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Sample records for aecl radiochemical slowpoke reactor

  1. The SLOWPOKE-2 reactor with low enrichment uranium oxide fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A SLOWPOKE-2 reactor core contains less than 1 kg of highly enriched uranium (HEU) and the proliferation risk is very low. However, to overcome proliferation concerns a new low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuelled reactor core has been designed. This core contains approximately 180 fuel elements based on the Zircaloy-4 clad UOsub(2) CANDU fuel element, but with a smaller outside diameter. The physics characteristics of this new reactor core ensure the inherent safety of the reactor under all conceivable conditions and thus the basic SLOWPOKE safety philosophy which permits unattended operation is not affected

  2. Keeping research reactors relevant: A pro-active approach for SLOWPOKE-2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE is a small, inherently safe, pool-type research reactor that was engineered and marketed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in the 1970s and 80s. The original reactor, SLOWPOKE-1, was moved from Chalk River to the University of Toronto in 1970 and was operated until upgraded to the SLOWPOKE-2 reactor in 1973. In all, eight reactors in the two versions were produced and five are still in operation today, three having been decommissioned. All of the remaining reactors are designated as SLOWPOKE-2 reactors. These research reactors are prone to two major issues: aging components and lack of relevance to a younger audience. In order to combat these problems, one SLOWPOKE -2 facility has embraced a strategy that involves modernizing their reactor in order to keep the reactor up to date and relevant. In 2001, this facility replaced its aging analogue reactor control system with a digital control system. The system was successfully commissioned and has provided a renewed platform for student learning and research. The digital control system provides a better interface and allows flexibility in data storage and retrieval that was never possible with the analogue control system. This facility has started work on another upgrade to the digital control and instrumentation system that will be installed in 2010. The upgrade includes new computer hardware, updated software and a web-based simulation and training system that will allow licensed operators, students and researchers to use an online simulation tool for training, education and research. The tool consists of: 1) A dynamic simulation for reactor kinetics (e.g., core flux, power, core temperatures, etc). This tool is useful for operator training and student education; 2) Dynamic mapping of the reactor and pool container gamma and neutron fluxes as well as the vertical neutron beam tube flux. This research planning tool is used for various researchers who wish to do irradiations (e.g., neutron

  3. The AECL reactor development programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modem CANDU-PHWR power reactor is the result of more than 50 years of evolutionary design development in Canada. It is one of only three commercially successful designs in the world to this date. The basis for future development is the CANDU 6 and CANDU 9 models. Four of the first type are operating and four more will go an line before the end of this decade. The CANDU 9 is a modernized single-unit version of the twelve large multi-unit plants operated by Ontario Hydro. All of these plants use proven technology which resulted from research, development, design construction, and operating experience over the past 25 years. Looking forward another 25 years, AECL plans to retain all of the essential features that distinguish today's CANDU reactors (heavy water moderation, on-power fuelling simple bundle design, horizontal fuel channels, etc.). The end product of the planned 25-year development program is more than a specific design - it is a concept which embodies advanced features expected from ongoing R and D programs. To carry out the evolutionary work we have selected seven main areas for development: Safety Technology, Fuel and Fuel Cycles, Fuel Channels, Systems and Components, Heavy Water and Tritium Information Technology, and Construction. There are three strategic measures of success for each of these work areas: improved economics, advanced fuel cycle utilization, and enhanced safety/plant robustness. The paper describes these work programs and the overall goals of each of them. (author)

  4. A new safety principle for the SLOWPOKE reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slowpoke-2 (LEU core) is a pool type nuclear reactor with a maximum thermal power of 20 kW. It uses a pelletized uranium oxide fuel (19.9% enrichment) and provides a useful high neutron flux in the order of 1012 n.cm-2s-1. The key safety features built into the reactor design are the strictly limited amount of excess reactivity and the negative reactivity feedback characteristics, which provides a demonstrably safe self-limiting power excursion response to large reactivity insertions. However, the limited amount of excess reactivity also limits the continuous prolong reactor operation at full power. With a 3.7 mk excess reactivity, the reactor can operate for about one day at the full power, 20 kW, before this excess activity is lost due to temperature effects and Xe poisoning. A new safety concept is proposed in this paper to extend the continuous operation time to months by increasing the excess reactivity from 4 mk to 6 mk. This new concept has been demonstrated using a Matlab/simulink model of Slowpoke-2. (author)

  5. Overview of research reactor operation within AECL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents information on reactor operations within the Research Company of Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) today relative to a few years ago, and speculates on future operations. In recent years, the need for Research Company reactors has diminished. This, combined with economic pressures, has led to the shutdown of some of the company's major reactors. However, compliance with the government agenda to privatize government companies in Canada, and a Research Company policy of business development, has led to some offsetting activities. The building of a pool-type 10 MWt MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental) reactor for isotope production will assist in the sale of the AECL isotopes marketing company. A Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel fabrication facility and a Tritium Extraction Plant (TEP), both currently under construction, are needed in support of the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor and are in line with business development strategies. The research program demands on NRU stretch many years into the future and the strategies for achieving effective operation of this aging reactor, now 32 years old, are discussed. The repair of the leaking light-water reflector of the NRU reactor is highlighted. The isotope business requires that a second reactor be available for back-up production and the operation of the 42 year old NRX (National Research Experimental) reactor in its present 'hot standby' mode is believed to be unique in the world

  6. A bibliography of AECL publications on reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL Publications on Reactor Safety in CANDU Reactors are listed in this bibliography. The listing is chronological and the accompanying index is by subject. The bibliography will be brought up to date annually. (auth)

  7. Modeling the critical hydrogen concentration in the AECL test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen is added to a pressurized water reactor (PWR) to suppress radiolysis and maintain reducing conditions. The minimum hydrogen concentration needed to prevent radiolysis is referred to as the critical hydrogen concentration (CHC). The CHC was measured experimentally in the mid-1990s by Elliot and Stuart in a reactor loop at Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL), and was found to be approximately 0.5 scc/kg for typical PWR conditions. This value is well below industry-normal PWR operating levels near 40 scc/kg. Radiation chemistry models have also predicted a low CHC, even below the AECL experimental result. In the last few years some of the radiation chemical kinetic rate constants have been re-measured and G-values have been reassessed by Elliot and Bartels. These new data have been used in this work to revise the models and compare them with AECL experimental data. It is quite clear that the scavenging yields tabulated for high-LET radiolysis by Elliot and Bartels are not appropriate to use in the present context, where track-escape yields are needed to describe the homogeneous recombination kinetics in the mixed radiation field. In the absence of such data for high temperature PWR conditions, we have used the neutron G-values as fitting parameters. Even with this expedient, the model predicts at least a factor of two smaller CHC than was observed. We demonstrate that to recover the reported CHC result, the chemistry of ammonia impurity must be included. - Highlights: ► Hydrogen is added to nuclear reactor cooling loops to prevent radiolysis. ► Tests at AECL were carried out to determine the critical hydrogen concentration. ► Neutron radiolysis G-values need to be modified to understand the results. ► Ammonia impurity needs to be included for quantitative modeling.

  8. The SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear reactor at the Royal Military College of Canada: applications for the Canadian Armed Forces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC) has a 20 kW SLOWPOKE-2 nuclear research reactor which is used for teaching and research.Since its commissioning, the reactor facility and instruments have been continuously upgraded to develop and enhance nuclear capabilities for the Canadian Armed Forces (CAF). Specific applications of neutron activation analysis (NAA), delayed neutron counting (DNC) and neutron imaging relevant to the CAF are discussed. (author)

  9. An experimental investigation of fission product release in SLOWPOKE-2 reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increasing radiation fields due to a release of fission products in the reactor container of several SLOWPOKE-2 reactors fuelled with a highly-enriched uranium (HEU) alloy core have been observed. It is believed that these increases are associated with the fuel fabrication where a small amount of uranium-bearing material is exposed to the coolant at the end-welds of the fuel element. To investigate this phenomenon samples of reactor water and gas from the headspace above the water have been obtained and examined by gamma spectrometry methods for reactors of various burnups at the University of Toronto, Ecole Polytechnique and Kanata Isotope Production Facility. An underwater visual examination of the fuel core at Ecole Polytechnique has also provided information on the condition of the core. This report (Volume 1) summarizes the equipment, analysis techniques and results of tests conducted at the various reactor sites. The data report is published as Volume 2. (author). 30 refs., 9 tabs., 20 figs

  10. The Development of Neutron Radiography and Tomography on a SLOWPOKE-2 Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, L. G. I.; Lewis, W. J.; Hungler, P. C.

    Development of neutron radiography at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC) started by trying to interest the Royal Canadian Air Force (RCAF) in this new non-destructive testing (NDT) technique. A Californium-252 based device was ordered and then installed at RMC for development of applicable techniques for aircraft by the first author. A second and transportable device was then designed, modified and used in trials at RCAF Bases and other locations for one year. This activity was the only foreign loan of the U.S. Californium Loan Program. Around this time, SLOWPOKE-2 reactors were being installed at four Canadian universities, while a new science and engineering building was being built at RMC. A reactor pool was incorporated and efforts to procure a reactor succeeded a decade later with a SLOWPOKE-2 reactor being installed at RMC. The only modification by the vendor for RMC was a thermal column replacing an irradiation site inside the reactor container for a later installation of a neutron beam tube (NBT). Development of a working NBT took several years, starting with the second author. A demonstration of the actual worth of neutron radiography took place with a CF-18 Hornet aircraft being neutron and X-radiographed at McClellan Air Force Base, Sacramento, CA. This inspection was followed by one of the rudders that had indications of water ingress being radiographed successfully at RMC just after the NBT became functional. The next step was to develop a neutron radioscopy system (NRS), initially employing film and then digital imaging, and is in use today for all flight control surfaces (FCS). With the third author, a technique capable of removing water from affected FCS was developed at RMC. Heating equipment and a vacuum system were utilized to carefully remove the water. This technique was proven using a sequence of near real time neutron images obtained during the drying process. The results of the drying process were correlated with a relative humidity

  11. A program for the a priori evaluation of detection limits in instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A program that permits the a priori calculation of detection limits in monoelemental matrices, adapted to instrumental neutron activation analysis using a SLOWPOKE II reactor, is described. A simplified model of the gamma spectra is proposed. Products of (n,p) and (n,α) reactions induced by the fast components of the neutron flux that accompanies the thermal flux at the level of internal irradiation sites in the reactor have been included in the list of interfering radionuclides. The program calculates in a systematic way the detection limits of 66 elements in an equal number of matrices using 153 intermediary radionuclides. Experimental checks carried out with silicon (for short lifetimes) and aluminum and magnesium (for intermediate lifetimes) show satisfactory agreement with the calculations. These results show in particular the importance of the contribution of the (n,p) and (n,α) reactions in the a priori evaluation of detection limits with a SLOWPOKE type reactor

  12. Medical isotope shortage 2009-2010 and future options NRU, SLOWPOKE and MAPLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hilborn, J. [Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The 15 month shutdown of NRU and the unexpected termination of the AECL/Nordion MAPLE project caused a world-wide shortage of medical isotopes. After the recent repair of NRU, AECL is confident that it could continue operating safely and reliably as a multi-purpose reactor until 2021 or longer. There is convincing evidence that the restoration of the MAPLE reactors is technically feasible, but it is highly improbable that a 10 MW MAPLE production reactor can ever be cost-effective. However, conversion of the present 10 MW reactors to 3 MW, without major changes to the structural hardware, warrants serious consideration. Finally, even the 20 kW SLOWPOKE reactor could produce useful quantities of Mo-99. If the present fuel rods were replaced with a small tank containing a solution of low-enriched uranyl sulphate in water, three of these liquid core reactors could supply all of Canada. (author)

  13. Validation of WIMS-AECL reactivity device calculations for CANDU reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Byung Joo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Donnelly, J. V. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    1997-06-01

    An important component of the overall program to validate WIMS-AECL for use with RFSP in the analysis of CANDU-6 reactors for design and safety analysis calculations is the validation of calculations of incremental cross sections used to represent reactivity devices. A method has been developed for the calculation of the three-dimensional neutron flux distribution in and around CANDU reactor fuel channels and reactivity control devices. The methods is based on one- and two dimensional transport calculations with the WIMS-AECL lattice cell code, SPH homogenization, and three-dimensional flux calculations with finite-difference diffusion theory using the MULTICELL code. Simulations of Wolsung 1 Phase-B commissioning measurements and Point Lepreau restart tests have been performed, as a part of the program to validate WIMS-AECL lattice cell calculations for application to CANDU reactor simulations in RFSP. The incremental cross section properties of the Wolsung 1 and Point Lepreau adjusters, Mechanical Control Absorbers(MCA) and liquid Zone Control Unit (ZCU) is based on the WIMS-AECL/MULTICELL modelling methods and the results are compared with those of WIMS-AECL/DRAGON-2 modelling methods. (author). 13 tabs., 4 figs., 11 refs.

  14. Some AECL facilities to relocate in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full-text': Under the terms of memorandum of understanding (MOU) signed by the federal and Saskatchewan governments, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) will relocate its design, engineering and marketing offices for CANDU 3 reactors to Saskatoon. This will mean 115 new high-technology jobs for the city in the first year, which might increase to 140 jobs in the second year. As well, the MOU calls for feasibility studies on the establishment of a nuclear accelerator technology centre with accelerator development and marketing components, a nuclear simulator and training facility, a Slowpoke Energy System business, and other related technology in the areas of medicine, agriculture and industry. The provincial government and AECL will cost-share the new arrangement to a maximum of $20 million each over the four year term of the agreement. The MOU is significantly different from the one signed in September, 1991 in that there is no pre-commitment, or any commitment, on the part of the province to purchase or build a CANDU reactor for nuclear generation, nor will there be any study or discussion of development of a nuclear waste site in the province. (author)

  15. The Jamaican SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor: neutron activation analysis in environmental and health studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In its 24 years of existence the reactor has been utilized mainly for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) and has played an important role in the development of research programs in the areas of archaeology, biology, chemistry, forensics, geochemistry, and mining as well as for the production of short lived radioisotopes for experimental work in the physics department. However, over the last fifth teen years our main thrust has been environmental geochemistry, agriculture and health related studies, with interesting results that have implications for land use, farming practices, diabetic control and dietary intakes during pregnancy. (author)

  16. Radiochemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this catalogue those radioactive chemicals for research are listed which are produced by the Radiochemical Centre Amersham and our laboratories at Brunswick. The dates given for each product can understandably only be limited within the framework of such a catalogue. Additional dates and references to application technique can be obtained from us any time. Our programme is continually updated by new products. If a compound not listed in the catalogue should be required we ask for inquiry. Our working team for special syntheses will try to produce it according to our possibilities and our requirements. (orig.)

  17. AECL passive autocatalytic recombiners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, L.B.; Marcinkowska, K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2012-03-15

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner (PAR) is a passive device used for hydrogen mitigation under post-accident conditions in nuclear reactor containment. The PAR employs a proprietary AECL catalyst which promotes the exothermal reaction between hydrogen and oxygen to form water vapour. The heat of reaction combined with the PAR geometry establishes a convective flow through the recombiner, where ambient hydrogen-rich gas enters the PAR inlet and hot, humid, hydrogen-depleted gas exits the outlet. AECL's PAR has been extensively qualified for CANDU and light water reactors (LWRs), and has been supplied to France, Finland, Ukraine, South Korea and is currently being deployed in Canadian nuclear power plants. (author)

  18. AECL passive autocatalytic recombiners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, L.B.; Marcinkowska, K. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Passive Autocatalytic Recombiner (PAR) is a passive device used for hydrogen mitigation under post-accident conditions in nuclear reactor containment. The PAR employs a proprietary AECL catalyst which promotes the exothermal reaction between hydrogen and oxygen to form water vapour. The heat of reaction combined with the PAR geometry establishes a convective flow through the recombiner, where ambient hydrogen-rich gas enters the PAR inlet and hot, humid, hydrogen-depleted gas exits the outlet. AECL's PAR has been extensively qualified for CANDU and light water reactors (LWRs), and has been supplied to France, Finland, Ukraine, South Korea and is currently being deployed in Canadian nuclear power plants. (author)

  19. Radiochemical characterization of graphite from Juelich experimental reactor (AVR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear reactors which have in-built graphite may receive a high neutron dose for a long period. Depending on the chemical composition of the graphite, numerous activation products may result. In addition, the amount of fission product contamination will depend on the location of the graphite. The migration of fission products may be supported by the high temperatures which occur in high-temperature reactors. At the Juelich 15 MWe high-temperature gas-cooled experimental AVR (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Versuchsreaktor) reactor, two different types of nuclear graphite had been in use. High-purity graphite was used as a basic material for core structures of the AVR. Insulation layers of carbon bricks (graphite with larger amounts of impurities) surrounding the graphite reflector were used to protect the metallic structures from high temperatures. For various reasons it is important to know the degree of contamination of graphite and carbon bricks from activation and fission products. The optimum method for nuclear graphite analysis in decommissioning is by incineration. Volatile activities (14C, 3H, 36Cl, ...) have to be captured for analysis. In cases where dust-like samples are handled, the incineration furnace has to be small enough to be operated in a glove-box. The resulting ashes can be used for determining all non-volatile nuclides by different radiochemical methods. In early 1999, some graphite and carbon brick samples from the AVR reactor were obtained by drilling. The samples were then analysed in the laboratories at the Juelich research centre. For incineration a vertical quartz tube was used which dips at the bottom into a small electric furnace. Tritium, 14C and 36Cl were captured in washing bottles. After further preparation, they were analysed by liquid scintillation counting (LSC). After dissolving the ashes, the elements were separated by ion exchange, extraction methods and HPLC. The radionuclides were then determined by alpha-spectrometry, LSC, low

  20. Various applications using the SLOWPOKE-2 facility at RMC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    History will record that the reactor pool at the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC was one of the first SLOWPOKE pools to be constructed (mid 1970s), even though the reactor itself was the last SLOWPOKE reactor to be installed and commissioned (1985). The unique and very useful feature of the reactor pool is that it is uncovered, allowing for applications in addition to the NAA and radioisotope production applications initially advertised. Because the installation of a tangential neutron beam tube (NBT) had been planned from the beginning, an outer irradiation site inside the reactor container was replaced by a thermal column. Next, a positioning system was added to accept large objects such as flight control surfaces from DND's CF-18 fighter aircraft. Imaging of these surfaces using film is being phased out with the introduction of digital imaging. Very recently a tomography stage was designed and built and is now integrated into the neutron imaging system. Also in the open pool are three pulley and rope 'elevators', two of which allow for large samples to be exposed to various kinds of radiation directly outside of the reactor container. The third elevator is located against the west pool wall, which allows for sample exposure to radiation without any neutron contribution. At the time of negotiating the purchase of the reactor, a teaching package consisting of an in-pool borated ion chamber and an outlet thermocouple was ordered. Automatic irradiation and counting systems in the form of cyclic, pseudo-cyclic, and long counting options were added to the original manual irradiation option. This past summer (2010), a delayed neutron counting system (DNCS) was built and installed in the SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at RMC. Examples will be given for the above-mentioned applications.

  1. Remote robotic inspection of irregular surfaces on the inner diameter of the AECL NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In May of 2009, the NRU (National Research Universal) reactor was forced to shut down after a small heavy water leak. In 2009-2010 repairs were performed in order to restart medical isotope production mid-August 2010. Since the NRU vessel's return to service, a series of periodic inspections is required to ensure the safe operation of the reactor. Eclipse Scientific in collaboration with Utex Scientific Instruments and Liburdi Automation developed the NDE inspection system for the In-Service Inspection program of the NRU vessel. In addition to the difficult environmental, delivery and inspection circumstances the inspection team was faced with the problem of doing an immersion inspection of the inside surface of the reactor vessel through a small 120 mm access port at a distance of more than 10 m to the inspection area at the bottom of the reactor. The vessel was built over 50 years ago and as the inner surface was modified by the repair program during the forced outage, there were no accurate drawings of the inner surface of the vessel that an automated system could rely upon. Eclipse Scientific in collaboration with Liburdi Automation developed a robotic arm designed to enter from the remote access port to deploy the Phased Array and Eddy Current Array inspection heads into the reactor vessel. The motion control and data acquisition system was developed in collaboration with Utex Scientific Instruments using their Inspection Ware software. This paper will highlight the challenges faced in the development of an inspection system capable of using ultrasonic signals to learn a surface and, using this acquired surface topography, effectively and safely deploy and articulate the different inspection heads required to perform the In-Service Inspection of the NRU vessel. (author)

  2. Radiochemical guidelines and process specifications for reactor shutdown: the EDF strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes to French nuclear regulations made in June 2006 [1.] have made it necessary for EDF to modify its ruling principles. These modifications required the restructuring of radiochemical guidelines to better reflect their impact on nuclear safety, the environment and radioprotection. In accordance with these aims, a new authoritative document has been produced. This ruling document identifies all parameters with a potential impact on nuclear safety, radiological releases to the environment and personnel dose rates. These diagnostic and control parameters have been identified for a reactor in production and for a reactor during shutdown. For parameters related to a reactor in production, some indicators are used to evaluate impacts on availability, radioprotection and the environment during shutdown and on outage and to anticipate mitigation ways. On the other side, several parameters related to the stages of shutdown were also directly evaluated in order to minimize the impacts. This paper describes the EDF methodology used to establish operational documents: radiochemical guidelines and process specifications, and includes the following: - description of monitored parameters and their associated areas of risk; - justification of target values, frequencies of inspection and the required actions for the monitored parameters. The sizing methodology is based on theoretical studies and on EDF operational experience analysis. By implementing in the operational and technical specifications requirements linked to nuclear safety, radioprotection and environment respect, EDF will benefit from an improved compromise between these areas as well as an increased focus. (authors)

  3. Royal Military College of Canada SLOWPOKE-2 facility. Integrated regulating and instrumentation system (SIRCIS) upgrade project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corcoran, W.P.; Nielsen, K.S.; Kelly, D.G.; Weir, R.D. [Royal Military College of Canada (RMCC), Kingston, Ontario (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    The SLOWPOKE-2 Facility at the Royal Military College of Canada has operated the only digitally controlled SLOWPOKE reactor since 2001 (Version 1.0). The present work describes ongoing project development to provide a robust digital reactor control system that is consistent with Aging Management as summarized in the Facility's Life Cycle Management and Maintenance Plan. The project has transitioned from a post-graduate research activity to a comprehensively managed project supported by a team of RMCC professional and technical staff who have delivered an update of the V1.1 system software and hardware implementation that is consistent with best Canadian nuclear industry practice. The challenges associated with the implementation of Version 2.0 in February 2012, the lessons learned from this implementation, and the applications of these lessons to a redesign and rewrite of the RMCC SLOWPOKE-2 digital instrumentation and regulating system (Version 3) are discussed. (author)

  4. District heating with SLOWPOKE energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE Energy System, a benign nuclear heat source designed to supply 10 thermal megawatts in the form of hot water for local heating systems in buildings and institutions, is at the forefront of these developments. A demonstration unit has been constructed in Canada and is currently undergoing an extensive test program. Because the nuclear heat source is small, operates at atmospheric pressure, and produces hot water below 100 degrees Celcius, intrinsic safety features will permit minimum operator attention and allow the heat source to be located close to the load and hence to people. In this way, a SLOWPOKE Energy System can be considered much like the oil- or coal-fired furnace it is designed to replace. The low capital investment requirements, coupled with a high degree of localization, even for the first unit, are seen as attractive features for the implementation of SLOWPOKE Energy Systems in many countries

  5. AECL's business prospects with China improve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In November 1994, Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) and the China National Nuclear Corp. signed a memorandum of understanding which opens the door for the eventual sale of two 685 MW Candu reactors worth a total of C$3.5-billion

  6. N.S. Savannah Reactor Vessel Metal Extraction and Radiochemical Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In early 2006 a project was concluded to determine radioisotopic inventory and Curie content of the N.S. Savannah Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV), Internals and Neutron Shield Tank (NST) by extracting metal samples and performing radiochemical analysis. The objective of this project was to determine if the RPV and internals could be removed, packaged, shipped and disposed as Class A radioactive waste without opening the RPV or conducting further sampling of the RPV/Internals. The N.S. Savannah is de-fueled and has been shut down for 37 years. The following conclusions can be drawn from this project: - Results are consistent with previous analyses and are based upon conservative methodology and assumptions. - Nuclide concentration for the N/S Savannah reactor pressure vessel and internals package are shown to be within Class A disposal limits when averaged over the entire volume of metal in the Reactor Pressure Vessel and internals. - Performance of N.S. Savannah's nuclear reactor was excellent. During normal operations, the reactor seldom operated above 80% of its rated power level, thereby minimizing thermal stresses on the fuel cladding. In addition, the fuel rods were not subjected to any accident or severe transient conditions that could result in cladding breeches with subsequent release of fission products and fuel particles to the primary coolant loop. The trace quantities of Cesium-137 observed in the primary loop water indicate that some pinhole penetrations of fuel rod cladding may have occurred during operations. Another source of Cesium-137 could be the presence of uranium fuel on the exterior of the fuel rod cladding (tramp uranium), a condition not uncommon in the N.S. Savannah fuel fabrication time frame. Fissioning of this 'tramp uranium' would cause the rapid release of chemically active Cesium-137 into the reactor coolant. However, the absence of other fission products (e.g., Strontium-90) as well as uranium and transuranic isotopes in the reactor

  7. AECL annual review 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Formed as a Crown Corporation in 1952, AECL consists of two main divisions: AECL CANDU, based in Missisauga and Montreal, responsible for the development, design, marketing and project management of CANDU nuclear power projects; and AECL Research, with its head office in Ottawa and laboratories in Chalk River, Ontario and Pinawa, Manitoba, which supports CANDU and performs the research, development, demonstration and marketing required to apply nuclear sciences and their associated technologies. A strategic plan is under development, which will address the issues of market identification, key partnerships, securing the CANDU technology base, export financing and optimum business structure. In 1991/92 operating income was $16.4 million, up from $7.8 million in 1990/91. Good progress was made on goals to revitalize and upgrade AECL employee's skills and productivity. Key goals for AECL CANDU were: launching the Wolsung 2 reactor project in south Korea; closing the timing and product options for Wolsong 3 and 4; securing new business for Cernavoda 1; and attaining an agreement with either Saskatchewan Power Corp. or the New Brunswick Electric Power Commission regarding the timing of their CANDU 3 projects. Some success was achieved in the first three goals; Saskatchewan has chosen not to proceed with its CANDU 3 plant, but negotiations are continuing in New Brunswick. Key goals for AECL Research were: securing an advanced CANDU research and development program outside the CANDU Owners Group; Disposing of remaining non-nuclear technologies by spin-off, licensing or close-out; rationalizing commercial operations to generate increased revenues; and obtaining the Atomic Energy Control Board's approval of the NRU reactor assessment basis document. Progress was made on all goals

  8. The AECL operator companion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As CANDU plants become more complex, and are operated under tighter constraints and for longer periods between outages, plant operations staff will have to absorb more information to correctly and rapidly respond to upsets. A development program is underway at AECL to use expert systems and interactive media tools to assist operations staff of existing and future CANDU plants. The complete system for plant information access and display, on-line advice and diagnosis, and interactive operating procedures is called the Operator Companion. A prototype, consisting of operator consoles, expert systems and simulation modules in a distributed architecture, is currently being developed to demonstrate the concepts of the Operator Companion

  9. AECL experience in fuel channel inspection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inspection of CANDU fuel channels (FC) is performed to ensure safe and economic reactor operation. CANDU reactor FCs have features that make them a unique non-destructive testing (NDT) challenge. The thin, 4 mm pressure-tube wall means flaws down to about 0.1 mm deep must be reliably detected and characterized. This is one to two orders of magnitude smaller than is usually considered of significant concern for steel piping and pressure vessels. A second unique feature is that inspection sensors must operate in the reactor core--often within 20 cm of highly radioactive fuel. Work on inspection of CANDU reactor FCs at AECL dates back over three decades. In that time, AECL staff have provided equipment and conducted or supervised in-service inspections in about 250 FCs, in addition to over 8000 pre-service FCs. These inspections took place at every existing CANDU reactor except those in India and Romania. Early FC inspections focussed on measurement of changes in dimensions (gauging) resulting from exposure to a combination of neutrons, stress and elevated temperature. Expansion of inspection activities to include volumetric inspection (for flaws) started in the mid-1970s with the discovery of delayed hydride cracking in Pickering 3 and 4 rolled joints. Recognition of other types of flaw mechanisms in the 1980s led to further expansion in both pre-service and in-service inspections. These growing requirements, to meet regulatory as well as economic needs, led to the development of a wide spectrum of inspection technology that now includes tests for hydrogen concentration, structural integrity of core components, flaws, and dimensional change. This paper reviews current CANDU reactor FC inspection requirements. The equipment and techniques developed to satisfy these requirements are also described. The paper concludes with a discussion of work in progress in AECL aimed at providing state-of-the-art FC inspection services. (author)

  10. AECL/US INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors -- Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Carmack; Randy D. Lee; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer; Michael Todosow; Holly B. Hamilton; Juan Nino; Simon Philpot; James Tulenko

    2005-06-01

    The U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Program and the Atomic Energy Canada Ltd (AECL) seek to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to minimize the overall Pu and minor actinides present in the light water reactor (LWR) nuclear fuel cycles. It is proposed to reuse the Pu from LWR spent fuel both for the energy it contains and to decrease the hazard and proliferation impact resulting from storage of the Pu and minor actinides. The use of fuel compositions with a combination of U and Pu oxide (MOX) has been proposed as a way to recycle Pu and/or minor actinides in LWRs. It has also been proposed to replace the fertile U{sup 238} matrix of MOX with a fertile-free matrix (IMF) to reduce the production of Pu{sup 239} in the fuel system. It is important to demonstrate the performance of these fuels with the appropriate mixture of isotopes and determine what impact there might be from trace elements or contaminants. Previous work has already been done to look at weapons-grade (WG) Pu in the MOX configuration [1][2] and the reactor-grade (RG) Pu in a MOX configuration including small (4000 ppm additions of Neptunium). This program will add to the existing database by developing a wide variety of MOX fuel compositions along with new fuel compositions called inert-matrix fuel (IMF). The goal of this program is to determine the general fabrication and irradiation behavior of the proposed IMF fuel compositions. Successful performance of these compositions will lead to further selection and development of IMF for use in LWRs. This experiment will also test various inert matrix material compositions with and without quantities of the minor actinides Americium and Neptunium to determine feasibility of incorporation into the fuel matrices for destruction. There is interest in the U.S. and world-wide in the investigation of IMF (inert matrix fuels) for scenarios involving stabilization or burn down of plutonium in the fleet of existing commercial power reactors. IMF offer the

  11. AECL's support to operating plants world wide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Through their operating records, CANDU reactors have established themselves as a successful and cost-effective source of electricity in Canada and abroad. They have proven to be safe, reliable and economical. A variety of factors have contributed to the enviable CANDU record, such as a sound design based on proven principles supported by effective development programs, along with dedicated plant owners committed to excellence in safely maintaining and operating their plants. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU designer, has continuously maintained a close relationship with owners/operators of the plants in Canada, Argentina, Romania and South Korea. AECL and the plant operators have all benefited from this strengthening relationship by sharing experience and information. CANDU plant operators have been required to respond decisively to the economic realities of downward cost pressures and deregulation. Operating, Maintenance and Administration (OM and A) costs are being given a new focus as plant owners review each cost element to improve the economic returns from their investments. Amongst the three main OM and A constituents, plant maintenance costs are the most variable and have the largest influence on effective plant operations. The correlation between effective plant maintenance and high capacity factors shows clearly the importance of proactive maintenance planning to reduce the frequency and duration of forced plant outages and their negative impacts on plant economics. This paper describes the management processes and organizational structures m AECL that support plant operations and maintenance in operating CANDU plants with cost effective products and services. (author)

  12. AECL's reliability and maintainability program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECL's reliability and maintainability program for nuclear generating stations is described. How the various resources of the company are organized to design and construct stations that operate reliably and safely is shown. Reliability and maintainability includes not only special mathematically oriented techniques, but also the technical skills and organizational abilities of the company. (author)

  13. Annual report 1997--1998. AECL research number AECL-11964

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the Annual report of AECL, the legal name of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Its mandate is to undertake research into nuclear energy and to develop commercial applications for its developments. This annual report presents information on marketing and commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management and nuclear sciences, environmental management and site refurbishment. A financial review is included, along with management responsibility, an Auditor's report, financial statements, a five-year financial summary, and a list of directors and locations

  14. AECL/U.S. INERI - Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Power Reactors Fuel Requirements and Down-Select Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Carmack; Randy Fielding; Pavel Medvedev; Mitch Meyer

    2005-08-01

    This report documents the first milestone of the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) U.S./Euratom Joint Proposal 1.8 entitled “Development of Inert Matrix Fuels for Plutonium and Minor Actinide Management in Light-Water Reactors.” The milestone represents the assessment and preliminary study of a variety of fuels that hold promise as transmutation and minor actinide burning fuel compositions for light-water reactors. The most promising fuels of interest to the participants on this INERI program have been selected for further study. These fuel compositions are discussed in this report.

  15. Materials chemical compatibility for the fabrication of small inherently safe nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aqueous nuclear fuels offer a unique set of characteristics for homogeneous reactor nuclear applications. Their advantages include high nuclear stability and inherent safety, high power density, high burn-up, simple preparation and reprocessing, easy fuel handling, high neutron economy, and simple control system leading to simple mechanical designs. The major disadvantages are corrosion, limited uranium concentration, and radiation decomposition of water. Likewise, organic coolants offer certain properties that are conducive for small reactor applications. These include reduced corrosion and activation, and low vapour pressures with good heat-transfer capabilities. Their major disadvantages are decomposition, fouling and flammability. A particular organic coolant, HB-40, has been extensively studied in Canada and was used for nineteen years in the 60-MWt organic-cooled WR-1 reactor at the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment (WNRE) of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL). Proper attention to design and coolant chemistry in the nineteen years of operation in the WR-1 reactor kept the coolant aspects related to decomposition, fouling and flammability to acceptable levels. For small reactor applications, organic coolants are potentially superior to heavy water in terms of overall cost. The purpose of this thesis work was, through a literature review, to select the most suitable aqueous fuel and materials of construction for two proposed small inherently safe reactors, the QH-1 reactor and the homogeneous SLOWPOKE reactor under design at the Royal Military College of Canada.

  16. AECL: Changing to meet the challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, the president of AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd.) shares some thoughts on reorganization in general, and the on-going reorganization of AECL in particular. He explains that downsizing and the drive for efficiency are not enough: the organization must be customer-oriented, which means meeting with potential customers and listening to them, as well as thinking about their needs, and planning accordingly. Not only AECL, but the whole Canadian nuclear industry needs to be market-driven and to improve its marketing skills

  17. Coupling of Wims-AECL and Origen-S for depletion calculations - 357

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the more powerful tools for isotope depletion calculations in neutron-irradiated material is the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) module ORIGEN-S, maintained and developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. ORIGEN-S takes as input, in addition to a material description, a problem-dependent cross section library in which relative reaction rates for each nuclear process have been pre-evaluated. Creating different libraries for different stages of burnup, and for different materials, allows the 'point' code phenomenology of ORIGEN-S to be extended to more complicated geometries. To this end, AECL (Atomic Energy of Canada Limited) has coupled its successful 2-D neutron transport solver WIMS-AECL 2.5d to ORIGEN-S to create the coupled code 'WOBI' (WIMS-ORIGEN Burnup Integration). This code has been validated against PIE (post irradiation examination) results for CANDUTM reactors and for light-water reactors, and is extensively used at AECL to calculate exit compositions and decay heats for high and low enriched uranium fuels at the NRU (National Research Universal) research reactor located at the Chalk River Laboratories. In addition, because of the significantly expanded list of reactions available in ORIGEN-S, WOBI is more useful for advanced fuel cycle studies than WIMS-AECL alone. This paper discusses the validation results, and verification of WOBI against simple WIMS-AECL and ORIGEN-S stand-alone models. (authors)

  18. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study. AECL research No. AECL-10851

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, J.J.; Smellie, J.A.T. (eds.)

    1994-07-15

    AECL has conducted natural analog studies on the Cigar Lake uranium deposit in northern Saskatchewan since 1984 as part of the Canadian Nuclear Fuel Waste Management Program. This report provides background information and summarizes the results of the study, emphasizing the analog aspects and the implications of modelling activities related to the performance assessment of disposal concepts for nuclear fuel wastes developed in both Canada and Sweden. The study was undertaken to obtain an understanding of the process involved in, and the effects of, steady-state water-rock interaction and trace-element migration in and around the deposit, including paleo-migration processes since the deposit was formed. To achieve these objectives, databases and models were produced to evaluate the equilibrium thermodynamic codes and databases; the role of colloids, organics, and microbes in transport processes for radionuclides; and the stability of UO2 and the influence of radiolysis on UO2 dissolution and radionuclide migration.

  19. Radiochemical determination of the neutron capture cross sections of {sup 241}Am irradiated in the JMTR reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinohara, N.; Hatsukawa, Y.; Hata, K.; Kohno, N. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The thermal neutron capture cross section {sigma}{sub 0} and Resonance integral I{sub 0} of {sup 241}Am leading to the production of {sup 242m}Am and {sup 242g}Am were measured by radiochemical method. The cross sections obtained in this study are {sigma}{sub 0}=60.9 {+-} 2.6 barn, I{sub 0}=213 {+-} 13 barn for {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}){sup 242m}Am and {sigma}{sub 0}=736 {+-} 31 barn, I{sub 0}=1684 {+-} 92 barn for {sup 241}Am(n,{gamma}){sup 242g}Am. (author)

  20. AECL programs in advanced systems research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL program in advanced systems research is directed in the long term to securing the option of obtaining fissile fuel by electronuclear breeding (accelerator breeder or fusion breeder) and to providing a basis from which AECL might move into stand alone fusion energy if warranted. In the short term the program is directed to reaping benefits from electronuclear technology. This report outlines the main activities and research facilities in both the long-term and short-term subprograms

  1. AECL annual report 1996-1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1996/1997 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from marketing, commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management, environmental management, financial review and copies of financial statements

  2. AECL annual report 1996-1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-07-01

    The 1996/1997 Annual Report of Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) is published and submitted to the Honourable member of parliament, Minister of Natural Resources. Included in this report are messages from marketing, commercial operations, product development, CANDU research, waste management, environmental management, financial review and copies of financial statements.

  3. Compendium of the data used with the SYVAC3-CC3 system model. AECL research No. AECL-11013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    AECL is evaluating a concept for disposing of nuclear fuel waste from CANDU reactors deep in plutonic rock of the Canadian Shield. As part of this evaluation, models of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes that could occur in a sealed disposal vault designed to limit transport of contaminants to the accessible environment were developed. The mathematical models of the transport of radionuclides and toxic chemicals from nuclear fuel waste are incorporated into a computer model named the Systems Variability Analysis Code, Generation 3, and Canadian Concept Model, Generation 3 (SYVAC3-CC3). The report presents the data in the master database used by SYVAC3-CC3 for the postclosure assessment of deep geological disposal, derived from a major program of laboratory and field studies conducted by AECL Research over the past 15 years. The data represents characteristics of a hypothetical vault, certain geologic characteristics of the Whiteshell Research Area, and a general surface environment with a human population living a rural lifestyle on a portion of the Canadian Shield in central Canada.

  4. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analyses are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  5. Impact of ENDF/B-VII.0 for AECL applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, Ken S.; Altiparmakov, Dimitar V. [AECL - Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River (Canada)

    2008-07-01

    This paper examines the impact of the new evaluated nuclear data library ENDF/B-VII.0 on selected reactor physics applications at AECL. The twin objectives are to provide feedback to the nuclear data community concerning the practical impact of their work and preliminary guidance to end-users. This work is based on comparison of the results of MCNP simulations with critical measurements involving both the ZED-2 zero power reactor and the MAPLE dedicated isotope production reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories. Significant improvement in the reactivity agreement with the measurements is obtained with ENDF/B-VII.0 for the specific ZED-2 measurements analysed; however, improvements associated with the thermal scattering law data for UO{sub 2} that had been observed initially were subsequently determined to be fortuitous, due to the inadvertent omission of the elastic neutron scattering component. Additionally, the net reactivity impact of major changes to the {sup 90}Zr and {sup 91}Zr capture cross sections with ENDF/B-VII.0 is examined in the MAPLE reactor context and found to be modest due primarily to the offsetting effects of the specific nuclides involved. (authors)

  6. Validation of WIMS-AECL/(MULTICELL)/RFSP system by the results of phase-B test at Wolsung-II unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, In Seob; Min, Byung Joo; Suk, Ho Chun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The object of this study is the validation of WIMS-AECL lattice code which has been proposed for the substitution of POWDERPUFS-V(PPV) code. For the validation of this code, WIMS-AECL/(MULTICELL)/RFSP (lattice calculation/(incremental cross section calculation)/core calculation) code system has been used for the Post-Simulation of Phase-B physics Test at Wolsung-II unit. This code system had been used for the Wolsong-I and Point Lepraeu reactors, but after a few modifications of WIMS-AECL input values for Wolsong-II, the results of WIMS-AECL/RFSP code calculations are much improved to those of the old ones. Most of the results show good estimation except moderator temperature coefficient test. And the verification of this result must be done, which is one of the further work. 6 figs., 15 tabs. (Author)

  7. Validation of the AECL response time tester

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response time of a nuclear safety (trip) channel is an important safety parameter, and an ISA standard requires nuclear operators to measure the response times of their trip instrumentation. As a major aid to facilitate this measurement, AECL (Chalk River) has designed and built a Response Time Tester (RTT) for pressure and differential-pressure transmitters. The RTT is mostly automated for ease of use, is self-checking, and complies with the requirements of ISA Standard, S67.06. The RTT was first checked for repeatability and self-consistency. Secondly, it was successfully validated against an independent measurement, namely the transfer function as measured using the natural in-service noise. This validation was done using two Bailey transmitters, which had the unfortunate property of having their response times as functions of the testing conditions. In all instances, after correcting for this Bailey nonlinearity, the RTT performance met its accuracy specification of ±(5% + 5 ms). (author)

  8. The keys to success in marketing small heating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of the SLOWPOKE Energy System requires acceptance of the SLOWPOKE reactor within the community where the reactor's energy is to be used. Public acceptance will be obtained once the public is convinced that this nuclear heat source is needed, safe and of economic benefit to the community. The need for a new application of nuclear energy is described and the ability of small reactors used for district heating to play that role is shown. The safety of the reactor is being demonstrated with the establishment of the SLOWPOKE Demonstration Reactor by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited and with open, candid discussion with the involved community. Economic arguments are reviewed and include discussion of quantitative and qualitative issues. (orig.)

  9. The MNSR reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This tank-in-pool reactor is based on the same design concept as the Canadian Slowpoke. The core is a right circular cylinder, 24 cm diameter by 25 cm long, containing 411 fuel pin positions. The pins are HEU-Aluminium alloy, 0.5 cm in diameter. Critical mass is about 900 g. The reactor has a single cadmium control rod. The back-up shutdown system is the insertion of a cadmium capsule in a core position. Excess reactivity is limited to 3.5mk. In both the MNSR and Slowpoke, the insertion of the maximum excess reactivity results in a power transient limited by the coolant/moderator temperature to safe values, independent of any operator action. This reactor is used primarily in training and neutron activation analysis. Up to 64 elements have been analyzed in a great variety of different disciplines. (author)

  10. The AECL study for an intense neutron - generator (technical details)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECL study for an intense neutron-generator has been in progress for two years. Recently the scientific and technical details and the conceptual designs were compiled in a report supporting proposals addressed to AECL's Board of Directors for further work. The compilation is being issued in this form to permit further discussion of the technical aspects. However readers are asked to appreciate that it was written primarily for an AECL audience, and specifically that those chapters giving tentative information about costs, the rate of investment and similar items have been omitted or modified, many references have been made to interim internal reports in order to complete the local documentation, but these references do not imply that the reports themselves can be made generally available. (author)

  11. The AECL study for an intense neutron - generator (technical details)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomew, G.A.; Tunnicliffe, P.R

    1966-07-01

    The AECL study for an intense neutron-generator has been in progress for two years. Recently the scientific and technical details and the conceptual designs were compiled in a report supporting proposals addressed to AECL's Board of Directors for further work. The compilation is being issued in this form to permit further discussion of the technical aspects. However readers are asked to appreciate that it was written primarily for an AECL audience, and specifically that those chapters giving tentative information about costs, the rate of investment and similar items have been omitted or modified, many references have been made to interim internal reports in order to complete the local documentation, but these references do not imply that the reports themselves can be made generally available. (author)

  12. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrin, V N

    2011-01-01

    Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^...

  13. Radiochemical synthesis of etomoxir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sodium 2-{6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl}oxirane-2-carboxylate (Etomoxir) inhibits transport of fatty acids via the carnitine shuttle into mitochondria of muscle cells and prevents long chain fatty acids from providing energy through β-oxidation especially for muscle contraction. The objective of this synthesis is to develop a method for radioiodination of Etomoxir in order to explore its potential in diagnostic metabolic studies and molecular imaging. Thus, a method is described for the radiochemical synthesis and purification of ethyl 2-{6-(4-[131I]iodophenoxy)hexyl}oxirane-2-carboxylate (3) and 2-{6-(4-[131I]iodo-phenoxy)hexyl}oxirane-2-carboxylic acid (4). For the synthesis of these new agents, ethyl 2-{6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl}oxirane-2-carboxylate (1) and 2-{6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl}oxirane-2-carboxylic acid (2) were refluxed with [131I]NaI in the presence of anhydrous acetone at a temperature of 80 oC and 90 oC for a period of 3-4 hours, respectively. The method of radiolabeling, based on the nucleophilic exchange reaction, resulted in a radiochemical yield of 43% and 67% for compounds 3 and 4, respectively. This paper reports on the labeling of etomoxir with radioiodine as 124I labeled etomoxir may be of great importance in molecular imaging.

  14. 11th radiochemical conference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference met in four sesions which discussed: Separation methods, Radioanalytical methods, Labelled compounds and Miscellaneous. The first session discussed extraction methods, ion exchange and chromatographic separation of radioisotopes. The second session heard papers on the application of these methods, e.g., in geochemistry, on the use of radioactive tracers in radiochemical analysis and the use of activation analysis in the determination of trace elements. The third session heard papers on the preparation of labelled organic compounds with isotopes 3H, 14C, radioiodine and 32P, on the preparation of RIA kits and on the chemistry and radiopharmacology of technetium compounds. The other contributions which could not be heard in any of the three sessions discussed, e.g., the preparation of elements on the cyclotron and microtron, the production of a new 99mTc-generator, the participation of the IAEA in processing low- and medium-level radioactive wastes, etc. (E.S.)

  15. Radiochemical synthesis of etomoxir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbas, Hafiz G. [Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Oncology (INMOL), New Campus Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Yunus, M. [University of the Punjab, New Campus Road, Lahore (Pakistan); Feinendegen, Ludwig E., E-mail: feinendegen@gmx.ne [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf, Wannental 45, 88131 Lindau (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    Sodium 2-{l_brace}6-(4-chlorophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylate (Etomoxir) inhibits transport of fatty acids via the carnitine shuttle into mitochondria of muscle cells and prevents long chain fatty acids from providing energy through {beta}-oxidation especially for muscle contraction. The objective of this synthesis is to develop a method for radioiodination of Etomoxir in order to explore its potential in diagnostic metabolic studies and molecular imaging. Thus, a method is described for the radiochemical synthesis and purification of ethyl 2-{l_brace}6-(4-[{sup 131}I]iodophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylate (3) and 2-{l_brace}6-(4-[{sup 131}I]iodo-phenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylic acid (4). For the synthesis of these new agents, ethyl 2-{l_brace}6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylate (1) and 2-{l_brace}6-(4-bromophenoxy)hexyl{r_brace}oxirane-2-carboxylic acid (2) were refluxed with [{sup 131}I]NaI in the presence of anhydrous acetone at a temperature of 80 {sup o}C and 90 {sup o}C for a period of 3-4 hours, respectively. The method of radiolabeling, based on the nucleophilic exchange reaction, resulted in a radiochemical yield of 43% and 67% for compounds 3 and 4, respectively. This paper reports on the labeling of etomoxir with radioiodine as {sup 124}I labeled etomoxir may be of great importance in molecular imaging.

  16. AECL programs in basic physics research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the CRNL program of research into the basic properties of atomic nuclei and condensed matter (liquids and solids). Brief descriptions are given of some of the current experimental programs done principally at the NRU reactor and MP tandem accelerator, the associated theoretical studies, and some highlights of past achievements

  17. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VT (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2}. For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute keff values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in keff), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}keff on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  18. Comparison of MCNP4B and WIMS-AECL calculations of coolant-void-reactivity effects for uniform lattices of CANDU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    1999-05-01

    This paper compares the results of coolant-void reactivity (CVR) reactor-physics calculations performed using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code, MCNP version 4B, with those obtained using Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL's) latest version of the Winfrith improved multigroup scheme (WIMS) code, WIMS-AECL version 2-5c. Cross sections derived from the evaluated nuclear data file version B-VI (ENDF/B-VI) are used for both the WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B calculations. The comparison is made for uniform lattices at room temperature containing either fresh natural uranium or mixed oxide (MOX) 37-element CANDU fuel. The MOX fuel composition corresponds roughly to that of irradiated CANDU fuel at a burnup of about 4500 MWd/tU. The level of agreement between the CVR predictions of WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is studied as a function of lattice buckling (a measure of the curvature of the neutron-flux distribution) over the range from 0.0 to 4.1 m{sup -2} . For the cases studied, it is found that the absolute k values calculated by WIMS-AECL are higher than those of MCNP4B by several mk (1 mk is a change of 0.001 in k), amounts that depend on the fuel type being modelled and the particular cross-section data used. However, the agreement between WIMS-AECL and MCNP4B is much better for the CVR (i.e., the {delta}k on coolant voiding), and is relatively insensitive to the fuel type. (author)

  19. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the naval reactors facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Tucker, Betty J.; Twining, Brian V.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Phtsburgh Naval Reactors Ofilce, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997?98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A totalof91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen qualityassurance samples also were collected and analyze~ seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however, some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  20. Radiochemical examination on irradiated PHWR and FBTR fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical examination of irradiated fuels from Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS) and Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) has been carried out in hot cells at Fuel Chemistry Division in Chemistry Group. Fuel was dissolved in concentrated nitric acid and small quantities of the fuel solution were transferred out of hot cells. Uranium and plutonium analysis were carried out using electro analytical techniques

  1. AECL devises new nuclear welding system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Automatic autogenous TIG pipe butt welding equipment has been developed for producing joints in reactor coolant monitoring systems for tubes of between 6 and 25 mm diameter and up to 3 mm wall thickness in stainless steel. The equipment is designed to work on site with power requirements of up to 2.2 KW maximum. A major feature of the design, therefore, was a welding system of sufficiently small size, portability and ruggedness to be able to withstand on-site conditions. Quality control is carried out automatically by a comparison of welding parameters with those of a standard acceptable weld. Details of power source characteristics and welding procedure are given. (author)

  2. The gentle giants of healing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, and medical radioisotope production are explained at a popular level, for the non-specialist. Nuclear medicine in Canada uses either Positron emission tomography (PET), or single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT). PET is used at the Montreal Neurological Institute to study epilepsy, brain tumours, stroke, or arterio-venous malformations. The much cheaper SPECT technique does many of the things that PET will do, and may eventually replace it to a considerable extent. This article features the manufacture of radioisotopes by Nordion Ltd., formerly known as AECL Radiochemical Co. Nordion supplies more than 20 isotopes, including about 80% of the world demand for 60Co, and 70% of all reactor isotopes, including the medically important 99Tc(m), 125I and 201Tl. Also featured is the intended acquisition (now cancelled) by Sherbrooke University of a 10-MW Slowpoke heating and isotope production reactor

  3. The Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) employee health study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary examination of records relating to past Chalk River employees provides some reassurance that large numbers of cancer deaths that might be related to occupational radiation exposure do not exist in the groups of employees studied to the end of 1982. The lack of reliable information on deaths of ex-employees who left AECL for other employment prevented the inclusion of this group in this preliminary study. This information will presumably be obtained during the course of the more comprehensive Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. employee health study. 6 refs

  4. SLOB, a SLOWPOKE channel binding protein, regulates insulin pathway signaling and metabolism in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L Sheldon

    Full Text Available There is ample evidence that ion channel modulation by accessory proteins within a macromolecular complex can regulate channel activity and thereby impact neuronal excitability. However, the downstream consequences of ion channel modulation remain largely undetermined. The Drosophila melanogaster large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel SLOWPOKE (SLO undergoes modulation via its binding partner SLO-binding protein (SLOB. Regulation of SLO by SLOB influences the voltage dependence of SLO activation and modulates synaptic transmission. SLO and SLOB are expressed especially prominently in median neurosecretory cells (mNSCs in the pars intercerebralis (PI region of the brain; these cells also express and secrete Drosophila insulin like peptides (dILPs. Previously, we found that flies lacking SLOB exhibit increased resistance to starvation, and we reasoned that SLOB may regulate aspects of insulin signaling and metabolism. Here we investigate the role of SLOB in metabolism and find that slob null flies exhibit changes in energy storage and insulin pathway signaling. In addition, slob null flies have decreased levels of dilp3 and increased levels of takeout, a gene known to be involved in feeding and metabolism. Targeted expression of SLOB to mNSCs rescues these alterations in gene expression, as well as the metabolic phenotypes. Analysis of fly lines mutant for both slob and slo indicate that the effect of SLOB on metabolism and gene expression is via SLO. We propose that modulation of SLO by SLOB regulates neurotransmission in mNSCs, influencing downstream insulin pathway signaling and metabolism.

