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Sample records for advocacy movement latin

  1. Building a Latin American cancer patient advocacy movement: Latin American cancer NGO regional overview Desarrollando un movimiento de apoyo para pacientes de cáncer en America Latina: resumen regional - ONGs de cáncer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Durstine

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the this paper is to assess and identify the key strengths and weaknesses for cancer control NGOs in Latin America, with the goal to make recommendations about how to improve thev impact of the patient advocacy movement as it pertains to cancer. The methods included literature review, expert interviews and site visits to Latin American cancer hospitals and NGOs. The overall findings conclude that NGOs currently do not take a leadership role in cancer control in Latin America. The lack of a survivorship movement, faulty patient information services and failure of the governments to include NGOs in policy creation are identified as areas for further project work and collaboration. The stigma of cancer still remains and a burgeoning patient movement can be created to help destigmatize and debunk the myths that surround cancer.El objetivo de este artículo es el de identificar y evaluar las fortalezas y debilidades clave de las ONG dedicadas al control del cáncer en Latinoamérica, con el fin de generar recomendaciones sobre el modo de mejorar el impacto del movimiento de apoyo para pacientes de cáncer. Los métodos incluyeron una revisión de la literatura, entrevistas a expertos y visitas a hospiptales y ONG dedicados al cáncer en Latinoamérica. Los hallazgos principales permiten concluir que en este momento las ONG no tienen un rol de liderazgo para el control del cáncer en Latinoamérica. La ausencia de un movimiento de sobrevivientes, servicios de información deficientes a los pacientes y el fracaso del gobierno para incluir a las ONG en la creación de políticas se identifican como áreas de trabajo y colaboración en proyectos a futuro. El estigma del cáncer aún subsiste y es factible crear un movimiento que florezca y ayude a desvanecerlo al exponer los mitos que rodean este padecimiento.

  2. Social Movements in Southeast Asia and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iqra Anugrah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Three recent works – Social Activism in Southeast Asia, Social Movements in Latin America: Neoliberalism and Popular Resistance, and Southeast Asia and the Civil Society Gaze: Scoping a Contested Concept in Cambodia and Vietnam – provide a timely update on the contemporary landscape of social movements in Southeast Asia and Latin America. These works are also relevant for broader theoretical discussions on social movements and provide a basis for future inter-regional comparative studies.

  3. Leadership Development of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities in the Self-Advocacy Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Exploring the life stories of leaders in the self-advocacy movement can expand our knowledge about leadership development of individuals with developmental disabilities. A better understanding of this process may assist with supporting the movement and leadership development of youth with disabilities. Methods: In-depth qualitative…

  4. Latin American Social Movements Take on the Net

    OpenAIRE

    Sally Burch

    2002-01-01

    Sally Burch argues that there is enormous potential for marginalized social groups to take advantage of the Internet for networking. The experience of Latin American social movements is demonstrating that participation in social dynamics is a strong incentive. But connectivity is only the first step. A study has explored how social networks are using this technology, the obstacles they face and the challenge of appropriating it, to fulfil their own goals. Communications training is a key need...

  5. Small wins matter in advocacy movements: giving voice to patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jason, Leonard A

    2012-06-01

    In this article, the various players are delineated in a story of a contested illness and patient advocacy, played out within the corridors of federal power. It is suggested that the mistreatment and negative attitudes that health care providers and others have towards those with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is possibly due to the social construction of this illness as being a "Yuppie flu" disease. Institutional factors are identified that created these norms and attributions, as well as the multiple stakeholders and constituent groups invested in exerting pressure on policy makers to effect systemic change. This article also provides examples of how the field of Community Psychology, which is fundamentally committed to/based on listening to and giving voice to patients, is broadly relevant to patient activism communities. This approach focused, over time, on epidemiological studies, the name, the case definition, and ultimately the change in CFS leadership at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Keys to this "small wins" approach were coalition building, use of "oppositional experts" (professionals in the scientific community who support patient advocacy goals) to challenge federal research, and taking advantage of developing events/shifts in power. Ultimately, this approach can result in significant scientific and policy gains, and changes in medical and public perception of an illness. PMID:21858612

