The 5

  18. Results of a survey on accident and safety analysis codes, benchmarks, verification and validation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of the information submitted by AECL, CIAE, JAERI, ORNL and Siemens in response to a need identified at the 'Workshop on R and D Needs' at the IGORR-3 meeting. The survey compiled information on the national standards applied to the Safety Quality Assurance (SQA) programs undertaken by the participants. Information was assembled for the computer codes and nuclear data libraries used in accident and safety analyses for research reactors and the methods used to verify and validate the codes and libraries. Although the survey was not comprehensive, it provides a basis for exchanging information of common interest to the research reactor community

  19. Cernavoda - Unit 2. A strategic project for Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents some key aspects of the Romanian nuclear program, focusing on Cernavoda NPP Unit No. 2 and the partnership with Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) and ANSALDO Italy for completion of this project. A brief historical presentation of the Romanian nuclear program is included. The success of Cernavoda NPP Unit 1 represents an important element in finalizing Unit 2 in an advanced state of equipment installation and more than 40 % complete. Also, the national infrastructure, including the legal framework and new Electricity Law represents a positive element for Project completion. The Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body represents the guarantee for the safe operation of CANDU reactors in Romania.(author)

  20. The Jamaican Slowpoke HEU-LEU core conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The HEU core of the Jamaican SLOWPOKE research reactor is scheduled for conversion to LEU. The actual conversion process will most likely be contracted to Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Preliminary calculations have indicated that the total activity of used HEU core in Jamaica (∼8 TBq) should be about half that of the Montreal used HEU core. There is sufficient infrastructure both onsite and offsite to maneuver the loaded transportation flask to the shipping vessel. Appropriate licenses for the importation of the new fuel and exportation of the used fuel will be applied for once a provisional timetable has been established. (author)

  1. Annual health, safety and environmental performance report for 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the occupational health and safety and the environmental protection record of the operations of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) during 1993. An introduction highlights the results and describes the facilities and organizational systems. Subsequent sections indicate the performance of the company with respect to personnel radiation exposures, occupational injuries, the handling of wastes, and the release of materials into the environment. Programs in health, safety and environmental protection are presented, along with site remediation and emergency preparedness practices. (author). 14 figs

  2. Verification of the thermal module in the ELESIM code and the associated uncertainty analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature is a critical parameter in fuel modelling because most of the physical processes that occur in fuel elements during irradiation are thermally activated. The focus of this paper is the temperature distribution calculation used in the computer code ELESIM, developed at AECL to model the steady-state behaviour of CANDU fuel. A validation procedure for fuel codes is described and applied to ELESIM's thermal calculation.The effects of uncertainties in model parameters, like Uranium Dioxide thermal conductivity, and input variables, such as fuel element linear power, are accounted for through an uncertainty analysis using Response Surface and Monte Carlo techniques

  3. R and D in support of CANDU plant life management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the keys to the long-term success of CANDUs is a high capacity factor over the station design life. Considerable R and D in underway at AECL to develop technologies for assessing, monitoring and mitigating the effect of plant ageing and for improving plant performance and extending plant life. To achieve longer service life and to realize high capacity factor from CANDU stations, AECL is developing new technologies to enhance fuel channel and steam generator inspection capabilities, to monitor system health, and to allow preventive maintenance and cleaning (e.g., on-line chemical cleaning processes that produce small volumes of wastes). The life management strategy for fuel channels and steam generators requires a program to inspect components on a routine basis to identify mechanisms that could potentially affect fitness-for-service. In the case of fuel channels, the strategy includes inspections for dimensional changes, flaw detection, and deuterium concentration. New techniques are been developed to enhance these inspection capabilities; examples include accurate measurement of the gap between a pressure tube and its calandria tube and rapid full-length inspections of steam generator tubes for all known flaw types. Central to life management of components are Fitness-for-Service Guidelines (FFSG) that have been developed with the CANDU Owners Group (COG) that provide a standardized method to assess the potential for propagation of flaws detected during in-service inspections, and assessment of any change in fracture characteristics of the material. FFSG continue to be improved with the development of new technologies such as the capability to credit relaxation of stresses due to creep and non-rejectable flaws in pressure tubes. Effective management of plant systems throughout their lifetime requires much more than data acquisition and display - it requires that system health is continually monitored and managed. AECL has developed a system Health Monitor

  4. Comparison with experiment of COMETHE III-L fuel rod behaviour predictions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comparison is presented between experimental results and COMETHE III-L fuel rod behaviour predictions. The first part of the paper focuses on mechanical aspects, with as main experiments, AECL X-264 and Studsvik Interramp. The second part presents the results of a wide FGR benchmarking campaign, with a reference to previous COMETHE versions. It appears that the variance between experiment and calculation has decreased by a factor four when the III-J version was improved into the III-L version. As conclusion, some COMETHE III-L calculations are presented in order to illustrate its capability of predicting fuel rod performance limits. (author)

  5. CRNL library serials list

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A list of 1900 serial publications (periodicals, society transactions and proceedings, annuals and directories, indexes, newspapers, etc.) is presented with volumes and years held by the Main Library. This library is the largest in AECL as well as one of the largest scientific and technical libraries in North America, and functions as a Canadian resource for nuclear information. A main alphabetical list is followed by broad subject field lists representing research interests, and lists of abstract and index serials, general bibliographic serials, conference indexes, press releases, English translations, and original language journals

  6. COG - organization of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU Owners' Group (COG) has three aims: to facilitate information exchange, to provide a basis for mutual assistance, and to plan and fund generic programs. Argentina and Korea now participate in information exchange. The CANNET messaging system provides a direct link between staff at different CANDU stations, to provide access to good practices, and help in resolving programs. The programs with funding shared between Ontario Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Hydro Quebec, and AECL included CM$38 worth of research and development in 1987, the CM$50 Spacer Location and Repositioning Tooling program, and CM$3 for Single Fuel Channel Replacement Tooling

  7. Application of electron beam on natural polymer systems. Viscose rayon and polysaccharide derivatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Application of electron accelerator on natural polymers, viscose rayon and polysaccharide derivatives is presented. In Canada at AECL, a high-energy (10 MeV) electron linear accelerator named IMPELA was used to reduce and control molecular weight of cellulose. Recently, under UNDP/RCA/IAEA project, Asian countries had a cooperated research program on this subject. Kinetics of radiation chemistry of polysaccharide derivatives is under investigation by means of pulse radiolysis with a 35 MeV electron linear accelerator. Rate constants between polymers and hydrated electron etc., and characteristics of very long-lived polymer radical were reported. (author)

  8. C5 capsule operation modes analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is part of the Nuclear Research Institute Program 13 dedicated to 'TRIGA Research Reactor performance enhancing' and its objective is improving the engineering of the structural materials irradiation. The paper raises the knowledge level on C5 capsule irradiation modes and utilizes previous results in order to increase C5 performances. In the paper the irradiation modes to test zirconium yttrium sample are assessed. These tests are proposed by AECL. There are presented the C5 initial conditions and models. Also. there are presented the thermal hydraulic conditions during normal and accidental operation. The results will be used in the C5 safety report. (authors)

  9. Romanian nuclear fuel program: past, present and future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budan, O.; Rotaru, I. [RENEL-GEN, Romanian Electricity Authority, Nuclear Power Group (Romania); Galeriu, C.A. [RENEL-FCN, Romanian Electricity Authority, Nuclear Fuel Plant (Romania)

    1997-07-01

    The paper presents and comments the policy adopted in Romania for the production of CANDU-6 nuclear fuel before and after 1990. In this paper the word 'past' refers to the period before 1990 and 'present' to the 1990-1997 period. The CANDU-6 nuclear fuel manufacturing started in Romania in December 1983. Neither AECL nor any Canadian nuclear fuel manufacturer were involved in the Romanian industrial nuclear fuel production before 1990. After January 1990, the new created Romanian Electricity Authority (RENEL) assumed the responsibility for the Romanian Nuclear Power Program. It was RENEL's decision to stop, in June 1990, the nuclear fuel production at the Institute for Nuclear Power Reactors (IRNE) Pitesti. This decision was justified by the Canadian specialists team findings, revealed during a general, but well enough technically founded analysis performed at IRNE in the spring of 1990. All fuel manufactured before June 1990 was quarantined as it was considered of suspect quality. By that time more than 31,000 fuel bundles had already been manufactured. This fuel was stored for subsequent assessment. The paper explains the reasons which provoked this decision. The paper also presents the strategy adopted by RENEL after 1990 regarding the Romanian Nuclear Fuel Program. After a complex program done by Romanian and Canadian partners, in November 1994, AECL issued a temporary certification for the Romanian nuclear fuel plant. During the demonstration manufacturing run, as an essential milestone for the qualification of the Romanian fuel supplier for CANDU-6 reactors, 202 fuel bundles were produced. Of these fuel bundles, 66 were part of the Cernavoda NGS Unit 1 first fuel load (the balance was supplied by Zircatec Precision Industries Inc. - ZPI). The industrial nuclear fuel fabrication re-started in Romania in January 1995 under AECL's periodical monitoring. In December 1995, AECL issued a permanent certificate, stating the Romanian

  10. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and AECL, has been safely,economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world

  11. Proceedings of DUPIC fuel workshop 97

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The researchers discuss the technical aspects of DUPIC fuel fabrication in the workshop as follows; 1) The DUPIC fuel development program in KAERI 2) AECL's progress in developing the DUPIC fuel fabrication process 3) Mechanical decladding 4) Nonproliferation and safeguards aspects of the DUPIC fuel cycle concept 5) Assessment of DUPIC fuel compatibility with CANDU-6 6) The development of combination software for spent PWR fuel to fabricate the homogeneous DUPIC fuel 7) Thermodynamic properties of the DUPIC fuel and its performance 8) Captural properties of cesium and ruthenium 9) A secondary fuel removal process : Plasma processing 10) Technology development for DUPIC process safeguards

  12. Biological effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this review radiation produced by the nuclear industry is placed into context with other sources of radiation in our world. Human health effects of radiation, derivation of standards and risk estimates are reviewed in this document. The implications of exposing the worker and the general population to radiation generated by nuclear power are assessed. Effects of radiation are also reviewed. Finally, gaps in our knowledge concerning radiation are identified and current research on biological effects, on environmental aspects, and on dosimetry of radiation within AECL and Canada is documented in this report. (author)

  13. Qualification of the reactor physics toolset for the design and analysis of the advanced CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The qualification of reactor physics toolset for Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) applications is described in this paper. The qualification process follows AECL standard code validation methodology. The ACR nuclear design incorporates certain features that challenge the physics code-suite capabilities. The physics codes were first assessed, and development work required to meet these challenges was undertaken. A Validation Matrix Document was prepared to identify the physics phenomena that could arise during postulated accident events, and specify the experimental data required for code validation. Key issues related to physics modelling and code validation are also discussed. (author)

  14. Using Fortran modules to design and develop modular reactor analysis software components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mwaba, M.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2009-07-01

    This paper presents a design for heavy and light water property calculation routines using object oriented design techniques. The designed routines are part of a new thermalhydraulics code being developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). We demonstrate how application of object-oriented methodology leads to Fortran modules that use new features of Fortran 95 effectively. We also present performance metrics. This paper contributes in two ways. Firstly, it provides a methodology that can be used to systematically identify objects, assign responsibilities to the objects and establish the interaction among objects. Secondly, it shows how the designs can be communicated using the Unified Modeling Language (UML). (author)

  15. Validation study on reliability analysis of main safety system in Nuclear Power Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Nam Jin; Cho, Chang Keun; Kim, Yong Hui; Kim, Tae Hyeong; Hong, Seo Kee; Park, Keon Woo; Park, Chang Jea [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cheong, Woo Sik [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Park, Moon Kyu [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-12-15

    The scope and contents of this validation study are to review the design changes of the four main safety systems in Wolsong 2/3/4 Nuclear Power Plants, to review the consideration of the above design changes in the AECL reports, the structure of fault trees, and the data base used in the quantification of the fault trees, to quantify the unavailabilities of main safety systems and check them if they meet the requirements, and to recommend desirable design changes in the emergency core cooling system to reduce the unavailability.

  16. New nuclear power plants for Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the end of this year the Ontario government will select the technology for its future nuclear power plants. To clarify the differences between the contending reactors I have put together the following quick overview. Ontario's requirement is for a stand-alone two-unit nuclear power plant to provide around 2,000 to 3,500 MWe of baseload generating capacity at a site to he specified with an option for one or two additional units. It is likely that the first units will be located at either the Darlington site near Bowmanville or the Bruce site near Kincardine. However the output from the Bruce site is presently transmission constrained. All nuclear-electric generation in Ontario comes from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) CANDU reactors at Pickering, Darlington and Bruce. The contenders are, AECL's 1085 MWe (net) ACR-1000 (Advanced CANDU Reactor), Westinghouse Electric Company's 1117 MWe (net) AP1000 (Advanced Passive), AREVA NP's 1600 MWe (net) U.S. EPR (United States Evolutionary Pressurized Reactor) and the 1550 MWe (net) GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy's ESBWR (Economic and Simplified Boiling Water Reactor). Westinghouse has Toshiba as a majority shareholder, AREVA has the government of France as a majority shareholder and GE-Hitachi has GE as the major shareholder. AECL is a federal crown corporation and is part of Team CANDU consisting of Babcock and Wilcox Canada, GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Hitachi Canada Limited and SNC-Lavalin Nuclear Inc. Generally the engineering split in Team CANDU would be, AECL, Mississauga, Ontario, responsible for the design of the nuclear steam plant including reactor and safety systems; Babcock and Wilcox Canada, Cambridge, Ontario, responsible for supply of the steam generators and other pressure retaining components; GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Canada Inc., Peterborough, Ontario for the fuel handling equipment; Hitachi Canada Limited, Mississauga, for the balance of plant steam to electricity conversion

  17. ORIGEN-S cross section libraries for CANDU used-fuel characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code system for producing burn-up dependent cross-section libraries for CANDU used-fuel characterization for use with the ORIGEN-S isotope generation and depletion code system is described. Benchmark results against experimental isotopic data for three CANDU-PHW reactor stations are presented. The code system couples the WIMS-AECL reactor physics analysis code with an ORIGEN-S depletion analysis to produce application-specific libraries that can be used in subsequent used-fuel analyses. 11 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs

  18. Analysis specifications for the CC3 biosphere model biotrac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szekely, J.G.; Wojciechowski, L.C.; Stephens, M.E.; Halliday, H.A.