  5. A study of the mortality of AECL employees. V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study has been underway since 1980 on the mortality of past and present AECL employees. The study population consists of 13,491 persons, 9997 males and 3494 females, for a total of 262,403.5 person-years at risk. During the period 1950-1985, 1299 deaths occurred in this population. The number of female deaths (121) is too few for detailed analysis, but the 1178 deaths in the male population represent a useful basis for this study. The present report examines mortality patterns in the AECL cohort between 1950 and 1985 by comparing the observed mortality with that expected in the general population for three groups of workers: those with no exposure, those with up to 50 mSv, and those with more than 50 mSv. Comparisons among the three groups of employees are discussed. The number of deaths is fewer than would be expected on the basis of general population statistics for both males who were exposed to ionizing radiation and those who were not exposed. The findings were similar for the 'all cancer' and 'all other deaths' groupings. In the group of exposed males, elevated Standardized Mortality Ratios (SMRs) are seen for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and for buccal cavity, rectum and rectosigmoid junction, and prostate cancers. There are elevated SMRs for lymphatic and myeloid leukemias and for large intestine, prostate, brain and biliary system cancers in the 'unexposed' male group. The number of cases identified in all of these cancers is small and the confidence intervals are wide, such that none of the elevated SMRs is statistically significant. The report compares the findings of this study with those of similar studies published in the past decade. (Author) (28 tabs., 33 refs., 2 figs.)

  6. AECL experience with low-level radioactive waste technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), as the Canadian government agency responsible for research and development of peaceful uses of nuclear energy, has had experience in handling a wide variety of radioactive wastes for over 40 years. Low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) is generated in Canada from nuclear fuel manufacturers and nuclear power facilities, from medical and industrial uses of radioisotopes and from research facilities. The technologies with which AECL has strength lie in the areas of processing, storage, disposal and safety assessment of LLRW. While compaction and incineration are the predominant methods practised for solid wastes, purification techniques and volume reduction methods are used for liquid wastes. The methods for processing continue to be developed to improve and increase the efficiency of operation and to accommodate the transition from storage of the waste to disposal. Site-specific studies and planning for a LLRW disposal repository to replace current storage facilities are well underway with in-service operation to begin in 1991. The waste will be disposed of in an intrusion-resistant underground structure designed to have a service life of over 500 years. Beyond this period of time the radioactivity in the waste will have decayed to innocuous levels. Safety assessments of LLRW disposal are performed with the aid of a series of interconnected mathematical models developed at Chalk River specifically to predict the movement of radionuclides through and away from the repository after its closure and the subsequent health effects of the released radionuclides on the public. The various technologies for dealing with radioactive wastes from their creation to disposal will be discussed. 14 refs

  7. Proceedings of the Tripartite Seminar on Nuclear Material Accounting and Control at Radiochemical Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems of creation and operation of nuclear materials (NM) control and accounting systems and their components at radiochemical plants were discussed in seminar during November 2-6 of 1998. There were 63 Russian and 25 foreign participants in seminar. The seminar programme includes following sessions and articles: the aspects of State NM control and accountancy; NM control and accounting in radiochemical plants and at separate stages of reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel and irradiated fuel elements of commercial reactors; NM control and accountancy in storage facilities of radiochemical plants; NM control and accounting computerization, material balance assessment, preparation of reports; qualitative and quantitative measurements in NM control and accounting at radiochemical plants destructive analysis techniques

  8. Reorganization of AECL and the future marketing program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. Engineering Co. has been reorganized to support the new emphasis on foreign sales of CANDU reactors. Much has been learned from reactor sales to Argentina, Korea, and Romania, but Canada needs to sell one 600 MWe reactor a year in order to avoid a decline in its nuclear industry. (LL)

  9. Collected radiochemical and geochemical procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, J [comp.

    1990-05-01

    This revision of LA-1721, 4th Ed., Collected Radiochemical Procedures, reflects the activities of two groups in the Isotope and Nuclear Chemistry Division of the Los Alamos National Laboratory: INC-11, Nuclear and radiochemistry; and INC-7, Isotope Geochemistry. The procedures fall into five categories: I. Separation of Radionuclides from Uranium, Fission-Product Solutions, and Nuclear Debris; II. Separation of Products from Irradiated Targets; III. Preparation of Samples for Mass Spectrometric Analysis; IV. Dissolution Procedures; and V. Geochemical Procedures. With one exception, the first category of procedures is ordered by the positions of the elements in the Periodic Table, with separate parts on the Representative Elements (the A groups); the d-Transition Elements (the B groups and the Transition Triads); and the Lanthanides (Rare Earths) and Actinides (the 4f- and 5f-Transition Elements). The members of Group IIIB-- scandium, yttrium, and lanthanum--are included with the lanthanides, elements they resemble closely in chemistry and with which they occur in nature. The procedures dealing with the isolation of products from irradiated targets are arranged by target element.

  10. Current status of the waste identification program at AECL's Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The management of routine operating waste by Waste Management and Decommissioning (WM and D) at Atomic Energy of Canada Limited's (AECL) Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) is supported by the Waste Identification (WI) Program. The principal purpose of the WI Program is to minimize the cost and the effort associated with waste characterization and waste tracking, which are needed to optimize waste handling, storage and disposal. The major steps in the WI Program are: (1) identify and characterize the processes that generate the routine radioactive wastes accepted by WM and D - radioisotope production, radioisotope use, reactor operation, fuel fabrication, et cetera (2) identify and characterize the routine blocks of waste generated by each process or activity - the initial characterization is based on inference (process knowledge) (3) prepare customized, template data sheets for each routine waste block - templates contain information such as package type, waste material, waste type, solidifying agent, the average non-radiological contaminant inventory, the average radiological contaminant inventory, and the waste class (4) ensure generators 'use the right piece of paper with the right waste' when they transfer waste to WM and D - that is they use the correct template data sheets to transfer routine wastes, by: identifying and marking waste collection points in the generator's facility; ensuring that generators implement effective waste collection/segregation procedures; implementing standard procedures to transfer waste to WM and D; and, auditing waste collection and segregation within a generator's facility (5) determine any additional waste block characterization requirements (is anything needed beyond the original characterization by process knowledge?) This paper describes the WI Program, it provides an example of its implementation, and it summarizes the current status of its implementation for both CRL and non-CRL waste generators. (author)

  11. Canadian Experience in Application of Graded Approach for Safety Assessment of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Research reactors are typically used for basic and applied research, education and training, production of isotopes, material testing, neutron activation analysis and other purposes. Most research reactors have a small potential for hazard to the public compared with power reactors. Safety assessment for the research reactors needs to be undertaken to evaluate compliance with safety requirements and to determine the measures to ensure reactor safety. Considering the different types of research reactors and their associated utilization, safety assessment should be commensurate with the potential hazard, ensuring that the design and operation of each reactor lead to adequate safety and defence in depth. The scope of presentation will cover the following topics: - Canadian regulatory framework for licensing research reactors; - Graded approach applied to safety assessment of the research reactors; - Use of graded approach to safety assessment of SLOWPOKE and NRU reactors. Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) has developed a regulatory framework for licensing small reactor facilities (including research reactors) that sets out requirements for the safety analysis and reactor design. CNSC staff considers each application individually in determining how much rigour and stringency are required for the safety assessment. All important factors affecting the overall reactor safety, such as safety system design, inherent safety features, the amount of fissile and fissionable materials, and the source terms are considered. The graded approach introduced, allows safety requirements to be implemented in such way that the level of safety assessment is proportional to the potential hazards posed by the research reactor. Licensing requirements vary with the type of facility and they may be applied in a graded fashion based on overall risk. Graded approach can be applied to all components of safety assessment including radiation risk, safety functions, defence in

  12. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU (Canada Deuterium Uranium) nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL Research will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement (EIS) on the concept for review by a Panel through the federal environmental assessment and review process (EARP). In accordance with AECL Research's mandate and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the review Panel, AECL Research has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used nuclear fuel waste

  13. AECL's concept for the disposal of nuclear fuel waste and the importance of its implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since 1978, Canada has been investigating a concept for permanently dealing with the nuclear fuel waste from Canadian CANDU nuclear generating stations. The concept is based on disposing of the waste in a vault excavated 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock of the Canadian Shield. AECL will soon be submitting an environmental impact statement on the concept to a federal environmental assessment review panel. In accordance with AECL's mandate, and in keeping with the detailed requirements of the panel, AECL has conducted extensive studies on a wide variety of technical and socio-economic issues associated with the concept. If the concept is accepted, we can and should continue our responsible approach, and take the next steps towards constructing a disposal facility for Canada's used fuel wastes. 16 refs

  14. AECL's participation in the commissioning of Point Lepreau generating station unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Support from Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL) to Point Lepreau during the commissioning program has been in the form of: seconded staff for commissioning program management, preparation of commissioning procedures, and hands-on commissioning of several systems; analysis of test results; engineering service for problem solving and modifications; design engineering for changes and additions; procurement of urgently-needed parts and materials; technological advice; review of operational limits; interpretation of design manuals and assistance with and preparation of submissions to regulatory authorities; and development of equipment and procedures for inspection and repairs. This, together with AECL's experience in the commissioning of other 600 MWe stations, Douglas Point and Ontario Hydro stations, provides AECL with a wide range of expertise for providing operating station support services for CANDU stations

  15. Self-sustainability of a research reactor facility with neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-term self-sustainability of a small reactor facility is possible because there is a large demand for non-destructive chemical analysis of bulk materials that can only be achieved with neutron activation analysis (NAA). The Ecole Polytechnique Montreal SLOWPOKE Reactor Facility has achieved self-sustainability for over twenty years, benefiting from the extreme reliability, ease of use and stable neutron flux of the SLOWPOKE reactor. The industrial clientele developed slowly over the years, mainly because of research users of the facility. A reliable NAA service with flexibility, high accuracy and fast turn-around time was achieved by developing an efficient NAA system, using a combination of the relative and k0 standardisation methods. The techniques were optimized to meet the specific needs of the client, such as low detection limit or high accuracy at high concentration. New marketing strategies are presented, which aim at a more rapid expansion. (author)

  16. Safety assessment for TA-48 radiochemical operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to document an assessment performed to evaluate the safety of the radiochemical operations conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory operations area designated as TA-48. This Safety Assessment for the TA-48 radiochemical operations was prepared to fulfill the requirements of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5481.1B, ''Safety Analysis and Review System.'' The area designated as TA-48 is operated by the Chemical Science and Technology (CST) Division and is involved with radiochemical operations associated with nuclear weapons testing, evaluation of samples collected from a variety of environmental sources, and nuclear medicine activities. This report documents a systematic evaluation of the hazards associated with the radiochemical operations that are conducted at TA-48. The accident analyses are limited to evaluation of the expected consequences associated with a few bounding accident scenarios that are selected as part of the hazard analysis. Section 2 of this report presents an executive summary and conclusions, Section 3 presents pertinent information concerning the TA-48 site and surrounding area, Section 4 presents a description of the TA-48 radiochemical operations, and Section 5 presents a description of the individual facilities. Section 6 of the report presents an evaluation of the hazards that are associated with the TA-48 operations and Section 7 presents a detailed analysis of selected accident scenarios

  17. Radiochemical analyses of several spent fuel Approved Testing Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guenther, R.J.; Blahnik, D.E.; Wildung, N.J.

    1994-09-01

    Radiochemical characterization data are described for UO{sub 2} and UO{sub 2} plus 3 wt% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} commercial spent nuclear fuel taken from a series of Approved Testing Materials (ATMs). These full-length nuclear fuel rods include MLA091 of ATM-103, MKP070 of ATM-104, NBD095 and NBD131 of ATM-106, and ADN0206 of ATM-108. ATMs 103, 104, and 106 were all irradiated in the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant (Reactor No.1), a pressurized-water reactor that used fuel fabricated by Combustion Engineering. ATM-108 was part of the same fuel bundle designed as ATM-105 and came from boiling-water reactor fuel fabricated by General Electric and irradiated in the Cooper Nuclear Power Plant. Rod average burnups and expected fission gas releases ranged from 2,400 to 3,700 GJ/kgM. (25 to 40 Mwd/kgM) and from less than 1% to greater than 10%, respectively, depending on the specific ATM. The radiochemical analyses included uranium and plutonium isotopes in the fuel, selected fission products in the fuel, fuel burnup, cesium and iodine on the inner surfaces of the cladding, {sup 14}C in the fuel and cladding, and analyses of the gases released to the rod plenum. Supporting examinations such as fuel rod design and material descriptions, power histories, and gamma scans used for sectioning diagrams are also included. These ATMs were examined as part of the Materials Characterization Center Program conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory provide a source of well-characterized spent fuel for testing in support of the US Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program.

  18. Radiochemical studies on nuclear fission at Trombay

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Asok Goswami

    2015-08-01

    Since the discovery of nuclear fission in the year 1939, both physical and radiochemical techniques have been adopted for the study of various aspects of the phenomenon. Due to the ability to separate individual elements from a complex reaction mixture with a high degree of sensitivity and selectivity, a chemist plays a significant role in the measurements of mass, charge, kinetic energy, angular momentum and angular distribution of fission products in various fissioning systems. At Trombay, a small group of radiochemists initiated the work on radiochemical studies of mass distribution in the early sixties. Since then, radiochemical investigations on various fission observables have been carried out at Trombay in , , and heavy-ion-induced fissions. An attempt has been made to highlight the important findings of such studies in this paper, with an emphasis on medium energy and heavy-ion-induced fission.

  19. Automated Radiochemical Separation, Analysis, and Sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapter 14 for the 2nd edition of the Handbook of Radioactivity Analysis. The techniques and examples described in this chapter demonstrate that modern fluidic techniques and instrumentation can be used to develop automated radiochemical separation workstations. In many applications, these can be mechanically simple and key parameters can be controlled from software. If desired, many of the fluidic components and solution can be located remotely from the radioactive samples and other hot sample processing zones. There are many issues to address in developing automated radiochemical separation that perform reliably time after time in unattended operation. These are associated primarily with the separation and analytical chemistry aspects of the process. The relevant issues include the selectivity of the separation, decontamination factors, matrix effects, and recoveries from the separation column. In addition, flow rate effects, column lifetimes, carryover from one sample to another, and sample throughput must be considered. Nevertheless, successful approaches for addressing these issues have been developed. Radiochemical analysis is required not only for processing nuclear waste samples in the laboratory, but also for at-site or in situ applications. Monitors for nuclear waste processing operations represent an at-site application where continuous unattended monitoring is required to assure effective process radiochemical separations that produce waste streams that qualify for conversion to stable waste forms. Radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and long term stewardship represent an application where at-site or in situ measurements will be most effective. Automated radiochemical analyzers and sensors have been developed that demonstrate that radiochemical analysis beyond the analytical laboratory is both possible and practical

  20. Effects of manipulating slowpoke calcium-dependent potassium channel expression on rhythmic locomotor activity in Drosophila larvae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin C. McKiernan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Rhythmic motor behaviors are generated by networks of neurons. The sequence and timing of muscle contractions depends on both synaptic connections between neurons and the neurons’ intrinsic properties. In particular, motor neuron ion currents may contribute significantly to motor output. Large conductance Ca2+-dependent K+ (BK currents play a role in action potential repolarization, interspike interval, repetitive and burst firing, burst termination and interburst interval in neurons. Mutations in slowpoke (slo genes encoding BK channels result in motor disturbances. This study examined the effects of manipulating slo channel expression on rhythmic motor activity using Drosophila larva as a model system. Dual intracellular recordings from adjacent body wall muscles were made during spontaneous crawling-related activity in larvae expressing a slo mutation or a slo RNA interference construct. The incidence and duration of rhythmic activity in slo mutants were similar to wild-type control animals, while the timing of the motor pattern was altered. slo mutants showed decreased burst durations, cycle durations, and quiescence intervals, and increased duty cycles, relative to wild-type. Expressing slo RNAi in identified motor neurons phenocopied many of the effects observed in the mutant, including decreases in quiescence interval and cycle duration. Overall, these results show that altering slo expression in the whole larva, and specifically in motor neurons, changes the frequency of crawling activity. These results suggest an important role for motor neuron intrinsic properties in shaping the timing of motor output.

  1. Radiochemical measurement of neutron-spectrum averaged cross sections for the formation of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Cu via the (n,p) reaction at a TRIGA Mark-II reactor. Feasibility of simultaneous production of the theragnostic pair {sup 64}Cu/{sup 67}Cu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uddin, M. Shuza; Hossain, Syed Mohammod [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology; Rumman-uz-Zaman, M. [Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka (Bangladesh). Inst. of Nuclear Science and Technology; Dhaka Univ. (Bangladesh). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering; Qaim, Syed M. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Neurowissenschaften und Medizin (INM-5) - Nuklearchemie

    2014-09-01

    Integral cross sections of the {sup 64}Zn(n,p){sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Zn(n,p){sup 67}Cu reactions were measured for the fast neutron spectrum of TRIGA Mark-II reactor at Savar, Dhaka, Bangladesh. A clean radiochemical separation was performed to isolate the copper radionuclides from the target element zinc. The radioactivities produced in the irradiation were measured by HPGe γ-ray spectroscopy. The neutron flux over the energy range 0.5-20 MeV was determined using the {sup 58}Ni(n,p){sup 58}Co monitor reaction. The measured results amount to 28.9 ± 2.0 mb and 0.84 ± 0.07 mb for the formation of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Cu, respectively. These values are slightly lower than the respective values for a pure fission spectrum. The present results were compared with data calculated using the neutron spectral distribution and the recently critically analysed excitation function of each reaction given in the literature. The good agreement validates the reliability of those excitation functions. The feasibility of simultaneous production of {sup 64}Cu and {sup 67}Cu with fast neutrons is discussed. (orig.)

  2. Rapid radiochemical separations in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rapid radiochemical separation procedures based on the removal of metal ions by columns of C18-bonded silica gel after selective complexation are examined and the simplicity of the method demonstrated by its application to the determination of Mn, Cu and Zn in neutron-activated biological material. The method is rapid and reliable and readily adaptable in all radiochemical laboratories. An alternative separation procedure for selenium in blood plasma involving desalination and concentration of the selenium protein complex by gel filtration or ultrafiltration is briefly discussed. (author)

  3. Thermal-hydraulic interfacing code modules for CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, W.S.; Gold, M.; Sills, H. [Ontario Hydro Nuclear, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1997-07-01

    The approach for CANDU reactor safety analysis in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) and Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is presented. Reflecting the unique characteristics of CANDU reactors, the procedure of coupling the thermal-hydraulics, reactor physics and fuel channel/element codes in the safety analysis is described. The experience generated in the Canadian nuclear industry may be useful to other types of reactors in the areas of reactor safety analysis.

  4. Processing of LLRW arising from AECL nuclear research centres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation of nuclear research reactors and laboratories results in the generation of a wide variety of solid and liquid radioactive wastes. This paper describes practical experience with processing of low-level radioactive wastes at two major nuclear research centres in Canada

  5. Co-operative projects with AECL in the fields of hydrogeology and geochemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report covers collaborative study with Atomic Energy of Canada Limited on geological aspects of waste disposal in crystalline rocks. A field test of the sinusoidal hydraulic pressure pulse method was carried out at the URL site to try to define hydraulic properties of major horizontal fractures. The trials were generally successful and observable sine and square wave signals were transmitted. Owing to the limited scale of the programme, and some equipment problems, the results proved difficult to interpret, although the speed and flexibility of the method was demonstrated. A second aspect of collaboration was to be the field comparison of the AECL and NERC/BGS borehole geochemical probes. In the event, the AECL probe development programme was curtailed and a Swedish design selected for purchase. Effort thus switched to technical comparison of the SGAB probe with the NERC/BGS design. Since both are still at various development points the collaboration was limited to technical exchange. The results are presented. (author)

  6. Microbial analysis of the buffer/container experiment at AECL's underground research laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Buffer/Container Experiment (BCE) was carried out at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) for 2.5 years to examine the in situ performance of compacted buffer material in a single emplacement borehole under vault-relevant conditions. During decommissioning of this experiment, numerous samples were taken for microbial analysis to determine if the naturally present microbial population in buffer material survived the conditions (i.e., compaction, heat and desiccation) in the BCE and to determine which group(s) of microorganisms would be dominant in such a simulated vault environment. Such knowledge will be very useful in assessing the potential effects of microbial activity on the concept for deep disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste, proposed by AECL. 46 refs., 31 tabs., 35 figs

  7. Automated radiochemical processing for clinical PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Siemens RDS 112, an automated radiochemical production and delivery system designed to support a clinical PET program, consists of an 11 MeV, proton only, negative ion cyclotron, a shield, a computer, and targetry and chemical processing modules to produce radiochemicals used in PET imaging. The principal clinical PET tracers are [18F]FDG, [13N]ammonia and [15O]water. Automated synthesis of [18F]FDG is achieved using the Chemistry Process Control Unit (CPCU), a general purpose valve-and-tubing device that emulates manual processes while allowing for competent operator intervention. Using function-based command file software, this pressure-driven synthesis system carries out chemical processing procedures by timing only, without process-based feedback. To date, nine CPCUs have installed at seven institutions resulting in 1,200+ syntheses of [18F]FDG, with an average yield of 55% (EOB)

  8. Methods for training radiochemical technicians at ORNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The training of personnel to carry out radiochemical operations at ORNL is a formidable and recurrent task since repetitive, production-type operations are not involved, and programs are constantly shifting. It is essential that provisions be made for the routine retraining of personnel if they are to make effective contributions on a continuing basis. The present training methods have emerged as a result of thirty years experience in a variety of radiochemical pilot-plant programs. These programs have included operations performed in glove boxes, hot-cell manipulator work handling high-neutron-emitting isotopes, and the entire spectrum of remote solvent extraction operations. Present methods of training and the results obtained are summarized

  9. Radiochemical separation of gold by amalgam exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruch, R.R.

    1970-01-01

    A rapid and simple method for the radiochemical separation of gold after neutron activation. The technique is based on treatment with a dilute indium-gold amalgam, both chemical reduction and isotopic exchange being involved. The counting efficiency for 198Au in small volumes of the amalgam is good. Few interferences occur and the method is applicable to clays, rocks, salts and metals. The possibility of determining silver, platinum and palladium by a similar method is mentioned. ?? 1970.

  10. 14th radiochemical conference. Booklet of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contributions dealt with the following topics: Radionuclides in the environment, radioecology; Nuclear analytical methods; Chemistry of actinide and trans-actinide elements; Ionizing radiation in science, technology, and arts and cultural heritage preservation; Production and application of radionuclides; Separation methods, speciation; Chemistry of nuclear fuel cycle, radiochemical problems in nuclear waste management; and Nuclear methods in medicine, radiopharmaceuticals, and radiodiagnostics, labelled compounds. Of the verbal and poster presentation, 192 have been input to INIS. (P.A.)

  11. Radiochemical aging of an epoxy network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is to give a better understanding of the radiochemical aging of a thermoset resin under gamma irradiation. The conditions of aging are gamma irradiation under air with a dose rate of 2 kGy/h at 120 C. The requested lifetime is four years, it means a dose of 70 MGy. The first step of this work was the choice of a resistive epoxy resin. This choice was made thanks to the literature data. The high glass transition temperature and the high amount of aromatic groups were the main criteria of the final choice. After this choice, thermal and mechanical properties were followed under thermal and radiochemical aging: i) under thermal aging, after 600 hours at 220 C, the glass transition temperature remained unchanged. But, from a mechanical point of view, properties at break dramatically decreased. This embrittlement was assigned to a critical oxidized layer. The thickness of this layer was estimated about 30 μm. ii) the same kind of embrittlement was observed under radiochemical aging. Moreover, it appeared a decrease of the glass transition temperature when increasing the dose of irradiation. This indicates that the main degradation mechanism is chain scission under anaerobic atmosphere. We, then, proposed a mechanistic model associated with a kinetic model to predict the evolution of the glass transition temperature depending on the irradiation conditions. Parameters of the kinetic model were determined by solid NMR and ESR experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculated values at 120 C is satisfactory, a global good agreement was found. (author)

  12. Destructive radiochemical analysis of uraniumsilicide fuel for burnup determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysemans, M.; Bocxstaele, M. van; Bree, P. van; Vandevelde, L.; Koonen, E.; Sannen, L. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, Mol (Belgium); Guigon, B. [CEA, Centre de Cadarache, Saint Paul lez Durance (France)

    2004-07-01

    During the design phase of the French research reactor Jules Horowitz (RJH) several types of low enriched uranium fuels (LEU), i.e. <20% {sup 235}U enrichment, are studied as possible candidate fuel elements for the reactor core. One of the LEU fuels that is taken into consideration is an uraniumsilicide based fuel with U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed in an aluminium matrix. The development and evaluation of such a new fuel for a research reactor requires an extensive testing and qualification program, which includes destructive radiochemical analysis to determine the burnup of irradiated fuel with a high accuracy. In radiochemistry burnup is expressed as atom percent burnup and is a measure for the number of fissions that have occurred per initial 100 heavy element atoms (%FIMA). It is determined by measuring the number of heavy element atoms in the fuel and the number of atoms of selected key fission products that are proportional to the number of fissions that occurred during irradiation. From the few fission products that are suitable as fission product monitor, the stable Nd-isotopes {sup 143}Nd, {sup 144}Nd, {sup 145}Nd, {sup 146}Nd, {sup 148Nd}, {sup 150}Nd and the gamma-emitters {sup 137}Cs and {sup 144}Ce are selected for analysis. Samples form two curved U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} plates, with a fuel core density of 5.1 and 6.1 g U/cm{sup 3} (35% {sup 235}U) and being irradiated in the BR2 reactor of SCK x CEN{sup [1]}, were analyzed. (orig.)

  13. Trace analysis measurements in high-purity aluminium by means of radiochemical neutron and proton activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the study consisted in the development of efficient radiochemical composite processes and activation methods for the multi-element determination of traces within the lower ng range in high-purity aluminium. More than 50 elements were determined with the help of activation with reactor neutrons; the selective separation of matrix activity (adsorption with hydrated antimony pentoxide) led to a noticeable improvement of detectability, as compared with instrumental neutron activation analysis. Further improvements were achieved with the help of radiochemical group separations in ion exchangers or with the help of the selective separation of the pure beta-emitting elements. Over 20 elements up to high atomic numbers were determined by means of activating 13 MeV protons and 23 Me protons. In this connection, improvements of the detection limit by as a factor of 10 were achieved with radiochemical separation techniques, as compared with pure instrumental proton activation analysis. (RB)

  14. 13th Radiochemical Conference. Booklet of Abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Conference included the following sessions: (i) Opening plenary presentations (6 contributions); (ii) Chemistry of natural radionuclides, discovery of radium and polonium (6 verbal presentations + 5 poster presentations); (iii) Radionuclides in the environment, radioecology (29 + 48); (iv) Activation analysis and other radioanalytical methods (36 + 49); (v) Ionizing radiation in science and technology (12 + 12); (vi) Chemistry of actinide and trans-actinide elements (11 + 14); (vii) Separation methods, speciation (18 + 41); (viii) Production and application of radionuclides (14 + 29); and (ix) Radiochemical problems in nuclear waste management (12 + 22). The majority of verbal presentations has been input to INIS, mostly in the form of the full authors' abstracts. (P.A.)

  15. Sensitivity analysis on various parameters for lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel with WIMS-AECL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roh, Gyu Hong; Choi, Hang Bok; Park, Jee Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The code WIMS-AECL has been used for the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel. The lattice parameters calculated by the code is sensitive to the choice of number of parameters, such as the number of tracking lines, number of condensed groups, mesh spacing in the moderator region, other parameters vital to the calculation of probabilities and burnup analysis. We have studied this sensitivity with respect to these parameters and recommend their proper values which are necessary for carrying out the lattice analysis of DUPIC fuel.

  16. Specifications for reactor physics experiments on CANFLEX-RU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is to describe reactor physics experiments to be performed in the ZED-2 reactor to study CANFLEX-RU fuel bundles in CANDU-type fuel channels. The experiments are to provide benchmark quality validation data for the computer codes and associated nuclear databases used for physics calculations, in particular WIMS-AECL. Such validation data is likely to be a requirement by the regulator as condition for licensing a CANDU reactor based on an enriched fuel cycle

  17. Technology transfer programs using a low power nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SLOWPOKE II nuclear reactor developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited is well suited for neutron activation analysis and the production of small quantities of radionuclides. Emphasis has been placed on local research groups to transfer appropriate technology developed in their laboratories into the community. The development of several research protocols and associated technology is reviewed and their successful implementation into local industry is outlined. These include for example, the monitoring of environmental chlorinated compounds, the irradiation of gem stones, placer gold-mining efficiency measurements and measuring industrial flow-processes. (author) 6 refs.; 1 tab

  18. Radiochemical Analysis Methodology for uranium Depletion Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scatena-Wachel DE

    2007-01-09

    This report provides sufficient material for a test sponsor with little or no radiochemistry background to understand and follow physics irradiation test program execution. Most irradiation test programs employ similar techniques and the general details provided here can be applied to the analysis of other irradiated sample types. Aspects of program management directly affecting analysis quality are also provided. This report is not an in-depth treatise on the vast field of radiochemical analysis techniques and related topics such as quality control. Instrumental technology is a very fast growing field and dramatic improvements are made each year, thus the instrumentation described in this report is no longer cutting edge technology. Much of the background material is still applicable and useful for the analysis of older experiments and also for subcontractors who still retain the older instrumentation.

  19. Experimental and analysis methods in radiochemical experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattadori, C. M.; Pandola, L.

    2016-04-01

    Radiochemical experiments made the history of neutrino physics by achieving the first observation of solar neutrinos (Cl experiment) and the first detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrinos component (Ga experiments). They measured along decades the integral νe charged current interaction rate in the exposed target. The basic operation principle is the chemical separation of the few atoms of the new chemical species produced by the neutrino interactions from the rest of the target, and their individual counting in a low-background counter. The smallness of the expected interaction rate (1 event per day in a ˜ 100 ton target) poses severe experimental challenges on the chemical and on the counting procedures. The main aspects related to the analysis techniques employed in solar neutrino experiments are reviewed and described, with a special focus given to the event selection and the statistical data treatment.

  20. Experimental and analysis methods in radiochemical experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cattadori, C.M. [INFN, Milano (Italy); Pandola, L. [Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN, Catania (Italy); Gran Sasso Science Institute, INFN, L' Aquila (Italy)

    2016-04-15

    Radiochemical experiments made the history of neutrino physics by achieving the first observation of solar neutrinos (Cl experiment) and the first detection of the fundamental pp solar neutrinos component (Ga experiments). They measured along decades the integral ν{sub e} charged current interaction rate in the exposed target. The basic operation principle is the chemical separation of the few atoms of the new chemical species produced by the neutrino interactions from the rest of the target, and their individual counting in a low-background counter. The smallness of the expected interaction rate (1 event per day in a ∝ 100 ton target) poses severe experimental challenges on the chemical and on the counting procedures. The main aspects related to the analysis techniques employed in solar neutrino experiments are reviewed and described, with a special focus given to the event selection and the statistical data treatment. (orig.)

  1. Cobalt-60 production in CANDU power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The technology for cobalt-60 production in CANDU reactors, designed and developed by MDS Nordion and AECL, has been safely,economically and successfully employed in CANDU reactors with over 195 reactor years of production. Today over forty percent of the world's disposable medical supplies are made safer through sterilization using cobalt-60 sources from MDS Nordion. Over the past 40 years, MDS Nordion with its CANDU reactor owner partners, has safely and reliably shipped more than 500 million curies of cobalt-60 sources to customers around the world

  2. OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE: UPGRADED MPC AND A SYSTEMS FOR THE RADIOCHEMICAL PLANT OF THE SIBERIAN CHEMICAL COMBINE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of reducing the risk of nuclear proliferation through physical protection and material control/accounting systems depends upon the development of an effective design that includes consideration of the objectives of the systems and the resources available to implement the design. Included among the objectives of the design are facility characterization, definition of threat, and identification of targets. When considering resources, the designer must consider funds available, rapid low-cost elements, technology elements, human resources, and the availability of resources to sustain operation of the end system. The Siberian Chemical Combine (SCC) is a multi-function nuclear facility located in the Tomsk region of Siberia, Russia. Beginning in 1996, SCC joined with the United States Department of Energy (US/DOE) Material Protection, Control, and Accounting (MPC and A) Program to develop and implement MPC and A upgrades for the Radiochemical, Chemical Metallurgical, Conversion, Uranium Enrichment, and Reactor Plants of the SCC. At the Radiochemical Plant the MPC and A design and implementation process has been largely completed for the Plutonium Storage Facility and related areas of the Radiochemical Plant. Design and implementation of upgrades for the Radiochemical Plant include rapid physical protection upgrades such as bricking up of doors and windows, and installation of security-hardened doors. Rapid material control and accounting upgrades include installation of modern balances and bar code equipment. Comprehensive MPC and A upgrades include the installation of access controls to sensitive areas of the Plant, alarm communication and display (AC and D) systems to detect and annunciate alarm conditions, closed circuit (CCTV) systems to assess alarm conditions, central and secondary alarm station upgrades that enable security forces to assess and respond to alarm conditions, material control and accounting upgrades that include upgraded physical

  3. Development of Commercial Neutron Activation Analysis Service with a Small Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown that with sufficient motivation the staff of a SLOWPOKE type reactor facility can develop a commercial NAA service generating enough revenues to pay the salaries of all those involved as well as reactor maintenance costs. The NAA service should be fast and continuously available; industry often requires a turn-around time of one day. At the École Polytechnique NAA Laboratory, years of work have led to the successful development of a hybrid NAA method combining the k0 method and the improved relative method. It offers large savings in time as well as improved flexibility and accuracy. (author)

  4. New opportunities from nuclear R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author presents a new initiative within Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), the intention to look for spin-off business opportunities from main-line research and development. In 1982 AECL began encouraging ideas for spin-off applications. Some problems were encountered: the reluctance of staff to divert attention from the CANDU program; resource allocation; difficulties in getting market input; and difficulties in deciding what to license and what to retain as an in-house business opportunity. Successes have come in the areas of using CANDU technology in LWRs, SLOWPOKE reactors, industrial accelerators, stable isotope production, intelligent sensing systems, and deuterated lucite for fibre optics. (L.L.)

  5. AECL R and D's role in promoting nuclear research and education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear renaissance has created new opportunities for new technology development and has also brought along the challenge of meeting the growing demand of trained personnel in the nuclear science and engineering. Towards meeting this challenge, AECL R and D organization is actively promoting and supporting the creation of nuclear research capabilities at the universities and also effectively leveraging the R and D at the universities. It has also put in place several new initiatives to attract and develop the talented young people for careers in nuclear science and engineering. This paper describes various interactions and collaborations with the universities that supports the nuclear R and D at the universities and develop highly qualified personnel for the future nuclear R and D needs. (author)

  6. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cigar Lake uranium deposit is located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The 1.3-billion-year-old deposit is located at a depth of about 450 m below surface in a water-saturated sandstone at the unconformity contact with the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The Cigar Lake deposit has many features that parallel those being considered within the Canadian concept for disposal of nuclear fuel waste. The study of these natural structures and processes provides valuable insight toward the eventual design and site selection of a nuclear fuel waste repository. The main feature of this analog is the absence of any indication on the surface of the rich uranium ore 450 m below. This indicates that the combination of natural barriers has been effective in isolating the uranium ore from the surface environment. More specifically, the deposit provides analog information relevant to the stability of UO2 fuel waste, the performance of clay-based barriers, radionuclide migration, colloid formation, radiolysis, fission-product geochemistry and general aspects of water-rock interaction. The main geochemical studies on this deposit focus on the evolution of groundwater compositions in the deposit and on their redox chemistry with respect to the uranium, iron and sulphide systems. Since 1984, through cooperation from the owners of the Cigar Lake deposit, analog studies have been conducted. AECL, with support from Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group, initiated international participation in 1989 through collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and, more recently, with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report gives the results of the various studies carried out during the 3-year collaboration between AECL and SKB, as well as a summery of the LANL study. It provides detailed information on the generated databases and models, and integrates this information into conclusions for use in safety

  7. Final report of the AECL/SKB Cigar Lake analog study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cigar Lake uranium deposit is located in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. The 1.3-billion-year-old deposit is located at a depth of about 450 m below surface in a water-saturated sandstone at the unconformity contact with the high-grade metamorphic rocks of the Canadian Shield. The uranium mineralization, consisting primarily of uraninite (UO2), is surrounded by a clay-rich halo in both sandstone and basement rocks, and remains extremely well preserved and intact. The average grade of the mineralization is ∼ 8 wt.% U; locally grades are as high as ∼ 55 wt.%U. The Cigar lake deposit has many features that parallel those being considered within the Canadian concept for disposal of nuclear fuel waste. Specifically, the deposit provides analog information relevant to the stability of UO2 fuel waste, the performance of clay-based barriers, radionuclide migration, colloid formation, radiolysis, fission-product geochemistry and general aspects of water-rock interaction. The main geochemical studies on this deposit focus on the evolution of groundwater compositions in the deposit and on their redox chemistry with respect to the uranium, iron and sulphide systems. Since 1984, through cooperation from the owners of the Cigar lake deposit, analog studies have been conducted. AECL, with support from Ontario Hydro under the auspices of the CANDU Owners Group, initiated international participation in 1989 through collaboration with the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) and, more recently, with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This report gives the results of the various studies carried out during the 3-year collaboration between AECL and SKB, as well as a summary of the LANL study. It provides detailed information on the generated databases and models, and integrates this information into conclusions for use in safety assessment of the Canadian, Swedish and United States disposal concepts. 15 refs., 25 figs., 55 tabs

  8. A general description of the NRX reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRX Reactor structure, equipment and experimental facilities are described. The purpose of the various components is explained using photographs and diagrams as much as possible. Dimensions are given so that the reader can visualize the relative sizes of the components. The report is meant to be an introduction to the NRX Design and Operating Manuals, from which detailed information can be obtained. It is expected that the report will be of value to trainee NRX Reactor Operations personnel and to those persons who require only a general knowledge of the reactor. A bibliography of AECL reports pertaining to NRX is given. (author)

  9. RECONSTRUCTION OF 131I RELEASES FROM STACKS OF THE RADIOCHEMICAL PLANT OF THE MAYAK PRODUCTION ASSOCIATION FOR THE PERIOD FROM 1948 TO 1967

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolenko, Y. V.; Drozhko, Evgeniy G.; Mokrov, Y.; Pyatin, N. P.; Rovny, Sergey I.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-06-01

    The method of reconstruction of 131I releases from the Mayak PA Radiochemical Plant stacks for the period from 1948 to 1967 is proposed and the results of reconstruction are given. During this period of time, no continuous routine experimental monitoring of release was performed. As a result, reconstruction was carried out on the basis of earlier obtained data on deliveries of 131I to the radiochemical plants with irradiated uranium from the Mayak PA graphite - uranium reactors. The reconstruction also used calculation - experimental data on the iodine distribution in process solutions and in ventilation exhaust gases from the radiochemical plants, as well as in archive information on the efficiency of iodine trapping with the help of gas purification facilities. Available experimental data on 131I releases from the stacks of the radiochemical plants are given. The reconstruction results are presented as average monthly and annual releases of 131I from the stacks of radiochemical plants B and DB. The results are intended to be used for estimating doses to the population living in the vicinity of the enterprise in the 1950s-1960s.

  10. Reconstruction Of 131I Releases From Stacks Of The Radiochemical Plant Of The Mayak Production Association For The Period From 1948 To 1967

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method of reconstruction of 131I releases from the Mayak PA Radiochemical Plant stacks for the period from 1948 to 1967 is proposed and the results of reconstruction are given. During this period of time, no continuous routine experimental monitoring of release was performed. As a result, reconstruction was carried out on the basis of earlier obtained data on deliveries of 131I to the radiochemical plants with irradiated uranium from the Mayak PA graphite - uranium reactors. The reconstruction also used calculation - experimental data on the iodine distribution in process solutions and in ventilation exhaust gases from the radiochemical plants, as well as in archive information on the efficiency of iodine trapping with the help of gas purification facilities. Available experimental data on 131I releases from the stacks of the radiochemical plants are given. The reconstruction results are presented as average monthly and annual releases of 131I from the stacks of radiochemical plants B and DB. The results are intended to be used for estimating doses to the population living in the vicinity of the enterprise in the 1950s-1960s.

  11. Build your own Candu reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author discusses the marketing of Candu reactors, particularly the export trade. Future sales will probably be of the nuclear side of a station only, thus striking a compromise between licensing and 'turnkey' sales. It is suggested that AECL might have made more money in the past had it not given the right to manufacture Candu fuel away to Canadian industry. Future sales to certain potential customers may be limited by the requirement of strict safeguards, which will almost certainly never be relaxed. (N.D.H.)

  12. Radiochemical studies on environmental radioactivity in Sudan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurements of uranium and thorium isotopes, 226 Ra, 210 Po, 228 Ra, 40 K and fallout radionuclide 137 Cs in soil samples collected from different districts in Sudan, rock phosphate samples collected from the uro and kurun rock phosphate deposits in the eastern part of the Nuba mountains in Western Sudan, and surface marine sediments and marine organisms collected from the sudanese coastal waters of the Red Sea have been made using a high resolution gamma-spectrometry, radiochemical separation and α spectrometry. The external exposure due to γ radiation from the ground has been calculated. The average exposure was found to be 45.4 ± 21.3 nGy/h, corresponding to the annual dose equivalent of 278 μSv/y. With the exception of some areas, the calculated exposure falls within the global wide range of outdoor radiation exposure given in the UNSCEAR publications. The nation-wide average concentrations of 226 Ra, 238 U, 232 Th, 40 K and 137 Cs determined were 31.6 ± 27, 20.1 ± 16.4, 19.1 ± 8.1, 280.3 ± 137.6 and 4.1 ± 4.3 Bq/Kg, respectively. This shows that there is little contamination due to fallout radioactivity at survey sites. The exchangeable radium fraction constitutes 19-24% of the total radium content. The data show that 238 U and its decay products are the principal contributors of radioactivity in both phosphate deposits at Uro and Kurun. The equivalent mass concentrations of uranium in the Uro rock phosphate fall within the range that could be economically recovered as the by-product of fertilizer industry. The mean activity concentrations weighted by average agricultural consumption of 300 kg/ha of untreated ground rock fertilizer resulted in an annual distribution of 120.63 Bq Ra/m2 with Uro rock and 12.97, 0.21 and 4.24 Bq/m2 respectively, with Kurun rock fertilizer. The external radiation exposure over agricultural areas was estimated 23.41 x 10 -9 Gy/h and 2.59 x 10 -9 Gy/h at 1 m above ground level for Uro and Kurun rock phosphate fertilizers

  13. Radiochemical analysis for nuclear waste management in decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, X. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy. Radiation Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark))

    2010-07-15

    The NKS-B RadWaste project was launched from June 2009. The on-going decommissioning activities in Nordic countries and current requirements and problems on the radiochemical analysis of decommissioning waste were discussed and overviewed. The radiochemical analytical methods used for determination of various radionuclides in nuclear waste are reviewed, a book was written by the project partners Jukka Lehto and Xiaolin Hou on the chemistry and analysis of radionuclide to be published in 2010. A summary of the methods developed in Nordic laboratories is described in this report. The progresses on the development and optimization of analytical method in the Nordic labs under this project are presented. (author)

  14. Trace Analysis of Ancient Gold Objects Using Radiochemical Neutron Activation

    CERN Document Server

    Olariu, A; Constantinescu, O; Badica, T; Popescu, I V; Besliu, C; Leahu, D; Olariu, Agata; Constantinescu, Mioara; Leahu, Doina

    1999-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis has been applied to investigate the microelements in gold samples with archaeological importance. Chemical separation has allowed the determination of traces of Ir, Os, Sb, Zn, Co, Fe, Ni. Instrumental neutron activation analysis has been used for the determination of Cu.

  15. AECL strategy for surface-based investigations of potential disposal sites and the development of a geosphere model for a site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to summarize AECL's strategy for surface-based geotechnical site investigations used in screening and evaluating candidate areas and candidate sites for a nuclear fuel waste repository and for the development of geosphere models of sites. The report is one of several prepared by national nuclear fuel waste management programs for the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co. (SKB) to provide international background on site investigations for SKB's R and D programme on siting.The scope of the report is limited to surface-based investigations of the geosphere, those done at surface or in boreholes drilled from surface. The report discusses AECL's investigation strategy and the methods proposed for use in surface-based reconnaissance and detailed site investigations at potential repository sites. Site investigations done for AECL's Underground Research Laboratory are used to illustrate the approach. The report also discusses AECL's strategy for developing conceptual and mathematical models of geological conditions at sites and the use of these models in developing a model (Geosphere Model) for use in assessing the performance of the disposal system after a repository is closed. Models based on the site data obtained at the URL are used to illustrate the approach. Finally, the report summarizes the lessons learned from AECL's R and D program on site investigations and mentions some recent developments in the R and D program. 120 refs, 33 figs, 7 tabs

  16. Analysis of the results for the AECL cohort in the IARC study on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in fifteen countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last two decades there have been attempts to estimate the risks from occupational exposure in the nuclear industry by epidemiological assessments on cohorts of workers. However, generally low doses and relatively small worker populations have limited the precision of such studies. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved workers from facilities in the USA, UK and AECL. In 2005, IARC completed a further study involving nuclear workers from 15 countries including Canada. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL component, was significantly higher than the cohort as a whole. The work described in this report is an attempt to unravel what might have accounted for the divergence between the results for the AECL cohort and the others

  17. Analysis of the results for the AECL cohort in the IARC study on the radiogenic cancer risk among nuclear industry workers in fifteen countries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashmore, J.P. [Ponsonby and Associates, Manotick, Ontario (Canada); Gentner, N.E. [Consultant, Petawawa, Ontario (Canada); Osborne, R.V. [Ranasara Consultants Inc., Deep River, Ontario (Canada)

    2007-03-31

    Over the last two decades there have been attempts to estimate the risks from occupational exposure in the nuclear industry by epidemiological assessments on cohorts of workers. However, generally low doses and relatively small worker populations have limited the precision of such studies. In 1995 the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) completed a study that involved workers from facilities in the USA, UK and AECL. In 2005, IARC completed a further study involving nuclear workers from 15 countries including Canada. Surprisingly, the risk ascribed to the Canadian cohort for all cancers excluding leukaemia, driven by the AECL component, was significantly higher than the cohort as a whole. The work described in this report is an attempt to unravel what might have accounted for the divergence between the results for the AECL cohort and the others.

  18. Load following testing by AECL in collaboration with the Institute for Nuclear Research in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests are planned to confirm and demonstrate that the load following (LF) operation of CANDU reactors would have no deleterious effect on fuel performance. Current operating experience with LF has not identified any new limiting criteria for LF operation. Thus far, fission-gas release and sheath strains have been consistent with those of baseline operation. As part of the collaboration under the Romania-Canada Memorandum for Cooperation in research and development of nuclear energy and technology, one of the areas of focus is LF experiments at the Institute for Nuclear Research (SCN) in Pitesti, Romania, where both in-reactor and out-reactor testing will be performed. This paper describes the irradiation and post-irradiation examination facilities at SCN in Pitesti, the operational experience with power-cycling testing performed in-reactor, and a description of the ongoing in-reactor testing in the SCN TRIGA reactor. This paper also describes the out-reactor test methodology and test matrix that will be used in the SCF tests at SCN. (author)

  19. Radiochemical Mix Diagnostic in the Presence of Burn

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayes, Anna C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-28

    There is a general interest in radiochemical probes of hydrodamicalmix in burning regions of NIF capsule. Here we provide estimates for the production of 13N from mixing of 10B ablator burning hotspot of a capsule. By comparing the 13N signal with x-ray measurements of the ablator mix into the hotspot it should be possible to estimate the chunkiness of this mix.

  20. Radiochemical analyses for radionuclide estimation in environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactivity is not only a residuary product of nuclear energy. It is also a normal constituent of the earth's crust. The stellar material from which the earth was formed about 4.5 billion years ago contained many unstable nuclides. The majority of these unstable nuclides have long time since decayed into stable elements. However, some of the original (primordial) nuclides, whose half-lives, are about as long as the earth's age, are still present. In recent decades the activity levels have been enhanced by the addition of man-made radionuclides, mainly from fallout due to the atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the 1950' s and 1960' s and from controlled and accidental discharges of radioactive effluents from nuclear installations. Variety of radiochemical techniques are employed in the determination of natural radionuclides, transuranes, and fission products present in water, soil, ores, tailings, vegetation, biological tissue, filters, resins, etc. at low levels. Sample breakdown and radionuclide solubilization is accomplished by wet-ashing or dry-ashing in a muffle furnace, depending on the volatility of the radionuclide(s ) of interest. Because of the low-level nature of these samples, subsequent radiochemical separators are generally done sequentially from a single sample. Radiochemical operations include coprecipitation, ion exchange, and solvent extraction. Each sample is spiked with the appropriate carriers and yield tracers prior to radiochemical analysis. Following separation, each radionuclide fraction is converted to a suitable form for counting using precipitation or electrodeposition. This source is counted for alpha, beta, or gamma using alpha spectrometry, gas proportional counting, liquid scintillation counting, or gamma spectroscopy. (authors)

  1. Study on the Radiochemical Separation of 142La

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    In order to increase the diagnostic sensitivity of nuclear material fine fission, short half-life fission-product nuclides are used. The precision of many nuclear data of short half-life fission-products is not well, so they must be measured by more precise method. At first separating and preparing radiochemically pure radionuclide is needed.As the existence of more than one isotopes of an element, it is impossible that individual

  2. Candu reactors with thorium fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the last decade and a half AECL has established a strong record of delivering CANDU 6 nuclear power plants on time and at budget. Inherently flexible features of the CANDU type reactors, such as on-power fuelling, high neutron economy, fuel channel based heat transport system, simple fuel bundle configuration, two independent shut down systems, a cool moderator and a defence-in-depth based safety philosophy provides an evolutionary path to further improvements in design. The immediate milestone on this path is the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM** (ACRTM**), in the form of the ACR-1000TM**. This effort is being followed by the Super Critical Water Reactor (SCWR) design that will allow water-cooled reactors to attain high efficiencies by increasing the coolant temperature above 5500C. Adaptability of the CANDU design to different fuel cycles is another technology advantage that offers an additional avenue for design evolution. Thorium is one of the potential fuels for future reactors due to relative abundance, neutronics advantage as a fertile material in thermal reactors and proliferation resistance. The Thorium fuel cycle is also of interest to China, India, and Turkey due to local abundance that can ensure sustainable energy independence over the long term. AECL has performed an assessment of both CANDU 6 and ACR-1000 designs to identify systems, components, safety features and operational processes that may need to be modified to replace the NU or SEU fuel cycles with one based on Thorium. The paper reviews some of these requirements and the associated practical design solutions. These modifications can either be incorporated into the design prior to construction or, for currently operational reactors, during a refurbishment outage. In parallel with reactor modifications, various Thorium fuel cycles, either based on mixed bundles (homogeneous) or mixed channels (heterogeneous) have been assessed for technical and economic viability. Potential applications of a

  3. Radiochemical Assays of Irradiated VVER-440 Fuel for Use in Spent Fuel Burnup Credit Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardine, L J

    2005-04-25

    The objective of this spent fuel burnup credit work was to study and describe a VVER-440 reactor spent fuel assembly (FA) initial state before irradiation, its operational irradiation history and the resulting radionuclide distribution in the fuel assembly after irradiation. This work includes the following stages: (1) to pick out and select a specific spent (irradiated) FA for examination; (2) to describe the FA initial state before irradiation; (3) to describe the irradiation history, including thermal calculations; (4) to examine the burnup distribution of select radionuclides along the FA height and cross-section; (5) to examine the radionuclide distributions; (6) to determine the Kr-85 release into the plenum; (7) to select and prepare FA rod specimens for destructive examinations; (8) to determine the radionuclide compositions, isotope masses and burnup in the rod specimens; and (9) to analyze, document and process the results. The specific workscope included the destructive assay (DA) of spent fuel assembly rod segments with an {approx}38.5 MWd/KgU burnup from a single VVER-440 fuel assembly from the Novovorenezh reactor in Russia. Based on irradiation history criteria, four rods from the fuel assembly were selected and removed from the assembly for examination. Next, 8 sections were cut from the four rods and sent for destructive analysis of radionuclides by radiochemical analyses. The results were documented in a series of seven reports over a period of {approx}1 1/2 years.

  4. RAPID RADIOCHEMICAL ANALYSES IN SUPPORT OF FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR ACCIDENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, S.

    2012-11-07

    reported within twenty-four (24) hours of receipt using rapid techniques published previously. The rapid reporting of high quality analytical data arranged through the U.S. Department of Energy Consequence Management Home Team was critical to allow the government of Japan to readily evaluate radiological impacts from the nuclear reactor incident to both personnel and the environment. SRNL employed unique rapid methods capability for radionuclides to support Japan that can also be applied to environmental, bioassay and waste management samples. New rapid radiochemical techniques for radionuclides in soil and other environmental matrices as well as some of the unique challenges associated with this work will be presented that can be used for application to environmental monitoring, environmental remediation, decommissioning and decontamination activities.