  6. Education and populist movements in Latin America: a failed emancipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel SOMOZA RODRÍGUEZ

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Populist movements, particularly those of Latin America, have been perceived as an intellectual problematic object since its appearance. In several occasions they introduced in the public discourse the issue of «emancipation» of Latin American nations from foreign guardianships or oligarchic national minorities, and implemented nationalist state policies. This article examines aspects of the education policies of the governments of Getúlio Vargas in Brazil and Juan D. Perón in Argentina, especially the reform and expansion of technical-vocational education boosted by both of them. The study highlights the connection between these reforms and the groups and social classes which provided support to these governments and with the strategies of the application of power. The article briefly revises the different interpretations that populism has generated and refers to the current academic debate on the subject. The conclusion points at the fact, that populist governments present contradictory stages in their social and educational policies, perhaps as an expression of the difficult conflicts that still hit Latin American societies.

  7. Conflict and Astroturfing in Niyamgiri: The Importance of National Advocacy Networks in Anti-Corporate Social Movements

    OpenAIRE

    Kraemer, R.; Whiteman, G; Banerjee, S. B.

    2013-01-01

    Traditional models of transnational advocacy networks (TANs) and stakeholder management do not capture the nuance and dynamics of (counter-)organising processes around anti-corporate mobilisation. Based on the case of a resistance movement against a planned bauxite mine on tribal land in India, we develop a process theory of interactions between local, national and international actors within transnational advocacy networks. These encounters are not always friendly and are often characterised...

  8. Self-Advocacy. Feature Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Mary F., Ed.; Ward, Nancy, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This feature issue newsletter looks at issues the self-advocacy movement is raising and the contributions it is making to the lives of people with developmental disabilities. Articles by self-advocates and advisors to self-advocacy organizations talk about their self-advocacy experiences, barriers to self-advocacy, and ways to support it. Primary…

  9. From Proposal to Policy: Social Movements and Teachers' Unions in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Leslie; Gindin, Julián

    2015-01-01

    Latin American teachers' unions have stepped into the policymaking sphere and shaped education policies unrelated to regular workplace priorities like salaries and class sizes at notable moments. The literature on teachers' unions in Latin America has not addressed this, tending to focus instead on those unions' history and role in social…

  10. A New Movement in an Old Bureaucracy: The Development of Self-Advocacy in the Czech Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siska, Jan

    2006-01-01

    In this paper I describe how self-advocacy has grown in the Czech Republic. First, I talk about how services for people with learning disabilities have begun to change in the last few years. This is because voluntary groups have lobbied and campaigned for change. I learned about self-advocacy during a visit to the UK in the 1990s. I went back to…

  11. Book review: Latin America’s multicultural movements: the struggle between communitarianism, autonomy, and human rights, edited by Todd A. Eisenstadt et al.

    OpenAIRE

    Cuevas, Senia

    2014-01-01

    "Latin America’s Multicultural Movements: The Struggle Between Communitarianism, Autonomy, and Human Rights." Todd A. Eisenstadt, Michael S. Danielson, Moises Jaime Bailon Corres, and Carlos Sorroza Polo (eds.) Oxford University Press. March 2013.. --- Throughout the Americas, indigenous people have been arguing that as “first peoples” they should be entitled to representation in local, national, and international fora in a capacity different from that of other civil society groups. Latin Ame...

  12. Cross-border population movements and regional economic integration in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratochwil, K H

    1995-01-01

    This article, which is concerned with the area of international migration, examines some of the problems associated with the trend toward greater integration of the economies of Latin American countries. The geographic focus is on the member countries of the Southern Common Market (MERCOSUR) or the Andean Group. The author proposes a program of measures to control migration. The proposal attempts to incorporate the social dimension of migration as well as its economic aspects.

