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Sample records for aecb staff annual

  1. AECB staff annual report of Pickering NGS for the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of Pickering NGS-A Units 1-4 and Pickering NGS-B Units 5-8 is monitored to ensure compliance with licensing and safety requirements by the AECB Pickering project office staff in cooperation with AECB staff in Ottawa. This report presents AECB staff's review of licensing issues and of the operational performance of Pickering NGS during 1990

  2. AECB staff annual report of BRUCE NGS 'A' for the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the AECB staff review of major licensing issues and the operational performance during 1990. In addition to the Quarterly Reports, other Ontario Hydro reports, official correspondence and observations of the AECB site staff have been taken into consideration. The report is limited to those aspects of station performance that AECB staff considers to have some safety significance. Where items of significance, associated with issues addressed in the report, occurred early in 1991 these are also mention

  3. AECB staff annual report of Point Lepreau G.S. for the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a review by AECB staff of the operation of Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station during 1990. The review is based on information contained in the various documents submitted by New Brunswick Power under the terms of the Operating Licence and on information gathered by AECB staff during routine site monitoring, inspections and audits

  4. AECB staff annual report on Point Lepreau G.S. for the year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB staff considers that the station has been operated and managed in a safe manner during 1988. The staff is satisfied that the NBEPC is proceeding properly towards resolution of any ongoing or outstanding work identified in this report

  5. AECB staff annual report of Darlington NGS 'A' for the year 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the AECB staff review of major licensing issues and of the operational performance of the station during 1990. In addition to the reports mentioned above, other Ontario Hydro reports, official correspondence, and observations of AECB site staff have been taken into consideration. The report is limited to those aspects of station performance that AECB staff consider to have some safety significance. Developments of significance associated with issues addressed in the report that occurred in the early part of 1991 are also mentioned

  6. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. Heavy water is an essential part of Canada's nuclear industry and the AECB regulates its production. The AECB staff assess every facilities performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence issued. All aspects of the facility's operation and management are reviewed and each facility is inspected. This report is the AECB staff assessment of the operation of the Bruce Heavy Water Plant during 1996. The operation was safe in 1996 and Ontario Hydro complied with the regulations. The emergency response capability was found satisfactory

  7. AECB staff annual report on Pickering NGS for the year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a review of major licensing issues and the operational performance of Pickering NGS-A (Units 1-4) and Pickering NGS-B (Units 5-8) by the staff of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) during 1989. Operations are monitored to ensure compliance with licensing requirements. This report is limited to those aspects that AECB staff consider to have particular safety significance. The number of infractions of the operating licence and the AECB Regulations doubled in 1989 compared to 1988. Three workers were exposed to radiation doses in excess of the regulatory limits. The AECB also found inadequate procedural compliance and an unacceptable level of housekeeping. Performance also requires improvement in response to AECB Health Physics appraisals; surveillance of systems by the Technical Section; chemical control performance; response to outstanding AECB action items; availability of special safety systems; operating memos, jumper records, call-ups and deficiency reports in effect; and fire fighting capability. Ontario Hydro has initiated a number of programs that are expected to result in improvements in these areas: an in-service station quality improvement plan; a program to improve and give assurance of compliance with the AECB Regulations, the operating licenses and the Operating Policies and Principles; a housekeeping and material condition improvement plan; and an action plan undertaken following radiation over-exposures. Given adequate resources and management support these programs should result in a noticeable improvement in station performance in 1990

  8. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B for 1995. Our on-site Project Officers and Ottawa-based specialists monitored the station during the year. AECB staff conclude that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce B safely in 1995. Radiation doses to workers and the public were well below the legal limits and remained well within Ontario Hydro's internal targets. Worker radiation doses increased slightly but were comparable to previous years. 7 tabs., 3 figs

  9. AECB staff annual assessment of the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Point Lepreau Generating Station in 1996. Point Lepreau operated safely but the worsening trends in NB Power's safety performance leads to the conclusion that urgent action is required. NB Power is required to report formally to the AECB on progress with measures to improve safety management every six months. Further licensing action will be taken on NB Power if it fails to make the improvements

  10. AECB staff annual report of Pickering NGS for the year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB Pickering project staff, in cooperation with AECB staff in Ottawa, monitor the operation of Pickering NGS-A units 1-4 and Pickering NGS-B units 5-8 to ensure that Ontario Hydro operates the station in compliance with the licensing and safety requirements of the Atomic Energy Control Board. This report presents the review of licensing issues and station performance during 1991. Improvement over 1990 station operation occurred in the following areas: availability of special safety systems; reduction of the station external dose; reorganization of station management to improve focus; station chemistry; housekeeping and material condition; fuel handling capability; training of operators and maintenance staff. However, little change occurred and improvement is still needed in the following: compliance with operating licence; system surveillance program; station maintenance; environmental qualification; radiation emergency response; fire and rescue emergency response; limited capability to predict and prevent equipment failures such as the boiler tube failure on unit 5. (L.L.)

  11. AECB staff annual assessment of the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board assessment of safety at Point Lepreau Generating Station for 1994. AECB on-site Project Officers, and Ottawa based specialists monitored the station throughout the year. The station operated safely during 1994. Performance of the special safety systems was very good, and NB Power made important progress improving the safety management of these systems. NB Power staff failed to comply with the conditions of our Operating Licence seven times during 1994. This is an improvement from last year, but the number of compliance problems is still too high. NB Power introduced safety culture training for its staff last year. AECB is optimistic that this will help to improve compliance. The station fully met the radiation safety requirements during the year. Releases of radioactive material to the environment are well below the limits set. Radiation exposure to workers are being well controlled, and AECB believe that NB Power is maintaining these exposures 'As Low As Reasonably Achievable' for this reactor type

  12. AECB staff annual assessment of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of safety at the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station for 1996. Ontario Hydro operated the station in a safe manner in 1996. All four special safety systems were fully available 100 percent of the time. There were more problems that affected the safety support systems in 1996 than in the previous year

  13. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B for 1996. It was concluded that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce B safely in 1996. Although the Bruce B plant is safe,it was noted that the number of outages and the number of secondary and tertiary equipment failures during reactor unit upsets increased. Ontario Hydro needs to pay special attention to prevent such a decrease in the safety performance at Bruce B

  14. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A for 1996. Ontario Hydro operated Bruce A safely in 1996, maintaining the risk to workers and the public at an acceptably low level. Special safety system performance at Bruce A was adequate. Availability targets were all met. Improvement is needed to reduce the number of operating licence non-compliances

  15. AECB staff annual report of Bruce A NGS for the year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report on Bruce A operations during 1991, AECB staff itemizes non-compliances with the operating licence. Non of the violations that occurred at Bruce A resulted in any significant threat to public safety or well-being. There were no exposures of workers to radiation in excess of the regulatory requirements; however, there have been instances of uncontrolled contaminated areas and spread of contamination in the station. Releases of radioactive material to the environment were much below target. The performance of the four special safety systems has been good, with the exception of shutdown system number two on Unit 3. A review of significant event reports and their causes has revealed an apparent lack of a system by which operations and maintenance work is verified as having been carried out correctly. There is a large backlog of maintenance work. Initiatives have been taken to correct this problem. Two important safety issues are discussed in detail. These are the chronic problem of leaking boiler tubes, and the potentially serious problem of fret marks on pressure tubes caused by abnormal fuel support. (Author)

  16. AECB staff annual report of Darlington NGS for the year 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Hydro operated Darlington in a safe manner in 1991. Ontario Hydro violated the Atomic Energy Control Regulations once and the physical security regulations three times in 1991. They failed to observe the Operating Licence conditions on ten occasions. The AECB did not find that the individual events had a significant impact on safety. There were no violations of the construction licence. None of the station staff received a radiation dose in excess of the regulatory limit. Radioactive emissions from the station were far below the regulatory limit. Special safety system performance was not fully satisfactory. Ontario Hydro failed to meet the unavailability targets for shutdown system one and the negative pressure containment system. Ontario Hydro reported seventeen incidents under conditions of the Operating and Construction licences. Units 1 and 2 remained shut down for most of 1991 because of unexplained fuel bundle damage in the reactor core. Ontario Hydro has decided to replace the main generator rotors because of cracks discovered on the rotor shaft. A fully modified rotor was installed on Unit 1. Ontario Hydro staff have a significant backlog of maintenance work. The Quality Improvement Program seemed to work well, resulting in some noticeable improvements. Three Shift Supervisors and four Control Operators were licensed this year. All planned emergency exercises and drills took place as scheduled. Ontario Hydro identified and are addressing several areas for improvement during the drills. Except for a power supply interruption to some IAEA equipment, Ontario Hydro achieved all its safeguards goals at Darlington in 1991. The Tritium Removal Facility (TRF) operated intermittently during 1991. Ontario Hydro is proceeding with the design and planning of an annex to the TRF to replace the present temporary facilities. (Author)

  17. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB believe that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce A in a safe manner during 1994, and that the risk to workers and the public has been maintained at an acceptably low level. Radiation doses to workers and releases to the environment were well below regulatory limits. All special safety systems met availability targets. We noted improvements in operation and maintenance but some further improvements are still required. This is particularly true of the station's compliance with the Operating Licence. AECB believe that the station continues to be well managed, with a high priority placed on safety. However, there is a need for increased capability in the area of safety analysis and assessment. 4 tabs., 4 figs

  18. AECB staff annual assessment of the Pickering A and B Nuclear Generating Stations for the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment of safety at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS-A and PNGS-B) for 1995. Our on-site Project Officers and Ottawa-based specialists monitored the stations throughout the year. In 1995, compliance with the Transportation Packaging of Radioactive Materials Regulations and the Cost Recovery Fees Regulations was satisfactory. The performance of the special safety systems was good. Releases of radioactive materials from the station were low and well below the legal limits for public safety. 10 tabs., 7 figs

  19. AECB staff annual assessment of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board assessment of safety at the Darlington Generating Station for 1994. The report is based on observations made by our staff, and on information submitted to us by Ontario Hydro. Ontario Hydro operated the station in a safe manner in 1994. Performance was satisfactory for three of the four special safety systems. Ontario Hydro failed to meet the unavailability target for the emergency coolant injection system on Unit 1. Ontario Hydro complied with the Atomic Energy Control Regulations in 1994. 9 tabs

  20. AECB staff annual assessment of the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board conducts a staff assessment of safety at Point Lepreau Generating Station for 1995. On-site Project Officers and Ottawa based specialists monitored the station throughout the year. Point Lepreau operated safely during 1995 which was an unusual year for the station. The station was shut down for a planned five month outage to allow NB Power to complete maintenance on the reactor's pressure tubes. NB Power failed to comply with the terms of the Operating Licence we issue on fourteen occasions in 1995. In addition, NB Power reported an unusually large number of events. None of the events themselves directly affected public safety, if this level of performance continues unchecked, it might result in increased risk from operation in the future. Human error was an important feature of these problems. NB Power had already introduced safety culture training for their staff, but they will need to undertake further work urgently to resolve the problems. Three of Point Lepreau's special safety systems failed to meet their availability targets during 1995. NB Power's safety analysis program progress slowed during 1995, due to the additional workload from the outage. The Point Lepreau's training, quality assurance and safeguards related activities continued to function satisfactorily. They have assigned additional resources to emergency preparedness planning, which should enable them to take a more pro-active approach in this area. 7 tabs., 5 figs

  1. AECB staff annual assessment of the Pickering A and B Nuclear Generating Stations for the year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) is located on the north shore of Lake Ontario, about 32 km east of downtown Toronto. It consists of two stations, PNGS-A and PNGS-B. Each station contains four reactor units. PNGS-A consists of Units 1 to 4, while PNGS-B consists of Units 5 to 8. Each unit can generate about 540 megawatts of electricity. All eight units are located within a single enclosure. Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Division has assigned one Station Director with authority over both stations, but each station has its own organization. AECB issue a separate operating licence for each station. This report presents the Atomic Energy Control Board staff assessment of the Pickering stations' safety performance in 1994 and other aspects that they consider to have significant impact on nuclear safety. AECB based their conclusions on their observations, audits, inspections and review of information that Ontario Hydro submits to them as required by the station Operating Licences. 11 tabs., 8 figs

  2. AECB staff annual assessment of the Pickering A and B Nuclear Generating Stations for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Pickering A and B Generating Stations for 1996. PNGS-A and PNGS-B operated safely during 1996. Although the risk to the workers and the public is low, major safety related changes are necessary at the stations and the sustainability of those changes needs to be demonstrated. Improvement is needed by Ontario Hydro in meeting the time limits for reporting reportable events. Ontario Hydro's follow up to events and causal factor analyses continue to need improvements. Improvements are needed to operational safety and reactor maintenance at both A and B. There are signs of improvement through Ontario Hydro's plan for recovery, and in station management changes. There also appears to be commitment to safety expressed at the highest level of the utility

  3. AECB staff review of Pickering NGS operations for the year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of Pickering NGS-A Units 1-4 and Pickering NGS-B Units 5-8 are monitored to ensure compliance with licensing requirements by the AECB Pickering project office staff. This report presents AECB staff's review of major licensing issues and of the operational performance of Pickering NGS during 1988. The report is limited to those aspects that AECB staff considers to have particular safety significance. More detailed information on routine performance is contained in Ontario Hydro's 1988 Quarterly Technical Reports for Pickering NGS-A and Pickering NGS-B

  4. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS'A' operation for the year 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents AECB project staff's review of major licensing issues and of the operational performance of the station during 1987. Ontario Hydro reports and official correspondence and observations on AECB staff at site have been taken into consideration. The report is limited to aspects of the station performance that AECB staff considers to have a safety significance. Where significant developments associated with issues addressed in the report occurred in the early part of 1988 (up to the time of writing), these are mentioned where appropriate. Ontario Hydro's Quarterly Reports for 1987 contain detailed technical information on the performance of the station, individual units and unit systems. It is the opinion of AECB project staff that despite a number of commendable actions and achievements which are identified in this report, the performance of the station in 1987 was only marginally satisfactory and less satisfactory than in 1986. This assessment is supported by key performance indicators such as the number of reportable significant events, the number of events caused by or influenced by human error and the reactor trip frequency, all of which exceeded 1986 levels, and also by the lack of satisfactory progress made during the year on actions to address the findings of the Fall '86 AECB Assessment of Operating Practices. AECB staff considers that the outstanding operations and maintenance problems that were identified in the 1986 Assessment are due, in part, to an ineffective quality assurance program, and in part to a shortage of resources

  5. Promoting a learning culture to maintain the nuclear safety competence of AECB staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Canadian regulatory approach, the safe operation of a nuclear installation is primarily the responsibility of the operator. The mission of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy does not pose unnecessary risk to workers, the general public and the environment. The AECB fulfills this responsibility through a comprehensive licensing framework in which compliance with regulatory standards and requirements is assured through systematic safety assessments, inspection and enforcement. These responsibilities require regulatory staff with specialized academic backgrounds and work experience related to the industry. In the past, the AECB readily attracted and retained the qualified personnel needed to ensure nuclear safety competence. However, several factors are now altering this situation. Anticipated retirement in the years ahead among the current generation of staff will result in significant losses of corporate knowledge and experience. In addition, the stagnation of the domestic nuclear power industry has impacted significantly on the recruitment of suitably qualified replacement candidates. Many Canadian universities have had to reduce their nuclear programmes as fewer undergraduate and postgraduate students choose a nuclear career option. In these circumstances, maintaining the AECB's nuclear safety competence requires a more systematic and deliberate approach. This paper describes the measures that the AECB has taken and is planning to take to promote a learning environment, and to assist staff in establishing and maintaining their knowledge and skills. (author)

  6. Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment and views of current maintenance practices of a four unit CANDU plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the AECB practices in assessing maintenance activities at one four unit CANDU nuclear plant.-it outlines the authority of the AECB in enforcing the licence condition concerned with maintenance, and how this is interpreted by AECB site staff to measure and report maintenance activities. The AECB staff attaches great importance to proper maintenance as it affects safe operation. Programs used by the licensee staff to identify safety important components, or to predict degradations and failures are of particular interest. In our experience, the application of such programs has been generally good. However, their integration into an overall maintenance scheme can be improved, and the possibilities of integration are not well understood. This paper includes examples of such integration to illustrate our views and to highlight the resultant benefits that AECB staff believes are possible. (author)

  7. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS 'A' operation for the year 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB project staff believes that overall performance of the station in 1988 was generally satisfactory and better than in 1987. However, this assessment is not supported by some of the key performance indicators, although the indicators in areas where AECB staff had specific concerns do support it. For example, the percentage of reported significant events attributable to human error, the number of operating memos beyond the review date, scheduled emergency drills completed, the number of completed reactor trips all show a significant improvement over the 1987 value. In addition, AECB staff has been encouraged by the licensee's implementation of effective review processes for operator and maintenance call-ups, routines and deficiencies, and the establishment of supervisor inspection tours and operator rounds programs. Nevertheless, it is the opinion of AECB staff that to achieve standards of operation which would be considered fully satisfactory, the backlog of maintenance work must be reduced, the quality of work performed in the plant improved, and assurance provided that the required quality standards are being consistently achieved and maintained

  8. AECB staff response to the environmental impact statement on the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) on the Concept for Disposal of Canada's Nuclear Fuel Waste was released in October 1994 (AECL,1994) in response to the guidelines issued in 1992 by a Panel formed to evaluate this concept (Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel, 1992). This response is primarily a statement of deficiencies and thus focuses on the negative aspects of the EIS. The staff review of the EIS was based on the AECB mandate, which is to protect human health and the environment and as such was focused on technical issues in the EIS. These were performance assessment of the multiple barrier system, environmental impacts, concept feasibility, siting, transport and safety as well as general issues of regulatory policy and criteria. The EIS and its supporting documentation have been the sole basis used to judge whether AECB staff expectations of the EIS have been met. The staff response (Part II) considers whether an issue is addressed appropriately and adequately, while taking account of the generic and preliminary nature of the concept. The overall conclusion that AECB staff have drawn from the technical review of the EIS is that the EIS, by itself, does not adequately demonstrate the case for deep geological disposal for nuclear fuel waste. However, AECB staff believe that the EIS information, in combination with a variety of generic national and international assessments, has provided confidence that the deep geological disposal concept is safe and viable. 74 refs

  9. AECB staff review of Bruce NGS 'A' operation for the year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'B' is monitored and licensing requirements are enforced by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). This report records the conclusions of the AECB staff assessment of Bruce NGS 'A' during 1989 and the early part of 1990. Overall operation of the station met acceptable safety standards. Despite numerous problems and technical difficulties encountered, station management and supervisory personnel acted with due caution and made decisions in the interests of safety. There was evidence of improvement in a number of key areas, supported by pertinent indicators in the objective measures table. The extensive inspection and maintenance programs carried out during the year revealed the extent of component deterioration due to aging to be larger than expected. Hydrogen embrittlement of pressure tubes, erosion/corrosion of steam and feed water valves, heat exchanger tubes and piping, fouling of boilers and heat exchangers, and environmental damage of electrical equipment are examples. Continued aging of plant equipment and its potential for reducing the margins for safe operation must be taken into account by Ontario Hydro in establishing priorities and target dates for completion of actions to resolve identified problems at Bruce NGS 'A'. (2 tabs.)

  10. AECB staff response to the environmental impact statement on the concept for disposal of Canada's nuclear fuel waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Environmental Impact Statement on the Concept for Disposal of Canada's Nuclear Fuel Waste was released in October 1994 in response to the guidelines issued in 1992 by a panel formed to evaluate this concept (Federal Environmental Assessment Review Panel, 1992). This response is primarily a statement of deficiencies and thus focuses on the negative aspects of the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The staff review of the EIS was based on the AECB mandate, which is to protect human health and the environment and as such was focused on technical issues in the EIS. These were performance assessment of the multiple barrier system, environmental impacts, concept feasibility, siting, transport and safety as well as general issues o f regulatory policy and criteria. 30 refs

  11. Annual report of AECB personnel on the Gentilly 2 nuclear power plant for the year 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board) personnel have reviewed in detail the main aspects related to the safe operation of the Gentilly-2 nuclear power plant during 1990. This station is operated by Hydro-Quebec under a licence issued by the AECB. This evaluation is based primarily on the contents of various reports submitted by Hydro-Quebec pursuant to the terms of the operating licence, as well as on the results of inspections, audits, and tours made by AECB personnel. In general, the station was operated safely. The submission of significant event reports is unacceptably delayed. An increasing number of contraventions of the operating licence has been noted during the last two years. A significant unavailability of the containment system has been attributed to high-activity detectors that did not meet design specifications. AECB personnel will take required action in 1991 in order to resolve the questions related to a pipe break in the turbine building

  12. Consolidated results of the AECB staff's detailed review of Ontario Hydro Nuclear's integrated independent performance assessment and safety system functional inspection findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In January 1997, Ontario Hydro announced that a team of nuclear industry experts from the United States, called the Nuclear Performance Advisory Group (NPAG), had been employed to help manage its nuclear program and to implement needed improvements in Ontario Hydro Nuclear (OHN) operations. In the spring of 1997, NPAG initiated a series of detailed reviews of OHN's operations, at its Pickering, Bruce and Darlington nuclear generating stations and in OHN's Head Office groups. These reviews, called 'Independent Integrated Performance Assessments' (UPA) and 'Safety System Functional Inspections' (SSFI), were carried out in April and May of this year with the objective of developing 'an integrated, accurate, and comprehensive understanding of the performance of OHN'.They were conducted in response to a request from the President of Ontario Hydro for a 'brutally honest' assessment of Ontario Hydro Nuclear. NPAG has since been integrated into Ontario Hydro's line organization. Ontario Hydro's Board of Directors received the results of the IIPAs and SSFIs and an Ontario Hydro report titled Basis for Continued Operation on August 12, 1997. AECB staff has been reviewing the reports containing these results since receiving them at that time. The conclusions of these studies are extremely critical of the management of Ontario Hydro Nuclear. They identify a large number of shortcomings in the operation and maintenance of the nuclear generating stations. Ontario Hydro states in the IIPA and SSFI reports that the reports are, by design, negative in slant and emphasize the weaknesses in performance rather than the strengths. The reports conclude that the stations can continue to operate safety while the near and long term improvements are implemented. This report contains the consolidated results of the AECB staffs detailed review of the IIPA and SSFI findings. (author)

  13. To assure public safety in a nuclear age we must reform the AECB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author argues that the Canadian AECB should clearly be seen to be independent of the nuclear industry and of governmental interference. He considers the board to be too small, as well as understaffed, and would expand it to seven members, three of them full-time. A larger staff would enable the board to serve as a reliable source of independent public information on nuclear regulatory issues. It is suggested that the government should publish policy directives for the AECB annually. Another suggestion is that some research should be contracted out to the National Research Council, instead of to the nuclear industry. The author wishes to accelerate changes that the AECB itself has set in motion. (N.D.H.)

  14. AECB introduces simulators for operator exams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB has completed its first round of simulator-based examinations for candidate shift supervisors and senior operators at each of the plant-specific simulators associated with the seven CANDU reactor sites in Canada. (author)

  15. AECB emergency response plan - in brief

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB's mission is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. The mission applies before, during and after emergencies

  16. The development of AECB regulatory documents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the Atomic Energy Control Board's (AECB) approach to the development and preparation of regulatory documents. The principal factors that have shaped the AECB'a regulatory approach are identified as background to the evolution of regulatory documents as are a number of current influences that affect the present and future development of these documents. Also described are the process by which regulatory documents are prepared and published and the points of contact between this process and the Canadian Standards Association program for nuclear standards. (author)

  17. AECB Cost Recovery Fees Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amendments to the AECB Cost Recovery Fees Regulations have been made with a view to simplifying the registration procedure for obtaining such a certificate or approval under the above Transport Regulations. In effect there will no longer be a need for a separate fee system for registered users of certified package designs. (NEA)

  18. Estimating the costs of AECB regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt is made to answer questions relating to the feasibility of determining costs imposed by regulatory activities of the Atomic Energy Control Board, and to provide a conceptual and methodological framework for an actual cost study of existing AECB requirments. (L.L.)

  19. Preparation of an annual report for a consolidated radioisotope licence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consolidated radioisotope licence is a single license issued by the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) to an institution having many users of radioactive materials. The licence is issued when the institution has fulfilled the requirements set by the AECB and has implemented policies and procedures which will ensure the maintenance of an effective radiation safety program. The consolidated licence is retained only if the results of AECB inspections are satisfactory -- or remedial action is taken promptly -- and if the institution reports regularly about the status of its radiation safety program. One aspect of this reporting procedure is an annual report. This guide describes the information that the AECB requires in the annual report. The guide applies primarily to universities and research institutions where a wide variety of radioisotope uses take place. The guide does not affect most other institutions or facilities, either because the nature and extent of their operations with radioactive materials do not lend themselves to consolidated licensing or because they are not licensed by the Radioisotopes and Transportation Division. (For example, this guide does not apply to reactors, to accelerators, or to waste management or uranium mining or refining facilities.) The information in the annual report should be specific to the consolidated radioisotope licence. Incidents, staff exposures, and waste associated with accelerators, research reactors, and waste management facilities should be excluded from this report unless they affected activities under the consolidated licence

  20. Methodologies for evaluation of AECB regulatory program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board) commissioned this report to obtain information about methods of planning and conducting evaluation of its regulatory program. The report begins with a bibliography consisting of 280 abstracts assembled from an extensive search of international literature. Each cited publication describes or uses methods applicable to the evaluation of regulatory programs. The report continues with a review of the methodologies found in the literature. It identifies the most relevant references for each step in program evaluation: the commissioning of evaluation; the identification of evaluation issues; the defining of questions; the answering of questions; the reporting of reslts, and the implementation of recommendations. Finally, the report examines the applicability, advantages and disadvantages of the different evaluation methods and makes recommendations about the selection of methods and their application to the AECB program

  1. Estimating the costs of AECB regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A comprehensive analysis of the costs to the Canadian nuclear industry of the present Atomic Energy Control Board regulatory activities was carried out to provide a framework for a socio-economic impact analysis of AECB regulations. Regulaory costs in uranium mining and milling, fuel fabrication, power generation, the nuclear fuel cycle as a whole, and radioisotope use are studied. The cost of safety measures which industry would still undertake in the absence of government regulations ('prudent operator' costs) are not included. (L.L.)

  2. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the thirty-ninth annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board. The period covered by this report is the year ending March 31, 1986. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) was established in 1946, by the Atomic Energy Control Act (AEC Act), (Revised Statues of Canada (R.S.C.) 1970 cA19). It is a departmental corporation (Schedule B) within the meaning and purpose of the Financial Administration Act. The AECB controls the development, application and use of atomic energy in Canada, and participates on behalf of Canada in international measures of control. The AECB is also repsonsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, (R.S.C. 1970 c29 1st Supp) as amended, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. The AECB reports to Parliament through a designated Minister, currently the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources

  3. Socio-economic impact analysis of new AECB regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The federal government's Socio-Economic Impact Analysis (SEIA) policy has been in effect since 1978. Under this policy, all new or amended regulations concerning health, safety, or fairness are subjected to a screening exercise which determines whether the regulations are major or minor. The costs and benefits of major regulations are analyzed in depth. This paper describes the SEIA policy and explains some of the basic concepts. Then the steps the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) follows in the analysis of new regulations are summarized. Finally, the AECB's past and forthcoming experience with the SEIA policy is discussed

  4. Socio-economic impact analysis of new AECB regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The federal government's Socio-Economic Impact Analysis (SEIA) policy has been in effect since 1978. Under this policy, all new or amended regulations concerning health, safety, or fairness are subjected to a screening exercise which determines whether the regulations are 'major' or 'minor'. The costs and benefits of major regulations are analyzed in depth. This paper describes the SEIA policy and explains some of the basic concepts. Then the steps the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) follows in the analysis of new regulations are summarized. Finally, the AECB's past and forthcoming experience with the SEIA policy is discussed

  5. Annual report, 1987-88

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the forty-first annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The period covered by this report is the year ending March 31, 1988. The AECB controls the development, application and use of nuclear energy in Canada, and participates on behalf of Canada in international measures of control of nuclear energy. The AECB was established in 1946, by the Atomic Energy Control Act. It is a departmental corporation within the meaning and purpose of the Financial Administration Act. The AECB also is responsible for the administration of the Nuclear Liability Act, including the designation of nuclear installations and the prescription of basic insurance to be carried by the operators of such nuclear installations. The AECB reports to Parliament through designated Minister, currently the Minister of Energy, Mines and Resources

  6. An audit of the AECB - what it revealed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An independent audit by the Office of the Auditor General of Canada concluded that the Canadian AECB needed updated legislation and improvements in its management processes and practices to facilitate its work of ensuring that the Canadian nuclear industry remains safe

  7. Annual Report of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Board. The Report made in 1972

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuant to the requirement in Article 14 of the Regulations of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund that the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Board present an annual report to the General Assembly of the United Nations and to the member organizations of the Fund, the United Nations has published the report presented by the Board in 1972 as Supplement No. 9 to the Official Records of the General Assembly: Twenty-Seventh Session (A/8709). The report has thus already been communicated to Governments. However, if any Member should require additional copies, the Secretariat is ready to obtain them

  8. Annual Report of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Board. The Report Made In 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuant to the requirement in Article 14(a) of the Regulations of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund that the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Board present an annual report to the General Assembly of the United Nations and to the member organizations of the Fund, the United Nations has published the report presented by the Board in 1974 as Supplement No. 9 to the Official Records of the General Assembly: Twenty-Ninth Session (A/9609). The report has thus already been communicated to Governments. However, if any Member should require additional copies, the Secretariat is ready to obtain them

  9. Annual Report of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Board. The Report made in 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pursuant to the requirement in Article 14(a) of the Regulations of the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Fund that the United Nations Joint Staff Pension Board present an annual report to the General Assembly of the United Nations and to the member organizations of the Fund, the United Nations has published the report presented by the Board in 1975 as Supplement No. 9 to the Official Records of the General Assembly: Thirtieth Session (A/10009). The report has thus already been communicated to Governments. However, if any Member should require additional copies, the Secretariat is ready to obtain them

  10. Evaluation of AECB-1119, risk of energy production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Inhaber report, 'Risk of Energy Production', is evaluated based on how the conclusions of the report match its objectives, the methodology used to reach the report's conclusions, and the presentation of the report. The authors recommend that a second volume containing the pertinent data used in the report should be published; and that total risks should be calculated ignoring material acquisition, construction and transportation risks, using the actual energy output of the various systems without imposing a backup energy supply, and comparing systems in such a way that death, injury and disease risks may be considered separately. They propose that the Atomic Energy Control Board should show how the report results relate to nuclear safety, and that the AECB should clarify the criteria for evaluating the small probability of a catastrophic nuclear accident. The response of the author of AECB--1119 is given in a separate section

  11. Proceedings of the AECB sponsored workshop on control of the ordering and receiving of radioactive material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop was held in Mississauga, Ontario, on February 4, 1997 for the purpose of bringing together radiation safety professionals to exchange information and propose options for action for the improved control of the ordering and receiving of radioactive materials. The focus was on unsealed radioisotopes and Type 'A' shipments. The workshop participants represented five major processors or distributors and five users who manage large radiation safety programs. These participants were invited because of their knowledge, experience and proximity. Workshop objectives were developed from a review of AECB files, from an AECB report which analysed, in a systematic manner, controls on the ordering and receiving of radioactive material, and from the participants' responses to a pre-workshop request for additional information. The objectives were to propose options for action: to prevent unauthorized persons from placing an order with a supplier; to prevent unauthorized persons from receiving radioactive material by establishing tighter control on the transfer of radioactive material and improving the control of radioactive material during and after delivery. This report provides a record of the presentations and discussions as well as the options for action developed during the workshop. The proposed options for action suggest additional regulatory requirements and guidance documents. Also identified was a need for better assessment, stricter enforcement and future discussions. Included in this report are new licence conditions which were developed as a result of this workshop, several 'parking lot' issues which were raised but considered outside the scope of the discussion and a list of participants. This workshop met the needs and expectation of the Materials Regulation Division (MRD) staff and addressed the needs of the participants. It also provided an opportunity to share information and ideas. It is MRDs intention to keep this collaborative workshop approach for

  12. Annual report 1989-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1989 the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) received additional resources, which will enable it to improve its regulatory ability, causing some reorganization of staff and the consolidation of the analysis and assessment functions in a new directorate. The year marked the commissioning of the first unit of the Darlington Generating Station. The start-up of this unit was delayed because the AECB had doubts about the safety aspects of the software for the two emergency shutdown systems. The accidental spill of contaminated water from the Rabbit Lake Mine in Saskatchewan allowed the AECB to detect some deficiencies in its inspection system and to correct them. The incident also emphasized the need to impose much higher fines and penalties on companies that violate the Atomic Energy Control Act. This report describes further activities of the AECB in the regulation of nuclear facilities, radioactive waste management, and nuclear materials handling; regulatory research; safeguards and security work; international activities; and public information

  13. Annual influenza vaccination: coverage and attitudes of primary care staff in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Kirsten; Seale, Holly; Zwar, Nicholas; Leask, Julie; MacIntyre, C. Raina

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Ward et al. (2011) Annual influenza vaccination: coverage and attitudes of primary care staff in Australia. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 135–141. Background  Annual influenza vaccination is recommended for all Australian health care workers (HCWs) including those working in primary health care. There is limited published data on coverage, workplace provision, attitudes and personal barriers to influenza vaccination amongst primary health care staff. The aim of this study was to contribute to the limited literature base in this important area by investigating these issues in the primary health care setting in New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Methods  A postal survey was sent to general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses (PNs) from inner city, semi‐urban and rural areas of NSW, Australia. There were 139 responses in total (response rate 36%) from 79 GPs (response rate 30%) and 60 PNs (response rate 46%). Results  Reported influenza vaccination coverage in both 2007 and 2008 was greater than 70%, with GPs reporting higher coverage than PNs in both years. The main barriers identified were lack of awareness of vaccination recommendations for general practice staff and concern about adverse effects from the vaccine. Conclusions  Rates of influenza vaccination coverage reported in this study were higher than in previous studies of hospital and institutional HCWs, though it is possible that the study design may have contributed to these higher results. Nevertheless, these findings highlight that more needs to be done to understand barriers to vaccination in this group, to inform the development of appropriate strategies to increase vaccination coverage in primary health care staff, with a special focus on PNs. PMID:21306577

  14. Assessment of annual average effective dose status in the cohort of medical staff in Lithuania during 1991-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Mastauskas, Albinas; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-12-01

    The use of radiation sources for various medical purposes is closely related to irradiation of the medical staff, which causes harmful effects to health and an increased risk of cancer. In total, 1463 medical staff who have been occupationally exposed to sources of ionising radiation (IR) had been monitored. Records with annual dose measurements (N = 19 157) were collected and regularly analysed for a 23-y period: from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2013. The collected annual average effective dose (AAED) data have been analysed according to different socio-demographic parameters and will be used in future investigation in order to assess cancer risk among medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR. A thorough analysis of data extracted from medical staff's dose records allows one to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR was consistently decreased from 1991 (1.75 mSv) to 2013 (0.27 mSv) (p < 0.0001). PMID:25614631

  15. Assessment of annual average effective dose status in the cohort of medical staff in Lithuania during 1991-2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of radiation sources for various medical purposes is closely related to irradiation of the medical staff, which causes harmful effects to health and an increased risk of cancer. In total, 1463 medical staff who have been occupationally exposed to sources of ionising radiation (IR) had been monitored. Records with annual dose measurements (N = 19 157) were collected and regularly analysed for a 23-y period: from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2013. The collected annual average effective dose (AAED) data have been analysed according to different socio-demographic parameters and will be used in future investigation in order to assess cancer risk among medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR. A thorough analysis of data extracted from medical staff's dose records allows one to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR was consistently decreased from 1991 (1.75 mSv) to 2013 (0.27 mSv) (p < 0.0001). (authors)

  16. 2011 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Schepens, A; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2012-01-01

    The 2011 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SRR) serves to report cases of submission of requests for review, internal appeals, appeals to the ILOAT, and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  17. 2014 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Barbin, Lucie; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Annual Report under Chapter VI ("Settlement of Disputes and Discipline") of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SRR) serves to report cases of submission of requests for review, internal appeals, complaints with the ILOAT, and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  18. 2012 Annual Report of Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations (Settlement of disputes and discipline) - HR Department

    CERN Document Server

    Schepens, A; CERN. Geneva. HR Department

    1013-01-01

    The 2012 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SRR) serves to report cases of submission of requests for review, internal appeals, appeals to the ILOAT, and cases in which disciplinary action was taken.