  5. MAPLE: a Canadian multipurpose reactor concept for national nuclear development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, following an investigation of Canadian and international needs and world-market prospects for research reactors, has developed a new multipurpose concept, called MAPLE (Multipurpose Applied Physics Lattice Experimental). The MAPLE concept combines H2O- and D2O-moderated lattices within a D2O calandria tank in order to achieve the flux advantages of a basic H2O-cooled and moderated core along with the flexibility and space of a D2O-moderated core. The SUGAR (Slowpoke Uprated for General Applied Research) MAPLE version of the conept provides a range of utilization that is well suited to the needs of countries with nuclear programs at an early stage. The higher power MAPLE version furnishes high neutron flux levels and the variety of irradiation facilities that are appropriate for more advanced nuclear programs

  6. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-11-01

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  7. An analysis of the AECL/CEC field experiment on the transport of 82Br through a single fracture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the joint AECL/CEC field experiment performed at the Chalk River test site in Canada in 1983 is presented. A pulse of 82Br tracer was injected into a steady dipole flow field set up in a single fracture between two boreholes 10.6 m apart. A model is presented accounting for dispersal by the dipole flow field and for hydrodynamic dispersion within the fracture. The model is fitted to the experimental data of the breakthrough curve by varying a dispersion length and the water travel time along the line joining the boreholes. In addition, the predicted recovery is compared with an estimate of the actual recovery. Recommendations are made for future experiments. (author)

  8. Research on radionuclide migration under subsurface geochemical conditions. JAERI/AECL Phase II Collaborative Program Year 1 (joint research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radionuclide migration experiment program for fractured rocks was performed under the JAERI/AECL Phase-II Collaborative Program on research and development in radioactive waste management. The program started in the fiscal year 1993, as a five-year program consists of Quarried block radionuclide migration program, Speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, Isotopic hydrogeology and Groundwater flow model development. During the first year of the program (Program Year 1: March 18, 1994 - September 30, 1994), a plan was developed to take out granite blocks containing part of natural water-bearing fracture from the wall of the experimental gallery at the depth of 240 m, and literature reviews were done in the area of the speciation of long-lived radionuclides in groundwater, isotopic hydrogeology and the groundwater flow model development to proceed further work for the Program Year 2. (author)

  9. Radiochemical separation methods for preparation of biomedical cyclotron radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A short review of the radiochemical methods for preparation of widely used or promising cyclotron-produced radionuclides for nuclear medicine and biomedical or environmental studies is given. The presented data include the current status of the production of some gamma-emitters (97Ru, 111In, 123I, 201Tl), generator-pairs (68Ge/68Ga, 82 Sr/82Rb, 128Ba/128Cs, 178W/178Ta), radioisotopes for metabolism studies (26Al, 67Cu, 237Pu) and actinides tracers for environmental researches (235Np, 236Np, 236Pu). The conditions for preparation of high-purity isotopes have been investigated and procedures including target chemistry design were developed. (author)

  10. Fast radiochemical separations with an automated rapid chemistry apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microcomputer controlled Automated Rapid Chemistry Apparatus, ARCA, is described together with the He(KCl) gas-jet and the target and recoil chamber as it was developed and used in experiments at the heavy ion accelerator UNILAC. This set-up allows in a fast and reproducible way to carry out automated high performance liquid chromatographic separations in a chemically inert apparatus. Its modular design makes a large variety of different types of radiochemical separations easily possible. As examples a group separation from our search for superheavy elements and a separation of the elements Md, No and Lr is discussed. (orig.)

  11. Guiding Principles for Sustainable Existing Buildings: Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, Jason E.

    2013-11-11

    In 2006, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE) signed the Federal Leadership in High Performance and Sustainable Buildings Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), along with 21 other agencies. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is exceeding this requirement and, currently, about 25 percent of its buildings are High Performance and Sustainable Buildings. The pages that follow document the Guiding Principles conformance effort for the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at PNNL. The RPL effort is part of continued progress toward a building inventory that is 100 percent compliant with the Guiding Principles.

  12. METHODS FOR RECONSTRUCTION OF RADIONUCLIDE COMPOSITION AND ACTIVITY OF FISSION PRODUCTS ACCUMULATED IN THE IRRADIATED URANIUM AT THE MOMENT OF ITS RADIOCHEMICAL REPROCESSING AT PLANT “B”, “MAYAK” PA IN THE EARLY 1950s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glagolenko, Y. V.; Drozhko, Evgeniy G.; Mokrov, Y.; Rovny, Sergey I.; Lyzhkov, A. V.; Anspaugh, L. R.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2008-06-01

    The article describes calculation procedure for reconstruction of radionuclide composition and activity of fission fragments accumulated in the irridated uranium from “Mayak” PA graphite-uranium reactors at the moment, when irradiation is completed, and at the moment, when the uranium is transferred to radiochemical processing (plant B) in the early 1950s. The procedure includes a reactor model and a cooling pool model. It is based on archive data on monthly uranium unloading and loading in the reactor and in the cooling pool of each reactor. The objects of reconstruction include: order of reloading of uranium versus its location radius in the reactor core; duration of irradiation and radionuclide composition of fission fragments for each radius; order of uranium removal from the cooling pool; effective time of uranium storage in the pool; radionuclide composition and activity of fission fragments in the irradiated uranium delivered to radiochemical reprocessing daily and on average for each month. The model is intended for use in reconstruction of parameters of radionuclide release source into the atmosphere and the source of liquid radioactive waste generation at the “Mayak” PA radiochemical plant.

  13. Methods For Reconstruction Of Radionuclide Composition And Activity Of Fission Products Accumulated In The Irradiated Uranium At The Moment Of Its Radiochemical Reprocessing At Plant 'B', 'Mayak' PA In The Early 1950s

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes calculation procedure for reconstruction of radionuclide composition and activity of fission fragments accumulated in the irradiated uranium from 'Mayak' PA graphite-uranium reactors at the moment, when irradiation is completed, and at the moment, when the uranium is transferred to radiochemical processing (plant B) in the early 1950s. The procedure includes a reactor model and a cooling pool model. It is based on archive data on monthly uranium unloading and loading in the reactor and in the cooling pool of each reactor. The objects of reconstruction include: order of reloading of uranium versus its location radius in the reactor core; duration of irradiation and radionuclide composition of fission fragments for each radius; order of uranium removal from the cooling pool; effective time of uranium storage in the pool; radionuclide composition and activity of fission fragments in the irradiated uranium delivered to radiochemical reprocessing daily and on average for each month. The model is intended for use in reconstruction of parameters of radionuclide release source into the atmosphere and the source of liquid radioactive waste generation at the 'Mayak' PA radiochemical plant.

  14. Radiochemical studies on thyroid function in Sudanese newborn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study two thyroid related hormones of 200 neonates were investigated, in order to study the prevalence of congenital hypothyroidism in Khartoum state. Radiochemical iodinated anti-thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) monoclonal antibody and and thyroxine labeled antigen were used as a radiotracer. Radiochemical chlora min T method of radioiodination, which based on chlomin T as strong oxidizing agent and sodium metabisulphite as strong reducing agent was used to prepare the iodine 125 labeled radio tracer of TSH and T4 hormones. There for two radiotracer were used in sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) for T4 and TSH. Cord blood was used at the moment of delivery to obtain serum samples for the investigations. The mean of most neonates was normal in T4 (117 nmol/1) and the TSH (1.8 mu/1), while the normal levels ranging from (50-150 nmol/ 1) and (0.4-4 mu/1) respectively. There was strong correlation between T4 and TSH, p>0.01. Two neonates showed high TSH level and low T4 level. In this study the prevalence of congenital hypothyroidism was found to be 1% which correlates with the international incidence. (Author)

  15. Design features of the laboratory-scale radiochemical immobilization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the High-Level Waste Immobilization Program, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is studying various ways to solidify high-level nuclear wastes. A variety of waste forms and processes are being investigated, with the most highly developed process being spray calcination coupled with in-can melting. This report describes a remote laboratory-scale system that was designed for the purpose of investigating the effects of different operating conditions and waste compositions on the product and on the effluents generated. It is termed laboratory-scale because of its nominal 1 L/h feed rate as compared to well over 300 L/h for full-scale equipment at PNL. The equipment currently consists of a feed system, a spray calciner, an in-can melter, and an effluent control system. It is operated in a shielded radiochemical hot cell using radioactive high-level liquid waste (HLLW) to answer questions on the deposition of radiochemicals during actual waste processing. The effluent control system can be modified in order to test different effluent systems, one of which has been proposed by the Savannah River Laboratories (SRL) for use in the Savannah River Plant vitrification system. The laboratory-scale system can also be used to test alternative immobilization processes, since spray calcination is a common processing step in many alternative waste form flowsheets. Thus, only the addition of a specific forming step such as pelletizing or sintering is necessary

  16. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan for the 325 Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shields, K.D.; Ballinger, M.Y.

    1999-04-02

    This Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) has been prepared for the 325 Building Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to meet the requirements in DOE Order 5400.1, ''General Environmental Protection Programs.'' This FEMP has been prepared for the RPL primarily because it has a ''major'' (potential to emit >0.1 mrem/yr) emission point for radionuclide air emissions according to the annual National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) assessment performed. This section summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the inventory based NESHAP assessment for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements. The RPL at PNNL houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and radioactive mixed waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities within the building include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed radioactive, low-level radioactive, and transuranic wastes generated by PNNL activities.

  17. Radiochemical analysis of waters and mud of Euganean spas (Padua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cianchi A.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The area around the Euganean Hills (North-East Italy is concerned with thermal phenomena known and used for therapeutic purposes since ancient times. The thermal waters collected in this area have taken up a natural radionuclides content due to the leaching of hot and permeable deep rocks, with which they come into contact, before their rising to the surface. During the "maturation" process of the mud used for treatment purposes, the thermal waters make happen a complex series of biochemical changes and release a series of chemical species to the mud, resulting, in particular, in an enrichment phenomenon for some radionuclides. In this work, the first radiochemical analysis extended to all the Euganean Thermal District is reported. In particular, chemical analyses of mud, as well as radiochemical analyses of both mud and waters were performed; the enrichment of the radioisotopes in mud used for treatments was also documented. The results show that the 226Ra content in mud, during the "maturation" process, presents an enrichment even of one order of magnitude with respect to the value found in the unprocessed mud. Furthermore, in the same thermal waters, high concentrations of "unsupported" 222Rn have been found, which have shown to be not completely negligible both for people under treatment and particularly for spa workers.

  18. Analytical performance of radiochemical method for americium determination in urine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an analytical method developed and adapted for separation and analysis of Plutonium (Pu) isotopes and Americium (Am) in urine samples. The proposed method will attend the demand of internal exposure monitoring program for workers involved mainly with dismantling rods and radioactive smoke detectors. In this experimental procedure four steps are involved as preparation of samples, sequential radiochemical separation, preparation of the source for electroplating and quantification by alpha spectrometry. In the first stage of radiochemical separation, plutonium is conventionally isolated employing the anion exchange technique. Americium isolation is achieved sequentially by chromatographic extraction (Tru.spec column) from the load and rinse solutions coming from the anion exchange column. The 243Am tracer is added into the sample as chemical yield monitors and to correct the results improving the precision and accuracy. The mean recovery obtained is 60%, and the detection limit for 24h urine sample is 1.0 mBq L-1 in accordance with the literature. Based in the preliminary results, the method is appropriate to be used in monitoring programme of workers with a potential risk of internal contamination. (author)

  19. Collaborative approach in developing a small supercritical water-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A joint Research and Development (R and D) project between University of Saskatchewan and Atomic Energy of Canada (AECL) is being established to develop a concept of the small Canadian supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) for power generation and process heat in remote areas. This project will be led by professors at the university and supported by technology experts from AECL. It integrates student training with a significant contribution to the reactor concept development. Students from various disciplines will combine results from physics, fuel, thermalhydraulic, control, material, and chemistry analyses to develop the core and fuel channel configurations and fuel design. This project would enhance the R and D expertise and capability of University of Saskatchewan and facilitate training of highly qualified persons (HQPs) for nuclear and non-nuclear industries at Saskatchewan and in Canada. (author)

  20. Development of a neutron tomography system using a low flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron tomography instrument was designed and developed at the Royal Military College (RMC) of Canada with Queen's University to enhance these institutions' non-destructive evaluation capabilities. The neutron imaging system was built around a Safe Low-Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE-2) nuclear research reactor. The low power and physical geometry of the reactor required that a novel design be developed to facilitate tomography. A unique rotisserie style rotary stage and clamping apparatus was developed. Furthermore, the low flux at the image plane (3x104 n cm-2 s-1), necessitated that the image acquisition and reconstruction processes be optimized. Tomographs of numerous samples were obtained using the new tomography instrument at RMC.

  1. The influence of non-aqueous radiochemical processes on radiation parameters of spent fuel and radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of the technology applied for separation of radioactive elements on radiation parameters of fuel and wastes when using non-aqueous radiochemical processing of spent fuels are studied. The results of calculational modelling the fuel recycle in the BREST-1200 reactor closed fuel cycle are considered. The data characterizing contribution of separate elements in potential biological danger (dose) and the dependence of the potential biological danger of the wastes on regenerated fuel cooling time are discussed. It is shown that plutonium and americium give the main contributions into the fuel potential biological danger in time period of 40-1000 years. For monitored cooling of 120-150 years the balance between natural uranium potential biological danger and that of wastes at different waste compositions is achievable. The fission product contributions into potential biological danger differ slightly for different variants of the processing technology. The 99Tc contribution is noticeable only in the case of metallurgical processing. The conclusion is made that differences in radiochemical technologies applied for waste fracturing and fuel purification degree do not influence in principle on capabilities for radiation balance achieving. For a long-time perspective the radiation balance is determined by plutonium, americium and their decay products. The technology peculiarities may change radiation characteristics of wastes only at separate stages of cooling and do not affect greatly the radiation balance as a whole

  2. Safe operation of the NRU research reactor now and beyond 2021

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will describe the approach that has been taken by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) to ensure that the National Research Universal (NRU) reactor designed in the 1940's continues to remain safe and reliable to operate now and for the near future (2021 and beyond). This paper focuses on two major projects, the NRU Upgrades Project undertaken in the 1990's and the Integrated Safety Review (ISR) resulting in the Integrated Implementation Plan (IIP) that is currently underway. Through the NRU Upgrades Project, AECL was able to identify areas for safety improvement and implement changes in the field. Following the NRU Upgrades Project, AECL was able to demonstrate that for design basis accidents that the reactor was able to meet the four basic safety requirements namely:- · It shall be possible to shut down the reactor and maintain it in that state indefinitely; · The capability of removing decay heat from the fuel during this shut down period shall be maintained; · The confinement structure shall continue to be capable of limiting radioactivity release; and · Continuous monitoring of reactor safety functions shall remain available. The NRU Upgrades Project enabled AECL to continue to operate the NRU reactor beyond the year 2000 but it was recognised in 2008 that if operations were to continue up to and beyond 2021 then another assessment was warranted. This assessment resulted in the ISR project. The ISR project consisted of reviewing the NRU design against current codes and standards and, where applicable, addressing gaps identified. This project identified not only gaps in the analysis basis for NRU, it also identified the need to replace ageing equipment that was reaching the end of its design life. The findings of the ISR project have been captured in the IIP; IIP has enabled AECL to prioritise equipment replacement to enable continued safe and reliable operation of the NRU reactor beyond 2021. The paper demonstrates that, in order to safely

  3. Radiolabelling, quality control and radiochemical purity assessment of the Octreotide analogue {sup 68}Ga DOTA NOC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Di Pierro, D.; Rizzello, A. [PET Radiopharmacy-Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Bologna, S. Orsolo-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40318 Bologna (Italy); Cicoria, G. [Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Bologna, S. Orsolo-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40318 Bologna (Italy); Lodi, F. [PET Radiopharmacy-Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Bologna, S. Orsolo-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40318 Bologna (Italy); Marengo, M.; Pancaldi, D. [Medical Physics, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Bologna, S. Orsolo-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40318 Bologna (Italy); Trespidi, S. [PET Radiopharmacy-Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Bologna, S. Orsolo-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40318 Bologna (Italy); Boschi, S. [PET Radiopharmacy-Nuclear Medicine, Azienda Ospedaliero, Universitaria di Bologna, S. Orsolo-Malpighi Hospital, Via Massarenti 9, 40318 Bologna (Italy)], E-mail: stefano.boschi@aosp.bo.it

    2008-08-15

    Somatostatin receptors 1-5 are over expressed in neuroendocrine tumours (NETs). {sup 68}Ga-labelled [1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid]-1-Nal3-Octreotide (DOTA NOC), a recent synthesized somatostatin analogue, shows high affinity for those receptors. Herein, modifications of a commercial module for the labelling of DOTA NOC with {sup 68}Ga, as well as the assessment of time course of the radiochemical purity variation are described. The evaluation of radiochemical stability was done by two different chromatographic methods: reversed-phase radio HPLC and fast TLC analysis. Labelled compound has been found radiochemically stable within 3 h from the end of labelling (EOL) and radiochemical purity was always higher than 99%. After 73 labelling sessions the system showed great reproducibility and high radiochemical yield.

  4. Polytrimethylsylylpropyne gas separation membranes modified by radiochemical grafting of divinylbenzene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vigo, F.; Traverso, M.; Uliana, C. [Univ. of Genoa (Italy); Costa, G. [I.M.A.G.-C.N.R., Genoa (Italy)

    1996-02-01

    A radiochemical method was employed to obtain poly(1-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne)(PTMSP)-divinylbenzene (DVB) grafted films. DVB monomer vapors were absorbed by the PTMSP, and the grafting reaction was thereafter accomplished by {sup 60}Co {gamma}-irradiation in a nitrogen atmosphere. The films so obtained were tested for nitrogen-oxygen separation. The performances of the membranes were studied as functions of time and percent of grafting. The DVB-grafted membranes show an increased selectivity factor and stability with time. The experimental data and some SEM observations confirm the presence of large voids in the PTMSP matrix. These voids are responsible for permeability changes during operation and disappear after the grafting procedure. 8 refs., 5 figs.

  5. Improvement in the degradation resistance of LDPE for radiochemical processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharescu, Traian; Pleşa, Ilona; Jipa, Silviu

    2014-01-01

    The effect of rosemary extract on radiochemical stability of low density polyethylene was studied by chemiluminescence, FT-IR spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry after γ(137Cs)-irradiation at processing low doses (10 and 20 kGy) in respect of pristine material. The additive concentrations (1, 2 and 5 wt%) induced a significant improvement in radiation stability, especially at high temperatures, for example 200 °C, which is proved chiefly by lower values of chemiluminescence intensities. The comparison of neat and rosemary-modified LDPE samples has revealed the protection action of this natural extract, which delays efficiently the propagation of oxidative degradation in γ-exposed polyethylene. The most evident proof for antioxidative protection efficiency promoted by rosemary is the smooth changes in hydroxyl and carbonyl indexes calculated on LDPE/5 wt% rosemary samples at all exposure doses.

  6. Fast analysis procedure of radiochemical coordinat uptake for methotrexate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under this invention, a radio-chemical analysis is submitted to determine the concentration of methotrexate or its equivalents in analysis in a biological medium. The amounts taken up of the labelled compound and the known concentrations of the unlabelled compound to be determined are radio-isotopically related to a first system containing a pre-determined amount of the labelled compound and a pre-determined amount of the unlabelled compound. In a second system, identical to the first, save that the sample of the biological medium to be analyzed takes the place of the unlabelled compound, the amount of labelled compound taken up is determined radio-isotopically. The concentration of the compound in the sample is then determined by correlation of the labelled compound uptake determined in the second system with the relation determined in the first system. The radio-isotopic relations and determinations may be made by direct and sequential analytical techniques

  7. Radiochemical methods for studying lipase-catalyzed interesterification of lipids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactions involving lipase-catalyzed interesterification of lipids, which are of commendable interest in biotechnology, have been monitored and assayed by radiochemical methods using 14C-labeled substrates. Medium chain (C12 plus C14) triacylglycerols were reacted in the presence of an immobilized lipase from Mucor miehei and hexane at 450C with methyl [1-14C]oleate, [1-14C]oleic acid, [carboxyl-14C]trioleoylglycerol, [1-14C]octadecenyl alcohol, and [U-14C]glycerol, each of known specific activity. The reactions were monitored and the rate of interesterification determined by radio thin layer chromatography from the incorporation of radioactivity into acyl moieties of triacylglycerols (from methyl oleate, oleic acid, and trioleoylglycerol), alkyl moieties of wax esters (from octadecenyl alcohol), and into glycerol backbone of monoacylglycerols and diacylglycerols (from glycerol). (orig.)

  8. Handling of Ammonium Nitrate Mother-Liquid Radiochemical Production - 13089

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the work is to develop a basic technology of decomposition of ammonium nitrate stock solutions produced in radiochemical enterprises engaged in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel and fabrication of fresh fuel. It was necessary to work out how to conduct a one-step thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate, select and test the catalysts for this process and to prepare proposals for recycling condensation. Necessary accessories were added to a laboratory equipment installation decomposition of ammonium nitrate. It is tested several types of reducing agents and two types of catalyst to neutralize the nitrogen oxides. It is conducted testing of modes of the process to produce condensation, suitable for use in the conversion of a new technological scheme of production. It is studied the structure of the catalysts before and after their use in a laboratory setting. It is tested the selected catalyst in the optimal range for 48 hours of continuous operation. (authors)

  9. Development of robotic plasma radiochemical assays for positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, D.L.; Shea, C.; Fowler, J.S.; Gatley, S.J.; Schlyer, D.J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-01

    A commercial laboratory robot system (Zymate PyTechnology II Laboratory Automation System; Zymark Corporation, Hopkinton, MA) was interfaced to standard and custom laboratory equipment and programmed to perform rapid radiochemical analyses for quantitative PET studies. A Zymark XP robot arm was used to carry out the determination of unchanged (parent) radiotracer in plasma using only solid phase extraction methods. Robotic throughput for the assay of parent radiotracer in plasma is 4--6 samples/hour depending on the radiotracer. Robotic assays of parent compound in plasma were validated for the radiotracers [{sup 11}C]Benztropine, [{sup 11}C]cocaine, [{sup 11}C]clorgyline, [{sup 11}C]deprenyl, [{sup 11}C]methadone, [{sup 11}C]methylphenidate, [{sup 11}C]raclorpride, and [{sup 11}C]SR46349B. A simple robot-assisted methods development strategy has been implemented to facilitate the automation of plasma assays of new radiotracers.

  10. Development of robotic plasma radiochemical assays for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A commercial laboratory robot system (Zymate PyTechnology II Laboratory Automation System; Zymark Corporation, Hopkinton, MA) was interfaced to standard and custom laboratory equipment and programmed to perform rapid radiochemical analyses for quantitative PET studies. A Zymark XP robot arm was used to carry out the determination of unchanged (parent) radiotracer in plasma using only solid phase extraction methods. Robotic throughput for the assay of parent radiotracer in plasma is 4--6 samples/hour depending on the radiotracer. Robotic assays of parent compound in plasma were validated for the radiotracers [11C]Benztropine, [11C]cocaine, [11C]clorgyline, [11C]deprenyl, [11C]methadone, [11C]methylphenidate, [11C]raclorpride, and [11C]SR46349B. A simple robot-assisted methods development strategy has been implemented to facilitate the automation of plasma assays of new radiotracers

  11. Enhanced candu 6 reactor: status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU 6 power reactor is visionary in its approach, renowned for its on-power refuelling capability and proven over years of safe, economical and reliable power production. Developed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), the CANDU 6 design offers excellent performance utilizing state-of-the-art technology. The first CANDU 6 plants went into service in the early 1980s as leading edge technology and the design has been continuously advanced to maintain superior performance with an outstanding safety record. The first set of CANDU 6 plants - Gentilly 2 and Point Lepreau in Canada, Embalse in Argentina and Wolsong- Unit 1 in Korea - have been in service for more than 22 years and are still producing electricity at peak performance; to the end of 2004, their average Lifetime Capacity Factor was 83.2%. The newer CANDU 6 units in Romania (Cernavoda 1), Korea (Wolsong-Units 2, 3 and 4) and Qinshan (Phase III- Units 1 and 2) have also been performing at outstanding levels. The average lifetime Capacity Factor of the 10 CANDU 6 operating units around the world has been 87% to the end of 2004. Building on these successes, AECL is committed to the further development of this highly successful design, now focussing on meeting customers' needs for reduced costs, further improvements to plant operation and performance, enhanced safety and incorporating up-to-date technology, as warranted. This has resulted in AECL embarking on improving the CANDU 6 design through an upgraded product termed the ''Enhanced CANDU 6'' (EC6), which incorporates several attractive but proven features that make the CANDU 6 reactor even more economical, safer and easier to operate. Some of the key features that are being incorporated into the EC6 include increasing the plant's power output, shortening the overall project schedule, decreasing the capital cost, dealing with obsolescence issues, optimizing maintenance outages and incorporating lessons learnt through feedback obtained from the

  12. Alternative methods for radiochemical purity testing in radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Ideli M. de; Martins, Patricia de A.; Silva, Jose L. da; Ramos, Marcelo P.S.; Lima, Jose A.S.; Pujatti, Priscilla B.; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The radiochemical purity (RCP) testing is as prerequisite for radiopharmaceuticals before the administration to the patient. Because time is critical in nuclear medicine, emphasis should be given to the radiochemical quality control procedures, in order to obtain the maximum amount of information in the minimum period of time. Radiochemical purity is defined as the proportion of the total radioactivity in the product that is present in the specified chemical form. Usually, the RCP is evaluated by thin layer chromatography (TLC) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The most widely used technique for RCP determination in radiopharmaceutical preparations is TLC-aluminium (TLC-Al), instant thin layer chromatography-silica gel (ITLC-SG) and paper chromatography (PC). Indeed, many of the pharmacopeial methods use these techniques. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate different chromatographic systems for RCP in {sup 67}Ga-Citrate, {sup 111}In-Octreotide, {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE and {sup 153}Sm-HA. PC was performed with 3MM/1MM Whatman plates, TCL-Al sheets from Merck and ITLC-SG sheets from Pall Corporation and Varian Inc. The mobile phases were 0.16 mol.L{sup -1} sodium acetate, 0.9% sodium chloride (p/v), 0.1 mol.L{sup -1} sodium citrate buffer, 0.2 mol.L{sup -1} EDTA, methanol:0.4 mol.L{sup -1} ammonium acetate (1:1) mixture, and pyridine:ethanol:water (1:2:4) mixture. The samples were placed on plates in triplicate and immediately put into pre-saturated chambers with the mobile phase. After the chromatographic separation, the plates were dried and cut into 7, 10 or 12 segments and each one was separately measured in a gamma counter during 0.20 minutes (set on the radioisotope window). The results in the gamma counter were expressed in counts per minute (cpm). The chromatographic systems for {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE and {sup 153}Sm-HA gave the best performances in 0.1 mol L{sup -1} sodium citrate buffer/TLC-Al and 0.9% (p/v) sodium chloride

  13. Kinetic study of the radiochemical ageing of polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various bulk or multilayer low density polyethylene samples were irradiated by cobalt gamma rays (60Co) in air and at ambient temperature. The thickness distribution of carbonyl groups concentration displays a sharp inflexion zone at an invariant depth of about 180 μm for the dose rate under investigation. The oxidation rate is practically zero in the core zone of thicker samples (≥500 μm). An investigation by DSC showed that chemicrystallisation process takes places in the oxidized zones, whereas the well known destruction of crystallites predominates in the center of the sample. Experiments at various oxygen pressures were made in order to determine the rate constants for the unperturbed oxidation process. Then, various kinetic models based on Fick's law, for the diffusion controlled oxidation were compared and discussed, showing that any explanation involving a variation of the permeability cannot be invoked. On this basis, explanations of the shape of the oxidation profiles are proposed, leading to a mathematical prediction of the thickness of the oxidized layer. Large difference is found near the boundaries between the experimental and theoretical results. Hypotheses are made and discussed to explain this discrepancy. The evolution of mechanical properties, for hdPE during radiochemical ageing is also presented; the influence of the oxidized layer on mechanical properties is shown

  14. Radiochemical evaluation of a new brain receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report about the radiochemical evaluation of a new serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor imaging agent. The new derivative of WAY 100635, viz. C1-(2 methoxyphenyl)-(4- mercaptoethyl)-piperazine, was labelled with technetium-99m using thiocresol through 99mTc(V)-glucoheptonate precursor. The labelling was carried out at room temperature within 10 minutes using 370-740 MBq of 99mTc-pertechnetate. The specific activity of the '2+1+1' mixed ligand complex was about 40 GBq/ml. The labelling efficiency and the stability of the labelled compound were monitored by ITLC-SG, solvent extraction and reverse-phase HPLC. The labelling efficiency exceeded 95% and remained high about 4 hours if stored at room temperature or in a refrigerator at 4 deg C. The results give evidence of a high labelling efficiency and stability of the ligand used. The labelled ligand seems to hold promise within the family of existing radiopharmaceuticals

  15. ACR-1000TM - advanced Candu reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM- 1000 (ACR-1000TM) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6TM reactor. This evolutionary advancement is based on AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU structures, systems, components and materials, gained during 50 years of continuous construction, engineering and commissioning, as well as on the experience and feedback received from operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. These innovations improve economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The Canadian nuclear reactor design evolution that has reached today's stage represented by the ACR-1000, has a long history dating back to the early 1950's. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few other countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. The ACR design has been reviewed by domestic and international regulatory bodies, and has been given a positive regulatory opinion about its licensability. The Canadian regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) completed the Phase 1 and Phase 2 pre-project design reviews in December 2008 and August 2009, respectively, and concluded that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the ACR-1000 design in Canada. The final stage of the ACR-1000 design is currently underway and will be completed by fall of 2011, along with the final elements of the safety analyses and probabilistic safety analyses supporting the finalized design. The generic Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the ACR-1000 was completed in September 2009. The PSAR demonstrates ACR-1000 safety case and compliance with Canadian and international regulatory requirements and expectations. (authors)

  16. Shielding design for research and education reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of education and research at the University, 20-KW powered SLOWPOKE-2 research reactor has been chosen as a prototype reactor. In order to study the safety characteristics of the reactor, exposure rate has been estimated at the pool boundary. Reactor core as a radiation source is assumed to be cylindrical volume source. Thus point kernel integration method can be applied to determine the exposure rate. For the sake of simplicity, calculation was done only for the prompt fission gamma rays and fission product gamma rays. As a result, the maximum exposure rate at the pool boundary was estimated to be 18R/min at the same height of the center of the core. In order to examine the accuracy for the point kernel integration method, two shielding experiments were carried out: one for the water tank only and the other for with concrete blocks outside the water tank. Water tank was made of wood pieces which is 13.4cm wide, 1.5cm thick and 2.15m long. Thus the water tank has the total dimension of 1 m radius and 2.1 m height. The experiment was carried out for the radiation source of 0.968 mCi Co-60 at the center of the water tank and the penetrated gamma rays were measured at 5 different detector positions. For the measurement and analysis of the responses, NaI(T1) 3''x3'' detector and 256 channel multichannel analyzer was utilized. To convert pulse height distribution to the exposure rate, Moriuchi conversion factor was adopted. Data from the calculations by point kernel method were well agreed within 10% band with the data from the the experiments. (Author)

  17. Radiochemical separation of 90Sr from high level waste: scaled-up studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical separation of 90Sr was carried out from High Level Waste (HLW) using a combination of different chemical techniques. This paper describes various steps for separation as well as the modifications incorporated during the scaling-up. (author)

  18. Automated radiochemical synthesis and biodistribution of [11C]l-α-acetylmethadol ([11C]LAAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-acting opioid agonists methadone and l-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) prevent withdrawal in opioid-dependent persons. Attempts to synthesize [11C]-methadone for PET evaluation of brain disposition were unsuccessful. Owing, however, to structural and pharmacologic similarities, we aimed to develop [11C]LAAM as a PET ligand to probe the brain exposure of long-lasting opioids in humans. This manuscript describes [11C]LAAM synthesis and its biodistribution in mice. The radiochemical synthetic strategy afforded high radiochemical yield, purity and specific activity, thereby making the synthesis adaptable to automated modules. - Highlights: • Radiochemical synthesis of opioid [11C]l-α-acetylmethadol (LAAM) described for the first time. • High radiochemical yield, purity and specific activity. • Easily reproducible and adaptable synthesis to any C-11 automated modules. • [11C]LAAM utility as a PET radiopharmaceutical for assessing brain penetration

  19. Present status and perspective of radiochemical analysis of radionuclides in Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Xiaolin; Olsson, Mattias; Togneri, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    Radiochemical analysis plays a critical role in the determination of pure beta and alpha emitting radionuclides for environmental monitoring, radioecology, decommissioning, nuclear forensics and geological dating. A remarkable development on radiochemical analysis has been achieved in the past...... decades to meet the increased requirement. In the recent years, mass spectrometric techniques have been considerably improved and are widely employed for measurement of radionuclides. Analytical methods for rapid, automated and simultaneous determination of radionuclides have been extensively developed...

  20. Biological and radiochemical quality control of indigenous 99mTc-radiopharmaceutical kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biological and radiochemical quality control of indigenous (Pinscan) diagnostic cold kits of Methylene Diphosphonate (MDP), Tin-colloid and Diethylene Triamine Pentaacetic Acid (DTPA) was performed in parallel with imported Amersham's kits (Amerscan). The results of radiochemical purity, sterility, apyrogenicity and biodistribution of indigenous (Pinscan) kits were good and quantitatively and qualitatively comparable to those obtained with Amersham's (Amerscan) imported kits. (author) 21 refs.; 8 tabs

  1. Quality assurance in radiochemical laboratories. Proceedings of the workshop contributions ZAKVARAL'09

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this collective work is an increase of knowledge level, expertness and qualification of personnel in the frame of general principles and practical radiation protection and environment protection with consecutive application at completion radiochemical analyses, evaluation of conversion parameters of riskiness of contaminants in practical application for chemical contaminants, ionizing radiation and radionuclides. The published collective work consists of 13 contributions from regular seminar meeting 'Quality assurance in radiochemical laboratories - ZAKVARAL 09', extended with 6 rigorous works in this area.

  2. Current studies of biological materials using instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Instrumental neutron activation analysis still remains the preferred option when analysing the trace element distribution in a wide rage of materials by neutron activation analysis. However, when lower limits of detection are required or major interferences reduce the effectiveness of this technique, radiochemical neutron activation analysis is applied. This paper examines the current use of both methods and the development of rapid radiochemical techniques for analysis of the biological materials, hair, cow's milk, human's milk, milk powder, blood and blood serum

  3. Assessment of CANDU reactor physics effects using a simplified whole-core MCNP model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K.S

    2002-07-01

    A whole-core Monte Carlo n-particle (MCNP) model of a simplified CANDU reactor was developed and used to study core configurations and reactor physics phenomena of interest in CANDU safety analysis. The resulting reactivity data were compared with values derived from corresponding WIMS-AECL/RFSP, two-neutron-energy-group diffusion theory core simulations, thereby extending the range of CANDU-related code-to-code benchmark comparisons to include whole-core representations. These comparisons show a systematic discrepancy of about 6 mk between the respective absolute k{sub eff} values, but very good agreement to within about -0.15 {+-} 0.06 mk for the reactivity perturbation induced by G-core checkerboard coolant voiding. These findings are generally consistent with the results of much simpler uniform-lattice comparisons involving only WIMS-AECL and MCNP. In addition, MCNP fission-energy tallies were used to evaluate other core-wide properties, such as fuel bundle and total-channel power distributions, as well as intra-bundle details, such as outer-fuel-ring relative power densities and outer-ring fuel element azimuthal power variations, which cannot be determined directly from WIMS-AECL/RFSP core calculations. The average MCNP values for the ratio of outer fuel element to average fuel element power density agreed well with corresponding values derived from WIMS-AECL lattice-cell cases, showing a small systematic discrepancy of about 0.5 %, independent of fuel bum-up. For fuel bundles containing the highest-power fuel elements, the maximum peak-to-average outer-element azimuthal power variation was about 2.5% for cases where a statistically significant trend was observed, while much larger peak-to-average outer-element azimuthal power variations of up to around 42% were observed in low-power fuel bundles at the core/radial-neutron-reflector interface. (author)

  4. A selective separation method for 93Zr in radiochemical analysis of low and intermediate level wastes from nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The zirconium isotope 93Zr is a long-lived pure β-particle-emitting radionuclide produced from 235U fission and from neutron activation of the stable isotope 92Zr and thus occurring as one of the radionuclides found in nuclear reactors. Due to its long half life, 93Zr is one of the radionuclides of interest for the performance of assessment studies of waste storage or disposal. Measurement of 93Zr is difficult owing to its trace level concentration and its low activity in nuclear wastes and further because its certified standards are not frequently available. A radiochemical procedure based on liquid-liquid extraction with 1-(2-thenoyl)-3,3,3-trifluoroacetone in xylene, ion exchange with Dowex resin and selective extraction using TRU resin has to be carried out in order to separate zirconium from the matrix and to analyze it by liquid scintillation spectrometry technique (LSC). To set up the radiochemical separation procedure for 93Zr, a tracer solution of 95Zr was used in order to follow the behavior of zirconium during the process by γ-ray spectrometry through measurement of the 95Zr. Then, the protocol was applied to low level waste (LLW) and intermediate level waste (ILW) from nuclear power plants. The efficiency detection for 63Ni was used to determination of 93Zr activity in the matrices analyzed. The limit of detection of the 0.05 Bq l-1 was obtained for 63Ni standard solutions by using a sample:cocktail ratio of 3:17 mL for OptiPhase HiSafe 3 cocktail. (author)

  5. Solar neutrino measurement with radiochemical gallium detector (GALLEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ammon, Reinhard

    1994-04-01

    The GALLEX experiment for the detection of solar neutrinos by means of a radiochemical gallium detector is operated by groups from Italy, France, Germany, Israel and the USA in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory (LNGS) near L'Aquila (Italy). It consists of (1) the technical scale tank made of glass fiber reinforced polyester fabric containing 101 metric tons (54 cu m) of a highly concentrated (8 moles per liter) GaCl3 solution; (2) a gas sparging system for desorption of GeCl4 which has been formed by interaction of the neutrinos with gallium according to Ga-71 + nue yields Ge-71 + e(-) and by addition of ca. 1 mg of a stable Ge isotope; (3) the absorption columns for concentration of GeCl4 into a volume of 1 l of water; (4) the laboratory scale apparatus for conversion of GeCl4 to GeH4 and mixing with the counting gas Xe; (5) the counter filling station, and (6) the low level proportional counters. Contributions of possible side reactions which have to be corrected for, e.g. by cosmic muons, fast neutrons and alpha-emitters are discussed, as well as the purification of the target solution from long-lived ( t1/2 = 271 d) cosmogenic Ge-68. A first preliminary result after one year of solar neutrino measurement is presented. This constitutes the first direct measurement of the basic proton-proton fusion reaction in the core of the sun. This result, appreciably below the predictions of the standard solar model (SSM) (132 Solar Neutrino Units (SNU)) can be interpreted, together with the results of the chlori ne and KAMIOKANDE experiments either by astrophysics or by neutrino oscillations (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect). The solar neutrino measurements are continuing and a calibration experiment with a Cr-51 source is in preparation.

  6. Factors controlling the population size of microbes in groundwater from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hamon, C. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Whiteshell Labs., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada); Mills, K. [University of Saskatoon, Saskatoon, SK (Canada); Rana, S.; Vaidyanathan, S. [Deep River Science Academy, Whiteshell Campus Summer 1997, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    2001-01-01

    Microbial populations in groundwaters from AECL's Underground Research Laboratory (URL) range from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 5} cells/mL. Based on the total dissolved organic carbon (DOC), nitrate and phosphate content of these waters, populations of about 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 7} cells/mL should be possible. Upon storage of groundwater samples, total cell counts generally increase and viable cell counts always increase. A study was undertaken to determine what controls the in situ microbial population size in groundwater and what causes this population to grow upon sampling. Fresh URL groundwater was filter-sterilized, inoculated with small quantities of the unaltered water and incubated in the absence and presence of added nutrients (nitrate, phosphate and glucose). Unfiltered groundwater and R2A growth medium inoculated with unaltered groundwater, were also incubated. Microbial changes over time were followed by total and viable (on R2A medium) cell counts. Results showed that in the absence of any nutrient addition, populations grew to between 5 x 10{sup 5} to 4 x 10{sup 6} cells/mL, regardless of the initial size of the population ({approx}10{sup 1} to 10{sup 4} cells/mL), suggesting that nutrients for growth were available in the unamended groundwater. It was hypothesized that the original groundwater population was in 'equilibrium' with the underground environment, which likely included a large population of sessile cells in biofilms on fracture surfaces. Sampling of the groundwater removed the large demand on nutrient supplies by the sessile population which subsequently allowed the planktonic population to grow to a new 'equilibrium' with the available nutrients in the sample bottles. Addition of single nutrients (C, N or P) did not increase cell numbers, suggesting that more than one nutrient is limiting growth. Glucose was used very efficiently aerobically in the presence of both added N and P, but somewhat less under anaerobic

  7. Mo-99 production on a LEU solution reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot homogenous reactor utilizing LEU has been developed by the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow along with their commercial partner TCI Medical. This solution reactor operates at levels up to 50 kilowatts and has successfully produced high quality Mo-99 and Sr-89. Radiochemical extraction of medical radionuclides from the reactor solution is performed by passing the solution across a series of inorganic sorbents. This reactor has commercial potential for medical radionuclide production using LEU UO2SO4 fuel. Additional development work is needed to optimize multiple 50 kilowatt cores while at the same time, optimizing production efficiency and capital expenditure. (author)

  8. Nuclear Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogerton, John

    1964-01-01

    This pamphlet describes how reactors work; discusses reactor design; describes research, teaching, and materials testing reactors; production reactors; reactors for electric power generation; reactors for supply heat; reactors for propulsion; reactors for space; reactor safety; and reactors of tomorrow. The appendix discusses characteristics of U.S. civilian power reactor concepts and lists some of the U.S. reactor power projects, with location, type, capacity, owner, and startup date.

  9. Repair of the NRU Reactor Vessel: Technical Challenges and Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In May 2009, following a Class 4 power outage that affected most of Eastern Ontario, including the Chalk River Laboratories site, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) announced to its various stakeholders that a small heavy-water leak in the NRU reactor had been detected during routine monitoring while the reactor was being readied for return to service. Over the next 15 months AECL located, inspected, repaired and returned the NRU reactor to service. This presentation will focus on the extensive efforts required to support the unique activities associated with reactor vessel inspection and repair including initial assessment, repair site challenges, repair preparation and finally repair execution. The presentation will summarize: - Initial leak search and assessment of the vessel condition through the use of specialized tooling and non-destructive evaluation which resulted in one of the largest single NDE inspection campaigns ever carried out in the nuclear industry; - Challenges of executing a repair through 12 cm access ports at a distance of nine meters including the development of the specialized tooling; - The importance of development of repair techniques through mock up testing to perform welding repairs on a thin wall aluminium vessel and the measures taken and engineering challenges overcome to achieve a successful repair; - The final repair process, including site preparation, weld execution and final NDE inspection techniques; - Challenges encountered and lesson learned during the execution of weld repair, NDE inspections, and return-to-service of the reactor. (author)

  10. Substoichiometric radiochemical separation and their application to neutron activation analysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemistry is the chemistry of substances which are detected by their nuclear radiations. The first radiochemical separation was used by Marie and Pierre Curie. The present paper discusses the concept of purity and the importance of various radiochemical separation methods such as precipitation, volatilization, high vacuum distillation, ring oven technique, ion exchange, solvent extraction, etc. NAA can be carried out by comparator or absolute method. Comparator method can be performed by radiochemical or instrumental technique. Radiochemical separation for NAA requires that the final product must be in well-defined chemical form, so as to obtain correct chemical yield. The chemical yield determination is time-consuming and important, especially when the product of activation has a short half-life. Ruzika and Star/proposed a substoichiometric procedure which uses subequivalent amount of the reagent corresponding to the amount of carrier added. If the carrier and reagent added to the sample and standard are the same, and the same fraction is isolated free from other activation products, the chemical yield determination is not required. The process becomes quantitative and time saving. The present paper discusses some new, rapid and selective method developed for the substoichiometric radiochemical separation and estimation of some elements

  11. The low power miniature neutron source reactors: Design, safety and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) is a low power research reactor with maximum thermal neutron flux of 1 x 1012 n.cm-2.s-1 in one of its inner irradiation channels and thermal power of approximately 30kW. The MNSR is designed based on the Canadian SLOWPOKE reactor and is one of the smallest commercial research reactors presently available in the world. Its commercial versions currently in operation in China, Ghana, Iran, Nigeria, Pakistan and Syria, is considered as an excellent tool for Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA), training of Scientist, and Engineers in nuclear science and technology and small scale radioisotope production. The paper highlights the basic design and theory of the commercial MNSR, its safety features, applications and advantages over the Chinese Prototype. The experimental flux characteristics determined in this work and in similar studies by other authors reveal that the commercial MNSR has more flux stability, longer life span, higher negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and low under-moderation compared to its prototype in China. The result shows that the facility is safe for reactor physics experiments, teaching and training of students and also ideal for application of NAA for the determination of elemental composition of biological and environmental samples. It can also be a useful tool for geochemical and soil fertility mapping. (author)

  12. Water chemistry management in cooling system of research reactor in JAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The department of research reactor presently operates three research reactors (JRR-2, JRR-3M and JRR-4). For controlling and management of water and gas in each research reactor are performed by the staffs of the research reactor technology development division. Water chemistry management of each research reactor is one of the important subject. The main objects are to prevent the corrosion of water cooling system and fuel elements, to suppress the plant radiation build-up and to minimize the radioactive waste. In this report describe a outline of each research reactor facilities, radiochemical analytical methods and chemical analytical methods for water chemistry management. (author)

  13. Management of research reactor; dynamic characteristics analysis for reactor structures related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Chang Kee; Shim, Joo Sup [Shinwa Technology Information, Seoul (Korea)

    2001-04-01

    The objective of this study is to deduce the dynamic correlation between the fuel assembly and the reactor structure. Dynamic characteristics analyses for reactor structure related with vibration of HANARO fuel assembly have been performed For the dynamic characteristic analysis, the in-air models of the round and hexagonal flow tubes, 18-element and 36-element fuel assemblies, and reactor structure were developed. By calculating the hydrodynamic mass and distributing it on the in-air models, the in-water models of the flow tubes, the fuel assemblies, and the reactor structure were developed. Then, modal analyses for developed in-air and in-water models have been performed. Especially, two 18-element fuel assemblies and three 36-element fuel assemblies were included in the in-water reactor models. For the verification of the modal analysis results, the natural frequencies and the mode shapes of the fuel assembly were compared with those obtained from the experiment. Finally the analysis results of the reactor structure were compared with them performed by AECL Based on the reactor model without PCS piping, the in-water reactor model including the fuel assemblies was developed, and its modal analysis was performed. The analysis results demonstrate that there are no resonance between the fuel assembly and the reactor structures. 26 refs., 419 figs., 85 tabs. (Author)

  14. Microwave assisted rapid and improved radiochemical method for the estimation of uranium in leaf samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we report the development of a rapid and improved radiochemical method assisted by microwave technique for the determination of uranium in leafy samples for use in radiological emergency situations, where quick assessment of radioactivity is required. About 200 g of fresh leaf sample was ashed in a microwave muffle furnace, followed by digestion in a microwave digester and radiochemically separated using UTEVA resin. Counting was performed in a passivated ion implanted planar silicon alpha spectrometer after electroplating the separated sample for uranium. By this method, the time of sample processing and analysis was reduced to few hours from about 2 days and also the radiochemical recovery of uranium has considerably enhanced as compared to conventional methods. (author)

  15. Radiolabeling, quality control and radiochemical purity assessment of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somatostatine receptors are widely expressed by several tumors, especially of the neuroendocrine origin. In vivo images of these tumors using radiolabeled somatostatine analogues became a useful clinical tool in oncology. The aim of this work was the radiolabeling of the somatostatine analogue HYNIC-TOC with 99mTc as well as the evaluation of the radiochemical stability and quality control of labeled complex. 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC was produced by labeling conditions using 20 μg of peptide, 20 mg of tricine and 10 mg of EDDA as coligands, 1110 MBq of 99mTc (99Mo-99mTc IPEN-TEC generator) and 15 μg of SnCl2.2H2O. The reaction proceeds for 10 minutes at boiling water bath. Radiochemical purity of labeled preparation was evaluated by different chromatographic systems: ITLC-SG in methanol:ammonium acetate (1:1); TLC-SG in sodium citrate buffer 0.1 N pH 5.0 and methylethylketone, and HPLC employing column C-18, 5 μm, 4.6 mm x 250 mm, UV (220 nm), radioactivity detectors, 1 mL/minute flow of acetonitrile and trifluoroacetic acid solution 0.1 %. Labeled compound has been found radiochemically stable for 5 hours and radiochemical purity was higher than 90 %. The thin layer chromatographic systems enabled the separation of radiochemical species presented in the labeled mixture as well as HPLC system. The labeling procedure studied resulted in high radiochemical yield and easy preparation. Future works include the preparation of a lyophilized reagent to make feasible the preparation of 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC at nuclear medicine services in order to study the clinical potential of the radiopharmaceutical in diagnostic and staging of neuroendocrine tumors. (author)

  16. Public acceptance of small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of any nuclear program requires acceptance by the local public and all levels of government involved in the decision to initiate a reactor program. Public acceptance of a nuclear energy source is a major challenge in successful initiation of a small reactor program. In AECL's experience, public acceptance will not be obtained until the public is convinced that the specific nuclear program is needed, safe and economic and environmental benefit to the community. The title of public acceptance is misleading. The objective of the program is a fully informed public. The program proponent cannot force public acceptance, which is beyond his control. He can, however, ensure that the public is informed. Once information has begun to flow to the public by various means as will be explained later, the proponent is responsible to ensure that the information that is provided by him and by others is accurate. Most importantly, and perhaps most difficult to accomplish, the proponent must develop a consultative process that allows the proponent and the public to agree on actions that are acceptable to the proponent and the community

  17. Inorganic and Radiochemical Analysis of AW-101 and AN-107 Tank Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the inorganic and radiochemical analytical results for AW-101 and AN-107 as received materials. The analyses were conducted in support of the BNFL Proposal No. 30406/29274 Task 5.0. The inorganic and radiochemical analysis results obtained from the as received materials are used to provide initial characterization information for subsequent process testing and to provide data to support permit application activities. Quality Assurance (QA) Plan MCS-033 provides the operational and quality control protocols for the analytical activities, and whenever possible, analyses were performed to SW-846 equivalent methods and protocols

  18. 2nd International technical meeting on small reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 2nd International Technical Meeting on Small Reactors was held on November 7-9, 2012 in Ottawa, Ontario. The meeting was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) and Canadian Nuclear Society (CNS). There is growing international interest and activity in the development of small nuclear reactor technology. This meeting provided participants with an opportunity to share ideas and exchange information on new developments. This Technical Meeting covered topics of interest to designers, operators, researchers and analysts involved in the design, development and deployment of small reactors for power generation and research. A special session focussed on small modular reactors (SMR) for generating electricity and process heat, particularly in small grids and remote locations. Following the success of the first Technical Meeting in November 2010, which captured numerous accomplishments of low-power critical facilities and small reactors, the second Technical Meeting was dedicated to the achievements, capabilities, and future prospects of small reactors. This meeting also celebrated the 50th Anniversary of the Nuclear Power Demonstration (NPD) reactor which was the first small reactor (20 MWe) to generate electricity in Canada.