    1994-12-01

    The CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) model BIOTRAC (Biosphere Transport and Consequences) describes the movement in the biosphere of releases from an underground disposal vault, and the consequent radiological dose to a reference individual. Concentrations of toxic substances in different parts of the biosphere are also calculated. BIOTRAC was created specifically for the postclosure analyses of the Environmental Impact Statement that AECL is preparing on the concept for disposal of Canada`s nuclear fuel waste. The model relies on certain assumptions and constraints on the system, which are described by Davis et al. Accordingly, great care must be exercised if BIOTRAC is used for any other purpose.

  19. Review of the nuclear fuel waste management program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Progress over the previous year in the nuclear fuel waste management program is reviewed. Universities, industry and consultants have become increasingly involved, and the work is being overseen by a Technical Advisory Committee. The program has also been investigated by Ontario's Porter Commission and Select Committe on Ontario Hydro Affairs. A public information program has been extended to cover most of the Canadian Shield region of Ontario. Ontario Hydro is studying spent fuel storage and transportation, while AECL is covering immobilization of spent fuel or processing wastes, geotechnical and geochemical research in the laboratory and in the field, design of disposal facilities, and environmental and safety assessments. (L.L.)

  20. Reactor physics studies for a pressure tube supercritical water reactor (PT-SCWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary lattice physics and full core neutronic analysis have been performed for the pressure-tube supercritical water reactor (PT-SCWR). Current CANDU reactor physics codes (WIMS-AECL and RFSP) were used for modeling this reactor. A key challenge in the physics design of this reactor is the optimization of lattice parameters to achieve the appropriate balance between coolant void reactivity (CVR) and fuel utilization. A vertically-oriented, batch-fuelled reactor is considered, with an insulated pressure tube to accommodate the high coolant temperatures and pressures. The analysis shows the reactor physics conceptual feasibility of the design, although further optimization is required. (author)

  1. Designing to minimize radiation exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposure received by the station staff must be considered during the design stage if CANDU stations are to achieve high capacity factor, high reliability and low maintenance and operational costs. On early CANDU stations, this exposure was higher than originally anticipated. Reviews to reduce exposure were started in 1969 and these have evolved into a formal program which defines specific objectives, classifies radiation levels, reviews designs and implements improvements where necessary. This paper outlines the program developed at AECL-PP (Power Projects) for use during the design of CANDU stations. (author)

  2. Management of legacy spent nuclear fuel wastes at the Chalk River Laboratories: the challenges and innovative solutions implemented

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has operated research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) site since 1947, for the purpose of nuclear energy and scientific research and for the production of radioisotopes. During the 1950s and 60s, a variety of spent nuclear fuel wastes were produced by irradiating metallic uranium and other prototype fuels. These legacy waste fuels were initially stored in water-filled fuel storage bays for a period of several years before being placed in storage containers and transferred to the CRL Waste Management Areas (WMAs), where they have been stored in below-grade, vertical cylindrical steel and concrete structures called 'tile holes'. (author)

  3. Attenuation of contaminant plumes in homogeneous aquifers: Sensitivity to source function at moderate to large peclet numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A groundwater mass transfer calculation is an essential part of the performance assessment for radioactive waste disposal facilities. AECL's IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) facility, which is designed for the near-surface disposal of low-level radioactive waste (LLRW), is to be situated in the sandy overburden at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. Flow in the sandy aquifers at the proposed IRUS site is relatively homogeneous and advection-dominated (large Peclet numbers). Mass transfer along the mean direction of flow from the IRUS site may be described using the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation, for which a Green's function representation of downstream radionuclide flux is convenient. This report shows that in advection-dominated aquifers, dispersive attenuation of initial contaminant releases depends principally on two time scales: the source duration and the pulse breakthrough time. Numerical investigation shows further that the maximum downstream flux or concentration depends on these time scales in a simple characteristic way that is minimally sensitive to the shape of the initial source pulse. (author). 11 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  4. CANDU 9 nuclear power plant design description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada limited (AECL) has make significant design improvements in the latest CANDU nuclear power plant (NPP)-the CANDU 9. The CANDU 9 operates with the energy efficient heavy water moderated reactor and natural uranium fuel and utilizes proven technology. The CANDU 9 NPP design is similar to the world leading CANDU 6 but is based upon the single unit adaptation of the 900 MWe class reactors currently operating in Canada (as multiunit configurations). The CANDU 9 NPP was developed as part of the comprehensive AECL product development program which addresses all aspects of CANDU technology including such disciplines as safety, reactor systems and components, constructability, instrumentation and control, health and environment, fuel and fuel cycles and heavy water systems. This paper will provide an overview for some of the key features of the CANDU 9 NPP such as plant layout, safety enhancements and operability improvements implemented in this design as well as outlining some of the advantages that can be expected by the operating utility

  5. The pressurized heavy water reactor programme in the Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KEPCO (Korea Electric Power Corporation) opened its HWR program in 1977 by starting the construction of Wolsong 1 (CANDU-6). Wolsong 1 completed its construction in 1983 and has been operated successfully achieving an average lifetime capacity factor of 85%. As far as PHWR technology is concerned, KEPCO did not have self reliance program like PWR but for the PHWR technology development of Korea, KEPCO and AECL made technology transfer agreement for the CANDU-6 NSSS design at the time of Wolsong 3 and 4 contracts. Under this agreement, AECL has provided the CANDU-6 design technology and it is contributing to the development of Korean PHWR design technology. In the field of fuel, KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) is carrying out the feasibility study of CANFLEX and DUPIC. Planning of future CANDU projects in Korea as well as type and capacity if constructed is under study by KEPCO. The economic aspects of CANDU-6, the future prospects of CANDU-9 technology development and availability of construction site will be the important points of study and it will be finished next year. The result of study will be reflected to the new Korean electric power development plan, which will extend Korean power plant construction schedule until 2010

  6. Discussing spent nuclear fuel in high school classrooms: addressing public fears through early education

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkel, S. [Deep River Science Academy, 20 Forest Ave. P.O. Box 600, Deep River, Ontario K0J 1P0 (Canada); Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Sullivan, J.; Jones, S.; Sullivan, K. [Deep River Science Academy, 20 Forest Ave. P.O. Box 600, Deep River, Ontario K0J 1P0 (Canada); Hyland, B.; Pencer, J.; Colton, A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The Inreach program combines the Deep River Science Academy (DRSA) 'learning through research' approach with state of the art communication technology to bring scientific research to high school classrooms. The Inreach program follows the DRSA teaching model where a university student tutor works on a research project with scientific staff at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. Participating high school classes are located across Canada. The high school students learn about the ongoing research activities via weekly web conferences. In order to engage the students and encourage participation in the conferences, themed exercises linked to the research project are provided to the students. The DRSA's Inreach program uses a cost-effective internet technology to reach a wide audience, in an interactive setting, without anyone leaving their desks or offices. An example Inreach research project is presented here: an investigation of the potential of the Canadian supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) concept to burn transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) to reduce the impact of used nuclear fuel. During this project a university student worked with AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) researchers on technical aspects of the project, and high school students followed their progress and learned about the composition, hazards, and disposition options for used nuclear fuel. Previous projects included the effects of tritium on cellular viability and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses in automobile engines.

  7. Dry Storage of Spent Fuel Discharged from Research Reactors in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) manages the spent fuel discharged from most of Canada's research reactors. These research reactors have been operated to support Canada's nuclear R and D programmes and medical isotope production. The spent fuel inventory consists of dozens of types and configurations, including intact and non-intact fuels and totalling approximately 95 MTHM. The fuels are a mixture of both high and low enrichments, and are typically aluminium-clad with various fuel core materials, including uranium metal, uranium dioxide, uranium-aluminium alloy, and uranium silicide-aluminium dispersion fuels. The discharged spent fuels are initially wet stored at reactor fuel bays for approximately two years before being transferred to dry storage facilities, at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories site and Whiteshell Laboratories site. After 50-100 years of interim dry storage, the spent fuel will be sent to permanent geological disposal as part of Canada's long term management programme for spent nuclear fuel. This paper presents the strategy and practices with regard to the management and storage of spent research reactor fuel in Canada. (author)

  8. Safety upgrades to the NRU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRU (National Research Universal) Reactor is a 135 MW thermal research facility located at Chalk River Laboratories, and is owned and operated by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. One of the largest and most versatile research reactors in the world, it serves as the R and D workhorse for Canada's CANDU business while at the same time filling the role as one of the world's major producers of medical radioisotopes. AECL plans to extend operation of the NRU reactor to approximately the year 2005 when a new replacement, the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF) will be available. To achieve this, AECL has undertaken a program of safety reassessment and upgrades to enhance the level of safety consistent with modem requirements. An engineering assessment/inspection of critical systems, equipment and components was completed and seven major safety upgrades are being designed and installed. These upgrades will significantly reduce the reactor's vulnerability to common mode failures and external hazards, with particular emphasis on seismic protection. The scheduled completion date for the project is 1999 December at a cost approximately twice the annual operating cost. All work on the NRU upgrade project is planned and integrated into the regular operating cycles of the reactor; no major outages are anticipated. This paper describes the safety upgrades and discusses the technical and managerial challenges involved in extending the operating life of the NRU reactor. (author)

  9. Neutron sources in Canada - Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolling, G.; Lidstone, R. F.

    Canada's pre-eminent neutron source since 1957 has been the NRU reactor at Chalk River. It is unlikely to operate beyond the year 2005. In 1994, AECL prepared the case and concept for a new research reactor, the Irradiation Research Facility (IRF), to replace NRU. The IRF was developed with the dual purpose of meeting the needs of both R&D programs to support existing and advanced CANDU® designs and also of condensed matter science and materials research using extracted neutron beams. In November 1995, AECL began a pre-project engineering programme to develop the design of the facility and to begin the safety analysis and “up-front” licensing process. The dual-purpose concept continues to be pursued and the design modified, to achieve maximum performance in the most cost-effective manner. The planned neutron-beam facilities, which include a cold source and a guide hall, will greatly enhance Canada's programs of neutron-beam research and applications. The current status of the IRF design and of efforts to secure funding for the neutron-beam components will be presented.

  10. Replacement of tritiated water from irradiated fuel storage bay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo, I.; Boniface, H.; Suppiah, S.; Kennedy, B.; Minichilli, A.; Mitchell, T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - AECL, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Recently, AECL developed a novel method to reduce tritium emissions (to groundwater) and personnel doses at the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor irradiated fuel storage bay (also known as rod or spent fuel bay) through a water swap process. The light water in the fuel bay had built up tritium that had been transferred from the heavy water moderator through normal fuel transfers. The major advantage of the thermal stratification method was that a very effective tritium reduction could be achieved by swapping a minimal volume of bay water and warm tritiated water would be skimmed off the bay surface. A demonstration of the method was done that involved Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling of the swap process and a test program that showed excellent agreement with model prediction for the effective removal of almost all the tritium with a minimal water volume. Building on the successful demonstration, AECL fabricated, installed, commissioned and operated a full-scale system to perform a water swap. This full-scale water swap operation achieved a tritium removal efficiency of about 96%.

  11. NRU main cooling circuit heat exchangers - life after 50 years of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCrea, L.; Gold, R.; Dam, R.F.; Nickerson, J.H. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-07-01

    Continued operation of the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor is recognized as essential for AECL and the wider research community to sustain existing programs of national research, isotope production, and fuel and materials testing. To support its continued operation beyond December 2005, AECL initiated a NRU Licensability Extension (LE) Program, of which the NRU LE Plant Life Management (PLiM) Project is one of the major components. As part of the NRU LE PLiM Project, a life assessment of the NRU heavy water main cooling circuit heat exchangers was performed. These heat exchangers have been in operation for 50 years and have provided excellent operational service to date. Inspection results show that the heat exchangers are still in good condition and the outcome of a rigorous and systematic assessment is that they have a good prognosis to achieve a further 10 to 20 years of service life. While recommendations have been made to support their continued operation, no concerns were identified as life limiting. This paper will provide an overview of the integrated assessment of the NRU heat exchangers and the strategies that were applied in support of a further 10 to 20 years of service life. (author)

  12. NRU main cooling circuit heat exchangers - life after 50 years of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Continued operation of the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor is recognized as essential for AECL and the wider research community to sustain existing programs of national research, isotope production, and fuel and materials testing. To support its continued operation beyond December 2005, AECL initiated a NRU Licensability Extension (LE) Program, of which the NRU LE Plant Life Management (PLiM) Project is one of the major components. As part of the NRU LE PLiM Project, a life assessment of the NRU heavy water main cooling circuit heat exchangers was performed. These heat exchangers have been in operation for 50 years and have provided excellent operational service to date. Inspection results show that the heat exchangers are still in good condition and the outcome of a rigorous and systematic assessment is that they have a good prognosis to achieve a further 10 to 20 years of service life. While recommendations have been made to support their continued operation, no concerns were identified as life limiting. This paper will provide an overview of the integrated assessment of the NRU heat exchangers and the strategies that were applied in support of a further 10 to 20 years of service life. (author)

  13. Prototype CIRCE plant - industrial demonstration of heavy water production from reformed hydrogen source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heavy water (D20) production has been dominated by the Girdler-Sulphide (G-S) process, which suffers several intrinsic disadvantages that lead to high production costs. Processes based on hydrogen/water exchange have become more attractive with the development of proprietary wetproofed catalysts by AECL. One process that is synergistic with industrial hydrogen production by steam methane reforming (SMR), the Combined Industrial Reforming and Catalytic Exchange (CIRCE) process, offers the best prospect for commercialization. SMRs are common globally in the oil-upgrading and ammonia industries. To study the CIRCE process in detail, AECL, in collaboration with Air Liquide Canada, constructed a prototype CIRCE plant (PCP) in Hamilton, Ontario. The plant became fully operational in 2000 July and is expected to operate to at least late fall of 2002. To-date, plant operation has confirmed the adequacy of the design and the capability of enriching deuterium to produce heavy water without compromising hydrogen production. The proprietary wetproofed catalyst has performed as expected, both in activity and in robustness. (author)