  19. SOR/93-163 AECB Cost Recovery Fees Regulations, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board (Cost Recovery Fees Regulations 1990 and subsequent amendments have been revoked and replaced by those new Regulations of 30 march 1993 which entered into force on 1 April 1993. The regulations were first made in 1990 in order to carry out the Government's policy of introducing the principle of ''user pay'' for the cost incurred by the AECB in its regulatory activities. The objective of the policy was to shift the cost of Government regulatory efforts for the taxpayer at large to those who most benefited from or whose activities were the reason for such effort. This new version of the Regulations reflects licensees' comments, e.g. extension of the period for review of proposed fees, and sets out increases in the fees. (NEA)

  20. Evaluation of the AECB's process of consultation with employees of its licensees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The study involved a review of public consultation methods used by various Federal Government agencies. These were then compared to the existing AECB programs to evaluate potential improvements. These were also referred to in later surveys of employees at licensed facilities to determine their perceived appropriateness. The majority of employees were both aware of AECB and correctly understood its function. Both of these aspects increased as a function of union membership, age, income, male sex and ARW status. However, the use of AECB consultative documents declined with union membership and increased with membership in professional associations. Satisfaction with the AECB consultative process was fairly low. Workers tended to be more satisfied with other agencies or safety associations. Feelings of job safety were greatest among those who received consultative documents or read AECB press releases. Feelings of safety also increased with age, education, income and professional association membership, but declined with union membership. Unionized employees expressed a desire for more consultation with AECB. Recommendations to improve the process of consultation are included

  1. Annual report, 1980-81

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Canadian Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) is responsible for the health, safety, and national and international security aspects of prescribed substances, equipment, and nuclear facilities. In 1981 it continued its work of licensing uranium mines and mills, uranium refining and conversion facilities, fuel fabrication operations, heavy water plants, reactors, accelerators, and radioactive waste management sites. It controlled the possession and transportation of prescribed substances and radioisotopes, and monitored the compliance of licensees with the terms of their licences. Research was done for the AECB on a contract basis in the areas of health effects, environmental processes, risk and safety evaluation, safeguards, and regulatory documents development. Cooperation with other national and international organizations in the area of safeguards and security continued. AECB staff are working on the cleanup of contaminated areas in Port Hope, Elliot Lake, and Bancroft, Ontario. Lists of licensed nuclear facilities in Canada with capacity and status information are included

  2. Annual report 1993-94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the forty-seventh annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The mission of the AECB is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. This is accomplished by controlling the development, application and use of nuclear energy in Canada, and by participating on behalf of Canada in international measure of control. The AECB achieves regulatory control of nuclear facilities and nuclear materials through a comprehensive licensing system. This control also extends to the import and export of nuclear materials and it involves Canadian participation in the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency as well as compliance with the requirements of Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The control covers both domestic and international security of nuclear materials and technology

  3. Annual report, 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the forty-fifth annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The mission of the AECB is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. This is accomplished by controlling the development, application and use of nuclear energy in Canada, and by participating on behalf of Canada in international measure of control. The AECB achieves regulatory control of nuclear facilities and nuclear materials through a comprehensive licensing system. This control also extends to the import and export of nuclear materials and it involves Canadian participation in the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency as well as compliance with the requirements of Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The control covers both domestic and international security of nuclear materials and technology

  4. Annual report 1992-93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the forty-sixth annual report of the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). The mission of the AECB is to ensure that the use of nuclear energy in Canada does not pose undue risk to health, safety, security and the environment. This is accomplished by controlling the development, application and use of nuclear energy in Canada, and by participating on behalf of Canada in international measure of control. The AECB achieves regulatory control of nuclear facilities and nuclear materials through a comprehensive licensing system. This control also extends to the import and export of nuclear materials and it involves Canadian participation in the activities of the International Atomic Energy Agency as well as compliance with the requirements of Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons. The control covers both domestic and international security of nuclear materials and technology

  5. Review of utility staff training and certification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) has reviewed the nuclear utility training programs in Canada and the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) certification program, to determine their effectiveness in meeting current and future needs. It has also looked briefly at the practices in other countries and in the aviation industry in Canada, by way of comparison. While a quantitative measure of effectiveness was beyond the scope of this review, on a purely qualitative basis the ACNS concludes that the current training and certification regime produces qualified operators, but not necessarily in the most effective way. The report makes five recommendations. The thrust of these recommendations is towards a more effective and streamlined training and certification regime based on strict adherence to the Systematic Approach to Training (SAT) methodology combined with independent verification through a peer review and accreditation process. The Committee believes that training and qualification of nuclear power plant operating staff is the complete responsibility of the utilities and that the role of the AECB is to audit the process to ensure that the utilities discharge their responsibility appropriately. In other words, the AECB should deal with operator training and certification in the same way that it deals with other aspects of nuclear power plant operation that are important to health, safety, security and the environment - by inspections and audits. The Committee believes that the proposed regulatory requirement for recertification of certain nuclear power plant operating staff, which would come into effect when the new Regulations are promulgated, is not consistent with the government's thrust and with how the AECB regulates other aspects of nuclear power plant operations. (author)

  6. CNSC staff annual report for 2001 on the Canadian nuclear power industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) staff assessments of the Canadian nuclear power industry's operational performance in 2001. The report presents the CNSC staff score card of licensee programs and performance in nine safety areas. In addition, the report makes comparisons where possible, shows trends and highlights significant issues that pertain to the industry at large. More detailed information on issues can be found in the licensing Commission Member Documents (CMD) for each facility. The report's conclusions are supported by information gathered by CNSC staff inspections and document reviews, event reviews and studies of performance indicators.Through these activities, CNSC staff identifies strengths and weaknesses in licensees' performance and raise issues requiring attention or corrective action. Of the 22 CANDU reactors that have been issued operating licences by the CNSC, eight have produced no electric power since 1998. The Bruce A reactors are defuelled and in a layed-up state. The Pickering A reactors are fuelled, but remain in a drained guaranteed shutdown state. The Bruce B reactors are currently limited to operating at or below 90% of full power. The Darlington reactors are limited to 98% of full power. The remaining reactors are nominally operating at full power. Figure 2 shows the location of each site, the number and generating capacity of the reactors, and the initial start-up date, licence holders and licence expiry date (at the time of the production of the report). To meet the legal requirements of the Nuclear Safety and Control Act and Regulations licensees must implement programs which ensure that station operation has adequate provisions for the protection of the environment, the health and safety of persons and the maintenance of national security and measures required to implement international obligations to which Canada has agreed. CNSC staff assesses every stations' performance against legal

  7. Abridged style manual for use by contractors producing typed reports to AECB format specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB contractor's style manual sets down basic standards for content and layout of typewritten reports. Points of style are outlined for reference by authors. The elements of a document and their location are described, and instructions to typists are detailed. Example of proper usage are given and the appendices contain layout pro formas for the setting up of any typewritten page. (author)

  8. ADEM - a system for recording and retrieving AECB decision-making

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept and plan is proposed for a system to record on-going decision-making by the AECB so that the decision-making can be retrieved in the future. The system could also be used to retrieve past decision-making. (author). 4 tabs., 1 fig

  9. Vietnam; Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper: Annual Progress Report: Joint Staff Advisory Note

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a Joint Staff Advisory Note on Vietnam’s Poverty Reduction Strategy. GDP growth accelerated to 7.7 percent despite several exogenous shocks, including the outbreak of avian influenza and a sharp rise in the price of key imported commodities. However, an adverse consequence of these supply shocks has been a sharp rise in inflation, which tested the government’s macroeconomic policymaking ability. The rapid growth of credit is of concern because of a potential accumulati...

  10. Recommendations on AECB draft licensing guides nos. 40,41,42

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Nuclear Safety (ACNS) to the Atomic Energy Control Board concerning the draft AECB Licensing Guides 40, 41 and 42 which were issued subsequently as Consultative Documents Nos. 7, 8 and 9. Since the report focusses on points of principle or generic concern, most of its recommendations apply generally to all three documents, although some specific recommendations are included

  11. SOR 90-190, 22 March 1990, AECB Cost Recovery Fees Regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These Regulations entered into force on 1 April 1990. They were made pursuant to the Atomic Energy Control Regulations and prescribe the legal obligations to pay fees imposed on applicants for and holders of licences from the Atomic Energy Control Board - AECB. The purpose of the Regulations is to shift the cost of government service from the general taxpayer to the users and to those who specifically benefit from the services. (NEA)

  12. Extremity doses of medical staff involved in interventional radiology and cardiology: Correlations and annual doses (hands and legs)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intensive measurement campaign was launched in different hospitals in Europe within work package 1 of the ORAMED project (Optimization of RAdiation protection for MEDical staff). Its main objective was to obtain a set of standardized data on extremity and eye lens doses for staff in interventional radiology (IR) and cardiology (IC) and to optimize staff protection. The monitored procedures were divided in three main categories: cardiac, general angiography and endoscopic retrograde cholangio-pancreatography(ERCP) procedures. Using a common measurement protocol, information such as the protective equipment used (lead table curtain, transparent lead glass ceiling screen, patient shielding, whole body shielding or special cabin etc.) as well as Kerma Area Product (KAP) values and access of the catheter were recorded. This study was performed with a final database of more than 1300 procedures performed in 34 European hospitals. Its objectives were firstly to determine if the measured extremity doses could be correlated to the KAP values; secondly to check if the doses to the eyes could be linked to the doses to the hands (finger or wrist positions) and finally if the doses to the fingers could be estimated based on the doses to the wrists. General correlations were very difficult to find and their strength was mostly influenced by three main parameters: the X-ray tube configuration, the room collective radioprotective equipment and the access of the catheter. The KAP value can provide a simple mean to estimate the extremity doses of the operator given that it is assessed correctly for the operator when he is actually using the X-ray tube. Moreover, this study showed that the doses to the left finger are strongly correlated to the doses to the left wrist when no ceiling shield is used. It is also possible to estimate the doses to the eyes given the doses to the left finger or left wrist but the X-ray tube configuration and the access have to be considered. The annual

  13. Cost of implementing AECB interim criteria for the closeout of uranium tailings sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this study was to arrive at a gross approximation of the costs to the Canadian uranium mining industry of meeting the proposed closeout criteria established by the Atomic Energy Control Board for tailings deposits. Two options have been investigated: on-land disposal and underlake disposal. Given the budget allocated to the study, the estimates must be understood as approximations. Overall cost figures for the Canadian uranium mining industry are linear extensions from a hypothetical base case. The results of a conference held in Ottawa on February 25 and 26 to discuss the proposed AECB interim criteria for the closeout of uranium tailings sites are also included. Representatives from mining firms, provincial regulatory authorities, universities and the Atomic Energy Control board attended the conference

  14. Reviewing staff performance and salaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2005-01-01

    Do you feel like you're on shaky ground when it comes time to evaluate your staffs performance or to give them raises? If so, you're not alone. Staff performance and salary reviews are among the most dreaded tasks among medical practice managers. Yet, they are among the most effective techniques you can use to motivate, manage, correct, and reward your staff. This article provides an overview of the different kinds of appraisals you will need to conduct with your staff and the order in which to do them. It suggests that you begin the process by establishing concrete goals for your medical practice and then help your staff follow suit by developing their own performance goals for the next six months. This article also provides how-to guidance about conducting regular interim progress reviews with your staff to keep abreast of progress, changes, and problems and to issue ongoing assistance and feedback. It explains how to conduct tension-free semi-annual staff performance reviews and semi-annual or annual salary reviews, including a formula for calculating potential raises for each employee in nine increments. Finally, this article offers additional tips for evaluating your staffs performance, including job description updates and staff surveys. PMID:16302443

  15. Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Remove of the staff association office   The Staff Association offices are going to be renovated during the coming four months, February to May 2014. The physical move from our current premises 64/R-002 to our temporary office in  510/R-010 will take place on Friday January 31st, so the Secretariat will be closed on that day. Hence, from Monday February 3rd until the end of May 2014 the Staff Association Secretariat will be located in 510/R-010 (entrance just across the CERN Printshop).    

  16. NICU staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your infant in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The staff often includes the following: ALLIED HEALTH ... involved in your baby's care while in the NICU, it is the neonatologist who determines and coordinates ...

  17. Staff Rostering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.A.E. Thompson

    1978-09-01

    Full Text Available Staff rostering is a key factor in nursing management with potential to bring life to, or to paralyse the system. This places immense responsibility on those in charge of rostering, and an all but intolerable load if the task is incumbent upon any one person. Nurse administrators (managers who have handled such a task, are to be congratulated on the order they have created out of potential ‘chaos’. It would seem, however, that the time is surely ripe for regular appraisals of the situation with a resultant increased participation in the policy and decision-making process.

  18. STAFF NEEDED

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The English National Programme, part of the Lycée International de Ferney-Voltaire (France) needs the following staff for September 2001: A part-time teacher of primary English The post involves teaching the English curriculum to pupils who are within the French educational system: Classes take place on Tuesday afternoons at the Lycée, Team spirit necessary as teachers work as a team, Induction & training are offered. A part time teacher of senior secondary history-geography in English A part time teacher of secondary mathematics in English Teachers must be mother-tongue English speakers and have a relevant degree and/or teaching qualification. For the history-geography post, either history or geography degrees are acceptable. Please send your c.v. and a letter of application to Peter Woodburn, Head, English National Programme, Lycée International, 01216 Ferney-Voltaire, France. (Email: engnat@hotmail.com) Telephone 04 50 40 82 66 for further details of posts. Ple...

  19. Afghanistan; Joint Staff Advisory Note

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2010-01-01

    This Joint Staff Advisory Note discusses Afghanistan’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper's annual progress report. Afghanistan has experienced a number of extraordinary challenges that delayed its implementation. The security situation deteriorated markedly and has been dominated by the cross-border Taliban insurgency. Growth started to recover from a devastating drought. In May 2008, food and fuel prices peaked, leading to high inflation and pressure on the budget for additional fuel and fo...

  20. Staff training in organisation

    OpenAIRE

    Vomáčka, Štěpán

    2012-01-01

    This thesis is focused to areas of staff training in organization. The first part summarize general problems of staff training as a part of human resources management and concepts are explained such as motivation to education, human recources management, staff training methods, analyses of staff training needs, methods of development needs identification, staff training planning, corporate staff training, e-learning and evaluation of personnel development results. The second part of this thes...

  1. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the sta...

  2. KLE annual report 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report on legal and economic fundamentals, licensing procedures, the state of construction, waste management schemes, financing, staff requirements, public relations, annual balances, cost-benefit calculations for 1985. (HP)

  3. Annual General Meeting

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      STAFF ASSOCIATION Our next annual general meeting will take place on : Thursday 22 May 2014 at 11:00 AM Building 40-S2-D01 For further information visit our website : https://indico.cern.ch/event/313124/

  4. Decentralized Ground Staff Scheduling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, M. D.; Clausen, Jens

    2002-01-01

    Typically, ground staff scheduling is centrally planned for each terminal in an airport. The advantage of this is that the staff is efficiently utilized, but a disadvantage is that staff spends considerable time walking between stands. In this paper a decentralized approach for ground staff...... scheduling is investigated. The airport terminal is divided into zones, where each zone consists of a set of stands geographically next to each other. Staff is assigned to work in only one zone and the staff scheduling is planned decentralized for each zone. The advantage of this approach is that the staff...... work in a smaller area of the terminal and thus spends less time walking between stands. When planning decentralized the allocation of stands to flights influences the staff scheduling since the workload in a zone depends on which flights are allocated to stands in the zone. Hence solving the problem...

  5. E3 Staff Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — E3 Staff database is maintained by E3 PDMS (Professional Development & Management Services) office. The database is Mysql. It is manually updated by E3 staff as...

  6. Use staff wisely to save NHS money.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Alison

    2015-12-01

    The NHS could save up to £ 2 billion a year by improving workflow and containing workforce costs, according to Labour peer Lord Carter's review of NHS efficiency. Changes in areas such as rostering and management of annual leave must avoid increasing the pressure on staff. PMID:26647680

  7. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Saff Association

    2013-01-01

    2013 Elections to Staff Council   Vote! Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site (https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2013).   Timetable elections Monday 28 October to Monday 11 November, 12:00 am voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November, Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee.

  8. Meeting staff representatives of the European Agencies

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

      The AASC (Assembly of Agency Staff Committee) held its 27th Meeting of the specialized European Agencies on 26 and 27 May on the premises of the OHIM (Office for Harmonization in the Internal Market) in Alicante, Spain. Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association, in charge of External Relations, attended as observers. This participation is a useful complement to regular contacts we have with FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants' Associations), which groups staff associations of the UN Agencies, and the annual CSAIO conferences (Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations), where each Autumn representatives of international organizations based in Europe meet to discuss themes of common interest to better promote and defend the rights of the international civil servants. All these meetings allow us to remain informed on items that are directly or indirectly related to employment and social conditions of our colleagues in other international and Europ...

  9. Library staff development course.

    OpenAIRE

    Eaton, E K

    1981-01-01

    The Moody Medical Library at the University of Texas Medical Branch plans, presents, and evaluates regularly a staff development program for its employees, including librarians and clerical and technical staff. The program's purpose is to provide continuing education for the library staff while concurrently: (1) providing information concerning specific library services and programs; (2) illustrating the interrelationship of the departments and divisions within the library; (3) developing a s...

  10. Planning Staff Meetings. Ideas for Staff Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie

    2002-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of the planning and the process of organizing staff meetings. Specifically addresses the areas concerning clarity of purpose and structure of meetings, as well as promoting learning and connecting during meetings. Provides specific strategies to achieve these goals including suggestions for self-assessment. (SD)

  11. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 31st of October to the 14th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months and will keep the next Staff Council very busy. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to vote * * * * * * * Vote Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. More details on the election...

  12. New staff contract policy

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    Following discussion at TREF and on the recommendation of the Finance Committee, Council approved a new staff contract policy, which became effective on 1 January 2006. Its application is covered by a new Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 3) 'Recruitment, appointment and possible developments regarding the contractual position of staff members'. The revised circular replaces the previous Circulars No. 9 (Rev. 3) 'Staff contracts' and No. 2 (Rev. 2) 'Guidelines and procedures concerning recruitment and probation period for staff members'. The main features of the new contract policy are as follows: The new policy provides chances for long-term employment for all staff recruits staying for four years without distinguishing between those assigned to long-term or short-term activities when joining CERN. In addition, it presents a number of simplifications for the award of ICs. There are henceforth only 2 types of contract: Limited Duration (LD) contracts for all recruitment and Indefinite Contracts (IC) for...

  13. Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. The voting takes place from the 28 of October to the 11th of November, at noon. As you may have noted when reading Echo, many issues concerning our employment conditions are on the agenda of the coming months, and in particular the Five-yearly-Review 2015, subject of the questionnaire that you probably recently filled out. All this will keep the next Staff Council very busy indeed. So, make your voice heard and take part in the elections for a new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will be representing you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. Every member of the Staff Association will have received an email containing a link to the webpage which will allow voting. If you are a member of the Staff Association and you did not receive such an email, please contact the Staff Association secretariat (staff.association@cern.ch). Do not forget to v...

  14. Optimisation of staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is important to minimize the radiation dose received by staff, but it is particularly important in interventional radiology. Staff doses may be reduced by minimizing the fluoroscopic screening time and number of images, compatible with the clinical objective of the procedure. Staff may also move to different positions in the room in an attempt to reduce doses. Finally, staff should wear appropriate protective clothing to reduce their occupational doses. This paper will concentrate on the optimization of personal shielding in interventional radiology. The effect of changing the lead equivalence of various protective devices on effective dose to staff has been studied by modeling the exposure of staff to realistic scattered radiation. Both overcouch x-ray tube/undercouch image intensified and overcouch image intensifier/undercouch x-ray tube geometries were simulated. It was deduced from this simulation that increasing the lead apron thickness from 0.35 mm lead to 0.5 mm lead had only a small reducing effect. By contrast, wearing a lead rubber thyroid shield or face mask is a superior means of reducing the effective dose to staff. Standing back from the couch when the x-ray tube is emitting radiation is another good method of reducing doses, being better than exchanging a 0.35 mm lead apron for a 0.5 mm apron. In summary, it is always preferable to shield more organs than to increase the thickness of the lead apron. (author)

  15. The AB Staff Plan

    CERN Document Server

    Boillot, J; Delahaye, J P; Myers, S; CERN. Geneva. AB Department

    2003-01-01

    The present report summarises the staff plan of the newly created Accelerators and Beams (AB) Division following the restructuring of the Accelerator Sector and covering the period 2003 to 2010. It underlines the refocusing of the staff on priority work, especially the LHC Project and is coherent with the recently adopted CERN Long Term Plan (LTP). It compares the requested and available manpower (both staff and industrial support) for each Project, Programme and Activity (PPA) split in work packages and highlights the missing manpower for each category of personnel.

  16. Staff turnover in statewide implementation of ACT: relationship with ACT fidelity and other team characteristics

    OpenAIRE

    Rollins, Angela L.; Salyers, Michelle P.; Tsai, Jack; Lydick, Jennifer M.

    2010-01-01

    Staff turnover on assertive community treatment (ACT) teams is a poorly understood phenomenon. This study examined annual turnover and fidelity data collected in a statewide implementation of ACT over a 5-year period. Mean annual staff turnover across all observations was 30.0%. Turnover was negatively correlated with overall fidelity at Year 1 and 3. The team approach fidelity item was negatively correlated with staff turnover at Year 3. For 13 teams with 3 years of follow-up data, turnover ...

  17. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the ...

  18. Staff Association Information Meetings

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Staff Association Information Meetings: - Thursday 29 September at 2 p.m., Meyrin, Kjell Johnsen Auditorium, 30-7-017 (in French) - Friday 30 September at 10 a.m., Prévessin, BE Auditorium, 864-1-D02 (in French) - Monday 3 October at 2 p.m., Meyrin, IT Auditorium, 31-3-004 (in French) - Tuesday 4 October at 2 p.m., Meyrin, Filtration Plant, 222-R-001 (in English)   Staff Association

  19. Staff attitudes towards opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) and the associations with treatment

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    This thesis, in addiction medicine, investigated staff attitudes towards opioid maintenance treatment (OMT) in different settings, and their association with treatment differences within the Norwegian OMT programme. In New South Wales, Australian prison health staff were found to discourage inmates from entering or remaining in OMT. Thus, the first aim of this thesis was to investigate staff attitudes towards and knowledge of OMT among prison health staff. In Norway, annual assessments of the...

  20. The perceived stress and turnover intention of direct-care staff of community residential facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Lightle, Kevin Eugene

    1990-01-01

    This study examines turnover among direct-care staff of community residential facilities. Turnover is of concern as the projected rate indicated by direct-care staff is 34%. A review of personnel records project an annual turnover rate of 40%. Stress is examined for its relationship to turnover. The Maslach Burnout Inventory is used to measure the perceived stress level of staff. Results indicate direct-care staff are not stressed to the point of burnout in two of ...

  1. The Commitments of Academic Staff and Career in Malaysian Universities

    OpenAIRE

    Fauziah Noordin; Kamaruzaman Jusoff; Jamil Hj Hamali; Mior Harris Mior Harun

    2009-01-01

    This article reports the study on career commitment of the academic staff of a local public university in Malaysia. The findings indicate that the academic staff of this university has higher level of career identity, low level of career resilient, and slightly high level of career planning. In addition, the results indicate that the respondents’ organizational tenure and annual salary have significant impact on their career resilience commitment. Other demographic variables showed no signifi...

  2. GKSS annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report reviews the structure and activities of the GKSS in 1983. R and D work was done on reactor safety engineering, environmental research/environmental engineering and underwater technology. It also reports on cooperation with outside partners, the organization, financing, and developments in the staff structure as well as on publications, lectures, applications for patents, etc. (UA)

  3. Staff rules and regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2007-01-01

    The 11th edition of the Staff Rules and Regulations, dated 1 January 2007, adopted by the Council and the Finance Committee in December 2006, is currently being distributed to departmental secretariats. The Staff Rules and Regulations, together with a summary of the main modifications made, will be available, as from next week, on the Human Resources Department's intranet site: http://cern.ch/hr-web/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp The main changes made to the Staff Rules and Regulations stem from the five-yearly review of employment conditions of members of the personnel. The changes notably relate to: the categories of members of the personnel (e.g. removal of the local staff category); the careers structure and the merit recognition system; the non-residence, installation and re-installation allowances; the definition of family, family allowances and family-related leave; recognition of partnerships; education fees. The administrative circulars, some of which are being revised following the m...

  4. Integration of CERN staff

    CERN Multimedia

    1965-01-01

    An example of the integration of CERN staff in the neighbouring communes is provided by the hamlet of Bugnon at St-Genis-Pouilly (Ain), FRance. The CERN installation on the Swiss site are visible on the left in the background. Behind them the Saleve mountain in Haute-Savoie.

  5. Systematic Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  6. Research of 2011 annual health condition and overweight of enterprise staff in a company%某企业员工2011年度健康状况及超重调查

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张维奇; 李伟强

    2014-01-01

    Objective To survey the health condition of employees in a company, and to understand the epidemic status of chronic non-communicable diseases in the company. Methods The physical examination data of the enterprise staff were collected, which were statistically analyzed by SPSS 17.0 statistical software. Results ①The high detection rates of physical abnormality were as follows in sequence, overweight (50.0%), hypertension (49.3%), high level of systolic blood pressure (SBP) (46.1%), high level of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) (380.%), high level of triglyceride (TG) (36.3%), and high level of cholesterol(TC)(32.6%).②There were statistically significant differences between overweight and non overweight staff of hypertension, hyperlipidemia, hepatic fat deposition, high level of alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and hyperglycemia. The result ofχ2 test (P=0.000) showed that the detection rate in overweight staff was obviously higher than that in non overweight staff. The differences of high blood uric acid and electrocardiographic abnormality had no statistical significance between overweight and non overweight staff (P>0.05). Conclusion ①Overweight, hypertension, high level of SBP, high level of LDL-C, high level of TG, and high level of cholesterol are then main indexes of the high detection rates of physical abnormality.②Overweight is a risk factor for hypertension, hyperlipidemia, hepatic fat deposition, and hyperglycemia.%目的:对某企业员工健康状况进行调查,了解该企业慢性非传染性疾病的流行现状。方法收集某企业员工的体检资料,应用SPSS17.0统计软件对体检结果进行统计分析。结果①体检指标异常检出率较高的依次为超重(50.0%)、高血压(49.3%)、收缩压(SBP)过高(46.1%)、高低密度脂蛋白胆固醇(LDL-C)(38.0%)、高甘油三酯(TG)(36.3%)、高胆固醇(TC)(32.6%);②超重、非超重员工高血压、高血脂、肝脂肪沉积、高丙氨酸转氨

  7. Moving Staff through Difficult Issues. Ideas for Training Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Margie; Pelo, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Offers practical solutions to three problems faced by administrators of early childhood education programs: motivating staff with different levels of commitment, dealing with staff communications and conflicts, and minimizing the impact of teacher turnover. (JPB)

  8. Developments in AECB operator examination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the on-going evolution of the system used by the Atomic Energy Control Board to assess the qualifications of shift supervisors and control room operators of CANDU nuclear power plants. The main change was the introduction in 1993 of routine simulator-based testing. The use of a simulator as a partial replacement for written examinations has been successful in ensuring competence; it fits in with training programs, results in spin-off operational safety benefits, and is accepted as fair. 4 refs., 1 ill., 1 tab

  9. Results of the staff survey: your priorities

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    This is the first in a series of articles which will give some details about the results of the Staff Association staff survey To know your priorities and the evolution of your concerns over the last decade we study how, in each of our latest three surveys, you chose from a list of 15 items the five most important and classified them by assigning them a priority, from the most important to the fifth most important. The list of fifteen items, and a short description, follows. Career evolution (classification, level of recruitment, advancement, promotion) Salary level Family policy (recognition of partners, allowances, school fees, kindergarten, nursery, crèche, parental leave) Health insurance Non-residence and international indemnity Annual salary adjustment (cost variation index) Contract policy (duration, recruitment, award of IC, conditions of the beginning and ending of the contract) Motivation at work (interest, team, supervision, mobility, reward scheme) Pensions (retirement, disability, o...

  10. Design of Staffs Assessing System

    OpenAIRE

    Hůlová, Iva

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the staff assessment system in the organization in connection with reward system. This thesis is divided into the theoretical part and the practical part. The theoretical part describes the concept of staff assessment system and system of reward. Within the frame of staff assessing in addition to these tasks further the basic and additional assessment methods are explained, assessment criteria and also the errors and problems connected with the staff assessing. The c...

  11. Management problems of staff motivation

    OpenAIRE

    PUZYNYA T.A.

    2015-01-01

    Staff motivation is a major link in improving the competitiveness of any organization. One of the main problems of management of motivation of staff is the individuality of each employee, so the knowledge of psychology and individual needs will help organizations effectively manage staff.

  12. Staff management, training and knowledge management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staff management/training and knowledge management are organisational issues that are particularly sensitive in long-term projects stretching over decades like the development and operation of a geological repository. The IAEA has already issued several publications that deal with this issue (IAEA, 2006, 2008). Organisational aspects were also discussed in the framework of a topical session organised by the Integration Group for the Safety Case (IGSC) at its annual meeting in 2009 and were regarded as a topic deserving future attention (NEA, 2009a). More recently, the Forum on Stakeholder Confidence (FSC) identified organisational, mission and behavioural features as attributes of confidence and trust (NEA, 2013). They also identified that aspects such as structural learning capacity, high levels of skill and competence in relevant areas, specific management plan, good operating records, transparency and consistency are associated with confidence building in a safety case. These aspects are considerably related to staff training/management and knowledge management. The IGSC has initiated a proposal of study dedicated to staff training/management and knowledge management with the objective to highlight how these recent concerns and the requirements issued by the IAEA are concretely implemented in the national programmes. The goal of this study is to acknowledge the differences of views and needs for staff management and knowledge management at different stages of individual programmes and between implementer and regulator. As a starting point to this study, the JAEA and ONDRAF/NIRAS prepared a draft questionnaire in order to succinctly capture processes and tools that the national organisations have implemented to meet the requirements and address the issues set out in the field of staff and knowledge management. For the purpose of this study, a questionnaire is now under development, which will be presented on the occasion of this symposium with guidance based on a

  13. Upcoming Summer Programs for Students and Staff | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Robin Meckley, Contributing Writer This summer, the Scientific Library is hosting three programs for students and NCI at Frederick staff: the Summer Video Series, Mini Science Film & Discussion Series, and Eighth Annual Student Science Jeopardy Tournament. Complete information on the programs is available on the Scientific Library’s website.

  14. Hand Dose in Nuclear Medicine Staff Members

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Measurement of the hand dose during preparation and injection of radiopharmaceuticals is useful in the assessment of the extremity doses received by nuclear medicine personnel. Hand radiation doses to the occupational workers that handling 99mTc-labeled compounds, 131I for diagnostic in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. A convenient method is to use a TLD ring dosimeter for measuring doses of the diagnostic units of different nuclear medicine facilities . Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 4 weeks. The radiation doses to the hands of nuclear medicine staff at the hospitals under study were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y) because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year

  15. The Staff Association and you

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    The Staff Association, your representative with the Management and the Member States The article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules and Regulations (SR&R) provides that “the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary”. This essential role of the Staff representatives, of being the spokesperson of the entire staff of the Organization vis-à-vis the Director-General and the Members States, is achieved through regular participation in the various joint advisory committees defined in the SR&R. The most important are the Standing Concertation Committee and the TREF, tripartite forum where your representatives meet with the Member States delegates, in the presence of the Management, to explain the position of the staff on the various issues concerning employment conditions. The Finance Committee also gives the opportunity to the Staff Association to ...

  16. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    The Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/. Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  17. Information for contractors' staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Dosimetry Service

    2005-01-01

    We have observed a significant decrease in the number of completed Certificates for Work in Controlled Radiation Areas being submitted with applications for dosimeters for your staff. Henceforth, we shall no longer be able to issue dosimeters without a certificate, which must be signed by the employee and the contractor's radiation-protection expert. You can obtain the certificate form from the Dosimetry Service at Building 24/E-011 or from our Website: http://service-rp-dosimetry.web.cern.ch/service-rp-dosimetry/ Thank you for your understanding. The Dosimetry Service

  18. STAFF VACANCY LIST

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For economy reasons, it has been decided to stop printing and distributing this list to Staff Members. It can be found on the Web (LIST). Divisional Administrative Officers will receive an updated printed copy on a monthly basis and are asked to display this in a public place in their division. Copies will also be posted on the notice boards of the Administration Building (No. 60) in the glass-fronted cabinet (close to the lifts) and also on the notice board close to the Post Office. A copy will also be given to the Reception (Building No. 33). Human Resources Division Tel. 74606

  19. Total - annual report 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report presents the activities and results of TOTAL S.A., french society on oil and gas. It deals with statistics, the managers, key information on financial data and risk factors, information on the Company, unresolved Staff Comments, employees, major Shareholders, consolidated statements, markets, security, financial risks, defaults dividend arrearages and delinquencies, controls and procedures, code of ethics and financial statements. (A.L.B.)

  20. The Commitments of Academic Staff and Career in Malaysian Universities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Noordin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This article reports the study on career commitment of the academic staff of a local public university in Malaysia. The findings indicate that the academic staff of this university has higher level of career identity, low level of career resilient, and slightly high level of career planning. In addition, the results indicate that the respondents’ organizational tenure and annual salary have significant impact on their career resilience commitment. Other demographic variables showed no significant differences on career identity, career resilience, and career planning of the respondents. Implications for management and recommendations for future studies are highlighted.

  1. Impact of hospital mergers on staff job satisfaction: a quantitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Ka Keat

    2014-01-01

    Background Hospital mergers began in the UK in the late 1990s to deal with underperformance. Despite their prevalence, there is a lack of research on how such organizational changes affect the staff morale. This study aims to assess the impact of NHS hospital mergers between financial years 2009/10 and 2011/12 on staff job satisfaction and to identify factors contributing to satisfaction. Methods Data on staff job satisfaction were obtained from the annual NHS Staff Survey. A list of mergers ...

  2. Recruiting and Retaining Summer Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crossen, Brian; Yerkes, Rita

    1998-01-01

    Recruiting of camp staff is challenged by economic and workplace restructuring, including business downsizing, part-time and temporary employment patterns, and generational attitude changes. Strategies for hiring and retaining staff include knowing what college-age workers want, marketing benefits, adopting new business strategies, and empowering…

  3. Risk management through staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seisser, M A; Epstein, A L

    1998-01-01

    The staff members of a healthcare organization are recognized as students of risk management. The risk manager, through application of the fundamentals of andragogy (i.e., learning strategies specific to adult learners), is in an advantageous position to assist staff in successfully applying risk management thought processes and related actions. PMID:10185075

  4. Staff Bullying in Australian Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Dan; Duncan, Deirdre J.; Edwards, John

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to estimate the prevalence of staff bullying in Australian schools, to identify bullies and targets and to examine some implications for school leaders in dealing with staff bullying. Design/methodology/approach: The quantitative research design survey instrument contained 11 demographic items, 44 questions of…

  5. 24 CFR 5.609 - Annual income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... local government) and training of a family member as resident management staff. Amounts excluded by this... who were persecuted during the Nazi era; (11) Earnings in excess of $480 for each full-time student 18...-Based Assistance Family Income § 5.609 Annual income. (a) Annual income means all amounts, monetary...