  13. Inadvertent advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhere, George F

    2012-02-01

    Policy advocacy is an issue regularly debated among conservation scientists. These debates have focused on intentional policy advocacy by scientists, but advocacy can also be unintentional. I define inadvertent policy advocacy as the act of unintentionally expressing personal policy preferences or ethical judgments in a way that is nearly indistinguishable from scientific judgments. A scientist may be well intentioned and intellectually honest but still inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. There are two ways to inadvertently engage in policy advocacy. First, a scientist expresses an opinion that she or he believes is a scientific judgment but it is actually an ethical judgment or personal policy preference. Second, a scientist expresses an opinion that he or she knows is an ethical judgment or personal policy preference but inadvertently fails to effectively communicate the nature of the opinion to policy makers or the public. I illustrate inadvertent advocacy with three examples: recovery criteria in recovery plans for species listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, a scientific peer review of a recovery plan for the Northern Spotted Owl (Strix occidentalis caurina), and the International Union for Conservation of Nature's definition of threatened. In each example, scientists expressed ethical judgments or policy preferences, but their value judgments were not identified as such, and, hence, their value judgments were opaque to policy makers and the public. Circumstances suggest their advocacy was inadvertent. I believe conservation scientists must become acutely aware of the line between science and policy and avoid inadvertent policy advocacy because it is professional negligence, erodes trust in scientists and science, and perpetuates an ethical vacuum that undermines the rational political discourse necessary for the evolution of society's values. The principal remedy for inadvertent advocacy is education of conservation scientists in an effort to

  14. Social movements and free trade in Latin America: what comes after ALCA?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes Botto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article examines social move­ments and their experiences of struggle in the processes of trade liberalisation that have taken place in Latin America since the early 1990s to the present day. This has been a construction process of transnational collec­tive action in which each experience has served to innovate the preceding one, until an alliance of continental and multisectoral scope was constituted. However, this learn­ing process has not been linear; instead it has experienced both steps forward and setbacks, and its moments of progress have depended, to a great extent, on the capacity of the members of these networks to identify global capital as their enemy in the conflict.

  15. Justice and deliberation about the good life: The contribution of Latin American buen vivir social movements to the idea of justice

    OpenAIRE

    Deneulin, Séverine

    2012-01-01

    Since the 1990s, Latin America has witnessed indigenous mobilization which contest the public policies implemented by their governments. They contend that public policy is not about following a linear development model of material accumulation, but about buen vivir or Good Living, about providing the conditions for people to live in harmony with each other and Nature. Buen vivir social movements aim at replacing the dominant cosmovision of humans above nature by another cosmovision of humans ...

  16. Advocacy for Art Education: Beyond Tee-Shirts and Bumper Stickers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobick, Bryna; DiCindio, Carissa

    2012-01-01

    Advocacy is not new to art education. Over the years, Goldfarb (1979), Hodsoll (1985), and Erickson and Young (1996) have written about the importance of arts advocacy, but the concept of advocacy has evolved with the times. For example, in the 1970s, arts advocacy was described as a "movement" and brought together art educators, administrators,…

  17. Aspects of Youth Participation in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Edgar

    1984-01-01

    The systematic intervention of Latin American youth in their societies sets them apart from young people in other world regions. The reasons for the distinctiveness of the Latin American student movement are discussed. The attitudes that the different kinds of Latin American political systems take toward youth participation are examined. (RM)

  18. Latin Lessons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Integration presents challenges and opportunities for Chinese companies in Latin America On December 3 the Third Summit of Latin American and Caribbean States lowered its curtain in Caracas, capital of Venezuela, officially signing into effect the formation of the Community of Latin A merican and Caribbean States (CELAC) as the new leading regional bloc, which symbolized further integration of the region and a milestone after Latin America’s independence fighters first raised the battle cry for a united Latin America 200 years ago. As the second largest trade partner and the third largest investor of the region,

  19. A History of Music Education Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Michael L.

    2002-01-01

    Provides a history of advocacy in music education discussing when formal advocacy started as well as advocacy with government agencies, the state level, and other types of advocacy. Includes a bibliography of resources related to music advocacy. (CMK)

  20. Philosophy + Advocacy = Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutt, Kevin; Townley, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge about music advocacy strategies has long been promoted as important for music educators, not only for the benefit of their individual programs but also for the specific benefit of music students and the general public. This article suggests an approach to advocacy grounded in the teacher's professional beliefs, phrased in terms…