  19. Radiochemical studies on corrosion products of oral biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work given in this thesis deals with a radioactive tracer study of the sorption of the corrosion products of dental amalgams and antimony on human teeth, porcelain and acrylic materials, used as dental restorative material. Sorption was investigated in presence of water and liquids commonly intaken by man; namely tea with or without sugar, soluble coffee ( Nescaffee) with or without sugar and/or milk, red tea (karkadeh or hibiscus) with or without sugar and chicken soup. The radioactive isotopes of Ag, Sn, Zn (amalgam components) and antimony were prepared by their irradiation in the nuclear reactor; 110m Ag, 113Sn, 65Zn and 124 Sb were thereby produced. The percent uptake of each studied element was evaluated from the depletion of radioactivity of the corresponding radioactive tracer in the given medium containing a tooth (human or artificial)

  20. Radiochemical measurement of mass distribution in 16O+238U reaction at sub-barrier energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present, radiochemical study of the mass distribution in 16O+238U has been carried out at sub-barrier energy to investigate the nature of mass distribution in CFF and TF channels. In addition, cross sections of evaporation residues formed in one nucleon transfer/pick-up reactions have also been measured

  1. Features of radiochemical polymerization of the PEh-265 polyester lacquer on thermal insulating substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The peculiarities of radiation polymerization of polyester lacquer on thermal insulating substrates have been investigated. The same features of polymerization on both pearlite and lignin substrates were studied. Physical, mechanical and thermal protective properties of the created materials were detected. It is shown that radiochemical modification of the surface layer on perlite or lignin substrates gives advanced heat-insulating materials

  2. On the form formation during flotation processing of the waste waters of radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froth formation in the process of flotational treatment of imitated and real sewage from radiochemical processes with a high content of anionic and nonionogenic surfactants was investigated. It is suggested that water-soluble polyelectrolyte VPK-402 should be used to reduce carryover of the waters treated to the froth

  3. Foam formation during flotation treatment of wastewaters from the radiochemical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foam formation is studied during flotation treatment of simulated and actual wastewaters from the radiochemical industry that contain large amounts of anionic and nonionic surface-active substances. Use of the water-soluble polyelectrolyte VPK-402 is recommended in order to reduce losses of treated waters to the foam. 5 refs., 5 tabs

  4. The use of HANDIDET reg-sign non-electric detonator assemblies to reduce blast-induced overpressure at AECL's Underground Research Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A number of aspects of the Canadian concept for nuclear fuel waste disposal are being assessed by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) in a series of experiments at its Underground Research Laboratory (URL) near Lac du Bonnet, Manitoba, Canada. One of the major objectives of the work being carried out at the URL is to develop and evaluate the methods and technology to ensure safe, permanent disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste. In 1994, AECL excavated access tunnels and a laboratory room for the Quarried Block Fracture Migration Experiment (QBFME) at the 240 Level of the URL. This facility will be used to study the transport of radionuclides in natural fractures in quarried blocks of granite under in-situ groundwater conditions. The experiment is being carried out under a cooperative agreement with the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The excavation of the QBFME access tunnels and laboratory was carried out using controlled blasting techniques that minimized blast-induced overpressure which could have damaged or interrupted other ongoing experiments in the vicinity. The majority of the blasts used conventional long delay non-electric detonators but a number of blasts were carried out using HANDIDET 250/6000 non-electric long delay detonator assemblies and HTD reg-sign non-electric short delay trunkline detonator assemblies. The tunnel and laboratory excavation was monitored to determine the levels of blast-induced overpressure. This paper describes the blasting and monitoring results of the blasts using HANDIDET non-electric detonator assemblies and the effectiveness of these detonators in reducing blast-induced overpressure

  5. Synthesis of 195mPt radiolabelled cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) of high chemical and radiochemical purity using high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved method is described for the synthesis of 195mPt-radiolabelled cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II). An amount of 10 mg of 95% enriched 194Pt was irradiated for 75 h in the hydraulic conveyer of the Kyoto University Reactor at a thermal neutron flux of approximately 8.15x1013 n.cm-2.sec-1 and the 195mPt-radiolabelled CDDP was purified using HPLC. The chemical yield is 61%, chemical purity is greater than 99.74%, the radiochemical purity is nearly 100%, and the specific activity is 7.4x106 Bq mg-1 CDDP (200 μCi mg-1 CDDP). (author) 9 refs.; 5 figs.; 1 tab

  6. The Northern Marshall Islands radiological survey: A quality control program for radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1979 to 1989, approximately 25,000 Post Northern Marshall Islands Radiological Survey (PNMIRS) samples were collected, and over 71,400 radiochemical and gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed to establish the concentration of 90Sr, 137Cs, 241Am, and plutonium isotopes in soil, vegetation, fish, and animals in the Northern Marshall Islands. While the Low Level Gamma Counting Facility (B379) in the Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division accounted for over 80% of all gamma spectroscopy analyses, approximately 4889 radiochemical and 5437 gamma spectroscopy analyses were performed on 4784 samples of soil, vegetation, terrestrial animal, and marine organisms by outside laboratories. Four laboratories were used by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to perform the radiochemical analyses: Thermo Analytical Norcal, Richmond, California (TMA); Nuclear Energy Services, North Carolina State University (NCSU); Laboratory of Radiation Ecology, University of Washington (LRE); and Health and Ecological Assessment (HEA) division, LLNL, Livermore, California. Additionally, LRE and NCSU were used to perform gamma spectroscopy analyses. The analytical precision and accuracy were monitored by including blind duplicates and natural matrix standards in each group of samples analyzed. On the basis of reported analytical values for duplicates and standards, 88% of the gamma and 87% of the radiochemical analyses in this survey were accepted. By laboratory, 93% of the radiochemical analyses by TMA; 88% of the gamma-ray spectrometry and 100% of the radiochemistry analyses by NCSU; 89% of the gamma spectroscopy and 87% of the radiochemistry analyses by LRE; and 90% of the radiochemistry analyses performed by HEA's radiochemistry department were accepted

  7. Pressure tube creep impact on the physics parameters for CANDU-6 reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, W. Y.; Min, B. J. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kam, S. C.; Kim, M. E. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    The lattice cell calculations are performed to assess the sensitivity of the reactor physics parameters to pressure tube creep resulting from radiation aging. The physics parameters of the lattice cell are calculated by using WIMSD-5B code, WIMS- AECL code, and MCNP code. The reference model(normal state) and two perturbed models accounting for the pressure tube creep are developed on the basis of CANDU-6 lattice cell. The 2.5% and 5% values of pressure tube diameter creep are considered. Also, The effects of the analyzed lattice parameters which are the coolant void reactivity, the fuel fission density and the atom density of Pu isotopes on the lattice.

  8. Implementation of advanced electrochemical oxidation for radiochemical concentrate treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water treatments in Nuclear Power Plants include ion exchange, evaporation and mechanical filtration techniques. These technologies are used to control the chemical release and to treat coolant in light water reactor types from chemicals and most importantly, from radioactive nuclides. Most of the conventional methods are efficient, but at the same time producing aqueous concentrates with high organic load. Before final storage, the level of organic content of those concentrates must be reduced. Advanced electrochemical oxidation with Boron Doped Diamond (BDD) electrodes are being investigated in laboratory- and pilot scale for treatment of dilute and concentrated aqueous waste streams at Vattenfall-Ringhals NPP. BDD anodes and cathodes are having high over potential against water electrolysis, and therefore well suitable for oxidation of organics. Dilute wastewater, such as laundry water, which has an initial COD level of around 500 mg/l, was reduced to a level of < 20 mg/l in the laboratory. Evaporator concentrates, with a TS content of 3% and pH of 7-8, were treated in pilot scale of 800 liters, working in batch operation mode, at temperatures between 25-50 deg. C. Initial COD levels between 2500 and 8000 mg/l in concentrate was reduced to < 100 mg/l at the first tests and later to < 300 mg/l. The advanced electrochemical oxidation is proven to be a promising technique for radioactive concentrate treatment. Long-term operation is still ongoing to evaluate the performance of the electrodes, cell components and overall process efficiency. (authors)

  9. RADCHEM - Radiochemical procedures for the determination of Sr, U, Pu, Am and Cm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidhu, R. [Inst. for Energy Technology (Norway)

    2006-04-15

    An accurate determination of radionuclides from various sources in the environment is essential for assessment of the potential hazards and suitable countermeasures both in case of accidents, authorised release and routine surveillance. Reliable radiochemical separation and detection techniques are needed for accurate determination of alpha and beta emitters. Rapid analytical methods are needed in case of an accident for early decision-making. The objective of this project has been to compare and evaluate radiochemical procedures used at Nordic laboratories for the determination of strontium, uranium, plutonium, americium and curium. To gather detailed information on the procedures in use, a questionnaire regarding various aspects of radionuclide determination was developed and distributed to all (sixteen) relevant laboratories in the Nordic countries. The response and the procedures used by each laboratory were then discussed between those who answered the questionnaire. This report summaries the findings and gives recommendation on suitable practice. (au)

  10. RADCHEM - Radiochemical procedures for the determination of Sr, U, Pu, Am and Cm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An accurate determination of radionuclides from various sources in the environment is essential for assessment of the potential hazards and suitable countermeasures both in case of accidents, authorised release and routine surveillance. Reliable radiochemical separation and detection techniques are needed for accurate determination of alpha and beta emitters. Rapid analytical methods are needed in case of an accident for early decision-making. The objective of this project has been to compare and evaluate radiochemical procedures used at Nordic laboratories for the determination of strontium, uranium, plutonium, americium and curium. To gather detailed information on the procedures in use, a questionnaire regarding various aspects of radionuclide determination was developed and distributed to all (sixteen) relevant laboratories in the Nordic countries. The response and the procedures used by each laboratory were then discussed between those who answered the questionnaire. This report summaries the findings and gives recommendation on suitable practice. (au)

  11. Protein binding studies with radiolabeled compounds containing radiochemical impurities. Equilibrium dialysis versus dialysis rate determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Honoré, B

    1987-01-01

    The influence of radiochemical impurities in dialysis experiments with high-affinity ligands is investigated. Albumin binding of labeled decanoate (97% pure) is studied by two dialysis techniques. It is shown that equilibrium dialysis is very sensitive to the presence of impurities resulting...... in erroneously low estimates of the binding affinity and in inconsistent results at varying albumin concentrations. Dialysis rate determination (R. Brodersen et al. (1982) Anal. Biochem. 121, 395-408) is less sensitive to impurities. Udgivelsesdato: 1987-Apr...

  12. Recent trends in the concept of specific activity: Impact on radiochemical and radiopharmaceutical producers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeevaart, Jan Rijn [Radiochemistry, Necsa - South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 582, Pretoria, 0001 (South Africa)]. E-mail: zeevaart@necsa.co.za; Olsen, Sylva [RadioAnalysis, Necsa - South African Nuclear Energy Corporation Ltd., P.O. Box 582, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2006-07-15

    In the radiochemical and radiopharmaceutical industry, the concepts and subsequent specification used for determining the purity of the radiopharmaceutical product are of concern to both the regulator and the producer. It is therefore of profound importance that these concepts such as specific radioactivity are used correctly and their meaning fully understood. Recent changes in the pharmacopoeias are evaluated and the implications thereof discussed. On the basis thereof suggestions are made for definitions, specifications and tests.

  13. Radiochemical solar neutrino experiment using 81Br(nu, e-)81Kr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Both geochemical and radiochemical experiments based on the interaction 81Br(nu,e-)81Kr to detect 7Be solar neutrinos have been suggested as a logical extension of the 37Cl experiment of Davis et al. The 81Br experiment, however, requires the development of a direct counter for the slowly decaying 81Kr. Progress toward such a detector based on Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (RIS) is discussed

  14. Study of performance characteristics of a radiochemical method to determine uranium in biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper is described a methodology to calculate detection limit (Ld), quantification level (Lq) and minimum detectable activity (MDA) in a radiochemical method for determination of uranium in urine samples. The concentration is measured by fluorimetry and alpha gross activity using liquid scintillation counting (LSC). The calculation of total propagated uncertainty on a spike sample is presented. Furthermore, the major sources of uncertainty and percentage contribution in both measurements are assessed. (author)

  15. Media effects on radiochemical corrosion at high-output gamma irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamma irradiation of metals at high dose rate conditions may induce or accelerate a wide variety of electrochemical corrosion processes. Examination of failures encountered in irradiation facilities due to corrosion indicated that, above a threshold value for atmospheric humidity, the electrode reactions are chiefly controlled by the action of radiolytic products arising from the electrolyte during gamma irradiation. Thus, the nature of the corrosive medium provides the decisive variable factor influencing the overall effect of radiochemical corrosion. (author)

  16. New radiochemical methods for determination of 237Np a 241Pu using extraction chromatography (Presentation)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thesis was focused on the development of a new methodology for the separation of anthropogenic transuranium radionuclides 237Np a 241Pu from different kinds of matrices. The analytical methods used in this study were based on extraction chromatography and were optimized according to the sample type. The proposed radiochemical procedure is a combination of two algorithms, which represent the separation of radionuclides by using extraction chromatographic sorbents TEVA resin and TRU resin supplied by Eichrom Technologies LLC. 239Np a 237Np were selectively captured on sorbent TEVA resin in oxidation state 4+. TRU resin was used for purification of plutonium fraction from interfering americium radionuclide. 242Pu and 239Np radionuclides as tracers have been used to monitor the radiochemical yields of separation. Before every radiochemical separation tracer radionuclide 239Np was obtained by separation from the parent radionuclide 243Am, which is in radioactive equilibrium to 239Np. The average yield of chemical separation was 69,3% for 239Np at 277 keV energy line and 65,9% at 228 keV energy line. The NPL AH-B08069 (2008) samples which consist of the mixture of alpha-radionuclides were used for the modification and optimization of separation method used for separation of Np and Pu in model samples. This method provided high radiochemical yields of 239,240Pu (95,0 ± 3,5)% and 237Np (87,9 ± 3,0)%.. Reliability of the method was verified by applying our modified separation procedures on reference materials IAEA-375 and IAEA-414 supplied by International Atomic Energy Agency. A good agreement between the results is obtained by this procedure and the certified values were found. Samples of contaminated soils from the area of Nuclear power plant A-1 Jaslovske Bohunice which is stored temporarily before disposal were analyzed using developed separation procedure. Specific activity of investigated radionuclides was determined in these samples. (author)

  17. New radiochemical methods for determination of 237Np a 241Pu using extraction chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thesis was focused on the development of a new methodology for the separation of anthropogenic transuranium radionuclides 237Np a 241Pu from different kinds of matrices. The analytical methods used in this study were based on extraction chromatography and were optimized according to the sample type. The proposed radiochemical procedure is a combination of two algorithms, which represent the separation of radionuclides by using extraction chromatographic sorbents TEVA resin and TRU resin supplied by Eichrom Technologies LLC. 239Np a 237Np were selectively captured on sorbent TEVA resin in oxidation state 4+. TRU resin was used for purification of plutonium fraction from interfering americium radionuclide. 242Pu and 239Np radionuclides as tracers have been used to monitor the radiochemical yields of separation. Before every radiochemical separation tracer radionuclide 239Np was obtained by separation from the parent radionuclide 243Am, which is in radioactive equilibrium to 239Np. The average yield of chemical separation was 69,3% for 239Np at 277 keV energy line and 65,9% at 228 keV energy line. The NPL AH-B08069 (2008) samples which consist of the mixture of alpha-radionuclides were used for the modification and optimization of separation method used for separation of Np and Pu in model samples. This method provided high radiochemical yields of 239,240Pu (95,0 ± 3,5)% and 237Np (87,9 ± 3,0)%.. Reliability of the method was verified by applying our modified separation procedures on reference materials IAEA-375 and IAEA-414 supplied by International Atomic Energy Agency. A good agreement between the results is obtained by this procedure and the certified values were found. Samples of contaminated soils from the area of Nuclear power plant A-1 Jaslovske Bohunice which is stored temporarily before disposal were analyzed using developed separation procedure. Specific activity of investigated radionuclides was determined in these samples. (author)

  18. Radiochemical separation of thorium from 18O induced reaction with natural uranium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A radiochemical procedure used to separate and purify trace concentra tion thorium produced in heavy ion reaction with uranium targets is presented. The procedure can rapidly yield thorium fraction suitable for gamma-ray spectroscopy studies. The resultant gamma-ray spectra showed that Th was isolated from a large number of elements produced in the reaction, and there were only a few contaminat ing activities of isotopes of Sc, Cd, In, etc. The decontamination factors for the main reaction products are given.

  19. Radiochemical separation of actinides for their determination in environmental samples and waste products

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleisberg, B. [Nuclear Engineering and Analytics Rossendorf, Inc. (VKTA), Dresden (Germany)

    1997-03-01

    The determination of low level activities of actinides in environmental samples and waste products makes high demands on radiochemical separation methods. Artificial and natural actinides were analyzed in samples form the surrounding areas of NPP and of uranium mines, incorporation samples, solutions containing radioactive fuel, solutions and solids resutling from the process, and in wastes. The activities are measured by {alpha}-spectrometry and {gamma}-spectrometry. (DG)

  20. Radiochemical aspects of production and processing of radiometals for preparation of metalloradiopharmaceuticals

    OpenAIRE

    Zhernosekov, Konstantin P.

    2006-01-01

    Radiometals play an important role in nuclear medicine as involved in diagnostic or therapeutic agents. In the present work the radiochemical aspects of production and processing of very promising radiometals of the third group of the periodic table, namely radiogallium and radiolanthanides are investigated. The 68Ge/68Ga generator (68Ge, T½ = 270.8 d) provides a cyclotron-independent source of positron-emitting 68Ga (T½ = 68 min), which can be used for coordinative labelling. However, f...

  1. Up-to-date radiochemical methods for the determination of long-lived radionuclides in the environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nóra Vajda

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiochemical methods for the determination of long-lived radionuclides have been briefly reviewed. Developments in nuclear measuring techniques such as alpha spectrometry and liquid scintillation counting as well as in chemical separations have been comparatively evaluated.

  2. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium metal

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium metal to determine compliance with specifications.

  3. Radiochemical aging of an epoxy network; Vieillissement radiochimique d'un reseau epoxyde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devanne, Th

    2003-05-01

    This thesis is to give a better understanding of the radiochemical aging of a thermoset resin under gamma irradiation. The conditions of aging are gamma irradiation under air with a dose rate of 2 kGy/h at 120 C. The requested lifetime is four years, it means a dose of 70 MGy. The first step of this work was the choice of a resistive epoxy resin. This choice was made thanks to the literature data. The high glass transition temperature and the high amount of aromatic groups were the main criteria of the final choice. After this choice, thermal and mechanical properties were followed under thermal and radiochemical aging: i) under thermal aging, after 600 hours at 220 C, the glass transition temperature remained unchanged. But, from a mechanical point of view, properties at break dramatically decreased. This embrittlement was assigned to a critical oxidized layer. The thickness of this layer was estimated about 30 {mu}m. ii) the same kind of embrittlement was observed under radiochemical aging. Moreover, it appeared a decrease of the glass transition temperature when increasing the dose of irradiation. This indicates that the main degradation mechanism is chain scission under anaerobic atmosphere. We, then, proposed a mechanistic model associated with a kinetic model to predict the evolution of the glass transition temperature depending on the irradiation conditions. Parameters of the kinetic model were determined by solid NMR and ESR experiments. Comparison between experimental and calculated values at 120 C is satisfactory, a global good agreement was found. (author)

  4. Past and future fracturing in AECL Research areas in the superior province of the Canadian Precambrian Shield, with emphasis on the Lac du Bonnet Batholith

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The likelihood that future fracturing, arising from geologic causes, could occur in the vicinity of a nuclear fuel waste repository in plutonic rock of the Canadian Precambrian Shield, is examined. The report discusses the possible causes of fracturing (both past and future) in Shield rocks. The report then examines case histories of fracture formation in Precambrian plutonic rocks in AECL's Research Areas, especially the history of the Lac du Bonnet Batholith, in the Whiteshell Area, Manitoba. Initially, fractures can be introduced into intrusive plutonic rocks during crystallization and cooling of an intrusive magma. These fractures are found at all size scales; as late residual magma dyking, hydraulic fracturing by retrograde boiling off of hydrothermal fluids, and, in some cases, through local differential cooling. Subsequent fracturing is largely caused by changes in environmental temperature and stress field, rather than by alteration of the material behaviour of the rock. Pluton emplacement during orogeny is commonly accompanied by uplift and erosional exhumation, altering both the tectonic and the lithostatic stresses, the rock temperature gradient and the pore fluid characteristics

  5. Simulation-based reactor control design methodology for CANDU 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kattan, M.K.; MacBeth, M.J. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan (Canada); Chan, W.F.; Lam, K.Y. [Cassiopeia Technologies Inc., Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1996-07-01

    The next generation of CANDU nuclear power plant being designed by AECL is the 900 MWe CANDU 9 station. This design is based upon the Darlington CANDU nuclear power plant located in Ontario which is among the world leading nuclear power stations for highest capacity factor with the lowest operation, maintenance and administration costs in North America. Canadian-designed CANDU pressurized heavy water nuclear reactors have traditionally been world leaders in electrical power generation capacity performance. This paper introduces the CANDU 9 design initiative to use plant simulation during the design stage of the plant distributed control system (DCS), plant display system (PDS) and the control centre panels. This paper also introduces some details of the CANDU 9 DCS reactor regulating system (RRS) control application, a typical DCS partition configuration, and the interfacing of some of the software design processes that are being followed from conceptual design to final integrated design validation. A description is given of the reactor model developed specifically for use in the simulator. The CANDU 9 reactor model is a synthesis of 14 micro point-kinetic reactor models to facilitate 14 liquid zone controllers for bulk power error control, as well as zone flux tilt control. (author)

  6. N Reactor

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The last of Hanfordqaodmasdkwaspemas7ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdflss nine plutonium production reactors to be built was the N Reactor.This reactor was called a dual purpose...

  7. Radiochemical neutron activation analysis for certification of ion-implanted phosphorus in silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Rick L; Simons, David S; Guthrie, William F; Lu, John

    2003-08-15

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis procedure has been developed, critically evaluated, and shown to have the necessary sensitivity, chemical specificity, matrix independence, and precision to certify phosphorus at ion implantation levels in silicon. 32P, produced by neutron capture of 31P, is chemically separated from the sample matrix and measured using a beta proportional counter. The method is used here to certify the amount of phosphorus in SRM 2133 (Phosphorus Implant in Silicon Depth Profile Standard) as (9.58 +/- 0.16) x 10(14) atoms x cm(-2). A detailed evaluation of uncertainties is given.

  8. Radiochemical methods for the determination of subnanogram amounts of cadmium in environmental samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamaev, V.I.

    1986-02-01

    A radiochemical method has been developed for the determination of cadmium, based on an interpolation method with the addition of an interfering element (zinc). Using extraction by Dithizone in chloroform form from alkaline media it is possible to determine cadmium with a detection limit of about 2x10/sup -10/ M and quite high selectivity. Combination of the method with a preliminary substoichiometric concentration allows the detection limit to be reduced to about 2x10/sup -11/ M and the selectivity to be increased significantly. The method was used to determine cadmium in environmental samples.

  9. Energy and Water Conservation Assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Stephanie R.; Koehler, Theresa M.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-05-31

    This report summarizes the results of an energy and water conservation assessment of the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory (RPL) at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The assessment was performed in October 2013 by engineers from the PNNL Building Performance Team with the support of the dedicated RPL staff and several Facilities and Operations (F&O) department engineers. The assessment was completed for the Facilities and Operations (F&O) department at PNNL in support of the requirements within Section 432 of the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007.

  10. Distribution of platinum in patients treated with cisplatin determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heydorn, K.; Rietz, B.; Krarup-Hansen, A.

    1998-01-01

    Cisplatin is used in a successful treatment of testicular cancer and some related conditions, but several toxic effects have been observed. Knowledge about the distribution of platinum in the human body after treatment with massive doses of cisplatin might provide clues to the origin of side...... effects, and a study was initiated to provide such information by the analysis of postmortem samples by our method of radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). Autopsy samples of kidney, liver, lung, muscle, and pancreas were taken with stainless steel scalpels together with samples of nerve...

  11. Conceptual Design for the Pilot-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J.; Meier, David E.; Tingey, Joel M.; Casella, Amanda J.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Edwards, Matthew K.; Jones, Susan A.; Rapko, Brian M.

    2014-08-05

    This report describes a conceptual design for a pilot-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide for use as exercise and reference materials, and for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production. This capability is referred to as the Pilot-scale Plutonium oxide Processing Unit (P3U), and it will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including plutonium dioxide (PuO2) dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and conversion to oxide by calcination.

  12. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lumetta, Gregg J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Meier, David E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Tingey, Joel M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Casella, Amanda J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Delegard, Calvin H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Edwards, Matthew K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Orton, Robert D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rapko, Brian M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smart, John E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  13. Advanced liquid and solid extraction procedures for ultratrace determination of rhenium by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizera, J.; Kučera, J.; Řanda, Z.; Lučaníková, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level based on use of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and extraction chromatography (EXC) have been developed. Two different LLE procedures were used depending on the way of sample decomposition using either 2-butanone or tetraphenylarsonium chloride in CHCl3. EXC employed new solid extractant materials prepared by incorporation of the liquid trioctyl-methyl-ammonium chloride into an inert polyacrylonitrile matrix. The RNAA procedures presented have been compared and applied for Re determination in several biological and environmental reference materials.

  14. New procedures of radiochemical neutron activation analysis for ultratrace determination of rhenium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level based on use of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and extraction chromatography (EXC) have been developed. Two different LLE procedures were used depending on the way of sample decomposition using either 2-butanone or tetraphenylarsonium chloride in CHCl3. EXC employed new solid extractant materials prepared by incorporation of the liquid trialkyl-methylammonium chloride into an inert polyacrylonitrile matrix. The RNAA procedures presented were compared and applied to Re determination in various biological and environmental reference materials. (author)

  15. A quantitative radiochemical study of ionic and molecular transport in bovine dental enamel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical method was developed to determine quantitatively and simultaneously the transport of up to four different compounds through dental enamel. The compounds chosen were [3H]-sorbitol, [14C]-glycerol, 36Cl- and 86Rb+. Effective diffusion coefficients of these compounds determined at 40C were considerably different for different specimens of enamel. Thus values for [3H]-sorbitol varied for 0.04 x 10-8 to 2.5 x 10-8 cm2s-1. Most enamel membranes showed an ion selective behaviour by which the cations were more mobile than the anions. A molecular sieve effect was observed for glycerol and sorbitol. (author)

  16. Rapid and accurate determination of radiochemical purity of sup(99m)Tc compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wide spread use of sup(99m)Tc-labelled radiopharmaceuticals and limitation of the short half-life of the isotope, is associated with an urgent need for a rapid, simple but accurate method for determining the radiochemical purity of the compound. A short paper chromatographic (KK) or thin layer chromatographic (KLT) method using 95% methanol or 0.9% saline solution as solvents, has solved the problem. With these methods, the amount of free sup(99m)Tc pertechnetate in a compound, can be determined in only a few minutes. These methods compare satisfactorily with lengtheir procedures. (author)

  17. Design of the Laboratory-Scale Plutonium Oxide Processing Unit in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a design for a laboratory-scale capability to produce plutonium oxide (PuO2) for use in identifying and validating nuclear forensics signatures associated with plutonium production, as well as for use as exercise and reference materials. This capability will be located in the Radiochemical Processing Laboratory at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The key unit operations are described, including PuO2 dissolution, purification of the Pu by ion exchange, precipitation, and re-conversion to PuO2 by calcination.

  18. Determination of trace elements in bottled water in Greece by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four different bottled water brands sold in Greece in the winter of 2001-2002 were analyzed for a wide range of chemical elements, using neutron activation analysis (NAA). The elements Na and Br were determined instrumentally (INAA), whereas the other metals and trace elements radiochemically (RNAA). The results indicated that the mean level of all the elements determined in the samples were well within the European Union (EU) directive on drinking water and accomplish the drinking water standards of the World Health Organisation (WHO) as well as of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (author)

  19. The Conflux Fuel bundle: An Economic and Pragmatic Route to the use of Advanced Fuel Cycles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANFLEX1 bundle is being developed jointly by AECL and KAERI as a vehicle for introducing the use of enrichment and advanced fuel cycles in CANDU2 reactors. The bundle design uses smaller diameter fuel elements in the outer ring of a 43-element bundle to reduce the maximum element ratings in a CANDU fuel bundle by 20% compared to the 37-element bundle currently in use. This facilitates burnups of greater than 21,000 MW d/TAU to optimize the economic benefit available from the use of enrichment and advanced fuel cycles. A combination of this lower fuel rating, plus development work underway at Aecl to enhance the thermalhydraulic characteristics of the bundle (including both CHF3 and bundle. This provides extra flexibility in the fuel management procedures required for fuel bundles with higher fissile contents. The different bundle geometry requires flow tests to demonstrate acceptable vibration and fretting behavior of the Conflux bundle. A program to undertake the necessary range of flow tests has started at KAERI, involving the fabrication of the required bundles, and setting up for the actual tests. A program to study the fuel management requirements for slightly enriched (0.9 wt % 235 in total U) Conflux fuel has been undertaken by both Aecl and KAERI staff, and further work has started for higher enrichments. Irradiation testing of the Conflux bundle started in the NUR reactor in 1989, and a second irradiation test is due to start shortly. This paper describes the program, and reviews the status of key parts of the program

  20. Scenarios for the transmutation of actinides in CANDU reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyland, Bronwyn, E-mail: hylandb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario, K0J 1J0 (Canada); Gihm, Brian, E-mail: gihmb@aecl.ca [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    With world stockpiles of used nuclear fuel increasing, the need to address the long-term utilization of this resource is being studied. Many of the transuranic (TRU) actinides in nuclear spent fuel produce decay heat for long durations, resulting in significant nuclear waste management challenges. These actinides can be transmuted to shorter-lived isotopes to reduce the decay heat period or consumed as fuel in a CANDU(R) reactor. Many of the design features of the CANDU reactor make it uniquely adaptable to actinide transmutation. The small, simple fuel bundle simplifies the fabrication and handling of active fuels. Online refuelling allows precise management of core reactivity and separate insertion of the actinides and fuel bundles into the core. The high neutron economy of the CANDU reactor results in high TRU destruction to fissile-loading ratio. This paper provides a summary of actinide transmutation schemes that have been studied in CANDU reactors at AECL, including the works performed in the past. The schemes studied include homogeneous scenarios in which actinides are uniformly distributed in all fuel bundles in the reactor, as well as heterogeneous scenarios in which dedicated channels in the reactor are loaded with actinide targets and the rest of the reactor is loaded with fuel. The transmutation schemes that are presented reflect several different partitioning schemes. Separation of americium, often with curium, from the other actinides enables targeted destruction of americium, which is a main contributor to the decay heat 100-1000 years after discharge from the reactor. Another scheme is group-extracted transuranic elements, in which all of the transuranic elements, plutonium (Pu), neptunium (Np), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) are extracted together and then transmuted. This paper also addresses ways of utilizing the recycled uranium, another stream from the separation of spent nuclear fuel, in order to drive the transmutation of other actinides.

  1. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-31

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro`s Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel.

  2. Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE is investigating methods for long term dispositioning of weapons grade plutonium. One such method would be to utilize the plutonium in Mixed OXide (MOX) fuel assemblies in existing CANDU reactors. CANDU (Canadian Deuterium Uranium) reactors are designed, licensed, built, and supported by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), and currently use natural uranium oxide as fuel. The MOX spent fuel assemblies removed from the reactor would be similar to the spent fuel currently produced using natural uranium fuel, thus rendering the plutonium as unattractive as that in the stockpiles of commercial spent fuel. This report presents the results of a study sponsored by the DOE for dispositioning the plutonium using CANDU technology. Ontario Hydro's Bruce A was used as reference. The fuel design study defined the optimum parameters to disposition 50 tons of Pu in 25 years (or 100 tons). Two alternate fuel designs were studied. Safeguards, security, environment, safety, health, economics, etc. were considered. Options for complete destruction of the Pu were also studied briefly; CANDU has a superior ability for this. Alternative deployment options were explored and the potential impact on Pu dispositioning in the former Soviet Union was studied. An integrated system can be ready to begin Pu consumption in 4 years, with no changes required to the reactors other than for safe, secure storage of new fuel

  3. Radiochemical separation and quality assessment for the 68Zn target based 64Cu radioisotope production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiochemical separation of the different radionuclides (64Cu, 67Cu, 67Ga, 66Ga, 56Ni, 57Ni, 55Co, 56Co, 57Co, 65Zn, 196Au ) induced in the Ni supported Cu substrate - 68Zn target system, which was bombarded with the 29.0 MeV proton beam, was performed by ion-exchange chromatography using successive isocratic and/or concentration gradient elution techniques. The overlapped gamma-ray spectrum analysis method was developed to assess the 67Ga and 67Cu content in the 64Cu product and even in the post-67Ga production 68Zn target solution without the support of radiochemical separation. This method was used for the assessment of 64+67Cu radioisotope separation from 67Ga , the quality control of 64Cu product and the determination of the 68Zn (p,2p)67Cu reaction yield. The improvement in the targetry and the optimization of proton beam energy for the 68Zn target based 64Cu and 67Ga production were proposed based on the stopping power and range of the incident proton and on the excitation functions, reaction yields and different radionuclides induced in the target system. (author)

  4. Multi-element characterization of silicon nitride powders by instrumental and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franek, M.; Krivan, V. (Ulm Univ. (Germany). Sektion Analytik und Hoechstreinigung)

    1992-07-15

    An optimized instrumental neutron activation analysis method was applied to the comprehensive trace characterization of good- and high- purity silicon nitride powders of different origins. Experimental modes are given for 55 elements leading to limits of detection below 1 ng g[sup -] [sup 1] for 28 elements, between 1 and 100 ng g[sup -1] for 19 elements and higher than 100 ng g[sup -1] for 8 elements. For the removal of the radionuclides [sup 140]La, [sup 182]Ta and [sup 187]W, which cause the major activity in certain types of materials, radiochemical procedures based in cation exchange from 2 M HCl and anion exchange from 2 M HF were developed. [sup 64]Cu was selectively extracted with dithizone from 10 M HF for counting the 511-keV line. By radiochemical neutron activation analysis, the limits of detection were improved by up to three orders of magnitude. Comparison with results obtained by inductively coupled plasma (ICP) atomic emission spectrometry and ICP mass spectrometry shows satisfactory agreement and demonstrates the advantages of neutron activation analysis especially when low elements contents are to be determined. (author). 30 refs.; 2 figs.; 6 tabs.

  5. Spectroscopic Online Monitoring for Process Control and Safeguarding of Radiochemical Fuel Reprocessing Streams - 13553

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is a renewed interest worldwide to promote the use of nuclear power and close the nuclear fuel cycle. The long term successful use of nuclear power is critically dependent upon adequate and safe processing and disposition of the used nuclear fuel. Liquid-liquid extraction is a separation technique commonly employed for the processing of the dissolved spent nuclear fuel. The instrumentation used to monitor these processes must be robust, require little or no maintenance, and be able to withstand harsh environments such as high radiation fields and aggressive chemical matrices. This paper discusses application of absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques supplemented by physicochemical measurements for radiochemical process monitoring. In this context, our team experimentally assessed the potential of Raman and spectrophotometric techniques for on-line real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid and Pu(IV)/Np(V)/Nd(III), respectively, in solutions relevant to spent fuel reprocessing. Both techniques demonstrated robust performance in the repetitive batch measurements of each analyte in a wide concentration range using simulant and commercial dissolved spent fuel solutions. Static spectroscopic measurements served as training sets for the multivariate data analysis to obtain partial least squares predictive models, which were validated using on-line centrifugal contactor extraction tests. Satisfactory prediction of the analytes concentrations in these preliminary experiments warrants further development of the spectroscopy-based methods for radiochemical safeguards and process control. (authors)

  6. Spectroscopic online monitoring for process control and safeguarding of radiochemical streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes application of the absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques supplemented by physicochemical measurements for radiochemical process monitoring. In this context, our team experimentally assessed the potential of Raman and spectrophotometric techniques for online real-time monitoring of the U(VI)/nitrate ion/nitric acid and Pu(IV)/Np(V)/Nd(III), respectively, in solutions relevant to spent fuel reprocessing. These techniques demonstrate robust performance in the repetitive batch measurements of each analyte in a wide concentration range using simulant and commercial dissolved spent fuel solutions. Spectroscopic measurements served as training sets for the multivariate data analysis to obtain partial least squares predictive models, which were validated using on-line centrifugal contactor extraction tests. Satisfactory prediction of the analytes concentrations in these preliminary experiments warrants further development of the spectroscopy-based methods for radiochemical process control and safeguarding. Additionally, the ability to identify material intentionally diverted from a liquid-liquid extraction contactor system was successfully tested using on-line process monitoring as a means to detect the amount of material diverted. (authors)

  7. A direct reading on-line flowrate meter for use in radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for measurement and remote direct reading display of the flowrates of streams in a radiochemical plant is described. The device is interposed in the measured stream and consists of a syphon pot with a specially developed attachment on the discharge line. Differential pressure switches are used to trigger a timer device at set levels in the pot and the time required for filling the pot during each cycle is measured and is used to compute and display the flowrate. The device is accurate and reliable and is simple to fabricate and install. It is maintenance-free since it has no moving parts. It is also suggested that a manometer with conductive contacts could be used in place of the d.p. switches. The background and various stages of development of the device are described. The operating data is tabulated and parameters required for plant applications are indicated in detail. A simple method to detect and correct for errors due to drift in d.p. switch setting is also outlined. Sketches of typical syphon pot, the schematic of the apparatus and suggested layout for application in radiochemical plant are also included. (author). 11 figures, 6 tables

  8. Determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples by radiochemical activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel in tissue samples. A radiochemical neutron activation analysis method for the determination of chromium, cobalt and nickel has been developed. The destruction device used consisted of a combined wet-ashing-distillation and ion-exchange system. Six samples could be treated at the same time. The samples were wet-ashed with H*L2SO*L4-H*L2O*L2 mixture. Volatile elements were distilled as bromide compounds with HBr*H-. The distillation residue in 8M HCl was passed through hydrated antimony pentoxide (HAP) in order to remove disturbing *H2*H4Na-activity and through a Dowex 2 x 8 column so as to retain *H6*H0Co (formed from *H5*H8Ni). Chromium was elutriated from the column and precipitated as Cr(OH)*L3 for the removal of disturbing *H3*H2P-activity. The standards and samples were treated in a similar manner each so that the yield determination is not necessarily needed. The yields by tracer experiments were (43 +- 5) % for Cr, (93 +- 4) % for Co and (88 +- 14) % for Ni. The precision and accuracy of the method were studied by using reference materials of the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) and the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

  9. Anion effect on radiochemical stability of room-temperature ionic liquids under gamma irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical stability of imidazolium-based ionic liquids constituted of the BuMeIm+ cation and associated with four commonly used anions (X-: Tf2N-, TfO-, PF6- and BF4-) has been investigated under gamma irradiation for high irradiation doses (up to 2.0 MGy). The anion effect has been examined by quantifying the radiolytic yields of disappearance for cation and anions and by identifying corresponding radiolysis products with several analytical techniques. On the one hand, a large number of radiolysis products are formed throughout the irradiation in ionic liquid solutions, resulting from reactions of primary generated species of cation and anion by indirect radiolysis. Primary generated species can react together throughout the irradiation by indirect radiolysis to form numerous radiolysis products in small quantities, indicating that several complex degradation pathways are involved for these radiation doses. This degradation pattern has been confirmed by identification of numerous gaseous radiolytic products. On the other hand, quantitative studies show that radiochemical stabilities of ionic liquids are in the same range of values as systems envisioned in nuclear fuel reprocessing with relatively low hydrogen yields. Indeed, this present work emphasizes the suitability of ionic liquids for applications in the nuclear fuel cycle. (authors)

  10. Radiochemical quality control of kits labelled with Tc-99m produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiopharmaceuticals labelled with Tc-99m are routinely used in Nuclear Medicine Laboratories. A large number of these employ tin (II) reagents to reduce Tc (pertechnetate-VII) to a lower valence state thereby making it more able to complex forming reactions. The miniaturized chromatography system of Tc-99m labelled compounds using Whatman 3MM (8 x 1 cm) as a support and 30% NaC1: 0,9% 'NaC1: 85% MeOH and acetone as a solvent permits to assay the radiochemical purity in a few minutes after preparation. In addition this method introduced in routine work not only determines Tc-99m (pertechnetate) but also determines reduced Tc - 99m unbound to the radiopharmaceuticals (hydrolyzed reduced Tc-99m). The lyophilized kits for labelling with Tc-99m produced at IPEN-CNEN/SP are: MDP, DTPA, HSA, GHA, HIDA, Pyro, MAA, MIAA, Sulfur Colloid, Dextran-500, Sn.Cit. and Phytate. Radiochemical quality control of these kits were performed at the first day of preparation and during 12 months for determining' their validity for use. All preparation showed high yield of labelling (95-99%) during this period of time. (author)

  11. Explicit core-follow simulations for a CANDU 6 reactor fuelled with recovered-uranium CANFLEX bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recovered uranium (RU) is a by-product of many light-water reactor (LWR) fuel recycling programs. After fission products and plutonium (Pu) have been removed from spent LWR fuel, RU is left. A fissile content in the RU of 0.9 to 1.0% makes it impossible for reuse in an LWR without re-enrichment, but CANDU reactors have a sufficiently high neutron economy to use RU as fuel. Explicit core-follow simulations were run to analyse the viability of RU as a fuel for existing CANDU 6 cores. The core follow was performed with RFSP, using WIMS-AECL lattice properties. During the core follow, channel powers and bundle powers were tracked to determine the operating envelope for RU in a CANFLEX bundle. The results show that RU fits the operating criteria of a generic CANDU 6 core and is a viable fuel option in CANDU reactors. (author)

  12. Study on the use of slightly enriched uranium fuel cycle in an existing CANDU 6 reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeom, Choong Sub; Kim, Hyun Dae [Institute for Advanced Engineering, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    To test the viability of CANFLEX-SEU bundles in an existing CANDU 6 reactor, core follow-up simulation has been carried out using the reactor fueling simulation program of the CANDU 6, RFSP computer code, and a lattice physics code, WIMS-AECL. During the core follow-up, bundle and channel powers and zone levels have been checked against their operating limits at each simulation. It is observed from the simulation results that an equilibrium core loaded with 0.9 w/o CANFLEX-SEU bundles could be refueled and maintained for 550 FPD without any significant violations in the channel and bundle power limits and the permissible operating range of the liquid zone controllers. 8 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab. (Author)

  13. Present and future activities of TRIGA RC-1 Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of reactor activities is presented and discussed. The RC-1 reactor is used by ENEA's laboratories, research institutes and national industries for different aims: research, analysis materials behaviour under neutron flux, etc. To satisfy the requests increase it is important to signalize: - the realization of a new radiochemical laboratory for radioisotopes production, to be used in a medical and/or diagnostic field in general; - the realization of a tritium handling laboratory, to study tritium solubility, release and diffusion in different material (particularly in ceramic breeder as lithium aluminate) to support Italian programs on fusion technology; - a research activity on the reactors computerized control by a console of advanced conception. The aim of this activity is the development of an ergonomic control room that could be a reference point for the planning of the power reactor control rooms

  14. Determination of the chemical and radiochemical purity and specific radioactivity of [18F]FDG by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in combination with the radioactivity detection is the best control method for the radiochemical purity of [18F]FDG. An anion exchange separation mechanism allows isocratic separation of carbohydrates. Using a strong basic eluent, the weakly acid carbohydrates form anions and are therefore retained on the anion exchange resin. The chemical and radiochemical purity and specific radioactivity can be determined simultaneously by including in the chromatographic system a mass detector sensitive, enough for quantitative determination of the product species. (orig.)

  15. Stability of Y-90 Zevalin: Radiochemical purity evaluation using instant thin layer and size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the stability of typical Y-90 Zevalin (IDEC Pharmaceuticals Corp) patient doses, either maintained at room temperature or refrigerated, using the manufacturer's recommended instant thin layer chromatography procedure and confirming the results using size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to evaluate radiochemical purity. Material and Methods: Following radiolabeling of Y-90 Zevalin, two patient doses were withdrawn into a 10-ml syringe. One patient dose, consisting of 41.2 mCi Y-90 Zevalin in 10 ml, was refrigerated. The other patient dose, consisting of 31.2 mCi Y-90 Zevalin in 7.3 ml, was maintained at room temperature. At selected time intervals after formulation, ranging from 0.5 to 49 hrs, radiochemical purity evaluations were performed using instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) with normal saline and size exclusion HPLC using a TSKgel G3000SW molecular sizing column. For each time interval, five separate samples were analyzed and the data statistically summarized. Results: Following initial radiolabeling, the radiochemical purity of all preparations evaluated was greater than 95%, as demonstrated by both chromatographic methods. At 24 hours post radiolabeling, the mean radiochemical purity of Y-90 Zevalin, refrigerated or maintained at room temperature, was 95.4% ± 0.3% (s.d.) and 86.3% ± 1.2% (s.d), respectively using instant thin layer chromatography. At 48 hours post radiolabeling, the mean radiochemical purity of Y-90 Zevalin, refrigerated or maintained at room temperature, was 91.0% ±± 0.8% (s.d.) and 86.0% ± 2.0% (s.d.), respectively using instant thin layer chromatography. In general, size exclusion HPLC confirmed the chromatographic results. With increased time post radiolabeling, an increase in radiolabeled low molecular weight components (Y-90 DTPA) and an increase in radiolabeled high molecular weight components and/or aggregates was observed. These radiochemical

  16. The smallest SMRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozier, K. [ACSION (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    An overview is presented on the subject of Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) for the generation of electricity and/or process heat in the Canadian context, with a particular focus on very small systems, up to about 30 MWe (less than about 100 MWt) output capacity. The potential Canadian market for such systems is examined, especially as a substitute for electricity generation by diesel engines in remote locations. Past experience with SMR systems in Canada and elsewhere is briefly reviewed, including AECL's earlier SLOWPOKE Energy System and Nuclear Battery development projects. Technology options and some recently proposed systems in this size range are discussed along with some of the requirements of an ideal SMR system for remote Canadian applications. (author)

  17. Reactor Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Abderrahim, A

    2001-04-01

    The Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis of reactor fuel. This expertise is applied in the Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments by means of neutron and gamma calculations. The activities of the Fuzzy Logic and Intelligent Technologies in Nuclear Science programme cover several domains outside the department. Progress and achievements in these topical areas in 2000 are summarised.

  18. A radio-high-performance liquid chromatography dual-flow cell gamma-detection system for on-line radiochemical purity and labeling efficiency determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindegren, S; Jensen, H; Jacobsson, L

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a method of determining radiochemical yield and radiochemical purity using radio-HPLC detection employing a dual-flow-cell system is evaluated. The dual-flow cell, consisting of a reference cell and an analytical cell, was constructed from two PEEK capillary coils to fit into the w...

  19. Analysis of the impact of coolant density variations in the high efficiency channel of a pressure tube super critical water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pressure Tube (PT) Supercritical Water Reactor (SCWR) is based on a light water coolant operating at pressures above the thermodynamic critical pressure; a separate low temperature and low pressure moderator. The coolant density changes by an order of magnitude depending on its local enthalpy in the porous ceramic insulator tube. This causes significant changes in the neutron transport characteristics, axially and radially, in the fuel channel. This work performs lattice physics calculations for a 78-element Pu-Th fuel at zero burnup and examines the effect of assumptions related to coolant density in the radial direction of a HEC, using the neutron transport code WIMS-AECL. (author)

  20. Radiochemical determination of Np-237 in soil samples contaminated with weapon grade plutonium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Palomares terrestrial ecosystem (Andalusia, southwestern Spain) is known to constitute a natural laboratory to study the distribution, behaviour and migration of certain actinides, such as plutonium, americium and neptunium. This scenario is partially contaminated with weapon grade plutonium since the burn-out and fragmentation of two of the four thermonuclear bombs accidentally dropped by a B-52 from the USA Air Force back in 1966. While performing radiometric measurements on the field, with the goal of gathering information about the surface contamination levels, the possible presence of 237Np was observed through its 29 keV gamma emission. To accomplish a more detailed characterization of the source term in the contaminated area using the isotopic ratios Pu-Am-Np, the radiochemical isolation and later quantification by alpha spectrometry of 237Np was initiated. As a first approach, a bibliographic study was undertaken, considering different radiochemical methods applied to a variety of samples such as soils, sediments, sea water, lichens, etc. The radiochemical procedure selected in our laboratory involves separation of neptunium from americium, uranium and plutonium with ionic resin (AG 1x2), given that in soil samples from Palomares 239+240Pu levels are several orders of magnitude higher than 237Np. Then neptunium is isolated using TEVA organic resin. After electro-deposition, quantification is performed by high resolution alpha spectrometry. Different analyses have been performed with blank solutions spiked with 236Pu, 237Np and 244Cm, solutions resulting from the total dissolution of isolated radioactive particles and soil samples. The lack of an appropriate tracer in our lab led to the determination of an average percentage of Np recovery using a certified solution of 237Np. Decontamination percentages obtained during the Pu-Np separation ranged from 98 % to 100 %. Some tests to investigate the effect of the addition or absence of NaNO2 (responsible for

  1. Reactor safeguards

    CERN Document Server

    Russell, Charles R

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Safeguards provides information for all who are interested in the subject of reactor safeguards. Much of the material is descriptive although some sections are written for the engineer or physicist directly concerned with hazards analysis or site selection problems. The book opens with an introductory chapter on radiation hazards, the construction of nuclear reactors, safety issues, and the operation of nuclear reactors. This is followed by separate chapters that discuss radioactive materials, reactor kinetics, control and safety systems, containment, safety features for water reactor

  2. Reactor operation

    CERN Document Server

    Shaw, J

    2013-01-01

    Reactor Operation covers the theoretical aspects and design information of nuclear reactors. This book is composed of nine chapters that also consider their control, calibration, and experimentation.The opening chapters present the general problems of reactor operation and the principles of reactor control and operation. The succeeding chapters deal with the instrumentation, start-up, pre-commissioning, and physical experiments of nuclear reactors. The remaining chapters are devoted to the control rod calibrations and temperature coefficient measurements in the reactor. These chapters also exp

  3. Development of a radiochemical separation for selenium with the aim of measuring its isotope 79 in low and intermediate nuclear wastes by ICP-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguerre, Sandrine; Frechou, Carole

    2006-05-15

    Selenium (Se) 79 is a beta emitter produced from (235)U fission thus occurring as one of the fission products found in nuclear reactors. Due to its long half life (about 10(5) years), (79)Se is one of the radionuclides of interest for the performance of assessment studies of waste storage or disposal. Thus, the National Radioactive Waste Management Agency (Andra, France) requests its monitoring in wastes packages before their disposal in specific sites. Measurement of (79)Se is difficult owing to its trace level concentration and its low activity in nuclear wastes. A radiochemical procedure has to be carried out in order to separate selenium from the matrix and to concentrate it before the measurement with a mass spectrometric or a nuclear technique. The beginning of the development is presented in this paper. The optimised protocol firstly developed in view of an ICP-MS measurement, includes five steps based on microwave digestion, evaporation and separations on ion exchange resins. It was tested first on synthetic solutions and was optimised in order to be applicable to a large number of sample types. The recoveries of the whole procedure were evaluated using natural (82)Se or the gamma emitter (75)Se as a radioactive spiker. Then, the protocol was applied to two solid samples spiked with natural selenium, a glass microfiber filter and an ion exchange resin, and two liquid samples spiked with (75)Se, a synthetic solution and an effluent. The yields obtained for both samples ranged from 70 up to 80%.

  4. Technologies for tritium control in fission reactors moderated with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was done within a program one of whose objectives was to analyze the possible strategies and technologies, to be applied to HWR at Argentine nuclear power plants, for tritium control. The high contribution of tritium to the total dose has given rise to the need by the operators and/or designers to carry out developments and improvements to try to optimize tritium control technologies. Within a tritium control program, only that one which includes the heavy water detritiation will allow to reduce the tritium concentrations at optimum levels for safety and cost-effective power plant operation. The technology chosen to be applied should depend not only on the technical feasibility but also on the analysis of economic and juncture factors such as, among others, the quantity of heavy water to be treated. It is the authors' belief that AECL tendency concerning heavy water treatment in its future reactors would be to employ the CECE technology complemented with immobilization on titanium beds, with the 'on-line' detritiation in each nuclear power plant. This would not be of immediate application since our analysis suggests that AECL would assume that the process is under development and needs to be tested. (author). 21 refs

  5. Radiochemical determination of Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule compression at the National Ignition Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a radiochemical measurement of the ratio of isotope concentrations produced in a gold hohlraum surrounding an Inertial Confinement Fusion capsule at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). We relate the ratio of the concentrations of (n,γ) and (n,2n) products in the gold hohlraum matrix to the down-scatter of neutrons in the compressed fuel and, consequently, to the fuel's areal density. The observed ratio of the concentrations of 198m+gAu and 196gAu is a performance signature of ablator areal density and the fuel assembly confinement time. We identify the measurement of nuclear cross sections of astrophysical importance as a potential application of the neutrons generated at the NIF

  6. Quantitative radiochemical methods for determination of the sources of natural radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosholt, J.N., Jr.

    1957-01-01

    Study of the state of equilibrium of any natural radioactive source requires determination of several key nuclides or groups of nuclides to find their contribution to the total amount of radioactivity. Alpha activity measured by scintillation counting is used for determination of protactinium-231, thorium-232, thorium-230, and radium-226. The chemical procedures for the separations of the specific elements are described, as well as the measurement techniques used to determine the abundances of the individual isotopes. To correct for deviations in the ore standards, an independent means of evaluating the efficiencies of the individual separations and measurements is used. The development of these methods of radiochemical analysis facilitates detailed investigation of the major sources of natural radioactivity.

  7. Solar neutrino results (from radio-chemical and water Cherenkov detectors)

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, Y

    2001-01-01

    Recent results on solar neutrino measurements are discussed. The results from radio-chemical experiments are briefly summarized. The new data from 1117 effective days of Super-Kamiokande shows that the spectrum shape agrees with that expected from the convoluted effect of the sup 8 B-neutrino spectrum, the recoil electron spectrum of neutrino electron scattering and the detector responses and that there is a 3.4% difference between the day- and night-time fluxes, but statistically not significant. There is no strong smoking gun evidence for oscillation yet, however those precise measurements of the spectrum shape and day/night fluxes have given a constraint on the oscillation parameters, indicating at 95% confidence level that the large mixing angles solutions (MSW LMA and LOW) are preferable.

  8. Determination of the radionuclide inventory in accelerator waste using calculation and radiochemical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schumann, D.; Neuhausen, J.; Weinreich, R. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Atchison, F. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)], E-mail: francis.atchison@psi.ch; Kubik, P.; Synal, H.-A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, c/o Institute of Particle Physics, ETH Zuerich, CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Korschinek, G.; Faestermann, Th.; Rugel, G. [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, D-85747 Garching (Germany)

    2007-11-15

    We use a description of the work carried out to determine the radioactive inventory for a redundant beam-dump from the PSI accelerator complex, as an illustration of techniques for the classification and characterisation of accelerator waste and how some difficulties can be circumvented. The work has been carried out using a combination of calculation and sample analysis: The inventory calculation effectively involves a large scale Monte-Carlo transport calculation of a medium-sized spallation facility and for the sample analysis, standard radiochemical analysis techniques have had to be extended to include AMS measurements so as to allow measurement of some of the long half-life, waste disposal relevant, nuclides.

  9. Investigation of the possibility of using hydrogranulation in reprocessing radioactive wastes of radiochemical production facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revyakin, V.; Borisov, L.M. [All Russian Scientific and Research Institute of Non-Organic Materials, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-05-01

    Radio-chemical production facilities are constantly accumulating liquid radioactive wastes (still residues as the result of evaporation of extraction and adsorption solutions etc.) which are a complex multicomponent mixtures. The wastes are frequently stored for extended periods of time while awaiting disposition and in some cases, and this is much worse, they are released into the environment. In this report, I would like to draw your attention to some results we have obtained from investigations aimed at simplifying handing of such wastes by the precipitation of hard to dissolve metal hydroxides, the flocculation of the above into granules with the help of surface-active agents (in this case a polyacrylamide - PAA), quickly precipitated and easily filtered. The precipitate may be quickly dried and calcinated, if necessary, and transformed into a dense oxide sinter. In other words it may be transformed into a material convenient for storage or burial.