  6. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    Vote Elections to fill all seats in the Staff Council are being organized this month. Voting will begin on Monday 31 October. Make your voice heard and be many to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will  represent you over the next two years and they will doubtless appreciate your gratitude. More details on the elections can be found on the Staff Association web site. (http://association.web.cern.ch) Elections Timetable Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee. 

  7. Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung. Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 1994 annual report of the Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Ernaehrung describes the tasks, structure and staff and fields of research of this institution and its scientific cooperation with other institutions. The report is supplemented by an alphabetic list off all publications. The BFE specializes in research on nutritional, food and ecotrophological sciences. (vhe)

  8. Annual report 1991-1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report 1991-92 contains an update on the NRPB's role in international and national standards, the technical services provided by the NRPB, their work on environmental, biomedical and physical sciences, the status of NRPB publications giving advice, the NRPB's finances, its senior directing staff and finally NRPB members. (UK)

  9. Assessing and Reducing Exposures to Nuclear Medicine Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine involves the handling of unsealed radiation sources. Occupational monitoring in nuclear medicine, thus, includes assessment of both external irradiation of the body and internal exposure due to inhalation or ingestion of radioactive substances. When appropriate radiation protection measures are applied, the annual effective dose to nuclear medicine staff is low (around 2–3 mSv). However, hand doses can be very high and can even exceed the regulatory limit for skin equivalent dose, without workers being aware of it. The paper presents the main results of the European Atomic Energy Community’s Seventh Framework Programme project, Optimization of Radiation Protection of Medical Staff (ORAMED), within the field of extremity dosimetry of nuclear medicine staff, and proposes recommendations to improve radiation protection in occupational exposure in nuclear medicine. (author)

  10. Pediatric and staff dose evaluation in fluoroscopy upper gastrointestinal series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filipov, Danielle; Nascimento, Eduarda X. do; Lacerda, Camila M., E-mail: diilipov@utfpr.edu.br [Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (UFTPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Schelin, Hugo R.; Ledesma, Jorge A.; Denyak, Valeriy; Legnani, Adriano, E-mail: ledesmajorgealberto@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisa Pele Pequeno Principe, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    Fluoroscopy upper GI series are widely used for the diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease in children. Pediatric radiological procedures bring concern due to the high life expectancy and radiosensitivity on children, as well as the risks to the exposed staff Important studies present the mean KAP values on patients and the European Commission (EC) recommends specific techniques for these procedures. For the occupational expositions, staffs doses must be within the annual limit, according to the CNEN 3.01. Based on those data, the aims of the current study are: analyzing the upper GI procedure; determining the KAP on the patient and estimating the annual equivalent dose on the staff's crystalline. LiF :Mg,Ti TLDs were positioned on the patient upper chest center, so that the entrance surface air kerma could be determined. The field size on the patient s surface and the kerma were multiplied so that the KAP was obtained. LiF:Mg,Cu,P dosimeters were used to estimate the equivalent dose on the staff s crystalline. The results showed discrepancy in the kVp range and in the exposure time when compared to the EC data. The mean KAP values for the 0-1,1-3 and 3-10 years old patients were, respectively: 102 ± 19 cGy.cm2, 142 ± 25 cGy.cm2 and 323 ± 39 cGy.cm2; which are higher than the KAPs presented in the studies used for comparison. The estimated annual equivalent dose in the staff s crystalline would be approximately 85% higher than the limit set by the CNEN. Analyzing the data, it becomes clear that an optimization implementation is necessary in order to reduce the radiation levels. (author)

  11. Patient and staff dose during hysterosalpinography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hysterosalpingography (HSG) is a useful and widely employed technique which uses X-ray fluoroscopy to investigate the female genital tract. Fluoroscopy is assessed by a gynaecologist, a physician who is not always trained to work with ionising radiation. Dose-area product measurements in a group of 34 patients allowed an estimation of the median effective dose (0,83 mSv) and the median dose to the ovaries (1,63 mGy) of the patient per procedure. The dose to the staff was estimated using thermoluminescent dosimetry. The following median entrance surface doses were estimated per procedure: 0,22 mGy to the lens of the eye, 0,15 mGy to the neck at thyroid level and 0,19 mGy to the back of the hand. The annual eye dose limit could be exceeded if the gynaecologist is a member of the public. (author)

  12. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2005 : Article R II 4.07 of the Staff Regulations - Leave year (pages 25 & 26) The purpose of the amendment is to allow certain members of the personnel, on an exceptional basis in the context of LHC construction, to carry forward more than 30 days of annual leave into the following year. This possibility of additional carry-forward, which will be used sparingly, is governed by strict conditions : i.e. it must be with the consent of the member of the personnel concerned and subject to a specific, documented request by the hierarchy and a favourable medical opinion. In addition, the number of additional days of leave that can be carried forward must not exceed 10 per leave year, and all days of leave accumulated in this way must be used before 30 September 2009. Finally, this possibility will not be available to members of the personnel taking part in the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) as at 3...

  13. Continue to Vaccinate Patients and Staff Against the Flu

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2012-02-08

    This podcast is a reminder to health care providers about the importance of annual flu vaccination—it’s not too late! Health care providers should get their flu vaccine and continue offering and encouraging flu vaccination among their staff, colleagues, and patients.  Created: 2/8/2012 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 2/14/2012.

  14. Nepal; Joint Staff Assessment of the Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2003-01-01

    The Joint Staff Assessment on Nepal’s Poverty Reduction Strategy Paper (PRSP) highlights the PRSP process aimed to provide sustainable macroeconomic framework, improving governance and the overall policy environment. It reviews the execution of the envisaged programs, expenditure planning, public expenditure management system, and the effectiveness of the monitoring system. It also identifies some shortcomings of the PRSP that could be addressed over time and reflected in the annual progres...

  15. Dose levels in medical staff at hemodynamics services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dose levels received by medical staff during interventional radiology are very high depending on the operational conditions and the patient trunk thickness. Dose levels could reach a factor of 30 for fluoroscopy or cine modes. The ALARA principle, that emphasizes the adoption of techniques and procedures to keep dose levels as low as reasonably achievable, should be followed to minimize the risk of radiation exposure to medical professionals. Dose reduction could be achieved by persuading the medical staff to wear protection devices (lead apron, thyroid protector, eyeglasses and gloves). Additionally, medical staff should also be persuaded that they should not be submitted to very high doses, above the acceptable limits for occupational workers. Dose levels at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, were analysed. Due to the equipment characteristics or the exam type and conditions x-ray machines were used with 70 to 120 kV, 2.5 to 699 mA and 80 to 2880s. Annual individual doses were estimated based on measured doses during a specific exam taking into account the workload. Maximum doses varied from 0.05 to 0.70 mSv per exam. The results projected for one work-year period show that all annual individual doses would be higher than the annual dose limit of 20 mSv/y with only a few values lower than 50 mSv/y. Dose levels measured at medical staff positions during hemodynamic exams showed that if the protective devices are not used professionals could be exposed to dose values higher than annual dose limits. (author)

  16. Dose levels in medical staff at hemodynamics services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T. de [FUNDACENTRO - Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]|[Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: airton.almeida@fundacentro.gov.br; Alonso, Thessa C.; Nogueira, Maria do S.; Silva, Teogenes A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: mnogue@cdtn.br; alonso@cdtn.br; silvata@cdtn.br

    2007-07-01

    The dose levels received by medical staff during interventional radiology are very high depending on the operational conditions and the patient trunk thickness. Dose levels could reach a factor of 30 for fluoroscopy or cine modes. The ALARA principle, that emphasizes the adoption of techniques and procedures to keep dose levels as low as reasonably achievable, should be followed to minimize the risk of radiation exposure to medical professionals. Dose reduction could be achieved by persuading the medical staff to wear protection devices (lead apron, thyroid protector, eyeglasses and gloves). Additionally, medical staff should also be persuaded that they should not be submitted to very high doses, above the acceptable limits for occupational workers. Dose levels at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, were analysed. Due to the equipment characteristics or the exam type and conditions x-ray machines were used with 70 to 120 kV, 2.5 to 699 mA and 80 to 2880s. Annual individual doses were estimated based on measured doses during a specific exam taking into account the workload. Maximum doses varied from 0.05 to 0.70 mSv per exam. The results projected for one work-year period show that all annual individual doses would be higher than the annual dose limit of 20 mSv/y with only a few values lower than 50 mSv/y. Dose levels measured at medical staff positions during hemodynamic exams showed that if the protective devices are not used professionals could be exposed to dose values higher than annual dose limits. (author)

  17. SENIOR STAFF ADVANCEMENT COMMITTEE (SSAC)

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Composition and mandateThe Senior Staff Advancement Committee is composed of members nominated ad persona by the Director-General.The Committee examines proposals from Divisions concerning promotions to grade 13 in Career Path IX, changes of career path to Career Path IX and advancements to the exceptional grade in Career path VIII.The Director-General may consult the Committee on any matter related to senior staff careers.The Committee makes its recommendations to the Director-General.

  18. Why join the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Becoming a member of the Staff Association (SA) is above all a personal choice, showing that the joining person’s commitment and adherence to values such as solidarity, social cohesion, etc.In September, the SA launches a membership campaign to convince a maximum number to join, to inform, arouse interest and support. Posters, emails and individual contacts are part of the campaign programme, just like this editorial. As far as individual contacts are concerned, we ask you to give time and lend an ear to the delegates of your department in the Staff Council, who will approach you, in order to make an open and constructive discussion possible. Do not hesitate to ask questions and let them know your thoughts about the SA, as (constructive) criticism enables us to progress. The Staff Association and its role of collective representation The Staff Association, via its delegates, represents collectively all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States. To do this, staff rep...

  19. 2012 Annual Report to Congress on White House Staff

    Data.gov (United States)

    Executive Office of the President — Since 1995, the White House has been required to deliver a report to Congress listing the title and salary of every White House Office employee. Consistent with...

  20. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nang Mie Mie Htun; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were counted. The reasons were classified into two categories; involuntary attrition (death or retirement) and voluntary attrition (resignation or absenteeism). Official records of the attrited staff were reviewed for identifying demographic characteristics. The annual attrition rate for all kinds of health workers was about 4%. Among 494 attrited staff from 2009 to 2013, 357 staff (72.3%) left their work by involuntary attrition, while 137 staff (27.7%) left voluntarily. Doctors left their work with the highest annual rate (6.7%), while the rate for nurses was the lowest (1.1%). Male staff attrited with a higher rate (4.6%) than female staff (2.7%). Staff aged 46-60 years had the highest attrition rate. PhD degree holders had the highest rate (5.9%), while basic degree holders had the second highest rate (3.5%). Associate professors and above showed the highest attrition rate (8.1%). Teaching staff from non-clinical subjects had the higher rates (8.2%). Among 494 attrited staff, significant differences between involuntary attrition and voluntary attrition were observed in age, marital status, education, overseas degree, position, field of teaching, duration of services and duration of non-residential service. These findings indicated the need to develop appropriate policies such as educational reforms, local recruitment plans, transparent regulatory and administrative measures, and professional incentives to retain the job. PMID:27019526

  1. Radiation monitoring of PET staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Positron emission tomography (PET) is becoming a common diagnostic tool in hospitals, often located in and employing staff from the Nuclear Medicine or Radiology departments. Although similar in some ways, staff in PET departments are commonly found to have the highest radiation doses in the hospital environment due to unique challenges which PET tracers present in administration as well as production. The establishment of a PET centre with a dedicated cyclotron has raised concerns of radiation protection to the staff at the WA PET Centre and the Radiopharmaceutical Production and Development (RAPID) team. Since every PET centre has differing designs and practices, it was considered important to closely monitor the radiation dose to our staff so that improvements to practices and design could be made to reduce radiation dose. Electronic dosimeters (MGP DMC 2000XB), which have a facility to log time and dose at 10 second intervals, were provided to three PET technologists and three PET nurses. These were worn in the top pocket of their lab coats throughout a whole day. Each staff member was then asked to note down their duties throughout the day and also note the time they performed each duty. The duties would then correlate with the dose with which the electronic monitor recorded and an estimate of radiation dose per duty could be given. Also an estimate of the dose per day to each staff member could be made. PET nurses averaged approximately 20 μ8v per day getting their largest dose from caring for occasional problematic patients. Smaller doses of a 1-2 μ8v were recorded for injections and removing cannulas. PET technologists averaged approximately 15 μ8v per day getting their largest dose of 1-5μ8v mainly from positioning of patients and sometimes larger doses due to problematic patients. Smaller doses of 1-2 μ5v were again recorded for injections and removal of cannulas. Following a presentation given to staff, all WA PET Centre and RAPID staff

  2. NO to sacrificing future staff!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    During our public meetings last week, we reviewed several subjects. However, the most urgent one today is the 2nd package of measures for our Pension Fund. In our previous issue, we devoted a long article to the Management’s plan for staff recruited from January 2012. A disaster! As we announced at our meetings, the Staff Association will organize a referendum at the beginning of April. For the message to be heard it is vital that as many staff as possible take part. By voting you will express your support to your staff representatives to stand in the way of these unacceptable measures. It is a matter of urgency that the staff makes their voice heard. Time is short, the decisions will be made in June. The future of our Organization is as stake. This is our future colleagues we are talking about. We must prevent this sacrifice. They must be welcomed in such a manner that there is no uneasiness between us. They must be made to feel welcome in their new family, CERN, our CERN. That they should pay an ...

  3. Day Camp Manual: Staff. Book II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, William

    Book II of a 5-book day camp manual focuses on staff selection and training. Following the philosophy that developing an effective staff is the responsibility of the camp director, the book contains major sections on staff recruitment (sources of staff, problems, selection procedures, job descriptions, personnel practices); guidelines for job…

  4. Staff Association Handbook, 1974-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery Coll. Staff Association, Takoma Park, MD.

    This handbook provides a list of Staff Senate and Committee members of the Staff Association of Montgomery College, a copy of the bylaws of the association, and sections of the college's "Policies and Procedures Manual" that affect staff employees. These sections of the manual pertain to: Administrative and Staff Communication; Affirmative Action…

  5. Resolution of the Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    You were many to attend the public information meetings organised in October and we thank you for your interest. In this decision phase of the current Five-Yearly Review of our employment conditions they provided an opportunity to review the Management proposals in detail. They were a moment of exchange also on the various topics under review, and your comments were many and very valuable. Meeting on Thursday 29th October, the Staff Council discussed once more these proposals. It considered that the "package" of proposed measures is not balanced enough in its current form. It decided to formulate additional requests to the Management, relating mainly to the effects of the introduction of the proposed new career system. The resolution adopted this morning also implies that the consultation of staff, originally foreseen next week, is postponed. The staff Council will reconvene in a special session on Thursday, 5th November to reassess its position depending on the progress made regarding its d...

  6. Internet Staff Development: A Continuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mary Alice

    1998-01-01

    Provides a synopsis of classes developed by the Winona (Minnesota) Middle School media center to provide staff with current Internet skills. Includes navigation techniques using browsers; e-mail; search engines; selecting and evaluating Web sites; Internet ethics and Netiquette; critical evaluation of Web sources; graphics; interactive video…

  7. Top 10 Staff Survival Tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Laurie

    1995-01-01

    Tips for camp staff on how to survive summer camp include not giving campers sugary drinks before bedtime, setting behavior limits with campers, setting an example by following camp rules, getting enough rest, being fair and consistent, controlling anger, being accountable for actions, asking questions, and being flexible. (LP)

  8. Special discount to the members of the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2012-01-01

    FNAC 5% discount on gifts card available in four Swiss shops without any restriction. Gifts card on sale to the Staff Association Secretariat. TPG 50 CHF discount on annual subscriptions. Subscription « tout Genève » for adult: 650 CHF; for junior: 400 CHF. On sale to the Staff Association Secretariat. Théâtre de Carouge Discount of 5.-CHF for all shows (30.– CHF instead of 35.-CHF) and on season tickets « first performance » ( 132.– CHF instead 162.– CHF) and also on « classical » ( 150.– CHF instead of 180.– CHF) upon presentation of your Staff Association membership card before payment. Aquaparc Discounted prices on admission of whole day. Children from 5 to 15 years: 30.-CHF instead of 39.-CHF; Adults from 16 years: 36.-CHF instead of 49.-CHF. Tickets on sale to the Staff Association Secretariat. Go Sport 15% off on all purchases in the whole shop upon present...

  9. Radiation Exposure Reduction to Brachytherapy Staff By Using Remote Afterloading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation exposures to the personnel staff from patients with brachytherapy implants in a brachytherapy service were reviewed. Exposures to the brachytherapy personnel, as determined by Thermoluminescence Dosimeter (TLD) monitors, indicates a four-fold reduction in exposures after the implantation of the use of remote afterloading devices. Quarterly TLD monitor data for seven quarters prior to the use of remote afterloading devices demonstrate an average projected annual dose equivalent to the brachytherapy staff of 2543 Μ Sv. After the implantation of the remote afterloading devices, the quarterly TLD monitor data indicate an average dose equivalent per person of 153 Μ Sv. This is 76% reduction in exposure to brachytherapy personnel with the use of these devices

  10. Staff

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2006-01-01

    TÜ teadustöötajaist ja õppejõududest on 2/3 doktorikraadiga. TÜ rektor Jaak Aaviksoo ja teadusprprektor Ain Heinaru valiti Euroopa kõrghariduspoliitika juhtorganitesse. Sotsiaalteaduskonna prof. Wolfgang Drechsler sai Saksa-Eesti akadeemiliste suhete arendamise eest Saksamaa Liitvabariigi Teeneteristi

  11. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Asscociation

    2015-01-01

    Make your voice heard, support your candidates! Be many to vote and to elect the new Staff Council. By doing so, you will be encouraging the men and women who will represent you over the next two years and they will without doubt appreciate your gratitude. The voting takes place from the 26th of October to the 9th of November, at noon at https://ap-vote.web.cern.ch/elections-2015.   Elections Timetable Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 8 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. Candidates for the 2015 elections

  12. Staff Adaptation in Selected Company

    OpenAIRE

    Štolcová, Jana

    2011-01-01

    The work focuses on personnel actions of employee adaptation as, nowadays, it is very important to maintain a good and skilled staff. The main aim of this work is to analyze and evaluate the process of adaptation of new employees at the headquarters of the BILLA, Ltd., which operates more than 200 supermarkets around the Czech Republic,. Another task is to propose partial measures which would improve the process of adaptation in the society. The literature review discusses the importance of ...

  13. Staff Policies in Rail Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Daneci-Patrau Daniel

    2011-01-01

    A staff policy well planed and well adjusted represents a way, by no means negligible, to contribute to the supporting of a competitive strategy of the organization. The employees, well selected, have a lever effect over the company’s productivity, because they use their talent, experience and their skills for the profit’s increase, occupying the given positions. The absence of some policies and methods and techniques of recruiting and selection determines the costs increases which are associ...

  14. Djibouti: Staff-Monitored Program

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2004-01-01

    This paper on the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP) on Djibouti explains economic developments and policy discussions. Djibouti faces important challenges to reduce widespread poverty. Since the mid-1990s, the government has been engaged in adjustment and reform programs to restore macroeconomic stability and achieve sustainable economic growth. The proposed policies and reforms should be sufficient to achieve the SMP’s objectives. Overall, the program will test the authorities’ resolve to im...

  15. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   Global CERN Career paths AA - G 14     Number of seats for fellows representatives Global CERN 5 For more informat...

  16. 2015 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Document Server

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    Elections Timetable Monday 21 September, at noon Start date for receipt of the application Friday 16 October, at noon Closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 26 October, at noon Start date for voting Monday 9 November, at noon Closing date for voting Monday 16 and Monday 23 November, publication of the results in Echo Monday 23 and Tuesday 24 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 1st December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 16 and 24 November. During its meeting of March 17 2015, the Staff Council approved the election rules, which define the allocation of seats in each department, as follows:   Number of seats in the electoral colleges Departments BE EN TE DG/DGS FP GS HR/PF IT PH Career paths AA - D 2 3 3 1 1 2 1 1 2 Career paths E - G 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 2 3   ...

  17. Strategies and best practices for staff renewal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the strategies and best practices for staff renewal in the electricity sector. Strategic initiatives for staff renewal include strategic recruiting, succession planning, employee relations, knowledge management and strategic partnerships

  18. THE RESULTS OF INDIVIDUAL DOSE CONTROL OF HEALTH INSTITUTIONS STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. N. Shleenkova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The  work  provides  comparative  assessment  of  the  levels  of  occupational  exposure  of  Saint-Petersburg health institutions staff. The analysis was carried out of the 891 individual doses measurement results which have  being  obtained  during  5  years  investigations  (2009-2013.  The  comparing  of  the  average  annual effective doses was carried out for 4 groups of medical specialists: x-ray laboratory assistant, radiotherapist, radiographer of dental clinics and X-ray surgery staff (surgeons, anesthesiologists and surgical nurses who are working close to irradiation source. It is shown that the annual effective dose average value is about 0.5 mSv for the first three groups of medical specialists. The same value for X-ray surgery staff is 1.6 mSv. Individual  annual  exposure  doses  have  not  exceeded  the  main  dose  limits  required  by  Radiation  Safety Standard 99/2009. The issues are considered of the estimation exactness of the effective dose basing on the results of individual dose equivalent measurement. 

  19. Managing assessment : student and staff perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Smailes, Joanne; Orr, Susan

    2005-01-01

    ‘I never realised assessment was for learning’ Laura Ludman BSc (Hons) Nursing, University of Central England Managing Assessment: Student and Staff Perspectives is a practical tool developed by the Managing Effective Student Assessment (MESA) benchmarking club. It aims to give senior management, staff and educational developers, teachers, and support staff insight into assessment issues along with ideas and tools to enable them to improve student learning and reduce the burden on staff. It i...

  20. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  1. 17 CFR 8.05 - Enforcement staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... staff shall consist of employees of the exchange and/or persons hired on a contract basis. It may not... within its disciplinary jurisdiction, regardless of whether its enforcement staff consists of employees... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Enforcement staff....

  2. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as...

  3. Training Staff for Technology: Options and Opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Lesley S. J.

    1999-01-01

    Focuses on effective technology training for library staff. Discusses helping staff overcome technophobia; suiting technology-based jobs with staff members' needs and capabilities; providing a policy/procedure manual to guide the training; the steps that should occur in training; aligning training with in-house library resources and services;…

  4. Somewhere over the Rainbow: The Challenges and Opportunities Open to LGBT* Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastings, Roscoe; Mansell, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    At the recent Association of University Administrators (AUA) Annual Conference in Nottingham, UK, the authors presented a session exploring the role that Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans* (LGBT*) Staff Networks have to play in higher education institutions and explored the best practice to support their successful launch and longevity. This…

  5. Indoor 222Rn Levels and Effectiv Dose Estimation of Academic Staff in izmir-Turkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TÜRKAN ALKAN; ÖZLEM KARADENİZ

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the annual effective doses from indoor radon received by academic staff in the Faculty building. Methods Measurements of indoor radon concentrations were performed in the Arts and Sciences Faculty of Dokuz Eylul University for two surveys of about 1 month duration respectively using the SSNTD (Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors) method with LR115 detectors. Time integrated measurements comprised different locations inside the faculty building: classrooms, toilets, canteen and offices. Homes of academic staff were also tested for radon. Results The aritthmetic mean radon concentration is 161 Bq m-3 with a range between 40 and 335 Bq m-3 in the Faculty. Six offices and three classrooms have a radon concentration above 200 Bq m-3. The results show that the radon concentration in classrooms is generally higher than in offices. Based on the measured indoor radon data, the annual effective doses received by staff in the Faculty were estimated to range from 0.79 to 4.27 mSv, according to UNSCEAR methodology. The annual effective doses received by staff ranged from 0.78 to 4.20 mSv in homes. On average, the Faculty contributed 56% to the annual effective dose. Conclusion Reported values for radon concentrations and corresponding doses are within the ICRP recommended limits for workplaces.

  6. Annual Report 2014 from the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 Annual Report from the Human Resources department concerning the settlement of disputes and discipline under Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations.   1) Introduction The 2014 Annual Report, under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations, serves to report: • cases of submission of requests for review, • internal appeals, • complaints before the Administrative Tribunal of the International Labour Organization (ILOAT); and • cases in which disciplinary action was taken.   2) Requests for Review and Internal Appeals Under Article S VI 1.01 of the Staff Rules, members of the personnel may challenge an administrative decision by the Director-General where it adversely affects the conditions of employment or association that derive from their contract or from the Staff Rules and Regulations. If permitted by the Staff Rules and Regulations, a decision may be chall...

  7. Annual Report 2011 from the Human Resources Department

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    Annual Report 2011 from the Human Resources Department concerning the settlement of disputes and discipline under Chapter VI of the Staff Rules and Regulations.   1) Introduction The 2011 Annual Report under Chapter VI (“Settlement of Disputes and Discipline”) of the Staff Rules and Regulations serves to report: • cases of submission of requests for review, • internal appeals, • appeals to the ILOAT, and • cases in which disciplinary action was taken.   2) Disciplinary Action Under Article S VI 2.01 of the Staff Rules, the Director-General may take disciplinary action against members of the personnel who, whether intentionally or through carelessness, are guilty of a breach of the Staff Rules and Regulations or of misconduct that is to the detriment of the Organization. Article S VI 2.02 of the Staff Rules stipulates that depending on the gravity of the breach or misconduct involved, the disciplinary action may be: • a...

  8. The operating staff of nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The training of its staff is one of the pillars of the safe and economical operation of a power plant. This is why power plant owners began to systematically train their staff already in the 50s, and why they created central training facilities. Staff members who have undergone this training make an indispensable contribution to the acceptedly high safety and availability of German power plants. The substantial cost of creating training facilities and of schooling plant staff is considered to be an investment for the future. Low labour turnover permits careful observation and development of staff and leads to a high standard of knowledge and experience. (orig./HSCH)

  9. STAFFS MOTIVATIONAL IN KNOWLEDGE TRANSFER BEHAVIOUR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saide

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Previous have highlighted knowledge transfer behaviour (KTB for an increase organization performance, however an obstacle from the perspective among staffs still exists. The problem is still difficult because staffs will not share their knowledge as they thinking their knowledge is important. This paper investigated factors of staffs motivational that influence KTB among staffs in Riau Province of Indonesia. The survey 400 respondents were used, 325 were returned, and 75 were not returned. Likert and smart PLS to confirmation the conceptual model. This paper conclude factors that reward, trust, and an enjoyment helping colleagues of staffs motivation are factors which influencing the KTB. The results and conclusions are discussed.

  10. Materials Department annual report for 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1995. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) 53 ills

  11. Materials Department annual report for 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Hansen, N. [eds.

    1996-04-01

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1995. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) 53 ills.

  12. Materials Department annual report for 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1994. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) (37 ills.)

  13. Materials Department annual report for 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horsewell, A.; Hansen, N.

    1995-04-01

    The annual report describes the work of the Materials Department at Risoe National Laboratory during 1994. The work is presented in three main chapters: Materials Science, Materials Engineering and Materials Technology. The report includes lists of staff members, guests, post docs and PhD students. There are detailed lists of the published work which has resulted from the projects. (au) (37 ills.).

  14. Nuclear accident and medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Described is the commentary concerning normative action of medical staff at radiation emergency and actual actions taken/to be taken for the Nuclear Power Plant Accident (NPPA) in Fukushima. The normative medical staff's action at radiation emergency is essentially based on rules defined by such international authorities as United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR), International Commission of Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and Basic Safety Standard (BSS) and by network in IAEA, World Health Organization (WHO) and so on. The rules stand on past atomic events like those in Hiroshima, Nagasaki, Three Mile Isl., Chernobyl, and in Japanese Tokai JCO accident. The action above is required as a medical teamwork over specialized doctors. At Fukushima NPPA, medicare flowed from the on-site first-aid station (doctors for industry and labors), then the base for patient transfer (doctors of Japanese Association of Acute Medicine and Tokyo Electric Power Comp.), to the primary hospital for acute exposure (Iwaki Kyoritsu Hos.), from which patients were further transported to the secondary (contamination detected or severe trauma, Fukushima Medical Univ.) and/or tertiary facilities (serious contamination or acute radiation injury, National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) and Hiroshima Univ.). The flow was built up by the previous lead of national official guidance and by urgent spontaneous network among medical facilities; exempli gratia (e.g.), Fukushima Medical Univ. rapidly specialized in coping with the radiation medicare by partial discontinuance of daily clinical practice. Specialists of acute radiation medicare are generally rare, for which measures for it are more desirable along with health risk communication in facilities concerned. The professional function and endowment required for medical staff at emergency are concluded to be their guts and devotion as well as medical

  15. Agency staff on special missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA Secretariat includes 190 scientists and engineers whose special qualifications cover most of the branches of nuclear science and applications of nuclear energy. This gives it a unique international concentration of specialized skills and knowledge, but increasingly this know-how is being taken straight to Member States. While the nucleus of the work of the technical Divisions is at the IAEA Headquarters, the Agency is sending out more and more of its specialists for short-term assignments 'in the field' to help and advise Member governments. These assignments are distinct from the longer-term technical assistance projects, for which specialists are recruited from outside the Secretariat and only occasionally from its staff. he different types of help that the Agency's Secretariat gives to Member States covers a wide range of subjects. The legal staff gives advice on basic laws and on safety regulations, and has done so in 35 countries. It has also accepted more than 30 trainees from Member States to work in its offices at headquarters since 1961. Scientists, economists and engineers go out to Member States to advise on problems linked to the planning of nuclear power programmes or to the building and commissioning of their first nuclear power plants. Inspectors from the Department of Safeguards and Inspection help to set up systems of nuclear materials management and control which are essential for safe and efficient operation of nuclear plants and for governmental surveillance of nuclear industry. Specialists in nuclear medicine have helped calibrate instruments and to advise the setting up of clinics. Staff geologists have advised many countries about the development of uranium ore. he list of specialities covered is very wide. We have singled out one type of mission as an example of the help that the IAEA can give in a field of particular importance. This is the safety and siting mission. (author)

  16. Fast neutron therapy at Edinburgh: staff protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    the major hazards encountered by staff using neutrons for radiotherapy are discussed. Specific reference is made to the experience gained at the MRC Cyclotron Unit at the Western General Hospital, Edinburgh, using neutrons generated by the d(15 MeV)+Be reaction. The neutron therapy facility consists of a cyclotron and both a fixed horizontal and an isocentric therapy beam, and staff protection during five years' operation is reviewed. Levels of induced activity in the cyclotron and therapy equipment are reported and problems of radioactive contamination discussed. Summaries of whole-body and finger dose equivalents received by engineering staff, and of whole-body dose equivalents received by physics and radiography staff, are presented and analysed. It is shown that, although doses received by staff are higher than for staff in an X-ray facility, they are all well below the maximum permissible levels, and it is also concluded that radioactive contamination of staff is minimal. (author)

  17. Propeller Research Tunnel - staff photo

    Science.gov (United States)

    1928-01-01

    Standing on the PRT balance are five of the six men who comprised the majority of the PRT engineering staff in 1928. From left to right: Fred Weick, Ray Windler, William H. Herrnstein, Jr., John L. Crigler, and Donald Wood. Melvin N. Gough is mising. This group conducted the cowling research work which won the NACA its first Collier Trophy. Weick became the head of the PRT section when Max Munk was fired and Elton Miller became the chief of the Aerodynamics Division. Fred Weick liked this team of engineers and later praised the group in his autobiography.

  18. CSAIO: exchanging experience to better defend the interests of the staff

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2014-01-01

    Two representatives of the CERN Staff Association took part in the 15th Annual Conference of Staff Associations of International Organizations (CSAIO), which took place on Thursday 16th and Friday 17th of October in one of the centres of the European Space Agency (ESA) in Frascati (Italy). The CSAIO brings together staff representatives from international organizations based in Europe, as well as institutions of the European Union, in order to promote and defend the interests of their personnel. This allows the CERN Staff Association to follow the evolution of working and social conditions in other organizations. This year, 51 delegates from about 30 organizations travelled to Frascati to attend the conference. Themes addressed at the conference were: Salary adjustment method presentations: European Commission, CERN, European Council, and FICSA (Federation of International Civil Servants’ Association). Performance evaluation presentations: OECD (Organization for Economic Co-operation and...

  19. Cone-beam computed tomography imaging: therapeutic staff dose during chemoembolisation procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging is an important requirement to perform real-time therapeutic image-guided procedures on patients. The purpose of this study is to estimate the personal-dose-equivalent and annual-personal-dose from CBCT imaging during transarterial chemoembolisation (TACE). Therapeutic staff doses (therapeutic and assistant physician) were collected during 200 patient (65  ±  15 years, range: 40–86) CBCT examinations over six months. Absorbed doses were assessed using thermo-luminescent dosimeters during patient hepatic TACE therapy. We estimated personal-dose-equivalent (PDE) and annual-personal-dose (APD) from absorbed dose based on international atomic energy agency protocol. APD for therapeutic procedure was calculated (therapeutic physician: 5.6 mSv; assistant physician: 5.08 mSv) based on institutional work load. Regarding PDE, the hands of the staff members received a greater dose compared to other anatomical locations (therapeutic physician: 56 mSv, 72 mSv; assistant physician: 12 mSv, 14 mSv). Annual radiation doses to the eyes and hands of the staff members were lower compared to the prescribed limits by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). PDE and APD of both therapeutic staff members were within the recommended ICRP-103 annual limit. Dose to the assistant physician was lower than the dose to the therapeutic physician during imaging. Annual radiation doses to eye-lenses and hands of both staff members were lower than prescribed limits. (paper)

  20. Planning Annual Shutdown Inspection for BFB Boiler

    OpenAIRE

    Sorsa, Tatu

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this thesis was to create an illustrative guidebook of annual inspection planning for BFB boiler to help power plant operator when planning of annual inspection is topical. This thesis was made for Andritz Oy and it is based on inspection reports and experiences of BFB boiler’s maintenance and inspection staff. In this thesis it is shown how to plan an annual inspection for BFB boiler and thesis gives good tools and hints for operator to manage inspection from the beginning ...

  1. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral colle...

  2. 2011 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2011-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 26 September, posters, etc. call for applications Wednesday 26 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the application Monday 31 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 14 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 21 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 22 and Wednesday 29 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 6 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure will be monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 21 November. In its meeting on 19 September 2011, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges 0.1 to 0.6: Sector Department Career path AA – A – B – C – D Career path E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 18 si&e...

  3. 2013 Elections to Staff Council

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    Elections Timetable Starting with Echo of 16 September, posters, etc. call for applications Monday 21 October, at noon closing date for receipt of the applications Monday 28 October, at noon start date for voting Monday 11 November, at noon closing date for voting Monday 18 and Monday 25 November, publication of the results in Echo Tuesday 19 November Staff Association Assizes Tuesday 3 December, at 10.00 a.m. first meeting of the new Staff Council and election of the new Executive Committee The voting procedure is monitored by the Election Committee, which is also in charge of announcing the results in Echo on 18 and 25 November. n its meeting on 11 September 2013, the Electoral Commission decided on the following distribution of seats in colleges O.1 to O.6: Sectors Departments Career paths AA – A – B – C – D Career paths E – F – G – H Accelerators and Technology BE TE EN Electoral college 0.1 13 si&...