  1. Latin and Cross Latin Squares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanouilidis, Emanuel

    2008-01-01

    Latin squares were first introduced and studied by the famous mathematician Leonhard Euler in the 1700s. Through the years, Latin squares have been used in areas such as statistics, graph theory, coding theory, the generation of random numbers as well as in the design and analysis of experiments. Recently, with the international popularity of…

  2. Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... future bladder cancer research through the Patient Survey Network. Read More... The JPB Foundation 2016 Bladder Cancer ... 2016 Young Investigator Awardees The Bladder Cancer Advocacy Network (BCAN) has announced the recipients of the 2016 ...

  3. The Dance of Advocacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lothian, Judith A.

    2005-01-01

    A childbirth educator asks how she can continue to use best evidence and prepare women adequately for birth within the constraints of a hospital practice that pressures educators not to “rock the boat.” This column discusses the challenge of advocating for normal birth and the dangers inherent in the advocacy role. Advocacy requires the childbirth educator to “dance” with many partners, including physicians and hospitals. Strategies for inviting colleagues and class participants onto the danc...

  4. Advocacy and technology assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, E. M.

    1975-01-01

    A highly structured treatment is presented of adversarial systems as they apply to technology assessment. One approach to the problem of adequate criteria of assessment focuses upon the internal operations of assessment entities; operations include problem perception, problem formulation, selection, utilization, determination, and evaluation. Potential contributions of advocacy as a mode of inquiry in technology are discussed; advocacy is evaluated by representative sets of criteria of adequate assessment which include participant criteria, perspectives criteria, situations criteria, base values criteria, and strategies criteria.

  5. Leopoldo Zea e o movimento latino-americano de História das idéias Leopoldo Zea and the Latin-American movement of History of Ideas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugênio Rezende de Carvalho

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa as etapas de fundação e consolidação de um dos mais importantes movimentos intelectuais da América Latina no século XX - o movimento latino-americano de História das Ideias -, a partir, sobretudo, das ações e escritos de seu principal líder e fundador, o filósofo mexicano Leopoldo Zea Aguilar (1912-2004. Na etapa de fundação, que corresponde à década de 1940, o foco principal é na obra inicial de Zea, bem como em seus primeiros esforços no sentido da articulação e organização institucional do movimento em escala continental. Já na etapa seguinte, que corresponde à década de 1950, é abordado o processo de consolidação orgânica e epistemológica do movimento.This article analyzes the stages of foundation and consolidation of one of the most important intellectual movements of Latin America in the twentieth century - the Latin-American movement of History of Ideas -, starting from actions and writings of its main leader and founder, the Mexican philosopher Leopoldo Zea Aguilar (1912-2004. In the 1940s, during the foundation period, the main focus is on the primary work of Zea, as well as on his first efforts to articulate and organize this movement in continental scale. Moreover, in the following stage held in the 1950s, the process of organic and epistemology consolidation of the movement is invoked.

  6. Social Justice Advocacy: Community Collaboration and Systems Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Baez, Sandra I.; Paylo, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the community collaboration and systems advocacy domains of the ACA (American Counseling Association) Advocacy Competencies (J. A. Lewis, M. S. Arnold, R. House, & R. L. Toporek, 2002). A case illustration is presented, and the 8 Advocacy Competencies within each domain are applied to the case study.

  7. Public health and media advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorfman, Lori; Krasnow, Ingrid Daffner

    2014-01-01

    Media advocacy blends communications, science, politics, and advocacy to advance public health goals. In this article, we explain how media advocacy supports the social justice grounding of public health while addressing public health's "wicked problems" in the context of American politics. We outline media advocacy's theoretical foundations in agenda setting and framing and describe its practical application, from the layers of strategy to storytelling, which can illuminate public health solutions for journalists, policy makers, and the general public. Finally, we describe the challenges in evaluating media advocacy campaigns.