  10. Radiochemical applications of insoluble sulfate columns. Analytical possibilities in the field of the fission product solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we go on with our study of the heterogeneous ion-isotopic exchange in column. At present, we apply it to determine the radiochemical composition of the raw solutions used in the industrial recuperation of the long-lived fission products. The separation of the radioelements contained in these solutions is carried out mainly by making use of small columns, 1-3 cm height, of BaSO4 or SrSO4, under selected experimental conditions. These columns behave like a special type of inorganic exchangers, working by absorption or by ion-isotopic exchange depending on the cases,a nd they provide the means for the selective separation of several important fission products employing very small volumes of fixing and eluting solutions. (Author) 11 refs

  11. Groundwater quality in wells in central rural Finland: a microbiological and radiochemical survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microbiological, physicochemical, and radiochemical water quality from samples of 150 rural wells in Finland was analyzed. Organic matter exceeded 12 mg KMnO4 L(-1) in 63% and nitrate 25 mg NO3 L(-1) in 29% of the wells. NO3--concentrations were higher in wells with cattle. Fecal coliforms and fecal streptococci were found in 10-40%. There was no direct positive correlation between heterotrophic and indicator bacteria. Salmonella or Campylobacter were not detected. Human pathogen Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from two and Yersinia enterocolitica serotypes O5 or O6 from four waters not containing fecal coliforms. Thus, the predictive value of fecal coliforms to indicate these pathogens is poor. Coliphages were found in seven wells. Mean concentrations of radon and long-lived alpha-active radionuclides were lower and those of beta-emitting radionuclides higher than the mean concentrations measured from groundwater in Finland. Radionuclides from the Chernobyl fallout were not detected

  12. Comparison study among methodologies of planar chromatography for radiochemical control of technetium-99m

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiopharmaceuticals are substances that have radioisotopes in their composition. About 95% of the procedures performed in nuclear medicine use radiopharmaceuticals with diagnostic purposes, and the Lyophilized Reagents (LR) labeled with Technetium-99m (99mTc), obtained from 99Mo/99mTc generator, are the most one used. Quality Control represents the set of assays to be performed to assure that the product is adequate to its purpose. An important feature to be evaluated in 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals is the radiochemical purity (% RqP) to quantify free pertechnetate (99mTcO4-) and technetium colloidal (99mTcO2) mainly by paper chromatography (PC), thin layer (TLC) and High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC). The objective of this work was to perform the comparison among the radiochemical control methodologies of LR labeled with 99mTc, described in the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) and European Pharmacopoeia (EP) and those used by IPEN. 99mTcO4- eluate and DISIDA, DMSA, DTPA, EC, ECD, GHA, MIBI, MDP, PIRO, SAH and Sn Coloidal LR were provided by IPEN-CNEN/SP. TLC-cellulose, TLC-SG.TLC-SG reverse phase, HPTLC-cellulose, HPTLC-SG (Merck) and ITLC-SG (Pall Corporation), W1MM, W3MM, W17M e W31ET (Whatman) chromatographic plates were used. The measurement of the radioactivity was done in a Perkin Elmer Cobra D-5002 gamma counter. LR were labeled to obtain 55,0 MBq mL1 (1,5 mCi mL1) of final radioactive concentration. The %99mTcO4-, %99mTcO2 and % RqP were determined up to 4 hour labeling. From 11 LR, only EC and GHA have no radiochemical control methods in USP and EP. In USP and/or EP, DTPA, MDP, PIRO, SAH and Sn Coloidal methods use ITLC-SG; IPEN uses this chromatography plate in DISIDA, EC, ECD, GHA, PIRO, MIBI and SAH. As ITLC-SG had been out of production (recommended in 40, 70 and 41% of the USP, EP and IPEN methodologies, respectively), it was necessary to search alternatives to replace ITLC-SG plate in the radiochemical control, comparing with HPTLC

  13. Quantitative radiochemical method for determination of major sources of natural radioactivity in ores and minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosholt, J.N.

    1954-01-01

    When an ore sample contains radioactivity other than that attributable to the uranium series in equilibrium, a quantitative analysis of the other emitters must be made in order to determine the source of this activity. Thorium-232, radon-222, and lead-210 have been determined by isolation and subsequent activity analysis of some of their short-lived daughter products. The sulfides of bismuth and polonium are precipitated out of solutions of thorium or uranium ores, and the ??-particle activity of polonium-214, polonium-212, and polonium-210 is determined by scintillation-counting techniques. Polonium-214 activity is used to determine radon-222, polonium-212 activity for thorium-232, and polonium-210 for lead-210. The development of these methods of radiochemical analysis will facilitate the rapid determination of some of the major sources of natural radioactivity.

  14. Combined procedure using radiochemical separation of plutonium, americium and uranium radionuclides for alpha-spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical separation of Pu, Am and U was tested from synthetic solutions and evaporator concentrate samples from nuclear power plants for isolation of each of them for alpha-spectrometry analysis. The separation was performed by anion-exchange chromatography, extraction chromatography, using TRU resin, and precipitation techniques. The aim of the study was to develop a sensitive analytical procedure for the sequential determination of 242Pu, 238Pu, 239+240Pu, 241Am and 235,238U in radioactive wastes. 238Pu, 242Pu, 243Am and 232U were used as tracers. The measurements of α emitting radionuclides were performed by semiconductor detector that is used especially when spectrometric information is needed. For synthetic solutions the chemical recovery was based on associated iron concentration and was about 93%. (author)

  15. Determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical neutron activation procedures using liquid-liquid extraction with tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform from 1 M HCl and solid extraction with ALIQUAT 336 incorporated in a polyacrylonitrile binding matrix from 0.1 M HCl were developed for accurate determination of rhenium in biological and environmental samples at the sub-ng.g-1 level. Concentrations of Re in the range of 0.1 to 2.4 ng.g-1 were determined in several botanical reference materials (RM), while in a RM of road dust a value of approx. 10 ng.g-1 was found. Significantly elevated values of Re, up to 90 ng.g-1, were found in seaweed (brown algae). Results for Re in the brown algae Fucus vesiculosus in which elevated 99Tc values had previously been determined suggest possible competition between Re and Tc in the accumulation process. (author)

  16. Standard practices for dissolving glass containing radioactive and mixed waste for chemical and radiochemical analysis

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2000-01-01

    1.1 These practices cover techniques suitable for dissolving glass samples that may contain nuclear wastes. These techniques used together or independently will produce solutions that can be analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS), radiochemical methods and wet chemical techniques for major components, minor components and radionuclides. 1.2 One of the fusion practices and the microwave practice can be used in hot cells and shielded hoods after modification to meet local operational requirements. 1.3 The user of these practices must follow radiation protection guidelines in place for their specific laboratories. 1.4 Additional information relating to safety is included in the text. 1.5 The dissolution techniques described in these practices can be used for quality control of the feed materials and the product of plants vitrifying nuclear waste materials in glass. 1.6 These pr...

  17. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2011-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for subsampling and for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of uranium hexafluoride UF6. Most of these test methods are in routine use to determine conformance to UF6 specifications in the Enrichment and Conversion Facilities. 1.2 The analytical procedures in this document appear in the following order: Note 1—Subcommittee C26.05 will confer with C26.02 concerning the renumbered section in Test Methods C761 to determine how concerns with renumbering these sections, as analytical methods are replaced with stand-alone analytical methods, are best addressed in subsequent publications. Sections Subsampling of Uranium Hexafluoride 7 - 10 Gravimetric Determination of Uranium 11 - 19 Titrimetric Determination of Uranium 20 Preparation of High-Purity U3O 8 21 Isotopic Analysis 22 Isotopic Analysis by Double-Standard Mass-Spectrometer Method 23 - 29 Determination of Hydrocarbons, Chlorocarbons, and Partially Substitut...

  18. Radiochemical determination of alpha- and beta-ray emitting radionuclides; Radiochemische Bestimmung von Alpha- und Betastrahlen emittierenden Radionukliden

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wershofen, Herbert [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Umweltradioaktivitaet

    2014-03-15

    The following topics are dealt with: The radiochemical separation procedure of the trace-measurement facility, sample pretreatment, preseparation and enrichment of the radionuclides, separation and purification of strontium, separation of uranium and plutonium, purification of uranium and plutonium, limits of these methods. (HSI)

  19. Assessment of radiochemical purity of [{sup 18}F]fludeoxyglucose by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Aline E.; Silva, Juliana B.; Silveira, Marina B.; Ferreira, Soraya Z., E-mail: radiofarmacoscdtn@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Pesquisa e Producao de Radiofarmacos

    2011-07-01

    The quality control of [{sup 18}F]fludeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG) has received attention due to its increasing clinical use. Although the quality requirements of {sup 18}FDG are established in various pharmacopoeia, the suitability of all testing methods used should be verified under actual conditions of use and documented. The aim of this study was to develop a high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for radiochemical purity evaluation of {sup 18}FDG, based on pharmacopoeia references, and to verify its suitability for routine quality control in our centre. HPLC analysis was performed with an Agilent HPLC. {sup 18}FDG and impurities were separated on an anion-exchange column by isocratic elution with 0.1 M NaOH as the mobile phase. Detection was accomplished with refractive index and NaI (Tl) scintillation detectors. The flow rate of the mobile phase was set at 0.8 mL/min and the column temperature was kept at 35 deg C. Specificity, linearity, precision and robustness were assessed to verify if the method was adequate for its intended purpose. Retention time of {sup 18}FDG was not affected by the presence of other components of the formulation and a good peak resolution was achieved. The analytical curve of {sup 18}FDG was linear, with a correlation coefficient value of 0.9995. Intraday repeatable precision, reported as the relative standard deviation, was 0.11%. Analytical procedure remained unaffected by small variations in mobile phase flow rate. Results evidenced that HPLC is suitable for radiochemical purity evaluation of {sup 18}FDG, considering operational conditions of our laboratory. (author)

  20. Radiochemical tecniques applied to laboratory studies of water leaching of heavy metals from coal fly ash

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of the potential environmental impact of heavy metals (HM) mobilized by coal-fired plants showed that water leaching of HM from pulverized fuel ash may for certain HM constitute an important pathway to the aquatic environment. This process was therefore investigated in more detail by laboratory experiments. Batch experiments were performed in order to simulate ash pond conditions, whereas column experiments were carried out to represent water leaching from fly ash deposits. Using highly sensitive radiochemical techniques such as radioactive tracers and neutron activation of fly ash the fate of a single HM could be easily followed even in very low concentration experiments. Employing radioisotopic tracers the distribution coefficients of simple ionic forms of As, Sb, Bi, Se, Te, Cr, Mo, W, Ni, Cd in a coal fly ash/water system could be determined as a function of pH. Results obtained on the absorption and desorption behaviour of HM on coal fly ash can be explained in part on the basis of the surface predominance and the aqueous chemistry of single ionic, mainly anionic, forms of the relative elements. But ion exchange and coprecipitation phenomena also seem to be important processes. The nature and concentration of ions contained originally in the water used (distilled water, fly ash leachate and seawater) were found to have a strong influence on the sorptive behaviour of HM on coal ashes. The high degree of applicability of radiochemical and nuclear techniques to coal ash water leaching problems has been demonstrated and further points for subsequent research in this field possibly using nuclear techniques are indicated. (author)

  1. Rock stability considerations for siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. Based on experiences from Aespoe HRL, AECL's URL, tunnelling and mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, C.D. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada); Christiansson, Rolf [Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden); Soederhaell, J. [VBB VIAK AB, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2001-12-01

    Over the past 25 years the international nuclear community has carried out extensive research into the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in hard rocks. In two cases this research has resulted in the construction of dedicated underground research facilities: SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden and AECL's Underground Research Laboratory, Canada. Both laboratories are located in hard rocks considered representative of the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields, respectively. This report is intended to synthesize the important rock mechanics findings from these research programs. In particular the application of these finding to assessing the stability of underground openings. As such the report draws heavily on the published results from the SKB's ZEDEX Experiment in Sweden and AECL's Mine- by Experiment in Canada. The objectives of this report are to: 1. Describe, using the current state of knowledge, the role rock engineering can play in siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. 2. Define the key rock mechanics parameters that should be determined in order to facilitate repository siting and construction. 3. Discuss possible construction issues, linked to rock stability, that may arise during the excavation of the underground openings of a KBS-3 repository. 4. Form a reference document for the rock stability analysis that has to be carried out as a part of the design works parallel to the site investigations. While there is no unique or single rock mechanics property or condition that would render the performance of a nuclear waste repository unacceptable, certain conditions can be treated as negative factors. Outlined below are major rock mechanics issues that should be addressed during the siting, construction and closure of a nuclear waste repository in Sweden in hard crystalline rock. During the site investigations phase, rock mechanics information will be predominately gathered from examination and testing of the rock core and

  2. Rock stability considerations for siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. Based on experiences from Aespoe HRL, AECL's URL, tunnelling and mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past 25 years the international nuclear community has carried out extensive research into the deep geological disposal of nuclear waste in hard rocks. In two cases this research has resulted in the construction of dedicated underground research facilities: SKB's Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden and AECL's Underground Research Laboratory, Canada. Both laboratories are located in hard rocks considered representative of the Fennoscandian and Canadian Shields, respectively. This report is intended to synthesize the important rock mechanics findings from these research programs. In particular the application of these finding to assessing the stability of underground openings. As such the report draws heavily on the published results from the SKB's ZEDEX Experiment in Sweden and AECL's Mine- by Experiment in Canada. The objectives of this report are to: 1. Describe, using the current state of knowledge, the role rock engineering can play in siting and constructing a KBS-3 repository. 2. Define the key rock mechanics parameters that should be determined in order to facilitate repository siting and construction. 3. Discuss possible construction issues, linked to rock stability, that may arise during the excavation of the underground openings of a KBS-3 repository. 4. Form a reference document for the rock stability analysis that has to be carried out as a part of the design works parallel to the site investigations. While there is no unique or single rock mechanics property or condition that would render the performance of a nuclear waste repository unacceptable, certain conditions can be treated as negative factors. Outlined below are major rock mechanics issues that should be addressed during the siting, construction and closure of a nuclear waste repository in Sweden in hard crystalline rock. During the site investigations phase, rock mechanics information will be predominately gathered from examination and testing of the rock core and mapping of the

  3. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and economic assessment. The investigation was conducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperature. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasibility issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density

  4. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  5. Research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article proposes an overview of research reactors, i.e. nuclear reactors of less than 100 MW. Generally, these reactors are used as neutron generators for basic research in matter sciences and for technological research as a support to power reactors. The author proposes an overview of the general design of research reactors in terms of core size, of number of fissions, of neutron flow, of neutron space distribution. He outlines that this design is a compromise between a compact enough core, a sufficient experiment volume, and high enough power densities without affecting neutron performance or its experimental use. The author evokes the safety framework (same regulations as for power reactors, more constraining measures after Fukushima, international bodies). He presents the main characteristics and operation of the two families which represent almost all research reactors; firstly, heavy water reactors (photos, drawings and figures illustrate different examples); and secondly light water moderated and cooled reactors with a distinction between open core pool reactors like Melusine and Triton, pool reactors with containment, experimental fast breeder reactors (Rapsodie, the Russian BOR 60, the Chinese CEFR). The author describes the main uses of research reactors: basic research, applied and technological research, safety tests, production of radio-isotopes for medicine and industry, analysis of elements present under the form of traces at very low concentrations, non destructive testing, doping of silicon mono-crystalline ingots. The author then discusses the relationship between research reactors and non proliferation, and finally evokes perspectives (decrease of the number of research reactors in the world, the Jules Horowitz project)

  6. Reactor physics and reactor computations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical methods and computer calculations for nuclear and thermonuclear reactor kinetics, reactor physics, neutron transport theory, core lattice parameters, waste treatment by transmutation, breeding, nuclear and thermonuclear fuels are the main interests of the conference

  7. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT NUCLEAR RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR SNM ATTRIBUTION AND NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sternat, M.; Beals, D.; Webb, R.; Nichols, T.

    2010-06-09

    Nuclear research reactors are the least safeguarded type of reactor; in some cases this may be attributed to low risk and in most cases it is due to difficulty from dynamic operation. Research reactors vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power and burnup providing a significant challenge to any standardized safeguard system. If a whole fuel assembly was interdicted, based on geometry and other traditional forensics work, one could identify the material's origin fairly accurately. If the material has been dispersed or reprocessed, in-depth reactor physics models may be used to help with the identification. Should there be a need to attribute research reactor fuel material, the Savannah River National Laboratory would perform radiochemical analysis of samples of the material as well as other non-destructive measurements. In depth reactor physics modeling would then be performed to compare to these measured results in an attempt to associate the measured results with various reactor parameters. Several reactor physics codes are being used and considered for this purpose, including: MONTEBURNS/ORIGEN/MCNP5, CINDER/MCNPX and WIMS. In attempt to identify reactor characteristics, such as time since shutdown, burnup, or power, various isotopes are used. Complexities arise when the inherent assumptions embedded in different reactor physics codes handle the isotopes differently and may quantify them to different levels of accuracy. A technical approach to modeling spent research reactor fuel begins at the assembly level upon acquiring detailed information of the reactor to be modeled. A single assembly is run using periodic boundary conditions to simulate an infinite lattice which may be repeatedly burned to produce input fuel isotopic vectors of various burnups for a core level model. A core level model will then be constructed using the assembly level results as inputs for the specific fuel shuffling pattern in an attempt to establish an equilibrium cycle

  8. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 16% of the world's electricity. By the end of 1997, over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience had been accumulated. Global environmental change, and the continuing increase in global energy supply required to provide increasing populations with an improving standard of living, make the contribution from nuclear energy even more important for the next century. For nuclear power to achieve its full potential and make its needed contribution, it must be safe, economical, reliable and sustainable. All of these factors can be enhanced by judicious choice and development of advanced fuel cycle options. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Fuel Cycle Options for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on behalf of the Canadian Government and was jointly conducted within the frame of activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (IWG-LWR) and the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (IWG-HWR). The TCM provided the opportunity to have in-depth discussions on important technical topics which were highlighted in the International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies: Adjusting to New Realities, held in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. The main results and conclusions of the TCM were presented as input for discussion at the first meeting of the IAEA newly formed International Working Group on Fuel Cycle Options

  9. Application of radiochemical methods for development of new biological preparation designed for soil bioremediation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Internationally the bioremediation of agricultural lands contaminated by persistent chloroorganic compounds by means of the microbial methods are used as the most low-cost and the most effective. One of the factors reducing efficacy of microbial degradation, is often the low quantity of microorganisms - destructors in the soil. Therefore, we have designed bioremediation technology of soils, contaminated by organochlorine compounds, with use of the alive microorganisms as active agent. We developed the biological preparation containing 5 aboriginal active strains of bacteria - destructors of persistent chloroorganic compounds and investigated the ability of biological preparation to increase the bioremediation potential of contaminated soils. To carry out the investigation we developed the complex of radiochemical methods with use of tritium labeled PCBs, including the following methods: 1.The method to define the accumulation and degradation of PCBs in soil bacteria in culture allows determination of quantitative characteristics of bacterial strains. 2. The method to define the PCBs degradation by soil bacteria strains in model conditions in the soil allows to estimate the PCB-destructive activity of strains after introducing in soil. 3. A method to define the PCB-destructive activity of own microbiota of contaminated soil. 4. A method to define the effect of stimulation of the PCB-destructive activity of biological preparation and own microbiota of soil with the help of biofertilizers. By using the developed radiochemical methods we have carried out investigation on creation of new biological preparation on the basis of strains of soil bacteria - destructors of PCBs. We also determined the quality and quantity characteristics of HCCH and PCBs-destructive activity of new biological preparation. It is shown that the new biological preparation is capable of accumulation and destruction of the PCBs in culture and in soil at model conditions. Thus, the

  10. Characterization of decommissioned reactor internals: Direct-assay method assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the direct-assay technique for measuring activation levels of irradiated reactor component hardware. It also compares the direct-assay technique with calculational analysis methods that predict activation levels. Direct assay is performed in four steps: (a) planning and component selection, (b) onsite measurements, (c) radiochemical analysis, and (d) data analysis and classification. Uncertainties are estimated for each step of this process, and an overall uncertainty in the classification accuracy is calculated as about ±35%. Numerous research ideas are identified to help reduce the uncertainty level; many of these ideas would improve activation determinations performed by either direct assay or by calculational analysis methods

  11. Characterization of decommissioned reactor internals: Direct-assay method assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cline, J.E.

    1993-03-01

    This study describes the direct-assay technique for measuring activation levels of irradiated reactor component hardware. It also compares the direct-assay technique with calculational analysis methods that predict activation levels. Direct assay is performed in four steps: (a) planning and component selection, (b) onsite measurements, (c) radiochemical analysis, and (d) data analysis and classification. Uncertainties are estimated for each step of this process, and an overall uncertainty in the classification accuracy is calculated as about {plus_minus}35%. Numerous research ideas are identified to help reduce the uncertainty level; many of these ideas would improve activation determinations performed by either direct assay or by calculational analysis methods.

  12. Radiochemical studies on the separation of iodine-131 and radioiodination of some organic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is constituted of three chapters:Chapter I: It deals with the theoretical consideration of the subject. The chapter deals with the importance of radioisotopes in medical applications, and the physical and biological properties of these isotopes. Also, this part deals with the chemical and physical properties of both tellurium and iodine and the methods of the production of radioiodine from tellurium targets especially dry distillation method and ion exchange method. It deals with general methods of labeling, chemistry of iodine especially the most frequently used in nuclear medicine, their methods of production and applications. It includes also the techniques used for the preparation of the radioiodinated compounds, especially the electrophilic technique or the oxidative radioiodination technique. In this technique, oxidizing agents are used to oxidize iodide ions to iodonium ions capable of electrophilic attack on the aryl group of the organic compound. This chapter deals also with the receptor tracers, their types and the effects that can occur due to the binding of these receptors to the cell membrane. Since these radiopharmaceuticals are used for diagnosis and therapeutic treatment of human diseases, quality control tests such as chemical purity, radionuclidic purity, radiochemical purity, sterility, apyrogenicity and biodistribution are performed to ensure the purity, the safety and efficiency of these products for the intended nuclear medicine application.Chapter II:It contains detailed information concerning the chemicals, reagents, the radionuclides, the equipment and the counting systems used in the study. It describes production technique of iodine-131 using dry distillation method. It describes also the electrophilic radioiodination for each of Y-indole and epidepride. Analysis of the labeled products was performed using two chromatographic techniques. The first technique is thin layer chromatography in which the compound was identified by

  13. Advanced CANDU reactor development: a customer-driven program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) product development program is well under way. The development approach for the ACR is to ensure that all activities supporting readiness for the first ACR project are carded out in parallel, as parts of an integrated whole. In this way design engineering, licensing, development and testing, supply chain planning, construct ability and module strategy, and planning for commissioning and operations, all work in synergy with one another. Careful schedule management :ensures that program focus stays on critical path priorities.'This paper provides an overview of the program, with an emphasis on integration to ensure maximum project readiness, This program management approach is important now that AECL is participating as the reactor vendor in Dominion Energy's DOE-sponsored Combined Construction/Operating License (COL) program. Dominion Energy selected the ACR-700 as their reference reactor technology for purposes of demonstrating the COL process. AECL's development of the ACR is unique in that pre-licensing activities are being carded out parallel in the USA and Canada, via independent, but well-communicated programs. In the short term, these programs are major drivers of ACR development. The ACR design approach has been to optimize to achieve major design objectives: capital cost reduction, robust design with ample margins, proveness by using evolutionary change from existing :reference plants, design for ease :of operability. The ACR development program maintains these design objectives for each of the program elements: Design: .Carefully selected design innovations based on the SEU fuel/light water coolant:/heavy water moderator approach. Emphasis on lessons-learned review from operating experience and customer feedback Licensing: .Safety case based on strengths of existing CANDU plus benefits of optimised design Development and Test: Choice of materials, conditions to enable incremental testing building on existing CANDU and LWR

  14. Reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The whole reactor building is accommodated in a shaft and is sealed level with the earth's surface by a building ceiling, which provides protection against penetration due to external effects. The building ceiling is supported on walls of the reactor building, which line the shaft and transfer the vertical components of forces to the foundations. The thickness of the walls is designed to withstand horizontal pressure waves in the floor. The building ceiling has an opening above the reactor, which must be closed by cover plates. Operating equipment for the reactor can be situated above the building ceiling. (orig./HP)

  15. REACTOR PHYSICS MODELING OF SPENT RESEARCH REACTOR FUEL FOR TECHNICAL NUCLEAR FORENSICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, T.; Beals, D.; Sternat, M.

    2011-07-18

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to {approx}93% {sup 235}U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical

  16. Reactor Physics Modeling Of Spent Research Reactor Fuel For Technical Nuclear Forensics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical nuclear forensics (TNF) refers to the collection, analysis and evaluation of pre- and post-detonation radiological or nuclear materials, devices, and/or debris. TNF is an integral component, complementing traditional forensics and investigative work, to help enable the attribution of discovered radiological or nuclear material. Research is needed to improve the capabilities of TNF. One research area of interest is determining the isotopic signatures of research reactors. Research reactors are a potential source of both radiological and nuclear material. Research reactors are often the least safeguarded type of reactor; they vary greatly in size, fuel type, enrichment, power, and burn-up. Many research reactors are fueled with highly-enriched uranium (HEU), up to ∼93% 235U, which could potentially be used as weapons material. All of them have significant amounts of radiological material with which a radioactive dispersal device (RDD) could be built. Therefore, the ability to attribute if material originated from or was produced in a specific research reactor is an important tool in providing for the security of the United States. Currently there are approximately 237 operating research reactors worldwide, another 12 are in temporary shutdown and 224 research reactors are reported as shut down. Little is currently known about the isotopic signatures of spent research reactor fuel. An effort is underway at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to analyze spent research reactor fuel to determine these signatures. Computer models, using reactor physics codes, are being compared to the measured analytes in the spent fuel. This allows for improving the reactor physics codes in modeling research reactors for the purpose of nuclear forensics. Currently the Oak Ridge Research reactor (ORR) is being modeled and fuel samples are being analyzed for comparison. Samples of an ORR spent fuel assembly were taken by SRNL for analytical and radiochemical analysis. The

  17. Canada, Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Chalk River Labs: Reuse and Licence Termination of a Number of Facilities at the Chalk River Labs to Allow for Refurbishment of the Site. Annex A. I-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalk River Labs is located along the Ottawa River in Ontario, Canada, approximately 200 km north-west of Ottawa. The site began construction in 1944 following the expropriation of approximately 1 500 ha of land. A number of research reactors were constructed at the site along with numerous nuclear labs, hot cells and administrative facilities in support of the research and development work planned for the site. The principal occupants of the Chalk River site are AECL employees with a strong presence from National Resources Canada (NRC) and other small research groups. The site is undergoing substantial changes with an emphasis on minimizing the impact of increasing the builtup area footprint in conjunction with site upgrades and new build projects. To accomplish this task, a number of refurbishment and decommissioning projects were planned. Decommissioning projects were initiated to make room for new development through a number of initiatives. The decommissioning mandate includes the removal of a select group of original deteriorating facilities to make room for new construction and to decommission other facilities to facilitate redevelopment and reuse of the available space. In Canada, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) issues nuclear licences. The licensees must demonstrate that it is safe to continue operations of the nuclear site and request a renewal of their licence. CNSC will issue a new operating licence for a specific period of time at which the licensee must demonstrate that it is safe to proceed with a licence renewal. A request to terminate a licensable activity must be submitted to the CNSC. Upon approval to proceed, it must be demonstrated that the licensable activities have ceased and the facility has been appropriately decommissioned. Licence termination requires a demonstration that the land or previous activities presents a low risk and that the process can be used to support redevelopment because it results in a scrutinized

  18. Very accurate (definitive) methods by radiochemical NAA and their significance for quality assurance in trace analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The idea of very accurate (definitive) methods by RNAA for the determination of individual trace elements in selected matrices is presented. The approach is based on combination of neutron activation with selective and truly quantitative post-irradiation isolation of an indicator radionuclide by column chromatography followed by high resolution γ-ray spectrometric measurement. The method should be, in principle, a single element method to optimize all conditions with respect to determination of this particular element. Radiochemical separation scheme should assure separation of the analyte from practically all accompanying radionuclides to provide interference-free γ-ray spectrometric measurement and achieving best detection limits. The method should have some intrinsic mechanisms incorporated into the procedure preventing any possibility of making gross errors. Several criteria were formulated which must be simultaneously fulfilled in order to acknowledge the analytical result as obtained by definitive method. Such methods are not intended for routine measurements but rather for verifying the accuracy of other methods of analysis and certification of the candidate reference materials. The usefulness of such methods is illustrated on the example of Cd and references are given to similar methods elaborated for the determination of several other elements (Co, Cu, Mo, Ni and U) in biological materials. (author)

  19. Observations on the radiochemical control of radiopharmaceuticals at tajoura nuclear research center (TNRC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production of radioisotopes for the radiopharmaceutical purposes is the main task of Tajoura nuclear center. During the analysis of the 131I- radioactive solution which was produced using the so-called dry method, the following has been observed : in order to reduce the cost and the time of analytical cycle or time used for the radiochemical purity (RCP), a spot test has been used to indicate the position of the radioactivity in the chromatogram rather than using autoradiographing or the x-ray films. This method was based on the reaction between I2 and starch to give a blue color at different Rf values I2 is liberated by I- oxidation (H2O2) or by IO-3 reaction with SCN- in the presence of HCl. A simple and fast test for the estimation of the content in the radioactive sample has been elaborated.This method was based on the reduction of Te (IV) or (VI) to Te metal using SnCI2 in a alkaline media. The detection limit of the elaborated method was found to be 131 I- buffer solution, and 16.0 m S for Na CI saline solution were obtained

  20. Accuracy and uncertainty in radiochemical measurements. Learning from errors in nuclear analytical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A characteristic that sets radioactivity measurements apart from most spectrometries is that the precision of a single determination can be estimated from Poisson statistics. This easily calculated counting uncertainty permits the detection of other sources of uncertainty by comparing observed with a priori precision. A good way to test the many underlysing assumptions in radiochemical measurements is to strive for high accuracy. For example, a measurement by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) of gold film thickness in our laboratory revealed the need for pulse pileup correction even at modest dead times. Recently, the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) and other international bodies have formalized the quantitative determination and statement of uncertainty so that the weaknesses of each measurement are exposed for improvement. In the INAA certification measurement of ion-implanted arsenic in silicon (Standard Reference Material 2134), we recently achieved an expanded (95 % confidence) relative uncertainly of 0.38 % for 90 ng of arsenic per sample. A complete quantitative error analysis was performed. This measurement meets the CCQM definition of a primary ratio method. (author)

  1. 324 Radiochemical engineering cells and high level vault tanks mixed waste compliance status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 324 Building in the Hanford 300 Area contains Radiochemical Engineering Cells and High Level Vault tanks (the open-quotes REC/HLVclose quotes) for research and development activities involving radioactive materials. Radioactive mixed waste within this research installation, found primarily in B-Cell and three of the high level vault tanks, is subject to RCRA/DWR (open-quotes RCRAclose quotes) regulations for storage. This white paper provides a baseline RCRA compliance summary of MW management in the REC/HLV, based on best available knowledge. The REC/HLV compliance project, of which this paper is a part, is intended to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable given the special technical difficulties of managing high activity radioactive materials, and to assure protection of human health and safety and the environment. The REC/HLV was constructed in 1965 to strict standards for the safe management of highly radioactive materials. Mixed waste in the REC/HLV consists of discarded tools and equipment, dried feed stock from nuclear waste melting experiments, contaminated particulate matter, and liquid feed stock from various experimental programs in the vault tanks. B-Cell contains most of these materials. Total radiological inventory in B-Cell is estimated at 3 MCi, about half of which is potentially open-quotes dispersibleclose quotes, that is, it is in small pieces or mobile particles. Most of the mixed waste currently in the REC/HLV was generated or introduced before mixed wastes were subjected to RCRA in 1987

  2. Radiochemical characterization of produced water from two production offshore oilfields in Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kpeglo, D O; Mantero, J; Darko, E O; Emi-Reynolds, G; Faanu, A; Manjón, G; Vioque, I; Akaho, E H K; Garcia-Tenorio, R

    2016-02-01

    Produced water from two Ghanaian offshore production oilfields has been characterized using alpha spectrometry after radiochemical separation, non-destructive gamma spectrometry and ICP-MS and other complimentary analytical tools. The measured concentrations of main NORM components were in the range of 6.2-22.3 Bq.L(-1), 6.4-35.5 Bq.L(-1), and 0.7-7.0 Bq.L(-1) for (226)Ra, (228)Ra and (224)Ra respectively. A good correlation between several physico-chemical parameters and radium isotopes was observed in each production oilfield. The radium concentrations obtained in this study for produced water from the two oilfields of Ghana are of radiological importance and hence there may be the need to put in place measures for future contamination concerns due to their bioavailability in the media and bioaccumulation characteristics. The results will assist in critical decision making for future set up of appropriate national guidelines for the management of NORM waste from the emerging oil and gas industry in Ghana. PMID:26630039

  3. Determination of total mercury and methylmercury in human head hair by radiochemical methods of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human hair samples have received lately much attention for studying trace elements in vivo. They can be used for monitoring environmental exposure to pollutants as well as for evaluating poisoning by heavy metals. Also the trace element composition of hair can be used for assessing nutritional status and can be related to human health or disease. Instrumental neutron activation analysis, due to its multi-elemental capabilities, has been applied by several authors to the trace analysis of many elements in hair. In the specific case of mercury and other elements like arsenic, selenium and antimony, also radiochemical separations have been developed. In Brazil hair samples were collected from two main groups up to now: Control group, of 30 people without any suspicion of contamination by mercury, e.g., university students and friends; Group of people living near the Billings Dam, in a small village called ''Santa Cruz'', of which 28 samples were collected up to now. The samples were collected according to the procedure recommended by the IAEA and analyzed by means of NAA. 12 refs

  4. Automation of column-based radiochemical separations. A comparison of fluidic, robotic, and hybrid architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two automated systems have been developed to perform column-based radiochemical separation procedures. These new systems are compared with past fluidic column separation architectures, with emphasis on using disposable components so that no sample contacts any surface that any other sample has contacted, and setting up samples and columns in parallel for subsequent automated processing. In the first new approach, a general purpose liquid handling robot has been modified and programmed to perform anion exchange separations using 2 mL bed columns in 6 mL plastic disposable column bodies. In the second new approach, a fluidic system has been developed to deliver clean reagents through disposable manual valves to six disposable columns, with a mechanized fraction collector that positions one of four rows of six vials below the columns. The samples are delivered to each column via a manual 3-port disposable valve from disposable syringes. This second approach, a hybrid of fluidic and mechanized components, is a simpler more efficient approach for performing anion exchange procedures for the recovery and purification of plutonium from samples. The automation architectures described can also be adapted to column-based extraction chromatography separations. (orig.)

  5. Overview of the application of nanosecond electron beams for radiochemical sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Problems concerning the use of nanosecond electron beams for sterilization of hermetically packed objects, and powdered or granulated materials, are discussed. The advantages and disadvantages of this type of radiation sterilization are demonstrated. The results are of interest to researchers who study the mechanism by which nanosecond electron beams act on microorganisms. It is worth considering repetitively pulsed electron accelerators as highly promising systems for use in commercial sterilization applications. Technologies and setups for the radiochemical sterilization (RCS) of medical glassware for blood products, beer bottles, bone meal used in food industry, medical instruments (surgical needles, systems for human kidneys), and of the external packaging for some biological materials used in ophthalmology are discussed. Such applications have been developed based on the use of the URT-0.2 and URT-0.5 repetitively nanosecond-pulsed electron accelerators. The observed sterilization of areas shaded from line-of-site irradiation and of the bottoms of, for example, glassware cannot be attributed to radiation sterilization alone, since the glass thickness was much larger than the range of electrons. Therefore, it can be conjectured that the demonstrated sterilization effect is due both to the electron beam and to the ozone and chemical radicals produced by the beam. Thus, one may introduce the notion of RCS

  6. Modification on labeling technique and chromatography mobile phase in the preparation and radiochemical analysis of 135Sm-EDTMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification on labeling technique and chromatography mobile phase in the preparation and radiochemical analysis of 153Sm-EDTMP. Preparation of 135Sm-EDTMP. Preparation of 153Sm-EDTMP for the therapy of metastatic bone cencer is carried out in CDRR-BATAN based on the reaction of 153SmCl3 solution with EDTMP in phosphate buffer. Some disadvantages appear from the routine procedure, e.g. relatively lengthy radiochemical analysis, relatively low and fluctuative radioactivity yields, and potentially high radiation exposure and contamination risk to the operator and the working area. The present work is aimed at solving those problems. Radiochemical analysis using Whatman I-paper chromatography was performed in a variety of mobile phases consisting of one, two and three components, while the labeling technique was modified by changing the solvent for the EDTMP and by changing the reactant mixing procedure. It was proven that the of NH4OH 25% - H2O mixture (1 : 9, v/v) as the chromatographic solvent gave faster migration rate better chromatographic behaviour as compared to other mobile phases used in this experiment, including that is used in the routine procedure. The migration distance of 14 cm and 10 cm gave no significant difference on the radiochemical analysis results. The labeling technique by gradual addition of EDTMP in NaOH (pH 9 - 10) into 135SmCl3 solution gave higher radioactivity yield and technically produced lower radiation exponsure and radioactive contamination risk as compared to the routine procedure. The proposed procedure is also better than the EDTMP labeling technique in acetic salt solution. The labeling efficiency achieved was highr than 98%, and therefore do not require any purification step. In general, the results of the present experiment gave good prospect to increase the efficiency and safety in the routine preparation process of 135Sm-EDTMP

  7. Labeling of thymidine analog with an organometallic complex of technetium-99m for diagnostic of cancer: radiochemical and biological evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thymidine analogs have been labeled with different radioisotopes due to their potential in monitoring the uncontrollable cell proliferation. Considering that the radioisotopes technetium-99m still keep a privileged position as a marker due to its chemical and nuclear properties, this dissertation was constituted by the developed of a new technique of labeling of thymidine analog with 99mTc, by means of the organometallic complex. The aims of this research were: synthesis of the organometallic complex technetium-99m-carbonyl, thymidine labeling with this precursor, evaluation of stability, and radiochemical e biological evaluation with healthy and tumor-bearing animals. The preparation of the organometallic precursor, using the CO gas, was easily achieved, as well as the labeling of thymidine with this precursor, resulting itself a radiochemical pureness of ≥ 97% and ≥ 94%, respectively. Chromatography systems with good levels of trustworthiness were used, ensuring the qualification and quantification of the radiochemical samples. The result of in vitro testing of lipophilicity disclosed that the radiolabeled complex is hydrophilic, with a partition coefficient (log P) of -1.48. The precursor complex and the radiolabeled have good radiochemical stability up to 6 h in room temperature. The cysteine and histidine challenge indicated losses between 8 and 1 1 % for concentrations until 300 mM. The biodistribution assay in healthy mice revealed rapid blood clearance and low uptake by general organs with renal and hepatobiliary excretion. The tumor concentration was low with values of 0.28 and 0.18 %ID/g for lung and breast cancer, respectively. The results imply more studies in other tumor models or the modification of the structure of the organic molecule that act like ligand. (author)

  8. Elementary computation of radiation doses and shieldings for radiochemical laboratories; Calculo Elemental de dosis y blindajes para laboratorios radioquimicos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jimeno de Osso, F.

    1971-07-01

    Simple procedures for the calculation of radiation exposition, half thickness, shield thickness, etc. are described and equations and graphs are included for those gamma-emitting radionuclides, that are more often used in radiochemical laboratories. Application is made of these procedures to three radionuclides, bromine-82, sodium-24 and cobalt-60 which cover a rather wl.de energy range; theoretical results are compared with those obtained from experimental measurements. (Author) 23 refs.

  9. Advantages and limitations of chemical preservatives for use in the radiochemical analysis of 131I in environmental milk samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selected preservatives (Formaldehyde, sodium bisulfite, sodium thiosulfate, methimazole, thimerosal and thiouracil) were tested for potential interference in stable iodide measurements, effectiveness as inhibitors of protein binding, and for compatibility with a radiochemical technique utilizing anion exchange, extraction of the ion species into carbon tetrachloride and subsequent precipitation of the iodide as cuprous iodide. Methimazole was judged to provide the best overall analytical performance - minimal interference with stable iodide measurements coupled with excellent inhibition of iodide protein binding. (author)

  10. Production and use of 18F by TRIGA nuclear reactor: a first report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiation and radiochemical facilities at public research centre can contribute to the start up of the regional PET centre. In particular, the TRIGA reactor of Casaccia Research Centre could produce a sufficient amount of 18F to start up a PET centre and successively integrated the cyclotron production. This report establishes, in the light of the preliminary experimental works, a guideline to the reactor's production and extraction of 18F in a convenient form for the synthesis of the most representative PET radiopharmaceutical: 18F-FDG

  11. Production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor via secondary tritons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siri, S. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Centro Atomico Ezeiza, Gerencia de Capacitacion, Quimica Nuclear y Ciencias de la Salud, Ezeiza, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Cohen, I.M. [Univ. Tecnologica Nacional, Dept. de Ingenieria Quimica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-07-01

    The production of {sup 48}V in a nuclear reactor, induced on titanium by tritons generated from the {sup 6}Li(n, t){sup 4} He reaction, and eventually {sup 7}Li(n, n't){sup 4}He, is described. Samples of lithium titanate were irradiated for an irradiation cycle (120 h) in the RA-3 reactor, belonging to Ezeiza Atomic Centre. After a radiochemical separation, the characteristic radiations from {sup 48}V were identified in the gamma ray spectra of the vanadium fractions. (orig.)

  12. SMART- IST: a computer program to calculate aerosol and radionuclide behaviour in CANDU reactor containments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SMART-IST computer code models radionuclide behaviour in CANDU reactor containments during postulated accidents. It calculates nuclide concentrations in various parts of containment and releases of nuclides from containment to the atmosphere. The intended application of SMART-IST is safety and licensing analyses of public dose resulting from the releases of nuclides. SMART-IST has been developed and validated meeting the CSA N286.7 quality assurance standard, under the sponsorship of the Industry Standard Toolset (IST) partners consisting of AECL and Canadian nuclear utilities; OPG, Bruce Power, NB Power and Hydro-Quebec. This paper presents an overview of the SMART-IST code including its theoretical framework and models, and also presents typical examples of code predictions. (author)

  13. Temperature effect of DUPIC fuel in CANDU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel temperature coefficient (FTC) of DUPIC fuel was calculated by WIMS-AECL with ENDF/B-V cross-section library. Compared to natural uranium CANDU fuel, the FTC of DUPIC fuel is less negative when fresh and is positive after 10,000 MWD/T of irradiation. The effect of FTC on the DUPIC core performance was analyzed using the pace-time kinetics module in RFSP for the refueling transient which occurs daily during normal operation of CANDU reactors. In this study, the motion of zoen controller units (ZCU) was modeled externally to describe the reactivity control during the refueling transient. Refueling operation was modeled as a linear function of time by changing the fuel burnup incrementally and the average fuel temperature was calculated based on the bundle power during the transient. The analysis showed that the core-wide FTC is negative and local positive FTC of the DUPIC fuel can be accommodated in the CANDU reactor because the FTC is very small, the refueling operation occurs slowly, and the channel-front-peaked axial power profile weakens the contribution of the positive FTC. (author). 11 refs., 31 tabs., 10 figs

  14. Radiochemically-Supported Microbial Communities: A Potential Mechanism for Biocolloid Production of Importance to Actinide Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moser, Duane P [DRI; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott D [DRI; Fisher, Jenny C [DRI; Bruckner, James C [DRI; Kruger, Brittany [DRI; Sackett, Joshua [DRI; Russell, Charles E [DRI; Onstott, Tullis C [Princeton University; Czerwinski, Ken [University of Nevada-Las Vegas; Zavarin, Mavrik [lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Campbell, James H [Northwest Missouri State University

    2014-06-01

    Due to the legacy of Cold War nuclear weapons testing, the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS, formerly known as the Nevada Test Site (NTS)) contains millions of Curies of radioactive contamination. Presented here is a summary of the results of the first comprehensive study of subsurface microbial communities of radioactive and nonradioactive aquifers at this site. To achieve the objectives of this project, cooperative actions between the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the Nevada Field Office of the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), the Underground Test Area Activity (UGTA), and contractors such as Navarro-Interra (NI), were required. Ultimately, fluids from 17 boreholes and two water-filled tunnels were sampled (sometimes on multiple occasions and from multiple depths) from the NNSS, the adjacent Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR), and a reference hole in the Amargosa Valley near Death Valley. The sites sampled ranged from highly-radioactive nuclear device test cavities to uncontaminated perched and regional aquifers. Specific areas sampled included recharge, intermediate, and discharge zones of a 100,000-km2 internally-draining province, known as the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS), which encompasses the entirety of the NNSS/NTTR and surrounding areas. Specific geological features sampled included: West Pahute and Ranier Mesas (recharge zone), Yucca and Frenchman Flats (transitional zone), and the Western edge of the Amargosa Valley near Death Valley (discharge zone). The original overarching question underlying the proposal supporting this work was stated as: Can radiochemically-produced substrates support indigenous microbial communities and subsequently stimulate biocolloid formation that can affect radionuclides in NNSS subsurface nuclear test/detonation sites? Radioactive and non-radioactive groundwater samples were thus characterized for physical parameters, aqueous geochemistry, and microbial communities using both DNA- and

  15. Literature search, review, and compilation of data for chemical and radiochemical sensors: Task 1 report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the next several decades, the US Department of Energy is expected to spend tens of billions of dollars in the characterization, cleanup, and monitoring of DOE's current and former installations that have various degrees of soil and groundwater contamination made up of both hazardous and mixed wastes. Each of these phases will require site surveys to determine type and quantity of hazardous and mixed wastes. It is generally recognized that these required survey and monitoring efforts cannot be performed using traditional chemistry methods based on laboratory evaluation of samples from the field. For that reason, a tremendous push during the past decade or so has been made on research and development of sensors. This report contains the results of an extensive literature search on sensors that are used or have applicability in environmental and waste management. While restricting the search to a relatively small part of the total chemistry spectrum, a sizable body of reference material is included. Results are presented in tabular form for general references obtained from data base searches, as narrative reviews of relevant chapters from proceedings, as book reviews, and as reviews of journal articles with particular relevance to the review. Four broad sensor types are covered: electrochemical processes, piezoelectric devices, fiber optics, and radiochemical processes. The topics of surface chemistry processes and biosensors are not treated separately because they often are an adjunct to one of the four sensors listed. About 1,000 tabular entries are listed, including selected journal articles, reviews of conference/meeting proceedings, and books. Literature to about mid-1992 is covered

  16. Comparison of alkali fusion and acid digestion methods for radiochemical separation of Uranium from dietary samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several methods exist for separation and measurement of uranium in dietary samples such as neutron activation analysis (NAA), alpha spectrometric determination, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) and fluorimetry. For qualitative determination of activity, NAA and alpha spectrometry are said to be superior to evaluate the isotopes of uranium (238U, 234U and 235U). In case of alpha spectrometry, the samples have to undergo radiochemical analysis for separation from other elements for uranium detection. In our studies, uranium was determined in food matrices by acid digestion (AD) and alkali fusion (AF) methods. The recovery yield of uranium in food matrices was compared in order to get consistent yield. The average activity levels of 238U and 234U in food samples were calculated based on recovery yield of 232U in the samples. The average recovery of 232U in AD method was 22 ± 8% and in AF method, it was 14.9 ± 1.3%. The spread is more in AD method than the AF method from their mean. The lowest recovery of 232U was found in AF method. This is due to the interference of other elements in the sample during electroplating. Experimental results showed that the uranium separation by AD method has better recovery than the AF method. The consistency in recovery of 232U was better for AF method, which was lower than the AD method. However, overall for both the methods, the recovery can be termed as poor and need rigorous follow up studies for consistently higher recoveries (>50%) in these type of biological samples. There are reports indicating satisfactory recoveries of around 80% with 232U as tracer in the food matrices

  17. Comparison of chromatography systems for radiochemical purity determination of lyophilized reagents labeled with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, Elisiane G.; Almeida, Erika V.; Ramos, Marcelo P.S.; Alves, Edson V.; Benedetti, Stella; Mengatti, Jair; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N., E-mail: elisianegodoy@terra.com.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    A variety of lyophilized reagents (LR) labeled with {sup 99m}Tc has been developed for determining organ function or assessing disease status by imaging methods. Usually, the quality of the radiopharmaceutical preparations is evaluated by paper chromatography (PC), thin layer chromatography (TLC), instant thin layer chromatography silica gel (ITLC-SG), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) on reverse-phase columns and capillary electrophoresis (CE). PC and TLC have been applied due to the low cost and short time in the determination of pertechnetate ({sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}-) and technetium dioxide ({sup 99m}TcO{sub 2}). The present study reports the comparison between PC and TLC chromatographic methods for determination of the radiochemical purity of LR labeled with {sup 99m}Tc from IPEN-CNEN/SP (Brazil). PC was performed with Whatman 3MM/1MM paper chromatography strips and TLC with ITLC-SG sheets or reversed phase (RP). RP was used only for ECD. Although the radioactivity profile of the separation of the species on both stationary phases was satisfactory, the difference in results for % {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}- and {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2} was up to 4.2 % using PC for ECD and PYP. ITLC supports gave better resolution than conventional PC supports for these products. In ECD analysis, the comparison was performed between RP and ITLC-SG stationary phases for determination of {sup 99m}TcO{sub 4}-, {sup 99m}TcO{sub 2} and other impurities. It was observed that the sheet length as described in the United States Pharmacopoeia was not sufficient for a good separation of the product and the impurities. The results showed that there were not significant differences between PC and TLC chromatographic stationary phases are going to be accomplished. (author)

  18. Literature search, review, and compilation of data for chemical and radiochemical sensors: Task 1 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-01-01

    During the next several decades, the US Department of Energy is expected to spend tens of billions of dollars in the characterization, cleanup, and monitoring of DOE`s current and former installations that have various degrees of soil and groundwater contamination made up of both hazardous and mixed wastes. Each of these phases will require site surveys to determine type and quantity of hazardous and mixed wastes. It is generally recognized that these required survey and monitoring efforts cannot be performed using traditional chemistry methods based on laboratory evaluation of samples from the field. For that reason, a tremendous push during the past decade or so has been made on research and development of sensors. This report contains the results of an extensive literature search on sensors that are used or have applicability in environmental and waste management. While restricting the search to a relatively small part of the total chemistry spectrum, a sizable body of reference material is included. Results are presented in tabular form for general references obtained from data base searches, as narrative reviews of relevant chapters from proceedings, as book reviews, and as reviews of journal articles with particular relevance to the review. Four broad sensor types are covered: electrochemical processes, piezoelectric devices, fiber optics, and radiochemical processes. The topics of surface chemistry processes and biosensors are not treated separately because they often are an adjunct to one of the four sensors listed. About 1,000 tabular entries are listed, including selected journal articles, reviews of conference/meeting proceedings, and books. Literature to about mid-1992 is covered.

  19. Compact Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date

  20. Load following tests on CANDU-type fuel elements in TRIGA research reactor of INR Pitesti

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two load following (LF) tests on CANDU-type fuel elements were performed in the TRIGA Research Reactor of INR Pitesti, where the tests were designed to represent fuel in a CANDU reactor operating in a load following regime. In the first LF test the designated '78R' fuel element successfully experienced 367 power cycles, mostly between 23 and 56 kW/m average linear power. In the second LF test, developed under INR-AECL co-operation, the fuel element designated as 'ME01' withstood 200 power cycles from 27 to 54 kW/m average linear power, as well as additional ramps due to reactor trips and restarts during the test period. This experimental program is ongoing at INR Pitesti. Both LF tests were simulated with finite element computer codes in order to evaluate Stress Corrosion Fatigue (SCF) of the cladding arising from expansion and contraction of the pellets. New LF tests are planned to be performed in order to establish the limits and capabilities for CANDU fuel in LF conditions. This paper presents the results of the LF tests performed in the INR TRIGA Research Reactor compared with the analytical assessment for SCF conditions and their relation to CANDU fuel performance in LF conditions. (author)

  1. Development of analysis system and analysis on reactor physics for CANDU advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Bong Gi; Bae, Chang Joon; Kwon, Oh Sun [Korea Power Electric Corporation, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-07-01

    characteristics of reactor physics for CANFLEX-NU fuel core were calculated using final fuel design data. The results of analysis showed that there was no impact on reactor operations and safety. The above results of calculations and analysis were described in the physics design for CANFLEX-NU= fuel core. Various fuel models were evaluated for selecting high burnup fuel using recovered uranium. It is judged to be worse effects for reactor safety Hence, the use of graphite within fuel was proposed and its results showed to be better. The analysis system of reactor physics for design and analysis of high burnup fuel was evaluated. Lattice codes and core code were reviewed. From the results, the probability of WIMS-AECL and HELIOS is known to be high for analysis of high burnup fuel. For the core code, RFSP, it was evaluated that the simplified 2 group equation should be replaced by explicit 2 group equation. (Author) 32 refs., 25 tabs., 79 figs.