  14. Enhancing PLiM/LCM through integration strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plant Life Management and Life Cycle Management activities continue to become an increasingly important part of NPP planning and O and M efforts. AECL, as a developer and provider of PLiM/LCM products and services, has been working towards providing effective and efficient tools and processes to support this activity. As these products evolve, it is becoming evident that there are significant benefits from ensuring that AECL and their utility partners engage in an Integrated PLiM approach. The integration of PLiM products and services goes far beyond simply relating the various aspects of the technology. The strategy to enhance the integration of PLiM includes three specific areas; namely the integrated aging knowledge base, the integrated assessment technology, and the integrated implementation within the plant. Through integration at all these levels the PLiM technology is able to be adaptive, providing a means for improved design and assessment capability, enhanced asset management capabilities, as well as providing for a flexible and more efficient delivery of PLiM services according to utility needs. This paper explores each of the three areas of integration, the resulting Enhanced PLiM/LCM capability, and how this capability translates to benefits for the operating stations both new and old. (author)

  15. PEAR code review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a necessary component in the continuous improvement and refinement of methodologies employed in the nuclear industry, regulatory agencies need to periodically evaluate these processes to improve confidence in results and ensure appropriate levels of safety are being achieved. The independent and objective review of industry-standard computer codes forms an essential part of this program. To this end, this work undertakes an in-depth review of the computer code PEAR (Public Exposures from Accidental Releases), developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to assess accidental releases from CANDU reactors. PEAR is based largely on the models contained in the Canadian Standards Association (CSA) N288.2-M91. This report presents the results of a detailed technical review of the PEAR code to identify any variations from the CSA standard and other supporting documentation, verify the source code, assess the quality of numerical models and results, and identify general strengths and weaknesses of the code. The version of the code employed in this review is the one which AECL intends to use for CANDU 9 safety analyses. (author)

  16. Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6): a proven mid-sized reactor with fuel cycle capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is finalizing development of the Enhanced CANDU 6 (EC6), which incorporates the CANDU 6's well-proven features, and enhancements that make the reactor even more safe and easier to operate. The EC6 is the only mid-sized reactor (700 MWe class) with a proven pedigree that meets modern reactor expectations and regulatory standards. It is sized for smaller grids and also has outstanding fuel-cycle capability. Changes are incremental and consistent with the CANDU 6 project approach. The EC6 utilizes modern computers and a distributed control system housed in an advanced control room which, along with automated testing and on-line diagnostics, make the plant easier and safer to operate, with minimal operator intervention. Containment and seismic capability are upgraded to meet modern standards. The first deployment of the EC6 is anticipated in Canada; international markets are also being pursued. AECL is performing a comprehensive review of the EC6 design in the wake of the Fukushima accident, will review lessons learned, and incorporate any necessary improvements into new build design. (author)

  17. Experience gained in the production of licensable safety-critical software for Darlington NGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Darlington Nuclear Generating Station is a new station, consisting of four 935 Mw units, built by Ontario Hydro, on the north shore of Lake Ontario, approximately 50 miles east of Toronto. In May, 1987, the first of the four units of this station was approaching the point where Ontario Hydro would be requesting a license to load fuel, and then proceed to first criticality. At this point, however, the regulatory authority, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) started to show increasing concerns related to the Trip Computer Software associated with Darlington's newly-designed computerized shutdown systems. The concerns centered around whether or not the safety reliability, reviewability, and maintainability of this software could be demonstrated by Ontario Hydro or the system designer, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). In order to back up the validity of their concerns, they hired a well-known consultant, who reviewed the code, and made recommendations concerning its design, implementation, and documentation. Considerable effort was required by Ontario Hydro and AECL in order to comply with those recommendations. This paper describes those efforts, outlines the difficulties encountered, and assesses the lessons learned from them

  18. Assessment of Siemens plessey electronic personal dosimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a laboratory assessment of the performance of a new type of personal dosimeter. The Electronic Personal Dosimeter, or EPD, was developed jointly by the National Radiological Protection Board and Siemens Plessey Controls Limited, both of the United Kingdom. Twenty pre-production units of the EPD and a reader were purchased by Ontario Hydro for the assessment. The tests were conducted jointly by Ontario Hydro's Health and Safety Division and AECL Research's Chalk River Laboratories (CRL), with funding from the Candu Owner's Group. A total of 26 tests were conducted, divided between Ontario Hydro and AECL. The test results were compared with the relevant requirements of three standards. In general, the performance of the EPD was found to be quite acceptable. It met most of the relevant requirements of the three standards and most of the design specifications. However, the following deficiencies were found: slow response time; sensitivity to high-frequency EMF; poor resistance to dropping; and an alarm that is not loud enough. In addition, the response of the EPD to low-energy beta rays may be too low for some applications. There were serious problems with the reliability of operation of the pre production EPDs used in these tests. 9 refs., 34 tabs., 20 figs

  19. Application of concept mapping principles to managing steam generator knowledge at CNSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear knowledge management (KM) initiatives have been observed in many international agencies, industries and research facilities, such as the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Canada.s own Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). This paper presents a brief overview of the theory behind concept mapping, its origins and application potential in an organizational context. Successful applications of nuclear KM efforts by the IAEA, the Defence Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), AECL and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) are specifically highlighted in the report for comparison and contrast. In addition, a system based on concept mapping theory is recently designed and implemented in order to efficiently manage steam generator-related knowledge at the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC). This tool aims to act as a powerful information asset for storage and retrieval of explicit and implicit knowledge, and to integrate KM practices into the CNSC workplace, all while maintaining its simplicity and ease for future modifications and fine-tuning when needed. (author)

  20. Analysis of common cause failure in Wolsong 2/3/4 NPPs PSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolsong 2/3/4 Nuclear Power Plants (WS 2/3/4 NPPs) are CANDU 6 type Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRs) being built in Wolsong site of Korea by Korea Power Electric Corporation (KEPCO). WS 2/3/4 NPPs are designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL). AECL performs Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for these NPPs. In this PSA, however, the effect of Common Cause Failure (CCF) is not analyzed due to the limitation of CANDU reliability data. Since the CCF is regarded as one of the most dominant contributors to the total core damage frequency (CDF) in Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) PSA. KEPCO and Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) initiated WS 2/3/4 NPPs Level 2 PSA which includes the CCF analysis and detailed HRA. In WS 2/3/4 NPPs Level 2 PSA, the authors reviewed the CCF data used in PWR PSA, and applied these data for WS 2/3/4 NPPs Level 2 PSA. The MGL method is implemented for the CCF analysis of WS 2/3/4 NPPs. The analyzed results show that the effect of CCF is not negligible in CANDU PSA as well as in PWR PSA. So the CCF data of CANDU plants should be collected and incorporated into CANDU PSA

  1. Qualification loop tests of cobalt-free hardfacing alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL is conducting endurance tests on valves hard-faced with four cobalt-free alloys. The first phase of the program, in which PWR primary heat transport conditions were simulated in AECL's valve test loop, has reached the 1400 cycle mark. This represents approximately 70% of the target value of 2000 cycles. The candidate alloys are NOREM 01, NOREM 04, EB 5183 and EVERIT 50. One valve with Stellite 6 trim serves as the standard. Prior to loop testing, a baseline inaugural inspection was performed. During testing the loop was shut down at approximately 500 cycle intervals, and the valves were disassembled for examination. The examinations included seat leak tests, profilometry and nondestructive inspection. Corrosion coupons in the loop were used to monitor any material loss due solely to corrosion mechanisms. This interim progress report summarizes the examination results and the relative performance of the candidate alloys. The results to date indicate that, based upon the sliding were damage assessment and seat leakage test results, all the candidate alloys perform better than the Stellite 6 control sample. On the same basis, NOREM 04 and EB 5183 are the best of the candidate alloys; although there are only minor differences in performance among the four alloys at this time. A final assessment can only be made after the cycling tests are complete and the seats and discs have been destructively examined. 3 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Upgrading from the Dicon Wiring Management system to IntEC at the Gentilly 2 station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The General Electric DICON Wiring Management system supplied to HQ during the construction of G2 is currently being replaced by the stand-alone version of the IntEC software developed by AECL. The reasons for replacing DICON and choosing lntEC are discussed. The different aspects of the two year DICON data conversion project are presented with the problems encountered and the means that were taken to resolve the problems. lntEC has shown our DICON data to be considerably more deficient than we had thought. This has increased the cost and the duration of the conversion process. However, correcting the errors during the conversion process provides us with much more accurate data. This should be viewed as an investment in configuration management. Many potential causes of future errors and potentially critical path delays have been removed. We have chosen to document the detailed procedures for the use of lntEC in our plant using a Windows Help File compiler. This also has been found to be extremely useful as a training tool as well as providing on-line help. The DICON data conversion into lntEC will not be completed until 1996. lntEC is not perfect. However, from what we have up to now, we are satisfied with the conviviality and efficiency of lntEC and with AECL's diligence in constantly aspiring in making it a better product. (author)

  3. R and D directions for the development of CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: AECL is carrying out a comprehensive R and D programme to advance all aspects of CANDU reactor technology. These programs are focusing on three main strategic directions: improved economics, enhanced safety, and fuel cycle flexibility. R and D areas include fuel cycle development, heavy water technology, fuel channel development, safety technology, control and instrumentation, reactor chemistry, systems and components, and health and environment. In each case, the R and D programs have short, medium, and long-term goals to achieve the overall strategic directions. Most of the programs seek to further develop and exploit some of the unique characteristics of pressurized heavy water reactors. Examples of this include high neutron economy and on-power fueling which allow several different fuel cycles, the presence of large water heat sinks for enhanced safety, and modular components that can be easily replaced for plant life extension. This presentation reviews AECL's product development directions and the R and D programs that have been begun for their development

  4. CANDU 6 - the highly successful medium sized reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 6 Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor system, featuring horizontal fuel channels and heavy water moderator continues to evolve, supported by AECL's strong commitment to comprehensive R and D programs. The initial CANDU 6 design started in the 1970's. The first plants went into service in 1983, and the latest version of the plant is under construction in China. With each plant the technology has evolved giving the dual advantages of proveness and modern technology. CANDU 6 delivers important advantages of the CANDU system with benefit to small and medium-sized grids. This technology has been successfully adopted by, and localized to varying extents in, each of the CANDU 6 markets. For example, all CANDU owners obtain their fuel from domestic suppliers. Progressive CANDU development continues at AECL to enhance this medium size product CANDU 6. There are three key CANDU development strategic thrusts: improved economics, fuel cycle flexibility, and enhanced safety. The CANDU 6 product is also enhanced by incorporating improvements and advanced features that will be arising from our CANDU Technology R and D programs in areas such as heavy water and tritium, control and instrumentation, fuel and fuel cycles, systems and equipment and safety and constructability. (author)

  5. A comparative study on the CANDU-6 reactivity device model based on Wolsong-2 physics measurement data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A benchmark calculation of a 713 MWe Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor was performed based on the physics measurement data of Wolsong-2 nuclear power plant by using WIMS-AECL, DRAGON, and RFSP codes. The benchmark calculation included sensitivity analyses on the number of energy groups, cross-section library, and the weighting spectrum of the homogenized lattice parameters. The effective multiplication factor, critical boron concentration, reactivity device worth and the flux distribution were estimated and compared with those obtained by the measurement and standard CANDU reactor physics design tools. In general, the prediction errors by WIMS-AECL, DRAGON and RFSP codes were within the acceptance limit for all the sensitivity calculations. The sensitivity calculations also showed that the calculation accuracy was improved when two energy groups were used especially for the prediction of the reactivity worth of strong absorbers such as mechanical control absorbers and shutoff rods. However, the prediction error increased when calculating the reactivity worth of the adjuster banks with two energy groups. Therefore a further study is recommended to obtain consistent results for the benchmark calculation. (authors)

  6. Romanian nuclear fuel fabrication and in-reactor fuel operational experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the Romanian nuclear program since mid 60's is made. After 1990, the new Romanian nuclear power authority, RENEL-GEN, elaborated a realistic Nuclear Fuel Program. This program went through the Romanian nuclear fuel plant qualification with the Canadian (AECL and ZPI) support, restarting in January 1995 of the industrial nuclear fuel production, quality evaluation of the fuel produced before 1990 and the recovery of this fuel. This new policy produced good results. FCN is since 1995 the only CANDU fuel supplier from outside Canada recognised by AECL as an authorised CANDU fuel manufacturer. The in-reactor performances and behaviour of the fuel manufactured by FCN after its qualification have been excellent. Very low - more then five times lesser than the design value - fuel defect rate has been recorded up to now and the average discharge of this fuel was with about 9% greater than the design value. Since mid 1998 when SNN took charge of the production of nuclear generated electricity, FCN made significant progresses in development and procurement of new and more efficient equipment and is now very close to double its fuel production capacity. After the completion of the recovery of the fuel produced before June 1990, FCN is already prepared to shift its fuel production to the so-called 'heavy' bundle containing about 19.3 kg of Uranium per bundle

  7. A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of a crystalline rock environment, Whiteshell research area, southeastern Manitoba, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A revised conceptual hydrogeologic model of regional groundwater flow in the crystalline rocks of the Whiteshell Research Area (WRA) has been developed by a team of AECL geoscientists. The revised model updates an earlier model developed in 1985, and has a much broader database. This database was compiled from Landsat and airborne radar images, geophysical surveys and surface mapping, and from analyses of fracture logs, hydraulic tests and water samples collected from a network of deep boreholes drilled across the WRA. The boundaries of the revised conceptual model were selected to coincide with the natural hydraulic boundaries assumed for the regional groundwater flow systems in the WRA. The upper and lower boundaries are the water table and a horizontal plane 4 km below ground surface. For modelling purposes the rocks below 4 km are considered to be impermeable. The rocks of the modelled region were divided on the basis of fracture characteristics into three categories: fractured zones (FZs); moderately fractured rock (MFR); and sparsely fractured rock (SFR). The FZs are regions of intensely fractured rock. Seventy-six FZs were selected to form the fault framework within the revised conceptual model. The physical rock/water properties of the FZs, MFR and SFR were selected by analysis of field data from hydraulic and tracer tests, laboratory test data and water quality data. These properties were used to define a mathematical groundwater flow model of the WRA using AECL's MOTIF finite element code (Ophori et al. 1995, 1996). (author). 29 refs., 4 tabs., 12 figs