  4. Don't neglect routine staff meetings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Board, H K

    1982-03-01

    Staff meetings are essential to good staff communication. Meetings help keep the grapevine from growing so big that it strangles the group with its rumors. By holding regular meetings with your staff, you create a consistency in your communications that helps prevent problems that you don't even suspect from cropping up. All personnel should attend the meetings. This way everyone hears news at the same time. Be consistent in your use of meetings. Meetings are more effective if you have a planned agenda and a firm time schedule. Encourage your staff to use meetings to talk out problems that affect the group. Once the meeting is over, encourage them to leave their feelings in the room. Many leaders are reluctant, for a variety of reasons, to hold meetings with their staffs. But it's like dieting and exercise; the more you do it, the easier it becomes. This type of meeting will pay rich dividends in staff personal and professional growth and in improved communication. The sense of participation that can be gained by the effective use of staff meetings can lead to high morale and effective staff performance. As you begin to see the results of a cohesive staff functioning together well, you will realize the routine staff meeting is a management tool that should not be overlooked or underused. PMID:6917733

  5. Measurement of doses to the extremities of nuclear medicine staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shousha, Hany A.; Farag, Hamed; Hassan, Ramadan A.

    2010-01-01

    Medical uses of ionizing radiation now represent>95% of all man-made radiation exposure, and is the largest single radiation source after natural background radiation. Therefore, it is important to quantify the amount of radiation received by occupational individuals to optimize the working conditions for staff, and further, to compare doses in different departments to ensure compatibility with the recommended standards. For some groups working with unsealed sources in nuclear medicine units, the hands are more heavily exposed to ionizing radiation than the rest of the body. A personal dosimetry service runs extensively in Egypt. But doses to extremities have not been measured to a wide extent. The purpose of this study was to investigate the equivalent radiation doses to the fingers for five different nuclear medicine staff occupational groups for which heavy irradiation of the hands was suspected. Finger doses were measured for (1) nuclear medicine physicians, (2) technologists, (3) nurses and (4) physicists. The fifth group contains three technicians handling 131I, while the others handled 99mTc. Each staff member working with the radioactive material wore two thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) during the whole testing period, which lasted from 1 to 4 weeks. Staff performed their work on a regular basis throughout the month, and mean annual doses were calculated for these groups. Results showed that the mean equivalent doses to the fingers of technologist, nurse and physicist groups were 30.24±14.5, 30.37±17.5 and 16.3±7.7 μSv/GBq, respectively. Equivalent doses for the physicians could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts (mSv) that accumulated in one week. Similarly, the dose to the fingers of individuals in Group 5 was estimated to be 126.13±38.2 μSv/GBq. The maximum average finger dose, in this study, was noted in the technologists who handled

  6. AECB Cost Recovery Fees Regulations, amendment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amendment to the Regulations was published on 24 October 1991 (SOR/91-590,Canada Gazette Part II, Vol.125, No 23). It modifies the list of institutions exempted from paying cost recovery fees (licence fees) to the Atomic Energy Control Board. The exemptions now include educational and health care institutions as well as Departments. (NEA)

  7. Calyx trademark EA implementation at AECB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes a project to examine the applicability of a knowledge-based decision support software for environmental assessment (Calyx) to assist the Atomic Energy Control Board in environmental screenings, assessment, management, and database searches. The report begins with background on the Calyx software and then reviews activities with regard to modification of the Calyx knowledge base for application to the nuclear sector. This is followed by lists of standard activities handled by the software and activities specific to the Board; the hierarchy of environmental components developed for the Board; details of impact rules that describe the conditions under which environmental impacts will occur (the bulk of the report); information on mitigation and monitoring rules and on instance data; and considerations for future work on implementing Calyx at the Board. Appendices include an introduction to expert systems and an overview of the Calyx knowledge base structure

  8. Annual report 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The book is a collection of short communications being a review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw in 1993. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics (9); radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, general chemistry (22); radiobiology (6). The last biggest chapter devoted to nuclear technologies and methods is divided into four smaller groups concerning: process engineering (2); material engineering, structural studies, diagnostics (14); radiation technologies (8) and nuclear control systems (4). The annual report of INCT 1993 contains also a general information about the staff and organizations of the Institute, the full list of scientific publications and patents, conferences organized by INCT, Ph.D. and Sc.D. thesis and a list of projects granted by Committee of Scientific Research and other organizations in Poland and elsewhere

  9. Annual Report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report of the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology (Warsaw, Poland) describes achievements of the Institute in 2009 obtained in ten laboratories: (1) Centre for Radiation Research and Technology, (2) Centre of Radiochemistry and Nuclear Chemistry, (3) Centre of Radiobiology and Biological Dosimetry, (4) Laboratory of Nuclear Analytical Methods, (5) Laboratory of Material Research, (6) Pollution Control Technologies Laboratory, (7) Laboratory of Stable and Environmental Isotopes, (8) Laboratory for Measurements of Technological Doses, (9) Laboratory for Detection of Irradiated Food, (10) Laboratory of Nuclear Control Systems and Methods. In total - 49 detailed papers prepared by the Institute staff and collaborating scientists are presented. General information on the Institute status, personnel activity, international cooperation and publications are also given.

  10. The operational staff during exercise RESUME-95

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, J. [Jensen Consult, Virum (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    With more than 100 participants entering the exercise RESUME-95 the Exercise Planning Committee decided to establish an operational staff named Directing Staff (DISTAFF) to ensure that the exercise plan was followed, the planned activities were carried out and to intervene if anything went wrong. In general the duties of the operational staff involve tasks such as secretarial assistance, keeping log of the progress of the situation and gathering, updating and distributing information on all aspects of the situation. Throughout the entire event it is the staff`s responsibility to keep a general view of the current situation and to make the necessary plans for the progress of the situation based on the available information. Furthermore the staff should ensure necessary contact to the public and to the media. (au).

  11. ANNUAL INTERVIEWS (MAPS)

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    The calendar for the 2002/2003 annual interview programme is confirmed as normally from 15 November 2002 to 15 February 2002 as foreseen in Administrative Circular N° 26 (rev. 2). However, where it is preferred to be as close as possible to 12 months since the last interview, supervisors and staff concerned may agree to the interview taking place up to 15 March 2003. This may also be necessary due to the roles of different supervisors resulting from the particular situations of divisional re-restructurings and detachments this year. The report form template is as last year available on the HR Division Website. A banner on the internal homepage leads directly to the page with the form. In collaboration with AS Division, the MAPS form including the personal data for the first page can be generated via the Human Resources Toolkit (HRT) application. For this exercise each staff member can now generate his/her own MAPS form. Information about how to do this is available here. Human Resources Division Tel. ...

  12. Staff Motivation at Kuwait University Libraries

    OpenAIRE

    Taghreed Alqudsi-ghabra; Huda H. Mansouri

    2010-01-01

    Motivation is a force that leads people to act or perform. Motivating staff is a key element in making workers productive. It has the potential to increase incentive, put staff members at ease, and derive some satisfaction from their jobs. Factors that motivate staff vary across the professional, para-professional, and non-professional levels. The research here is a study of motivation techniques used by managers of Kuwait University libraries to improve employees' job satisfaction levels. In...

  13. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Rosocha; Silvia Vernerova; Robert Verner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem. Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a...

  14. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    OpenAIRE

    Ladislav Rosocha; Silvia Vernerova; Robert Verner

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a ...

  15. Public service activities among University staff

    OpenAIRE

    Nivakoski, Sanna; O'Connell, Philip J.; Hargaden, Mark

    2015-01-01

    University staff frequently engage in Public Service Activities (PSAs), over and above their core roles, making a valuable contribution to society and the economy, although little is known about such activity. This study examines the extent of PSA among university staff — both academic and non-academic. The data come from a survey carried out in 2014 of the staff of University College Dublin (UCD), an Irish research university with a wide disciplinary coverage. The survey collected informatio...

  16. The staff regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the first comprehensive review of the Provisional Staff Regulations conducted by the Secretariat, the Board of Governors approved on 12 June 2002 amendments to the Provisional Staff Regulations including the removal of the attribute 'provisional' from their title. The revised Staff Regulations of the Agency are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  17. Staff roster for 1979-Energy Sciences programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manowitz, B.; Gurinsky, D.H.

    1979-12-01

    This publication lists the education, research interests, professional affiliations, committee memberships, research experience, and selected publications of BNL staff members in energy sciences programs. (RWR)

  18. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows: as from 1 April 2003 • Article R II 1.19 - Types and duration of contracts of staff members (page 15) as from 1 July 2003 Implementation of the category of local staff members Copies of this update are available in the divisional secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  19. Dose levels in medical staff at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil-Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T. de [FUNDACENTRO-Brazilian Institute for Safety and Health at Work, Rua Guajajaras, no 40, 14o andar, Centro, 30180-100 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Alonso, Thessa C. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Av. Prof. Antonio Carlos 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Nogueira, Maria do S. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Av. Prof. Antonio Carlos 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)], E-mail: mnogue@edtn.br; Silva, Teogenes A. da [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN)-Av. Prof. Antonio Carlos 6627, Campus UFMG, Pampulha, 31270-901 Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2008-02-15

    Medical staff during interventional radiology could be exposed to radiation conditions that may cause very high dose levels depending on the X-ray machine operational conditions. The dose levels received by medical staff during interventional radiology are very high depending on the operational conditions and the patient trunk thickness. Dose levels could reach a factor of 30 for fluoroscopy or cine modes. The ALARA principle, which emphasizes the adoption of techniques and procedures to keep dose levels as low as reasonably achievable, should be followed to minimize the risk of radiation exposure to medical professionals. Dose reduction could be achieved by persuading the medical staff to wear protection devices (lead apron, thyroid protector, eyeglasses and gloves). Additionally, medical staff should also be persuaded that they should not be submitted to very high doses, above the acceptable limits for occupational workers. Dose levels at hemodynamics services in Minas Gerais State, Brazil, were analyzed. Due to the equipment characteristics or the exam type and conditions X-ray machines were used with 70-120 kV, 2.5-699 mA and 80-2880 s. Annual individual doses were estimated based on measured doses during a specific exam taking into account the workload. Maximum doses varied from 0.05 to 0.70 mSv per exam. The results projected for one work-year period show that all annual individual doses would be higher than the annual dose limit of 20 mSv/y with only a few values lower than 50 mSv/y. Dose levels measured at medical staff positions during hemodynamic exams showed that if the protective devices are not used professionals could be exposed to dose values higher than annual dose limits.

  20. The impact of staff turnover and staff density on treatment quality in a psychiatric clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfram Alexis Brandt; Bielitz, Christoph J.; Alexander eGeorgi

    2016-01-01

    Intuition suggests that improving stability of the health workforce brings benefits to staff, the organization and, most importantly, the patients. Unfortunately, there is limited research available to support this, and how health workforce stability can contribute to reduced costs and better treatment outcomes.To help to rectify this situation, we investigated the effects of staff turnover and staff density (staff members per patient) on the treatment outcome of inpatients in a psychiatric c...

  1. The Impact of Staff Turnover and Staff Density on Treatment Quality in a Psychiatric Clinic

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Wolfram A.; Bielitz, Christoph J.; Georgi, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Intuition suggests that improving stability of the health workforce brings benefits to staff, the organization and, most importantly, the patients. Unfortunately, there is limited research available to support this, and how health workforce stability can contribute to reduced costs and better treatment outcomes. To help to rectify this situation, we investigated the effects of staff turnover and staff density (staff members per patient) on the treatment outcome of inpatients in a psychiatric ...

  2. CMS Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de la Rubia, T D; Shang, S P; Rennie, G; Fluss, M; Westbrook, C

    2005-07-29

    Glance at the articles in this report, and you will sense the transformation that is reshaping the landscape of materials science and chemistry. This transformation is bridging the gaps among chemistry, materials science, and biology--ushering in a wealth of innovative technologies with broad scientific impact. The emergence of this intersection is reinvigorating our strategic investment into areas that build on our strength of interdisciplinary science. It is at the intersection that we position our strategic vision into a future where we will provide radical materials innovations and solutions to our national-security programs and other sponsors. Our 2004 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. We have organized this report into two major sections: research themes and our dynamic teams. The research-theme sections focus on achievements arising from earlier investments while addressing future challenges. The dynamic teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that support a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national-security mission. By maintaining an organizational structure that offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, we are able to nurture the discoveries and breakthroughs required for future successes.

  3. CMS Annual Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glance at the articles in this report, and you will sense the transformation that is reshaping the landscape of materials science and chemistry. This transformation is bridging the gaps among chemistry, materials science, and biology--ushering in a wealth of innovative technologies with broad scientific impact. The emergence of this intersection is reinvigorating our strategic investment into areas that build on our strength of interdisciplinary science. It is at the intersection that we position our strategic vision into a future where we will provide radical materials innovations and solutions to our national-security programs and other sponsors. Our 2004 Annual Report describes how our successes and breakthroughs follow a path set forward by our strategic plan and four organizing research themes, each with key scientific accomplishments by our staff and collaborators. We have organized this report into two major sections: research themes and our dynamic teams. The research-theme sections focus on achievements arising from earlier investments while addressing future challenges. The dynamic teams section illustrates the directorate's organizational structure of divisions, centers, and institutes that support a team environment across disciplinary and institutional boundaries. The research presented in this annual report gives substantive examples of how we are proceeding in each of these four theme areas and how they are aligned with our national-security mission. By maintaining an organizational structure that offers an environment of collaborative problem-solving opportunities, we are able to nurture the discoveries and breakthroughs required for future successes

  4. The Staff Development Maze: Where Are We?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    The author presents a five-stage model for staff development used in a survey of professors and practitioners. The survey found that there is a disparity between what professors and practitioners believe is practiced and what is actually occurring in staff development. (MD)

  5. Staff Organization in Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the organization of operating and maintenance staff at nuclear power stations in Italy and manpower variations, either because the plants themselves differ or are organized in some special way. Staff doing jobs for which a specific training is required are given special consideration in the paper. (author)

  6. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial... employees, and the office for which the designated employee works shall make reasonable efforts...

  7. 20 CFR 900.5 - Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff. 900.5 Section 900.5 Employees' Benefits JOINT BOARD FOR THE ENROLLMENT OF ACTUARIES STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION § 900.5 Staff. (a) The... the Act and performs such other functions as the Board may delegate to him. (b) Members of the...

  8. Gaming: a creative strategy for staff education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartzendruber, D

    1994-02-01

    Providing staff development in a stimulating, innovative manner is the challenge of all nurse educators. This article discusses gaming, a creative teaching strategy that can help meet these needs. Games designed specifically for the education of dialysis staff will be reviewed. Advantages of the various games will also be examined. PMID:8141633

  9. Stacks Tour Project Presents Staff Development Opportunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coopey, Barbara M.; Nicastro, David

    2007-01-01

    The Penn State Libraries' Open House activities for incoming students find Access Services staff extending beyond their everyday routines to creatively help relieve students' fears of the library and understand how Access Services can help them. Serving on the Access Services Open House Committee offers staff many opportunities for development as…

  10. Exploring Staff Perceptions of Student Plagiarism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, Abbi; Clegg, Sue; Macdonald, Ranald

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents analysis of qualitative data from a research project looking at staff perceptions of plagiarism at a post-1992 university. Twenty-six members of staff from departments and academic schools from across the university took part in open and semi-structured interviews. Analysis shows that variable definitions of plagiarism exist;…

  11. Open Educational Resources: Staff Attitudes and Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes towards "open educational resources" (OER) as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n = 6) were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews…

  12. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training....

  13. Staff Development for PICKUP. Workshop Materials Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, John; Richardson, Sally

    This manual has been developed for those staff members at further education unit (FEU) colleges and polytechnics in the United Kingdom that are responsible for Professional, Industrial, and Commercial Updating (PICKUP) staff development activities. It is divided into four sections. The first section provides background on the PICKUP project, and…

  14. School Site Staff Development: Structures and Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solo, Leonard J.

    1985-01-01

    Analyzes the importance of staff development (broadly defined as anything that enables teachers to learn) and considers different development structures. Describes the role and duties of staff developer at a Cambridge, Massachusetts, elementary school as well as its "teacher teams," groups of instructors who meet monthly to discuss issues…

  15. Quality Control in Child Care Staff Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Merwin R.

    1975-01-01

    This paper focuses on the process of staff selection of child care staff at a residential treatment center for children, ages 8-16. Phases of candidate selection, an "open-door" interview procedure, the orientation of hired candidates and the agency's philosophy, procedures and practices are discussed. (GO)

  16. Restructure Staff Development for Systemic Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a systems approach based on the work of W. Edwards Deming to system wide, high impact staff development. Deming has pointed out the significance of structure in systems. By restructuring the process of staff development we can bring about cost effective improvement of the whole system. We can improve student achievement while…

  17. Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1996, Volume 21, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation is the annual cumulation of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors

  18. National Nuclear Research Institute, Ghana Atomic Energy Commission: Annual Report 2014

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report covers the research and commercial activities of the National Nuclear Research Institute of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2014. Also listed are the scientific and technical publications issued by staff.

  19. Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1996, Volume 21, No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehan, M.A.

    1997-04-01

    This compilation is the annual cumulation of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors.

  20. Professional Staff Contributions to Positive Student Outcomes: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carroll

    2013-01-01

    Although professional staff comprise more than half the Australian higher education workforce, typically research has concentrated on the work of academic staff. Professional staff are increasingly researching the working lives of professional staff, adding to the understanding of the work of professional staff and the contributions they make…

  1. Job and task analysis for technical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In September of 1989 Cooper Nuclear Station began a project to upgrade the Technical Staff Training Program. This project's roots began by performing job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff. While the industry has long been committed to Job and Task Analysis to target performance based instruction for single job positions, this approach was unique in that it was not originally considered appropriate for a group as diverse as Tech Staff. Much to his satisfaction the Job and Task Analysis Project was much less complicated for Technical Staff than the author had imagined. The benefits of performing the Job and Task Analysis for Technical Staff have become increasingly obvious as he pursues lesson plan development and course revisions. The outline for this presentation will be as follows: philosophy adopted; preparation of the job survey document; performing the job analysis; performing task analysis for technical staff and associated pitfalls; clustering objectives for training and comparison to existing program; benefits now and in the future; final phase (comparison to INPO guides and meeting the needs of non-degreed engineering professionals); and conclusion. By focusing on performance based needs for engineers rather than traditional academics for training the author is confident the future Technical Staff Program will meet the challenges ahead and will exceed requirements for accreditation

  2. The Staff Association and its history

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Association will celebrate its 60th birthday in the spring of 2015. We are collecting all information about the sixty years of the Staff Association. In particular, we are looking at publications of the Staff Association, which started with the “Staff Association Journal”, in 1955, which later became “Le Proton déchainé”, then, more simply, “Proton” in 1982 (the figure on the left shows the different mutations of our magazine). In our collection we are missing a few issues, in particular № 1 (dated mid-1955).     Dear reader, if have any old issues of this magazine, or of Graviton (figure on the right), another magazine edited by the Staff Association, or any other material or information that might help us document the history of the Staff Association, we would very much like to have a copy of the material or your contribution (written or oral). Please contact the Staff Association Sec...

  3. Individual radiation load monitoring in the medical and technical staff of a regional dosimetric center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structure of radiological procedures over the last decade underwent substantial changes that influenced the working conditions of the medical and technical staff of photofluorographic departments. Radiodiagnostic equipment became more powerful. To find a solution to urgent problems of individual dosimetric monitoring there should be organized regional dosimetric centers using methods of thermoluminescent dosimetry. According to the data obtained, the levels of occupational irradiation of the medical and technical staff of photofluorotraphic departments, have a clear tendency to a decrease, and Din most cases do not exceed 0.1 of the MP. Mathematical approximation of the density of annual dose distribution has revealed the stabilization of their maximum and a gradual decrease that attests to the standardization of the working conditions. A collective dose for the staff-members of photofluorographic departments in 1979 was 290 man/rem

  4. Minimum staff complement: safety in numbers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adequate staffing is an essential safety barrier for event mitigation. For this reason, Canadian nuclear power plant (NPP) licences specify the minimum staff complement (MSC), which is the number and qualifications of staff always required on-site. A systematic analysis and its validation form the basis of the MSC. The analysis and validation demonstrate a licensee is able to control, cool and contain the reactor after any credible event. The CNSC published regulatory guidelines for analyzing the basis for essential staff levels, monitoring compliance with these levels, and controlling MSC changes (G-323). Lessons learned from a full-scale MSC analysis are discussed. (author)

  5. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    OpenAIRE

    Rolfe, Vivien

    2012-01-01

    Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes towards ‘‘open educational resources’’ (OER) as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n6) were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews that facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n50) were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it mea...

  6. Radiation exposure to staff and patients during two endocrinological procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the present work is to obtain information about the exposure to patient and staff during percutaneous nephrolithotripsy and ureteroscopy with intracorporeal lithotripsy and to search for a correlation between these parameters. The collected data for each procedure consist of the total air kerma-area product, PKA, cumulative dose, CD, fluoroscopy time, FT, number of images acquired, as well as clinical patient data. Average, minimum, maximum and median values were calculated for 38 patients. Mean values and median in parentheses were as follows: 355 (383) cGy cm2 (PKA for PCNL); 433 (286) cGy cm2 (PKA for URS); 42 (37) mGy (CD for PCNL); 12 (7) mGy (CD for URS); 3.5 (3.0) min (FT for PCNL); 1.4 (1.3) min (FT for URS). The typical operator doses for PCNL and URS were assessed to be 66.1 μSv and 34.3 μSv, respectively, while the maximum doses for the same type of procedures were 152.6 μSv and 124.1 μSv. Good correlation was observed between the staff dose and PKA for both procedures, while the correlation of staff dose with CD and FT was found to be weak. While applying principles of radiation protection and normal load in the clinic, there is no possibility to exceed the new annual dose limit for eye lens of 20 mSv per year averaged over 5 years. The correlation of PKA with FT and CD was also explored and no significant interconnection was observed. (authors)

  7. Knowledge Assessment of Hospital Staff Regarding Biomedical Waste Management in A Tertiary Care Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Bathma Vishal; Likhar Swarn K; Mishra Mahesh K; Athavale Arvind V; Agarwal Sanjay; Shukla Uma S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biomedical waste (BMW) is waste generated during diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human beings or animals. Approximately 10-25% of the Bio-Medical waste is hazardous and can be injurious to humans or animals and deleterious to environment. It is estimated that annually about 0.33 million tones of hospital waste are generated in India. Objectives: To assess the knowledge regarding hospital waste management amongst hospital staff. Material and Methods: The study comprises of ...

  8. Radiation Exposure to Staff in Intensive Care Unit with Portable CT Scanner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhichao Xie

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bedside radiological procedures pose a risk of radiation exposure to ICU staff. The perception of risk may increase the degree of caution among the health care staff and raise new barriers preventing patients from obtaining prompt care. Objective. The aim of this study was to estimate the annual cumulative radiation dose to individual ICU staff. Methods. In this prospective study, forty subjects were required to wear thermoluminescent dosimeter badges during their working hours. The badges were analyzed to determine the exposure after 3 months. Results. A total of 802 radiological procedures were completed at bedside during the study period. The estimated annual dosage to doctors and nurses on average was 0.99 mSv and 0.88 mSv (p<0.001, respectively. Residents were subjected to the highest radiation exposure (1.04 mSv per year, p=0.002. The radiation dose was correlated with day shift working hours (r=0.426; p=0.006 and length of service (r=-0.403; p<0.01. Conclusions. With standard precautions, bedside radiological procedures—including portable CT scans—do not expose ICU staff to high dose of ionizing radiation. The level of radiation exposure is related to the daytime working hours and length of service.

  9. Technique for determining training staff size

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determining an adequate training staff size is a vital function of a training manager. Today's training requirements and standards have dictated a more stringent work load than ever before. A trainer's role is more than just providing classroom lectures. In most organizations the instructor must develop programs, lesson plans, exercise guides, objectives, test questions, etc. The tasks of a training organization are never ending and the appropriate resources must be determined and allotted to do the total job. A simple method exists for determining an adequate staff. Although not perfect, this method will provide a realistic approach for determining the needed training staff size. This method considers three major factors: instructional man-hours; non-instructional man-hours; and instructor availability. By determining and adding instructional man-hours and non-instructional man-hours a total man-hour distribution can be obtained. By dividing this by instructor availability a staff size can be determined

  10. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities. PMID:10151790

  11. Does staff diversity imply openness to diversity?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose – Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international...... university departments in Denmark. The authors set out to investigate the relationship between different types of staff diversity and openness to diversity in terms of linguistic, visible, value, and informational heterogeneity. Design/methodology/approach – This study uses responses from 489 staff members......, was unrelated or negatively associated with positive diversity attitudes. Originality/value – Few studies deal with the role of staff diversity and no prior studies the authors know of have examined the link between diversity types and openness to diversity....

  12. [A listening support group for nursing staff].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemoine, Dominique

    2016-05-01

    The feedback from a consultant nurse in a listening support group for health professionals shows that, for hospital nursing staff, the phenomenon of suffering in the workplace is a reality. In addition to providing help to professionals who request it, the missions of such a group are to promote discussion around psycho-social risks in the framework of a policy of compassionate care for staff. PMID:27157563

  13. Staff recruitment and Selection of employees

    OpenAIRE

    Krotilová, Karolína

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this Bachelor's Thesis is to analyse the process of the staff recruitment and selection of employees in an IT company - SOFTEC. It confronts the theoretical starting-points and used principles and procedures, identifies their strengths and weaknesses and suggests better or alternative solution. The theoretical part explains all the basic terms and relations regarding human resources and the staff recruitment process as such including particular principles and methods of this acquis...

  14. Nurse handover:Patient and staff experiences

    OpenAIRE

    Bruton, Jane; Norton, Christine; Smyth, Natasha; Ward, Helen; Day, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    AIM AND OBJECTIVES: to understand the purpose, impact and experience of nurse handover from patient and staff perspectives.BACKGROUND: poor communication is increasingly recognised as a major factor in healthcare errors. Handover is a key risk point. Little consensus exists regarding the practice in nursing but the trend is towards bedside handover. Research on patient and staff experiences of handover is limited.DESIGN: a qualitative and observational study on two acute wards in a large urba...

  15. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In accordance with Article VII.E of the Statute and of the general principles approved by the General Conference in resolution GC.1(S)/RES/13, the Board of Governors has established 'the terms and conditions on which the Agency's staff shall be appointed, remunerated and dismissed.' The Provisional Staff Regulations thus approved and amended by the Board up to 15 January 1959 are reproduced in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency

  16. Staff rosters for 1979: environmental programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-12-01

    The roster of the scientific and professional staffs of the Environmental Programs of the Department of Energy and Environment has been compiled as of December 1979. Staff members have been listed according to their organizational units, i.e., the Atmospheric Sciences Division, the Environmental Chemistry Division, the Oceanographic Sciences Division, and the Land and Freshwater Environmental Sciences Group. Educational background, research interests, professional activities, summary of experience at BNL, and selected publications have been included for each member listed.

  17. Motivation theories of medical staff in hospitals

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Kanellopoulos

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, interest in hospital administration has turned increasingly to the effective motivation of doctors. Purpose: The presentation of selected theories of motivation through literature review and their application in medical and hospital staff. Material and methods: The Greek and international bibliography has been reviewed, and in particular papers on the motivation theories of medical staff published during the last ten years via Pub Med and Science Direct, during the period 2...

  18. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-01-01

    The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional ce...

  19. The Agricultural Research Department annual report 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report begins with a general review of the research work of the department. The activities of the year are described in 5 short project reports and in the lists of publications and of lectures and seminars. Further, the report includes 4 review articles on selected subjects related to the work on the department, and a list of the staff and students of the year. (author)

  20. Night nursing – staff's working experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Ann-Mari

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although the duties and working conditions of registered, and enrolled nurses have previously been described from different perspectives, they have not been examined from the night nursing aspect. The aim of the study was to describe the night nursing staff's working experiences. Methods The design of the study is qualitative and descriptive. Interviews were conducted with 10 registered and 10 enrolled nurses working as night staff at a Swedish University Hospital. The interview guide was thematic and concerned the content of their tasks, as well as the working conditions that constitute night nursing. In addition, the interviews were transcribed verbatim and analyzed using content analysis. Results The night duties have to be performed under difficult conditions that include working silently in dimmed lighting, and making decisions when fatigue threatens. According to the night staff, its main goals are to provide the patients with rest and simultaneously ensure qualified care. Furthermore, the night nursing staff must prepare the ward for the daytime activities. Conclusion The most important point is the team work, which developed between the registered and enrolled nurses and how necessary this team work is when working at night. In order for nurses working at night to be fully appreciated, the communication between day and night staff in health care organizations needs to be developed. Furthermore, it is important to give the night staff opportunities to use its whole field of competence.

  1. Annual Interviews

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Annex II, page 1, Section 3 of the Administrative Circular no. 26 (Rev. 5) states that "The annual interview shall usually take place between 15 November of the reference year and 15 February of the following year." Following the meeting of the Executive Board on 7 December 2004 and the meeting of the Standing Concertation Committee on 19 January 2005, it has been decided, for the advancement exercise of 2005, to extend this period until 15 March 2005. Human Resources Department Tel. 73566

  2. Safety review of operating nuclear power plants in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Public utilities own and operate all 22 operating power reactors in Canada. The Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB), a Federal Government agency, regulates the nuclear industry in Canada and, as part of that responsibility, continually reviews the safety of power reactor operation. Canada's regulatory process is not as prescriptive as it is in many other countries. The AECB sets general requirements for reactor design, analysis and operation, and requires the licensee to develop and carry out procedures, processes and practices to meet these requirements. The primary responsibility for safety of nuclear power reactors rests with the licensee. The safety review process of the AECB covers all of its regulatory requirements and accommodates a two-year licence renewal cycle. Project officers located at the plant sites continually monitor operation and inspect the plant. Quality assurance, radiation protection practices, emergency plans, pressure boundary integrity design changes, reported events and safety analyses are also continually reviewed. The review of each station's operation by AECB staff is summarized in annual reports which are available to the public. These reports are an important input into the two-yearly licence renewal process. The safety review process currently focuses on obtaining assurance that the risk to public and worker health and safety and to the environment remains within the bounds of the original licensing basis for the facility. The AECB recognizes that, to obtain the desired level of assurance of continuing safety for an ageing reactor population, its current safety review process needs to be changed. More attention has to be focused on operational safety (i.e. plant operation and maintenance) and on developing the standards and skills to do this effectively. The compliance assessment programme should be expanded to include station management processes and practices, such as maintenance strategy, configuration management and risk

  3. Impact of nutritional interventions on food consumption pattern changes of workers and staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Boshtam

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Worksite Intervention Project from Isfahan Healthy Heart Program aiming at modifying life style of workers and staff in Isfahan and Najafabad (intervention areas, and Arak (reference area carried out for 5 years. Nutritional interventions are one of the interventions of this project. This research aiming at studying the effect of these interventions on food consumption pattern changes carried out in workers and staff of Isfahan and Najafabad. Materials and Method: Food consumption pattern by food frequency questionnaire and demographic information of this group were collected before, after and annually during the intervention. Data were analyzed by Genera Linear Models (GLM, descriptive and trend analysis. Results: Beverage and hydrogenated oil consumption decreased and fruits and vegetables increased in workers and staff of intervention area more than reference area (p0.27. Compare to reference society fast food consumption in office staff of intervention society was increased (p<0.001.Conclusion: We conclude that nutritional interventions have favorite effects on practice of workers and staff of this Iranian population and interventions used in this study can use as applicable interventions for similar societies

  4. Annual budget

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that all businesses, including individuals, should have a budget - that is, an estimation of income and expense over an annual cycle. For companies, the budget is generally prepared and approved about one quarter before the start of the company's fiscal year and is updated and revised each quarter during the year. Although budgeting is a task dreaded by most exploration managers, it is usually the vehicle by which drilling prospects, the heart of any exploration program, are sold to the final decision makers. The budgeting process should be viewed as an opportunity rather than as a chore to be completed as quickly as possible

  5. Evaluating Burnout among Administrative and Healthcare Staffs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda Khorshidian

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims of the Study Burnout is an occupational hazard which is known as one of the major factors affecting employees’ psychological disorders. The present study aimed to evaluate occupational burnout among administrative and healthcare staffs of Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Materials & Methods In this cross sectional study, 300 employees (150 administrative staff and 150 health care staff were selected using random sampling method. Data were collected using Maslach Burnout Inventory and analyzed using SPSS software. Results: The mean of burnout was 2.33±0.60. The results showed no significant difference between men and women employees in terms of occupational burnout and its three dimensions. Moreover, a significant difference between administrative and medical staffs  were found only in the dimension of emotional exhaustion. The mean score of emotional exhaustion in the administrative staff was significantly lower than that of their peers in the healthcare sector (2.03±0.84vs. 2.36±1.00 (p=0.03. Conclusions: The results showed that the majority of employees reported an average level of burnout .Such finding was in agreement with the results reported in previous studies. The obtained results can pave the way for further study on the identifying determinants of burnout.

  6. ICRP and radiation protection of medical staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Committee 3 (Protection in Medicine) and Committee 4 (Application of Recommendations) of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) deal with the protection of medical staff. In the last 10 years, the Committee on Protection in Medicine has been involved in the preparation of 12 publications, some of which include specific recommendations on occupational RP. This paper summarizes the most relevant aspects of these recommendations on RP for medical staff. The most recent publication on Radiation Dose to Patients from Radiopharmaceuticals contains an annex on hand exposure in radio-pharmacies. Radiation detriment from exposure of both radiological staff and other individuals is considered as part of the justification of medical exposures and of the optimization process. ICRP advises on the uncertainty concerning the risk of cataracts and puts particular emphasis on optimization in situations of exposure of the eyes. Some recommendations on staff protection are included in the documents on computed tomography, digital radiology, pregnancy, discharge of patients after therapy and interventional radiology. The contents related to staff RP in the coming publications of the Committee (pediatric, cardiology, and fluoroscopy) are also summarized.

  7. Open educational resources: staff attitudes and awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivien Rolfe

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Attitudes are changing in education globally to promote the open sharing of educational courses and resources. The aim of this study was to explore staff awareness and attitudes toward ‘open educational resources’ (OER as a benchmark for monitoring future progress. Faculty staff (n=6 were invited to participate in semi-structured interviews which facilitated the development of a questionnaire. Staff respondents (n=50 were not familiar with the term OER but had a clear notion of what it meant. They were familiar with open content repositories within the university but not externally. A culture of borrowing and sharing of resources exists between close colleagues, but not further a field, and whilst staff would obtain resources from the Internet they were reticent to place materials there. Drivers for mobilising resources included a strong belief in open education, the ability of OER to enhance individual and institutional reputations, and economic factors. Barriers to OER included confusion over copyright and lack of IT support. To conclude, there is a positive collegiate culture within the faculty, and overcoming the lack of awareness and dismantling the barriers to sharing will help advance the open educational practices, benefiting both faculty staff and the global community.

  8. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dola Saha

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specialty hospital using a structured personal interview questionnaire consisting of 21 sources of stress. The hospital staff was asked to rate each item according to the extent to which it had contributed to their stress as experienced in their jobs in the past few months on a scale of 0 (not at all,1(a little, 2(quite a bit, 3 (a lot. A global rating of stress was also obtained. Result: The prime sources of stress were found to be underpayment (76%, excessive workload (70.3%, inadequate staff (48.6, & being involved in the emotional distress of patients (46.7%. Conclusion: The staffs of the hospital were in moderate stress due to the prime stressors so adequate measures should be taken to alleviate these stressors. This could be achieved through workload management, job redesign, & by offering occupational health education.