  2. Two-phase control absorber development program: out-reactor measurements with hoorizontal absorber elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two-phase control absorber works on the principle that the neutron flux in a nuclear reactor can be regulated by changing the density of a two-phase fluid flowing through U-tubes in the reactor core. The concept is considered to be a strong candidate for use in future CANDU nuclear reactors with either vertical or horizontal pressure tubes. In addition to the experiments carried out previously on vertically oriented U-tubes and reported separately, a series of tests with horizontal U-tubes was performed. The results confirmed that U-tube orientation has no measurable effect on the performance of the two-phase control absorber concept. In particular, the measured pressure drops, mixture densities, fluid velocities and void propagation velocities, at given operating conditions, were identical in the two orientations, within experimental error. The results of the experiments and analyses were incorporated in a steady-state design code that was used in the conceptual design of a Two-Phase Absorber Control System for a CANDU-PHW-1250 power reactor. The experimental data are available separately as AECL-6532 Supplement. (auth)

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, H.L.

    1960-09-20

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising fissionable material dispersed in graphite blocks, helium filling the voids of the blocks and the spaces therebetween, and means other than the helium in thermal conductive contact with the graphite for removing heat.

  4. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, H.I.; Smith, R.C.

    1958-01-21

    This patent relates to nuclear reactors of the type which use a liquid fuel, such as a solution of uranyl sulfate in ordinary water which acts as the moderator. The reactor is comprised of a spherical vessel having a diameter of about 12 inches substantially surrounded by a reflector of beryllium oxide. Conventionnl control rods and safety rods are operated in slots in the reflector outside the vessel to control the operation of the reactor. An additional means for increasing the safety factor of the reactor by raising the ratio of delayed neutrons to prompt neutrons, is provided and consists of a soluble sulfate salt of beryllium dissolved in the liquid fuel in the proper proportion to obtain the result desired.

  5. Chemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, C. N.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a course, including content, reading list, and presentation on chemical reactors at Cambridge University, England. A brief comparison of chemical engineering education between the United States and England is also given. (JN)

  6. NUCLEAR REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, C.R.

    1962-07-24

    A fluidized bed nuclear reactor and a method of operating such a reactor are described. In the design means are provided for flowing a liquid moderator upwardly through the center of a bed of pellets of a nentron-fissionable material at such a rate as to obtain particulate fluidization while constraining the lower pontion of the bed into a conical shape. A smooth circulation of particles rising in the center and falling at the outside of the bed is thereby established. (AEC)

  7. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce neutron embrittlement of the pressue vessel of an LWR, blanked off elements are fitted at the edge of the reactor core, with the same dimensions as the fuel elements. They are parallel to each other, and to the edge of the reactor taking the place of fuel rods, and are plates of neutron-absorbing material (stainless steel, boron steel, borated Al). (HP)

  8. Development of Off-take Model, Subcooled Boiling Model, and Radiation Heat Transfer Input Model into the MARS Code for a Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to a lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use a vendor's code for a regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of the existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to the MARS code including a quality assurance of the developed models

  9. Development of Off-take Model, Subcooled Boiling Model, and Radiation Heat Transfer Input Model into the MARS Code for a Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, C.; Rhee, B. W.; Chung, B. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, S. H.; Kim, M. W. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-15

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to a lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use a vendor's code for a regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of the existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of the RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to the MARS code including a quality assurance of the developed models.

  10. Evaluation of different detection systems to determine the radiochemical purity of the technetium eluate and the radiopharmaceutical sestamibi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Poliane Angelo de L.; Andrade, Wellington G., E-mail: polianeangelo@gmail.com, E-mail: wandrade@cnen.gov.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear; Santos, Luiz Antonio P.; Lima, Fabiana Farias de, E-mail: luanps@uol.com.br, E-mail: fflima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Since 2008 the Brazilian Health Surveillance Agency (ANVISA) has imposed some rules requiring that Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) perform a minimum of tests with the radiopharmaceuticals before they are administered to their patients according to the Resolution n. 38 (RDC 38). Among the tests, the radiochemical purity is very important because the effectiveness for the use in vivo, and the fact radiochemical impurities may increase the radiation dose beyond to cause some damage in the diagnostic images. Radiochemical Purity is determined by ascendant chromatography technique and when it is used by NMS, the strips are analyzed in dose calibrator. Furthermore, the low activity on the strips can produce errors due to the low detection of this equipment type. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to compare different methods for determining the radiochemical purity of {sup 99m}Tc eluate and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI radiopharmaceutical; gamma camera, and dose calibrator. The study was developed in three clinics in Recife-PE, and 15 analyses were performed to determine radiochemical purity of technetium eluate and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI. For evaluating technetium eluate it was used Whatman® 3MM paper in 1cmx8cm strips. On the other hand, for analyzing MIBI radiopharmaceutical it was used 3 Whatman® 3MM paper strips and 3 with silica gel in 1cmx6.5cm format. According to the manufactures, an 1cm point from the base of the strip was labeled. It was dropped 50μ1 of sodium pertechnetate and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI and, then, the strips were put in the glass tank, with solvent, according to the pharmacopoeia and inserts of the drug manufacturers. After the solvent front reached the end point, the strips were removed and allowed to dry. Firstly, the radioactivity count was made with a gamma camera. After that, the strips were cut in half (eluate) and in 2.5 cm from the base (MIBI) and measured with a dose calibrator. The results of the average radiochemical purity of the eluate in clinics A, B

  11. Radiolabeling of anti-CD20 with Re-188 for treatment of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma: radiochemical control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dias, Carla R.; Osso Junior, Joao A., E-mail: carladias@usp.b, E-mail: jaosso@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The development of tumor-selective radiopharmaceuticals is clinically desirable as a means of detecting or confirming the presence and location of primary and metastatic lesions and monitoring tumor response to (chemo)therapy. In addition, the application of targeted radiotherapeutics provides a unique and effective modality for direct tumor treatment. In this manner the radioimmunotherapy (RIT) uses the targeting features of monoclonal antibody to deliver radiation from an attached radionuclide. Antibody therapy directed against the CD20 antigen on the surface of B-cells is considered one of the first successful target-specific therapies in oncology. The radionuclide rhenium-188 ({sup 188}Re) is currently produced from the father nuclide tungsten-188 ({sup 188}W) through a transportable generator system. Because of its easy availability and suitable nuclear properties (EbetaMAX = 2.1 MeV, t{sub 1/2} = 16.9 h, Egamma = 155 keV), this radionuclide is considered an attractive candidate for application as therapeutic agent and could be conveniently utilized for imaging and dosimetric purposes. The purpose of this work is to show the radiochemical control of the optimized formulation (solution) and lyophilized formulation (kit) of labeled rituximab (anti-CD20) with {sup 188}Re. Rituximab was reduced by incubation with 2-mercaptoethanol at room temperature. The number of resulting free sulfhydryl groups was assayed with Ellman's reagent. Radiochemical purity of {sup 188}Re-rituximab was evaluated using instant thin layer chromatography-silica gel (ITLC-SG). Quality control methods for evaluation of radiochemical purity showed good labeling yield of the antibody. (author)

  12. Radiochemical Separation and Quantification of Tritium in Metallic Radwastes Generated from CANDU Type NPP - 13279

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, H.J.; Choi, K.C.; Choi, K.S.; Park, T.H.; Park, Y.J.; Song, K. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon, 305-330 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    As a destructive quantification method of {sup 3}H in low and intermediate level radwastes, bomb oxidation, sample oxidation, and wet oxidation methods have been introduced. These methods have some merits and demerits in the radiochemical separation of {sup 3}H radionuclides. That is, since the bomb oxidation and sample oxidation methods are techniques using heating at high temperature, the separation methods of the radionuclides are relatively simple. However, since {sup 3}H radionuclide has a property of being diffused deeply into the inside of metals, {sup 3}H which is distributed on the surface of the metals can only be extracted if the methods are applied. As an another separation method, the wet oxidation method makes {sup 3}H oxidized with an acidic solution, and extracted completely to an oxidized HTO compound. However, incomplete oxidized {sup 3}H compounds, which are produced by reactions of acidic solutions and metallic radwastes, can be released into the air. Thus, in this study, a wet oxidation method to extract and quantify the {sup 3}H radionuclide from metallic radwastes was established. In particular, a complete extraction method and complete oxidation method of incomplete chemical compounds of {sup 3}H using a Pt catalyst were studied. The radioactivity of {sup 3}H in metallic radwastes is extracted and measured using a wet oxidation method and liquid scintillation counter. Considering the surface dose rate of the sample, the appropriate size of the sample was determined and weighed, and a mixture of oxidants was added to a 200 ml round flask with 3 tubes. The flask was quickly connected to the distilling apparatus. 20 mL of 16 wt% H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} was given into the 200-ml round flask through a dropping funnel while under stirring and refluxing. After dropping, the temperature of the mixture was raised to 96 deg. C and the sample was leached and oxidized by refluxing for 3 hours. At that time, the incomplete oxidized {sup 3}H compounds were

  13. Radiochemical and biological evaluation of a new brain serotonin1A receptor imaging agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical and biological evaluations are made of a new bidentate radioligand as a potential brain serotonin1A (5-HT1A) receptor imaging agent. The bidentate part of the complex was a derivative of the well known serotonin1A receptor antagonist molecule, namely WAY 100635; the monodentate parts were thiocresol, thiosalicylic acid and thio-2-naphthol. The labelling procedure was performed through the 99mTc(V)-glucoheptonate precursor. The bidentate + monodentate complex formed during the reaction in the case of thiocresol was identified as 99TcO(o-CH3-C6H4-N(CH2-CH2)2N-CH2CH2S)( p-C6H4CH3)2 (99mTc-1). Its labelling efficiency and stability were determined by thin layer chromatography, the organic solvent extraction method and high performance liquid chromagraphy. The biodistribution of the labelled compound was found by using male Wistar rats. On the basis of these data, kinetic curves were constructed for different organs and the dosimetry for humans was calculated. The brain uptake and pharmacokinetics were followed by planar and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats. Average brain count density was calculated and different regional count densities (counts/gram tissue) were obtained for the hippocampus and other receptor-rich regions. A detailed SPECT study was carried out after administration of 99mTc-1 to a cynomolgus monkey (Macaca cynomolgus). The results found show that, of three investigated aromatic thiol compounds, the labelling efficiency was the highest in the case of thiocresol as the monodentate part. Therefore all further studies were carried out using thiocresol. The labelling efficiency of this bidentate complex was about 80%, and the molecule was stable for up to one hour. The biodistribution data show that more than 0.1% of the injected dose is present in the rat brains a few minutes after administration, and the metabolic pathway is through the hepatobiliary system. From the results obtained with the study of the

  14. A sequential radiochemical procedure to determine natural radionuclides in samples from a strongly polluted river by alpha-particle spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    River Tinto is located in the Huelva province, SW of Spain. This river has been strongly affected by anthropogenic activities in its vicinity such as mining, paper mills or phosphoric acid industries (in fact phosphogypsum deposits, so-called gyp-stacks, are located in the mouth of the Tinto River estuary). The combination of acid water from mines, different industrial effluents and fluvial and sea waters plays a determining role in the evolutionary process of the environmental characteristics of the Tinto River and its estuary. In this context several natural radionuclides as polonium, radium, thorium and uranium isotopes, could be used as markers and/or tracers of several environmental processes. Therefore, environmental matrixes (superficial sediments, waters and suspended matter) have been collected from 12 points along the Tinto River and its estuary. Activity concentrations of natural radionuclides (210Po, 226,228Ra, 230,232Th, 234,238U) have been determined in these samples. Due to sampling conditions, low water volumes and suspended matter masses were collected, so radioactive activities were expected to be close to the mBq order of magnitude. As a consequence, alpha-particle spectrometry was a suitable radiometric technique to perform our wide set of measurements. Then a radiochemical scheme for polonium, radium, thorium and uranium isolation, purification and deposition from these polluted environmental samples was needed. This work will show the sequential radiochemical procedure, originally developed by CSIRO laboratories, adapted to our laboratory conditions and applied for natural radionuclides determination in environmental samples collected from the Tinto River. Hence, and after pretreatment of the sample, polonium was extracted by DDTC and deposited onto silver planchets. Then, after a co-precipitation process, uranium was found in the supernatant whereas radium and thorium were found in the precipitate. Using TBP, uranium was separated and

  15. Chemical and radiochemical specifications - PWR power plants; Specifications chimiques et radiochimiques - Centrales REP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stutzmann, A. [Electricite de France (EDF), 93 - Saint-Denis (France)

    1997-07-01

    Published by EDF this document gives the chemical specifications of the PWR (Pressurized Water Reactor) nuclear power plants. Among the chemical parameters, some have to be respected for the safety. These parameters are listed in the STE (Technical Specifications of Exploitation). The values to respect, the analysis frequencies and the time states of possible drops are noticed in this document with the motion STE under the concerned parameter. (A.L.B.)

  16. Influence of the Generator in-Growth Time on the Final Radiochemical Purity and Stability of Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Uccelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At Legnaro laboratories of the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics (INFN, a feasibility study has started since 2011 related to accelerated-based direct production of by the 100Mo(p,2n reaction. Both theoretical investigations and some recent preliminary irradiation tests on 100Mo-enriched samples have pointed out that both the / ratio and the specific activity will be basically different in the final accelerator-produced Tc with respect to generator-produced one, which might affect the radiopharmaceutical procedures. The aim of this work was to evaluate the possible impact of different / isomeric ratios on the preparation of different Tc-labeled pharmaceutical kits. A set of measurements with , eluted from a standard 99Mo/ generator, was performed, and results on both radiochemical purity and stability studies (following the standard quality control procedures are reported for a set of widely used pharmaceuticals (i.e., -Sestamibi, -ECD, -MAG3, -DTPA, -MDP, -HMDP, -nanocolloids, and -DMSA. These pharmaceuticals have been all reconstituted with either the first [O4]− eluate obtained from a 99Mo/ generator (coming from two different companies or eluates after 24, 36, 48, and 72 hours from last elution. Results show that the radiochemical purity and stability of these radiopharmaceuticals were not affected up to the value of 11.84 for the / ratio.

  17. Burn-up determination of irradiated uranium oxide by means of direct gama spectrometry and by radiochemical method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burn-up of thermal neutrons irradiated U3O8 (natural uranium) samples has been determined by using both direct gamma spectrometry and radiochemical methods and the results obtained were compared. The fission products 144Ce, 103Ru, 106Ru, 137Cs and 95Zr were chosen as burn-up monitors. In order to isolate the radioisotopes chosen as monitors, a radiochemical separation procedure has been established, in which the solvent extraction technique was used to separate cerium, cesium and ruthenium one from the other and all of them from uranium. The separation between zirconium and niobium and of both elements from the other radioisotopes and uranium was accomplished by means of adsorption on a silica-gel column, followed by selective elution of zirconium and of niobium. When use was made of the direct gamma-ray spectrometry method, the radioactivity of each nuclide of interest was measured in presence of all others. For this purpose use was made of gamma-ray spectrometry and of a Ge-Li detector. Comparison of burn-up values obtained by both methods was made by means of Student's 't' test, and this showed that results obtained in each case are statistically equal. (Author)

  18. Radiochemical synthesis and preliminary in vivo evaluation of new radioactive platinum complexes with carnosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurin, MichaL [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, National Medicines Institute, 30/34 CheLmska Street, 00-725 Warsaw (Poland)], E-mail: mmaurin@il.waw.pl; Garnuszek, Piotr [Department of Radiopharmaceuticals, National Medicines Institute, 30/34 CheLmska Street, 00-725 Warsaw (Poland)

    2010-02-15

    Application of cross-linking agents such as SATA and 2-iminothiolane (2-IT) for radiochemical synthesis of new radioactive Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes with carnosine was investigated. The mixed-ligand Pt(II)([{sup 125}I]Hist)(Carnosine) complex has been synthesized in a multi-step reaction. First, carnosine was modified by the attachment of SATA. After chromatographic purification, the conjugate was unprotected to form a reactive sulfhydryl functional group, and then the modified carnosine was substituted to PtCl{sub 2}[{sup 125}I]Hist complex. The Pt(II)(IT-[{sup 125}I]Carnosine) and Pt(IV)(IT-[{sup 131}I]Carnosine) complexes were synthesized in a three-step reaction. First, carnosine was labeled with iodine radionuclide ({sup 125}I or {sup 131}I), followed by conjugation with 2-IT. The modified IT-[*I]Carnosine was complexed with tetrachloroplatinate or hexachloroplatinate. Comparative biodistribution studies were performed in normal Wistar rats and in Lewis rats with implanted (s.c.) rat pancreatic tumor cells (AR42J). The HPLC analysis showed a relatively fast formation of the new mixed-ligand Pt([{sup 125}I]Hist)(Carnosine) complex (yield ca. 50% after 20 h). Reaction of K{sub 2}PtCl{sub 4} with [{sup 125}I]Carnosine modified by 2-IT proceeded rapidly and with a high yield (>95% after 2 h). The synthesis of the Pt(IV)IT-[*I]Carnosine complex was the slower reaction in comparison to the analogous synthesis of the Pt(II) complex (yield ca. 70% after 12 h), thus a purification step was necessary. The biodistribution study proved the in vivo stability of the newly synthesized complexes (a low accumulation in thyroid gland and in GIT) and showed that the conjugation of the modified carnosine changes significantly biodistribution scheme of the Pt complexes comparing to the reference Pt(II)[*I]Hist and Pt(IV)([*I]Hist){sub 2} complexes. The mixed-ligand complex was rapidly excreted in urine and revealed the highest accumulation in kidneys (>5%ID/g). A very high

  19. Sonochemical Reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogate, Parag R; Patil, Pankaj N

    2016-10-01

    Sonochemical reactors are based on the generation of cavitational events using ultrasound and offer immense potential for the intensification of physical and chemical processing applications. The present work presents a critical analysis of the underlying mechanisms for intensification, available reactor configurations and overview of the different applications exploited successfully, though mostly at laboratory scales. Guidelines have also been presented for optimum selection of the important operating parameters (frequency and intensity of irradiation, temperature and liquid physicochemical properties) as well as the geometric parameters (type of reactor configuration and the number/position of the transducers) so as to maximize the process intensification benefits. The key areas for future work so as to transform the successful technique at laboratory/pilot scale into commercial technology have also been discussed. Overall, it has been established that there is immense potential for sonochemical reactors for process intensification leading to greener processing and economic benefits. Combined efforts from a wide range of disciplines such as material science, physics, chemistry and chemical engineers are required to harness the benefits at commercial scale operation.

  20. Technical report on implementation of reactor internal 3D modeling and visual database system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report was described a prototype of reactor internal 3D modeling and VDB system for NSSS design quality improvement. For improving NSSS design quality several cases of the nuclear developed nation's integrated computer aided engineering system, such as Mitsubishi's NUWINGS (Japan), AECL's CANDID (Canada) and Duke Power's PASCE (USA) were studied. On the basis of these studies the strategy for NSSS design improvement system was extracted and detail work scope was implemented as follows : 3D modelling of the reactor internals were implemented by using the parametric solid modeler, a prototype system of design document computerization and database was suggested, and walk-through simulation integrated with 3D modeling and VDB was accomplished. Major effects of NSSS design quality improvement system by using 3D modeling and VDB are the plant design optimization by simulation, improving the reliability through the single design database system and engineering cost reduction by improving productivity and efficiency. For applying the VDB to full scope of NSSS system design, 3D modelings of reactor coolant system and nuclear fuel assembly and fuel rod were attached as appendix. 2 tabs., 31 figs., 7 refs. (Author) .new

  1. A radiochemical NAA method for the determination of tin, barium, copper and antimony- role of tin as an indicator for gun shot residues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallic tin being present as impurity and hardening agent of lead bullet/shot, is expected to play an important role in forensic ballistics in matching of bullet lead specimens for establishment of commonness of origin and also as an additional parameter for characterisation of Gun Shot Residue (GSR). 121Sn is a suitable radioisotope for quantification of the element at ppm level if it is separated in highest radiochemical purity. A sequential Radiochemical Neutron Activation Analysis (RNAA) procedure for its simultaneous determination along with trace levels of Ba, Cu and Sb has been developed and its applications in forensic science are described. (author)

  2. Hydrologic conditions and distribution of selected radiochemical and chemical constituents in water, Snake River Plain aquifer, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1992 through 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Tucker, B.J.; Ackerman, D.J.; Liszewski, M.J.

    1997-04-01

    Radiochemical and chemical wastewater discharged since 1952 to infiltration ponds and disposal wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has affected water quality in the Snake River Plain aquifer. The US Geological Survey, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, maintains a monitoring network at the INEL to determine hydrologic trends and to delineate the movement of radiochemical and chemical wastes in the aquifer. This report presents an analysis of water-level and water-quality data collected from the Snake River Plain aquifer during 1992--95.

  3. Studies on the separation of radiochemically pure 90Sr from PUREX HLLW

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies carried out in this paper deal with the recovery of 90Sr from PUREX-HLLW using only solid-liquid separation routes. Initially, majority of 137Cs is removed by ammonium molybdophosphate to reduce the radiation level. This was followed by a pH controlled hydroxide precipitation to remove the hydrolysable cations after adding Sr carrier. Finally, Sr is precipitated as carbonate. The precipitate is washed free of 137Cs. The scheme was tested with simulated PHWR-HLLW as well as with a diluted actual research reactor - HLLW. Sr recovery exceeding 95% was obtained with good purity. (author)

  4. CANDU reactors, their regulation in Canada, and the identification of relevant NRC safety issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited (AECL) and its subsidiary in the US, are considering submitting the CANDU 3 design for standard design certification under 10 CFR Part 52. CANDU reactors are pressurized heavy water power reactors. They have some substantially different safety responses and safety systems than the LWRs that the commercial power reactor licensing regulations of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) have been developed to deal with. In this report, the authors discuss the basic design characteristics of CANDU reactors, specifically of the CANDU 3 where possible, and some safety-related consequences of these characteristics. The authors also discuss the Canadian regulatory provisions, and the CANDU safety systems that have evolved to satisfy the Canadian regulatory requirements as of December 1992. Finally, the authors identify NRC regulations, mainly in 10 CFR Parts 50 and 100, with issues for CANDU 3 reactor designs. In all, eleven such regulatory issues are identified. They are: (1) the ATWS rule (section 50.62); (2) station blackout (section 50.63); (3) conformance with Standard Review Plan (SRP); (4) appropriateness of the source term (section 50.34(f) and section 100.11); (5) applicability of reactor coolant pressure boundary (RCPB) requirements (section 50.55a, etc); (6) ECCS acceptance criteria (section 50.46)(b); (7) combustible gas control (section 50.44, etc); (8) power coefficient of reactivity (GDC 11); (9) seismic design (Part 100); (10) environmental impacts of the fuel cycle (section 51.51); and (11) (standards section 50.55a)

  5. Method of fission product beta spectra measurements for predicting reactor anti-neutrino emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Burns, Kimberly A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Greenfield, Bryce A.; Kos, Marek S.; Orrell, John L.; Schram, Malachi; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wood, Lynn S.; Wootan, David W.

    2015-03-01

    The nuclear fission process that occurs in the core of nuclear reactors results in unstable, neutron-rich fission products that subsequently beta decay and emit electron antineutrinos. These reactor neutrinos have served neutrino physics research from the initial discovery of the neutrino to today's precision measurements of neutrino mixing angles. The prediction of the absolute flux and energy spectrum of the emitted reactor neutrinos hinges upon a series of seminal papers based on measurements performed in the 1970s and 1980s. The steadily improving reactor neutrino measurement techniques and recent reconsiderations of the agreement between the predicted and observed reactor neutrino flux motivates revisiting the underlying beta spectra measurements. A method is proposed to use an accelerator proton beam delivered to an engineered target to yield a neutron field tailored to reproduce the neutron energy spectrum present in the core of an operating nuclear reactor. Foils of the primary reactor fissionable isotopes placed in this tailored neutron flux will ultimately emit beta particles from the resultant fission products. Measurement of these beta particles in a time projection chamber with a perpendicular magnetic field provides a distinctive set of systematic considerations for comparison to the original seminal beta spectra measurements. Ancillary measurements such as gamma-ray emission and post-irradiation radiochemical analysis will further constrain the absolute normalization of beta emissions per fission. The requirements for unfolding the beta spectra measured with this method into a predicted reactor neutrino spectrum are explored.

  6. Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Project Acceptance Criteria for Light Water Reactor Spent Fuel Storage System [OCRWM PER REV2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JOHNSON, D.M.

    2000-12-20

    As part of the decommissioning of the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells there is a need to remove commercial Light Water Reactor (LWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presently stored in these hot cells. To enable fuel removal from the hot cells, the commercial LWR SNF will be packaged and shipped to the 200 Area Interim Storage Area (ISA) in a manner that satisfies site requirements for SNF interim storage. This document identifies the criteria that the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cell Clean-out Project must satisfy for acceptance of the LWR SNF by the SNF Project at the 200 Area ISA. In addition to the acceptance criteria identified herein, acceptance is contingent on adherence to applicable Project Hanford Management Contract requirements and procedures in place at the time of work execution.

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reactor container has a suppression chamber partitioned by concrete side walls, a reactor pedestal and a diaphragm floor. A plurality of partitioning walls are disposed in circumferential direction each at an interval inside the suppression chamber, so that independent chambers in a state being divided into plurality are formed inside the suppression chamber. The partition walls are formed from the bottom portion of the suppression chamber up to the diaphragm floor to isolate pool water in a divided state. Operation platforms are formed above the suppression chamber and connected to an access port. Upon conducting maintenance, inspection or repairing, a pump is disposed in the independent chamber to transfer pool water therein to one or a plurality of other independent chambers to make it vacant. (I.N.)

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J.B.

    1960-01-01

    A reactor is described which comprises a tank, a plurality of coaxial steel sleeves in the tank, a mass of water in the tank, and wire grids in abutting relationship within a plurality of elongated parallel channels within the steel sleeves, the wire being provided with a plurality of bends in the same plane forming adjacent parallel sections between bends, and the sections of adjacent grids being normally disposed relative to each other.

  9. Determination of platinum by radiochemical neutron activation analysis in neural tissues from rats, monkeys and patients treated with cisplatin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rietz, B.; Krarup-Hansen, A.; Rorth, M.

    2001-01-01

    of the animals mentioned and in the neural tissues of human patients. For the determination of platinum in the tissues radiochemical neutron activation analysis has been used. The detection limit is 1 ng Pt g(-1). The platinum results indicate that platinum becomes accumulated in the dorsal root ganglia......Cisplatin is one of the most used antineoplastic drugs, essential for the treatment of germ cell tumours. Its use in medical treatment of cancer patients often causes chronic peripheral neuropathy in these patients. The distribution of cisplatin in neural tissues is, therefore, of great interest....... Rats and monkeys were used as animal models for the study of sensory changes in different neural tissues, like spinal cord (ventral and dorsal part), dorsal root ganglia and sural nerve. The study was combined with quantitative measurements of the content of platinum in the neural tissues...

  10. Radiochemical application on industrial grade ion exchange resins Indion 830 (Type-1) Indion N-IP (Type 2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    131I as a radioactive tracer isotopes were used to study the ion-isotopic self diffusion reaction using industrial grade ion exchange resins Indion 830 (Type-1) and Indion N-IP (Type-2). The effect of concentration of iodide ions in external exchanging medium and the amount of ion exchange resins on the self diffusion reaction was investigated. From the results it appears that, for Indion N-IP (Type - 2) resins the amount of iodide ions exchanged (millimoles) was higher than that for Indion 830 (Type - 1) resins which was due to the higher initial rate of iodide ion exchanged (millimoles/min). The results indicates the high level efficiency of Indion N-IP (Type-2) resins as against Indion 830 (Type 1) resins for complex and time consuming separation processes involved in industries, for the assessment of which radiochemical tracer technique was successfully applied in the present investigation. (author)

  11. Development of a rapid radiochemical procedure for the separation of /sup 235m/U from 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a rapid radiochemical procedure for the isolation and purification of /sup 235m/U (t/sub 1/2/ = 26 minutes) from 239Pu samples up to 250 mg. Purpose of developing the procedure was to measure the thermal neutron fission cross section of the isomeric meta state of 235U. We used rapid small-scale anion exchange columns that absorbed uranium in concentrated HBr but did not absorb plutonium. Uranium was easily eluted with very dilute HF. The separation time required 25 to 35 minutes. We were able to attain a separation factor of uranium from plutonium of approximately 1 x 1010 with samples ranging from 1 x 1010 to 3 x 1011. The ratio of the fission cross sections for the meta to ground state was measured to be 1.42. 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. Radiochemical analysis of 210Pb e 226Ra in samples of sludges and scales in petroleum industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The exploration and production of oil can generate different types of waste, such as scales, which are formed in the internal surface of pipes and equipment, sludges that is deposited in water/oil separators, storage tanks and valves and water that is removed along with the oil, which bring to the surface some of the radionuclides present in the rock matrix. From a radiological point of view, the most important radionuclides, which appear in sludges and scales are 228Ra, 226Ra, 210Pb and 228Th, since the exposure to these radionuclides can represent a significant dose on workers. The analysis already performed using gamma spectrometry in samples of sludge and scales indicated the presence of high concentrations of radio isotopes, showing the need to enlarge the radiometric survey including other elements of the 238U series. This work focuses on radiochemical determination of 210Pb and 226Ra concentrations in samples of sludge and scales

  13. Experience gained with nuclear material accounting and control in storage facility for plutonium dioxide of SChK radiochemical plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The task for the computerized accounting of containers at the storage with barcoding equipment for inventory taking has been performed at achieve the pre-commissioning phase. This gave the following upgrade: decrease of the time spent by the personnel in storage compartments with plutonium dioxide during inventory taking, this diminishing the dose for personnel; changeover from traditional record book to computerized accounting of nuclear materials at the storage, which will make it possible to include the local workstation of the storage into computer network for nuclear material (NM) accounting at the Radiochemical plant; test and improve technique for the use of barcoding equipment for further introduction at plants and storage facilities of the SChK. Works are underway for further improvement of the NM accounting at the storage for plutonium dioxide

  14. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade uranyl nitrate solution to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Determination of Uranium 7 Specific Gravity by Pycnometry 15-20 Free Acid by Oxalate Complexation 21-27 Determination of Thorium 28 Determination of Chromium 29 Determination of Molybdenum 30 Halogens Separation by Steam Distillation 31-35 Fluoride by Specific Ion Electrode 36-42 Halogen Distillate Analysis: Chloride, Bromide, and Iodide by Amperometric Microtitrimetry 43 Determination of Chloride and Bromide 44 Determination of Sulfur by X-Ray Fluorescence 45 Sulfate Sulfur by (Photometric) Turbidimetry 46 Phosphorus by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 54-61 Silicon by the Molybdenum Blue (Photometric) Method 62-69 Carbon by Persulfate Oxidation-Acid Titrimetry 70 Conversion to U3O8 71-74 Boron by ...

  15. Standard test methods for chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover procedures for the chemical, mass spectrometric, spectrochemical, nuclear, and radiochemical analysis of nuclear-grade plutonium nitrate solutions to determine compliance with specifications. 1.2 The analytical procedures appear in the following order: Sections Plutonium by Controlled-Potential Coulometry Plutonium by Amperometric Titration with Iron(II) Plutonium by Diode Array Spectrophotometry Free Acid by Titration in an Oxalate Solution 8 to 15 Free Acid by Iodate Precipitation-Potentiometric Titration Test Method 16 to 22 Uranium by Arsenazo I Spectrophotometric Test Method 23 to 33 Thorium by Thorin Spectrophotometric Test Method 34 to 42 Iron by 1,10-Phenanthroline Spectrophotometric Test Method 43 to 50 Impurities by ICP-AES Chloride by Thiocyanate Spectrophotometric Test Method 51 to 58 Fluoride by Distillation-Spectrophotometric Test Method 59 to 66 Sulfate by Barium Sulfate Turbidimetric Test Method 67 to 74 Isotopic Composition by Mass Spectrom...

  16. Nuclear research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It's presented data about nuclear research reactors in the world, retrieved from the Sien (Nuclear and Energetic Information System) data bank. The information are organized in table forms as follows: research reactors by countries; research reactors by type; research reactors by fuel and research reactors by purpose. (E.G.)

  17. Nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor is described in which the core components, including fuel-rod assemblies, control-rod assemblies, fertile rod-assemblies, and removable shielding assemblies, are supported by a plurality of separate inlet modular units. These units are referred to as inlet module units to distinguish them from the modules of the upper internals of the reactor. The modular units are supported, each removable independently of the others, in liners in the supporting structure for the lower internals of the reactor. The core assemblies are removably supported in integral receptacles or sockets of the modular units. The liners, units, sockets and assemblies have inlet openings for entry of the fluid. The modular units are each removably mounted in the liners with fluid seals interposed between the opening in the liner and inlet module into which the fluid enters in the upper and lower portion of the liner. Each assembly is similarly mounted in a corresponding receptacle with fluid seals interposed between the openings where the fluid enters in the lower portion of the receptacle or fitting closely in these regions. As fluid flows along each core assembly a pressure drop is produced along the fluid so that the fluid which emerges from each core assembly is at a lower pressure than the fluid which enters the core assembly. However because of the seals interposed in the mountings of the units and assemblies the pressures above and below the units and assemblies are balanced and the units are held in the liners and the assemblies are held in the receptacles by their weights as they have a higher specific gravity than the fluid. The low-pressure spaces between each module and its liner and between each core assembly and its module is vented to the low-pressure regions of the vessel to assure that fluid which leaks through the seals does not accumulate and destroy the hydraulic balance

  18. Nuclear reactor physics course for reactor operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The education and training of nuclear reactor operators is important to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. Therefore, a course on basic 'Nuclear reactor physics' in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The aim of the basic course on 'Nuclear Reactor Physics for reactor operators' is to provide the reactor operators with a basic understanding of the main concepts relevant to nuclear reactors. Seen the education level of the participants, mathematical derivations are simplified and reduced to a minimum, but not completely eliminated

  19. The safety of Ontario's nuclear power reactors. A scientific and technical review. A submission to the Ontario Nuclear Safety Review by Atomic Energy Canada Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This submission comments on the evolution of the Canadian nuclear program, the management of safety, and the reactor design, analysis, operation and research programs that contribute to the safety of the CANDU reactor and provide assurance of safety to the regulatory agency and to the public. The CANDU reactor system has been designed and developed with close cooperation between Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. (AECL), utilities, manufacturers, and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The AECB has the responsibility, on behalf of the public, for establishing acceptable standards with respect to public risk and for establishing through independent review that these standards are satisfied. The plant designer has responsibility for defining how those standards will be met. The plant operator has responsibility for operating within the framework of those standards. The Canadian approach to safety design is based on the philosophy of defence in depth. Defence in depth is achieved through a high level of equipment quality, system redundancy and fail-safe design; regulating and process systems designed to maintain all process systems within acceptable operating parameters; and, independent safety systems to shut down the reactor, provide long-term cooling, and contain potential release of radioactivity in the event of an accident. The resulting design meets regulatory requirements not only in Canada but also in other countries. Probabilistic safety and risk evaluations show that the CANDU design offers a level of safety and least as good as other commercially available reactor designs

  20. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reis, Isabela C.; Mesquita, Amir Z., E-mail: icr@cdtn.br, E-mail: amir@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  1. Research on physical and chemical parameters of coolant in Light-Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The coolant radiochemical monitoring of light-water reactors, both power reactor as research reactors is one most important tasks of the system safe operation. The last years have increased the interest in the coolant chemical studying to optimize the process, to minimize the corrosion, to ensure the primary system materials integrity, and to reduce the workers exposure radiation. This paper has the objective to present the development project in Nuclear Technology Development Center (CDTN), which aims to simulate the primary water physical-chemical parameters of light-water-reactors (LWR). Among these parameters may be cited: the temperature, the pressure, the pH, the electric conductivity, and the boron concentration. It is also being studied the adverse effects that these parameters can result in the reactor integrity. The project also aims the mounting of a system to control and monitoring of temperature, electric conductivity, and pH of water in the Installation of Test in Accident Conditions (ITCA), located in the Thermal-Hydraulic Laboratory at CDTN. This facility was widely used in the years 80/90 for commissioning of several components that were installed in Angra 2 containment. In the test, the coolant must reproduce the physical and chemical conditions of the primary. It is therefore fundamental knowledge of the main control parameters of the primary cooling water from PWR reactors. Therefore, this work is contributing, with the knowledge and the reproduction with larger faithfulness of the reactors coolant in the experimental circuits. (author)

  2. Determination of total mercury and methylmercury in human head hair by radiochemical methods of analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total mercury has been determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis in the hair of several Indian tribes living in the Xingu Park, located in the Amazonic region of Brazil. Methylmercury and total mercury have been determined in selected samples using cold vapour atomic absorption spectroscopy, at the Nuclear Chemistry Department, Jozef Stefan Institute, Ljubliana, Slovenia. Mercury levels were found to be much higher in the Indian hair samples as compared to the samples from the control population. The arithmetic and geometric means for total mercury in the Indian hair samples ranged from 10 to 20 ppm, compared to values of about 1 ppm for the means of the control group. The results obtained for methylmercury have shown that the majority of the mercury is present in the hair of the Indians as the organic form. The Indian study populations living in the Xingu Park can thus be considered as being at risk with regards to contamination by mercury. With the aim of applying neutron activation analysis for the determination of methylmercury in hair, experiments were done at the IEA-R1 nuclear research reactor irradiating cysteine- and also thioacetamide- impregnated filter papers, on which a methylmercury solution was pipetted. The results obtained have shown that all the mercury was lost from the cysteine-impregnated paper and about 90 % of the mercury remained on the paper impregnated with thioacetamide. (author)

  3. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T.; Sahimi, Muhammad; Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak; Harale, Aadesh; Park, Byoung-Gi; Liu, Paul K. T.

    2011-03-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  4. Hybrid adsorptive membrane reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsis, Theodore T. (Inventor); Sahimi, Muhammad (Inventor); Fayyaz-Najafi, Babak (Inventor); Harale, Aadesh (Inventor); Park, Byoung-Gi (Inventor); Liu, Paul K. T. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A hybrid adsorbent-membrane reactor in which the chemical reaction, membrane separation, and product adsorption are coupled. Also disclosed are a dual-reactor apparatus and a process using the reactor or the apparatus.

  5. Advanced CANDU reactor: an optimized energy source of oil sands application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) is developing the ACR-700TM (Advanced CANDU Reactor-700TM) to meet customer needs for reduced capital cost, shorter construction schedule, high capacity factor while retaining the benefits of the CANDU experience base. The ACR-700 is based on the concept of CANDU horizontal fuel channels surrounded by heavy water moderator. The major innovation of this design is the use of slightly enriched uranium fuel in a CANFLEX bundle that is cooled by light water. This ensures: higher main steam pressures and temperatures providing higher thermal efficiency; a compact and simpler reactor design with reduced capital costs and shorter construction schedules; and reduced heavy water inventory compared to existing CANDU reactors. ACR-700 is not only a technically advanced and cost effective solution for electricity generating utilities, but also a low-cost, long-life and sustainable steam source for increasing Alberta's Oil Sand production rates. Currently practiced commercial surface mining and extraction of Oil Sand resources has been well established over the last three decades. But a majority of the available resources are somewhat deeper underground require in-situ extraction. Economic removal of such underground resources is now possible through the Steam Assisted Gravity Drainage (SAGD) process developed and proto-type tested in-site. SAGD requires the injection of large quantities of high-pressure steam into horizontal wells to form reduced viscosity bitumen and condensate mixture that is then collected at the surface. This paper describes joint AECL studies with CERI (Canadian Energy Research Institute) for the ACR, supplying both electricity and medium-pressure steam to an oil sands facility. The extensive oil sands deposits in northern Alberta are a very large energy resource. Currently, 30% of Canda's oil production is from the oil sands and this is expected to expand greatly over the coming decade. The bitumen deposits in the

  6. The near boiling reactor: Conceptual design of a small inherently safe nuclear reactor to extend the operational capability of the Victoria Class submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Christopher J. P.

    Nuclear power has several unique advantages over other air independent energy sources for nuclear combat submarines. An inherently safe, small nuclear reactor, capable of supply the hotel load of the Victoria Class submarines, has been conceptually developed. The reactor is designed to complement the existing diesel electric power generation plant presently onboard the submarine. The reactor, rated at greater than 1 MW thermal, will supply electricity to the submarine's batteries through an organic Rankine cycle energy conversion plant at 200 kW. This load will increase the operational envelope of the submarine by providing up to 28 continuous days submerged, allowing for an enhanced indiscretion ratio (ratio of time spent on the surface versus time submerged) and a limited under ice capability. The power plant can be fitted into the existing submarine by inserting a 6 m hull plug. With its simplistic design and inherent safety features, the reactor plant will require a minimal addition to the crew. The reactor employs TRISO fuel particles for increased safety. The light water coolant remains at atmospheric pressure, exiting the core at 96°C. Burn-up control and limiting excess reactivity is achieved through movable reflector plates. Shut down and regulatory control is achieved through the thirteen hafnium control rods. Inherent safety is achieved through the negative prompt and delayed temperature coefficients, as well as the negative void coefficient. During a transient, the boiling of the moderator results in a sudden drop in reactivity, essentially shutting down the reactor. It is this characteristic after which the reactor has been named. The design of the reactor was achieved through modelling using computer codes such as MCNP5, WIMS-AECL, FEMLAB, and MicroShield5, in addition to specially written software for kinetics, heat transfer and fission product poisoning calculations. The work has covered a broad area of research and has highlighted additional areas

  7. Reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To prevent shocks exerted on a vent head due to pool-swell caused within a pressure suppression chamber (disposed in a torus configuration around the dry well) upon loss of coolant accident in BWR type reactors. Constitution: The following relationship is established between the volume V (m3) of a dry well and the ruptured opening area A (m2) at the boundary expected upon loss of coolant accident: V >= 30340 (m) x A Then, the volume of the dry well is made larger than the ruptured open area, that is, the steam flow rate of leaking coolants upon loss of coolant accident to decrease the pressure rise in the dry well at the initial state where loss of coolant accident is resulted. Accordingly, the pressure of non-compressive gases jetted out from the lower end of the downcomer to the pool water is decreased to suppress the pool-swell. (Ikeda, J.)

  8. Drug-binding ability of human serum albumin at children with chronic virus hepatitis radiochemical definition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The chronic virus hepatitis produces numerous abnormalities of liver function. The viruses of B, C, D, F and G hepatitis possess the ability to cause chronically proceeding diseases. Earlier we have found that binding ability of serum albumin at patients with acute forms of virus hepatitis is authentically reduced in comparison with the given parameters of control group. At an acute virus hepatitis B with middle severity the reducing of binding ability of serum albumin was observed at 70 % of patients. At an acute virus hepatitis A the reduce of binding ability of serum albumin is less expressed than at acute virus hepatitis B. At of chronic virus intoxication in human organism there is a formation and accumulation of toxic compounds in the excessive concentrations, which are not inherent to a normal metabolism. One of universal mechanisms of reaction of an organism on the increasing concentration of metabolism products is formation of complexes of various compounds with blood plasma proteins. The formation in an organism of endo- and exotoxins excessive concentrations results in blocking the binding centers of albumin molecule that causes the change of its complexing ability. The purpose of the present research: investigation of binding ability of serum albumin with use of radiochemical method at children with a chronic virus hepatitis B and C. Materials and methods. Under clinical observation there were 52 children in the age from 3 till 14 years. From them at 32 the chronic virus hepatitis B was confirmed, at 20 chronic virus - hepatitis C. Etiological diagnostics was carried out by definition of specific markers of a hepatitis B and C method IFA and PCR. Binding ability of serum albumin was defined by radiochemical method with use of the tritium labeled no-spa (drotaverine hydrochloride). The control group consists from 10 conditionally health children of similar age. Results and their discussion. The results of investigation have shown, that at a

  9. Radiochemical and chemical constituents in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake river Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from nine irrigation wells, three domestic wells, two dairy wells, two springs, one commercial well, one stock well, and one observation well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. Additional sampling at six sites was done to complete the third round of sampling. None of the radiochemical or chemical constituents exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than their respective reporting levels

  10. Radiochemical and chemical constituents in water from selected wells and springs from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area, Idaho, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartholomay, R.C.; Williams, L.M. [Geological Survey, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Campbell, L.J. [Idaho Dept. of Water Resources, Boise, ID (United States)

    1997-06-01

    The US Geological Survey and the Idaho Department of Water Resources, in cooperation with the US Department of Energy, sampled 19 sites as part of the fourth round of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake river Plain aquifer from the southern boundary of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to the Hagerman area. Water samples were collected and analyzed for selected radiochemical and chemical constituents. The samples were collected from nine irrigation wells, three domestic wells, two dairy wells, two springs, one commercial well, one stock well, and one observation well. Two quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed. Additional sampling at six sites was done to complete the third round of sampling. None of the radiochemical or chemical constituents exceeded the established maximum contaminant levels for drinking water. Many of the radionuclide- and inorganic-constituent concentrations were greater than their respective reporting levels.

  11. High-performance liquid chromatography method with radiochemical detection for measurement of nitric oxide synthase, arginase, and arginine decarboxylase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volke, A; Wegener, G; Vasar, E; Volke, V

    2006-01-01

    Nitric oxide has been shown to be involved in numerous biological processes, and many studies have aimed to measure nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity. Recently, it has been demonstrated that arginase and arginine decarboxylase (ADC), two enzymes that also employ arginine as a substrate, may regulate NOS activity. We aimed to develop a HPLC-based method to measure simultaneously the products of these three enzymes. Traditionally, the separation of amino acids and related compounds with HPLC has been carried out with precolumn derivatization and reverse phase chromatography. We describe here a simple and fast HPLC method with radiochemical detection to separate radiolabeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, L-ornithine, and agmatine. 3H-labeled L-arginine, L-citrulline, agmatine, and 14C-labeled L-citrulline were used as standards. These compounds were separated in the normal phase column (Allure Acidix 250 x 4.6 mm i.d.) under isocratic conditions in less than 20 min with good sensitivity. Using the current method, we have shown the formation of L-citrulline and L-ornithine in vitro using brain tissue homogenate of rats and that of agmatine by Escherichia coli ADC. PMID:16541190

  12. A radiochemical technique for the establishment of a solvent-independent scale of ion activities in amphiprotic solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiochemical determination of solubilities of hardly soluble compounds of silver (Ph4BAg, AgCl), by means of Ag-110m in amphiprotic solutions is used for setting-up a solvent-independent scale of ion activities based on the concept of the media effect. The media effects of the salts are calculated from the solubility data of the Ag compounds in question. The splitting into the media effects of single ions takes place with the extrathermodynamic assumption of the same media effects for large ions, such as Ph4B- = Ph4As-. A standardized ion activity scale in connection with the activity coefficients for the solvent in question can be established with water as the basic state of the chemical potential. As the sum of the media effects of the single ions gives the media effect of the salt concerned, which is easily obtained from data which are experimentally accessible (solubility, vapour pressure, ion exchange ect.), this method leads to single ion activities of a large number of ions in a multitude of solvents. (orig./LH)

  13. Automated radiochemical synthesis of [{sup 18}F]FBEM: A thiol reactive synthon for radiofluorination of peptides and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiesewetter, Dale O., E-mail: dk7k@nih.go [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Building 10, Room 1C401, MSC 1180, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Jacobson, Orit; Lang Lixin; Chen Xiaoyuan [Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine (LOMIN), National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), National Institutes of Health - NIH, Building 10, Room 1C401, MSC 1180, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The automated radiochemical synthesis of N-[2-(4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzamido)ethyl]maleimide ([{sup 18}F]FBEM, IUPAC name: N-maleoylethyl-4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzamide), a prosthetic group for radiolabeling the free sulfhydryl groups of peptides and proteins, is herein described. 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoic acid was first prepared by nucleophilic displacement of a trimethylammonium moiety on a pentamethylbenzyl benzoate ester with [{sup 18}F]fluoride. In the second step the ester was cleaved under acidic conditions. Finally, 4-[{sup 18}F]fluorobenzoic acid was coupled to N-(2-aminoethyl)maleimide using diethylcyanophosphate and diisopropylethyl amine. Following high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification, [{sup 18}F]FBEM was obtained in 17.3{+-}7.1% yield (not decay corrected) in approximately 95 min. Isolation from the HPLC eluate and preparation for subsequent use, which was conducted manually, required an additional 10-15 min. The measured specific activity for three batches was 181.3, 251.6, and 351.5 GBq/ {mu}mol at the end of bombardment (EOB).

  14. The analysis of thallium in geological materials by radiochemical neutron activation and x-ray fluorescence spectrometry: a comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGoldrick, P.J.; Robinson, P. [Tasmania Univ., Sandy Bay, TAS (Australia)

    1993-12-31

    Carrier-based radiochemical neutron activation (RNAA) is a precise and accurate technique for the analysis of Tl in geological materials. For about a decade, until the mid-80s, a procedure modified from Keays et al. (1974) was used at the University of Melbourne to analyse for Tl in a wide variety of geological materials. Samples of powdered rock weighing several hundred milligrams each were irradiated in HIFAR for between 12 hours and 1 week, and subsequently fused with a sodium hydroxide - sodium peroxide mixture and several milligrams of inactive Tl carrier. Following acid digestion of the fusion mixture anion exchange resin was used to separate Tl from the major radioactive rock constituents. The Tl was then stripped from the resin and purified as thallium iodide and a yield measured gravimetrically. Activity from {sup 204}Tl (a {beta}-emitter with a 3 8 year half-life) was measured and Tl determined by reference to pure chemical standards irradiated and processed along with the unkowns. Detection limits for the longer irradiations were about one part per billion. Precision was monitored by repeat analyses of `internal standard` rocks and was estimated to be about five to ten percent (one standard deviation). On the other hand, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) was seen as an excellent cost-effective alternative for thallium analysis in geological samples, down to 1 ppm. 6 refs. 1 tab., 1 fig.