  8. Advanced in fuel channel gauging tool - instrumenting a SLAR tool for dual purpose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the latest inspection technology to be implemented on a SLARette tool. In 2002, a gauging module was developed and qualified to replace the SLARette tool's blister module. This gauging module had five ultrasonic transducers for diameter creeping and wall thickness measurements. The results of the 2002 SLARette campaign were excellent; the data obtained came within ten microns of that collected with a CANDE tool in 2003. Gentilly-2 decided to continue developing gauging techniques and apparatus to be mounted on a SLARette tool. The new front-end module incorporates both sag measurement and revolutionary pressure tube (PT)/calandria tube (CT) gap modules. Advancements were made along several lines: (1) selection of a radiation-resistant sag module, (2) development of a sag simulator, (3) improvement of AECL gap measurement technology and finally, (4) design of a front-end encompassing module with motorized lift-off capability. This front-end module is only 19 centimeters long and is capable of performing all of the gauging measurements required for fuel channel life-cycle management. This paper will detail the development efforts of Hydro-Quebec, IREQ and AECL in improving fuel channel gauging technology, as well as the implementation and field results of the 2005 Gentilly-2 inspection campaign. (author)

  9. Blasting in the lower shaft station of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has the responsibility for research, and development of technologies, for the safe and permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel wastes. As part of this comprehensive program, AECL is constructing an Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, to evaluate aspects of the concepts of waste disposal deep in stable geological formations. No nuclear wastes will be used in the URL program. The lower shaft station of the URL was excavated between 1984 December and 1985 February. Substantial effort went into producing good results from the blasting to minimize the blast damage to the rock surrounding the excavation. All headings of the lower shaft station were excavated by the pilot heading and slash method. The blasts for the pilot headings were designed using a combination of Swedish and Canadian blast design methods, with the detailed layout of the blast holes being finalized at the excavation face. By experimenting with the perimeter of the pilot headings, it was possible to finalize the perimeter blast design before starting on the final walls

  10. Input modelling of ASSERT-PV V2R8M1 for RUFIC fuel bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the input modelling for subchannel analysis of CANFLEX-RU (RUFIC) fuel bundle which has been developed for an advanced fuel bundle of CANDU-6 reactor, using ASSERT-PV V2R8M1 code. Execution file of ASSERT-PV V2R8M1 code was recently transferred from AECL under JRDC agreement between KAERI and AECL. SSERT-PV V2R8M1 which is quite different from COBRA-IV-i code has been developed for thermalhydraulic analysis of CANDU-6 fuel channel by subchannel analysis method and updated so that 43-element CANDU fuel geometry can be applied. Hence, ASSERT code can be applied to the subchannel analysis of RUFIC fuel bundle. The present report was prepared for ASSERT input modelling of RUFIC fuel bundle. Since the ASSERT results highly depend on user's input modelling, the calculation results may be quite different among the user's input models. The objective of the present report is the preparation of detail description of the background information for input data and gives credibility of the calculation results

  11. Hydrogen isotope enrichment by hydrophobic Pt-catalyst in Japan and Western countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the studies on hydrogen isotope separation by hydrophobic Pt-catalyst in Japan and the Western countries between 1970 and 1990 were reviewed. The R and D of tritium separation from heavy water or light water by the H2/H2O-isotopic exchange system with the aid of hydrophobic Pt-catalyst at the CRNL in Canada, the Mound Facility in the USA, the University of Karlsruhe in Germany and the Nuclear Center of Mol in Belgium were technically successful, but the construction of a commercial H2/H2O-isotopic exchange plant was abandoned or suspended because of political or budgetary problems. On the other hand, the Fugen heavy water upgrader using hydrogen isotope exchange by hydrophobic Pt-catalyst was constructed commercially and is treating on the average of about 10 m3 degraded heavy water (about 30%D) a year since 1986. In Canada, the major thrust of the development program of a new heavy water production process is directed at the CIRCE process. The catalyst used in this process is based on AECL's structured-type hydrophobic screen Pt-catalysts which are about three times more active than the corresponding random-type. Recent advances have allowed a fourfold reduction in Pt-metal loading without affecting catalyst performance. The objective of AECL is to develop the catalyst technology to allow commitment of a prototype CIRCE plant in 1994. (author)

  12. Recent development of ELESTRES for applications to more demanding reactor operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELESTRES (ELEment Simulation and sTRESses) is an AECL's fuel performance computer program that models thermal, mechanical and micro-structural behaviours. It is used to assess the performance of CANDU fuel under normal operating conditions. It is also used to provide initial conditions for evaluating fuel behaviour during high-temperature transients. The CANDU fuel design is evolving to meet more requirements, such as higher burnup operations and higher coolant temperatures and pressures, compared to the current CANDU fuel designs. As a result, requirements on ELESTRES capability are also evolving. To meet the new requirements, the ELESTRES code analysis capabilities have been improved through the implementation of, or modification to, code models such as fission gas release, fuel pellet densification, flux depression (radial power distribution in the pellet), fuel pellet thermal conductivity, fuel sheath creep, fuel sheath yield strength, fuel sheath oxidation, two-dimensional heat transfer between the fuel pellet and the sheath; and an automatic finite-element meshing capability to handle various pellet shapes. The code design and development was planned, implemented, and verified in accordance with the AECL software quality assurance program. Code validation is currently underway. Preliminary comparative results between code models and data showed good agreement. (author)

  13. ACR-1000 pre-project regulatory review progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ACR-1000 design developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is a 1200 MWe-class light-water-cooled, heavy-water-moderated pressure-tube reactor, which has evolved from the well-established CANDU line of reactors. The ACR-1000 design retains the basic, proven, CANDU design features while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technologies to ensure fully competitive safety, operation, performance and economics. Improvements include greater operating and safety margins plus adherence and compliance with the latest safety objectives of designing with due consideration to external events and risk assessment. AECL initiated a pre-project regulatory review of the ACR-1000 reactor design by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) to confirm compliance with regulatory requirements and also incorporate regulatory feedback in the design process to minimize regulatory risks in obtaining construction and operating licences. Regulatory pre-project reviews have also been conducted earlier in the UK and US to ensure that the ACR design is compliant with international regulatory requirements. (author)

  14. Post-irradiation examination of prototype Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuel rods from NRU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sears, D.F.; Primeau, M.F.; Buchanan, C.; Rose, D. [Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)

    1997-08-01

    Three prototype fuel rods containing Al-64 wt% U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} (3.15 gU/cm{sup 3}) have been irradiated to their design burnup in the NRU reactor without incident. The fuel was fabricated using production-scale equipment and processes previously developed for Al-U{sub 3}Si fuel fabrication at Chalk River Laboratories, and special equipment developed for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} powder production and handling. The rods were irradiated in NRU up to 87 at% U-235 burnup under typical driver fuel conditions; i.e., nominal coolant inlet temperature 37{degrees}C, inlet pressure 654 kPa, mass flow 12.4 L/s, and element linear power ratings up to 73 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations showed that the fuel elements survived the irradiation without defects. Fuel core diametral increases and volumetric swelling were significantly lower than that of Al-61 wt% U{sub 3}Si fuel irradiated under similar conditions. This irradiation demonstrated that the fabrication techniques are adequate for full-scale fuel manufacture, and qualified the fuel for use in AECL`s research reactors.

  15. Factors affecting the differences in reactivity and dissolution rates between UO2 and spent nuclear fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strategies for the permanent disposal of spent nuclear fuel are being investigated by the U.S. Department of Energy at the Yucca Mountain site and by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in plutonic rock formations in the Canadian Shield. Uranium dioxide is the primary constituent of spent nuclear fuel and dissolution of the matrix is regarded as a necessary step for the release of radionuclides to repository groundwaters. In order to develop models to describe the dissolution of the U02 fuel matrix and subsequent release of radionuclides, it is necessary to understand both chemical and oxidative dissolution processes and how they can be affected by parameters such as groundwater composition, pH, temperature, surface area, radiolysis and redox potential. This report summarizes both published and on-going dissolution studies of U02 and both LWR and CANDU spent fuels being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in the U.S. and at AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories in Canada. The studies include both dissolution tests and electrochemical experiments to measure uranium dissolution rates. The report focuses on identifying differences in reactivity towards aqueous dissolution between U02 and spent fuel samples as well as estimating bounding values for uranium dissolution rates. This review also outlines the basic tenets for the development of a dissolution model that is based on electrochemical principles. (author). 49 refs., 2 tabs., 11 figs

  16. Streamlined Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) application to CANDU 6 stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past five years, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) has been working with CANDU utilities on Plant Life Management (PLiM) programs that will see existing CANDU plants through their design life and beyond. As part of this initiative, AECL and New Brunswick Power have partnered to develop a Systematic Approach to Maintenance program applied to selected critical plant systems. This paper will describe how streamlined Reliability Centred Maintenance (RCM) techniques have been applied on systems at the Point Lepreau Generating Station to provide a sound documented basis for maintenance strategies. These strategies have emphasised a hierarchy of condition based maintenance, time based maintenance and, where appropriate, corrective maintenance. The major steps in the process are described. The clear benefits of focusing maintenance in areas where it is needed and effective from the context of impact on system function requirements are described. The basis of the maintenance program is fully documented at the individual task level. The results of the program are also used to define maintenance strategies for future CANDU power plants. (author)

  17. The next generation of CANDU reactor: evolutionary economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDUR plants by applying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features from the CANDU 6 Reactors in service and the design of the CANDU 9. Advances made in the construction of the Wolsong reactors have been built upon in the current project in China. The basis for the new design is to evolve from the current CANDU units by replicating or adapting existing components for a new core design. Using slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core with light water coolant, and heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples of cost reduction features are given, together with enhancement of design margins

  18. Decontamination of radium from a commercial building located in a large Canadian city

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In August 1975, the Ministry of Health of the Province of Ontario at the request of one of the tenants of a building in a large Canadian city conducted a radiation survey of the third floor of the building. The survey, although preliminary, showed that high radiation existed on the third and second floors and that significant contamination existed in some other parts of the six-floor building. The contamination was identified as radium-226. An investigation revealed that the third floor of the building had been used during World War II for processing radium and also for some radium dial painting work. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) requested Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to remove the radium contaminant from the building. AECL assigned the job to its Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories (CRNL). The objectives were to reduce the radium concentration throughout the building so that radon decay products would be less than 0.02 Working Levels (WL) and exposure rates would be less than 50 μR/h. The techniques used and the extent of decontamination achieved are reported

  19. Investigating a Link Between Knowledge Management and NPP Organizational Performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effective knowledge management (KM) enhances a firm's capability to assimilate, create and exploit knowledge. KM is widely recognized in both the management literature and in practice as an important enabler of long term organizational performance. Its role is particularly important in technology intensive industries such as the nuclear power industry. Various nuclear power plants (NPPs) around the globe have begun to recognize the strategic importance of KM initiatives in achieving sustained high levels of operational performance. Although these organizations have been involved in KM-related activities for some time, they typically have not viewed and managed these activities from a KM perspective. Several NPPs have been early adopters of KM practices in the nuclear industry, and have been proactive in implementing company-wide KM programmes. However, at most NPPs, the concepts and benefits of KM are only beginning to be understood and have yet to be applied. Atomic Energy Canada Ltd. (AECL) undertook a research project entitled Knowledge Management (KM) for Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs), which formed part of the IAEA's Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on Comparative Analysis of Methods and Tools for Nuclear Knowledge Preservation. The programme scope of work included the following activities: conducting a literature review, participation in IAEA KM meetings and Assist Visits to NPPs, development of an industry survey, peer review and trial of the survey, and preparation of a summary report. This paper summarizes findings of the research done at AECL under this CRP.

  20. The geochemistry, age, and origin of groundwater in a mafic pluton, East Bull Lake, Ontario, Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is conducting geoscience investigations of several plutons in Canada's Precambrian Shield as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program, to determine whether such rock masses are suitable for the safe disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The East Bull Lake (EBL) gabbro-anorthosite layered complex is unique in this program as it is the only mafic pluton in which hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical studies have been conducted. These results can be compared with those of similar studies of granitic rocks which have been investigated more extensively. During the period, 1983-85, hydrogeological testing and hydrochemical sampling were conducted by the National Hydrology Research Institute of Environment Canada and AECL in boreholes drilled to depths of up to 850 m into the EBL pluton (Raven et al., 1987). This paper discusses the hydrogeochemistry of the pluton and identifies the major rock-water interactions controlling the chemistry. The spatial variability in chemistry will be shown to be related to the nature of the groundwater flow systems present at this site. The ages and origins of the groundwaters and their solutes are inferred from isotopic analyses

  1. Lessons learned from current Qinshan CANDU project and the impact on future NPP's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has adopted an evolutionary approach to the development of the CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) designs. Each new NPP project benefits from previous projects and contains an increasing number of fully proven enhancements. In accordance with this evolutionary design approach, AECL has built on the Wolsong and Qinshan successes and the solid performance of the reference CANDU stations to define, review and implement the enhancements for the CANDU 9 NPP. Some of these enhancements include fully integrated project information systems and databases, safety enhancements coming from PSA studies and licensing activities, distributed control systems for plant-wide control and an advanced control center which addresses human factors engineering concepts. Examples of the Qinshan CANDU project delivery enhancements are the utilization of electronic engineering tools for the complete plant, and the linking of these tools with the project material management system and document management systems. The project information is reviewed and approved at the engineering office in Canada and then transmitted to site electronically. Once the electronic data is at site the information packages are extracted as necessary to enable construction and facilitate contract needs with minimum effort. This paper will provide details of the CANDU Qinshan project experiences as well as describing some of the corresponding CANDU 9 enhancements. (author)

  2. Technologies for tritium control in fission reactors moderated with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to analyze the possible strategies and technologies, to be applied to HWR at Argentine nuclear power plants, for tritium control. The high contribution of tritium to the total dose has given rise to the need by the operators and/or designers to carry out developments and improvements to try to optimize tritium control technologies. Within a tritium control program, only that one which includes the heavy water detritiation will allow to reduce the tritium concentrations at optimum levels for safety and cost-effective power plant operation. The technology chosen to be applied should depend not only on the technical feasibility but also on the analysis of economic and juncture factors such as, among others, the quantity of heavy water to be treated. It is the authors' belief that AECL tendency concerning heavy water treatment in its future reactors would be to employ the CECE technology complemented with immobilization on titanium beds, with the 'on-line' detritiation in each nuclear power plant. This would not be of immediate application since our analysis suggests that AECL would assume that the process is under development and needs to be tested. (author). 21 refs