  8. Advocacy for eye care

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    Thulasiraj D Ravilla

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of eye care service delivery is often dependant on how the different stakeholders are aligned. These stakeholders range from the ministries of health who have the capacity to grant government subsidies for eye care, down to the primary healthcare workers who can be enrolled to screen for basic eye diseases. Advocacy is a tool that can help service providers draw the attention of key stakeholders to a particular area of concern. By enlisting the support, endorsement and participation of a wider circle of players, advocacy can help to improve the penetration and effectiveness of the services provided. There are several factors in the external environmental that influence the eye care services - such as the availability of trained manpower, supply of eye care consumables, government rules and regulations. There are several instances where successful advocacy has helped to create an enabling environment for eye care service delivery. Providing eye care services in developing countries requires the support - either for direct patient care or for support services such as producing trained manpower or for research and dissemination. Such support, in the form of financial or other resources, can be garnered through advocacy.

  9. Minority Women and Advocacy for Women's Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumanyika, Shiriki K.; Morssink, Christiaan B.; Nestle, Marion

    2001-01-01

    US minority health issues involve racial/ethnic disparities that affect both women and men. However, women's health advocacy in the United States does not consistently address problems specific to minority women. The underlying evolution and political strength of the women's health and minority health movements differ profoundly. Women of color comprise only one quarter of women's health movement constituents and are, on average, socioeconomically disadvantaged. Potential alliances may be inhibited by vestiges of historical racial and social divisions that detract from feelings of commonality and mutual support. Nevertheless, insufficient attention to minority women's issues undermines the legitimacy of the women's health movement and may prevent important advances that can be achieved only when diversity is fully considered. PMID:11527764

  10. Geoparks in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Geopark is a territory delimited part of a holistic concept of protection, education and sustainable development, based on geological sites of particular importance, rarity or aesthetic geological sites. A Geopark achieves its goals through three main areas: geoconservation, education and geotourism. The first network of Geoparks born in Europe in 2000, and from 2004 UNESCO is promoting the creation of a Global Geoparks Network (Global Geoparks Network, GGN ). Currently, there are 64 Global Geoparks in 19 countries, and the movement is in full development. In Latin America there is hardly Araripe Geopark in Brazil. Presented in this work, projects and studies related to the development of Geoparks in Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Costa Rica, Peru and Venezuela. We understand that Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Mexico and Nicaragua have projects in this line, but the details are not yet readily available. The authors invite geoscientists and professionals in related fields to join a movement for the creation of the Latin American Network of Geoparks, intended as a framework for the conservation, sustainable use and disclosure of our national geological heritage

  11. THE SOLITUDE OF LATIN AMERICA IN THE GREAT PRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Barbosa

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it is investigated the reasons why Latin America has a little qualitative and quantitative space in great press. This study is based on sociohistorical and journalistic aspects. This research demonstrates that the Latin-American continent is separated, because of historical processes, in the “official Latin America” and the “popular Latin America”. While the great press represents the “official Latin America”, the “popular Latin America” is represented by the alternative press. Thus, the myth of the impartiality is broken and it is concluded that, in order to not condemn Latin America to the solitude, it is necessary to develop and study the Latin-American social movements, including its communication processes.

  12. New Regionalisms and Radical Identity Formation in Latin America: Towards an “Alter-global” Paradigm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efe Can Gürcan

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The post-Cold War period has witnessed the simultaneous emergence of a new trend of regionalism and a radicalized form of identity politics in Latin America, in parallel with the rise of numerous new left governments and alter-globalist social movements confronting neo-liberalism. In fact, the globalization of this continental struggle through a new trend of regionalism is a process which illustrates the fact that in today’s world, national, regional and global identities are complexly entwined beyond “wellestablished” dichotomies such as nationalism-cosmopolitanism. This paper suggests that regionalism could be an efficient tool to promote the formation of new collective identities at the global level by linking social struggles at the national level to the global resistance movement against neo-liberalism, as observed in the current Latin American experience of new regionalism. The first part of the paper would attempt to explain the actual significance of regionalism and the challenge of “identity formations” under globalization, and would develop an alternative theoretical approach based on Mittelman’s underrated concept of “transformative regionalism” (2004, besides elaborating the basic premises of the New Regionalism School. In turn, the second part would discuss the transformative potential of the new Latin American regionalisms through the involvement of social movements, mostly based on the experience of ALBA, but not without mentioning also the experience of TELESUR, UNASUR and Bank of the South. Finally, the concluding parts would deal with alternative policy recommendations and the emerging research agenda of new regionalism in Latin America, with a special focus on the case of the rising food sovereignty (globalization of peasant identities and counter-hegemonic mass education movements (the “HEFA regime” within the context of “radical identity formation”. Thereby, the paper attempts to explain how local