  15. Hardware and software modifications on the Advion NanoTek microfluidic platform to extend flexibility for radiochemical synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic systems are currently receiving a lot of attention in the PET radiochemistry field, due to their demonstrated ability to obtain higher incorporation yields with reduced total processing time and using a decreased amount of precursors. The Advion NanoTek LF was the first commercial microfluidic system available for radiochemistry that allows basic parameter optimization to be performed. In this paper we report hardware and software modifications that would allow better performing procedures, higher product throughput and flexibility to utilize the system. In particular, HPLC purification and SPE formulation have been fully integrated. - Highlights: • The commercial system has been added with hardware to implement HPLC and SPE purification. • Automatic control of all production phases has been achieved using the same provided interface. • The extended operations have been rendered simple, repeatable and reliable. • Processes for one-step and two-step reactions are included. • Adopted modifications would allow the inclusion of microfluidic labelling into typical radiochemical production routes

  16. Report on the radiochemical and environmental isotope character for monitoring well UE-1-q: Groundwater Characterization Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Well UE-1-q is located in the northeastern portion of area 1 of the Nevada Test Site in southwestern Nevada, 1244.1 meters above sea level. The well was originally an exploratory hole drilled to a depth of 743 meters below the surface (mbs) by LANL in November of 1980. In May 1992, the Groundwater Characterization Program (GCP) extended the total depth to approximately 792.5 mbs. UE-1-q is cased to a total depth of 749.5 mbs, with the remaining uncased depth exposed exclusively to Paleozoicaged carbonate rock, the principle zone of groundwater sampling. Geologic logging indicates approximately 390 meters of tuffaceous and calcareous alluvium overlies 320 meters of Tertiary-aged volcanic ash-flow and bedded tuffs. Paleozoic carbonate lithology extends from 716 mbs to the total well depth and is separated from the overlying Tertiary volcanic deposits by 6 meters of paleocolluvium. This report outlines the results and interpretations of radiochemical and environmental isotopic analyses of groundwater sampled from UE-1-q on July 10, 1992 during the well pump test following well development. In addition, results of the field tritium monitoring performed during the well drilling are reported in Appendix 1. Sampling, analytical techniques, and analytical uncertainties for the groundwater analyses are presented in Appendix 2

  17. Radiochemical separation of no-carrier-added (NCA) arsenic-77 from neutron irradiated germanium oxide : a promising β-emitting radioisotope for radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim, of this work was to develop a simple, economical and practical radiochemical separation method of 77As from irradiated GeO2 as well as to recover GeO2 quantitatively for further irradiation. The separated 77As was also used for formulation of 77As[As(III)] compound such as, no-carrier-added (NCA) [77As]AsI3, a versatile labeling synthon and NCA 77As[As(V)] compound

  18. Fuel cycle of BREST reactors. Solution of the radwaste and nonproliferation problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast reactors with a nitride fuel and a lead coolant (BREST) have low excessive in-core plutonium breeding (CBR ∼1.05) and do not have breeding blankets. The fuel cycle of BREST reactors includes stages that are traditionally considered in a closed fuel cycle of fast reactors excluding the breeding blanket cycle, namely in-pile fuel irradiation, post-irradiation cooling of spent FAs (SFAs); SFA transportation to the recovery shop, SFA dismantling, fuel extraction and separation of the SFA steel components, radiochemical treatment, adjustment of the fuel mixture composition, manufacturing of nitride pellets, manufacturing of fuel elements and fuel assemblies, interim storage and transportation to the reactor. There is a radioactive waste storage facility at the NPP site. The fuel cycle of fast reactors with CBR of ∼1 does not requires plutonium separation to produce 'fresh' fuel, so it should use a radiochemical technology that would not separate plutonium from the fuel in the recovery process. Besides, rough recovered fuel cleaning of fission products is permitted (the FP residue in the 'fresh' fuel is 10-2-10-3 of their content in the irradiated fuel) and the presence of minor actinides therein causes high activity of the fuel (radiation barrier for fuel thefts). The fuel cycle under consideration 'burns' uranium- 238 added to the fuel during reprocessing. And plutonium is a fuel component and circulates in a closed cycle as part of the high-level material. The radiation balance between natural uranium consumed by the nuclear power closed system and long-lived high-level radioactive waste generated in the BREST-type nuclear reactor system is provided by actinides transmutation in the fuel (U, Pu, Am, Np) and long-lived products (Tc, I) in the BREST reactor blanket and by monitored pre-disposal cooling of high-level waste for approximately 200 years. The design of the building and the entire set of the fuel cycle equipment has been completed for a BREST-OD-300

  19. Present Services at the TRIGA Mark II Reactor of the JSI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Jožef Stefan Institute has been continuously operating since the year 1966. The currently offered services include: (1) Neutron activation analysis in both instrumental and radiochemical modes; (2) neutron irradiation of various kinds of materials intended to be used for research and applicative purposes; (3) training and education of university students as well as on-job training of staff working in public and private institutions, (4) verification of computer codes and nuclear data, comprising primarily criticality calculations and neutron flux distribution studies and (5) testing and development of a digital reactivity meter. The paper briefly describes the aforementioned activities and shows that even such small reactors are still indispensable in nuclear science and technology. (author)

  20. Synthesis of [18F]FMISO in a flow-through microfluidic reactor: Development and clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The PET radiotracer [18F]FMISO has been used in the clinic to image hypoxia in tumors. The aim of the present study was to optimize the radiochemical parameters for the preparation of [18F]FMISO using a microfluidic reaction system. The main parameters evaluated were (1) precursor concentration, (2) reaction temperature, and (3) flow rate through the microfluidic reactor. Optimized conditions were then applied to the batch production of [18F]FMISO for clinical research use. Methods: For the determination of optimal reaction conditions within a flow-through microreactor synthesizer, 5–400 μL the precursor and dried [18F]fluoride solutions in acetonitrile were simultaneously pushed through the temperature-controlled reactor (60–180 °C) with defined flow rates (20–120 μL/min). Radiochemical incorporation yields to form the intermediate species were determined using radio-TLC. Hydrolysis to remove the protecting group was performed following standard vial chemistry to afford [18F]FMISO. Results: Optimum reaction parameters for the microfluidic set-up were determined as follows: 4 mg/mL of precursor, 170 °C, and 100 μL/min pump rate per reactant (200 μL/min reaction overall flow rate) to prepare the radiolabeled intermediate. The optimum hydrolysis condition was determined to be 2 N HCl for 5 min at 100 °C. Large-scale batch production using the optimized conditions gave the final, ready for human injection [18F]FMISO product in 28.4 ± 3.0% radiochemical yield, specific activity of 119 ± 26 GBq/μmol, and > 99% radiochemical and chemical purity at the end of synthesis (n = 4). Conclusion: By using the NanoTek microfluidic synthesis system, [18F]FMISO was successfully prepared with good specific activity and high radiochemical purity for human use. The product generated from large-scale batch production using flow chemistry is currently being used in clinical research

  1. Research Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Published in English and in French, this large report first proposes an overview of the use and history of research nuclear reactors. It discusses their definition, and presents the various types of research reactors which can be either related to nuclear power (critical mock-ups, material test reactors, safety test reactors, training reactors, prototypes), or to research (basic research, industry, health), or to specific particle physics phenomena (neutron diffraction, isotope production, neutron activation, neutron radiography, semiconductor doping). It reports the history of the French research reactors by distinguishing the first atomic pile (ZOE), and the activities and achievements during the fifties, the sixties and the seventies. It also addresses the development of instrumentation for research reactors (neutron, thermal, mechanical and fission gas release measurements). The other parts of the report concern the validation of neutronics calculations for different reactors (the EOLE water critical mock-up, the MASURCA air critical mock-up dedicated to fast neutron reactor study, the MINERVE water critical mock-up, the CALIBAN pulsed research reactor), the testing of materials under irradiation (OSIRIS reactor, laboratories associated with research reactors, the Jules Horowitz reactor and its experimental programs and related devices, irradiation of materials with ion beams), the investigation of accident situations (on the CABRI, Phebus, Silene and Jules Horowitz reactors). The last part proposes a worldwide overview of research reactors

  2. AECL research programs in life sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report summarizes the current research activities in life sciences in the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited-Research Company. The research is carried out at its two main research sites: the Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories and the Whiteshell Nuclear Research Establishment. The summaries cover the following areas of research: radiation biology, medical biophysics, epidemiology, environmental research and dosimetry. (author)

  3. Reactor Physics Training

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    University courses in nuclear reactor physics at the universities consist of a theoretical description of the physics and technology of nuclear reactors. In order to demonstrate the basic concepts in reactor physics, training exercises in nuclear reactor installations are also desirable. Since the number of reactor facilities is however strongly decreasing in Europe, it becomes difficult to offer to students a means for demonstrating the basic concepts in reactor physics by performing training exercises in nuclear installations. Universities do not generally possess the capabilities for performing training exercises. Therefore, SCK-CEN offers universities the possibility to perform (on a commercial basis) training exercises at its infrastructure consisting of two research reactors (BR1 and VENUS). Besides the organisation of training exercises in the framework of university courses, SCK-CEN also organizes theoretical courses in reactor physics for the education and training of nuclear reactor operators. It is indeed a very important subject to guarantee the safe operation of present and future nuclear reactors. In this framework, an understanding of the fundamental principles of nuclear reactor physics is also necessary for reactor operators. Therefore, the organisation of a basic Nuclear reactor physics course at the level of reactor operators in the initial and continuous training of reactor operators has proven to be indispensable. In most countries, such training also results from the direct request from the safety authorities to assure the high level of competence of the staff in nuclear reactors. The objectives this activity are: (1) to provide training and education activities in reactor physics for university students and (2) to organise courses in nuclear reactor physics for reactor operators

  4. Safeguarding research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is organized in four sections, including the introduction. The second section contains a discussion of the characteristics and attributes of research reactors important to safeguards. In this section, research reactors are described according to their power level, if greater than 25 thermal megawatts, or according to each fuel type. This descriptive discussion includes both reactor and reactor fuel information of a generic nature, according to the following categories. 1. Research reactors with more than 25 megawatts thermal power, 2. Plate fuelled reactors, 3. Assembly fuelled reactors. 4. Research reactors fuelled with individual rods. 5. Disk fuelled reactors, and 6. Research reactors fuelled with aqueous homogeneous fuel. The third section consists of a brief discussion of general IAEA safeguards as they apply to research reactors. This section is based on IAEA safeguards implementation documents and technical reports that are used to establish Agency-State agreements and facility attachments. The fourth and last section describes inspection activities at research reactors necessary to meet Agency objectives. The scope of the activities extends to both pre and post inspection as well as the on-site inspection and includes the examination of records and reports relative to reactor operation and to receipts, shipments and certain internal transfers, periodic verification of fresh fuel, spent fuel and core fuel, activities related to containment and surveillance, and other selected activities, depending on the reactor

  5. Determination of radiochemical yield of {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceutical preparations using gamma counter and linear radiochromatography scanner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Patricia de A.; Moura, Rebeca G.; Shiki, Andressa M.; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N., E-mail: patyosborne@yahoo.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The radiochemical purity (RCP) evaluation is a prerequisite for radiopharmaceuticals before the administration in patients. RCP is defined as the proportion of the total radioactivity in the product that is present in the specified chemical form. The most widely used techniques for RCP determination in radiopharmaceutical preparations are thin layer chromatography (TLC-Al), instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and paper chromatography (PC). These techniques combined with radioactivity detection are one of the most important tools in the RCP of the radiopharmaceutical compounds. Several methods are used for the determination of the spatial distribution of radioactivity on the strips. The aim of this study was to compare two methods for radioactivity measurement in the determination of RCP in {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals using gamma counter and linear radiochromatography scanner. Lyophilized radiopharmaceuticals were labeled with {sup 99m}Tc. The analysis was carried out using TLC-Al and high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC-Cellulose) sheets, ITLC-SG and 3MM Whatman PC. The radioactivity distribution was determined by counting each strip during 1 minute in a radiochromatography TLC scanner. For comparison, the strips were cut into small pieces and each one was separately measured in a gamma-counter during 0.20 minutes in 70-210 KeV {sup 99m}Tc window. USP 36 and FDA specify that not less than 90% of the total radioactivity must be in the spot corresponding to {sup 99m}Tc labeled compound. In conclusion, the procedure for RCP determination of ALBUMINA-TEC, DEX500-TEC, ECD-TEC, MACRO-TEC and MIBI-TEC can be faster using radiochromatography. (author)

  6. A simple and rapid method for the determination of iodine in rice samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple and rapid method has been developed for the determination of iodine in rice samples by radiochemical neutron activation analysis. Irradiated rice powder was decomposed together with an iodide carrier solution containing I-131 on heating in a sodium hypochlorite solution. After decomposition, the solution was acidified with hydrochloric acid, and the insoluble residue was filtered off. To the filtrate sodium sulfite solution and palladium chloride solution were added, and the precipitate of palladium iodide was separated with a glass fiber filter paper. Iodine contents of rice were calculated from the peak areas under the 443 keV γ-ray of I-128 in the precipitate and comparative stand ard. Corrections for the chemical recovery were applied to them by means of the areas under the 365 keV γ-ray of I-131. This method was applied to the certified refe rece materials, IAEA wheat flour RM-V-5 and NBS orchard leaves SRM 1571. The results were in good agreement with the recommended values. Iodine contents of rice samples of two different origins in Japan were found to be of the order of 100ng g-1 (dry weight base). The recovery of iodine in this procedure was about 80%. Decontamination factors for Mn, Cl, Na, and Br in the final fraction were 7 x 103, 2 x 104, 3 x 104, and 2 x 102, respectively. The time required for the chemical procedure was about 15 min, and the limit of determination was 0.7 ng of iodine in a sample of 1 g. (author)

  7. Rapid and frequent turbidite accumulation in the bottom of Izu-Ogasawara Trench: Chemical and radiochemical evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Yoichi

    1993-12-01

    Two sediment cores (pilot gravity and piston) were obtained from the bottom of the Izu-Ogasawara Trench at 9750 m and analyzed for various elements and radioisotopes. The results showed a history of complex and frequent turbidite deposition: In the gravity core, eight layers rich in manganese were observed, of which five are enriched in Cu and Co as well. The other three are also enriched in Mo but no other heavy metals, suggesting the presence of at least two mechanisms of formation. Trapping of iron manganese micronodules can account for the enrichment of Mn, Cu and Co. The other three layers rich in Mn and Mo appear to be formed by a post-depositional diagenetic process of Mn mobilization and redeposition in the sediment column. A strong correlation between Ra-226 and Cu in the gravity core suggests that the Ra-226 was also carried into the bottom of the trench in turbidites in association with Mn micronodules. Little excess of Pb-210 over Ra-226 was found at the top but the excess was significant at mid-depths from 30 to 70 cm, indicating that those sediments were deposited within the last 200 y. In the piston core there is a sharp discontinuity of chemical and radiochemical composition around a depth of 250 cm. Below that depth the sediments appear to be dominated by materials derived from terrestrial sources, as compared with those in the upper layer which are of contemporary marine origin. Ra-226 is deficient relative to Th-230 throughout the sediment column down to about 6 m. This finding is consistent with the finding that the average rate of sediment accumulation is 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than that in the western North Pacific abyssal plain, suggesting the convergence of materials into the bottom of the trench.

  8. Atomic Energy of Canada Limited annual report 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited for the fiscal year ended March 31, 1988 covers: Research Company; CANDU Operations; Radiochemical Company; Medical Products Division; The Future; Financial Sections; Board of Directors and Officers; and AECL locations

  9. 1979-80 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. added a fifth semi-autonomous unit, Atomic Energy of Canda International Company, in June 1979, to assist in the company's pursuit of world wide acceptance of the CANDU system. Evaluations of reactor safety following the Three Mile Island accident, public hearings in Ontario, and the report of the Porter Commission all reaffirm the safety of Canadian nuclear power plants. Continuing efforts were made to bring information on nuclear power to the public. AECL continued to participate in the International Fuel Cycle Evaluation; INFCE findings confirm the competitiveness of the CANDU reactor. Emphasis in the AECL research program was on safety, safeguards, health effects of radiation, waste management and new applications for nuclear power. The Radiochemical Company had sales of $49 million, with 97% of its business being in the export market. The Engineering Company is working on eight major projects totalling 12000 MW(e) as well as providing consulting service for the CANDU stations already in operation. The Chemical Company produced over 5000000 kg of heavy water. AECL revenues were $497.1 million in 1979, an increase of 41.6 percent over the previous year. Research and development expenditures increased 2 percent to $127.2 million. Net income for the year increased to $11.2 million from $5.2 million for the previous year. (LL)

  10. General aspects of the cyclotrons and radiochemical separation of: 11 C, 15 O, 18 F and 14 N

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The particle accelerators, as the cyclotrons, are extraordinarily important as tools for the radioisotope production and its application in the area of the medicine. In this time, another method exists for the production of artificial radioisotopes, based on the irradiation of samples with alpha particles or with neutrons coming from a natural radioisotope being obtained a neutron source (Ra + Be, Rn + Be, Po + Be). However, its can be obtained a great quantity of radioisotopes by means of cyclotrons in very short time, compared with other methods. After the second world war, artificial radioisotopes took place by means of reactors and its had many applications, not only medical and in little time the accelerators were manufactured that were more indispensable that the reactors to produce radioisotopes with medical aims. For this reason, the accelerators, in few years became in machines very important for the production of artificial radioisotopes and consequently its were developed techniques of radioactive traces progressively more sophisticated, since it is evident that the production of radioactive nuclei through nuclear reactors its cannot satisfy all the demands. In general terms, only the neutrons can be used as nuclear projectiles in reactors and as a result, the production spectra of radioisotopes is limited and as alternative it is unavoidable that the cyclotrons are a good tool for this end. The use of a cyclotron to produce radioisotopes, it can be justified, only if the following conditions are completed. 1. If the radioisotopes of an element produced in a reactor don't favor with the nuclear properties for the purposes of the traced studies, for example: if the half life is very short or very big, if the decay system not to suit him. 2. If the wanted radioisotope cannot produce in the reactor with enough specific activity. (Author)

  11. Relative fission product yield determination in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehl, Michael A.

    Fission product yield data sets are one of the most important and fundamental compilations of basic information in the nuclear industry. This data has a wide range of applications which include nuclear fuel burnup and nonproliferation safeguards. Relative fission yields constitute a major fraction of the reported yield data and reduce the number of required absolute measurements. Radiochemical separations of fission products reduce interferences, facilitate the measurement of low level radionuclides, and are instrumental in the analysis of low-yielding symmetrical fission products. It is especially useful in the measurement of the valley nuclides and those on the extreme wings of the mass yield curve, including lanthanides, where absolute yields have high errors. This overall project was conducted in three stages: characterization of the neutron flux in irradiation positions within the U.S. Geological Survey TRIGA Mark I Reactor (GSTR), determining the mass attenuation coefficients of precipitates used in radiochemical separations, and measuring the relative fission products in the GSTR. Using the Westcott convention, the Westcott flux, modified spectral index, neutron temperature, and gold-based cadmium ratios were determined for various sampling positions in the USGS TRIGA Mark I reactor. The differential neutron energy spectrum measurement was obtained using the computer iterative code SAND-II-SNL. The mass attenuation coefficients for molecular precipitates were determined through experiment and compared to results using the EGS5 Monte Carlo computer code. Difficulties associated with sufficient production of fission product isotopes in research reactors limits the ability to complete a direct, experimental assessment of mass attenuation coefficients for these isotopes. Experimental attenuation coefficients of radioisotopes produced through neutron activation agree well with the EGS5 calculated results. This suggests mass attenuation coefficients of molecular

  12. Reactor Physics Programme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Raedt, C

    2000-07-01

    The Reactor Physics and Department of SCK-CEN offers expertise in various areas of reactor physics, in particular in neutronics calculations, reactor dosimetry, reactor operation, reactor safety and control and non-destructive analysis on reactor fuel. This expertise is applied within the Reactor Physics and MYRRHA Research Department's own research projects in the VENUS critical facility, in the BR1 reactor and in the MYRRHA project (this project aims at designing a prototype Accelerator Driven System). Available expertise is also used in programmes external to the Department such as the reactor pressure steel vessel programme, the BR2 reactor dosimetry, and the preparation and interpretation of irradiation experiments. Progress and achievements in 1999 in the following areas are reported on: (1) investigations on the use of military plutonium in commercial power reactors; (2) neutron and gamma calculations performed for BR-2 and for other reactors; (3) the updating of neutron and gamma cross-section libraries; (4) the implementation of reactor codes; (6) the management of the UNIX workstations; and (6) fuel cycle studies.

  13. TMI-2 Reactor Building source term measurements: surfaces and basement water and sediment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Presented in this report are the results of radiochemical and elemental analyses performed on samples collected from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building from August 1979 to December 1983. The quantities of fission products and core materials that were measured on the external surfaces in the Reactor Building or in the water and sediment in its basement are summarized. Recent analysis results for access panels removed from the air cooling assembly and for liquid and particulate samples collected from the Reactor Building sump and reactor coolant drain tank are included in the report. Measurements show that 59% of the 3H, 2.7% of the 90Sr, 15% of the 129I, 20% of the 131I, and 42% of the 137Cs originally in the core at the time of the accident could be accounted for outside the core in the Reactor Building. With the exceptions of 90Sr and 144Ce, the vast majority of each radionuclide released was found dispersed in the water and sediment in the basement

  14. TMI-2 Reactor Building source term measurements: surfaces and basement water and sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McIsaac, C V; Keefer, D G

    1984-10-01

    Presented in this report are the results of radiochemical and elemental analyses performed on samples collected from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 Reactor Building from August 1979 to December 1983. The quantities of fission products and core materials that were measured on the external surfaces in the Reactor Building or in the water and sediment in its basement are summarized. Recent analysis results for access panels removed from the air cooling assembly and for liquid and particulate samples collected from the Reactor Building sump and reactor coolant drain tank are included in the report. Measurements show that 59% of the /sup 3/H, 2.7% of the /sup 90/Sr, 15% of the /sup 129/I, 20% of the /sup 131/I, and 42% of the /sup 137/Cs originally in the core at the time of the accident could be accounted for outside the core in the Reactor Building. With the exceptions of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 144/Ce, the vast majority of each radionuclide released was found dispersed in the water and sediment in the basement.

  15. Post-irradiation examination of Al-61 wt% U3Si fuel rods from the NRU reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the post-irradiation examination of 4 intact low enrichment uranium (LEU) fuel rods from the national research universal (NRU) reactor at the Chalk River Laboratories of AECL. The rods were irradiated during the period 1993 through 1995, under typical driver fuel operating conditions in NRU, i.e., nominal D2O coolant inlet temperature 37E C, inlet pressure 654 kPa and mass flow 12.4 L/s. Irradiation exposures ranged from 147 to 251 full-power days, corresponding to 40 to 84 atom % 235U burnup. The maximum rod power was ∼2 MW, with element linear power ratings up to 68 kW/m. Post-irradiation examinations, conducted in 1997, focused on optical metallography to measure cladding oxide thickness and fuel core and cladding microstructural examinations. The cladding oxide was approximately 24 : m thick at the mid-plane of fuel rods irradiated to 251 full-power days, with small areas up to 34 : m thick on the fins. The cladding retained significant ductility after irradiation, and its microstructure appeared unchanged. Fuel core diametral increases were small (up to 4%) and within the range previously observed on Al-61 wt% U3Si fuel irradiated in the NRU reactor. (author)

  16. Ship propulsion reactors technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper takes the state of the art on ship propulsion reactors technology. The french research programs with the corresponding technological stakes, the reactors specifications and advantages are detailed. (A.L.B.)

  17. Undergraduate reactor control experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sequence of reactor and related experiments has been a central element of a senior-level laboratory course at Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) for more than 20 yr. A new experiment has been developed where the students program and operate a computer controller that manipulates the speed of a secondary control rod to regulate TRIGA reactor power. Elementary feedback control theory is introduced to explain the experiment, which emphasizes the nonlinear aspect of reactor control where power level changes are equivalent to a change in control loop gain. Digital control of nuclear reactors has become more visible at Penn State with the replacement of the original analog-based TRIGA reactor control console with a modern computer-based digital control console. Several TRIGA reactor dynamics experiments, which comprise half of the three-credit laboratory course, lead to the control experiment finale: (a) digital simulation, (b) control rod calibration, (c) reactor pulsing, (d) reactivity oscillator, and (e) reactor noise

  18. Reactor System Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SMART NPP(Nuclear Power Plant) has been developed for duel purpose, electricity generation and energy supply for seawater desalination. The objective of this project IS to design the reactor system of SMART pilot plant(SMART-P) which will be built and operated for the integrated technology verification of SMART. SMART-P is an integral reactor in which primary components of reactor coolant system are enclosed in single pressure vessel without connecting pipes. The major components installed within a vessel includes a core, twelve steam generator cassettes, a low-temperature self pressurizer, twelve control rod drives, and two main coolant pumps. SMART-P reactor system design was categorized to the reactor coe design, fluid system design, reactor mechanical design, major component design and MMIS design. Reactor safety -analysis and performance analysis were performed for developed SMART=P reactor system. Also, the preparation of safety analysis report, and the technical support for licensing acquisition are performed

  19. A flashing driven moderator cooling system for CANDU reactors: Experimental and computational results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flashing-driven passive moderator cooling system is being developed at AECL for CANDU reactors. Preliminary simulations and experiments showed that the concept was feasible at normal operating power. However, flow instabilities were observed at low powers under conditions of variable and constant calandria inlet temperatures. This finding contradicted code predictions that suggested the loop should be stable at all powers if the calandria inlet temperature was constant. This paper discusses a series of separate-effects tests that were used to identify the sources of low-power instabilities in the experiments, and it explores methods to avoid them. It concludes that low-power instabilities can be avoided, thereby eliminating the discrepancy between the experimental and code results. Two factors were found to be important for loop stability: (1) oscillations in the calandria outlet temperature, and (2) flashing superheat requirements, and the presence of nucleation sites. By addressing these factors, we could make the loop operate in a stable manner over the whole power range and we could obtain good agreement between the experimental and code results. (author)

  20. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawakami, Hiroto

    1995-02-07

    A reactor container of the present invention has a structure that the reactor container is entirely at the same temperature as that at the inlet of the reactor and, a hot pool is incorporated therein, and the reactor container has is entirely at the same temperature and has substantially uniform temperature follow-up property transiently. Namely, if the temperature at the inlet of the reactor core changes, the temperature of the entire reactor container changes following this change, but no great temperature gradient is caused in the axial direction and no great heat stresses due to axial temperature distribution is caused. Occurrence of thermal stresses caused by the axial temperature distribution can be suppressed to improve the reliability of the reactor container. In addition, since the laying of the reactor inlet pipelines over the inside of the reactor is eliminated, the reactor container is made compact and the heat shielding structures above the reactor and a protection structure of container walls are simplified. Further, secondary coolants are filled to the outside of the reactor container to simplify the shieldings. The combined effects described above can improve economical property and reliability. (N.H.).

  1. Fossil nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maurette, M.

    1976-01-01

    The discussion of fossil nuclear reactors (the Oklo phenomenon) covers the earth science background, neutron-induced isotopes and reactor operating conditions, radiation-damage studies, and reactor modeling. In conclusion possible future studies are suggested and the significance of the data obtained in past studies is summarized. (JSR)

  2. The Advanced Candu reactor annunciation system - Compliance with IEC standard and US NRC guidelines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annunciation is a key plant information system that alerts Operations staff to important changes in plant processes and systems. Operational experience at nuclear stations worldwide has shown that many annunciation implementations do not provide the support needed by Operations staff in all plant situations. To address utility needs for annunciation improvement in Candu plants, AECL in partnership with Canadian Candu utilities, undertook an annunciation improvement program in the early nineties. The outcome of the research and engineering development program was the development and simulator validation of alarm processing, display, and information presentation techniques that provide practical and effective solutions to key operational deficiencies with earlier annunciation implementations. The improved annunciation capabilities consist of a series of detection, information processing and presentation functions called the Candu Annunciation Message List System (CAMLS). The CAMLS concepts embody alarm processing, presentation and interaction techniques, and strategies and methods for annunciation system configuration to ensure improved annunciation support for all plant situations, especially in upset situations where the alarm generation rate is high. The Advanced Candu Reactor (ACR) project will employ the CAMLS annunciation concepts as the basis for primary annunciation implementations. The primary annunciation systems will be implemented from CAMLS applications hosted on AECL Advanced Control Centre Information System (ACCIS) computing technology. The ACR project has also chosen to implement main control room annunciation aspects in conformance with the following international standard and regulatory review guide for control room annunciation practice: International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) 62241 - Main Control Room, Alarm Function and Presentation (International standard) US NRC NUREG-0700 - Human-System Interface Design Review Guidelines, Section 4

  3. 324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnett, J.M.

    1998-03-25

    The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the

  4. 324 Building radiochemical engineering cells, high-level vault, low-level vault, and associated areas closure plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Site, located adjacent to and north of Richland, Washington, is operated by the US Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The 324 Building is located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The 324 Building was constructed in the 1960s to support materials and chemical process research and development activities ranging from laboratory/bench-scale studies to full engineering-scale pilot plant demonstrations. In the mid-1990s, it was determined that dangerous waste and waste residues were being stored for greater than 90 days in the 324 Building Radiochemical Engineering Cells (REC) and in the High-Level Vault/Low-Level Vault (HLV/LLV) tanks. [These areas are not Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) permitted portions of the 324 Building.] Through the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) Milestone M-89, agreement was reached to close the nonpermitted RCRA unit in the 324 Building. This closure plan, managed under TPA Milestone M-20-55, addresses the identified building areas targeted by the Tri-Party Agreement and provides commitments to achieve the highest degree of compliance practicable, given the special technical difficulties of managing mixed waste that contains high-activity radioactive materials, and the physical limitations of working remotely in the areas within the subject closure unit. This closure plan is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1.0 provides the introduction, historical perspective, 324 Building history and current mission, and the regulatory basis and strategy for managing the closure unit. Chapters 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 discuss the detailed facility description, process information, waste characteristics, and groundwater monitoring respectively. Chapter 6.0 deals with the closure strategy and performance standard, including the closure activities for the B-Cell, D-Cell, HLV, LLV; piping and miscellaneous associated building areas. Chapter 7.0 addresses the

  5. Nuclear reactor repairing device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To enable free repairing of an arbitrary position in an LMFBR reactor. Constitution: A laser light emitted from a laser oscillator installed out of a nuclear reactor is guided into a portion to be repaired in the reactor by using a reflecting mirror, thereby welding or cutting it. The guidance of the laser out of the reactor into the reactor is performed by an extension tube depending into a through hole of a rotary plug, and the guidance of the laser light into a portion to be repaired is performed by the transmitting and condensing action of the reflecting mirror. (Kamimura, M.)

  6. Nuclear reactor physics

    CERN Document Server

    Stacey, Weston M

    2010-01-01

    Nuclear reactor physics is the core discipline of nuclear engineering. Nuclear reactors now account for a significant portion of the electrical power generated worldwide, and new power reactors with improved fuel cycles are being developed. At the same time, the past few decades have seen an ever-increasing number of industrial, medical, military, and research applications for nuclear reactors. The second edition of this successful comprehensive textbook and reference on basic and advanced nuclear reactor physics has been completely updated, revised and enlarged to include the latest developme

  7. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  8. Selenium in bread and durum wheats grown under a soil-supplementation regime in actual field conditions, determined by cyclic and radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on the ability of bread and durum wheat to accumulate selenium (Se) via a soil-addition procedure at sowing time. Total Se in mature-grain samples was determined by neutron activation analysis (cyclic and radiochemical). Results show that Se-supplementation at the top rate (100 g Se ha-1) can increase Se contents up to 2, 16, 18 and 20 times for Jordao, Roxo, Marialva and Celta cultivars, respectively, when compared to their unsupplemented crops. These findings do not preclude the need for weighing up an eventual trade-off between agrochemical costs, field logistics and Se recovery for alternative Se-biofortification methods. (author)

  9. Radiochemical Separation and Measurement by Mass Spectrometry with Magnetic Sector with Inductively Coupled Plasma source (ICP-SFMS of Plutonium Isotopes in Soil Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Torres-Cortés

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is twofold: to optimize the radiochemical separation of Plutonium (Pu from soil samples, and to measure the Pu concentration. Soil samples were prepared using acid digestion assisted by microwaves; then, Pu purification was carried out with Pu AG1X8 resin. Pu isotopes were measured using Mass Spectrometry with Magnetic Sector with Inductively Coupled Plasma source (ICP-SFMS. In order to reduce the interference due to the presence of 238UH+ in the samples a desolvation system (Apex was used. The limit of detection (LOD of Pu was determined. The efficiency of Pu recovery from soil samples varies from 70 to 93%.

  10. Radiochemical method for the simultaneous determination of 233U, 236U, 237Np, 236Pu, 238Pu, and 239Pu in biological materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical method has been developed for the determination of multiple isotopes of uranium, neptunium, and plutonium in biological materials. The elements are separated from the other sample constituents and from each other by anion exchange in halide media. Their recoveries are monitored by isotopic diluents. The amounts of the analyte and diluent isotopes of each element are measured alpha spectrometrically. The interelemental separation factors are generally greater than 102, and the recovery of each element ranges from 60% to 90%. 4 references, 1 table

  11. Spinning fluids reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  12. Dietary intake of Arsenic, Iodine and Selenium by adolescents in three Orphanages in Southern Ghana using Radiochemical Neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adolescents require optimum dietary supply of the essential trace minerals iodine (I) and selenium (Se). Their dietary exposure to arsenic (As), due to its natural presence in the diet, should be at levels that provides ample safety. Due to the late recognition of the critical nature of adolescent nutrition, there is scarce and almost non-existence of data on the adolescents dietary intake of As, I and Se; making it difficult for public health nutritionists to assess the adequacy of the dietary intake. The absence of data has also adversely affected the formulation of policies on adolescent nutrition and its integration into existing nutrition and health care programmes in Ghana. The dietary intake of As, I and Se for adolescents (12-15years) in three residential care orphanages, (Osu, Tutu- Akwapim, and Teshie), in Southern Ghana, have been evaluated by sampling their 24- hour total duplicate diets (including water) for 7-consecutive days using the duplicate diet sampling technique. The mass fraction of As, I and Se in the pooled blended lyophilized homogenates of duplicate diets was determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA). The validity of the RNAA methods for As, I and Se determinations were respectively checked by analyses of NIST SRM 1548a (Typical Diet). The chemical yields (recovery of the respective radiochemical separation of As, I and Se were 90- 92%, 83-88%, and 78-85%. The mass fraction of arsenic in the lyophilized diets for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie were 134 ± 104 [46-240], 146 ± 87 [39-355], and 189 ± 123 [69-348] ng As g-1 lyophilized matter. The dietary exposures to As were 47 ± 23 [17-84], 58 ± 44 [16-125] and 67 ± 28 [24-117] μg As day-1 for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie orphanages respectively. The mass fraction of I in the lyophilized diets were 287 ± 95 [206-397], 286 ± 109 [201-386], and 961 ± 142 [588-1766] ng I g-1 lyophilized matter, for Osu, Tutu-Akwapim and Teshie respectively. The dietary intake of I

  13. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  14. The bungling giant: Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980--1994

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Ian James

    From 1980--1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be "passively" or "inherently" safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, "piecemeal social engineering." Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  15. The bungling giant : Atomic Energy Canada Limited and next-generation nuclear technology, 1980-1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1980-1994 Atomic Energy Canada Limited (AECL), the Crown Corporation responsible for the development of nuclear technology in Canada, ventured into the market for small-scale, decentralized power systems with the Slowpoke Energy System (SES), a 10MW nuclear reactor for space heating in urban and remote areas. The SES was designed to be 'passively' or 'inherently' safe, such that even the most catastrophic failure of the system would not result in a serious accident (e.g. a meltdown or an explosion). This Canadian initiative, a beneficiary of the National Energy Program, was the first and by far the most successful attempt at a passively safe, decentralized nuclear power system anywhere in the world. Part one uses archival documentation and interviews with project leaders to reconstruct the history of the SES. The standard explanations for the failure of the project, cheap oil, public resistance to the technology, and lack of commercial expertise, are rejected. Part two presents an alternative explanation for the failure of AECL to commercialize the SES. In short, technological momentum towards large-scale nuclear designs led to structural restrictions for the SES project. These restrictions manifested themselves internally to the company (e.g., marginalization of the SES) and externally to the company (e.g., licensing). In part three, the historical lessons of the SES are used to refine one of the central tenets of Popper's political philosophy, 'piecemeal social engineering.' Popper's presentation of the idea is lacking in detail; the analysis of the SES provides some empirical grounding for the concept. I argue that the institutions surrounding traditional nuclear power represent a form utopian social engineering, leading to consequences such as the suspension of civil liberties to guarantee security of the technology. The SES project was an example of a move from the utopian social engineering of large-scale centralized nuclear technology to the piecemeal

  16. Evaluation of background concentrations of selected chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; L. Flint Hall,

    2016-05-05

    The U.S. Geological Survey and Idaho Department of Environmental Quality Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Oversight Program in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy determined background concentrations of selected chemical and radiochemical constituents in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer to aid with ongoing cleanup efforts at the INL. Chemical and radiochemical constituents including calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, silica, chloride, sulfate, fluoride, bicarbonate, chromium, nitrate, tritium, strontium-90, chlorine-36, iodine-129, plutonium-238, plutonium-239, -240 (undivided), americium-241, technetium-99, uranium-234, uranium-235, and uranium-238 were selected for the background study because they were either not analyzed in earlier studies or new data became available to give a more recent determination of background concentrations. Samples of water collected from wells and springs at and near the INL that were not believed to be influenced by wastewater disposal were used to identify background concentrations. Groundwater in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at and near the INL was divided into two major water types (western tributary and eastern regional) based on concentrations of lithium less than and greater than 5 micrograms per liter (μg/L). Median concentrations for each constituent were used to define the upper limit of background.

  17. Validation of the FDG (18F) radiochemical purity assay by thin layer chromatography; Validacao do ensaio de pureza radioquimica do FDG (18F) por cromatografia em camada delgada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, R.L.C.; Oliveira, M.L.; Nascimento, J.E.; Nascimento, N.C.E.S., E-mail: renata.lleao@hotmail.com [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Div. de Producao de Radiofarmacos

    2013-08-15

    All methodologies utilized in radiopharmaceutical industry should be validated in order to prove that they meet the requirements of analytical applications, ensuring the reliability of the results. At a radiopharmaceutical industry there is one challenge aspect: sometimes it is not possible use a stable standard to perform the validation analysis. In order to overcome this difficulty, the objective of this study was to suggest a validation protocol for these methodologies, based on the recommendations of RE n° 899/Agencia Nacional de Vigilancia Sanitaria (ANVISA), and prove its efficiency, performing the radiochemical purity validation test of FDG (18F), by TLC. To obtain the calibration curve, we suggested that the theoretical activity values should be determined using a dose calibrator, simultaneously of each analysis performed by TLC, for 5 hours. The method was linear (R{sup 2} of 0.996), precise (CV% <5%) and accurate (96.85% < accuracy < 102.56%). In relation to the robustness test, our experiments evaluated the influence of the distance travelled by mobile phase, variations at mobile phase concentration and type of chromatographic plate (silica gel on glass or aluminium plates). The detection and quantification limits were determined (321.9 and 1065.6 kBq, respectively). As expected, this methodology was nonspecific, showing a slight spot corresponding to the FDM. The proposed protocol was efficient and the methodology tested was effective to determine the radiochemical purity of FDG (18F), in accordance to the limits recommended by ANVISA. (author)

  18. Labelling of N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine with (123I-IMP. Radiochemical and biological control evaluation in medium size animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine (IMP) is an amine with appropriated physical-chemical properties that allows to cross the hemato encephalic barrier, allowing cerebral function studies and regional cerebral flux evaluation. These characteristics turns this amine into an important agent in the diagnosis and treatment of the cerebrovascular and neurologic diseases in nuclear medicine. The IMP labelling is a processing of isotopic nucleophilic substitution, where the ascorbic acid is used as a reducer agent and the copper-I as a catalyst. The radiochemical purity was evaluated by ascendant chromatography in paper and high efficiency liquid chromatography (HELC). The biodistribution was realized in Wistar rats. The animals were sacrified in times of 5, 15, 30, 60, 240 and 1440 min after the intravenous administration of the dosage. The absorption of the blood samples and organs were determined. Scintillographic images were obtained for the evaluation of the cerebral blood stream in rabbit, in times of 20 and 50 min after the radiopharmaceutical administration. The 123I-IMP were obtained in ideal conditions for the application in human beings for the cerebral perfusion evaluation, with labeling yield of 80-90% and radiochemical purity of 95-98%. The biodistribution study showed that 2,54% and 2,15% of the administrated dosage were absorbed in the rat brain in times of 60 and 240 min, respectively. The acquired images in rabbit revealed persistent cerebral absorption

  19. Fast Spectrum Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Todd, Donald; Tsvetkov, Pavel

    2012-01-01

    Fast Spectrum Reactors presents a detailed overview of world-wide technology contributing to the development of fast spectrum reactors. With a unique focus on the capabilities of fast spectrum reactors to address nuclear waste transmutation issues, in addition to the well-known capabilities of breeding new fuel, this volume describes how fast spectrum reactors contribute to the wide application of nuclear power systems to serve the global nuclear renaissance while minimizing nuclear proliferation concerns. Readers will find an introduction to the sustainable development of nuclear energy and the role of fast reactors, in addition to an economic analysis of nuclear reactors. A section devoted to neutronics offers the current trends in nuclear design, such as performance parameters and the optimization of advanced power systems. The latest findings on fuel management, partitioning and transmutation include the physics, efficiency and strategies of transmutation, homogeneous and heterogeneous recycling, in addit...

  20. Multipurpose research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The international symposium on the utilization of multipurpose research reactors and related international co-operation was organized by the IAEA to provide for information exchange on current uses of research reactors and international co-operative projects. The symposium was attended by about 140 participants from 36 countries and two international organizations. There were 49 oral presentations of papers and 24 poster presentations. The presentations were divided into 7 sessions devoted to the following topics: neutron beam research and applications of neutron scattering (6 papers and 1 poster), reactor engineering (6 papers and 5 posters), irradiation testing of fuel and material for fission and fusion reactors (6 papers and 10 posters), research reactor utilization programmes (13 papers and 4 posters), neutron capture therapy (4 papers), neutron activation analysis (3 papers and 4 posters), application of small reactors in research and training (11 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  1. Occurrence and hydrogeochemistry of radiochemical constituents in groundwater of Jefferson County and surrounding areas, southwestern Montana, 2007 through 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Rodney R.; Nimick, David A.; DeVaney, Rainie M.

    2014-01-01

    of this study, 24 percent exceeded the MCL of 30 micrograms per liter for uranium, 50 percent exceeded the proposed alternative MCL of 4,000 picocuries per liter for radon, and 27 percent exceeded the MCL of 5 micrograms per liter for combined radium-226 and radium-228. Elevated radioactive constituent values were detected in samples representing a large range of field properties and water types. Correlations between radioactive constituents and pH, dissolved oxygen, and most major ions were not statistically significant (p-value > 0.05) or were weakly correlated with Spearman correlation coefficients (rho) ranging from -0.5 to 0.5. Moderate correlations did exist between gross beta-particle activity and potassium (rho = 0.72 to 0.82), likely because one potassium isotope (potassium-40) is a beta-particle emitter. Total dissolved solids and specific conductance also were moderately correlated (rho = 0.62 to 0.71) with gross alpha-particle and gross beta-particle activity, indicating that higher radioactivity values can be associated with higher total dissolved solids. Correlations were evaluated among radioactive constituents. Moderate to strong correlations occurred between gross alpha-particle and beta-particle activities (rho = 0.77 to 0.96) and radium isotopes (rho = 0.78 to 0.92). Correlations between gross alpha-particle activity (72-hour count) and all analyzed radioactive constituents were statistically significant (p-value Radiochemical results varied temporally in samples from several of the thirty-eight wells sampled at least twice during the study. The time between successive sampling events ranged from about 1 to 10 months for 29 wells to about 3 years for the other 9 wells. Radiochemical constituents that varied by greater than 30 percent between sampling events included uranium (29 percent of the resampled wells), and radon (11 percent of the resampled wells), gross alpha-particle activity (38 percent of the resampled wells), and gross beta

  2. Reactor BR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2000-07-01

    The BR2 reactor is still SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facility. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. Various aspects concerning the operation of the BR2 Reactor, the utilisation of the CALLISTO loop and the irradiation programme, the BR2 R and D programme and the production of isotopes and of NTD-silicon are discussed. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  3. The Integral Fast Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integral Fast Reactor (IFR) is an innovative liquid metal reactor concept being developed at Argonne National Laboratory. It seeks to specifically exploit the inherent properties of liquid metal cooling and metallic fuel in a way that leads to substantial improvements in the characteristics of the complete reactor system. This paper describes the key features and potential advantages of the IFR concept, with emphasis on its safety characteristics. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  4. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1981 are described. The work of the Division is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and fusion reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and fusion reactor technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  5. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanbe, Mitsuru

    1997-04-04

    An LMFBR type reactor comprises a plurality of reactor cores in a reactor container. Namely, a plurality of pot containing vessels are disposed in the reactor vessel and a plurality of reactor cores are formed in a state where an integrated-type fuel assembly is each inserted to a pot, and a coolant pipeline is connected to each of the pot containing-vessel to cool the reactor core respectively. When fuels are exchanged, the integrated-type fuel assembly is taken out together with the pot from the reactor vessel in a state where the integrated-type fuel assembly is immersed in the coolants in the pot as it is. Accordingly, coolants are supplied to each of the pot containing-vessel connected with the coolant pipeline and circulate while cooling the integrated-type fuel assembly for every pot. Then, when the fuels are exchanged, the integrated type fuel assembly is taken out to the outside of the reactor together with the pot by taking up the pot from the pot-containing vessel. Then, neutron economy is improved to thereby improve reactor power and the breeding ratio. (N.H.)

  6. Microbial analysis of the buffer/container experiment at AECL`s Underground Research Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroes-Gascoyne, S.; Hamon, C.J.; Haveman, S.A.; Delaney, T.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, MB (Canada). Whiteshell Labs; Pedersen, K.; Ekendahl, S.; Jahromi, N.; Arlinger, J.; Hallbeck, L. [Univ. of Goeteborg, (Sweden). Dept. of General and Marine Microbiology; Daumas, S.; Dekeyser, K. [Guiges Recherche Appliquee en Microbiologie, Aix-en-Provence, (France)

    1996-05-01

    The Buffer/Container experiment was carried out for 2.5 years to examine the in-situ performance of compacted buffer material in a single emplacement borehole under vault-relevant conditions. During decommissioning of this experiment, numerous samples were taken for microbial analysis to determine if the naturally present microbial population in buffer material survived to conditions and to determine which groups of microorganisms would be dominant in such a simulated vault environment. Microbial analyses were initiated within 24 hour of sampling for all types of samples taken. The culture results showed an almost universal disappearance of viable microorganisms in the samples taken from near the heater surface. The microbial activity measurements confirmed the lack of viable organisms with very weak or no activity measured in most of these samples. Generally, aerobic heterotrophic culture conditions gave the highest mean colony-forming units (CFU) values at both 25 and 50 C. Under anaerobic conditions, and especially at 50 C, lower mean CFU values were obtained. In all samples analyzed, numbers of sulfate reducing bacteria were less than 1000 CFU/g dry material. Methanogens were either not present or were found in very low numbers. Anaerobic sulfur oxidizing bacteria were found in higher numbers in most sample types with sufficient moisture. The statistical evaluation of the culture data demonstrated clearly that the water content was the variable limiting the viability of the bacteria present, and not the temperature. 68 refs, 35 figs, 37 tabs.

  7. Characterisation of imperial college reactor centre legacy waste using gamma-ray spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shuhaimi, Alif Imran Mohd [Nuclear Energy Department, Regulatory Economics & Planning Division, Tenaga Nasional Berhad (Malaysia)

    2016-01-22

    Waste characterisation is a principal component in waste management strategy. The characterisation includes identification of chemical, physical and radiochemical parameters of radioactive waste. Failure to determine specific waste properties may result in sentencing waste packages which are not compliant with the regulation of long term storage or disposal. This project involved measurement of intensity and energy of gamma photons which may be emitted by radioactive waste generated during decommissioning of Imperial College Reactor Centre (ICRC). The measurement will use High Purity Germanium (HPGe) as Gamma-ray detector and ISOTOPIC-32 V4.1 as analyser. In order to ensure the measurements provide reliable results, two quality control (QC) measurements using difference matrices have been conducted. The results from QC measurements were used to determine the accuracy of the ISOTOPIC software.

  8. Characterisation of imperial college reactor centre legacy waste using gamma-ray spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuhaimi, Alif Imran Mohd

    2016-01-01

    Waste characterisation is a principal component in waste management strategy. The characterisation includes identification of chemical, physical and radiochemical parameters of radioactive waste. Failure to determine specific waste properties may result in sentencing waste packages which are not compliant with the regulation of long term storage or disposal. This project involved measurement of intensity and energy of gamma photons which may be emitted by radioactive waste generated during decommissioning of Imperial College Reactor Centre (ICRC). The measurement will use High Purity Germanium (HPGe) as Gamma-ray detector and ISOTOPIC-32 V4.1 as analyser. In order to ensure the measurements provide reliable results, two quality control (QC) measurements using difference matrices have been conducted. The results from QC measurements were used to determine the accuracy of the ISOTOPIC software.

  9. Aspects of the physics and chemistry of water radiolysis by fast neutrons and fast electrons in nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, D.R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Tsang, K.T. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Laughton, P.J

    1998-09-01

    Detailed radiation physics calculations of energy deposition have been done for the coolant of CANDU reactors and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). The geometry of the CANDU fuel channel was modelled in detail. Fluxes and energy-deposition rates for neutrons, recoil ions, photons, and fast electrons have been calculated using MCNP4B, WIMS-AECL, and specifically derived energy-transfer factors. These factors generate the energy/flux spectra of recoil ions from fast-neutron energy/flux spectra. The energy spectrum was divided into 89 discrete ranges (energy bins).The production of oxidizing species and net coolant radiolysis can be suppressed by the addition of hydrogen to the coolant of nuclear reactors. It is argued that the net dissociation of coolant by gamma rays is suppressed by lower levels of excess hydrogen than when dissociation is by ion recoils. This has consequences for the modelling of coolant radiolysis by homogeneous kinetics. More added hydrogen is required to stop water radiolysis by recoil ions acting alone than if recoil ions and gamma rays acted concurrently in space and time. Homogeneous kinetic models and experimental data suggest that track overlap is very inefficient in providing radicals from gamma-ray tracks to recombine molecular products in ion-recoil tracks. An inhomogeneous chemical model is needed that incorporates ionizing-particle track structure and track overlap. Such a model does not yet exist, but a number of limiting cases using homogeneous kinetics are discussed. There are sufficient uncertainties and contradictions in the data relevant to the radiolysis of reactor coolant that the relatively high CHC's (critical hydrogen concentration) observed in NRU reactor experiments (compared to model predictions) may be explainable by errors in fundamental data and understanding of water radiolysis under reactor conditions. The radiation chemistry program at CRL has been focused to generate quantitative water-radiolysis data in a

  10. One piece reactor removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Research Reactor No.3 (JRR-3) was the first reactor consisting of 'Japanese-made' components alone except for fuel and heavy water. After reaching its initial critical state in September 1962, JRR-3 had been in operation for 21 years until March 1983. It was decided that the reactor be removed en-bloc in view of the work schedule, cost and management of the reactor following the removal. In the special method developed jointly by the Japanese Atomic Energy Research Institute and Shimizu Construction Co., Ltd., the reactor main unit was cut off from the building by continuous core boring, with its major components bound in the block with biological shield material (heavy concrete), and then conveyed and stored in a large waste store building constructed near the reactor building. Major work processes described in this report include the cutting off, lifting, horizontal conveyance and lowering of the reactor main unit. The removal of the JRR-3 reactor main unit was successfully carried out safely and quickly by the en-block removal method with radiation exposure dose of the workers being kept at a minimum. Thus the high performance of the en-bloc removal method was demonstrated and, in addition, valuable knowhow and other data were obtained from the work. (Nogami, K.)

  11. Reactor Materials Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Walle, E

    2001-04-01

    The activities of the Reactor Materials Research Department of the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre SCK-CEN in 2000 are summarised. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) fusion, in particular mechanical testing; (2) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (3) nuclear fuel; and (4) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel (RPVS)

  12. Light water reactor program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franks, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s Light Water Reactor Program is outlined. The scope of the program consists of: design certification of evolutionary plants; design, development, and design certification of simplified passive plants; first-of-a-kind engineering to achieve commercial standardization; plant lifetime improvement; and advanced reactor severe accident program. These program activities of the Office of Nuclear Energy are discussed.

  13. Implementation of Wolsong Pump Model, Pressure Tube Deformation Model and Off-take Model into MARS Code for Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use vendor's code for regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to MARS code including quality assurance of the developed models. This first part of the research series presents the implementation and verification of the Wolsong pump model, the pressure tube deformation model, and the off-take model for arbitrary-angled branch pipes

  14. Implementation of Wolsong Pump Model, Pressure Tube Deformation Model and Off-take Model into MARS Code for Regulatory Auditing of CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, C.; Rhee, B. W.; Chung, B. D. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Y. J.; Kim, M. W. [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Korea currently has four operating units of the CANDU-6 type reactor in Wolsong. However, the safety assessment system for CANDU reactors has not been fully established due to lack of self-reliance technology. Although the CATHENA code had been introduced from AECL, it is undesirable to use vendor's code for regulatory auditing analysis. In Korea, the MARS code has been developed for decades and is being considered by KINS as a thermal hydraulic regulatory auditing tool for nuclear power plants. Before this decision, KINS (Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety) had developed RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code for CANDU safety analyses by modifying the model of existing PWR auditing tool, RELAP5/MOD3. The main purpose of this study is to transplant the CANDU models of RELAP5/MOD3/CANDU code to MARS code including quality assurance of the developed models. This first part of the research series presents the implementation and verification of the Wolsong pump model, the pressure tube deformation model, and the off-take model for arbitrary-angled branch pipes.

  15. Research reactor DHRUVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DHRUVA, a 100 MWt research reactor located at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, attained first criticality during August, 1985. The reactor is fuelled with natural uranium and is cooled, moderated and reflected by heavy water. Maximum thermal neutron flux obtained in the reactor is 1.8 X 1014 n/cm2/sec. Some of the salient design features of the reactor are discussed in this paper. Some important features of the reactor coolant system, regulation and protection systems and experimental facilities are presented. A short account of the engineered safety features is provided. Some of the problems that were faced during commissioning and the initial phase of power operation are also dealt upon

  16. TRIGA research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TRIGA (Training, Research, Isotope production, General-Atomic) has become the most used research reactor in the world with 65 units operating in 24 countries. The original patent for TRIGA reactors was registered in 1958. The success of this reactor is due to its inherent level of safety that results from a prompt negative temperature coefficient. Most of the neutron moderation occurs in the nuclear fuel (UZrH) because of the presence of hydrogen atoms, so in case of an increase of fuel temperature, the neutron spectrum becomes harder and neutrons are less likely to fission uranium nuclei and as a consequence the power released decreases. This inherent level of safety has made this reactor fit for training tool in university laboratories. Some recent versions of TRIGA reactors have been designed for medicine and industrial isotope production, for neutron therapy of cancers and for providing a neutron source. (A.C.)

  17. Mirror reactor surface study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey is presented of surface-related phenomena associated with the following mirror reactor elements: plasma first wall, ion sources, neutral beams, director converters, vacuum systems, and plasma diagnostics. A discussion of surface phenomena in possible abnormal reactor operation is included. Several studies which appear to merit immediate attention and which are essential to the development of mirror reactors are abstracted from the list of recommended areas for surface work. The appendix contains a discussion of the fundamentals of particle/surface interactions. The interactions surveyed are backscattering, thermal desorption, sputtering, diffusion, particle ranges in solids, and surface spectroscopic methods. A bibliography lists references in a number of categories pertinent to mirror reactors. Several complete published and unpublished reports on surface aspects of current mirror plasma experiments and reactor developments are also included

  18. Iris reactor conceptual design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.E.; Petrovic, B.; Paramonov, D.V. [Westinghouse Electric Comp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Galvin, M.; Todreas, N.E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States); Lombardi, C.V.; Maldari, F.; Ricotti, M.E. [Politecnico di Milano, Milan (Italy); Cinotti, L. [Ansaldo SpA, Genoa (Italy)

    2001-07-01

    IRIS (International Reactor Innovative and Secure) is a modular, integral, light water cooled, low-to-medium power (100-350 MWe) reactor which addresses the requirements defined by the US DOE for Generation IV reactors, i.e., proliferation resistance, enhanced safety, improved economics and fuel cycle sustainability. It relies on the proven technology of light water reactors and features innovative engineering, but it does not require new technology development. This paper discusses the current reference IRIS design, which features a 1000 MWt thermal core with proven 5%-enriched uranium oxide fuel and five-year long straight burn fuel cycle, integral reactor vessel housing helical tube steam generators and immersed spool pumps. Other major contributors to the high level of safety and economic attractiveness are the safety by design and optimized maintenance approaches, which allow elimination of some classes of accidents, lower capital cost, long operating cycle, and high capacity factors. (author)

  19. Status of French reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ballagny, A. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Saclay (France)

    1997-08-01

    The status of French reactors is reviewed. The ORPHEE and RHF reactors can not be operated with a LEU fuel which would be limited to 4.8 g U/cm{sup 3}. The OSIRIS reactor has already been converted to LEU. It will use U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} as soon as its present stock of UO{sub 2} fuel is used up, at the end of 1994. The decision to close down the SILOE reactor in the near future is not propitious for the start of a conversion process. The REX 2000 reactor, which is expected to be commissioned in 2005, will use LEU (except if the fast neutrons core option is selected). Concerning the end of the HEU fuel cycle, the best option is reprocessing followed by conversion of the reprocessed uranium to LEU.