  9. Annual Report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 2000'' the scientific, organizational end educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research projects (grants) as well as information about PhD and DSc theses. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 sections - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Ray Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Material Studies, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these sections are preceded by short overview given by the head of given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  10. Annual Report 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 1999'' the scientific, organizational and educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, departments of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants) as well as information about PhD and DSc theses. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 sections - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training and Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these sections is preceded by short overview given by the head of given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  11. Annual Report 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 1998'' the scientific, organizational and educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants), PhD and DSc theses as well as the information about organized schools and exhibitions. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 parts - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these parts are preceded by a short overview given by the head of the given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  12. Annual Report 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 2004' the scientific, organizational and educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, departments of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research projects (grants) as well as information about PhD and DSc theses. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 sections - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Ray Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Material Studies, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training and Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these sections are preceded by short overview given by the head of given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski, is also given

  13. Annual Report 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Preibisz, Z.; Zupranski, P. [eds.

    1999-10-01

    In the presented ``Annual Report 1998`` the scientific, organizational and educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants), PhD and DSc theses as well as the information about organized schools and exhibitions. The second one: ``Reports on Research`` describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 parts - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these parts are preceded by a short overview given by the head of the given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  14. Annual Report 2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 2003'' the scientific, organizational end educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consists of the general information about management, scientific council, departments of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants) as well as information about PhD and DSc theses and the organized by SINS conferences and workshops. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 sections - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Ray Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Material Studies, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training and Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these sections are preceded by short overview given by the head of given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  15. Annual report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chmielewska, D.; Infeld, E.; Zupranski, P. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    In the presented ``Annual Report 1997`` the scientific, organizational end educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consist of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants), PhD and DSc theses as well as the information about organized schools and exhibitions. The second one: ``Reports on Research`` describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 parts - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Atomic Nucleus Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these parts are foreworded by short overview given by the head of appropriate department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  16. Annual report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 1997'' the scientific, organizational end educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consist of the general information about management, scientific council, department of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants), PhD and DSc theses as well as the information about organized schools and exhibitions. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 parts - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Radiation Physics, Department of Atomic Nucleus Theory, Department of Radiation Detectors, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these parts are foreworded by short overview given by the head of appropriate department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  17. 2007 LDRD ANNUAL REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    French, T

    2008-12-16

    I am pleased to present the fiscal year 2007 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) annual report. This represents the first year that SRNL has been eligible for LDRD participation and our results to date demonstrate we are off to an excellent start. SRNL became a National Laboratory in 2004, and was designated the 'Corporate Laboratory' for the DOE Office of Environmental Management (EM) in 2006. As you will see, we have made great progress since these designations. The LDRD program is one of the tools SRNL is using to enable achievement of our strategic goals for the DOE. The LDRD program allows the laboratory to blend a strong basic science component into our applied technical portfolio. This blending of science with applied technology provides opportunities for our scientists to strengthen our capabilities and delivery. The LDRD program is vital to help SRNL attract and retain leading scientists and engineers who will help build SRNL's future and achieve DOE mission objectives. This program has stimulated our research staff creativity, while realizing benefits from their participation. This investment will yield long term dividends to the DOE in its Environmental Management, Energy, and National Security missions.

  18. Annual Report 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presented ''Annual Report 2002'' the scientific, organizational end educational activities of the Andrzej Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies (SINS) are presented. The document is divided into two parts. First of them consist of the general information about management, scientific council, departments of SINS, scientific staff, visiting scientists, list of research project (grants) as well as information about PhD and DSc theses. The second one: ''Reports on Research'' describes the research activities of SINS. It is divided into 12 sections - in which the works of SINS departments and establishments are presented (Department of Nuclear Reactions, Department of Nuclear Spectroscopy and Technique, Department of Detectors and Nuclear Electronics, Department of Radiation Shielding and Dosimetry, Department of Plasma Physics and Technology, Department of High Energy Physics, Department of Cosmic Ray Physics, Department of Nuclear Theory, Department of Material Studies, Department of Accelerator Physics and Technology, Department of Training an Consulting and Establishment for Nuclear Equipment). Each of these sections are preceded by short overview given by the head of given department. The foreword, in which the whole activities of the SINS are summarized, given by head of the Institute professor Z. Sujkowski is also given

  19. Patient and staff dose optimisation in nuclear medicine diagnosis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete test of publication follows. The implementation of the Basic Safety Standards (BSS) Directive 96/29 on the protection of workers and general population against the danger arising from ionising radiation and the Directive 97/43 on health protection of individuals against dangers of ionising radiation in relation to medical exposure, known as the Medical Exposure Directive (MED), they started in Poland some years ago with the Polish Atomic Law and executive orders published by the Polish Government and Polish Health Minister. Poland's Government has applied for several years transitory period to complete implementation of the Directive 97/43/Euratom because of the technical, organising and economical problems related with this procedure. The most important task has arisen to prepare procedures according with the current state of knowledge in the area of Quality Assurance (QA) and Quality Control (QC) of medical equipment using ionising radiation in diagnosis. QA and QC in X-ray diagnosis equipment started to be introduced since several years ago and nowadays they are put in common practice in almost each X-ray laboratory in Poland. As result, the nuclear medicine departments must follows the new legislation which has imposed also obligatory necessity of regular Quality Assurance and Quality Control of equipment and procedures for preparing and using radiopharmaceuticals. Documentation for QA system in nuclear medicine includes, among others, quality book, general procedures applied in diagnosis, description of specific procedures prepared in accordance with the rules in current legislation. The physical parameters of equipment (gamma camera, SPECT) undergo the basic tests and some special ones. The basic tests are carried out by staff of the nuclear medicine department. Units with accreditation perform special tests annually. The basic test for planar gamma camera includes: measurement of radioactivity, measurement of background, estimation of photons energy

  20. Transmission of Pneumocystis carinii from patients to hospital staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Bettina; Elvin, K; Rothman, L P; Ljungström, I; Lidman, C; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1997-01-01

    to human P carinii by ELISA, Western blotting, and indirect immunofluorescence in 64 hospital staff with and 79 staff without exposure to patients with PCP from Denmark and Sweden. DNA amplification of oropharyngeal washings was performed on 20 Danish staff with and 20 staff without exposure to...

  1. Training staff to conduct a paired-stimulus preference assessment.

    OpenAIRE

    Lavie, Tami; Sturmey, Peter

    2002-01-01

    Three staff members were trained to conduct stimulus preference assessments using a paired-stimulus format with 8 children with autism. Staff were trained to mastery level using brief instruction, a video model, and rehearsal with verbal feedback. Training took about 80 min per staff member. Results demonstrated that staff rapidly learned to correctly perform paired-stimulus preference assessments with children.

  2. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator in developing and planning agency program initiatives. The Chief of Staff is responsible for... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff...

  3. JOB CENTRE FOR DOMESTIC STAFF IN SWITZERLAND

    CERN Multimedia

    Relations with the Host States Service; http://www.cern.ch/relations/

    2001-01-01

    The Permanent mission of Switzerland to the International Organisations in Geneva has informed CERN that the Geneva Welcome Centre has set up an employment registration desk for the domestic staff of international civil servants. The aim of this pilot project is, on the one hand, to help international civil servants find domestic staff and, on the other hand, to help domestic staff holding an 'F'-type carte de légitimation find employment within 30 days after the expiry of a contract. For more information, please contact the Geneva Welcome Centre, La Pastorale, 106, route de Ferney, Case postale 103, 1211 Genève 20, tel. (+41.22) 918 02 70, fax (+41.22) 918 02 79), http://geneva-international.org/Welcome.E.html.

  4. The different roles of the Staff association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2012-01-01

    The statutory role of the CERN Staff Association is defined in Chapter VII of the Staff Rules and Regulations. The means of the Association to realize its aims are described in Article I.1.3 of the Statutes of the CERN Staff Association. Generally speaking, its aims are “To serve and defend the economic, social, professional and moral interests of its members and all CERN staff“. Usually we deal with professional and social issues (employment conditions, defence of collective or individual rights, promotion of basic research...). But the Association also plays a role of integration (clubs promoting cultural, humanitarian, and sport or offering entertainment, organizing exhibitions and conferences) and it can promote actions to provide its members with material or social advantages (Interfon, commercial offers). Advantageous commercial offers In recent years the Association was able to negotiate with business or cultural partners benefits for its members. A full list can be found on our...

  5. Staff Performance Evaluation in Public Organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drumea C.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In public Organizations staff performance is difficult to measure in absence of overall quantitative performance indicators. There are also the qualitative indicators that give an overview on staff’s motivation, strive, ability, commitment to values, teamwork. These aspects are even less easy to illustrate, in private and public sectors equally. In both cases, measuring staff performance at work, as well as its input on the global performance of the organization is a difficult task which has in practice different approaches. Subsequently, this paper is discussing the system indicators and performance triggers used in International Organizations UN affiliated, in order to adjust staff classification and benefits to their staff’s performance.

  6. Annual report of the German Weather Service 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report describes the budget, organisation, staff, and structure of the German Weather Service in 1989. Activities in measuring stations network maintenance, weather forecasts, climate monitoring, agricultural meteorology, radioactivity measurements, aerological services and telecommunications are described. Other fields discussed are research and international cooperation, and the publications in the year under report. (orig.) With 42 figs., 27 tabs

  7. Annual report of the German Weather Service 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report describes the budget, organisation, staff, and structure of the German Weather Service in 1988. Activities in measuring stations network maintenance, weather forecasts, climate monitoring, agricultural meteorology, radioactivity measurements, aerological services and telecommunications are described. Other fields discussed are research and international cooperation, and the publications in the year under report. (orig.) With 31 figs., 14 tabs

  8. The Virtual Extension Annual Conference: Addressing Contemporary Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Nancy K.; Brekke, Robin; Coates, Deb; Kress, Cathann; Hlas, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Extension systems are experimenting with new models for conducting professional development to enhance staff competence and other returns on professional development investments. The ISUEO virtual annual conference provides a successful flipped classroom model of asynchronous and synchronous learning events for conducting an Extension annual…

  9. Leidos Reclaims Defelice Cup at Annual Golf Tournament | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer Leidos Biomedical Research reclaimed the Defelice Cup trophy from NCI at the eighth annual Ronald H. Defelice golf tournament, held October 14. The final score was 15–7, with Leidos Biomed tying the series 4 to 4. Fourteen players on each team battled it out at Rattlewood golf course in Mount Airy, Md.

  10. NASPA Student Affairs Administration in Higher Education Annual Report, 1998.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Inc.

    This annual report covers 1997-1998, which was a year of great commitment by the NASPA Board of Directors, membership, corporate partners, and staff. All of these groups made significant contributions to the association's success, measured by how well the mission was fulfilled through addressing established goals and objectives. This year NASPA…

  11. [Hospital auxiliary staff, between polyvalence and invisibility].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veissier, Pascale

    2016-01-01

    Often underestimated, hospital auxiliary staff carry out on a daily basis a professional activity that may be difficult to define and/or recognize. What does their work consist in and what are the boundaries of the scope of their activity? Faced with a growing rate of absenteeism among these members of staff in a nursing home for elderly people attached to a hospital, an issue emerges: does the content of their professional activity have an impact on the causes and evolution of this phenomenon? PMID:26976318

  12. International activities related to medical staff dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The past experience and collaboration between several European laboratories - 12 participants from 9 countries- involved in radiation protection measurements, helped to establish a new collaborative project ORAMED (Optimization of Radiation Protection for Medical Staff) within the framework of 7-th FP of EU ( EURATOM Programme for Nuclear Research and Training), with the general objective to improve standards of protection for medical staff, for procedures resulting in potentially high exposures. In the presentation there will be described the main topics of the project and the participation of our department in the various working groups. (authors)

  13. Understanding Job Stress among Healthcare Staff

    OpenAIRE

    Dola Saha; Rajesh Kumar Sinha; Kankshi Bhavsar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Job life is an important part of a person’s daily life. There are many aspects of a job. A person may be satisfied with one or more aspects of his/her job but at the same time may be unhappy with other things related to the job. Objective: To evaluate the sources of job stress (stressful aspects of work) among the staff of a super specialty hospital & to suggest measures to decrease level of job stress. Methodology: Descriptive study employing 381 staff members of a super specia...

  14. Turning Up the Staff for Organizational Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jr., Richard V.

    1969-01-01

    With the tremendous growth of innovation in education in recent years, the need to "tune up the staff has appeared as an essential ingredient. The days of change through administrative directives have disappeared with the rise in teacher militancy and competency. (CK)

  15. Supervision, Staff Development, and Evaluation Connections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuarrie, Frank O.; Wood, Fred H.

    1991-01-01

    Examines the relationship between supervision, staff development, and teacher evaluation, discussing why educators must strive to make connections among the three, identifying important misunderstandings about them, and describing the purposes of each process and the similarities, differences, and connections between them. Together, they can be…

  16. Greeks in America; Staff Development Module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lereah, Lucy; And Others

    This module lists eight staff development objectives pertaining to various aspects of Greek-American culture. Topics dealt with include Greek emigration and immigration, Greek vocabulary, contributions made by prominent Greek-Americans, Greek family life and the changing role of family members, Greek values, and the growth of Atlanta's Greek…

  17. Between Education and Psychology: School Staff Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Tim; Finney, Dave

    2015-01-01

    When discussing contributions from psychology in/to educational practices like school-based mental health promotion, it is peculiar that psychologists (of an educational or clinical kind) or education-oriented sociologists, both not often based in schools or classrooms, dominate the topic. It has been acknowledged that school staff have been over…

  18. Assessing and Reducing Exposures to Cardiology Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interventional radiology and interventional cardiology practices represent the highest radiological workload in hospitals and have the potential for high exposures to staff operating near patients. The IAEA has promoted the Information System on Occupational Exposure in Medicine, Industry and Research (ISEMIR) project where the working group on interventional cardiology assessed levels of exposure and methods applied for individual monitoring, and designed an international database of occupational exposures. Worldwide surveys of interventional cardiologists from 32 countries and 81 regulatory bodies from 55 countries provided information on dosimetry practice: only 57% of regulatory bodies define the number and/or position of dosimeters for staff monitoring and less than 40% could provide doses. The survey results proved poor compliance with staff monitoring recommendations in a large fraction of hospitals and the need for staff monitoring harmonization and monitoring technology advancements. Given the new occupational dose limit for the lens of the eye, the existence of high eye doses in interventional cardiology practice and the general lack of knowledge of actual eye doses in interventional cardiology (and other similar interventional practices), ISEMIR recommends improving training in occupational radiation protection and monitoring methods for assessing eye lens doses, and urging hospital management to utilize the international database under development for benchmarking occupational doses in interventional cardiology and, hence, improve optimization of protection. (author)

  19. Radiation Safety Awareness Among Medical Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The common access to imaging methods based on ionizing radiation requires also radiation protection. The knowledge of ionizing radiation exposure risks among the medical staff is essential for planning diagnostic procedures and therapy. Evaluation of the knowledge of radiation safety during diagnostic procedures among the medical staff. The study consisted of a questionnaire survey. The questionnaire consisted of seven closed-ended questions concerning the knowledge of the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation as well as questions related to responder’s profession and work experience. The study group included a total of 150 individuals from four professional groups: nurses, doctors, medical technicians, support staff. The study was carried out in the three largest hospitals in Gdańsk between July and October 2013. The highest rates of correct answers to questions related to the issue of radiation protection were provided by the staff of radiology facilities and emergency departments with 1–5 years of professional experience. The most vulnerable group in terms of the knowledge of these issues consisted of individuals working at surgical wards with 11–15 years of professional experience. Education in the field of radiological protection should be a subject of periodic training of medical personnel regardless of position and length of service

  20. MEDICAL STAFF SCHEDULING USING SIMULATED ANNEALING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladislav Rosocha

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The efficiency of medical staff is a fundamental feature of healthcare facilities quality. Therefore the better implementation of their preferences into the scheduling problem might not only rise the work-life balance of doctors and nurses, but also may result into better patient care. This paper focuses on optimization of medical staff preferences considering the scheduling problem.Methodology/Approach: We propose a medical staff scheduling algorithm based on simulated annealing, a well-known method from statistical thermodynamics. We define hard constraints, which are linked to legal and working regulations, and minimize the violations of soft constraints, which are related to the quality of work, psychic, and work-life balance of staff.Findings: On a sample of 60 physicians and nurses from gynecology department we generated monthly schedules and optimized their preferences in terms of soft constraints. Our results indicate that the final value of objective function optimized by proposed algorithm is more than 18-times better in violations of soft constraints than initially generated random schedule that satisfied hard constraints.Research Limitation/implication: Even though the global optimality of final outcome is not guaranteed, desirable solutionwas obtained in reasonable time. Originality/Value of paper: We show that designed algorithm is able to successfully generate schedules regarding hard and soft constraints. Moreover, presented method is significantly faster than standard schedule generation and is able to effectively reschedule due to the local neighborhood search characteristics of simulated annealing.

  1. Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Rune Nørgaard

    2016-01-01

    SRA would very much like to support the exchange of best practice between members throughout the year and the Membership Committee is presently looking into the opportunities for a Staff Exchange or Legal Alien Program. However the International Section has already had the chance to provide this...

  2. Are Students Customers? Perceptions of Academic Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomas, Laurie

    2007-01-01

    This paper examines the notion of the student as a customer in a university, focusing on the perceptions of academic staff. Changes in the higher education sector in recent years have significantly reduced the differences between universities and other types of organisations and it has been argued that students have become "consumers" of higher…

  3. The Hazardous Waters of Staff Selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoop, Robert J.; Dunklee, Dennis R.

    2001-01-01

    Understanding prospective employees' rights (under the 1964 Civil Rights Act and other federal legislation prohibiting discriminatory practices) can help principals protect themselves, their schools, and their districts from litigation. Scenarios are described, along with permissible staff-selection steps: position analysis, recruitment,…

  4. Selecting and Developing an A+ Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Vernon G.

    2008-01-01

    Because the demand for excellence in public education is ever present, this article explores the development of a professional enhancement program designed to select and develop a qualified, competent faculty and staff. The basis for the program is a strong educational philosophy, which leads to a vision of what schools can be. It stresses the…

  5. Staff-Development Program. Maxi I Practicum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutalo, Anthony J.

    Described are various aspects of a program to train school personnel to meet the special needs of mainstreamed children. The staff development program is discussed in terms of program responsibility, strategy, and steps taken by the principal in the implementation procedure. The four stages of Project RETAP, a special education in-service program…

  6. Does Staff Diversity Imply Openness to Diversity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauring, Jakob; Selmer, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Post-secondary educational organizations are currently some of the most diverse settings to be found. However, few educational studies have dealt with staff diversity and hardly any has looked outside the USA. The purpose of this paper is to present a study of members of international university departments in Denmark. The authors set out…

  7. The Lighter Side of Staff Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacall, Aaron

    2004-01-01

    As educators, we often take ourselves a bit too seriously, so veteran educator and illustrator Aaron Bacall offers a little perspective with these lighthearted cartoons. Whether used as overheads for meetings or as an individual break in a busy day, this collection of whimsical glimpses at staff development will provide a moment to laugh and add a…

  8. Visit of the US Congressional Staff delegation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    List of participants: Jon Kamarck, Chief Clerk, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; Cheh Kim, Professional Staff Member, VA-HUD subcommittee, Senate Appropriations Committee; David Schindel, Head, National Science Foundation, Europe Office; Terry Schaff, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Tim Clancy, National Science Foundation, Office of Legislative & Public Affairs; Ms Lynette Poulton, First Secretary, US Mission in Geneva

  9. 1999 Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The year 1999 was a very challenging one for Ryan Energy Technologies Inc. In the wake of the industry slowdown the Company removed from service 12 'measurement while drilling/logging while drilling' (MWD/LWD) systems or 40 per cent of its MWD/LWD equipment. Staff was reduced correspondingly, resulting in a proportional improvement in cost structures. Despite the financially challenging first three quarters of 1999, Ryan entered the year 2000 with a strong balance sheet. It was able to complete an equity offering of $ 7.5 million in gross proceeds to fund the expansion of its electromagnetic (EM) communication and data management equipment fleet, and to provide a source of cash for possible acquisitions. With the turnaround of oil prices Ryan returned to service its MWD/LWD systems in the fourth quarter of 1999, and rehired a significant number of its previous staff. Revenues in the fourth quarter increased by 95 per cent and the company returned to profitability. Consolidated revenues for the year ending December 31, 1999 decreased to $ 27.3 million from $ 43.9 million in 1998. Consolidated net losses amounted to $ 3.4 million compared to net earnings of $ 2.0 million in 1998. Despite hard times, the Company was able to manufacture four additional EM systems, bringing EM job capacity to seven. The Company also completed the acquisition of the directional drilling assets of Whipstock Systems Inc of Calgary . Ryan secured its first MWD/LWD job contract in Venezuela in the third quarter; since then it also shipped a second unit to Venezuela to meet rising demand for the company;' services. Ryan also began drilling a multi-well pilot program in Abu Dhabi in late 1999. Two of these wells have been successfully completed to date, and a third well is in the planning stages. Upon finishing this program, Ryan Energy Technologies will be eligible for multi-year contracts with the Abu Dhabi National Oil Company, an important step in establishing a Middle East presence in the

  10. A 10 year statistical review of occupational doses of cardiology and angiography staff: Strengthening the radiation protection programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) in Riyadh has a yearly workload of about 3,000 cardiac catheterization and 2,000 angiography patients. In the year 2005, IAEA approved a three-year project on radiation protection in interventional radiology procedures. The objectives were to identify and evaluate factors that contribute to high patient and staff doses and to determine methods for strengthening the radiation protection programme in this area. Occupational doses of KFSH and RC staff are being monitored using TLD badges. The TLD badges are regularly tested for accuracy and reproducibility at the KFSH and RC Secondary Standard Dosimetry Laboratory before issuance to users. In the study, the mean annual occupational doses of cardiac catheterization and angiography staff for years 1999 to 2008 were determined from the monthly TLD dosimetry reports. Comparison of the yearly mean doses was made for the two categories of staff. The variation in occupational doses was investigated and causes for the variation were identified. The collective dose per year was also determined and evaluated. The Pearson correlation coefficients of dose with the patient workload, number of staff monitored and collective dose were calculated. An evaluation on the impact of the IAEA research project on the radiation protection of staff was undertaken. The angiography staff obtained high annual doses (2 to 7 mSv) from years 1999 to 2008 with a mean value of 4.8 mSv. Each year two to four staff (radiologists) exceeded the annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Cardiac catheterization staff obtained a mean dose of about 1 mSv (0.7 to 1.42 mSv) in the 10 year review. A good correlation existed between the number of staff and collective dose (r2= 0.89) for angiography. A poor correlation existed between the number of staff and mean occupational dose for both groups. The long fluoroscopy time in angiography and the lack of image quality criteria contributed to the high staff doses

  11. A "Coach Approach" to Staff Engagement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Macmillan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The speed of change is challenging libraries to redevelop themselves in ways we have never seen before. Rising costs and changing customer expectations are forcing staff to continuously learn new skills, adapt to new technologies and work more closely in collaboration with others in response to this unpredictable environment. At the same time library leaders need to communicate regularly with staff and to motivate them to dialogue with each other about the value of the library service that they provide to the community. A creative approach to building flexibility, resilience and staff engagement has become essential for survival. Coaching is a creative, innovative and effective communications tool that is now considered to be one of the most important ways to encourage employees to continue to learn and develop. Its greatest impact is in building leadership and staff engagement. Communicating with “a coach approach” or coaching mindset is a powerful way for library leaders to connect with others where the flow and exchange is positive and there is a mutual benefit of contribution and collaboration, expanded knowledge and innovation. The basics of fostering “a coach approach” with library staff requires an understanding of the importance of “reframing” one’s personal attitudes and perspectives, appreciating the art of focused listening and the impact of positive acknowledgement, learning to ask the right questions and formulating action plans for continued success. It is a learned skill that requires a commitment to practice but is one that will ultimately demonstrate positive results.

  12. Laser program annual report 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  13. Laser program annual report 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications

  14. Knowledge Assessment of Hospital Staff Regarding Biomedical Waste Management in A Tertiary Care Hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bathma Vishal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomedical waste (BMW is waste generated during diagnosis, treatment or immunization of human beings or animals. Approximately 10-25% of the Bio-Medical waste is hazardous and can be injurious to humans or animals and deleterious to environment. It is estimated that annually about 0.33 million tones of hospital waste are generated in India. Objectives: To assess the knowledge regarding hospital waste management amongst hospital staff. Material and Methods: The study comprises of assessment of the knowledge regarding BMW management. For this purpose, a 10% sample of each of the 4 categories of staff on roll was randomly selected for the study; the sample consisted of 110 respondents: 38 doctors, 44 nurses, 21 Lab-technicians and 7 waste handlers/supporting staff. Results: The knowledge of doctors about BMW management & handling rule was much better (92.1% as compared to nurses (54.5% and Lab-technicians (47.6% and it was statistically significant (p-value < 0.05. Conclusion: The doctors where observed to be good in theoretical knowledge. While in case of nurses and lab-technicians the reverse was true. Recommendation: The need of comprehensive training programs regarding Bio-Medical waste management is highly recommended to all hospital staff.

  15. Mean and individual radiation exposures of the staff of the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center, 1969 - 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the Karlsruhe Nuclear Research Center radiation protection monitoring of personnel exceeds by far the stipulations of the Radiation Protection Ordinance of the Federal Republic of Germany. To have an overall view of the radiation burden due to external radiation, not only occupationally exposed workers, but all members of the staff are monitored with solid state dosimeters. Recent evaluation of dosimetric data of the last ten years shows an average annual dose of 170 mrem including the natural radiation background. A total of about 30,000 persons were monitored during this time. Of the total radiation impact of approximately 5,000 man-rem during these ten years half the value is caused by the natural radiation background. Only 5.1% of all persons would have to be categorized as exposed workers of category B with an annual dose 0.5 to 1.5 rem. Only 1.3%, corresponding approximately to 400 persons, received a dose higher than 1.5 rem per year. A detailed analysis revealed that the workers responsible for the treatment and final conditioning of radioactive wastes are exposed to a higher radiation burden. In addition to detailed information on the mean radiation burden of the staff of different working areas, the distribution of cases of annual dose higher than 1.5 rem during these ten years is analyzed. (H.K.)

  16. Improving Scientific Communication and Publication Output in a Multidisciplinary Laboratory: Changing Culture Through Staff Development Workshops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noonan, Christine F.; Stratton, Kelly G.

    2015-07-13

    Communication plays a fundamental role in science and engineering disciplines. However, many higher education programs provide little, if any, technical communication coursework. Without strong communication skills scientists and engineers have less opportunity to publish, obtain competitive research funds, or grow their careers. This article describes the role of scientific communication training as an innovative staff development program in a learning-intensive workplace – a national scientific research and development laboratory. The findings show that involvement in the workshop has increased overall participating staff annual publications by an average of 61 percent compared to their pre-workshop publishing performance as well as confidence level in their ability to write and publish peer-reviewed literature. Secondary benefits include improved information literacy skills and the development of informal communities of practice. This work provides insight into adult education in the workplace.

  17. Effects of hospital downsizing on surviving staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, S; Brown, H N

    1998-01-01

    In 1993, 27% of 1,147 surveyed hospitals planned to decrease staff size in the next year. This study surveyed 48 vice presidents of nursing in North Carolina hospitals with an average inpatient census over 100 using a 13-item questionnaire in an effort to discover strategies that were helpful in effective downsizing endeavors. Of the 31 (48%) returned questionnaires, 11 (35%) of the VPs reported downsizing in the past 3 years, most of which required the closing of one or more units. The respondents ranked attrition as the most common strategy, followed by relocation, early retirement, a change in skill mix, and layoffs. The most important components in successful downsizing or reorganization efforts were: two-way communication and sufficient planning, as well as seeking and using input from a broad group of staff (using both individual meetings and group forums/discussions). PMID:9987324

  18. Contract policy for CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2009-01-01

    Public information meeting on Monday 28 September 2009 at 10.00 a.m. With effect from 1 August 2009, new provisions regarding staff employment contract policy have entered into force. These provisions are set out in: The Staff Rules and Regulations and Administrative Circular No. 2 (Rev. 4). Further details are available in: Frequently Asked Questions. The new provisions are outlined below: Limited-duration contracts From 1 August 2009, limited-duration contracts will be awarded for a maximum period of five years (instead of four years previously) and no extensions beyond five years will be granted. Contracts for periods shorter than five years can be exceptionally awarded, e.g. for a project whose mission or financial resources are time-limited. Indefinite contracts : award procedure A number of changes have been introduced regarding the procedure for the award of indefinite contracts. From now on, posts leading to the award of an indefinite contract will be opened at le...

  19. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2005 : Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2004/2005, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2004 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 4/2005, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  20. Mobbing behaviors encountered by nurse teaching staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Dilek; Yildirim, Aytolan; Timucin, Arzu

    2007-07-01

    The term 'mobbing' is defined as antagonistic behaviors with unethical communication directed systematically at one individual by one or more individuals in the workplace. This cross-sectional and descriptive study was conducted for the purpose of determining the mobbing behaviors encountered by nursing school teaching staff in Turkey, its effect on them, and their responses to them. A large percentage (91%) of the nursing school employees who participated in this study reported that they had encountered mobbing behaviors in the institution where they work and 17% that they had been directly exposed to mobbing in the workplace. The academic staff who had been exposed to mobbing behaviors experienced various physiological, emotional and social reactions. They frequently 'worked harder and [were] more organized and worked very carefully to avoid criticism' to escape from mobbing. In addition, 9% of the participants stated that they 'thought about suicide occasionally'. PMID:17562724

  1. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1st January 1996 are modified as follows as of 1st July 2006: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme-reorganisation of the Fellowship Programme-modification of Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions-new definition of disability and associated benefits-revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board-bringing together of the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification No.16) are available from Departmental secretariats. In addition, the Staff Rules and Regulations can be consulted on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular No. 14 (Rev. 2)-July 2006 Protection of members o...

  2. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 July 2006: The modifications are listed below: Financial and social conditions for Paid Associates, Fellows and Students (introduction of a new payment scheme for the Paid Scientific Associates Programme - reorganization of the Fellowship Programme - modification of the Student subsistence rates) Protection of members of the personnel against the financial consequences of illness, accident and disability (clarification of the scope of the relevant provisions - new definition of disability and associated benefits - revised role of the Joint Advisory Rehabilitation and Disability Board - bringing together the relevant provisions). Copies of this update (modification# 16) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Administrative Circular ...

  3. Outbreak of Mysterious Illness Among Hospital Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Peter; Ebbehøj, Niels Erik

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospitals are rarely reported as settings for mass psychogenic illness (MPI). The present report scrutinizes an outbreak of probable MPI among hospital staff, with medical intervention reinforcing the course of the illness. CASE REPORT: Four of seven staff members in an emergency...... sick leave. The ward was closed for several weeks during comprehensive but negative investigations for toxic chemicals. Clinical data and lack of indication of chemical exposure, together with an attack pattern with only some individuals becoming ill in a shared environment, suggest MPI. Iatrogenic...... influence from dramatic intervention was probably a strong driving force in the outbreak. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Awareness of MPI may prevent unnecessary and potentially harmful treatment as well as improve health care resilience, particularly with respect to preparedness...

  4. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from 1 January 2004: • Preliminary note - Terminology realignment following the restructuring of the Organization (page - i -) • Annex R A 1 - Scale of basic salaries (page 73) • Annex R A 2 - Scale of stipends paid to fellows (page 74) • Annex R A 4 - Family allowance and child allowance (page 81) • Annex R A 8.01 - Reimbursement of education fees for the academic year 2003/2004, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2003 (page 81). Copies of this update, announced in Weekly Bulletin 3/2004, are available in the departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/admin_services/rules/default.asp Human Resources Department Tel. 74128

  5. Republic of Congo; Staff-Monitored Program

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2008-01-01

    Social and political stability has improved in Congo, but the security situation is fragile. Executive Directors welcomed the Staff-Monitored Program (SMP), which was designed to safeguard fiscal and external stability. They stressed the need for stabilizing the economy and pursuing structural reforms with a view for achieving sustainable growth, reducing poverty, diversifying the economy, and benefiting from enhanced HIPC Initiative debt relief. As a sign of their renewed commitment to reeng...

  6. The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Provisional Staff Regulations of the Agency, as amended up to 19 September 1975 by the Board of Governors, are set forth in this document for the information of all Members of the Agency. When an individual provision of the Regulations and the Annexes thereto has been amended since their approval by the Board in 1957, this is indicated by a footnote giving the date on which the current text became effective. There is a subject index at the end of the document

  7. Staff Psychological Contract Innovates Human Resource Management

    OpenAIRE

    Wei, Xin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly studies on the relationships between the contents of staff psychological contract, job satisfaction level and occupation satisfaction level by surveying, combining research methods of literature, academic and empirical research. The research results have important reference value on human resource management innovation. New suggestions were also put forward, which are relative with recruitment, measure of psychological contract, culture construction and targeted incentives t...

  8. Teaching Staff Advanced Training: European Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovalchuk Vasyl

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The issue of teaching staff advanced training is paid much attention in many countries. In the Republic of Moldova progressive professional credits system is used. Credits are scored not only in assigning teaching degrees or issuing a certificate of continuing professional education, but also for teachers’ evaluation at the educational institution. Advanced training of teaching staff in France is provided by various institutions of postgraduate education, university institutes and regional centers of education in order to help teachers to renew their professional knowledge and at the same time to refocus it on the level of consciousness according to the real problems of school and the community. The feature of teaching staff advanced training in France is that it is teachers’ personal matter and duration of all periods of training should come to one year during all professional career. In Finland, teaching staff advanced training is organized directly in schools under aegis of the National Board of Education, the National Centre for Advanced Training in Education, departments of teacher education and other faculties of higher educational institutions on credit system basis. Among the topical forms there are targeted, cascade, common (cooperative teaching and learning by own example. In the UK, advanced training takes place in two models: the course model based on higher educational establishments and school based in-service education. The main purpose of advanced training system is to familiarize teachers with theoretical and practical innovations in educational activities, progressive teaching technologies, and consolidate their skills of independent acquisition of knowledge necessary for their professional development.

  9. Analysis Of Staff And Customer Satisfaction

    OpenAIRE

    Evgeni Stanimirov; Borislava Cherkezova

    2012-01-01

    Intensive competition in the area of business services stimulates companies to try to manage the satisfaction and loyalty of their most important customers. Front office personnel of companies selling their products, through their attitudes and behaviour, affect the satisfaction and loyalty levels of customers. The ability of sales staff to assess comparatively accurately whether customers receive the desired and expected service level is important from the viewpoint of marketing. The precise...

  10. Developing behavioral objectives for perioperative staff development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitz, J M

    1996-07-01

    Behavioral objectives (i.e., clear statements that describe intended instructional outcomes) are a crucial component of educational planning for perioperative staff development. Properly written objectives promote positive learning outcomes such as increased motivation, better retention of information, and improved instructional accountability. This article describes the advantages of using behavioral objectives, gives a historical perspective of their development, presents a practical "how-to" approach to formulating them, and delineates their link to the selection of appropriate evaluation methods. PMID:8827333

  11. Production, staff, working time and financial planning

    OpenAIRE

    Orlando Boiteux; Albert Corominas; Amaia Lusa; Carme Martinez

    2009-01-01

    Aggregate planning can be a tool for coordinating the tactical decisions belonging to some functional areas of a company. This potential has been limited due to methodological and technical reasons, but nowadays it is possible to solve very sophisticated models integrating, with a high level of detail, a great number of decisions of several functional areas and that permit to include new management schemes. In this paper, a production, staff, working time and cash management model is introduced.