  3. Progress report - physical sciences TASCC division 1990 July 01 - December 31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A completely new administrative structure of AECL Research was implemented on 1990 July 1. All of the basic physics programs, together with accelerator physics, radiation applications and most of the chemistry programs of AECL, have been placed in a new organizational unit called Physical Sciences. This unit also includes the management of the National Fusion Program. The research programs of Physical Sciences are grouped into three divisions: Chemistry, Physics and TASCC. Progress in each division will henceforth be reported on a twice-yearly basis. This report is the first of the new series to be issued by the TASCC Division. During the period covered by this report, the operation of the superconducting cyclotron has matured considerably, with over 30 accelerated ion beams more-or-less routinely available for a wide variety of nuclear physics experiments. The TASCC team, together with all the engineers, trades-people and other staff members who contributed to the design, constructed and commissioning of the Tandem Accelerator Superconducting Cyclotron facility, are to be heartily congratulated on bringing it to its present highly successful state in an unusually short period of time. In conjunction with our many outside collaborators, we are now engaged on exciting experiments in several areas of nuclear physics research, as reported in the following pages. We are well on the way to the establishment of a truly National Centre for Nuclear Physics research in Canada

  4. Catalytic hydrogen recombination for nuclear containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic recombiners appear to be a credible option for hydrogen mitigation in nuclear containments. The passive operation, versatility and ease of back fitting are appealing for existing stations and new designs. Recently, a generation of wet-proofed catalyst materials have been developed at AECL which are highly specific to H2-O2, are active at ambient temperatures and are being evaluated for containment applications. Two types of catalytic recombiners were evaluated for hydrogen removal in containments based on the AECL catalyst. The first is a catalytic combustor for application in existing air streams such as provided by fans or ventilation systems. The second is an autocatalytic recombiner which uses the enthalpy of reaction to produce natural convective flow over the catalyst elements. Intermediate-scale results obtained in 6 m3 and 10 m3 spherical and cylindrical vessels are given to demonstrate self-starting limits, operating limits, removal capacity, scaling parameters, flow resistance, mixing behaviour in the vicinity of an operating recombiner and sensitivity to poisoning, fouling and radiation. (author). 13 refs., 10 figs

  5. Reliable reactor coolant pump seal performance - the station's role

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the early days of the Canada deuterium uranium (CANDU) power reactor program, operators and designers learned that close attention to reactor coolant pump (RCP) seals was imperative for achieving high-capacity factors. This lesson was driven home by unpredictable and frequent seal failures in the following early CANDU plants. Those seal failures caused forced outages, maintenance/dose burdens, and heavy-water losses. Because then-available industrial seal technology proved inadequate in providing satisfactory fixes, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) began a major effort to understand seal performance, develop improved designs, and evolve the station technology needed to attain the RCP seal reliable lifetime requirement of 4 yr. The payback has been huge: Fixes have been successfully implemented and excellent performance is now being achieved with AECL improved RCP seals. In this paper, the CANDU RCP seal experience, the methodology (with emphasis on the station's role) for attaining reliable long RCP seal life, and the adaptability of this technology to US light water reactors (LWRs) are discussed

  6. Geological disposal concept hearings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article outlines the progress to date on AECL spent-nuclear fuel geological disposal concept. Hearings for discussion, organised by the federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel, of issues related to this type of disposal method occur in three phases, phase I focuses on broad societal issues related to long term management of nuclear fuel waste; phase II will focus on the technical aspects of this method of disposal; and phase III will consist of community visits in New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba and Saskatchewan. This article provides the events surrounding the first two weeks of phase I hearings (extracted from UNECAN NEWS). In the first week of hearings, where submissions on general societal issues was the focus, there were 50 presentations including those by Natural Resources Canada, Energy Probe, Ontario Hydro, AECL, Canadian Nuclear Society, Aboriginal groups, environmental activist organizations (Northwatch, Saskatchewan Environmental Society, the Inter-Church Uranium Committee, and the Canadian Coalition for Nuclear responsibility). In the second week of hearings there was 33 presentations in which issues related to siting and implementation of a disposal facility was the focus. Phase II hearings dates are June 10-14, 17-21 and 27-28 in Toronto

  7. Repair of the NRU Reactor Vessel: Technical Challenges and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In May 2009, following a Class 4 power outage that affected most of Eastern Ontario, including the Chalk River Laboratories site, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) announced to its various stakeholders that a small heavy-water leak in the NRU reactor had been detected during routine monitoring while the reactor was being readied for return to service. Over the next 15 months AECL located, inspected, repaired and returned the NRU reactor to service. This presentation will focus on the extensive efforts required to support the unique activities associated with reactor vessel inspection and repair including initial assessment, repair site challenges, repair preparation and finally repair execution. The presentation will summarize: - Initial leak search and assessment of the vessel condition through the use of specialized tooling and non-destructive evaluation which resulted in one of the largest single NDE inspection campaigns ever carried out in the nuclear industry; - Challenges of executing a repair through 12 cm access ports at a distance of nine meters including the development of the specialized tooling; - The importance of development of repair techniques through mock up testing to perform welding repairs on a thin wall aluminium vessel and the measures taken and engineering challenges overcome to achieve a successful repair; - The final repair process, including site preparation, weld execution and final NDE inspection techniques; - Challenges encountered and lesson learned during the execution of weld repair, NDE inspections, and return-to-service of the reactor. (author)

  8. Technical report on implementation of reactor internal 3D modeling and visual database system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yeun Seung; Eom, Young Sam; Lee, Suk Hee; Ryu, Seung Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-06-01

    In this report was described a prototype of reactor internal 3D modeling and VDB system for NSSS design quality improvement. For improving NSSS design quality several cases of the nuclear developed nation`s integrated computer aided engineering system, such as Mitsubishi`s NUWINGS (Japan), AECL`s CANDID (Canada) and Duke Power`s PASCE (USA) were studied. On the basis of these studies the strategy for NSSS design improvement system was extracted and detail work scope was implemented as follows : 3D modelling of the reactor internals were implemented by using the parametric solid modeler, a prototype system of design document computerization and database was suggested, and walk-through simulation integrated with 3D modeling and VDB was accomplished. Major effects of NSSS design quality improvement system by using 3D modeling and VDB are the plant design optimization by simulation, improving the reliability through the single design database system and engineering cost reduction by improving productivity and efficiency. For applying the VDB to full scope of NSSS system design, 3D modelings of reactor coolant system and nuclear fuel assembly and fuel rod were attached as appendix. 2 tabs., 31 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new.

  9. The introduction of microbial nutrients into a nuclear waste disposal vault during excavation and operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL has developed a concept for permanent geological disposal of used nuclear fuel waste in Canada. This concept would involve disposal of the waste in corrosion-resistant metal containers, surrounded by compacted clay-based buffer and backfill materials, in a vault 500-1000 m deep in granitic rock of the Canadian Shield. Such a vault would not be a sterile environment. Microbial activity would be expected in those areas of a vault where effects of heat, moisture content, and radiation would not exclude microbial life and where sufficient nutrients would be present. Although the granitic rock environment is naturally nutrient-poor, a substantial amount of nutrients could be introduced from residues of explosives used in the excavation of a vault. Using standard rock leaching techniques, measurements of the concentrations of such residues were made in excavated rock, tunnel walls and mine service-water supplies at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory. The effects of these residues on the bacterial population size in groundwater were also determined. Results showed that the largest potential nutrient addition (both N and C) to a vault would result from using untreated broken rock as part of the backfill. Nitrate in the residues could increase groundwater bacterial populations by several orders of magnitude. (author)

  10. Annual report, 1981-82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent operational restructuring implemented grouped the Engineering, Chemical, and International Companies under CANDU Operations. The Research Company was charged with finding products and markets to bridge the gap in new orders for reactors apparent for the next few years. Net income rose 46 percent to $19.7 million. Economic slowdown in Canada and elsewhere had little effect as AECL continued to fufill obligations on previously negotiated multi-year contracts. Over 60 percent of commercial revenue came from outside Canada, and at $234 million was marginally higher than 1980-81. Development of the superconducting cyclotron continued at Chalk River, with successful testing of magnetic field and radiofrequency systems. The nuclear fuel waste management program continued, with selection of a site for an underground research laboratory near Pinawa, Manitoba. The Therac-25 high energy accelerator for cancer therapy neared completion of its development and manufacturing program. There are more than 10 orders already booked. A record 15.2 million curies of cobalt 60 were shipped, an increase of 25 percent in orders for gamma irradiation processing. The prototype Douglas Point generating station was returned to full power and reached its highest annual capacity factor since 1975. Conceptual design of the new standardized two 950MW-unit CANDU PHWR generating station was completed. AECL responded to a request for quotations from the Mexican government for its nuclear power program

  11. Fabrication of a CANFLEX-RU designed bundle for power ramp irradiation test in NRU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BDL-443 CANFLEX-RU bundle AKW was fabricated at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) for power ramp irradiation testing in NRU reactor. The bundle was fabricated with IDR and ADU fuel pellets in adjacent elements and contains fuel pellets enriched to 1.65 wt% 235U in the outer and intermediate rings and also contains pellets enriched to 2.00 wt% 235U in the inner ring. This bundle does not have a center element to allow for insertion on a hanger bar. KAERI produced the IDR pellets with the IDR-source UO2 powder supplied by BNFL. ADU pellets were fabricated and supplied by AECL. Bundle kits (Zircaloy-4 end plates, end plugs, and sheaths with brazed appendages) manufactured at KAERI earlier in 1996 were used for the fabrication of the bundle. The CANFLEX bundle was fabricated successfully at KAERI according to the QA provisions specified in references and as per relevant KAERI drawings and technical specification. This report covers the fabrication activities performed at KAERI. Fabrication processes performed at AECL will be documented in a separate report

  12. Radioactive decay properties of Bruce 'A' CANDUTM UO2 fuel and fuel recycle waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of the radioactive decay properties of irradiated CANDU fuel of the type used at the Bruce Nuclear Power Generating Station. The report is similar to AECL-4436/1 and AECL-4436/2, which describe the decay properties of Pickering fuel. Using revised reference input data, the computer codes LATREP and CANIGEN II were employed to calculate the mass, activity and decay heat of the component isotopes in irradiated Bruce fuel. The decay properties of the fuel are tabulated for burnup levels of 550, 685, 865 and 1045 GJ/kg U (150, 190, 240 and 290 MWh/kg U). The decay properties for the waste that would be produced from recycling the fuel in a Purex-type process are tabulated for a burnup of 685 GJ/kg U. The total alpha, beta and gamma activity, the gamma spectra and neutron emissions of the used fuel and recycle waste are also presented. The report also presents a comparison of the CANIGEN II generated data with other codes such as ISOGEN, ORIGEN, FISSPROD-2 and earlier CANIGEN data. A detailed analysis of the differences between codes is presented along with a comparison of the ability of the codes to correctly predicts measured decay heats, radiation fields and actinide concentrations. This report is intended to provide a reference source to assist both research programs and safety assessment studies within the Canadian Nuclear Waste Management Program

  13. Discussing spent nuclear fuel in high school classrooms: addressing public fears through early education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Inreach program combines the Deep River Science Academy (DRSA) 'learning through research' approach with state of the art communication technology to bring scientific research to high school classrooms. The Inreach program follows the DRSA teaching model where a university student tutor works on a research project with scientific staff at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories. Participating high school classes are located across Canada. The high school students learn about the ongoing research activities via weekly web conferences. In order to engage the students and encourage participation in the conferences, themed exercises linked to the research project are provided to the students. The DRSA's Inreach program uses a cost-effective internet technology to reach a wide audience, in an interactive setting, without anyone leaving their desks or offices. An example Inreach research project is presented here: an investigation of the potential of the Canadian supercritical water cooled reactor (SCWR) concept to burn transuranic elements (Np, Pu, Am, Cm) to reduce the impact of used nuclear fuel. During this project a university student worked with AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) researchers on technical aspects of the project, and high school students followed their progress and learned about the composition, hazards, and disposition options for used nuclear fuel. Previous projects included the effects of tritium on cellular viability and neutron diffraction measurement of residual stresses in automobile engines

  14. ACR-1000: Advanced I and C and IT systems to enhance operations and maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor ACR-1000 is a 1200-MWe-class Generation III+ nuclear power plant designed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Its design is evolutionary, starting with a strong base of proven CANDU reactor technology coupled with thoroughly demonstrated innovative features to enhance economics, safety, operability and maintainability. Two key design strategies were to expand the Instrumentation and Control (I and C) and Information Technology (IT) systems, and improve Operations and Maintenance (O and M) capability. AECL has developed ACR-1000 I and C and IT systems, including SMART CANDU, to improve the timeliness, the quality and the integration of the information made available to plant operators and engineers. These systems use automatic data mining and present organized and analyzed data to operators and engineers to facilitate diagnostics and reduce mental burden - thus increasing the ability to make proactive and informed decisions affecting plant operation. Major advances have also been made in designing and ACR-1000 control room itself. Additionally, direct feedback from CANDU plant operators on enhancing the ACR-1000's operability has permitted optimization of on-line maintenance and facilitated and reduced off-line maintenance. New features have been designed into the plant to reduce operating risk and reduce costs. This paper outlines how IT and O and M advances have enabled the ACR-1000 to meet and exceed performance and operability targets. (author)

  15. Features, events, processes, and safety factor analysis applied to a near-surface low-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stephens, M.E.; Dolinar, G.M.; Lange, B.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    An analysis of features, events, processes (FEPs) and other safety factors was applied to AECL`s proposed IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) near-surface LLRW disposal facility. The FEP analysis process which had been developed for and applied to high-level and transuranic disposal concepts was adapted for application to a low-level facility for which significant efforts in developing a safety case had already been made. The starting point for this process was a series of meetings of the project team to identify and briefly describe FEPs or safety factors which they thought should be considered. At this early stage participants were specifically asked not to screen ideas. This initial list was supplemented by selecting FEPs documented in other programs and comments received from an initial regulatory review. The entire list was then sorted by topic and common issues were grouped, and issues were classified in three priority categories and assigned to individuals for resolution. In this paper, the issue identification and resolution process will be described, from the initial description of an issue to its resolution and inclusion in the various levels of the safety case documentation.