  20. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  1. Nuclear reactor design

    CERN Document Server

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on core design and methods for design and analysis. It is based on advances made in nuclear power utilization and computational methods over the past 40 years, covering core design of boiling water reactors and pressurized water reactors, as well as fast reactors and high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. The objectives of this book are to help graduate and advanced undergraduate students to understand core design and analysis, and to serve as a background reference for engineers actively working in light water reactors. Methodologies for core design and analysis, together with physical descriptions, are emphasized. The book also covers coupled thermal hydraulic core calculations, plant dynamics, and safety analysis, allowing readers to understand core design in relation to plant control and safety.

  2. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities in the Division of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1977 are described. Works of the Division are development of multi-purpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, fusion reactor engineering, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor for Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology, and Committee on Reactor Physics. (Author)

  3. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering in fiscal 1983 are described. The work of the Department is closely related to development of multipurpose Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor and Fusion Reactor, and development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor carried out by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation. Contents of the report are achievements in fields such as nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, fusion neutronics, shielding, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, reactor control and diagnosis, and safeguards technology, and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (author)

  4. Reactor Engineering Division annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research activities conducted in Reactor Engineering Division in fiscal 1975 are summarized in this report. Works in the division are closely related to the development of multi-purpose High-temperature Gas Cooled Reactor, the development of Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation, and engineering research of thermonuclear fusion reactor. Many achievements are described concerning nuclear data and group constants, theoretical method and code development, integral experiment and analysis, shielding, heat transfer and fluid dynamics, reactor and nuclear instrumentation, dynamics analysis and control method development, fusion reactor technology and activities of the Committee on Reactor Physics. (auth.)

  5. AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION OF THE 236U DETECTION LIMIT IN THE SURFACE AIR USING RADIOCHEMICAL SEPARATION AND ALPHA-SPECTROMETRY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Gedeonov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to nuclear weapon testing, nuclear reactor accidents, uranium mining and nuclear fuel reprocessing, additional uranium has been introduced into the environment. 236U isotope is produced from 235U by capture of a thermal neutron and it can be used as an indicator for artificial uranium in the environment. In this paper the sensitive method for236U determination in the surface air is described. This method includes a total dissolution of the air dust in a mixture of mineral acids, uranium concentration and purification by anion-exchange chromatography. Long time measurements of the separated uranium fraction are made with the use of alpha-spectrometer based on PIPS-detector. The lower limit of detection for 236U in the surface air is determined as 5 • 10-9 Bq/m3 (2 ng/m3.

  6. Trace rare earth element analysis of IAEA Hair (HH-1), Animal Bone (H-5) and other biological standards by radiochemical neutron activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a rare earth group separation scheme was used to measure ultratrace levels of rare earth elements (REE) in IAEA Human Hair (HH-1), IAEA Animal Bone (H-5), NBS Bovine Liver (SRM 1577), and NBS Orchard Leaf (SRM 1571) standards. The REE concentrations in Human Hair and Animal Bone range from 10-8 g/g to 10-11 g/g and their chondritic normalized REE patterns show a negative Eu anomaly and follow as a smooth function of the REE ionic radii. The REE patterns for NBS Bovine Liver and Orchard Leaf are identical except that their concentrations are higher. The similarity among the REE patterns suggest that the REE do not appear to be fractionated during the intake of biological materials by animals or humans. (author)

  7. BAR-CODE BASED WEIGHT MEASUREMENT STATION FOR PHYSICAL INVENTORY TAKING OF PLUTONIUM OXIDE CONTAINERS AT THE MINING AND CHEMICAL COMBINE RADIOCHEMICAL REPROCESSING PLANT NEAR KRASNOYARSK, SIBERIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the technical tasks being implemented to computerize the physical inventory taking (PIT) at the Mining and Chemical Combine (Gorno-Khimichesky Kombinat, GKhK) radiochemical plant under the US/Russian cooperative nuclear material protection, control, and accounting (MPC and A) program. Under the MPC and A program, Lab-to-Lab task agreements with GKhK were negotiated that involved computerized equipment for item verification and confirmatory measurement of the Pu containers. Tasks under Phase I cover the work for demonstrating the plan and procedures for carrying out the comparison of the Pu container identification on the container with the computerized inventory records. In addition to the records validation, the verification procedures include the application of bar codes and bar coded TIDs to the Pu containers. Phase II involves the verification of the Pu content. A plan and procedures are being written for carrying out confirmatory measurements on the Pu containers

  8. Reactor performance calculations for water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The principles of nuclear, thermal and hydraulic performance calculations for water cooled reactors are discussed. The principles are illustrated by describing their implementation in the UKAEA PATRIARCH scheme of computer codes. This material was originally delivered as a course of lectures at the Technical University of Helsinki in Summer of 1969.

  9. Safety of research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The number of research reactors that have been constructed worldwide for civilian applications is about 651. Of the reactors constructed, 284 are currently in operation, 258 are shut down and 109 have been decommissioned. More than half of all operating research reactors worldwide are over thirty years old. During this long period of time national priorities have changed. Facility ageing, if not properly managed, has a natural degrading effect. Many research reactors face concerns with the obsolescence of equipment, lack of experimental programmes, lack of funding for operation and maintenance and loss of expertise through ageing and retirement of the staff. Other reactors of the same vintage maintain effective ageing management programmes, conduct active research programmes, develop and retain high calibre personnel and make important contributions to society. Many countries that operate research reactors neither operate nor plan to operate power reactors. In most of these countries there is a tendency not to create a formal regulatory body. A safety committee, not always independent of the operating organization, may be responsible for regulatory oversight. Even in countries with nuclear power plants, a regulatory regime differing from the one used for the power plants may exist. Concern is therefore focused on one tail of a continuous spectrum of operational performance. The IAEA has been sending missions to review the safety of research reactors in Member States since 1972. Some of the reviews have been conducted pursuant to the IAEA' functions and responsibilities regarding research reactors that are operated within the framework of Project and Supply Agreements between Member States and the IAEA. Other reviews have been conducted upon request. All these reviews are conducted following procedures for Integrated Safety Assessment of Research Reactors (INSARR) missions. The prime objective of these missions has been to conduct a comprehensive operational safety

  10. Obtention process of phosphorus 32 starting from commercial sulfur and design and construction of the radiochemical separation prototype; Proceso de obtencion de fosforo-32 a partir de azufre comercial y diseno y construccion del prototipo de separacion radioquimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duarte A, C.; Alanis M, J.; Gutierrez R, C. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    In this work an obtention process of phosphorus 32 ({sup 32} P) in orthophosphoric acid form (H{sub 3}{sup 32}PO{sub 4}) is described starting from commercial sulfur. Also the design and construction of the experimental prototype used in the radiochemical separation and their results in three tests carried out is reported. (Author)

  11. Bothropstoxin-I reduces evoked acetylcholine release from rat motor nerve terminals: radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia-de-Sá, Paulo; Noronha-Matos, José B; Timóteo, Maria A; Ferreirinha, Fátima; Marques, Patrícia; Soares, Andreimar M; Carvalho, Cicilia; Cavalcante, Walter L G; Gallacci, Márcia

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the biological activity profile of the snake venom components is fundamental for improving the treatment of snakebite envenomings and may also contribute for the development of new potential therapeutic agents. In this work, we tested the effects of BthTX-I, a Lys49 PLA(2) homologue from the Bothrops jararacussu snake venom. While this toxin induces conspicuous myonecrosis by a catalytically independent mechanism, a series of in vitro studies support the hypothesis that BthTX-I might also exert a neuromuscular blocking activity due to its ability to alter the integrity of muscle cell membranes. To gain insight into the mechanisms of this inhibitory neuromuscular effect, for the first time, the influence of BthTX-I on nerve-evoked ACh release was directly quantified by radiochemical and real-time video-microscopy methods. Our results show that the neuromuscular blockade produced by in vitro exposure to BthTX-I (1 μM) results from the summation of both pre- and postsynaptic effects. Modifications affecting the presynaptic apparatus were revealed by the significant reduction of nerve-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release; real-time measurements of transmitter exocytosis using the FM4-64 fluorescent dye fully supported radiochemical data. The postsynaptic effect of BthTX-I was characterized by typical histological alterations in the architecture of skeletal muscle fibers, increase in the outflow of the intracellular lactate dehydrogenase enzyme and progressive depolarization of the muscle resting membrane potential. In conclusion, these findings suggest that the neuromuscular blockade produced by BthTX-I results from transient depolarization of skeletal muscle fibers, consequent to its general membrane-destabilizing effect, and subsequent decrease of evoked ACh release from motor nerve terminals. PMID:23142504

  12. The platinum group elements and gold: analysis by radiochemical and instrumental neutron activation analysis and relevance to geological exploration and related problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reeves, S.; Plimer, I. R. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of research conducted with the support of the Australian Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering, at the University of Melbourne, School of Earth Sciences, Radiochemical Neutron Activation Laboratory. The primary objective of this research is to realize the high potential of the platinum group elements (PGE) and gold to the solution of petrogenetic problems, the study of magma generation and magmatic processes in mafic/ultramafic rock suites, as tracers in hydrothermal ore formation. The PGEs (Os, Ru, Ir, Pt, Pd and Rh) are among the least abundant of all elements on earth with unique properties such as high melting points, high electrical and thermal conductivity, high density, strength and toughness as alloys. They exhibit both siderophile and chalcophile characteristics and are valuable tools in providing information about magmatic processes, in particular S-saturation, as well as crystal fractionation trends. Two distinct groups of PGEs are discerned; the IPGEs (Ru, Os, Ir) and the PPGEs (Pt, Pd, Rh, Au) on the basis of their behaviour during fractionation processes. Using chondrite normalized PGE patterns it is possible to distinguish between sulphides that segregated from primitive magmas, such as komatiites, and sulphides which segregated from more fractionated magmas, such as tholeiites. It is critical to the understanding of these processes to be able to analyse key elements, such as the PGE and gold, in the parts per billion to parts per trillion range. Platinum group elements and Au were determined by radiochemical neutron activation analysis using a modified NiS fire-assay preconcentration technique, adapted from procedures first used by Robert, R.V. D. and van Wyk, E. (1975) . Detection limits are generally 0.005-0.01 ppb (Au and Ir), 0.1-0.2 ppb (Pd and Pt), and 0.1-0.5 ppb for Ru. 9 refs.

  13. Reactor Engineering Department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1992 (April 1, 1992-March 31, 1993). The major Department's programs promoted in the year are the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor, the design activities of advanced reactor system and development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the engineering applications including TRU incineration. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on the nuclear data and group constants, the developments of theoretical methods and codes, the reactor physics experiments and their analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project were also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  14. Reactor engineering department annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the research and development activities in the Department of Reactor Engineering during the fiscal year of 1989 (April 1, 1989 - March 31, 1990). One of major Department's programs is the assessment of the high conversion light water reactor and the design activities of advanced reactor system. Development of a high energy proton linear accelerator for the nuclear engineering including is also TRU incineration promoted. Other major tasks of the Department are various basic researches on nuclear data and group constants, theoretical methods and code development, on reactor physics experiments and analyses, fusion neutronics, radiation shielding, reactor instrumentation, reactor control/diagnosis, thermohydraulics, technology assessment of nuclear energy and technology developments related to the reactor physics facilities. The cooperative works to JAERI's major projects such as the high temperature gas cooled reactor or the fusion reactor and to PNC's fast reactor project also progressed. The activities of the Research Committee on Reactor Physics are also summarized. (author)

  15. Slurry reactor design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, J.M.; Degen, B.D.; Cady, G.; Deslate, F.D.; Summers, R.L. (Bechtel Group, Inc., San Francisco, CA (USA)); Akgerman, A. (Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (USA)); Smith, J.M. (California Univ., Davis, CA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    The objective of these studies was to perform a realistic evaluation of the relative costs of tublar-fixed-bed and slurry reactors for methanol, mixed alcohols and Fischer-Tropsch syntheses under conditions where they would realistically be expected to operate. The slurry Fischer-Tropsch reactor was, therefore, operated at low H{sub 2}/CO ratio on gas directly from a Shell gasifier. The fixed-bed reactor was operated on 2.0 H{sub 2}/CO ratio gas after adjustment by shift and CO{sub 2} removal. Every attempt was made to give each reactor the benefit of its optimum design condition and correlations were developed to extend the models beyond the range of the experimental pilot plant data. For the methanol design, comparisons were made for a recycle plant with high methanol yield, this being the standard design condition. It is recognized that this is not necessarily the optimum application for the slurry reactor, which is being proposed for a once-through operation, coproducing methanol and power. Consideration is also given to the applicability of the slurry reactor to mixed alcohols, based on conditions provided by Lurgi for an Octamix{trademark} plant using their standard tubular-fixed reactor technology. 7 figs., 26 tabs.

  16. Test reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  17. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts

  18. Fast Breeder Reactor studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Till, C.E.; Chang, Y.I.; Kittel, J.H.; Fauske, H.K.; Lineberry, M.J.; Stevenson, M.G.; Amundson, P.I.; Dance, K.D.

    1980-07-01

    This report is a compilation of Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) resource documents prepared to provide the technical basis for the US contribution to the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Evaluation. The eight separate parts deal with the alternative fast breeder reactor fuel cycles in terms of energy demand, resource base, technical potential and current status, safety, proliferation resistance, deployment, and nuclear safeguards. An Annex compares the cost of decommissioning light-water and fast breeder reactors. Separate abstracts are included for each of the parts.

  19. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Operating Units Status Report --- Licensed Operating Reactors provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff on NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non- power reactors in the US

  20. nuclear reactor design calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work , the sensitivity of different reactor calculation methods, and the effect of different assumptions and/or approximation are evaluated . A new concept named error map is developed to determine the relative importance of different factors affecting the accuracy of calculations. To achieve this goal a generalized, multigroup, multi dimension code UAR-DEPLETION is developed to calculate the spatial distribution of neutron flux, effective multiplication factor and the spatial composition of a reactor core for a period of time and for specified reactor operating conditions. The code also investigates the fuel management strategies and policies for the entire fuel cycle to meet the constraints of material and operating limitations

  1. Course on reactor physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Germany only few students graduate in nuclear technology, therefore the NPP operating companies are forced to develop their own education and training concepts. AREVA NP has started together with the Technical University of Dresden a one-week course ''reactor physics'' that includes the know-how of the nuclear power plant construction company. The Technical University of Dresden has the training reactor AKR-2 that is retrofitted by modern digital instrumentation and control technology that allows the practical training of reactor control.

  2. PWR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a PWR with a primary circuit, consisting of a reactor pressure vessel, a steam generator and a reactor coolant pump, hot coolant is removed by means of an auxiliary system containing h.p. pumps for feeding water into the primary circuit and being connected with a pipe, originating at the upper part, which has got at least one isolating value. This is done by opening an outlet in a part of the auxiliary system that has got a lower pressure than the reactor vessel. Preferably a water jet pump is used for mixing with the water of the auxiliary system. (orig.)

  3. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuzzo, Ralph G.; Mitrovski, Svetlana M.

    2011-03-22

    A microfluidic electrochemical reactor includes an electrode and one or more microfluidic channels on the electrode, where the microfluidic channels are covered with a membrane containing a gas permeable polymer. The distance between the electrode and the membrane is less than 500 micrometers. The microfluidic electrochemical reactor can provide for increased reaction rates in electrochemical reactions using a gaseous reactant, as compared to conventional electrochemical cells. Microfluidic electrochemical reactors can be incorporated into devices for applications such as fuel cells, electrochemical analysis, microfluidic actuation, pH gradient formation.

  4. Measurement of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sulphur is an important element in some food chains and the release of radioactive sulphur to the environment must be closely controlled if the chemical form is such that it is available or potentially available for entering food chains. The presence of sulphur-35 in the coolant gas of the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor warranted a study to assess the quantity and chemical form of the radioactive sulphur in order to estimate the magnitude of the potential environmental hazard which might arise from the release of coolant gas from Civil Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactors. A combination of gas chromatographic and radiochemical analyses revealed carbonyl sulphide to be the only sulphur-35 compound present in the coolant gas of the Windscale Reactor. The concentration of carbonyl sulphide was found to lie in the range 40 to 100 x 10-9 parts by volume and the sulphur-35 specific activity was about 20 mCi per gramme. The analytical techniques are described in detail. The sulphur-35 appears to be derived from the sulphur and chlorine impurities in the graphite. A method for the preparation of carbonyl sulphide labelled with sulphur-35 is described. (author)

  5. Production and use of {sup 18}F by TRIGA nuclear reactor: a first report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgio, N.; Ciavola, C.; Festinesi, A.; Capannesi, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-02-01

    The irradiation and radiochemical facilities at public research centre can contribute to the start up of the regional PET centre. In particular, the TRIGA reactor of Casaccia Research Centre could produce a sufficient amount of {sup 18}F to start up a PET centre and successively integrated the cyclotron production. This report establishes, in the light of the preliminary experimental works, a guideline to the reactor`s production and extraction of {sup 18}F in a convenient form for the synthesis of the most representative PET radiopharmaceutical: {sup 18}F-FDG. [Italiano] Le facilities di irraggiamento e i laboratori Radiochimici dei Centri Statali di Ricerca possono contribuire allo sviluppo di centri regionali PET (Tomografia ed Emissione Positronica). In particolare, il reattore TRIGA del Centro Ricerca Casaccia potrebbe produrre un quantitativo di {sup 18}F sufficiente alle attivita` formative propedeutiche al centro PET che, successivamente sarebbe in grado di avviare una propria produzione da ciclotrone. Questo rapporto stabilisce le linee guida sperimentali per la produzione del {sup 18}F da reattore nucleare e la sua successiva estrazione in una forma conveniente per la sintesi del piu` rappresentativo dei radiofarmaci PET: il {sup 18}F-FDG.

  6. Concept of erbium doped uranium oxide fuel cycle in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is aimed at the development of a fuel cycle concept for host countries with a lack of nuclear infrastructure. To minimize plutonium proliferation concern the adoption of long-life core with no fuel radiochemical treatment on site is suggested. Current investigation relies upon light water reactor technology and plutonium-free fresh fuel. Erbium doped to uranium oxide (enrichment 19.8%) fuel is selected as the reference. Such a high enrichment is selected in attempt to approach the longest irradiation time in one batch mode. In addition to that, uranium enriched up to 20% does not consider as a nuclear material for direct use in weapon manufacture. A sequence of two irradiation cycles for the same fuel rods in two different light water reactors is the key feature of the advocated approach. It is found that the synergism of PWR and pressure tube graphite reactor offers fuel burnup up to 140 GWd/tHM without compromising safety characteristics. Being as large as 8% in the final isotopic vector, fraction of 238Pu serves as an inherent protective measure against plutonium proliferation. (author)

  7. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given

  8. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL COMPOSITION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, W.C.

    1961-01-10

    Uranium-aluminum alloys in which boron is homogeneously dispersed by adding it as a nickel boride are described. These compositions have particular utility as fuels for neutronic reactors, boron being present as a burnable poison.

  9. Pulsed fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This summer school specialized in examining specific fusion center systems. Papers on scientific feasibility are first presented: confinement of high-beta plasma, liners, plasma focus, compression and heating and the use of high power electron beams for thermonuclear reactors. As for technological feasibility, lectures were on the theta-pinch toroidal reactors, toroidal diffuse pinch, electrical engineering problems in pulsed magnetically confined reactors, neutral gas layer for heat removal, the conceptual design of a series of laser fusion power plants with ''Saturn'', implosion experiments and the problem of the targets, the high brightness lasers for plasma generation, and topping and bottoming cycles. Some problems common to pulsed reactors were examined: energy storage and transfer, thermomechanical and erosion effects in the first wall and blanket, the problems of tritium production, radiation damage and neutron activation in blankets, and the magnetic and inertial confinement

  10. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2002-04-01

    The BR2 materials testing reactor is one of SCK-CEN's most important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. In 2001, the reactor was operated for a total of 123 days at a mean power of 59 MW in order to satisfy the irradiation conditions of the internal and external programmes using mainly the CALLISTO PWR loop. The mean consumption of fresh fuel elements was 5.26 per 1000 MWd. Main achievements in 2001 included the development of a three-dimensional full-scale model of the BR2 reactor for simulation and prediction of irradiation conditions for various experiments; the construction of the FUTURE-MT device designed for the irradiation of fuel plates under representative conditions of geometry, neutron spectrum, heat flux and thermal-hydraulic conditions and the development of in-pile instrumentation and a data acquisition system.

  11. Reactor BR2. Introduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubel, P

    2001-04-01

    The BR2 is a materials testing reactor and is still one of SCK-CEN's important nuclear facilities. After an extensive refurbishment to compensate for the ageing of the installation, the reactor was restarted in April 1997. During the last three years, the availability of the installation was maintained at an average level of 97.6 percent. In the year 2000, the reactor was operated for a total of 104 days at a mean power of 56 MW. In 2000, most irradiation experiments were performed in the CALLISTO PWR loop. The report describes irradiations achieved or under preparation in 2000, including the development of advanced facilities and concept studies for new programmes. An overview of the scientific irradiation programmes as well as of the R and D programme of the BR2 reactor in 2000 is given.

  12. Reactor Neutrino Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present a review of the antineutrino spectra emitted from reactors. Knowledge of these and their associated uncertainties are crucial for neutrino oscillation studies. The spectra used to-date have been determined by either conversion of measured electron spectra to antineutrino spectra or by summing over all of the thousands of transitions that makeup the spectra using modern databases as input. The uncertainties in the subdominant corrections to beta-decay plague both methods, and we provide estimates of these uncertainties. Improving on current knowledge of the antineutrino spectra from reactors will require new experiments. Such experiments would also address the so-called reactor neutrino anomaly and the possible origin of the shoulder observed in the antineutrino spectra measured in recent high-statistics reactor neutrino experiments.

  13. Experience with Kamini reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamini is a 233U fuelled, 30 kW(th) research reactor. It is one of the best neutron source facility with a core average flux of 1012 n/cm2/s in IGCAR used for neutron radiography of active and nonradioactive objects, activation analysis and radiation physics research. The core consists of nine plate type fuel elements with a total fuel inventory of 590 g of 233U. Two safety control plates made of cadmium are used for start up and shutdown of the reactor. Three beam tubes, two-thimble irradiation site outside reflector and one irradiation site nearer to the core constitute the testing facilities of Kamini. Kamini attained first criticality on 29th October 96 and nominal power of 30 kW in September 1997. This paper covers the design features of the reactor, irradiation facilities and their utilities and operating experience of the reactor. (author)

  14. Reactor pressure boundary materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With a long-term operation of nuclear power plants, the component materials are degraded under severe reactor conditions such as neutron irradiation, high temperature, high pressure and corrosive environment. It is necessary to establish the reliable and practical technologies for improving and developing the component materials and for evaluating the mechanical properties. Especially, it is very important to investigate the technologies for reactor pressure boundary materials such as reactor vessel and pipings in accordance with their critical roles. Therefore, this study was focused on developing and advancing the microstructural/micro-mechanical evaluation technologies, and on evaluating the neutron irradiation characteristics and radiation effects analysis technology of the reactor pressure boundary materials, and also on establishing a basis of nuclear material property database

  15. Fusion Reactor Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    2002-04-01

    The objective of SCK-CEN's programme on fusion reactor materials is to contribute to the knowledge on the radiation-induced behaviour of fusion reactor materials and components as well as to help the international community in building the scientific and technical basis needed for the construction of the future reactor. Ongoing projects include: the study of the mechanical and chemical (corrosion) behaviour of structural materials under neutron irradiation and water coolant environment; the investigation of the characteristics of irradiated first wall material such as beryllium; investigations on the management of materials resulting from the dismantling of fusion reactors including waste disposal. Progress and achievements in these areas in 2001 are discussed.

  16. New reactor type proposed

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Russian scientists at the Research Institute of Nuclear Power Engineering in Moscow are hoping to develop a new reactor that will use lead and bismuth as fuel instead of uranium and plutonium" (1/2 page).

  17. Special lecture on nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book gives a special lecture on nuclear reactor, which is divided into two parts. The first part has explanation on nuclear design of nuclear reactor and analysis of core with theories of integral transports, diffusion Nodal, transports Nodal and Monte Carlo skill parallel computer and nuclear calculation and speciality of transmutation reactor. The second part deals with speciality of nuclear reactor and control with nonlinear stabilization of nuclear reactor, nonlinear control of nuclear reactor, neural network and control of nuclear reactor, control theory of observer and analysis method of Adomian.

  18. Evaluation of spiral wound reverse osmosis for four radioactive waste processing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pilot-scale spiral wound reverse osmosis rig was used to treat four significantly different radioactive waste streams, three of which were generated at the Chalk River Laboratories at AECL. These streams included: 1. A chemical decontamination (CD/DC) waste stream which is routinely treated by the plant-scale membrane system at CRL; 2. Reactor waste which is a dilute radioactive waste stream (containing primarily tritium and organic acids), and it an effluent from the operating reactors at AECL; 3. An ion exchange regenerant waste stream which contains a mixture of stream (1) (CD/DC), blended with secondary waste from ion exchange regeneration; 4. Boric acid simulated waste which is a by-product waste of the PWR reactors. This was the only stream treated that was not generated as a waste liquid at AECL. For the first three streams specified above, reverse osmosis was used to remove chemical and radiochemical impurities from the water with efficiencies usually exceeding 99%. In these three cases the 'permeate' or clean water was the product of the process. In the case of stream 4, reverse osmosis was used in a recovery application for the purpose of recycling boric acid back to the reactor, with the concentrate being the 'product'. Reverse osmosis technology was successfully demonstrated for the treatment of all four streams. Prefiltration and oxidation (with photocatalytic continuous oxidation technology) were evaluated as pretreatment alternatives for streams 1, 2, and 3. The results indicated that the effective crossflow velocity through and membrane vessel was more important in determining the extent of membrane fouling than the specific pretreatment strategy employed. (author)

  19. Jet-Stirred Reactors

    OpenAIRE

    Herbinet, Olivier; Guillaume, Dayma

    2013-01-01

    The jet-stirred reactor is a type of ideal continuously stirred-tank reactor which is well suited for gas phase kinetic studies. It is mainly used to study the oxidation and the pyrolysis of hydrocarbon and oxygenated fuels. These studies consist in recording the evolution of the conversion of the reactants and of the mole fractions of reaction products as a function of different parameters such as reaction temperature, residence time, pressure and composition of the inlet gas. Gas chromatogr...

  20. Generation IV reactors: economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operating nuclear reactors were built over a short period: no more than 10 years and today their average age rounds 18 years. EDF (French electricity company) plans to renew its reactor park over a far longer period : 30 years from 2020 to 2050. According to EDF this objective implies 3 constraints: 1) a service life of 50 to 60 years for a significant part of the present operating reactors, 2) to be ready to built a generation 3+ unit in 2020 which infers the third constraint: 3) to launch the construction of an EPR (European pressurized reactor) prototype as soon as possible in order to have it operating in 2010. In this scheme, generation 4 reactor will benefit the feedback experience of generation 3 and will take over in 2030. Economic analysis is an important tool that has been used by the generation 4 international forum to select the likely future reactor systems. This analysis is based on 4 independent criteria: the basic construction cost, the construction time, the operation and maintenance costs and the fuel cycle cost. This analysis leads to the evaluation of the global cost of electricity generation and of the total investment required for each of the reactor system. The former defines the economic competitiveness in a de-regulated energy market while the latter is linked to the financial risk taken by the investor. It appears, within the limits of the assumptions and models used, that generation 4 reactors will be characterized by a better competitiveness and an equivalent financial risk when compared with the previous generation. (A.C.)

  1. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the year 1976. The main items reported on are: a) the process supervision and control which have focused on core monitoring and control, and operator-process communication; b) the fuel performance and safety behavior which have provided data and analytical descriptions of the thermal, mechanical and chemical behavior of fuel under various operating conditions; c) the reactor operations and d) the administration and finance

  2. Nuclear reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear reactor fuel element comprising a column of vibration compacted fuel which is retained in consolidated condition by a thimble shaped plug. The plug is wedged into gripping engagement with the wall of the sheath by a wedge. The wedge material has a lower coefficient of expansion than the sheath material so that at reactor operating temperature the retainer can relax sufficient to accommodate thermal expansion of the column of fuel. (author)

  3. Department of Reactor Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risø National Laboratory, Roskilde

    The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included.......The general development of the Department of Reactor Technology at Risø during 1981 is presented, and the activities within the major subject fields are described in some detail. Lists of staff, publications, and computer programs are included....

  4. Moon base reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  5. BWR type nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To simplify the structure of an emergency core cooling system while suppressing the flow out of coolants upon rapture accidents in a coolant recycling device of BWR type reactors. Constitution: Recirculation pumps are located at a position higher than the reactor core in a pressure vessel, and the lower plenum is bisected vertically by a partition plate. Further, a gas-liquid separator is surrounded with a wall and the water level at the outer side of the wall is made higher than the water level in the inside of the wall. In this structure, coolants are introduced from the upper chamber in the lower plenum into the reactor core, and the steams generated in the reactor core are separated in the gas-liquid separator, whereby the separated liquid is introduced as coolants by way of the inner chamber into the lower chamber of the lower plenum and further sent by way of the outer chamber into the reactor core. Consequently, idle rotation of the recycling pumps due to the flow-in of saturated water is prevented and loss of coolants in the reactor core can also be prevented upon raptures in the pipeway and the driving section of the pump connected to the pressure vessel and in the bottom of the pressure vessel. (Horiuchi, T.)

  6. OECD Halden reactor project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the nineteenth annual Report on the OECD Halden Reactor Project, describing activities at the Project during 1978, the last year of the 1976-1978 Halden Agreement. Work continued in two main fields: test fuel irradiation and fuel research, and computer-based process supervision and control. Project research on water reactor fuel focusses on various aspects of fuel behavior under normal, and off-normal transient conditions. In 1978, participating organisations continued to submit test fuel for irradiation in the Halden boiling heavy-water reactor, in instrumented test assemblies designed and manufactured by the Project. Work included analysis of the impact of fuel design and reactor operating conditions on fuel cladding behavior. Fuel performance modelling included characterization of thermal and mechanical behavior at high burn-up, of fuel failure modes, and improvement of data qualification procedures to reduce and quantify error bands on in-reactor measurements. Instrument development yielded new or improved designs for measuring rod temperature, internal pressure, axial neutron flux shape determination, and for detecting cladding defects. Work on computer-based methods of reactor supervision and control included continued development of a system for predictive core surveillance, and of special mathematical methods for core power distribution control

  7. Reactor neutron activation for multielemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron Activation Analysis using single comparator (K0 NAA method) has been used for obtaining multielemental profiles in a variety of matrices related to environment. Gold was used as the comparator. Neutron flux was characterised by determining f, the epithermal to thermal neutron flux ratio and cc, the deviation from ideal shape of the neutron spectrum. The f and a were determined in different irradiation positions in APSARA reactor, PCF position in CIRUS reactor and tray rod position in Dhruva reactor using both cadmium cut off and multi isotope detector methods. High resolution gamma ray spectrometry was used for radioactive assay of the activation products. This technique is being used for multielement analysis in a variety of matrices like lake sediments, sea nodules and crusts, minerals, leaves, cereals, pulses, leaves, water and soil. Elemental profiles of the sediments corresponding to different depths from Nainital lake were determined and used to understand the history of natural absorption/desorption pattern of the previous 160 years. Ferromanganese crusts from different locations of Indian Ocean were analysed with a view to studying the distribution of some trace elements along with Fe and Mn. Variation of Mn/Fe ratio was used to identify the nature of the crusts as hydrogenous or hydrothermal. Fe-rich and Fe-depleted nodules from Indian Ocean were analysed to understand the REE patterns and it is proposed that REE-Th associated minerals could be the potential Th contributors to the sea water and thus reached ferromanganese nodules. Dolomites (unaltered and altered), two types of serpentines and intrusive rock dolerite from the asbestos mines of Cuddapah basin were analysed for major, minor and trace elements. The elemental concentrations are used for distinguishing and characterising these minerals. From our investigations, it was concluded that both dolomite and dolerite contribute elements in the serpentinisation process. Chemical neutron

  8. Reactor physics and economic aspects of the CANDU reactor system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A history of the development of the CANDU system is given along with a fairly detailed description of the 600 MW(e) CANDU reactor. Reactor physics calculation methods are described, as well as comparisons between calculated reactor physics parameters and those measured in research and power reactors. An examination of the economics of CANDU in the Ontario Hydro system and a comparison between fossil fuelled and light water reactors is presented. Some physics, economics and resources aspects are given for both low enriched uranium and thorium-fuelled CANDU reactors. Finally the RβD program in Advanced Fuel Cycles is briefly described

  9. Reactor Safety Planning for Prometheus Project, for Naval Reactors Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Delmolino

    2005-05-06

    The purpose of this letter is to submit to Naval Reactors the initial plan for the Prometheus project Reactor Safety work. The Prometheus project is currently developing plans for cold physics experiments and reactor prototype tests. These tests and facilities may require safety analysis and siting support. In addition to the ground facilities, the flight reactor units will require unique analyses to evaluate the risk to the public from normal operations and credible accident conditions. This letter outlines major safety documents that will be submitted with estimated deliverable dates. Included in this planning is the reactor servicing documentation and shipping analysis that will be submitted to Naval Reactors.

  10. Fast breeder reactor research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The meeting was attended by 15 participants from seven countries and two international organizations. The Eighth Annual Meeting of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors (IWGFR) was attended by representatives from France, Fed. Rep. Germany, Italy, Japan, United Kingdom, Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and the United States of America - countries that have made significant progress in developing the technology and physics of sodium cooled fast reactors and have extensive national programmes in this field - as well as by representatives of the Commission of the European Communities and the IAEA. The design of fast-reactor power plants is a more difficult task than developing facilities with thermal reactors. Different reactor kinetics and dynamics, a hard neutron spectrum, larger integral doses of fuel and structural material irradiation, higher core temperatures, the use of an essentially novel coolant, and, as a result of all these factors, the additional reliability and safety requirements that are imposed on the planning and operation of sodium cooled fast reactors - all these factors pose problems that can be solved comprehensively only by countries with a high level of scientific and technical development. The exchange of experience between these countries and their combined efforts in solving the fundamental problems that arise in planning, constructing and operating fast reactors are promoting technical progress and reducing the relative expenditure required for various studies on developing and introducing commercial fast reactors. For this reason, the meeting concentrated on reviewing and discussing national fast reactor programmes. The situation with regard to planning, constructing and operating fast experimental and demonstration reactors in the countries concerned, the experience accumulated in operating them, the difficulties arising during operation and ways of over-coming them, the search for optimal designs for the power

  11. BR2 Reactor: Introduction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The irradiations in the BR2 reactor are in collaboration with or at the request of third parties such as the European Commission, the IAEA, research centres and utilities, reactor vendors or fuel manufacturers. The reactor also contributes significantly to the production of radioisotopes for medical and industrial applications, to neutron silicon doping for the semiconductor industry and to scientific irradiations for universities. Along the ongoing programmes on fuel and materials development, several new irradiation devices are in use or in design. Amongst others a loop providing enhanced cooling for novel materials testing reactor fuel, a device for high temperature gas cooled fuel as well as a rig for the irradiation of metallurgical samples in a Pb-Bi environment. A full scale 3-D heterogeneous model of BR2 is available. The model describes the real hyperbolic arrangement of the reactor and includes the detailed 3-D space dependent distribution of the isotopic fuel depletion in the fuel elements. The model is validated on the reactivity measurements of several tens of BR2 operation cycles. The accurate calculations of the axial and radial distributions of the poisoning of the beryllium matrix by 3He, 6Li and 3T are verified on the measured reactivity losses used to predict the reactivity behavior for the coming decades. The model calculates the main functionals in reactor physics like: conventional thermal and equivalent fission neutron fluxes, number of displacements per atom, fission rate, thermal power characteristics as heat flux and linear power density, neutron/gamma heating, determination of the fission energy deposited in fuel plates/rods, neutron multiplication factor and fuel burn-up. For each reactor irradiation project, a detailed geometry model of the experimental device and of its neighborhood is developed. Neutron fluxes are predicted within approximately 10 percent in comparison with the dosimetry measurements. Fission rate, heat flux and

  12. Scaleable, High Efficiency Microchannel Sabatier Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Microchannel Sabatier Reactor System (MSRS) consisting of cross connected arrays of isothermal or graded temperature reactors is proposed. The reactor array...

  13. LMFBR type reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Iida, Masaaki; Moriki, Yasuyuki

    1994-10-18

    A reactor core is divided into a plurality of coolants flowrate regions, and electromagnetic pumps exclusively used for each of the flowrate regions are disposed to distribute coolants flowrates in the reactor core. Further, the flowrate of each of the electromagnetic pumps is automatically controlled depending on signals from a temperature detector disposed at the exit of the reactor core, so that the flowrate of the region can be controlled optimally depending on the burning of reactor core fuels. Then, the electromagnetic pumps disposed for every divided region are controlled respectively, so that the coolants flowrate distribution suitable to each of the regions can be attained. Margin for fuel design is decreased, fuels are used effectively, as well as an operation efficiency can be improved. Moreover, since the electromagnetic pump has less flow resistance compared with a mechanical type pump, and flow resistance of the reactor core flowrate control mechanism is eliminated, greater circulating flowrate can be ensured after occurrence of accident in a natural convection using a buoyancy of coolants utilizable for after-heat removal as a driving force. (N.H.).

  14. Reactor coolant cleanup facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A depressurization device is disposed in pipelines upstream of recycling pumps of a reactor coolant cleanup facility to reduce a pressure between the pressurization device and the recycling pump at the downstream, thereby enabling high pressure coolant injection from other systems by way of the recycling pumps. Upon emergency, the recycling pumps of the coolant cleanup facility can be used in common to an emergency reactor core cooling facility and a reactor shutdown facility. Since existent pumps of the emergency reactor core cooling facility and the reactor shutdown facility which are usually in a stand-by state can be removed, operation confirmation test and maintenance for equipments in both of facilities can be saved, so that maintenance and reliability of the plant are improved and burdens on operators can also be mitigated. Moreover, low pressure design can be adopted for a non-regenerative heat exchanger and recycling coolant pumps, which enables to improve the reliability and economical property due to reduction of possibility of leakage. (N.H.)

  15. EBT reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a recent ELMO Bumpy Torus (EBT) reactor study that includes ring and core plasma properties with consistent treatment of coupled ring-core stability criteria and power balance requirements. The principal finding is that constraints imposed by these coupling and other physics and technology considerations permit a broad operating window for reactor design optimization. Within this operating window, physics and engineering systems analysis and cost sensitivity studies indicate that reactors with approx. 6 to 10%, P approx. 1200 to 1700 MW(e), wall loading approx. 1.0 to 2.5 MW/m2, and recirculating power fraction (including ring-sustaining power and all other reactors auxiliaries) approx. 10 to 15% are possible. A number of concept improvements are also proposed that are found to offer the potential for further improvement of the reactor size and parameters. These include, but are not limited to, the use of: (1) supplementary coils or noncircular mirror coils to improve magnetic geometry and reduce size, (2) energetic ion rings to improve ring power requirements, (3) positive potential to enhance confinement and reduce size, and (4) profile control to improve stability and overall fusion power density

  16. Generalities about nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From Zoe, the first nuclear reactor, till the current EPR, the French nuclear industry has always advanced by profiting from the feedback from dozens of years of experience and operations, in particular by drawing lessons from the most significant events in its history, such as the Fukushima accident. The new generations of reactors must improve safety and economic performance so that the industry maintain its legitimacy and its share in the production of electricity. This article draws the history of nuclear power in France, gives a brief description of the pressurized water reactor design, lists the technical features of the different versions of PWR that operate in France and compares them with other types of reactors. The feedback experience concerning safety, learnt from the major nuclear accidents Three Miles Island (1979), Chernobyl (1986) and Fukushima (2011) is also detailed. Today there are 26 third generation reactors being built in the world: 4 EPR (1 in Finland, 1 in France and 2 in China); 2 VVER-1200 in Russia, 8 AP-1000 (4 in China and 4 in the Usa), 8 APR-1400 (4 in Korea and 4 in UAE), and 4 ABWR (2 in Japan and 2 in Taiwan)

  17. Reactor Structural Materials: Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaouadi, R

    2000-07-01

    The objectives of SCK-CEN's R and D programme on Rector Pressure Vessel (RPV) Steels are:(1) to complete the fracture toughness data bank of various reactor pressure vessel steels by using precracked Charpy specimens that were tested statically as well as dynamically; (2) to implement the enhanced surveillance approach in a user-friendly software; (3) to improve the existing reconstitution technology by reducing the input energy (short cycle welding) and modifying the stud geometry. Progress and achievements in 1999 are reported.

  18. Mimic of OSU research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ohio State University research reactor (OSURR) is undergoing improvements in its research and educational capabilities. A computer-based digital data acquisition system, including a reactor system mimic, will be installed as part of these improvements. The system will monitor the reactor system parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital parameters available to the reactor operator either in digital or analog form. The system includes two computers. All the signals are sent to computer 1, which processes the data and sends the data through a serial port to computer 2 with a video graphics array VGA monitor, which is utilized to display the mimic system of the reactor

  19. Methanation assembly using multiple reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Fred C.; Parab, Sanjay C.

    2007-07-24

    A methanation assembly for use with a water supply and a gas supply containing gas to be methanated in which a reactor assembly has a plurality of methanation reactors each for methanating gas input to the assembly and a gas delivery and cooling assembly adapted to deliver gas from the gas supply to each of said methanation reactors and to combine water from the water supply with the output of each methanation reactor being conveyed to a next methanation reactor and carry the mixture to such next methanation reactor.

  20. MINT research reactor safety program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamad Idris bin Taib [Division of Special Project, Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT), Bangi (Malaysia)

    2000-11-01

    Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT) Research Reactor Safety Program has been done along with Reactor Power Upgrading Project, Reactor Safety Upgrading Project and Development of Expert System for On-Line Nuclear Process Control Project. From 1993 up to date, Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulics analysis, Probabilistic Safety Assessment as well as installation of New 2 MW Secondary Cooling System were done. Installations of New Reactor Building Ventilation System, Reactor Monitoring System, Updating of Safety Analysis Report and Upgrading Primary Cooling System are in progress. For future activities, Reactor Modeling will be included to add present activities. (author)

  1. Thermionic Reactor Design Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schock, Alfred

    1994-08-01

    Paper presented at the 29th IECEC in Monterey, CA in August 1994. The present paper describes some of the author's conceptual designs and their rationale, and the special analytical techniques developed to analyze their (thermionic reactor) performance. The basic designs, first published in 1963, are based on single-cell converters, either double-ended diodes extending over the full height of the reactor core or single-ended diodes extending over half the core height. In that respect they are similar to the thermionic fuel elements employed in the Topaz-2 reactor subsequently developed in the Soviet Union, copies of which were recently imported by the U.S. As in the Topaz-2 case, electrically heated steady-state performance tests of the converters are possible before fueling.

  2. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An international design team comprised of members from Canada, Europe, Japan, the Soviet Union, and the United States of America, are designing an experimental fusion test reactor. The engineering and testing objectives of this International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are to validate the design and to demonstrate controlled ignition, extended burn of a deuterium and tritium plasma, and achieve steady state using technology expected to be available by 1990. The concept maximizes flexibility while allowing for a variety of plasma configurations and operating scenarios. During physics phase operation, the machine produces a 22 MA plasma current. In the technology phase, the machine can be reconfigured with a thicker shield and a breeding blanket to operate with an 18 MA plasma current at a major radius of 5.5 meters. Canada's involvement in the areas of safety, facility design, reactor configuration and maintenance builds on our internationally recognized design and operational expertise in developing tritium processes and CANDU related technologies

  3. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly Licensed Operating Reactors Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  4. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    THE OPERATING UNITS STATUS REPORT - LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management from the Headquarters staff of NRC's Office of Enforcement (OE), from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. The three sections of the report are: monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC's Regional Offices, OE Headquarters and the utilities; and an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor-years of experience and non-power reactors in the US

  5. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the Utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  6. Reactor safety equipments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To positively recover radioactive substances discharged in a dry well at the time of failure of a reactor. Constitution: In addition to the emergency gas treating system fitted to a reactor building, a purification system connected through a pipeline to the dry well is arranged in the reactor building. This purification system is connected through pipes fitted to the dry well to forced circulation device, heat exchanger, and purification device. The atmosphere of high pressure steam gases in the dry well is derived to the heat exchanger for cooling, and then radioactive substances which are contained in the gases are removed by filter sets charged with the HEPA filters and the HECA filters. At last, there gases are returned to dry well by circulation pump, repeat this process. (Kamimura, M.)

  7. Licensed operating reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's monthly LICENSED OPERATING REACTORS Status Summary Report provides data on the operation of nuclear units as timely and accurately as possible. This information is collected by the Office of Information Resources Management, from the Headquarters Staff of NRC's Office of Inspection and Enforcement, from NRC's Regional Offices, and from utilities. This report is divided into three sections: the first contains monthly highlights and statistics for commercial operating units, and errata from previously reported data; the second is a compilation of detailed information on each unit, provided by NRC Regional Offices, IE Headquarters and the utilities; and the third section is an appendix for miscellaneous information such as spent fuel storage capability, reactor years of experience and non-power reactors in the United States

  8. Welding and reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high safety requirements which must be demanded of the quality of the welded joints in reactor technique have so far not been fulfilled in all cases. The errors occuring have caused considerable loss of availability and high material costs. They were not, however, so serious that one need have feared any immediate danger to the personnel or to the environment. The safety devices of reactor plants were only called upon in a few cases and to these they responded perfectly. The intensive efforts to complete and improve the specifications are to contribute to that in future, the reactor plants can be counted even more so as one of the safest technical plants ever. (orig./LH)

  9. Backfitting swimming pool reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations based on measurements in a critical assembly, and experiments to disclose fuel element surface temperatures in case of accidents like stopping of primary coolant flow during full power operation, have shown that the power of the swimming pool type research reactor FRG-2 (15 MW, operating since 1967) might be raised to 21 MW within the present rules of science and technology, without major alterations of the pool buildings and the cooling systems. A backfitting program is carried through to adjust the reactor control systems of FRG-2 and FRG-1 (5 MW, housed in the same reactor hall) to the present safety rules and recommendations, to ensure FRG-2 operation at 21 MW for the next decade. (author)

  10. Reactor operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the TRIGA Users Conference in Helsinki 1970 the TRIGA reactor Vienna was in operation without any larger undesired shutdown. The integrated thermal power production by August 15 1972 accumulated to 110 MWd. The TRIGA reactor is manly used for training of students, for scientific courses and research work. Cooperation with industry increased in the last two years either in form of research or in performing training courses. Close cooperation is also maintained with the IAEA, samples are irradiated and courses on various fields are arranged. Maintenance work was performed on the heat exchanger and to replace the shim rod magnet. With the view on the future power upgrading nine fuel elements type 110 have been ordered recently. Experiments, performed currently on the reactor are presented in details

  11. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  12. Fusion reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the fifteenth in a series of semiannual technical progress reports on fusion reactor materials. This report combines research and development activities which were previously reported separately in the following progress reports: Alloy Development for Irradiation Performance; Damage Analysis and Fundamental Studies; Special purpose Materials. These activities are concerned principally with the effects of the neutronic and chemical environment on the properties and performance of reactor materials; together they form one element of the overall materials programs being conducted in support of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The Fusion Reactor Materials Program is a national effort involving several national laboratories, universities, and industries. The purpose of this series of reports is to provide a working technical record for the use of the program participants, and to provide a means of communicating the efforts of materials scientists to the rest of the fusion community, both nationally and worldwide

  13. Safety systems of heavy water reactors and small power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After introductional descriptions of heavy water reactors and natural circulation boiling water reactors the safety philosophy and safety systems like ECCS, residual heat removal, protection systems etc., are described. (RW)

  14. AREVA's nuclear reactors portfolio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reasonable assumption for the estimated new build market for the next 25 years is over 340 GWe net. The number of prospect countries is growing almost each day. To address this new build market, AREVA is developing a comprehensive portfolio of reactors intended to meet a wide range of power requirements and of technology choices. The EPR reactor is the flagship of the fleet. Intended for large power requirements, the four first EPRs are being built in Finland, France and China. Other countries and customers are in view, citing just two examples: the Usa where the U.S. EPR has been selected as the technology of choice by several U.S utilities; and the United Kingdom where the Generic Design Acceptance process of the EPR design submitted by AREVA and EDF is well under way, and where there is a strong will to have a plant on line in 2017. For medium power ranges, the AREVA portfolio includes a boiling water reactor and a pressurized water reactor which both offer all of the advantages of an advanced plant design, with excellent safety performance and competitive power generation cost: -) KERENA (1250+ MWe), developed in collaboration with several European utilities, and in particular with Eon; -) ATMEA 1 (1100+ MWe), a 3-loop evolutionary PWR which is being developed by AREVA and Mitsubishi. AREVA is also preparing the future and is deeply involved into Gen IV concepts. It has developed the ANTARES modular HTR reactor (pre-conceptual design completed) and is building upon its vast Sodium Fast Reactor experience to take part into the development of the next prototype. (author)

  15. Oscillatory flow chemical reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slavnić Danijela S.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Global market competition, increase in energy and other production costs, demands for high quality products and reduction of waste are forcing pharmaceutical, fine chemicals and biochemical industries, to search for radical solutions. One of the most effective ways to improve the overall production (cost reduction and better control of reactions is a transition from batch to continuous processes. However, the reactions of interests for the mentioned industry sectors are often slow, thus continuous tubular reactors would be impractically long for flow regimes which provide sufficient heat and mass transfer and narrow residence time distribution. The oscillatory flow reactors (OFR are newer type of tube reactors which can offer solution by providing continuous operation with approximately plug flow pattern, low shear stress rates and enhanced mass and heat transfer. These benefits are the result of very good mixing in OFR achieved by vortex generation. OFR consists of cylindrical tube containing equally spaced orifice baffles. Fluid oscillations are superimposed on a net (laminar flow. Eddies are generated when oscillating fluid collides with baffles and passes through orifices. Generation and propagation of vortices create uniform mixing in each reactor cavity (between baffles, providing an overall flow pattern which is close to plug flow. Oscillations can be created by direct action of a piston or a diaphragm on fluid (or alternatively on baffles. This article provides an overview of oscillatory flow reactor technology, its operating principles and basic design and scale - up characteristics. Further, the article reviews the key research findings in heat and mass transfer, shear stress, residence time distribution in OFR, presenting their advantages over the conventional reactors. Finally, relevant process intensification examples from pharmaceutical, polymer and biofuels industries are presented.

  16. Reactor Materials Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of SCK-CEN's Reactor Materials Research Department for 2001 are summarised. The objectives of the department are: (1) to evaluate the integrity and behaviour of structural materials used in nuclear power industry; (2) to conduct research to unravel and understand the parameters that determine the material behaviour under or after irradiation; (3) to contribute to the interpretation, the modelling of the material behaviour and to develop and assess strategies for optimum life management of nuclear power plant components. The programmes within the department are focussed on studies concerning (1) Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC); (2) nuclear fuel; and (3) Reactor Pressure Vessel Steel

  17. Nuclear reactor simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Nuclear Reactor Simulator was projected to help the basic training in the formation of the Nuclear Power Plants operators. It gives the trainee the opportunity to see the nuclear reactor dynamics. It's specially indicated to be used as the support tool to NPPT (Nuclear Power Preparatory Training) from NUS Corporation. The software was developed to Intel platform (80 x 86, Pentium and compatible ones) working under the Windows operational system from Microsoft. The program language used in development was Object Pascal and the compiler used was Delphi from Borland. During the development, computer algorithms were used, based in numeric methods, to the resolution of the differential equations involved in the process. (author)

  18. Diagnostics for hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hybrid Reactor(HR) can be considered an attractive actinide-burner or a fusion assisted transmutation for destruction of transuranic(TRU) nuclear waste. The hybrid reactor has two important subsystems: the tokamak neutron source and the blanket which includes a fuel zone where the TRU are placed and a tritium breeding zone. The diagnostic system for a HR must be as simple and robust as possible to monitor and control the plasma scenario, guarantee the protection of the machine and monitor the transmutation.

  19. Small mirror fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basic requirements for the pilot plants are that they produce a net product and that they have a potential for commercial upgrade. We have investigated a small standard mirror fusion-fission hybrid, a two-component tandem mirror hybrid, and two versions of a field-reversed mirror fusion reactor--one a steady state, single cell reactor with a neutral beam-sustained plasma, the other a moving ring field-reversed mirror where the plasma passes through a reaction chamber with no energy addition

  20. Reactor neutron dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of requirements and possibilities for experimental neutron spectrum determination during the reactor pressure vessel surveil lance programme is given. Fast neutron spectrum and neutron dose rate were measured in the Fast neutron irradiation facility of our TRIGA reactor. It was shown that the facility can be used for calibration of neutron dosimeters and for irradiation of samples sensitive to neutron radiation. The investigation of the unfolding algorithm ITER was continued. Based on this investigations are two specialized unfolding program packages ITERAD and ITERGS written this year. They are able to unfold data from activation detectors and NaI(T1) gamma spectrometer respectively