  12. Amendments to the Staff Rules and Regulations

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Department

    2006-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2005 Internal taxation of remuneration, payments and other financial benefits (New articles IV 2.01, R IV 2.01 to 2.04 pages 56 bis & 56 ter; Annex R A 1 bis page 73 bis) 1 September 2005 Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01 page 81) for the academic year 2005/2006 1 November 2005 Age limit (Article R II 6.04 page 37) 1 January 2006 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 page 73 & Annex R A 2 page 74 respectively). Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4 page 76) New contract policy for staff members (Articles R II 1.19 & 1.20 page 15, R II 1.23 page 16, II 6.01 page 36, R II 6.02 & R II 6.06 page 37, VIII 1.03 page 68, R A 9.01 page 83). Copies of this update (modification # 15) are available in departmental secretariats. In addition, Staff Rules and Regulations are available for consultation on the Web at the following addr...

  13. A new logo for the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2013-01-01

    On 3rd December 2012 the Staff Association launched a competition open to all to design a new logo, which should not contain the official CERN logo, reserved by CERN’s new graphic charter to the official use by the Organization. We are pleased that this competition sparked a strong interest. A total of 57 proposals were received within the time limits, some submitted from far away: Poland, Czech Republic, Turkey and even Cameroon! The selection of the winning logo was made in two steps: first the pre-selection of six finalists, followed by the final choice of the winning logo by members of the Staff Association.  Winning logo The pre-selection was made in two stages. Three of the six finalists were nominated by a jury consisting of seven members of the Staff Association, including communication professionals. In parallel, from 4 to 15 February CERN employed members of the personnel were able to visit the exhibition of all the logo proposals on the 1st floor of the Main Building and ...

  14. Essentials of Staff Development and Why You Should Care

    OpenAIRE

    Gesme, Dean H.; Towle, Elaine L.; Wiseman, Marian

    2010-01-01

    Physicians may reason that their energy, education, and training should be focused on patient care and research, whereas staff education should be the responsibility of practice managers. But physicians have an important role in staff development.

  15. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  16. 77 FR 37665 - Notice of Commission Staff Attendance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-22

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Notice of Commission Staff Attendance The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission hereby gives notice that members of the Commission's staff may attend the following meeting related to the transmission planning activities of the North Carolina Transmission Planning...

  17. The place of human-factors in the work of the Atomic Energy Control Board

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The AECB do not effectively regulate human factors in nuclear power plants since they have no staff trained to do so. Two new positions are recommended and their activities are outlined. Special problems are identified in the certification of personnel, management information control, and in accommodating human factors to AECB style

  18. Staff doses in intervention radiology in Portugal in 1999-2006

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The annual effective doses received by the staff working in the field of interventional radiology in public hospitals and private clinics in Portugal in the period 1999-2006 was analysed and is presented in this paper. The work was carried out based on the occupational dose data reported to the Central Dose Registry of the Nuclear and Technological Institute (ITN) by the individual monitoring companies operating in the country. Previous studies have shown that the relative proportion of workers in each field of activity is approximately 80% for medicine, 13% for industry, 6% for research and 1% for mining, as there are no nuclear power plants in the country. The highest contribution to the total collective dose is due to the medical sector. Interventional radiology represents approximately 11% of the number of workers in the medical sector and the dose values associated to this type of activity are generally high. The aim of this work is to characterize the occupational exposure in interventional radiology, identifying the professions of the individuals working in this field and related doses. The annual whole body doses evaluated in the period 1999-2006 was used to derive the distribution of workers by effective dose intervals for every profession namely, medical doctors, nurses, radiology technicians, auxiliary and administrative staff. The respective annual average doses and collective doses as well as the total average and total collective doses for the interventional radiology field are presented. From the analysis of the data it can be inferred that medical doctors and nurses are more exposed than other staff categories. (author)

  19. Use of an accident and emergency department by hospital staff.

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, C J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the number of attendances by hospital staff at an accident and emergency (A&E) department, and reasons for their attendance. METHODS: A&E attendances by hospital staff were studied for a 12 month period. Comparison was made with attendances by non-hospital staff in full or part time employment. Differences between the observed and expected numbers of attendances were analysed using chi 2 analysis. RESULTS: 560 staff attendances were recorded out of 78,103 total attendance...

  20. Identifying needs to develop a PBL staff development program

    OpenAIRE

    Prarthana Coffin

    2013-01-01

    Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL) academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims to answer the following research questions 1) how can university academic staff be assisted to acquire pedagogical competences for an initiative of t...

  1. Academic Staff Disposition to Promotion Criteria in Nigerian Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archibong, Ijeoma A.; Effiom, David O.; Omoike, Don; Edet, Aniefiok O.

    2010-01-01

    This study aimed at determining academic staff satisfaction with promotion criteria and what, in their view, should be included in the promotion criteria. A researcher-designed questionnaire was utilized for data collection from a sample size of 349 academic staff. Findings show that the majority of the academic staff were dissatisfied with the…

  2. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  3. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 401... § 401.112 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All CMS administrative staff manuals and... Rulings. These manuals are generally not printed in a sufficient quantity to permit sale or other...

  4. 32 CFR 1602.5 - Area office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....5 Area office staff. The compensated employees, civilian and military, of the Selective Service System employed in an area office will be referred to as the area office staff. ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Area office staff. 1602.5 Section...

  5. Staff Reactions to Challenging Behaviour: An Observation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Greet; Van Den Noortgate, Wim; Eeman, Lieve; Maes, Bea

    2010-01-01

    Staff reactions play an important role in the development and maintaining of clients' challenging behaviour. Because there is a paucity of research on staff reactions in naturalistic settings, this study examined sequential associations between challenging behaviour and staff reactions by means of a descriptive analysis. We analysed video…

  6. Enhancing staff performance through a customized evaluation form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, E S

    1993-03-01

    Using a customized staff performance evaluation form identifies specific behaviors characteristic of an ideal staff person. The form assists the manager in addressing how each staff member displays these characteristics and helps the manager and employee coauthor a written plan designed to enhance self-development and teamwork. PMID:8335780

  7. Radiation dose measurements for staff members involved in holmium-166 preclinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Neutron-activated holmium-166 (166Ho) is an excellent radionuclide for internal radiation therapy (Eβmax = 1.84 MeV) with an appropriate half-life (26.8 h), which emits photons (81 keV, 6.2%) suitable to be detected by gamma cameras. Preparing and injecting radiopharmaceuticals containing beta/gamma emitting holmium-166 implies a risk of exceeding the upper limit for skin and hand radiation equivalent doses (500 mSv/an). This study was aimed to estimate the whole body and finger exposure for staff responsible for dose preparation, dose dispensing, and dose injection of holmium-166 therapy. Methods: To measure the finger dose from external exposure, all staff members wore TLD dosimeters. Personal dose equivalents Hp(10) were measured using electronic personal dosimeters (EPD MK2, Thermo Fischer Scientific) placed on the left side of the chest. During our study, staff members administered more than 40 166Ho-based therapies for preclinical trial. Appropriate radiation safety procedures and shielding were applied at each stage. Results: In this study, the whole body doses were 2.80 ± 1.56 nSv MBq−1 for one 166Ho-therapy preparation/formulation, and 2.68 ± 1.70 nSv MBq−1 for one intravenous injection. Maximum finger doses were 2.9 ± 0.2 μSv MBq−1 and 2.5 ± 0.3 μSv MBq−1 for preparation and injection, respectively (activities injected: 72 ± 3 MBq). Conclusion: Extrapolated annual doses from 300 166Ho radionuclide therapies were lower than the annual limit doses for skin and the whole body, 500 mSv and 20 mSv, respectively, reported in the European Directive EURATOM 96/29 when applying appropriate radiation protection standards. However, these doses have to be added to other diagnostic or therapeutic protocols, performed in preclinical facilities. - Highlights: • Radiation measurements for staff performing 166 Holmium radionuclide therapy was evaluated. • Hand exposure was estimated using TLD dosimeter. • Whole body doses was evaluated using EPD

  8. Dose evaluation in medical staff during diagnostics procedures in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies show that personal dosimeters may underestimate the dose values in interventional physicians, especially in extremities and crystalline. The objective of this work was to study the radiation exposure levels of medical staff in diagnostic interventional radiology procedures. For this purpose LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100) dosimeters were placed in different regions of the physician body. When comparing with reference dose levels, the maximum numbers of annual procedures were found. This information is essential to ensure the radiological protection of those professionals. (author)

  9. Occupational exposure of medical staff: An overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational exposure is defined as the exposure of a worker that is received or committed during a period of work. For an overview of the different area's where workers can be occupationally exposed we can refer to the UNSCEAR reports. The physicians, technicians, nurses, and other medical staff constitute the largest group of workers occupationally exposed to man-made sources of radiation. In this UNSCEAR publication you can find the average occupational doses worldwide and trends during the last 20-30 years. Of course these statistics are difficult to obtain, and there are large differences between different countries. According to the UNSCEAR data, the average exposure of medical workers are now decreasing worldwide, but the number of workers exposed to medical sources of radiation is still increasing. We will give an overview of the occupational exposures in different areas of the medical field, and we will discuss some of the hot-topics and radiation protection problems. We will give some examples of recent staff dose measurements in the different medical fields Diagnostic radiology: Radiography is by far the most widely used X-ray imaging technique. During radiography with fixed installations, the radiographer would normally be expected to stand in a control booth that is typically shielded against X-ray tube leakage and scattered radiation from the room and patient. The occupational doses are mostly low. Fluoroscopic procedures are by far the largest source of occupational exposure in medicine. These procedures require the operator to be present in the examination room, usually close to the patient. In fact, the patient is the main source of exposure because of scattered radiation. Shielding for this scattered radiation is more difficult, but it is possible to reduce the staff doses by partial shielding and simple procedural steps. Fluoroscopy procedures can also be therapeutic. In such cases the procedures arc even longer and doses to staff arc generally

  10. List of unclassified documents by the staff of Metallurgy Division, AERE Harwell from January 1972 to July 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This list constitutes unclassified material published or presented between January 1972 and July 1977 by the staff of Metallurgy Division. It covers reports, memoranda, bibliographies, articles in periodicals, conference papers, books, theses and patent specifications. It is planned to issue a list annually. The publications are listed under the following titles of the research teams concerned: fast reactor fuels, advanced reactor systems, fracture studies, structural materials, radiation effects, composite materials, high voltage microscope and metals fabrication, management and administration. (U.K.)

  11. Assessment of personal occupational radiation exposures received by nuclear medicine and oncology staff in Punjab (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafar, T; Masood, K; Zafar, J

    2015-09-01

    The impact of occupational radiation exposures on oncology staff working in the disciplines of Nuclear Medicine (NM), Radiotherapy (RT), and Diagnostic Radiology (DR) is of significance to ensure a health risk free environment. In this study, occupationally received radiation doses amongst Pakistani oncology staff in NM, RT and DR during the period (2003-2012) were assessed. The Film Badge Dosimetry (FBD) technique has been utilized to process over 81,000 films (13,237 workers) concerning the occupationally exposed workers data (2003-2012) at a national scale. The annual effective doses were found to range between 0.30-0.97 mSv for NM, 0.44-1.02 mSv for RT and 0.31-1.09 mSv for DR. The annual effective doses averaged over a period of 10 years were assessed to be 0.63, 0.70 and 0.68 mSv for NM, RT and DR respectively. The exposure data were categorized into three exposure levels (≤0.99, 1-4.99 and 5-9.99 mSv) to establish the staff distribution in these categories. It was found that 89.8-96% in NM, 82-94.5% in RT and 76-96.8% staff workers in DR have received doses within the range from the Minimum Detectable Limit (MDL)--0.99 mSv. The annual effective doses, in all categories, were measured to be less than the recommended annual limit of 20 mSv. PMID:26260188

  12. FY 2014 LDRD Annual Report Project Summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomchak, Dena [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    The FY 2014 Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Annual Report is a compendium of the diverse research performed to develop and ensure the INL's technical capabilities can support future DOE missions and national research priorities. LDRD is essential to INL - it provides a means for the laboratory to pursue novel scientific and engineering research in areas that are deemed too basic or risky for programmatic investments. This research enahnces technical capabilities at the laboratory, providing scientific and engineering staff with opportunities for skill building and partnership development.

  13. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1995)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1995. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  14. Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory 2004 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, Julia C.

    2005-04-17

    This 2004 Annual Report describes the research and accomplishments of staff and users of the W.R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), located in Richland, Washington. EMSL is a multidisciplinary, national scientific user facility and research organization, operated by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research. The resources and opportunities within the facility are an outgrowth of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to fundamental research for understanding and resolving environmental and other critical scientific issues.

  15. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1996)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1996. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  16. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1997)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1997. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  17. Radiation Protection Group annual report (1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Report of the Radiation Protection Group is intended to inform the Host State Authorities, as well as the CERN Management and staff, about the radiological situation at CERN during the year 1998. The structure of the present report follows that of previous years and has five sections. It presents the results of environmental radiation monitoring, gives information about the radiation control on the sites of the Organization, describes the radiation protection activities around the CERN accelerators, reports on personnel dosimetry, calibration and instrumentation, and briefly comments on the non-routine activities of the Radiation Protection Group

  18. Agricultural research department. Annual report 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report gives a general review of the research work of the department. The activities of the year are described in short project reports followed by a list of publications, posters and lectures. Further, the report gives three review articles on selected subjects related to the work: ''Chitinase in barley and rape seed'', ''Symbiotic nitrogen fixation'' and ''Biological control of powdery mildews''. Included in the report are also a list of the staff members, guest scientists and students, lectures given at the department, and a list of travel - and other acitivities. (author) 10 refs

  19. The effectiveness of staff training focused on increasing emotional intelligence and improving interaction between support staff and clients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijlmans, L.J.M.; Embregts, P.J.C.M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A.M.T.; Derksen, J.J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed a

  20. The Effectiveness of Staff Training Focused on Increasing Emotional Intelligence and Improving Interaction between Support Staff and Clients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlmans, L. J. M.; Embregts, P. J. C. M.; Gerits, L.; Bosman, A. M. T.; Derksen, J. J. L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recent research addressed the relationship between staff behaviour and challenging behaviour of individuals with an intellectual disability (ID). Consequently, research on interventions aimed at staff is warranted. The present study focused on the effectiveness of a staff training aimed at emotional intelligence and interactions…

  1. Annual report 1993

    OpenAIRE

    Chifamba, P.C.

    1993-01-01

    The report provides an account of the activities carried out by the Lake Kariba Fisheries Research Institute during the year 1993 under the following headings: Institute finances; Staffing and staff training; Staff housing; Infrastructure and institute expansion; Vehicles and vessels; and, Fisheries and fishery management. Individual reports regarding the various project activities conducted during the year are also included.

  2. Annual report 1994

    OpenAIRE

    Mtsambiwa, M.Z.

    1994-01-01

    The report provides an account of the activities carried out by the Lake Kariba Fisheries Research Institute during the year 1994 under the following headings: Institute finances; Staffing and staff training; Staff housing; Infrastructure and institute expansion; Vehicles and vessels; and, Fisheries and fishery management. Individual reports regarding the various project activities conducted during the year are also included.

  3. Annual report 1990

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Report contains short descriptions of the studies done in 1990 by the staff of Theoretical Physics Department of the Institute of Nuclear Physics in Cracow. Basic information about conferences' and seminars' participation as well as lectures and published papers is presented. The lists of staff and visitors are given. (A.S.)

  4. A crèche for CERN staff The Staff Association project

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    For many years, the Staff Association has supported the demand for the creation of a crèche for the children of CERN staff. Several studies have been carried out without leading to a concrete plan. The fact that the CERN population is getting younger and the shortage of local facilities have led to a more urgent demand for this type of social service over the past few years. Furthermore, the Equal Opportunities Panel had already recommended that crèche places be made available.

  5. Staff numbers: from words to action!

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2006-01-01

    2006 is a decisive year for the definition of needs for human resources and long-term budget for the Organization. The LHC is officially programmed for 31 August 2007; the Director-General has to draw up a â€ワLong-term Plan” (LTP) by the end of the year. This projected programme will specify the needs for staff fron now until 2010 and beyond, in particular in the framework of the completion and running of this unique machine.

  6. Nursing staff requirements for neonatal intensive care.

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, S.; Whelan, A; Weindling, A M; Cooke, R W

    1993-01-01

    A study to estimate the number of nursing staff required for neonatal nursing was undertaken. Certain nursing tasks, such as transporting any infant, caring for the dying infant, and looking after the very unstable infant required continuous attention by one nurse (5.5 whole time equivalent (wte) nurses for each cot). The stable ventilated infant required 10.5 nursing hours each day-that is, 2.4 wte/cot. Infants with intravenous infusions, but not ventilated, required only slightly less nursi...

  7. Geneva University honours two CERN staff members

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Albert Hofmann Steve Myers On 8 June, two CERN staff members will receive Geneva University's highest distinction. On the proposal of the University's particle physicists, Steve Myers and Albert Hoffmann, who orchestrated LEP commissioning and operation and were instrumental in its success, will awarded the distinction of doctor honoris causa. The ceremony, interspersed with musical interludes, will be followed by a formal reception and is open to all. The Uni Dufour car park will be free to members of the public attending the ceremony. 8 June 2001 at 10.00 a.m. Uni Dufour, Auditoire Piaget 24, rue Général Dufour, Geneva.

  8. Factors Effecting Job Satisfaction Among Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezih Dağdeviren

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this paper, we aimed to investigate the job satisfaction levels of all the academic staff in Trakya University, along with their socioeconomic features.Material and Methods: We used a questionnaire including the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire Short Form. Frequency tables, cross tabulations, Pearson Chi-square, Exact Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn’s Multiple Comparison and Chi-squared Automatic Interaction Detector (CHAID tests were used for statistical analysis.Results: The mean age of 560 participants was 33.86±7.33 years, of whom 47% (n=263 were female and 53% (n=297 male. Of the participants, the mean levels were 63.06±10.96 for general, 44.79±7.49 for intrinsic, and 18.27±4.64 for extrinsic job satisfaction. 85.4% of the academic staff (n=478 had a moderate level of satisfaction, whereas 14.6% (n=82 had a higher level. There was a significant relationship between income and job satisfaction levels. With the CHAID analysis, it was determined that job satisfaction had a relationship with age, educational status, total years of service and years of service in the current department. Conclusion: Job satisfaction can reflect the general emotional status of employees. It has a greater importance for the jobs that can affect the extraoccupational lives directly and require constant devotion. Employers should take some measures to increase job satisfaction in order to improve efficiency.

  9. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows: Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) Cristoforo BENVENUTI/EST [Convener] David PLANE/EP Peter SCHMID/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin LAUCKNER/SL [Chairman] Flemming PEDERSEN/PS Lucie LINSSEN/EP Dietrich SCHINZEL/EP Marcel MOTTIER/EST Louis WALCKIERS/LHC Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano CAMPORESI/EP [Convener] Florence RANJARD/EP [Alternate] Jacques GRUBER/PS [until 30.6.2002] Roger BAILEY/SL [from 1.7. 2002] Peter SIEVERS/LHC [Alternate] Doris FORKEL-WIRTH/TIS Pierre NININ/ST [Alternate] Sue FOFFANO/AS Maarten WILBERS/DSU [Alternate] Werner ZAPF/HR[Secretary] LTCB 2 Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique PARIS/SL [Convener] Fabien PERRIOLLAT/PS [Alternate] Mats WILHELMSSON/ST Charles NUTTALL/TIS [Alternate] Lucie LINSSEN/EP Alfredo PLACCI/EP [Alternate] Patrick GEERAER...

  10. Composition of Staff Review Advisory Bodies - 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David Plane/EP [Convener] Enrico Chiaveri/AB Peter Schmid/EP Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Robin Lauckner/AB [Chairman]Marcel Mottier/EST Michael Letheren/EP Louis Walckiers/AT Lucie Linssen/EP Mats Wilhelmsson/ST Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/EP [Convener]Florence Ranjard/EP [Alternate] Roger Bailey/ABPeter Sievers/AT " " Doris Forkel-Wirth/TISPierre Ninin/ST " " Rob Rayson/HRMaarten Wilbers/DSU " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/AB [Convener]Fabien Perriollat/AB [Alternate] Christian Lasseur/ESTRamon Folch/EST " " Lucie Linssen/EP Alfredo Placci/EP " " Mats Møller/ASLaszlo Abel/SPL " " Seamus Hegarty/HR [Secretary] Human Resources Division Tel. 74128

  11. COMPOSITION OF STAFF REVIEW ADVISORY BODIES - 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Seamus Hegarty / HR; Tel. 74128

    2001-01-01

    For the present staff review, the advisory bodies set up to prepare recommendations are composed as follows : Senior Staff Advancement Committee (SSAC) David O. Williams/it (Convener) Cristoforo Benvenuti/est David Plane/ep Technical Engineers & Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) Sverre Jarp/it (Chairman) Flemming Pedersen/ps Robin Lauckner/sl Christian Roche/ett Lars Leistam/est Dietrich Schinzel/ep Long-term contract Boards (LTCBs) LTCB 1 (Categories 2 & 5a) Tiziano Camporesi/ep [Convener] - Florence Ranjard/ep [Alternate] Jacques Gruber/ps - Peter Sievers/lhc [Alternate] Thomas Pettersson/est - Michel Mayoud/est [Alternate] Sue Foffano/as - Thierry Lagrange/spl [Alternate] Werner Zapf/hr (Secretary) LTCB 2 (Categories 3, 4, 5b & 5c) Véronique Paris/sl [Convener] - Fabien Perriollat/ps [Alternate] Mats Wilhelmsson/st - Véronique Fassnacht/tis [Alternate] Lucie Linssen/ep - Alfredo Placci/ep [Alternate] Patrick Geeraert/fi - John Cuthb...

  12. Annual Check-up

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Annual Check-Up Posted under Health Guides . Updated 7 January 2015. + ... I get ready for my annual medical check-up? If this is your first visit to your ...

  13. Case study: Grundtvig In-service Staff Training for Adult Education Staff

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friche, Nanna; Rasmussen, Palle

    2010-01-01

    This case study investigates the implementation in Denmark of a specific action under the European Commission's Grundtvig programme, the scheme of individual grants to adult education staff for participating in in-service training courses abroad. The emphasis in the case study is on the individual...

  14. Radiation exposure for medical staff performing quantitative coronary perfusion PET with 13N-ammonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate radiation doses to medical staff performing quantitative 13N-ammonia myocardial perfusion positron emission tomography (PET). Methods: Seventeen PET examinations were performed. Nine examinations consisted of two PET scans (one during rest and one after pharmacological stress with dipyridamole) and eight examinations consisted of three PET scans (additionally a scan after cold pressor testing). The two nuclear technologists and the physician attending the examinations were equipped with an electronic dosemeter over the chest and thermoluminescent dosimetry chips on the right index finger and wrist. Results: The highest mean equivalent dose per examination for a staff member was 453 μSv (417-490 μSv) to the right index finger, 138 μSv (127-149 μSv) to the right wrist and 13±0.8 μSv to the chest. Conclusions: Myocardial perfusion PET with 13N-ammonia exposes the staff to radiation doses that are comparable to doses from 18F-fluoro-deoxy-glucose scans and the annual doses are well within the recommended upper limits for radiation workers. (authors)

  15. Pediatric patient and staff dose measurements in barium meal fluoroscopic procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filipov, D.; Schelin, H. R.; Denyak, V.; Paschuk, S. A.; Porto, L. E.; Ledesma, J. A.; Nascimento, E. X.; Legnani, A.; Andrade, M. E. A.; Khoury, H. J.

    2015-11-01

    This study investigates patient and staff dose measurements in pediatric barium meal series fluoroscopic procedures. It aims to analyze radiographic techniques, measure the air kerma-area product (PKA), and estimate the staff's eye lens, thyroid and hands equivalent doses. The procedures of 41 patients were studied, and PKA values were calculated using LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) positioned at the center of the patient's upper chest. Furthermore, LiF:Mg,Cu,P TLDs were used to estimate the equivalent doses. The results showed a discrepancy in the radiographic techniques when compared to the European Commission recommendations. Half of the results of the analyzed literature presented lower PKA and dose reference level values than the present study. The staff's equivalent doses strongly depends on the distance from the beam. A 55-cm distance can be considered satisfactory. However, a distance decrease of ~20% leads to, at least, two times higher equivalent doses. For eye lenses this dose is significantly greater than the annual limit set by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. In addition, the occupational doses were found to be much higher than in the literature. Changing the used radiographic techniques to the ones recommended by the European Communities, it is expected to achieve lower PKA values ​​and occupational doses.

  16. Patient and staff dosimetry during radiographic procedures in an intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Rosario; Moreno-Torres, Miguel; Contreras, Antonia M; Núñez, María I; Guirado, Damián; Peñas, Luis

    2015-09-01

    The performance of radiography in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) may be associated with a certain level of radiation exposure for staff and patients in the unit. Little evidence on exposure levels is available in the literature. However, healthcare professionals in the ICUs at our centre tend to leave the room during radiographic examinations, potentially compromising patient care. The objectives of this study were to quantify dose levels within the ICU and to evaluate the performance of ICU x-ray studies according to patient dose measurements. This study was conducted in the 18-bed ICU of a third-level hospital. The scattering radiation due to mobile x-ray examinations was measured by using four personal thermoluminiscent dosimeters (TLDs). The dose area product (DAP) was measured at each examination using a transmission chamber installed on the diaphragm of the x-ray equipment. Based on the TLD readings and taking account of the error margin, the annual dose to patients and staff was less than 0.6 mSv. The value given by the DAP meter for chest x-rays was 94  ±  17 mGy cm(2); this value is well below the lower limit recommended by different agencies and committees. Exposure levels were found to be extremely low and pose no apparent risk to staff or to those in beds adjacent to the patients undergoing x-ray examinations, which were correctly performed in the unit. PMID:26344655

  17. Elections for staff representatives – Join, commit and vote!

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2015-01-01

    The Staff Council is a statutory body representing collectively in the area of employment conditions all CERN staff members (MPE and MPA), as well as the pensioners, former Cernois. The Staff Council is the supreme representative body of the CERN staff and pensioners, which defines the main lines of the policy of the Staff Association. The Staff Council is composed of staff representatives (45 seats to represent staff members, and 5 for representing fellows and associate members), as well as delegates for pensioners (seven positions), designated by GAC-EPA. Every two years, the Council is renewed through elections. Concerning the 45 delegates representing staff members, all departments have a least two seats allocated, one in career paths AA to D and one in career paths E to H. This guarantees a fair distribution of seats among the various organizational units and career paths. The table below, shows the exact number of delegates per department and career paths. Staff members or fellows who want to participa...

  18. STAFF ACTIVE AND REFLECTIVE LEARNING (ARL TO ENHANCE STUDENT MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tay Sing Leong

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The Staff Active Reflective Learning (ARL is a new scheme designed to enhance student management though regular get-togethers of a group of teaching staff. It provides a platform for staff to share issues related to teaching, and seek solutions. This addresses current and future challenges faced in classroom management. The implementation of the Staff ARL is one of the recent initiatives taken under a new approach to shared learning within the School of Electronic and Info-Comm Technology. It provides a platform for mentors to facilitate in developing fellow staff members through the provision of professional support, helping existing staff to learn and grow professionally. Insights into classroom management techniques are provided for new staff to apply while waiting to attend the formal Pedagogic Certification in Technical Education (a compulsory component for all staff. The Staff ARL fosters good working relationships, as staff can ‘chill out’ and be rewarded through the enrichment of knowledge, sharpening of capabilities, building of confidence, and growth of mutual support. The scheme received good feedback as it resulted in the creation of a range of purposeful learning tools and strategies for thedevelopment of problem solving skills, reflective thinking skills and awareness of upto-date classroom situations.

  19. Beta radiation exposure of staff during and after therapies with 90Y-labelled substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radio-immuno-therapies (RITs) and peptide receptor radio-therapies (PRRTs) with 90Y-labelled compounds offer promising prospects for tumor treatment in nuclear medicine. However, when preparing and performing these therapies, which require manipulations of high activities of 90Y (>1 GBq), technicians and physicians may receive high exposures, mainly to the skin of the hands. Even non-occupationally exposed persons, such as caregivers and family members, receive external exposures in the initial period after therapy, arising from the 90Y in the patient. The local skin doses of the individual staff members, measured during RITs and PRRTs with thermoluminescence detectors fixed with tapes to the fingers, vary considerably. The exposure of staff can exceed the annual permissible dose limit of 500 mSv if radiation protection standards are low. Thus, adequate safety measures are needed. Measurements of the dose rate around patients, made using survey meters with sufficient response to beta particles, indicate that the exposure of caregivers and family members is considerably higher than previously assumed, and was dominated by primary beta radiation instead of Bremsstrahlung. Nevertheless, under normal circumstances, the annual dose limits for the public (effective dose: 1 mSv, skin dose: 50 mSv) will be complied with. (authors)

  20. RB research nuclear reactor, Annual report for 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report for 1981 includes the following: utilization of the RB reactor; accident and incidents analysis; description of the reactor equipment status; dosimetry and radiation protection; RB reactor staff; financial data. Seven Annexes to this report are concerned with: maintenance of the reactor components and equipment, including nuclear fuel, heavy water, reactor vessel, heavy water coolant circuit, experimental platforms, absorption rods; maintenance of the electric power supply system, neutron source equipment, crane; control and maintenance of ventilation and heating systems, gas and comprised gas systems, fire protection system; plan for renewal of the reactor components; contents of the RB reactor safety report; reactor staff; review of measured radiation doses; experimental methods; training of the staff; and financial report

  1. Obtaining your annual internal taxation certificate

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    (cf. Article R IV 2.04 of the Staff Regulations) Your annual internal taxation certificate will state the taxable amount of your CERN remuneration, payments and other financial benefits and the amount of tax levied by the Organization during the previous financial year. In France, your tax return must be accompanied by this certificate. Current Members of the Personnel (including Members of the Personnel participating in a pre-retirement programme): - You will receive an e-mail containing a link to your printable annual certificate, which will be stored together with your pay and leave statements (e-Payslips). - You can also access your annual certificate via https://hrt.cern.ch (open 'My Payslips' at the bottom of the main menu.) - If you experience any technical difficulties in accessing your annual certificate (e.g. invalid AIS login or password), please contact CERN's AIS support team at ais.support@cern.ch. Former Members of the Personnel:- If you remember your AIS login and password, you can acc...

  2. Radioprotection protocol hospital staff for the care of patients treated with 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the present article is to start giving some answers to the inquiries of community about one of the peaceful uses of the nuclear energy which is the use of radiation in the diagnosis and therapy of unseal sources. The administrative staff from the Nuclear Medicine Service supplies the first answers to patients and their relatives or even to staff working in other hospital services. Not only information about the studies performed but also answers to clear doubts or worries in connection with the use of such radiation during the diagnosis or therapy. Regarding the worries arisen within the Nurses department in charge of the care of patients under treatment with 131I about the basic safety standards for protection against ionizing radiation, the conditions of facilities were checked and also regulations and ways of working of the staff caring for the said patients. The result was used in the annual doses calculation received by the staff in the present conditions of work. In order to estimate dose which may be received by nurses twenty four patient were considered, with an administered average activity of 150 mCi (5550MBq). Data provided by the Nuclear Medicine Service. Adopting the model described in the ICRP N53 'Radiation Dose to Patient from Radiopharmaceutical', the annual dose received by the staff of nurses is obtained. It results to be equivalent to receiving the dose of 18 thorax x-rays. This value is below the limit settled down by the ARN applied for general public. This work tries to palliate the great ignorance as regards radiation safety, not only concerning patients and relatives, but also the nurses who are daily dealing with patients under treatment of unseal sources. This methodology allows evaluating current working conditions, as well as possible future actions or recommendations in order to decrease the personnel 's dose. A written protocol was carried out according to the international regulations regarding this type of therapy

  3. Dose assessment of medical staff taking care of patients treated with 131I due to the intake of 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: Legislation requires that patient receiving 131I in activities greater than 550MBq have to be hospitalized in special closed department. Medical staff taking care of these patients can be exposed to external irradiation and internal contamination with 131I. The aim of this study was to assess the annual effective dose of medical staff taking care of patients treated with 131I due to the occupational intake of 131I. Material - Medical Staff: 6 nurses took care of 6 patients (placed into two rooms) treated with 131I in activities between 550 and 1100 MBq. 131I was normally delivered to patients once per week. After patients received 131I nurses were in contact with patients in average 4 hours per day, 4 days per week. Methods: Direct Method - whole body counting (WBC) of staff was performed daily after they finished their work and indirect method - determination of air 131I concentration in patient's rooms (AC) were used to assess the intake of 131I by staff. Measurements were done in winter period.Results and Dose Assessment: Results of measurements of medical staff and determination of 131I air concentration are presented. Average daily 131I intake of staff assessed from WBC results was 315 Bq; average daily 131I air concentration for first four days was 35 Bq/m3. Assessment of annual effective dose due to the internal contamination (realistic approach): - Direct method: 315 Bq/day x 208 days/year x 7,6 Sv/Bq x 10-9 = 0,498 mSv/year. - Indirect method: 35 Bq/m3 x 1,5 m3/hour x 832 hours/year x 7,6 Sv/Bq x 10-9 = 0,332 mSv/year. Conclusion: Medical staff taking care of patients treated with 131I received effective dose less than 0,5 mSv/year due to the intake of 131I. In the some time period they received 1,65 to 2,24 mSv due to the exposure to the external radiation coming from patients treated with 131I

  4. Environmental Measurements Laboratory, annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1995 and serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Manager and staff of the Chicago Operations Office, and our colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven research program areas: (1) Environmental Radiation and Radioactivity; (2) Radiation Transport and Dosimetry; (3) Environmental Radon, Thoron, and Related Aerosols; (4) Atmospheric and Surface Pollutant Studies Related to Global Climate Change; (5) Atmospheric Chemistry; and (6) Metrology, Consultation, and Emergency Response Environmental Management The mission of EML is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues, and related national security issues

  5. Environmental Measurements Laboratory 1994 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1994 and it serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the manager and staff of the Chicago Field Office, and the authors colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven general program areas: environmental radiation and radioactivity; radiation transport and dosimetry; environmental radon, thoron, and related aerosols; atmospheric and surface pollutant studies related to global climate change; atmospheric chemistry; metrology, consultation, and emergency response; environmental management. EML's mission is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants, and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues and related national security issues

  6. Environmental Measurements Laboratory, annual report 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krey, P.W.; Heit, M. [eds.

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) for the calendar year 1995 and serves as an annual report to the Director of the Office of Energy Research (ER), the Associate Director and staff of the Office of Health and Environmental Research (OHER), the Manager and staff of the Chicago Operations Office, and our colleagues. Emphasized are the progress and accomplishments of the year, rather than future plans or expectations. The technical summaries are grouped according to the following seven research program areas: (1) Environmental Radiation and Radioactivity; (2) Radiation Transport and Dosimetry; (3) Environmental Radon, Thoron, and Related Aerosols; (4) Atmospheric and Surface Pollutant Studies Related to Global Climate Change; (5) Atmospheric Chemistry; and (6) Metrology, Consultation, and Emergency Response Environmental Management The mission of EML is to address important scientific questions concerning human health and environmental impacts. Through its multidisciplinary staff, EML conducts experimental and theoretical research on radioactive and other energy-related pollutants and provides DOE and other federal agencies with the in-house capability to respond effectively and efficiently with regard to quality assurance activities, environmental issues, and related national security issues.