  16. Nuclear safety review process at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada has a extensive health and safety organization in place to protect its facilities and employees, and the public in general. This consists of the operating groups who have the primary responsibility for safety, and a network of safety advisory groups and safety review committees for providing the broadest possible overview of facility safety. A rigorous multi-stage nuclear safety review process is specified by Company policies and procedures to ensure that all activities have undergone thorough review and have satisfied predetermined requirements. For major facilities, this includes up to five distinct safety review and licensing stages with approvals being required from both the Atomic Energy Control Board and AECL Nuclear Safety Advisory Committee for the major steps in the process. In addition, each approved operating facility, including its experimental program, undergoes regular independent safety review and assessment of ongoing operation. The role of the AECL Safety and Reliability Directorate in these activities is described. Other aspects of the overall safety review process including the development of safety criteria, the development of standard safety documentation, and the application of quality assurance to safety assessment activities are discussed. Some thinking is presented on possible future directions in the continuing evolution of these overall safety processes

  17. Waste Management Improvement Initiatives at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited - 13091

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) has been in operation for over 60 years. Radioactive, mixed, hazardous and non-hazardous wastes have been and continue to be generated at CRL as a result of research and development, radioisotope production, reactor operation and facility decommissioning activities. AECL has implemented several improvement initiatives at CRL to simplify the interface between waste generators and waste receivers: - Introduction of trained Waste Officers representing their facilities or activities at CRL; - Establishment of a Waste Management Customer Support Service as a Single-Point of Contact to provide guidance to waste generators for all waste management processes; and - Implementation of a streamlined approach for waste identification with emphasis on early identification of waste types and potential disposition paths. As a result of implementing these improvement initiatives, improvements in waste management and waste transfer efficiencies have been realized at CRL. These included: 1) waste generators contacting the Customer Support Service for information or guidance instead of various waste receivers; 2) more clear and consistent guidance provided to waste generators for waste management through the Customer Support Service; 3) more consistent and correct waste information provided to waste receivers through Waste Officers, resulting in reduced time and resources required for waste management (i.e., overall cost); 4) improved waste minimization and segregation approaches, as identified by in-house Waste Officers; and 5) enhanced communication between waste generators and waste management groups. (authors)

  18. Laboratory and modeling studies in search of the critical hydrogen concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The great success of hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for primary coolant in nuclear power plants is due to the prevention of net radiolysis and to maintenance of the corrosion potential below -230 mV (SHE) where the rate of stress corrosion cracking is minimized. The critical hydrogen concentration or CHC has been defined as that concentration of excess H2 in primary coolant water, which prevents net water radiolysis via the chain reaction OH + H2 ↔H2O + H (1, -1) H + H2O2 → H2O + OH (2) The principle oxidizing free radical (OH) is thus converted into a reducing radical (H), oxidation products are reduced back to water, and the net result is no chemical change. A set of benchmark experiments at the U2 reactor in Chalk River have been reported in an extensive AECL report, which indicate that the CHC in this reactor is ca. 25 micro-molar. Using the review of yields and reaction rates set forth in another recent AECL report, the Chalk River experiments have been modelled in work at NNL, Harwell. The model was not able to successfully reproduce the experimental CHC, or the steady-state H2 concentrations (SSH2) in the absence of excess hydrogen. A sensitivity analysis of the entire model was carried out. Essentially three important variables have been found to dominate the result. Reaction rate (1) is overwhelmingly important in determining how much H2 is needed to accomplish the chain back-reaction. Almost with equal importance, the back reaction (-1) needs to be considered at 300 deg. C, but there is some uncertainty of its magnitude. Finally, the relative yields of radicals and molecular products (i.e. H2, H2O2 ) in particular H2:OH from the radiolysis are critical. Laboratory studies of hydrogenated water radiation chemistry have been carried out with a van de Graaff electron accelerator at Notre Dame Radiation Laboratory. Modelling of the hydrogen produced as a function of the hydrogen input, suggests that the reaction rate (-1) is ca. two times larger at 300

  19. Nuclear knowledge management strategies in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Canadian Nuclear Industry recognizes the importance of nuclear knowledge management and has already implemented a number of initiatives to maintain competency, capture and preserve existing knowledge, advance the nuclear technology, develop future nuclear workers, and maintain a critical R and D capability. Although this paper addresses the Canadian scene in general, it will focus on knowledge management from a technology development point of view. Therefore, special emphasis will be placed on activities underway at present at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Maintaining competency is a high priority issue. With the on-going retirement of nuclear workers, resource management, succession planning and technical training programs are all in place at AECL. For example, a comprehensive assessment was recently completed to identify critical core competencies and the potential and timing of future retirements. Using a risk-based approach, the technology disciplines were prioritized and a plan was developed to address the requirements. The plan is now being implemented to hire, train, mentor and develop a new core of technical experts. Collaboration and knowledge sharing are important success factors in that regard. This is being achieved through cross-functional teamwork, consolidation of expertise, on-going work on nuclear power plant projects (e.g., the just completed units in China and ongoing work on unit 2 at the Romanian Cernavoda site), developing and designing new products (Advanced CANDU Reactor, ACR-700), adopting and improving Quality Management Systems (e.g., ISO 9001:2000 Global Certification and pursuing business excellence through the adoption of the Canadian Framework for Business Excellence). Capturing and preserving existing knowledge as well as advancing nuclear technology have also received significant attention. Fully computerized engineering tools have been developed and used to document the complete design of CANDU plants, and

  20. Communicating Qualitative Risk to a Rural Audience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many risk assessment involve complex mathematical models and a thorough understanding, communicating the risk to the general public can present a considerable challenge. Comprehending a 'one-in-a-million' risk some 10 000 years in the future can be a challenge to the average citizen who is surrounded by more imminent dangers and who has, by virtue of their familiarity, become immune to them. A number of years ago, the then Japan Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI) signed a multi-year cooperative agreement with Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd (AECL) that included a number of self-contained radioisotope diffusion and migration experiments to be performed under in situ geochemical conditions in a specially designed radiochemistry laboratory at a depth of 240 metres in AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. This underground facility has been excavated in a previously undisturbed granite pluton in the Canadian Shield to study various aspects of high-level nuclear waste management. The region has been the home to AECL's Whiteshell Laboratories since the early 1960's and is surrounded by lakes, forests, some agriculture and mining activity. The economy of town, Lac du Bonnet is based on tourism, forestry, mining and agriculture. The relationship between Lac du Bonnet and AECL has generally been good although there have been attempts by a few local citizens, aided by antinuclear activists from Winnipeg, Manitoba's capital, to curtail the operation of the URL. Although the use of radioisotopes was approved by the then-Atomic Energy Control Board, the Canadian regulatory body, maintaining good working relations with the elected officials of the neighbouring communities was essential to the proposed radioisotope migration experiments. One reason for this was that minute quantities of radioisotope solutions needed to be transported over a distance of ∼25 km between the URL and the Whiteshell Laboratories over public roads. As

  1. ACR-1000 Project - Licensing Opportunities and Challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: 1000 (ACR-1000) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. The ACR-1000 design has evolved from AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the experience and feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The Canadian nuclear reactor design evolution that has reached today's stage represented by the ACR-1000 as described above, has a long history dating back to the early 1950s. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few other countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. With the Canadian nuclear technology development, in parallel, the development of Canadian regulations and licensing processes took place. This latter development was carried out by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), established in 1946. The AECB mandate, originally focused on security, and later extended to include nuclear safety, was focused on regulating the nuclear sector, establishing health and safety regulations, and also played an instrumental role in forming the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). The AECB, which preceded the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC), established in 2000, licensed all CANDU power reactors in Canada and provided assistance to the overseas regulatory authorities in licensing of CANDU reactors in Korea, Argentina, China and Romania. The regulatory framework in Canada is currently in a period of change. The CNSC is further developing its requirements for new reactor designs in Canada whilst at the same time AECL development of the ACR design. This situation has created

  2. Replacement of steam generators for Embalse NGS - the steam generator cartridge design and manufacturing issues, localization and site assembly challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embalse Nuclear Generating Station (Central Nuclear Embalse) was placed in service in 1983 and the outage for refurbishment is foreseen for 2011/2012. Embalse is equipped with four vertical inverted 'U' tube-type Steam Generators (SG) with integral preheater, I-800 tubes and carbon steel internals. Between 2002-2006, the owner assessed the potential for SG life extension; Nucleoelectrica Argentina S.A. (NA-SA) and AECL and a number of actions were completed towards meeting this objective (i.e.: primary divider plate replacement, additional U Bend support and inspection port installation). However, degradation of the tube supports (carbon steel broached plate) and U-bend supports due to Flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) compromised the possibility for life extension of these Steam Generators. This issue, coupled with the plan to increase the plant power output during the life extension of the station, resulted in the strategic decision by NA-SA, to replace the Steam Generators. Several options were considered for SG replacement: In-situ replacement of the SG tube bundle, the original steam drum to be re-used; Removal and replacement of the entire SG (including the steam drum); and, Replacement of the bottom portion of the SG, i.e. the shell, the tube bundle, the tube sheet, the primary head and its internals and the primary nozzles with a factory assembled cartridge (collectively called the 'SG cartridge'). In this option, the original steam drum would be retained for the extended life. The final decision, based on the recommendations from the Life Assessment Study performed during the Pre-project Condition Assessment Process, is to replace only the Steam Generator cartridges. NA-SA requested AECL's support for the preparation of the Technical Specification for the replacement cartridges, allowing for the higher plant output. This paper presents the design basis for the technical requirements covered in the Technical Specification. The specified requirements include

  3. Enhanced candu 6 reactor: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 6 power reactor is visionary in its approach, renowned for its on-power refuelling capability and proven over years of safe, economical and reliable power production. Developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU 6 design offers excellent performance utilizing state-of-the-art technology. The first CANDU 6 plants went into service in the early 1980s as leading edge technology and the design has been continuously advanced to maintain superior performance with an outstanding safety record. The first set of CANDU 6 plants - Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau in Canada, Embalse in Argentina and Wolsong- Unit 1 in Korea - have been in service for more than 22 years and are still producing electricity at peak performance; to the end of 2004, their average Lifetime Capacity Factor was 83.2%. The newer CANDU 6 units in Romania (Cernavoda 1), Korea (Wolsong-Units 2, 3 and 4) and Qinshan (Phase III- Units 1 and 2) have also been performing at outstanding levels. The average lifetime Capacity Factor of the 10 CANDU 6 operating units around the world has been 87% to the end of 2004. Building on these successes, AECL is committed to the further development of this highly successful design, now focussing on meeting customers' needs for reduced costs, further improvements to plant operation and performance, enhanced safety and incorporating up-to-date technology, as warranted. This has resulted in AECL embarking on improving the CANDU 6 design through an upgraded product termed the ''Enhanced CANDU 6'' (EC6), which incorporates several attractive but proven features that make the CANDU 6 reactor even more economical, safer and easier to operate. Some of the key features that are being incorporated into the EC6 include increasing the plant's power output, shortening the overall project schedule, decreasing the capital cost, dealing with obsolescence issues, optimizing maintenance outages and incorporating lessons learnt through feedback obtained from the

  4. Pre-licensing of the Advanced CANDU Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) developed the Advanced CANDU Reactor-700 (ACR-700) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6 reactor. As further advancement of the ACR design, AECL is currently developing the ACR-1000 for the Canadian and international market. The ACR-1000 is aimed at producing electrical power for a capital cost and a unit-energy cost significantly less than that of the current generation of operating nuclear plants, while achieving shorter construction schedule, high plant capacity factor, improved operations and maintenance, increased operating life, and enhanced safety features. The reference ACR-1000 plant design is based on an integrated two-unit plant, using enriched fuel and light-water coolant, with each unit having a nominal gross electrical output of 1165 MWe. The ACR-1000 design has evolved from AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU systems, components, and materials, as well as the experience and feedback received from owners and operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. It also features major improvements in economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The CANDU system is ideally suited to this evolutionary approach since the modular fuel channel reactor design can be modified, through a series of incremental changes in the reactor core design, to increase the power output and improve the overall safety, economics, and performance. The safety enhancements made in ACR-1000 encompass improved safety margins, performance and reliability of safety related systems. In particular, the use of the CANFLEX-ACR fuel bundle, with lower linear rating and higher critical heat flux, provides increased operating and safety margins. Safety features draw from those of the existing CANDU plants (e.g., the two

  5. Recycled uranium: An advanced fuel for CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of recycled uranium (RU) fuel offers significant benefits to CANDU reactor operators particularly if used in conjunction with advanced fuel bundle designs that have enhanced performance characteristics. Furthermore, these benefits can be realised using existing fuel production technologies and practices and with almost negligible change to fuel receipt and handling procedures at the reactor. The paper will demonstrate that the supply of RU as a ceramic-grade UO2 powder will increasingly become available as a secure option to virgin natural uranium and slightly enriched uranium(SEU). In the context of RU use in Canadian CANDU reactors, existing national and international transport regulations and arrangements adequately allow all material movements between the reprocessor, RU powder supplier, Canadian CANDU fuel manufacturer and Canadian CANDU reactor operator. Studies have been undertaken of the impact on personnel dose during fuel manufacturing operations from the increased specific activity of the RU compared to natural uranium. These studies have shown that this impact can be readily minimised without significant cost penalty to the acceptable levels recognised in modem standards for fuel manufacturing operations. The successful and extensive use of RU, arising from spent Magnox fuel, in British Energy's Advanced Gas-Cooled reactors is cited as relevant practical commercial scale experience. The CANFLEX fuel bundle design has been developed by AECL (Canada) and KAERI (Korea) to facilitate the achievement of higher bum-ups and greater fuel performance margins necessary if the full economic potential of advanced CANDU fuel cycles are to be achieved. The manufacture of a CANFLEX fuel bundle containing RU pellets derived from irradiated PWR fuel reprocessed in the THORP plant of BNFL is described. This provided a very practical verification of dose modelling calculations and also demonstrated that the increase of external activity is unlikely to require any