  13. Advocacy and IPR, tutorial 4

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2005-01-01

    With open access and repositories assuming a high profile some may question whether advocacy is still necessary. Those involved in the business of setting up and populating repositories are aware that in the majority of institutions there is still a great need for advocacy. This tutorial will give participants an opportunity to discuss different advocacy methods and approaches, including the 'top down' and 'bottom up' approach, publicity methods and the opportunities offered by funding body positions on open access. Participants will have the opportunity to share experiences of what works and what doesn't. The advocacy role often encompasses responsibility for advising academics on IPR issues. This is a particularly critical area where repository staff are engaged in depositing content on behalf of academics. The tutorial will offer an opportunity to discuss the IPR issues encountered by those managing repositories. The tutorial will draw on the experience of participants who have been engaged in advocacy act...

  14. Advocacy Networks and Romani Politics in Central and Eastern Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vermeersch

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the impact of the activity of international solidarity and human rights organizations on the political involvement of the Roma in Central and Eastern Europe. It will conclude that the increase of an international advocacy network focussing on the plight of the Roma has offered new opportunities to domestic Romani organizations for pressuring governments to change state behaviour or to introduce new policy. In some cases, governments have even appointed Romani personalities from well-known advocacy organizations to advisory positions. However, the influence of a growing advocacy network has not been able yet to create a better democratically elected representation of the Roma in the central arenas of political decision-making on domestic level. Moreover, within domestic Romani movements there is growing discussion about the legitimacy and accountability of Romani advisors.

  15. Advocacy for Effective Activism

    OpenAIRE

    Cederlund, Veronica; Larsson, Helena

    2006-01-01

    The Movement Action Plan (MAP) was created by Bill Moyer (1933-2002), an experienced activist engaged in movements for civil rights, peace and the environment, as he believed activists need to become aware of the roles they and their organisations are playing in the larger social movement in order to become successful. MAP is a practical strategy and action-planning model as well as a “how-to-do it” analytical tool for evaluating and organising social movements. The aim of this study is to in...

  16. Patient advocacy: barriers and facilitators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikravesh Mansoure

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During the two recent decades, advocacy has been a topic of much debate in the nursing profession. Although advocacy has embraced a crucial role for nurses, its extent is often limited in practice. While a variety of studies have been generated all over the world, barriers and facilitators in the patient advocacy have not been completely identified. This article presents the findings of a study exploring the barriers and facilitators influencing the role of advocacy among Iranian nurses. Method This study was conducted by grounded theory method. Participants were 24 Iranian registered nurses working in a large university hospital in Tehran, Iran. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. All interviews were transcribed verbatim and simultaneously Constant comparative analysis was used according to the Strauss and Corbin method. Results Through data analysis, several main themes emerged to describe the factors that hindered or facilitated patient advocacy. Nurses in this study identified powerlessness, lack of support, law, code of ethics and motivation, limited communication, physicians leading, risk of advocacy, royalty to peers, and insufficient time to interact with patients and families as barriers to advocacy. As for factors that facilitated nurses to act as a patient advocate, it was found that the nature of nurse-patient relationship, recognizing patients' needs, nurses' responsibility, physician as a colleague, and nurses' knowledge and skills could be influential in adopting the advocacy role. Conclusion Participants believed that in this context taking an advocacy role is difficult for nurses due to the barriers mentioned. Therefore, they make decisions and act as a patient's advocate in any situation concerning patient needs and status of barriers and facilitators. In most cases, they can not act at an optimal level; instead they accept only what they can do, which we called 'limited advocacy' in