  7. Promotion and development of creativity among staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.O. Khizhnyak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article. The main purpose of this paper is to analyze the reasons for the lack of creative thinking among specialists, possible ways of its development, using one integrated methodology rather than many currently existing approaches.The results of the analysis. The authors investigated existing creativity development methods of staff and made an integrated plan, adapted to the specifics of Ukrainian enterprises. Three steps to stimulate creativity are proposed.First stage. Organization`s development evaluation. It is necessary for understanding what the workers do in the company, the opportunity to develop creativity, what leadership style is in this organization today. Thus, the characteristics of the company can determine which of the six types of companies through the spiral dynamics it belongs.Second stage. Appropriate atmosphere creating. When you know what is happening in the company, you can begin the change. It is known that you need a special atmosphere for ideas appearing. Creative director assumes the creation of such atmosphere and its support. There are six factors that contribute to the creative atmosphere in the company.Third stage. Work motivation. Creative relation to certain activities consists of three elements: competence, ability and flexibility to non-standard thinking. Manager can influence first two components, but this is the way of great investments and much time. Measures aimed at increasing internal motivation provide greater effect. For it manager has four levels: 1 tasks complexity;2 freedom degree; 3 group work; 4 level of incentives and the way of organizational support.In this study the authors found that for development and promotion of creative thinking among staff, a manager has to give them freedom to act, to stimulate their work by clarifying the ultimate goal and the importance of its implementation. He should encourage the formation of creative solutions. Creative manager should:create an

  8. Staff Training for Nanoindustry in Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidorov Sergey Grigoryevich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nanotechnology industry represents such a direction of the development of science, technologies and industries by means of which Russia will be able to achieve advanced positions in the world. For the last decade the necessary regulatory base for nanotech industry development was created in the country, beginning with the concept of nanotechnological works, and the strategy of nanotech industry development, and finishing by the program of nanotech industry development in Russia till 2015. The special place is allocated for education in the field of nanotechnologies and nanomaterials. The system of staff training for nanotech industry is developing very quickly. The departments of nanotechnologies are established almost in all leading higher education institutions of Russia, the institutes of scientific and educational centers as well as the centers of collective use are introduced in the country, the national nanotechnological network is functioning. RUSNANO State Corporation of Nanotechnologies makes significant contribution to the training of innovation staff. The corporation is planning to create at least 100 educational programs of staff training and retraining for the needs of nanotech industry. The fund of infrastructure and educational programs was established in RUSNANO which in 2012 launched the project on creation of training system in the field of nanotechnology in the e-Learning mode. In 2013 the fund created the autonomous non-profit organization “Electronic Education for Nanotech Industry” (“eNano” which became the leading developer of innovative branch educational resources and the operator on rendering educational services for nanotech industry. Since 2011 in RUSNANO there is a School League which set for itself the task to make the contribution to improvement of the situation in teaching naturalscience disciplines at schools. At the same time, according to the results of students enrolment in Russia in 2011-2014, the

  9. An investigation of staff attitudes towards challenging behaviour in intellectually disabled offenders: exploring the influence of staff characteristics and behavioural attributions

    OpenAIRE

    Rooney, Donna Louise

    2010-01-01

    Background: There is little research on staff attitudes towards Intellectually Disabled (ID) offenders, particularly their attitudes towards challenging behaviour. Past research from ID and offender populations indicate that staff characteristics such as age, gender, experience, training and qualification may influence the attributions staff make about challenging behaviour. Additionally both staff characteristics and attributions may influence staffs‟ emotional reactions. Method: 91 staff...

  10. Transforming Spaces and Identities: The Contributions of Professional Staff to Learning Spaces in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Carroll

    2012-01-01

    Staff are a university's key resource. Typically, research has concentrated on the contribution of academic staff, and has largely overlooked the crucial role of professional staff. However, recently there has been an increase in research by professional staff, about professional staff. In Australia, professional staff comprise more than half the…

  11. RB research nuclear reactor, Annual report for 1984, I - III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report for 1984 contains 3 parts. Part one includes the following: description of the reactor, exploitation possibilities of the reactor, reactor operation, accident and incidents analysis; reactor equipment and components; dosimetry and radiation protection; RB reactor staff and financial data. Part two of this report is devoted to maintenance and control of reactor components, electronic and electric equipment as well as auxiliary systems. Part three describes reactor exploitation; development of experimental methods; utilization of the reactor as a radiation source

  12. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-10-01

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  13. Annual Report of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is the collection of short communications being the review of the scientific activity of Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology - Warsaw in 1997. The papers are gathered in several branches as follows: radiation chemistry and physics; radiochemistry, stable isotopes, nuclear analytical methods, chemistry in general; radiobiology; nuclear technologies and methods. The annual report of INCT-1997 contains also the general information about INCT as well as the full list of scientific papers being published by the staff in 1997

  14. Staff eye doses in a large medical centre in Saudi Arabia: are they meeting the new ICRP recommendations?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 5-y retrospective analysis of the cardiology staff eye doses was performed on 34 staff from different categories (cardiologists, nurses and technologists) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. KFSHRC is a tertiary medical centre with 800-bed capacity having more than 5000 cardiac catheterisation procedures performed annually. The aim of the study is to derive staff doses to the lens of the eyes using the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07) values from the annual TLD dose report for the years 2008-2012 and determine the category of staff with high estimated eye doses. The study also aims to investigate the causes for high doses and recommend dose-reduction techniques. The dose to the lens of the eye was estimated by using the ratio Hp(0.07)slab/Hlens of 1.1 where Hp(0.07) values are the reported doses read from TLD badge worn at the collar level. The average annual eye dose of each category for the 5-y monitoring period was determined. Cardiologists tend to receive higher doses than the nurses by a factor of 2-4 and can exceed 5 mSv y-1. No correlation exists between the eye doses of nurses and the cardiologists. There is a need to use a conversion coefficient in terms of eye lens dose per dose-area product for faster estimation of eye lens doses. However, there is a limitation on the use of the conversion coefficient because it will depend on the clinical procedure and the X-ray tube angulation. Further investigation on this limitation is needed. (authors)

  15. Staff eye doses in a large medical centre in Saudi Arabia: are they meeting the new ICRP recommendations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N; Lobriguito, Aida M; Al-Gain, Ibrahim

    2015-07-01

    A 5-y retrospective analysis of the cardiology staff eye doses was performed on 34 staff from different categories (cardiologists, nurses and technologists) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. KFSHRC is a tertiary medical centre with 800-bed capacity having more than 5000 cardiac catheterisation procedures performed annually. The aim of the study is to derive staff doses to the lens of the eyes using the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07) values from the annual TLD dose report for the years 2008-2012 and determine the category of staff with high estimated eye doses. The study also aims to investigate the causes for high doses and recommend dose-reduction techniques. The dose to the lens of the eye was estimated by using the ratio Hp(0.07)slab/Hlens of 1.1 where Hp(0.07) values are the reported doses read from TLD badge worn at the collar level. The average annual eye dose of each category for the 5-y monitoring period was determined. Cardiologists tend to receive higher doses than the nurses by a factor of 2-4 and can exceed 5 mSv y(-1). No correlation exists between the eye doses of nurses and the cardiologists. There is a need to use a conversion coefficient in terms of eye lens dose per dose-area product for faster estimation of eye lens doses. However, there is a limitation on the use of the conversion coefficient because it will depend on the clinical procedure and the X-ray tube angulation. Further investigation on this limitation is needed. PMID:25848104

  16. The palliative care needs of ethnic minority patients: staff perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diver, Fiona; Molassiotis, Alexander; Weeks, Les

    2003-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess palliative care staff's perceptions of multicultural care provision and explore the barriers and facilitators to culturally sensitive care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews with five palliative care staff were conducted. Staff showed awareness of inter-cultural diversity and the importance of individualized care. It also became apparent that staff did not possess ethnocentric attitudes. Facilitators of multicultural care that emerged from the data included training, learning from experience, the use of culturally specific literature and resources, and effective communication channels in the team. However, barriers were present, including limited interpreting services, and some staff and other patients' negative behaviours towards ethnic minority patients. The findings lead to recommendations for better resourcing and expansion of interpreting services, and for more training, based on staff's desire for limited culturally specific knowledge in sensitive combination with an individualized care philosophy. PMID:12968120

  17. Identifying needs to develop a PBL staff development program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prarthana Coffin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Staff development is a crucial element for educational intervention. Recognizing the importance of staff development, this study aims to pin-point suitable methodologies in developing a Problem-Based Learning (PBL academic staff development program for a higher education institute where PBL has become an intervention alternative. The study aims to answer the following research questions 1 how can university academic staff be assisted to acquire pedagogical competences for an initiative of the implementation of PBL curriculum? 2 What kinds of support do university academic staff need in order to maintain PBL implementation? Through a combination of a literature review, interviews with 6 PBL experts which emphasize the importance of PBL facilitators, and document analysis of reflection notes from 18 trainees of a PBL workshop, this study will produce a guideline in developing a PBL Academic Staff Development Program for an institute wishes to implement and retain PBL as the education strategy.

  18. Education in geriatric medicine for community hospital staff.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Hanlon, Shane

    2010-12-01

    Community hospitals provide many services for older people. They are mainly managed by nursing staff, with some specialist input. Little is known about education provided in these facilities. Most education in geriatric medicine is provided in hospitals, despite most elderly care being provided in the community. The authors surveyed senior nursing staff in Irish community hospitals to examine this area in more detail. Staff in all 18hospitals in the Health Service Executive (South) area were invited to participate. The response rate was 100%. Sixteen of the 18 respondents (89%) felt staff did not have enough education in geriatric medicine. Just over half of hospitals had regular staff education sessions in the area, with a minority of sessions led by a geriatrician, and none by GPs. Geriatrician visits were valued, but were requested only every 1-3 months. Staff identified challenging behaviour and dementia care as the areas that posed most difficulty.

  19. THE STAFF ASSOCIATION'S INTERNAL COMMISSIONS A source of innovative ideas

    CERN Multimedia

    STAFF ASSOCIATION

    2010-01-01

    In the heart of the Staff Association, internal commissions carry out preparatory work which is indispensable for productive discussions in Staff Council and Executive Committee meetings. These working groups, composed of staff delegates and interested staff members, are think tanks for all subjects in the area assigned to them. Five commissions are active in 2010 : The “In-Form-Action” Commission develops a communication strategy (Information), organizes staff mobilization and action (Action) and promotes delegate training (Formation [training]), in order to enhance, support and professionalize the activities of the Staff Association. The Commission for “Employment Conditions” deals with remuneration, the advancement system, working hours, recruitment, and retention, among other things. It gives its opinion on proposals by the Management or elaborates its own proposals. The Commission for “Health and Safety” examines all aspec...

  20. Survey of how staff commute to work

    CERN Multimedia

    2014-01-01

    A survey was initiated by the Canton of Geneva (Direction Générale des Transports) and the Swiss Permanent Mission to the United Nations, and is aimed at better understanding how staff in International Organisations commute to/from work so as to better plan future works (road access, public transport, etc.). The ILO, WHO, UNAIDs, Global Fund, IFRC, CERN and UNOG are taking part in this important survey.   People living in Switzerland or France are invited to respond to this survey. The purpose of this survey is to better understand: - your commuting habits, - your willingness to explore alternative commuting options, - your expectations and needs. All data provided to this external company (www.mobilidee.ch) will be kept confidential and will only be used for this particular study. CERN has received all guarantees of confidentiality from this company. Many thanks for your collaboration! GS Department

  1. Data Intelligence Training for Library Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine de Smaele

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Data Intelligence 4 Librarians course was developed by 3TU.Datacentrum at the end of 2011 to provide online resources and training for digital preservation practitioners, specifically for library staff. The course objectives are to transfer and exchange knowledge about data management, and to provide participants with the skills required to advise researchers or research groups on efficient and effective ways of adding value to their data. The paper describes the process of creating the course, the methodology and the results of the first pilot, which took place from February to June 2012. It also demonstrates the choices made during the design process and discusses the implications of the evaluation of the pilot course for further development: in particular, how the course might be expanded to more disciplines and other data repositories.

  2. G. N. Rassam Joins AGU Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghassan N. Rassam joined the AGU staff today, assuming the dual roles of Division Director for Public Information and Marketing and of Special Assistant for Nonprint Publications. He comes to AGU from the American Geological Institute, where he has been chief editor and assistant director of the GeoRef Information System.As Director of Public Information and Marketing, Rassam will head one of AGU's five divisions. He will have under his purview the Public Information Department and the Promotion and Sales Department. The Public Information Department produces Eos and also has the responsibility for press relations, including the preparation of news releases and the operation of press rooms at meetings. These activities are critical to the implementation of AGU's public education and public affairs initiatives, as well as to the central role of AGU in promoting the unity of geophysics.

  3. AMENDMENTS TO THE STAFF RULES AND REGULATIONS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    The Staff Rules and Regulations in force since 1 January 1996 are modified as follows as from : 1 January 2001 Scale of basic salaries and scale of basic stipends (Annex R A 1 and Annex R A 2 respectively). These scales include the correction approved in June 2001 of the discrepancy of 0.3% in the net salary adjustment on 1 January 2001. Family Allowance and Child Allowance (Annex R A 4). Reimbursement of education fees (Article R A 8.01) for the academic year 2000/2001, i.e. with effect from 1 September 2000. Periodic reviews of the financial conditions of members of the personel (Annex A1). 1 July 2001 Various drafting amendments adopted in order to ensure greater coherence between the texts, the procedures and actual practice. 1 September 2001 Implementation of the new career structure. Copies of these updates are available in the divisional secretariats.

  4. A business focus for technical support staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has become the norm for nuclear power plants to be operated with a focus on achieving performance goals for safety and reliability of production. However, the business goal has to include the control of costs to ensure success in a competitive power market. While business managers accept that the three elements of production, safety and cost control are compatible, technical staff are often skeptical. The purpose of this paper is to examine the skepticisms and to give the technical basis for nuclear professionals' support in controlling the costs of production and safety. The management of financial risk and safety risk is related to selected performance areas to emphasize the importance of a professional approach to technical support work. (author)

  5. An analysis of obituaries in staff magazines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heynderickx, Priscilla C; Dieltjens, Sylvain M

    2016-01-01

    In the literature, extensive attention is given to the content, structure, and style of obituaries in newspapers. Analyses of the demise of colleagues in internal business communications are however nonexistent. This article discusses a bottom-up analysis of 150 obituaries published in Flemish staff magazines--obituaries that mostly focus on the deceased's career and professional qualities. Following analysis, the data were divided in obituaries that are continuous texts and obituaries with a letter format. The differences between the two types lie at different levels: format, content, structure, and language use. Obituaries with a letter format are characterized and determined by three paradoxes: the sender-receiver paradox, life-death paradox, and happiness-sadness paradox. PMID:26073609

  6. Joint Institute for Nanoscience Annual Report 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baer, Donald R.; Campbell, Charles

    2004-02-01

    The Joint Institute for Nanoscience (JIN) is a cooperative venture of the University of Washington and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to encourage and enhance high-impact and high-quality nanoscience and nanotechnology of all types. This first annual report for the JIN summarizes activities beginning in 2001 and ending at the close of fiscal year 2003 and therefore represents somewhat less than two years of activities. Major portions of the JIN resources are dedicated to funding graduate students and postdoctoral research associates to perform research in collaborations jointly directed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) staff scientists and University of Washington (UW) professors. These fellowships were awarded on the basis of applications that included research proposals. JIN co-sponsors an annual Nanoscale Science and Technology Workshop held in Seattle. In addition to involving PNNL staff in various UW nanoscience courses and seminars, a National Science Foundation grant Development of UW-PNL Collaborative Curriculums in Nano-Science and Technology has allowed the development of three intensive short courses that are taught by UW faculty, PNNL staff, and faculty from other institutions, including Washington State University, the University of Idaho, Stanford University, and the University of Alaska. The initial JIN agreement recognized that expansion of cooperation beyond UW and PNNL would be highly valuable. Starting in early 2003, efforts were initiated to form a regional communication link called the Northwest Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Network (N₄). In concept, N₄ is a tool to encourage communication and help identify regional resources and nanoscience and technology activities.

  7. Democratic Republic of the Congo; Review of the 2006 Staff-Monitored Program and a New Staff-Monitored Program for 2007: Staff Report; Staff Statement; Statement by the Executive Director for the Democratic Republic of the Congo

    OpenAIRE

    International Monetary Fund

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the 2006 Staff-Monitored Program (SMP) and a New Staff-Monitored Program for 2007 for the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Most quantitative and structural benchmarks under the SMP for April–December 2006 were not met; nevertheless, the SMP helped prevent major financial instability during the protracted electoral period. Cognizant of the need to reestablish macroeconomic stability, the government agreed on a policy framework for 2007 to be monitored by the IMF staff. Sa...

  8. Radiation Protection of Patients and Staff in Interventional Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While radiation risks in most diagnostic radiological procedures (primarily risk of cancer) are uncertain and speculative, the radiation effects in interventional procedures have been documented both in patients and in staff. Every action to protect patients will result in a proportionate effect on staff protection, but the reverse is not true. When protection methods and tools are employed, the safety of patients and staff can be achieved. (author)

  9. Early Contributions of “Staff Papers” to International Economics

    OpenAIRE

    Mario I. Blejer; Mohsin S. Khan; Masson, Paul R.

    1995-01-01

    Staff Papers has, since its inception in 1950, been an important vehicle for the dissemination of research done by staff of the IMF. The paper discusses three areas in which articles published in Staff Papers up until the 1970s made major contributions to the literature in international economics. The areas covered are: first, the absorption approach and the monetary theory of the balance of payments; second, the Mundell-Fleming model; and third, foreign trade modeling. The nature of the cont...

  10. Perinatal staff perceptions of safety and quality in their service

    OpenAIRE

    Sinni, Suzanne V; Wallace, Euan M; Cross, Wendy M

    2014-01-01

    Background Ensuring safe and appropriate service delivery is central to a high quality maternity service. With this in mind, over recent years much attention has been given to the development of evidence-based clinical guidelines, staff education and risk reporting systems. Less attention has been given to assessing staff perceptions of a service’s safety and quality and what factors may influence that. In this study we set out to assess staff perceptions of safety and quality of a maternity ...

  11. The relationship between managerial leadership behaviors and staff nurse retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Carol

    2004-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to describe perceptions of managerial leadership behaviors associated with staff nurse turnover and to compare nurse manager leadership behaviors as perceived by managers and their staff nurses. Effective leadership styles among nurse managers have been associated with staff nurse job satisfaction and retention. Although both transformational and transactional leadership styles have been described as effective, it is unclear which nurse manager leadership behaviors contribute most to staff nurse retention. This descriptive, correlational study was conducted at a 465-bed community hospital in the northeastern United States. All staff nurses and nurse managers employed in both ambulatory and acute care nursing units were invited to participate in the study. The study sample comprised 79 staff nurses and 10 nurse managers, who completed demographic forms and the 45-item Multifactor Leadership Questionnaire, which measures 12 dimensions of leadership style. Data were collected from July through September 2003. Active management by exception as perceived by staff nurses was the only managerial leadership style associated with staff nurse turnover (r = .26, p = .03). Compared with the perceptions among their staff nurses, nurse managers consistently perceived that they demonstrated a higher mean frequency of transformational leadership behaviors. The transactional leadership style of active management by exception not only appeared to be a deterrent to staff nurse retention but also reflected leadership perceptions among staff nurses who work evening and night shifts. This study also provides further evidence regarding a trend in which nurse managers and staff nurses do not concur on the frequency of transformational leadership behaviors but do demonstrate agreement on the frequency of transactional leadership behaviors. PMID:15898399

  12. Didactic Competencies among Teaching Staff of Universities in Kenya

    OpenAIRE

    Florah Katanu Karimi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the levels and types of didactic competencies that exist among teaching staff in universities in Kenya, giving recognition to curriculum development, pedagogical attributes and quality assurance competencies. The study was carried out in two phases among two samples of the teaching staff population. The first sample consisted of 229 randomly sampled teaching staff from three public chartered universities in Kenya while the second sample consisted of 46 t...

  13. TEACHING STAFF' ATTITUDE TOWARD ICT: IS GENDER A FACTOR?

    OpenAIRE

    ELSAADANI, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    Current research seeks to understand weather gender is a factor that should be considered when considering teaching staff' attitude toward Information and Communication Technology (ICT). Survey methodology is facilitated through the use of the questionnaires. The survey domain is a random sampling of teaching staff in Egyptian higher education institutions (HEI). The population for this study was 500 full-time Faculty staff, only 412 returned and complete questionnaires are considered as the ...

  14. Experiences of nursing staff on psychiatric care of depressed patients

    OpenAIRE

    Suutarinen, Kreetta-Maija

    2012-01-01

    The thesis researched the views and experiences of nursing staff of psychiatric special care ward on psychiatric care of depressed patients. Because caring is patient/client oriented profession, it is essential to include patients and nursing staff in the development work. This assumption was basis for the thesis. The thesis aimed to add knowledge on the views of the nursing staff and to show how this knowledge can be used in development of psychiatric care. The thesis also pursue...

  15. Breastfeeding Attitudes of WIC Staff: A Descriptive Study

    OpenAIRE

    Reifsnider, Elizabeth; Gill, Sara; Villarreal, Patty; Tinkle, Mindy B.

    2003-01-01

    A sample of staff members from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC program) were interviewed about breastfeeding and their perceptions of WIC recipients' views on breastfeeding. WIC staff members universally supported breastfeeding and expressed desires for more linkages between WIC agencies and perinatal education specialists in childbirth education classes, as well as with mothers during their postpartum hospital stay. The WIC staff members in thi...

  16. Staff development planning in an academic health sciences library*

    OpenAIRE

    Hartman, Linda M.; Abromitis, Rebecca A.; Kuller, Alice B.; Epstein, Barbara A.

    2005-01-01

    Objective: A staff development committee (SDC) was convened to implement staff development opportunities for an academic health sciences library system comprised of three separate facilities. The charge for the SDC was to: (1) develop programs to enhance workplace skills and personal growth, (2) communicate the availability of existing programs at the university and medical center, and (3) encourage the staff to participate in these opportunities.

  17. Annual report for 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report falls under the following headings: fusion research experiments; the JET project; supporting studies; theoretical plasma physics, computational physics and computing; fusion reactor studies; engineering and technology; commercial programmes; external relations; staff, finance and services. (U.K.)

  18. Staff planning for operating rooms with different surgical services lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Monica C; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-06-01

    We present a two-phase model for a staff planning problem in a surgical department. We consider the setting where staff, in particular nurse circulators and surgical scrub technicians, are assigned to one of different service lines, and while they can be 'pooled' and temporally assigned to other service line if needed, these re-assignments should belimited. In Phase I, we decide on the number of staff hours to budget for each service line, considering policies limiting staff pooling and overtime, and different demand scenarios. In Phase II, we determine how these budgeted staff hours should be allocated across potential work days and shifts, given estimated staff requirements and shift-related scheduling restrictions. We propose a heuristic to speed the model's Phase II solution time. We implement the model using a hospital's surgical data and compare the model's results with the hospital's current practices. Using a simulation model for the surgical operations, we find that our two-phase model reduces the delays caused by staff unavailability as well as staff pooling, without increasing the workforce size. Finally, we briefly describe a decision-support tool we developed with the objective of fine-tuning staff planning decisions. PMID:25366968

  19. Job Dissatisfaction and Its Related Factors among Laboratory Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nehzat FADAEI

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of job dissatisfaction, and to ascertain the association between job strain and job dissatisfaction and socio-demographic and occupational factors among laboratory staff of Universiti Putra Malaysia (UPM.Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted among 450 research laboratory staff in 10 faculties and 8 institutes of Universiti Putra Malaysia. Probability appropriate to size sampling and simple random sampling method were used and data were collected via Job content Questionnaire (JCQ from September 2012 to February 2013. SPSS (version 20.0 software was used for data analysis.Results: A total of 285 laboratory staff with at least one year job tenure participated in this study (Response rate: 91.3%. The finding revealed that 47% of laboratory staff reported job dissatisfaction. The results of this survey showed laboratory staffs with age 35, and less were two-fold more likely to report job dissatisfaction than the older staff (adjusted OR= 2.108, 95% CI: 1.241- 3.582. Laboratory staffs with higher toxic exposures 2 times more likely to report job dissatisfaction (adjusted OR= 1.887, 95% CI: 1.062-3.353.Conclusion: There is a need to have training plans to increase the knowledge on toxic exposures among younger laboratory staff, which may be helpful to reduce job dissatisfaction among them. Keywords:  Job dissatisfaction, Laboratory staff, JCQ, UPM

  20. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC`s Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff`s current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff`s uses of PRA.

  1. Integrating New Technical Staff: Implications for Acquiring New Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Denis M. S.; Allen, Thomas J. (Thomas John), 1931-

    1982-01-01

    Hiring new staff in R&D provides an important opportunity for a firm to acquire new technological knowledge. It also takes a considerable length of time before new R&D staff become fully integrated into the organization. This study compares the communication patterns of new and veteran R&D staff as a function of their work activities. The results suggest that both the benefits and problems in the hiring and integration of new R&D staff is moderated by the type of research, development or tech...

  2. Staff Scheduling within the Retail Business in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leedgaard, Jesper; Mortensen, Kim H.; Larsen, Allan;

    2002-01-01

    Staff Scheduling within the retail business deals with the assignment of employees such as shop assistants to work tasks so that the right number of employees are available at any given times and the total staff costs are minimized. In this paper the retail staff scheduling problem is formulated as...... a Mixed Integer Problem. The retail staff scheduling problem is solved using the metaheuristic {\\$\\backslash\\$it Simulated Annealing}. The heuristic is implemented by modifying the original MIP model. Some of the constraints defined in the MIP are relaxed, entered into the objective function and...

  3. THE MANY ROLES OF THE CERN STAFF ASSOCIATION

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2011-01-01

    The Staff Association represents all staff Article VII 1.01 of the Staff Rules & Regulations (SR&R) stipulates that “[…] the relations between the Director-General and the personnel shall be established either on an individual basis or on a collective basis with the Staff Association as intermediary.” The role of the Staff Association delegates as representatives of all staff of the Organization before the Director-General and Member States is demonstrated by its participation in different joint committees defined in the SR&R and by TREF. This role was particularly visible in 2009 and 2010 with demonstrations of between one and two thousand participants, first for our Pension Fund in December 2009 and March 2010, then for basic research in August 2010. The presence of the Staff Association was also evident with its public meetings, staff votes in the framework of the 2010 five-yearly review, and other actions. But the Staff Association is also The CERN Nu...

  4. Innovative public library services - staff-less or staff-intensive?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannsen, Carl Gustav Viggo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose – Several recent library innovations seem to make professional and clerical staff superfluous such as automated loan and delivery equipment, staff-less libraries open in 80 hours a week, and virtual services, enabling users to search the library catalogue and make reservations of library ...... contains a first-hand report on the results of a recent (2011-2012) unique, full-scale, Danish public library development project, investigating the experiences with pro-active and guest-customer relationships within a public library setting........ Design/methodology/approach – The paper is based on the author's evaluations of two recent Danish library development projects. Both evaluations are based on empirical data and apply quantitative (questionnaires) as well as qualitative (interviews, observations) methods. Findings – The findings reveal...

  5. Occupational exposure and mistakes in the wearing of film badges in computed tomography staff (1990–2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the magnitude of occupational radiation dose and errors in film badge usage by computed tomography (CT) staff over a 20-year period (1990–2009). Materials and methods: The magnitude of occupational radiation dose and errors in film badge use between 1990 and 2009 were investigated by collecting and analyzing the associated film badge reports. A total of 95 film badge reports containing approximately 400 occupational doses of CT staff were investigated. Results: The majority (83%) of the CT staff received a radiation dose 0.05 mSv used the same film badge when performing other X-ray imaging procedures (e.g. angiography). Within this second group the range and mean value of the annual average effective dose was 0.15–1.55 mSv and 0.73 mSv, respectively. The most common errors were not returning the film badge or returning it later than the due date. Conclusion: In spite of an annual increase in the number of patients undergoing radiological procedures, within the 83% of the radiation workers identified during the period evaluated, there has been a decrease in the frequency of errors. This decrease has occurred whilst maintaining a radiation dose <0.05 mSv. The results indicate that occupational radiation protection has improved. The improvement is considered to result from improved management and systems and protocols alterations

  6. Training the staff of the regulatory body for nuclear facilities: A competency framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    only a small staff are examples of training programmes, and their development, for individual staff members. Maintaining the qualification and competence of regulatory staff would also be addressed.To respond to the above requests and recommendations, the purpose of this technical document is to provide guidance on training and qualification based on the competency framework required for the regulatory body to perform its functions. The main aim is to support the Regulatory Bodies supervising nuclear facilities such as nuclear power plants and research reactors. To support regulatory training activities in nuclear installation safety, the IAEA has also developed two standardized training courses to provide basic knowledge needed for work in nuclear safety. A basic professional training course on nuclear safety was organized for the first time in 1999 in Saclay, France, in English. In 2000, the course was provided in Romania, in English, and in Brazil, in Spanish. In 2001, the course was organized as a six-week course in Saclay, France for the European countries and in Argonne, USA, for the Asian countries. For the course, a textbook was developed and used that included test questions to support and control learning. At the next level of specialized knowledge, a training course on regulatory control of nuclear power plants, aimed at new staff members in regulatory organizations with varying experience levels, has been organized in Europe on an annual basis from 1995 to 2001 in the framework of the Department of Technical Co-operation. A textbook has also been developed and used for this training course

  7. Staff retention and recruitment: "one great department".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casady, Wanda M; Dowd, Terry A

    2002-01-01

    The projected demand for healthcare workers during the next ten years has been the impetus for many organizations to develop more creative strategies to ensure adequate staffing levels in the future. In order to keep pace with service demands, the diagnostic imaging department at Valley Lutheran Medical Center (VLMC) in Mesa, Ariz., has been growing as well. Since November of 1999, the number of core FTEs increased from 54.5 to 96. As a result, efforts to retain the current employees became just as critical as efforts to recruit staff for the new positions that were created to support the expanded services. In February 2001, an AHRA seminar was held in Phoenix, which included a day-long session called "Workforce 2001: Recruitment, Selection, Retention of Quality Employees." The presenter, Clint Maun, C.S.P., emphasized the need to provide "passionate orientation" for new employees, encouraged team-based selection of new employees, and reminded the audience that new employees decide within the first three days whether or not they will stay with an organization, regardless of how long it actually takes to leave. Maun also described to the group a model for creating team effort called "One Great Unit" (OGU), which uses a "12-Week Plan" for engaging staff. For the diagnostic imaging department at VLMC, this concept was remodeled so that, instead of focusing on one modality (unit) in the department, the focus was on the whole department. The first step to creating "One Great Department" was to establish an Oversight Committee that would help define the focus of the 12-Week Teams. Five, front-line employees were recruited who represented a cross-section of the imaging department. To assist in the implementation, the director of learning and innovation at VLMC agreed to facilitate the first two meetings. The first 12-Week Team was called together in May 2001. The operational objective addressed was "improving communication inter- and intra-departmentally." Each member

  8. The Clinical Supervision Cycle: A Component of Staff Development Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Susan R.; Koskela, Ruth A.

    Findings are reported from a statewide survey of middle and junior high schools in Wisconsin. The study had two major purposes: (1) to determine the extent to which the clinical supervision cycle was a component of staff development programs; and (2) to identify characteristics of existing clinical supervision practices within staff development…

  9. 45 CFR 701.13 - Staff organization and functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Employment Opportunity Program; and conducts agency liaison with the Executive Office of the President, the... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff organization and functions. 701.13 Section... ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.13 Staff organization and...

  10. Attitudes of Spanish University Teaching Staff to Quality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barandiaran-Galdos, Marta; Barrenetxea-Ayesta, Miren; Cardona-Rodriguez, Antonio; Mijangos-Del-Campo, Juan Jose; Olaskoaga-Larrauri, Jon

    2012-01-01

    This article sets out to investigate the notions Spanish university teaching staff have of quality in education, on the assumption that those notions give a reliable picture of the attitudes of teaching staff towards education policy design and university management. The paper takes an empirical approach, collecting opinions telematically via a…

  11. Quality Assurance of Assessment and Moderation Discourses Involving Sessional Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grainger, Peter; Adie, Lenore; Weir, Katie

    2016-01-01

    Quality assurance is a major agenda in tertiary education. The casualisation of academic work, especially in teaching, is also a quality assurance issue. Casual or sessional staff members teach and assess more than 50% of all university courses in Australia, and yet the research in relation to the role sessional staff play in quality assurance of…

  12. 20 CFR 1001.141 - Functions of DVOP staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Functions of DVOP staff. 1001.141 Section 1001.141 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) § 1001.141 Functions of DVOP staff. Each DVOP specialist shall carry...

  13. 20 CFR 1001.142 - Stationing of DVOP staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Stationing of DVOP staff. 1001.142 Section 1001.142 Employees' Benefits OFFICE OF THE ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS' EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING... Veterans Outreach Program (DVOP) § 1001.142 Stationing of DVOP staff. DVOP specialists shall be...

  14. Teaching the Lecturers: Academic Staff Learning about Online Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcote, Maria; Reynaud, Daniel; Beamish, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Developing online teaching skills can occur through involvement in learn-by-doing strategies, which incorporates informal, organic or need-driven strategies. Such processes are sometimes labeled as "bottom-up" staff development processes. In other contexts, teaching staff are formally directed to develop online teaching skills through a series of…

  15. PLANNING METHODOLOGY SALES STAFF IN RETAIL TRADE ORGANIZATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayduk V. I.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The article describes a method of optimizing the number of members of the sales staff in retail organizations, which enables a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the manpower of the enterprise, evaluate the effectiveness of the use of the sales staff and offer based on it the optimal number of employees in each structural unit

  16. 25 CFR 36.86 - Are there staff training requirements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) Suicide Prevention. (c) Homeliving staff as well as all employees that supervise students participating in... as all employees that supervise students participating in homeliving services and activities must... licensing requirements. (b) All homeliving program staff as well as all employees who supervise...

  17. Some Thoughts on Role-Blurring and Staff Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnin, Mary T.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses library personnel role-blurring driven by budget cuts, technology, and promotion requirements for professional staff. Notes that hard feelings must be overcome, the need for compensation must be acknowledged, and job descriptions rewritten. Concludes with a discussion on the importance of staff development. (AEF)

  18. Personal Sustainability: Listening to Extension Staff and Observing Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstadt, Leslie; Fortune, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Extension staff are increasingly challenged to do excellent work and balance their lives. University of Maine Cooperative Extension committed to a 2-year participatory action research project to support staff and to an organizational climate that encourages personal sustainability. With tools from ethnography and appreciative inquiry, staff…

  19. Experiences of Australian School Staff in Addressing Student Cannabis Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Peter J.; Norberg, Melissa M.; Dillon, Paul; Manocha, Ramesh

    2013-01-01

    Cannabis is the most frequently used illicit drug by Australian secondary school students yet there is scant research investigating school staff responses to student cannabis use. As such, this study surveyed 1,692 school staff who attended "Generation Next" seminars throughout Australia. The self-complete survey identified that the…

  20. 18 CFR 701.76 - The Water Resources Council Staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false The Water Resources Council Staff. 701.76 Section 701.76 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.76 The Water Resources Council Staff. The...

  1. Faculty and Staff: The Weather Radar of Campus Climate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Patricia; Cofer, James; Austin, Jan L.; Inman, Dean; Martin, Tim; Rook, Steve; Stokes, Tim; Wilkinson, Leah

    1998-01-01

    The campus climate for faculty and staff is one of change and uncertainty. College faculty are varied and bring to their work diverse perspectives. They are challenged to redefine their work, assimilate interdisciplinary and active learning techniques into their repertoires, and deal with a new population of students. Nonteaching staff may find…

  2. Staff and Student Perceptions of Plagiarism and Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Jenny

    2009-01-01

    Cheating, plagiarism, and other forms of academic misconduct are a significant issue in higher education. In this study, the attitudes of academic staff and students in a 3 year undergraduate nursing program to various forms of academic misconduct were assessed and compared. Forty-nine percent of staff and 39% of students thought that cheating on…

  3. 13 CFR 120.824 - Professional management and staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Professional management and staff... management and staff. A CDC must have full-time professional management, including an Executive Director (or... loans, service, and, if authorized by SBA, liquidate the loan portfolio, and sustain a sufficient...