  6. The evolution of the CANDU energy system - ready for Europe's energy future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As air quality and climate change issues receive increasing attention, the opportunity for nuclear to play a larger role in the coming decades also increases. The good performance of the current fleet of nuclear plants is crucial evidence of nuclear's potential. The excellent record of Cernavoda-1 is an important part of this, and demonstrates the maturity of the Romanian program and of the CANDU design approach. However, the emerging energy market also presents a stringent economic challenge. Current NPP designs, while established as reliable electricity producers, are seen as limited by high capital costs. In some cases, the response to the economic challenge is to consider radical changes to new design concepts, with attendant development risks from lack of provenness. Because of the flexibility of the CANDU system, it is possible to significantly extend the mid-size CANDU design, creating a Next Generation product, without sacrificing the extensive design, delivery and operations information base for CANDU. This enables a design with superior safety characteristics while at the same time meeting the economic challenge of emerging markets. The Romanian nuclear program has progressed successfully forward, leading to the successful operation of Cernavoda-1, and the project to bring Cernavoda-2 to commercial operation. The Romanian nuclear industry has become a full-fledged member of the CANDU community, with all areas of nuclear technology well established and benefiting from international cooperation with other CANDU organizations. AECL is an active partner with Romanian nuclear organizations, both through cooperative development programs, commercial contracts, and also through the activities of the CANDU owners' Group (COG). The Cernavoda project is part of the CANDU 6 family of nuclear power plants developed by AECL. The modular fuel channel reactor concept can be modified extensively, through a series of incremental changes, to improve economics, safety

  7. ANL progress in minimizing effects of LEU conversion on calcination of fission-product 99Mo acid waste solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program is to limit the use of high-enriched uranium (HEU) in research and test reactors by substituting low-enriched uranium (LEU) wherever possible. The work reported here documents technical progress in our partnership with MDS Nordion (MSDN), Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL) and SGN of France to convert the 99Mo production in the MAPLE reactors and the New Processing Facility at AECL Chalk River Laboratories from the use of HEU targets to LEU targets. The role of Argonne National Laboratory and the Chemical Engineering Division in the program is to work with MDSN to minimize the impact of conversion on the efficiency and reliability of their production effort. The primary concern with the conversion to LEU from HEU targets is that it would result in a five fold increase in the total uranium. This increase is likely to result in more liquid waste from the process. We have been working with MDSN/AECL/SGN to minimize liquid waste volume and the effects of 5 times more uranium on waste treatment and storage. The planned process for solidifying high level fissile waste from the processing of HEU targets in the New Processing Facility will use calcination of the uranium waste solution. This method generates NO2 gas and UO3 solid. We have studied two processes for treating the uranium-rich liquid waste from a LEU-based process for MDSN: (1) an optimized direct calcination process that is similar to the planned process, and (2), a calcination of uranyl oxalate precipitate. The specific goal of the work reported here was to characterize the chemical reactions that occur during these two processes. In particular, the compositions of the gaseous and solid products were of interest. A series of experiments was carried out to show the effects of temperature and the redox potential of the reaction atmosphere. The primary products of the direct calcination process were mixtures of U3O8 and UO3 solids

  8. Advanced CANDU reactor, evolution and innovation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the ACRTM (Advanced CANDU(1) ReactorTM) to meet today's market challenges. It is a light water tube type pressurized water reactor and is the latest evolution of CANDU technology. The design was launched to be cost-competitive with other generating sources, while building on the unique safety and operational advantages of the CANDU design. The ACR is an evolutionary design that retains the proven CANDU features delivered at Qinshan Phase III, while incorporating a set of innovative features and proven state-of-the-art technologies that have emerged from AECL's ongoing Research, Development and Demonstration programs. This approach ensures that key design parameters are well supported by existing reactor experience and R and D. The result is a design that delivers a new threshold in safety, performance and economics while retaining ample design margin. AECL has developed the enabling technologies and components for the ACR design, and has applied them to two plant sizes, ACR-700 and ACR-1000. The ACR integrates hallmark characteristics of traditional CANDU plants (e.g. horizontal pressure tubes, on power fuelling, automated reactor control systems, and dual independent shutdown systems), new innovations (e.g. state-of-the- art control room, extensive use of modular construction techniques, smaller reactor core, enriched uranium fuel), and certain PWR features (e.g. light water coolant, negative void reactivity). The ACR is designed for a high capacity factor and low operation and maintenance costs. It fully exploits the construction techniques that contributed to the impressive schedule accomplishments at Qinshan Phase III and therefore features a very short construction schedule, 40 months construction schedule (First Concrete to Fuel Loading ) for the first unit with improvements to 36 months for later units. The ACR is a true Gen-III plus product with a broad application. It has been proven to be an ideal

  9. Darlington NGS fuel damage investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darlington Unit 2 operated successfully from July to November 1990, but then a fuelling machine jammed, and the problem was soon traced to fuel debris. Initial inspections done with the CIGAR video camera, and subsequent metallurgical inspections at AECL, showed that vibration had produced fatigue cracking of some fuel end plates, and the damaged fuel had fretted one or two pressure tubes. The inspection and modelling programs showed that the cause of the trouble was resonant amplification of pressure pulsations produced by the primary heat transport system pumps. The trouble, which also affected the operation of Unit 1, has been cured by changing the number of vanes on each impeller from five to seven. Other possible solutions were considered

  10. Installation of an irradiated fuel bundle discharge counter at Bruce NGS-B 3 000 MW(e) CANDU power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design, manufacture and installation of an irradiated fuel bundle discharge counter for the multi-unit CANDU Bruce NGS-B Generating Station involved contributions from the International Atomic Energy Agency (Agency), designers (AECL), contractors, manufacturers, utility and the regulatory agency. The installation at Bruce NGS-B was the first made by the Agency as a retrofit to a multi-unit CANDU reactor approaching its fist critical operation, where the whole project was the responsibility of the Agency and where the original design of the reactor had not had provision for the Agency equipment. The scheduling and integration of the installation into the normal activities involved in starting up a 3 000 MW(e) multi-unit generating station were successfully achieved. The Agency has demonstrated the capability and performance of the fuel discharge counter

  11. Development of best estimate auditing code for CANDU thermal hydraulic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B. D.; Lee, W. J.; Lim, H. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic auditing code for the CANDU reactor, modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool, i.e. RELAP5/MOD3. This scope of project is first step of the whole project, thus focus to the establishment of improvement area. The study was performed by reconsideration of the previous code assessment works and investigation of AECL design analysis tools. In order to identify the thermal hydraulic phenomena for events, the whole system of CANDU plant was divided into main functional systems and subcomponents. Each phenomena was addressed to the each subcomponent. Finally improvement areas of model development for auditing tool were established based on the identified phenomena. 8 refs., 21 figs., 19 tabs. (Author)

  12. Development of a best estimate auditing code for CANDU thermal hydraulic safety analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, B.D.; Lee, W.J.; Lim, H.S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejeon (Korea)

    2000-03-01

    The main purpose of this study is to develop a thermal hydraulic auditing code for the CANDU reactor, modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool , i.e. RELAP5/MOD3. This scope of project is a third step of the whole project, and expand the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU version for implementation of LOCA Analysis. There are three main area of model development, i.e. Moody critical flow model, flow regime model of horizontal CANDU bundle, and fuel element heatup model when the stratification occurs. Newly developed version, namely RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU+ is applicable to CANDU plant analysis with keeping the function of light water reactor analysis. The limited validations of model installation were performed. Assessment of CHF model using AECL separated effect test and calculation for Wolsong 2 plant were performed also for the applicability test of the developed version. 15 refs., 37 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  13. Development of Off-take Model, Subcooled Boiling Model, and Radiation Heat Transfer Input Model into the MARS Code for a Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, C.; Rhee, B. W.; Chung, B. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, S. H.; Kim, M. W. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to a lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use a vendor's code for a regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of the existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to the MARS code including a quality assurance of the developed models.

  14. Accelerating the Whiteshell Laboratories Decommissioning Through the Implementation of a Projectized and Delivery-Focused Organization - 13074

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whiteshell Laboratories (WL) is a nuclear research site in Canada that was commissioned in 1964 by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. It covers a total area of approximately 4,375 hectares (10,800 acres) and includes the main campus site, the Waste Management Area (WMA) and outer areas of land identified as not used for or impacted by nuclear development or operations. The WL site employed up to 1100 staff. Site activities included the successful operation of a 60 MW organic liquid-cooled research reactor from 1965 to 1985, and various research programs including reactor safety research, small reactor development, fuel development, biophysics and radiation applications, as well as work under the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. In 1997, AECL made a business decision to discontinue research programs and operations at WL, and obtained government concurrence in 1998. The Nuclear Legacy Liabilities Program (NLLP) was established in 2006 by the Canadian Government to remediate nuclear legacy liabilities in a safe and cost effective manner, including the WL site. The NLLP is being implemented by AECL under the governance of a Natural Resources Canada (NRCan)/AECL Joint Oversight Committee (JOC). Significant progress has since been made, and the WL site currently holds the only Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) nuclear research site decommissioning license in Canada. The current decommissioning license is in place until the end of 2018. The present schedule planned for main campus decommissioning is 30 years (to 2037), followed by institutional control of the WMA until a National plan is implemented for the long-term management of nuclear waste. There is an impetus to advance work and complete decommissioning sooner. To accomplish this, AECL has added significant resources, reorganized and moved to a projectized environment. This presentation outlines changes made to the organization, the tools implemented to foster projectization, and the benefits

  15. The potential for vault-induced seismicity in nuclear fuel waste disposal: experience from Canadian mines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seismic event which causes damage to an underground opening is called a rockburst. Practical experience indicates that these damaging seismic events are associated with deep mines where extraction ratios are greater than 0.6. For the arrangement being considered by AECL for nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults, extraction ratios, for the room and pillar design, will be less than 0.3. At this extraction ratio the stress magnitudes will not be sufficient to induce seismic events that can damage the underground openings. Documented world-wide experience shows that unless the underground opening is very close to the source of a naturally occurring seismic event, such as an earthquake, the opening will also not experience any significant damage. Backfilling a disposal vault will improve its resistance to earthquake damage. Backfilling a disposal vault will also reduce the total convergence of the openings caused by thermal loads and hence minimize the potential for thermally-induced seismic events. (author)

  16. Validation of MATRA-h hydraulic model for HANARO fuel assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A subchannel analysis computer code named MATRA-h is used to evaluate the thermal margin of HANARO core. The accurate prediction of subchannel velocity is very important for evaluation of thermal margin. The average subchannel velocities of 18 element fuel assembly were obtained from the results of velocity measurement test. To validate the adequacy of the hydraulic model, the code predictions were compared with the experimental results for the subchannel velocity distribution in 18 element fuel channel. The calculated subchannel velocity distributions in the central channels coincided with those of experiment, while the subchannel velocities in the outer channels were smaller. It is expected that the hydraulic model of MATRA-h gives conservative CHF values from the point of safety because CHF phenomena had been occurred in the outer fuel element in the bundle CHF test of AECL

  17. SCC-induced failure of a 304 stainless steel pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 1991 January 12, a 304 Stainless Steel (SS) suction line in the AECL-Research NRU reactor failed, shutting down the reactor for approximately 12 months. The pipe, a 32 mm schedule 40 304 stainless steel line exposed to D2O at temperatures ≤35 degrees C had been in service for approximately 20 years, although no manufacturing data or composition specifications were available. The failure and resultant leak resulted in a small loss of D2O moderator from the reactor vessel. The pipe cracked approximately 180 degrees C around the circumference of a weld. This failure was unexpected and hense a thorough metallographic examination was carried out on the failed section, on the rest of the line (Line 1212), and on representative samples from the rest of the reactor in order to assess the integrity of the remaining piping

  18. Modelling iodine behaviour using LIRIC 3.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wren, J.C.; Glowa, G.A.; Ball, J.M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs.

    1996-12-01

    The overall objective of the iodine chemistry research program at the Whiteshell Laboratories of AECL is to develop and validate the LIRIC (Library of Iodine Reactions In Containment) model. The model, once validated, is intended as either a stand-alone analytical tool or for incorporation into a code for licensing analyses of fission-product behaviour in containment. LIRIC is currently being used to assess the role and importance of individual phenomena on iodine volatility under reactor accident conditions and, thus, help to establish priorities within the iodine research program. The LIRIC model has undergone significant alterations since it was last reported (LIRIC 2.0), mainly as a result of considerable development in understanding of iodine behaviour over the last few years. The new version, LIRIC 3.0, has been used to simulate various results from the Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) with reasonable success, although under somewhat limited conditions.

  19. User's manual for the CC3 computer models of the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is assessing a concept for disposing of CANDU reactor fuel waste in a vault deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. A computer program called the Systems Variability Analysis Code (SYVAC) has been developed as an analytical tool for the postclosure (long-term) assessment of the concept, and for environmental assessments of other systems. SYVAC3, the third generation of the code, is an executive program that directs repeated simulation of the disposal system, which is represented by the CC3 (Canadian Concept, generation 3) models comprising a design-specific vault, a site-specific geosphere and a biosphere typical of the Canadian Shield. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 21 figs

  20. Dosimetry practice for irradiation of the Mediterranean fruit fly Ceratitis capitata (Wied.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a sterile insect technique (SIT) programme the sterility of mass-reared insects, in our case Mediterranean fruit flies, is of primary importance. Mediterranean fruit fly pupae are irradiated in an AECL-CP-JS-7400 irradiator. Originally the capacity was 31,300 Ci, but because of the natural decay of cobalt, the actual source strength is 14,836 Ci. Thus, the dose with which the pupae are irradiated is 14.5 +- 1 krad (145 +- 10 Gy). A great risk in the daily release of sterile flies is that some batches of fertile flies may also be released. To ensure that this does not occur, continuous dosimetric check-ups have to routinely be carried out. Fricke dosimetry is ideal for this purpose because it has a range of response to doses of 4 to 40 krad (40 to 400 Gy) and because it is an economic and simple dosimetric system. (author)

  1. Hand-held electronic data collection and procedure environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of a CANDU Owners Group project, AECL has developed a hand-held electronic data collection and procedure environment. Integral to this environment is the Computerized Procedure Engine. The development of the CPE allows operators, maintainers, and technical support staff to execute virtually any type of station procedure on a general-purpose PC-compatible hand-held computer. There are several advantages to using the computerized procedures: less paper use and handling, reduction in human error, reduction in rework in the field, an increase in procedural compliance, and immediate availability of data to download to databases and plant information systems. The paper describes: the advantages of using computerized procedures, why early forms of computerized procedures were inadequate, the features that the Computerized Procedure Engineoffers to the user, the streamlined life cycle of a computerized procedure, and field experience. The paper concludes that computerized procedures are ready for pilot applications at stations. (author)

  2. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor

  3. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  4. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 2000-2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2001 and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 2000-2001. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with progress being reported in the construction of two CANDU 6 reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, the anticipated completion of Cernavoda unit 2, the completion of spent fuel storage at Cernavoda unit 1 in Romania, as well as the service business with New Brunswick Power, Ontario Power Generation, Bruce Power and Hydro Quebec in the refurbishment of operating, CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs discussions continue on funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for Materials Research (CNF) and progress on the Maple medical isotope reactor.

  5. Effects of end-of-life power ramping on UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A power-ramp test performed on fuel from the Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD) reactor as part of the AECL Research extended-burnup program is described. The National Research Universal (NRU) reactor at Chalk River was used to ramp NPD fuel burned up to about 35 MW.d/kg U at declining power. The NRU ramp to about 36 kW/m proved sufficient to cause significant fission-gas release and diametral strain in the fuel elements. The ceramographic observations on both the ex-NPD and ex-NRU fuel are described and contrasted. Parallels are drawn with other recent observations on high-burnup fuel, and causative mechanisms for increased diametral strain and gas release are inferred

  6. Catalytic removal of dissolved oxygen for nuclear and non-nuclear applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygen, present at high concentrations in water, is the main cause of corrosion in process equipment such as steam generators in power production and water-cooled stator windings in turbine generators. Thus, mitigating corrosion involves removal of oxygen by a method such as mechanical deaeration, chemical scavenging or catalytic recombination with hydrogen. Where hydrogen is already present in the water or that it can be conveniently provided, the catalytic recombination has become a preferred method because of its ability to remove oxygen to very low levels (a few ppb levels) without producing any undesirable by-products. Palladium supported on anion or cation exchange resins is the most common catalyst used in industry. Canadian utilities use sulfite-based resins to scavenge the oxygen in stator cooling water application. In the 1980's, AECL demonstrated the application of wetproofed catalysts for dissolved oxygen removal under an EPRI/AECL contract. The work reported here is focussed on further development of palladium- and platinum-based catalysts on inert styrenedivinylbenzene (SDB) polymer support for dissolved oxygen removal applications. The inert nature of the catalyst support is expected to be an additional benefit for this application. A lab-scale plug flow reactor, 19-mm diameter by 100-mm long, was used for the tests at water fluxes ranging from 400 to 900 mol·s-1·m-2 (4.3 to 9.6 bed volumes per minute) at ambient temperatures. The catalyst performance was characterized in terms of conversion efficiency based on dissolved oxygen concentrations at the inlet and outlet of the reactor and benchmarked against the commercial catalyst Lewatit OC1045 (marketed by Bayer). The effect of the type of precious metal (platinum or palladium), the catalyst support particle size distribution, the catalyst metal loading and the molar ratio of reactants (oxygen and hydrogen) on conversion efficiency was studied to optimize the catalyst performance. Also, the effect

  7. The gentle giants of healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, and medical radioisotope production are explained at a popular level, for the non-specialist. Nuclear medicine in Canada uses either Positron emission tomography (PET), or single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). PET is used at the Montreal Neurological Institute to study epilepsy, brain tumours, stroke, or arterio-venous malformations. The much cheaper SPECT technique does many of the things that PET will do, and may eventually replace it to a considerable extent. This article features the manufacture of radioisotopes by Nordion Ltd., formerly known as AECL Radiochemical Co. Nordion supplies more than 20 isotopes, including about 80% of the world demand for 60Co, and 70% of all reactor isotopes, including the medically important 99Tc(m), 125I and 201Tl. Also featured is the intended acquisition (now cancelled) by Sherbrooke University of a 10-MW Slowpoke heating and isotope production reactor

  8. Updated follow-up of long-term Chalk River employees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on the follow-up of CRNL employees who died during employment or after retirement have been updated to 1982 December 31. Updated tables on mortality for AECL participants in the 1953 NRX clean-up and in the 1958 NRU decontamination are also included in this report. Preliminary mortality data on two other groups are presented here for (a) female employees of CRNL, 1966-1982 and (b) male employees of CRNL who have accumulated lifetime occupational doses of 0.2 Sv (20 rem) or more. Data on types of fatal cancer recorded for long-term male CRNL employees over the period 1966-1982 are also given. No statistically significant increases in cancer deaths were found in any of the groups analyzed

  9. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1999-2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the annual report of the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the year ending March 31, 2000, and summarizes the activities of AECL during the period 1999-2000. The activities covered in this report include the CANDU reactor business, with the completion of the Wolsong unit 4 in the Republic of Korea, progress in the construction of two CANDU reactors for the Qinshan CANDU project in China, as well as the service business with Ontario Power Generation in the rehabilitation and life extension of operating CANDU reactors. In the R and D programs there is on-going effort towards the next generation of reactor technologies for CANDU nuclear power plants, discussions continue on the funding for the Canadian Neutron Facility for materials research (CNF) and progress being made on the Maple medical isotope reactor

  10. Creep and shrinkage analysis for concrete spent fuel dry storage module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CANDU reactors are designed in Canada and are built and operated worldwide to produce electricity economically with no emission of green house gases. This paper presents creep and shrinkage analysis for a concrete spent fuel dry storage module of a CANDU nuclear power plant. Creep and shrinkage analysis was performed using a method outlined in American Concrete Institute (ACI) code, and then the creep and shrinkage strains were analyzed in a finite element model to obtain the structural behavior of the concrete module. This demonstrated that the creep and shrinkage analysis for concrete spent fuel dry storage is reasonable. AECL's spent fuel dry storage module is adequate to resist the time-dependent effects due to creep and shrinkage of concrete. (author)

  11. Assessing CANDU requirements for irradiation - Research facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian nuclear program needs ongoing access to irradiation-research facilities to support the safe operation of existing CANDU reactors and the evolutionary development of CANDU components and design features. The irradiation-research program must facilitate the testing of unique CANDU technology such as the fuel bundle, on-power refueling, the pressure tube, and the heavy-water coolant and moderator. Since 1957, NRU has operated as Canada's principal irradiation facility; however, it has become clear that NRU needs costly refurbishing if its lifetime is to be significantly extended. Accordingly, AECL has reviewed the requirements for CANDU irradiation research and is presently assessing alternatives for providing the necessary future access to irradiation-research facilities. Various options are under consideration, including renting space in existing research reactors, performing irradiations in CANDU power reactors, and building a new indigenous materials testing reactor specifically to meet essential program requirements

  12. Progress in developing research-reactor technology for Canadian and international applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) continues to develop multipurpose research-reactor technology to meet Canadian and international requirements into the next millennium. Considerable progress has been made in refining the concept for a new Canadian Irradiation Research Facility (JRF) that will underpin the evolutionary development of CANDU (CANada Deuterium Uranium) technology and generate neutrons for basic and applied materials science. Additionally, an IRF-based standardized MAPLE research centre is being developed with various reactor-core options to meet international needs for neutron-beam research plus ancillary isotope production (a 1 5-MWt 19-site core), for multipurpose materials testing plus neutron-beam applications (a 30-MWt 31-site core), and high-flux neutron-beam plus materials-testing applications (a 30 to 40-MWt complex core with twin 18-site core segments). (author)

  13. Implementation of the electronic DDA workflow for NSSS system design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For improving NSSS design quality, and productivity several cases of the nuclear developed nation's integrated management system, such as Mitsubishi's NUWINGS (Japan), AECL's CANDID (Canada) and Duke Powes's (USA) were investigated, and it was studied in this report that the system implementation of NSSS design document computerization and the major workflow process of the DDA (Document Distribution for Agreement). On the basis of the requirements of design document computerization which covered preparation, review, approval and distribution of the engineering documents, KAERI Engineering Information Management System (KEIMS) was implemented. Major effects of this report are to implement GUI panel for input and retrieval of the document index information, to setup electronic document workflow, and to provide quality assurance verification by tracing the workflow history. Major effects of NSSS design document computerization are the improvement of efficiency and reliability and the engineering cost reduction by means of the fast documents verification capability and electronic document transferring system. 2 tabs., 16 figs., 9 refs. (Author)

  14. Deep geological disposal of nuclear fuel waste: background information and regulatory requirements regarding the concept assessment phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In their Joint Statement of August 1981, the governments of Canada and Ontario noted that the Nuclear Fuel Waste Program had been established to assure the safe and permanent disposal of radioactive waste from nuclear power reactors. The statement addressed the scope and schedule of the 'Concept Assessment Phase' of the Program, and identified the participating organizations and their responsibilities. The scope of this initial phase includes the development and assessment by Ontario Hydro and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) of a disposal concept and its subsequent review by the regulatory agencies and government. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), as lead regulatory agency is issuing this statement to outline its position with respect to evaluation of the concept

  15. Canada's high-level nuclear waste disposal concept: The evaluation process and a review of some aspects of the research work

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of disposing of high-level nuclear waste in granitic rocks in the Canadian Shield, developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), is anticipated to undergo a national public review within two years. A document which comprehensively describes the disposal concept is being prepared as a environmental impact statement (EIS). The process for EIS review and concept evaluation, including the role of the public, government and the scientific/engineering community, is summarized. A Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) has provided external peer review of the program since 1979 and its findings are published in annual reports which are publicly available. TAC's current views of certain geologic and geotechnical aspects of the program are presented along with a description of the safety and performance assessment of the disposal concept. (author). 35 refs., 2 figs

  16. Perceived risks of nuclear fuel waste disposal: trust, compensation, and public acceptance in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's recommendation to place the high-level radioactive waste in corrosion resistant containers and bury it in underground vaults several hundred metres deep in the rock of the Canadian shield is presently under federal review. If and when the disposal concept is approved by the federal review panel, a search will begin for a suitable host community. Given that siting guidelines prevent the government from unilaterally imposing the waste on a reluctant community, identifying a suitable site may represent the single greatest obstacle to successfully implementing the disposal concept. Even if the concept is approved by the review panel, it may be very difficult to find a community that is willing to accept the waste. In the US, efforts to site an underground disposal facility for high-level nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain has run into strong opposition from local residents and politicians, resulting in long delays and major cost overruns

  17. Canada's national policy on the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Nuclear energy is an important part of Canada's diversified energy mix. There are 22 CANDU reactors in Canada located in the provinces of Ontario, New Brunswick, and Quebec. Like any other industry, nuclear fuel cycle operations produce some waste, and for this paper, we will focus on nuclear fuel waste, i.e., the irradiated fuel taken out of nuclear reactors at the end of their useful life. Canada has no plans to reprocess and recycle this used nuclear fuel, so current plans are based on direct long-term management. Although nuclear fuel wastes is currently in safe storage, steps are now underway to develop and proceed effectively with the implementation of long-term management solutions. A cornerstone of Canada's approach to addressing radioactive waste management is the Government of Canada's 1996 Policy Framework for Radioactive Waste, which has set general policy for dealing with a all radioactive waste from the nuclear fuel cycle (nuclear fuel waste, low level radioactive waste, and uranium mine and mill waste). The Framework clearly indicates that the federal government will ensure safe, environmentally sound, comprehensive, cost-effective and integrated waste management, including disposal; that it will develop policy, regulate and oversee the waste owners to ensure compliance with legal and financial requirement in accordance with approved disposal plans; and that the waste owners are responsible for the funding, organization, management and operation of long term management, including disposal, facilities. With respect to the long-term management of nuclear fuel waste, a deep geological disposal concept was developed by the federal crown corporation Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Ontario Hydro, and, in October 1988, it was referred by the government for review by an independent Federal Environmental Assessment Panel. AECL submitted the Environmental Impact Statement to the Panel in 1994. The Panel reported its conclusions and

  18. Insights from the panel review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The environmental review process for nuclear waste management and disposal was unusual in that the Panel was asked to examine a concept rather than a specific project at a specific site. The Panel was charged with commenting on the safety and acceptability of the AECL concept, examining criteria for determining the safety and acceptability of any concept for managing nuclear fuel waste, and examining future steps which should be taken. In short, it was asked to provide policy advice to governments. The Panel concluded that safety is a key part, but only one part, of acceptability, and that safety must be viewed from both a technical and a social perspective. It judged that safety of the AECL concept had been adequately demonstrated from a technical perspective, but not from a social perspective. It also concluded that the AECL concept does not have the required level of public acceptability to be adopted as Canada's approach for managing nuclear fuel wastes. The paper examines in some detail the various aspects of the public concerns surrounding the nuclear cycle in general, and the safety of the proposals put forward by AECL for nuclear fuel waste management in particular. It notes the differences between those who look at safety from a technical perspective, and those who look at safety from a social perspective. And it lists the concerns related to acceptability in addition to the key factor of safety. After outlining the Panel's recommendations to governments on future steps to be taken, the paper discusses the extent to which the recommendations respond to the public's concerns. It stresses the importance of Aboriginal participation; of the creation of a new agency to deal with the full range of activities, technical and social, related to long-term management; of the public and decision-makers having more than one viable option to choose from; and of the essentiality of an inter-active process of public participation at all stages of decision-making. Finally

  19. Nuclear power plant accident handbook. A CNSC emergency operations centre tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the Fukushima Nuclear Emergency and the subsequent Emergency Operations Centre (EOC) response, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) Fukushima Task Force recommended that hardcopy and electronic version reference packages for all Canadian nuclear reactor sites are readily available to the Technical Support Team. CNSC staff, in a cooperative agreement with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at Chalk River Laboratories (AECL-CRL), has begun implementing this recommendation through the development of the Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) Accident Handbook. The NPP Accident Handbook will provide readily available reference material for technical staff involved in EOC operations. The NPP Accident Handbook will assist technical staff in finding site-specific and accident-specific details that will help them provide expert advice to the EOC team during a nuclear power plant accident. (author)

  20. Development of Off-take Model, Subcooled Boiling Model, and Radiation Heat Transfer Input Model into the MARS Code for a Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to a lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use a vendor's code for a regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of the existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to the MARS code including a quality assurance of the developed models