  4. Didactic Competencies among Teaching Staff of Universities in Kenya

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Florah Katanu

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the levels and types of didactic competencies that exist among teaching staff in universities in Kenya, giving recognition to curriculum development, pedagogical attributes and quality assurance competencies. The study was carried out in two phases among two samples of the teaching staff population. The first…

  5. Identification of Domains for Malaysian University Staff Happiness Index Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yassin, Sulaiman Md.

    2014-01-01

    Without any doubt happiness among staff in any organization is pertinent to ensure continued growth and development. However, not many studies were carried out to determine the domains that will be able to measure the level of happiness among staff in universities. Thus, the aim of this study is to elicit the domains that explain the overall…

  6. PLANNING METHODOLOGY SALES STAFF IN RETAIL TRADE ORGANIZATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Gayduk V. I.; Takaho E. E.

    2014-01-01

    The article describes a method of optimizing the number of members of the sales staff in retail organizations, which enables a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the manpower of the enterprise, evaluate the effectiveness of the use of the sales staff and offer based on it the optimal number of employees in each structural unit

  7. Workplace Information Literacy for Administrative Staff in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Mark; Smith, Marian

    2008-01-01

    A joint project carried out by Leeds University and Loughborough University, funded by JISC, studied the information literacy of non academic staff in higher education. The in-depth, qualitative study deployed an information audit, interviews and focus groups with eleven staff in the Finance and Research Departments at Loughborough University. The…

  8. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  9. Retention of Staff in the Early Childhood Education Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holochwost, Steven J.; DeMott, Kerri; Buell, Martha; Yannetta, Kelly; Amsden, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    What incentives can the administrators of early childhood education facilities offer their staff in order to retain them? In light of research identifying low staff turnover as a key component of high quality early childhood education, the answer to this question has ramifications beyond human-resources management. This paper presents the results…

  10. Annual report 1973

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The GKSS scientific annual report summarizes the problems and results of the research and development projects of 1973. In contrast to earlier annual reports, a comprehensive description of the research facilities is not included. The annual report was extended by the paragraph 'Financial Report 1973' in the chapter 'Development of Geesthacht Research Centre'. The financial report gives a survey of the financial transactions and the major operations of the year under review. (orig./AK)

  11. Ombuds' Corner: Users and Staff Members

    CERN Multimedia

    Vincent Vuillemin

    2010-01-01

    In this series, the Bulletin aims to explain the role of the Ombuds at CERN by presenting practical examples of misunderstandings that could have been resolved by the Ombuds if he had been contacted earlier. Please note that, in all the situations we present, the names are fictitious and used only to improve clarity. 
     Pam* and Jeff* are both physicists working on the same project for an experiment. Pam is from a collaborating institute and Jeff is a CERN staff member. As the project is being developed at CERN they both share the same technical support available in the Laboratory. At the beginning they organised themselves so they could get the support that both of them needed. When some milestones concerning the delivery of parts became urgent, they started to actually compete for the same resources, which could not possibly satisfy all requests at the same time. With the time pressure increasing, Jeff started to accuse Pam of diverting the resources for her own share of the proj...

  12. Protection of staff in interventional radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project focuses on the interventional radiology. The main objective of this project work was to provide a guidance and advice for occupational exposure and hospital management to optimize radiation protection safety and endorse safety culture. It provides practical information on how to minimize occupational exposure in interventional radiology. In the literature review all considerable parameters to reduce dose to the occupationally exposed are well discussed. These parameters include dose limit, risk estimation, use of dosimeter, personal dose record keeping, analysis of surveillance of occupational dose, investigation levels, and proper use of radiation protection tools and finally about scatter radiation dose rate. In addition the project discusses the ways to reduce occupational exposure in interventional radiology. The methods for dose reduction are minimizing fluoroscopic time, minimizing the number of fluoroscopic image, use of patient dose reduction technologies, use of collimation, planning interventional procedures, positioning in low scattered areas, use of protective shielding, use of appropriate fluoroscopic imaging equipment, giving training for the staff, wearing the dosimeters and know their own dose regularly, and management commitment to quality assurance and quality control system and optimization of radiation protection of safety. (author)

  13. HOSPITAL INFECTION: VISION OF PROFESSIONAL NURSING STAFF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarciane da Silva Monteiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective: The hospital-acquired infection (HAI is defined as a serious public health problem, resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. The role of nursing staff on this issue is essential in ensuring solving and quality care, minimizing damages that may arise as a result of the care offered to patients. From this discussion, this study aimed to understand the vision of the nursing team professionals about HAI. Method: This is a qualitative, descriptive study. The data collection was performed using a semi-structured interview. We used the Bardin Content Analysis. Results: The categories that emerged were: Definition of HAI; Implemented prevention measures; Difficulties in controlling the HAI, and coping strategies. The study found a clear understanding of what is a HAI for nurses, however, for practical nurses that understanding appeared wrongly. Hand washing and the use of PPE were the main measures mentioned in prevention. The low uptake of the above measures and the problems of working in teams were listed challenges. Conclusion: Therefore, lifelong learning is an important instrument to promote changes in practice. It is essential that HIC act with professionals raising their awareness about the importance of play in the prevention and control of potential complications, ensuring the safety and quality of care directed to the patient. KEYWORDS: Cross Infection. Nursing. Qualitative research.

  14. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2015 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  15. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2011 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  16. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2003 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  17. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2004 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  18. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2008 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  19. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2002 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  20. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2001 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  1. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2006 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  2. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2000 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  3. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2009 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  4. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2010 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  5. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2007 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  6. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2014 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  7. Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Annual Statistical Supplement, 2005 includes the most comprehensive data available on the Social Security and Supplemental Security Income programs. More than...

  8. Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal): Annual compilation for 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC's intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually

  9. Regulatory and technical reports (abstract index journal). Annual compilation for 1984. Volume 9, No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This compilation consists of bibliographic data and abstracts for the formal regulatory and technical reports issued by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Staff and its contractors. It is NRC's intention to publish this compilation quarterly and to cumulate it annually

  10. Biotechnology and Nuclear Agricultural Research Institute Annual Report January - December 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The annual report highlights the activities of the Biotechnology and Nuclear Agriculture Research Institute (BNARI) of the Ghana Atomic Energy Commission for the year 2012 grouped under the following headings: Overview of programmes and activities; list of publications, conferences, training courses and workshops attended by staff and future projections. (A. B.)

  11. Assessment of individual dose equivalents Hp(0.07 of medical staff occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Papierz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The paper presents the Nofer Institutes of Occupational Medicine in Łódź's results of the assessment of individual dose equivalents Hp(0.07 of medical staff exposed to X-rays in Poland in 2012. In addition, the collected data was analysed in terms of types of medical units performing medical procedures and the categorization of personnel. Material and Methods: Dosimetric service was provided for medical staff of interventional radiology departments occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation in terms of individual dose equivalents Hp(0.07. In 2012, personal dosimetry Hp(0.07 determinations were performed by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź and covered 2044 employees from 174 health facilities. The determinations were performed using thermoluminescence dosimetry according to the procedure accredited by the Polish Centre for Accreditation (document number AB 327. The measurements were performed using ring-dosimeters in the periods of 1 or 2 months. Results: Mean annual individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07 in 2012 was equal to 3.3 mSv (annual limit for Hp(0.07 is 500 mSv. The average value of annual individual dose equivalent Hp(0.07 decreased comparing to the previous year. In 2012, no single case of exceeding the annual limit for Hp(0.07 was reported. Data stored in the file indicates that more than 96% of all of the annual doses did not exceed the level of 10 mSv. Conclusions: The analysis of data on occupational exposure to ionizing radiation confirms a stable level of exposure and satisfactory radiological protection in interventional radiology facilities monitored by the Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine in Łódź in Poland in 2012. Med Pr 2014;65(2:167–171

  12. SGUDS - Annual report 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of activities carried out by the State Geological Institute of Dionyz Stur (SGUDS) in 2008 year is presented. These activities are reported under the following headings: Introduction by director; Organization scheme; Staff composition; Organizational unit of vice-director for economy; Organisation's budget; Organizational unit of vice-director for science and research; Division of geological research and mapping; Division of specialized laboratories; Organizational unit of vice-director for geology and projects; Division of environmental geology; Division of geoanalytic laboratories; International cooperation; Organizational unit of vice-director for informatics; Division of Geofond; Division of information systems; Specialised conferences and seminars; Quality management system ISO 9001 : 2000; Publications of staffs of the SGUDS in 2009; List of staffs.

  13. Whole-body counters in Canada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A compilation of whole-body counting existing across Canada was prepared by AECB (Atomic Energy Control Board) staff. This work was initiated so that AECB staff and other concerned parties would have this information readily available, especially during urgent situations. This report is to be used for reference purposes only, as it makes no attempt to judge the present state of the art of whole-body counting

  14. Selecting the right staff for your center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R C

    1989-01-01

    Even though ambulatory surgery centers have proven to be an effective health care delivery service, the success of the concept to a great extent is due to the employees who staff them. The method in which management deals with these employees will have a direct impact on the success of the center. Surgery centers have relatively few employees with which to continually prove the facility to be a viable alternative to other surgical services. Because of this, management's decisions, as they relate to personnel administration, frequently have to be more precise than those made in larger institutions. These decisions start with the recruitment process and continue through every phase of personnel management. The spirit in which these decisions are made should be one of causing the employee to grow in their particular position, even at the risk of the employee accepting a better position with another employer. While the employee's performance is critical to the success of the center, proper staffing is essential to ensure that salary expenses do not escalate to the point that revenue is being spent for unproductive manhours. This requires an ongoing monitoring process combined with the flexibility to adjust to sporadic case load demands. As health care becomes more competitive, there will be even greater need to effectively manage the center's human resources. To agement must be creative in its pursuit of setting employees to function in a manner which results in job satisfaction for themselves and exception service to the physician and patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10292258

  15. Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 2001. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  16. Annual Report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  17. Natural gas annual 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Natural Gas Annual 1991 provides information on the supply and disposition of natural gas to a wide audience including industry, consumers Federal and State agencies, and education institutions. This report, the Natural Gas Annual 1991 Supplement: Company Profiles, presents a detailed profile of selected companies

  18. Annual Report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golnik, N.; Mika, J.R.; Wieteska, K. [eds.

    1998-12-31

    This Annual Report of the Institute of Atomic Energy describes the results of the research works carried out at the Institute at 1997. As in the preceding years the authors of the individual scientific reports published in this Annual Report are fully responsible for their content and layout. The Report contains the information on other activities of the Institute as well. (author)

  19. Annual Energy Review, 2008

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2009-06-01

    The Annual Energy Review (AER) is the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) primary report of annual historical energy statistics. For many series, data begin with the year 1949. Included are statistics on total energy production, consumption, trade, and energy prices; overviews of petroleum, natural gas, coal, electricity, nuclear energy, renewable energy, and international energy; financial and environment indicators; and data unit conversions.

  20. Upcoming change at the head of the Staff Association

    CERN Multimedia

    Staff Association

    2016-01-01

    Alessandro Raimondo, President of the Staff Association, has decided to tender his resignation to the Staff Council effective from 31 August 2016. “You know that the Pension Fund is my passion, and I have chosen to follow my heart,” he declared in a statement sent to the Staff Council on 22 June. In fact, in a session held on 16 June 2016, the CERN Council elected Alessandro Raimondo as the Vice-Chairman of the Pension Fund Governing Board. Following this election, Alessandro was compelled to choose between the Pension Fund and his role as the President of the Staff Association. According to the statutes of the Staff Association, resignation of the President results in the resignation of the Bureau and the Executive Committee. In a meeting held on 5 July 2016, the Staff Council thus decided on the following timetable and modalities for the election of the new Executive Committee: Wednesday 13 July: deadline for submission of lists for election; Tuesday 19 July: meeting of the Staff Counc...

  1. A review of NRC staff uses of probabilistic risk assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NRC staff uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) and risk management as important elements its licensing and regulatory processes. In October 1991, the NRC's Executive Director for Operations established the PRA Working Group to address concerns identified by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards with respect to unevenness and inconsistency in the staff's current uses of PRA. After surveying current staff uses of PRA and identifying needed improvements, the Working Group defined a set of basic principles for staff PRA use and identified three areas for improvements: guidance development, training enhancements, and PRA methods development. For each area of improvement, the Working Group took certain actions and recommended additional work. The Working Group recommended integrating its work with other recent PRA-related activities the staff completed and improving staff interactions with PRA users in the nuclear industry. The Working Group took two key actions by developing general guidance for two uses of PRA within the NRC (that is, screening or prioritizing reactor safety issues and analyzing such issues in detail) and developing guidance on basic terms and methods important to the staff's uses of PRA

  2. Leadership styles in nursing management: implications for staff outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Avoka Asamani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nursing is a people-centred profession and therefore the issue of leadership is crucial for success. Nurse managers’ leadership styles are believed to be important determinant of nurses’ job satisfaction and retention. In the wake of a global nursing shortage, maldistribution of health workforce, increasing healthcare costs and expanding workload, it has become imperative to examine the role of nurse managers’ leadership styles on their staff outcomes. Using the Path-Goal Leadership theory as an organised framework, this study investigated the leadership styles of nurse managers and how they influence the nursing staff job satisfaction and intentions to stay at their current workplaces.Methods: The study employed a cross-sectional survey design to collect data from a sample of 273 nursing staff in five hospitals in the Eastern Region of Ghana. Descriptive and regression analyses were performed using SPSS version 18.0Results: Nurse managers used different leadership styles depending on the situation, but were more inclined to the supportive leadership style, followed by the achievement-oriented leadership style and participative leadership style. The nursing staff exhibited moderate levels of job satisfaction. The nurse managers’ leadership styles together explained 29% of the variance in the staff job satisfaction. The intention to stay at the current workplace was low (2.64 out of 5 among the nursing staff. More than half (51.7% of the nursing staff intended to leave their current workplaces, and 20% of them were actively seeking the opportunities to leave. The nurse managers’ leadership styles statistically explained 13.3% of the staff intention to stay at their current job position.Conclusions: These findings have enormous implications for nursing practice, management, education, and human resource for health policy that could lead to better staff retention and job satisfaction, and ultimately improve patient care.  

  3. AECB workshop on seismic hazard assessment in southern Ontario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the workshop was to review available geological and seismological data which could affect earthquake occurrence in southern Ontario and to develop a consensus on approaches that should be adopted for characterization of seismic hazard. The workshop was structured in technical sessions to focus presentations and discussions on four technical issues relevant to seismic hazard in southern Ontario, as follows: (1) The importance of geological and geophysical observations for the determination of seismic sources, (2) Methods and approaches which may be adopted for determining seismic sources based on integrated interpretations of geological and seismological information, (3) Methods and data which should be used for characterizing the seismicity parameters of seismic sources, and (4) Methods for assessment of vibratory ground motion hazard. The format of each session involved invited presentations of relevant data followed by open presentations by participants, a general discussion focusing on the relevance of the presented information for seismic hazard assessment in southern Ontario, then development of conclusions and recommendations. In the final session, the conclusions and recommendations were summarized and an open discussion was held to develop consensus. This report presents perspective summaries of the workshop technical sessions together with conclusions and recommendations prepared by the session chairs and the general chairman. 2 refs

  4. Customer care a training manual for library staff

    CERN Document Server

    Gannon-Leary, Pat

    2010-01-01

    Customer Care provides a detailed course suitable for delivery to library staff at all levels. It can be used as a stand-alone reference work for customer care processes and procedures or, alternatively, it can be used by library staff to tailor a customer care course to suit the requirements and training needs of their own staff.Dual use - reference work and/or training manualPotential as a text bookApplicable to a wider context than LIS - could be used for a whole HEI institutional approach to customer care or in local authorities/public services

  5. Levels of Job Satisfaction amongst Malaysian Academic Staff

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fauziah Noordin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A study of job satisfaction of academic staff of a public university in Malaysia used the 7-item general satisfaction scale in a survey to determine the level of job satisfaction of the academic staff. The results indicated that overall the academic staff of the university has a moderate level of job satisfaction. In addition, current status, marital status, age and salary appear to have significant impact on the respondents’ level of job satisfaction. Implications on the study’s findings to the management of the university are also discussed.

  6. Staff training program of CANDU projects in Saskatoon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the training process for a nuclear project on a new site. When AECL opened a project office Saskatoon, senior management recognized the need for large scale staff training and made the necessary commitments. Two types of training programs were initiated, general and technical. The general training plan included topics related to nuclear project life cycle. Technical training was discipline and task specific. Based on the job descriptions and staff qualifications, technical training requirements were documented for the entire staff. The training strategy was developed and implemented. Detailed records were maintained to monitor the progress, draw conclusions, and plan training for future nuclear facilities. (author)

  7. Determination of Radon Concentration in Some Types of the Smoking Staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radon concentrations were measured with long- term alpha-track radon detectors along with radon scout. Radon gas emanates from the radium content of terrestrial products, like tobacco leaves. Smoking materials contain, beside tobacco, many other additives that may also contain radium traces. These additives aim at exciting smoker’s feeling via chemical reactions, which may be disrupted by alpha particle simultaneous ionizing effect leading to mutation. This study may provide evidence of intimate relation between smoke’s radon and risk of lung cancer. Radon was measured by tracking its emitted alpha particles in solid state CR - 39 plastic detector and also by counting ionization pulses in silicon surface barrier detector (radon-scout). The results indicate that some of the cigarette staffs raise radon concentration in air to 270 bq/m3, corresponding to an annual effective dose of about 5500 μ Sv

  8. Annually laminated speleotherms : a review

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Andy; Smith, Claire; Jex, Catherine; Fairchild, I. J.; Genty, Dominique; Fuller, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    This review of annually laminated speleothems firstly considers the four types of annual laminae found within speleothems: fluorescent laminae formed by annual variations in organic matter flux; visible or petrographic laminae, formed by annual variations in calcite texture or fabric; calcite-aragonite couplets; and finally trace element laminae. The methods available to confirm the annual nature, or otherwise, of lamina deposition are reviewed. We consider the use of annual laminae ...

  9. Nuclear medicine annual external occupational dose distribution: Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, year 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauricio, Claudia L P; Lima, Ana L S; da Silva, Herica L R; Souza-Santos, Denison; Silva, Claudio R

    2011-03-01

    Brazil has about 300 nuclear medicine services (NMS), 44 of them located in the state of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). Most nuclear medicine staff are routinely monitored for external dose. This paper makes a statistical analysis of all the RJ NMS annual external occupational doses in year 2005. Around 100 professionals of RJ NMS received annual doses >4.0 mSv, considering only external doses, but no one receives doses higher than the mean annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Extremities dosemeters are used by about 10 % of the staff. In some cases, these doses are more than 10 times higher than the dose in thorax. The maximum ratio of extremity dose/thorax dose, in 2005, was 72. This study shows the importance to improve radiation protection procedures in nuclear medicine, mainly because the number of occupational individuals in nuclear medicine and their external doses are increasing. PMID:21051433

  10. Nuclear medicine annual external occupational dose distribution: Rio de Janeiro (Brazil), year 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brazil has about 300 nuclear medicine services (NMS), 44 of them located in the state of Rio de Janeiro (RJ). Most nuclear medicine staff are routinely monitored for external dose. This paper makes a statistical analysis of all the RJ NMS annual external occupational doses in year 2005. Around 100 professionals of RJ NMS received annual doses >4.0 mSv, considering only external doses, but no one receives doses higher than the mean annual dose limit of 20 mSv. Extremities dosemeters are used by about 10 % of the staff. In some cases, these doses are more than 10 times higher than the dose in thorax. The maximum ratio of extremity dose/thorax dose, in 2005, was 72. This study shows the importance to improve radiation protection procedures in nuclear medicine, mainly because the number of occupational individuals in nuclear medicine and their external doses are increasing. (authors)

  11. Radiation exposure of eyes, thyroid gland and hands in orthopaedic staff: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesavachandran Chandrasekharan Nair

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various procedures, especially minimal invasive techniques using fluoroscopy, pose a risk of radiation exposure to orthopaedic staff. Anatomical sites such as the eyes, thyroid glands and hands are more vulnerable to radiation considering the limited use of personal protective devices in the workplace. The objective of the study is to assess the annual mean cumulative and per procedure radiation dose received at anatomical locations like eyes, thyroid glands and hands in orthopaedic staff using systematic review. Methods The review of literature was conducted using systematic search of the database sources like PUBMED and EMBASE using appropriate keywords. The eligibility criteria and the data extraction of literature were based on study design (cohort or cross-sectional study, study population (orthopaedic surgeons or their assistants, exposure (doses of workplace radiation exposure at hands/fingers, eye/forehead, neck/thyroid, language (German and English. The literature search was conducted using a PRISMA checklist and flow chart. Results Forty-two articles were found eligible and included for the review. The results show that radiation doses for the anatomical locations of eye, thyroid gland and hands were lower than the dose levels recommended. But there is a considerable variation of radiation dose received at all three anatomical locations mainly due to different situations including procedures (open and minimally invasive, work experience (junior and senior surgeons,distance from the primary and secondary radiation, and use of personal protective equipments (PPEs. The surgeons receive higher radiation dose during minimally invasive procedures compared to open procedures. Junior surgeons are at higher risk of radiation exposure compared to seniors. PPEs play a significant role in reduction of radiation dose. Conclusions Although the current radiation precautions appear to be adequate based on the low dose radiation

  12. Radiation exposure to nuclear medicine staff involved in PET/CT practice in Serbia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the radiation exposure to nuclear medicine (NM) staff in the two positron emission tomography-computed tomography centres in Serbia and to investigate the possibilities for dose reduction. Dose levels in terms of Hp(10) for whole body and Hp(0.07) for hands of NM staff were assessed using thermoluminescence and electronic personal dosemeters. The assessed doses per procedure in terms of Hp(10) were 4.2-7 and 5-6 μSv, in two centres, respectively, whereas the extremity doses in terms of Hp(0.07) in one of the centres was 34-126 μSv procedure-1. The whole-body doses per unit activity were 17-19 and 21-26 μSv GBq-1 in two centres, respectively, and the normalised finger dose in one centre was 170-680 μSv GBq-1. The maximal estimated annual whole-body doses in two centres were 3.4 and 2.0 mSv, while the corresponding extremity dose in the later one was 45 mSv. Improvements as introduction of automatic dispensing system and injection and optimisation of working practice resulted in dose reduction ranging from 12 up to 67 %. (authors)

  13. IAEA research contracts. Ninth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is the seventh annual publication of the summaries of final reports received during 1968 in connection with contracts and agreements awarded by the IAEA Research Contract Programme. Ninety nine such summaries are included, thus bringing to 323 the total number published so far. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation

  14. John B. Little Center Annual Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Annual Symposium of the John B. Little Center for Radiation Sciences and Environmental Health at the Harvard School of Public Health seeks to educate radiobiologists and biomedical scientists in related areas on the leading research related to the effects of ionizing radiation and related environmental agents in biological systems. This effort seeks to further the training of individuals in this field, and to foment productive interactions and collaborations among scientists at Harvard and with other institutions. The Symposium attracts world-class scientists as speakers, and a broad cross-section of attendees from academic, government, and industrial research centers, as well as editorial staff from leading scientific publications. In order to maintain this quality, funding to support the travel and local expenses of invited speakers is sought, along with funds to allow use of appropriate conference facilities.

  15. IAEA research contracts. Sixth annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is the sixth annual report and presents full summaries of 37 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1965. Including these, a total of 136 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology

  16. Annual Report 2013. Nuclear Regulatory Authority

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present Annual Report of Activities of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN), prepared regularly from the creation as independent institution, describes across seven parts and eight annexes the activities developed by the organism during 2013. The main topic are: the organization and the activity of the ARN; the regulatory standards; the licensing and inspection of nuclear power plants and critical facilities; the emergency systems; the environmental monitoring; the occupational surveillance; the training and the public information; improved organizational and budgetary developments. Also, this publication has annexes with the following content: regulatory documents; inspections to medical; presentations of publications from ARN staff; measurement and evaluation of the drinking water of Ezeiza; international expert report on the implementation of international standards on radiation protection in the Ezeiza Atomic Center; Code of Ethics of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority.

  17. Institute for Safety Research. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Institute is concerned with evaluating the design based safety and increasing the operational safety of technical systems which include serious sources of danger. It is further occupied with methods of mitigating the effects of incidents and accidents. For all these goals the institute does research work in the following fields: modelling and simulation of thermofluid dynamics and neutron kinetics in cases of accidents; two-phase measuring techniques; safety-related analyses and characterizing of mechanical behaviours of material; measurements and calculations of radiation fields; process and plant diagnostics; development and application of methods of decision analysis. This annual report gives a survey of projects and scientific contributions (e.g. Single rod burst tests with ZrNb1 cladding), lists publications, institute seminars and workshops, names the personal staff and describes the organizational structure. (orig./HP)

  18. JAERI TIARA annual report vol. 1 (1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This annual report describes research activities which have been performed with the JAERI TIARA (Takasaki Ion Accelerators for Advanced Radiation Application) facilities from April 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992, and also gives an outline of the ion accelerators and surrounding apparatus which have been constructed and prepared for various experiments. As well as an outline of the characteristics of AVF cyclotron, 3 MV tandem electrostatic accelerator and other ones, included are 25 summary reports on preparation of experimental apparatus and on the preliminary results of experimental studies using the 3 MV tandem accelerator in the different research fields of beam technology, materials for space environment and nuclear fusion reactor, organic and inorganic functional materials, biology, medicine, radiation chemistry, radioisotope production and nuclear chemistry. Lists of publication, staff of TIARA and cooperated researchers are also given. (author)

  19. IAEA research contracts. Seventh annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume is the seventh annual report and presents full summaries of 52 final reports from contracts, sponsored under the Agency's Research Contract Programme, which were completed during 1966. Including these, a total of 188 summaries have been published in the various fields in which support is provided under the IAEA Research contract program. In every case the summary of the contractor's final report has been prepared by that member of the Agency's scientific staff who has been most closely connected with the particular branch of research concerned. The scientific data are the responsibility of the contractor, though the Agency is responsible for any additional observations. The reports presented are related to research in the field of radioactive waste management and environmental sciences; health physics and radiation protection; radiobiology; safeguards methods; nuclear reactors physics and nuclear fuels; radioisotope applications in agriculture, medicine and hydrology, food preservation by irradiation

  20. Annual report - 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contents include a description of research equipment and computing procedures in operation, and a review of research undertaken during the year. Studies included light ion induced reactions, Coulomb excitation, fission studies, experiments involving (HEAVY-ION, XN) reactions and ion-solid interactions. Laboratory staff and department publications are also listed

  1. Annual Report 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brief surveys are given of the activities in the various groups in the department, including experimental elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, plasma, molecular and atomic physics and theoretical physics. Lists of staff and publications are given as well as an outline of study plans for undergraduates. (JIW)

  2. 78 FR 22418 - Reassignment of Commission Staff Responsibilities and Delegations of Authority

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Commission Staff Responsibilities and Delegations of Authority AGENCY: Commodity Futures Trading Commission... responsibilities, including delegations of authority, resulting from its recent reorganization of Commission staff... reassigned its staff and responsibilities to the newly established Division of Swap Dealer and...

  3. Salaries and Salary Scales of Full-Time Teaching Staff at Canadian Universities, 2008/2009: Preliminary Report. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 076

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statistics Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The data in this report are drawn from the "University and College Academic Staff Survey" ("UCASS"). Conducted since 1946, "UCASS" presents a national picture of the socio-economic characteristics of full-time university teachers in degree-granting institutions. The survey is conducted annually, with a reference date of October 1. Therefore, the…

  4. Salaries and Salary Scales of Full-Time Teaching Staff at Canadian Universities, 2006/2007: Final Report. Culture, Tourism and the Centre for Education Statistics. Research Paper. Catalogue no. 81-595-M No. 073

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statistics Canada, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The data in this report are drawn from the "University and College Academic Staff Survey" ("UCASS"). Conducted since 1946, "UCASS" presents a national picture of the socio-economic characteristics of full-time university teachers in degree-granting institutions. The information is conducted annually, with a reference date of October 1. Therefore,…

  5. Lead thickness in shielding in the protection of radiodiagnostic staff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors indicate the principles which can be used to apply cost-benefit analysis to radiation protection of staff in an X-ray department. The cost of saving radiation exposure to staff by varying the lead equivalence of lead gowns and lead protective screens is calculated. The cost is compared with the financial values of the detriment as assessed by the National Radiological Protection Board. The expenditure required to avoid a man-Sv for staff protection in diagnostic departments is suggested. In the examples taken it is found that the larger staff dose reductions, and often the cheaper reductions, can be obtained by reducing the radiation dose to the patient. There are, of course, major additional advantages to the patient in reducing this dose. (author)

  6. Engineering Staff Association Honors Snider And Williams For Outstanding Contributions

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2003-01-01

    Jeff Snider of Christiansburg and Beverly Williams of Pembroke have received 2003 Employee Recognition Awards from the College Association for Staff in Engineering (CASE) for their outstanding contributions and service to the college.

  7. Outstanding contributions of Virginia Tech laboratory staff recognized

    OpenAIRE

    Trulove, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Daniel L. Reed of Elliston, Va., laboratory manager in the Department of Engineering Science and Mechanics, is the winner of the 2009 Virginia Tech Staff Award for Outstanding Performance in Laboratories.

  8. Study on the Issue of Staff Training in Business Hotel

    OpenAIRE

    Qiumei Fan

    2009-01-01

    According to the analysis of characteristics of hotel business and business traveler, a business hotel will have new requirements to employees. So this essay puts forward new ways of staff training in business hotels.

  9. Staff confidence in dealing with aggressive patients: a benchmarking exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, S; Wynaden, D; Harding, N; Yassine, A; Parker, J

    1999-09-01

    Interacting with potentially aggressive patients is a common occurrence for nurses working in psychiatric intensive care units. Although the literature highlights the need to educate staff in the prevention and management of aggression, often little, or no, training is provided by employers. This article describes a benchmarking exercise conducted in psychiatric intensive care units at two Western Australian hospitals to assess staff confidence in coping with patient aggression. Results demonstrated that staff in the hospital where regular training was undertaken were significantly more confident in dealing with aggression. Following the completion of a safe physical restraint module at the other hospital staff reported a significant increase in their level of confidence that either matched or bettered the results of their benchmark colleagues. PMID:10661079

  10. Wise honored with Research Staff Co-worker Award

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    Virginia Tech alumna and employee Barbara Wise of Blacksburg, Va. was presented with the"Research Staff Co-worker Award" during the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine's recent 2006 Research Symposium.

  11. An exploration of cancer staff attitudes and values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKegney, F P; Visco, G; Yates, J; Hughes, J

    1979-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team involved in the care of patients with advanced cancer including physicians, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, nutritionists, clergymen, enterostomal therapists, biostatisticians and administrative personnel were studied over a period of eighteen months. A prospective study of staff attitudes and values about life, disease, and medical care which focused particularly on cancer, cancer treatment and patients with cancer was undertaken. Data were gathered from the staff by written responses to the following instruments: 1) Rokeach Value Survey and 2) a Personal Attitudes Toward Illness Questionnaire. This longitudinal prospective study demonstrated the reliability of scrutinizing individual and collective staff characteristics in a cancer care team. Although most team members had minimal previous contact with clinical research or with patients with advanced cancer, increased exposure did not result in changes in staff attitudes and values over the period of seventeen months. PMID:481321

  12. What does Brexit mean for nursing and our EU staff?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Hannah; Kendall-Raynor, Petra; Longhurst, Chris

    2016-06-29

    Currently there is free movement of labour and mutual recognition of nurse training and qualifications between EU member states. This means UK hospitals can actively recruit nurses from across the EU to cover staff shortfalls. So what now? PMID:27353905

  13. The Principal and Staff Development: Countering the School Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Mary; Rogus, Joseph F.

    1979-01-01

    After addressing the problems inherent in developing staff improvement programs, the author offers starter planning steps for countering the energy drainage of teachers, countering the weak technology of teaching, and countering the feeling of aloneness of the teacher. (KC)

  14. Job stress in the staff of a tire factory

    OpenAIRE

    marzieh torshizi; alireza saadatjoo

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aim: Occupational stress is a major problem in industrial societies. Its relationship with various diseases is increasing ,but it probably has vast socio-economic consequences manifested in the form of absenteeism, labour turnover, loss of productivity and disability pension costs. The present study aimed at determining stress in the staff of a tyre factory.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive-analytical study was done on 196 members of staff from various sections of a ti...

  15. The staff show their profound attachment to SLS

    CERN Multimedia

    Association du personnel

    2007-01-01

    The results of the poll on the Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) have now been analyzed and are published in this edition and on our web site. You were 1194 to reply to the questionnaire (approximately 50% of all staff members). The distribution of the replies according to certain variables (sex, age, career path, etc.) in the sample corresponds to the one observed for the overall staff population. This indicates that the sample is representative.

  16. Analysis of staff education system (for particular example)

    OpenAIRE

    Malinová, Ludmila

    2009-01-01

    This bachelor thesis is attending to problems of systematic staff education in companies. The principal aim of work is to analyze particular system of education in concrete company and then introduce some recommendations for improvement the system. The first part involves theoretical knowledge describing important aspects of business education, methods of education in company and focuses on possibility of using information and communication technologies in staff education. The practical part ...

  17. Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Casey Addresses NPS Community

    OpenAIRE

    Naval Postgraduate School Public Affairs Office

    2010-01-01

    Naval Postgraduate School students, staff and faculty gathered to see Army Chief of Staff General George W. Casey offer a hopeful and focused look at the future of the Army and its role in the big picture of the U.S. military. During his visit on May 13 as a Secretary of the Navy Guest Lecturer, Casey expressed his gratitude for the men and women in uniform, and the challenges they continue to face.

  18. Suspected Child Maltreatment: Preschool Staff in a Conflict of Loyalty

    OpenAIRE

    Svensson, Birgitta; Janson, Staffan

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the actions of Swedish preschool staff when suspecting the maltreatment of children in their domestic environment, and the staff’s further experiences and relations to the family members. Methods A questionnaire in 2005 to the staff of 189 child groups in community preschools, including 3,100 children. Results: A report to Child Protective Agency (CPA) was submitted in 30% of the cases where maltreatment was suspected. The staff’s decisions as well as their working s...

  19. Social media guidance for British Geological Survey staff

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Clive; Noakes, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Social media guidance for British Geological Survey staff Social media is a great way to communicate BGS science, activities, achievements and services. This guidance is for BGS staff using social media as a way to communicate BGS science and technology. It is based on the Social Media Guidance for Civil Servants (Cabinet Office, 2012) the NERC Electronic Communications Policy (NERC, 2013) and the NERC Code of Conduct. This guidance was first published in Broadcasting the science sto...

  20. Outcomes evaluation of the school staff health promotion project

    OpenAIRE

    Magdalena Woynarowska-Sołdan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This article presents selected outcomes of a 3-year project “Health promotion of school staff in health-promoting schools,” as well as the achievements and difficulties in its implementation. Material and Methods: The research was conducted on 644 teachers and 226 members of non-teaching staff in 21 schools. The method involved opinion poll and authored questionnaires. A 2-part model of outcome evaluation was developed. Results: Most participants appreciated the changes that took ...