  17. Advocacy: exploring the concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardell, A

    1996-10-01

    The concept of the nurse as the patient's advocate is one that has become popular in the last fifteen years or so in both North America and the United Kingdom, having its basis in nursing theory. The UKCC first embraced the concept, stating in the Code of Professional Conduct that nurses must; 'act always in such a manner so as to promote and safeguard the interests and well being of patients and clients'. This is a laudable principle and one that nurses cannot dispute as there are many members of our society who are weak and vulnerable and may be unable to speak up for themselves. But are nurses always in a position to be an advocate for their patients? As the nature of nursing is so diverse then the nature of advocacy will be different in the multifarious settings in which nurses practise. Can theatre nurses ever be in a position to act as an advocate for a patient who is often anaesthetised? What precisely is advocacy and is the Concise Oxford Dictionary definition of 'one who pleads for another' appropriate in the nursing context? Then there is the position of nurses in the healthcare organisation in which they practise. In advocating for their patients, nurses may find they are pleading a case for a patient, or a group of patients, that could bring the nurse into conflict with their medical colleagues or with the management of the organisation by whom they are employed. Additionally, they may not posses the skills and knowledge to advocate effectively under such circumstances. Nursing is littered with the casualties of such conflicts over the years, the most publicised of whom, in the UK, was probably Graham Pink who lost his job as a charge nurse after drawing public attention to what he considered to be an unacceptable standard of care in the hospital in which he worked. PMID:8974516

  18. Multi-latin squares

    CERN Document Server

    Cavenagh, Nicholas; Lefevre, James G; Stones, Douglas S

    2010-01-01

    A multi-latin square of order $n$ and index $k$ is an $n\\times n$ array of multisets, each of cardinality $k$, such that each symbol from a fixed set of size $n$ occurs $k$ times in each row and $k$ times in each column. A multi-latin square of index $k$ is also referred to as a $k$-latin square. A $1$-latin square is equivalent to a latin square, so a multi-latin square can be thought of as a generalization of a latin square. In this note we show that any partially filled-in $k$-latin square of order $m$ embeds in a $k$-latin square of order $n$, for each $n\\geq 2m$, thus generalizing Evans' Theorem. Exploiting this result, we show that there exist non-separable $k$-latin squares of order $n$ for each $n\\geq k+2$. We also show that for each $n\\geq 1$, there exists some finite value $g(n)$ such that for all $k\\geq g(n)$, every $k$-latin square of order $n$ is separable. We discuss the connection between $k$-latin squares and related combinatorial objects such as orthogonal arrays, latin parallelepipeds, semi-...

  19. LATIN--Latin American Regional News Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, John Spicer

    The establishment of a regional news agency for Latin America to improve the balance of news flow and increase the transmission of news more applicable to regional problems has often been proposed. Despite wide acceptance of the concept, the birth of the Third World's first regional news agency, Agencia Latinoamericana de Informacion (LATIN), has…

  20. Patient advocacy: the role of the nurse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Pin Pin

    2015-06-10

    The role of nurses as patient advocates is well recognised by healthcare professionals, yet the processes and practices involved in patient advocacy are not clearly understood. A suboptimal level of advocacy is often apparent in the literature, encompassing paternalistic concepts of protecting patients from harm. This article examines the concept of patient advocacy and its relevance to nursing, associated goals and outcomes of advocacy and the processes and practices involved. It provides insights into how nurses practise patient advocacy in healthcare settings and how they may develop this role further, through formal education, workplace learning, role modelling by expert nurses and promoting an organisational culture conducive to patient advocacy.

  1. The Ethics of Evaluation Neutrality and Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Lois-ellin

    1999-01-01

    Examines arguments for and against evaluation advocacy in terms of the American Evaluation Association's "Guiding Principles for Evaluators" and other statements on advocacy and neutrality. Suggests revision of the "Guiding Principles." (Author/SLD)

  2. Competition Advocacy: the Italian Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rebecchini

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Competition advocacy is considered, together with enforcement, the core business of an antitrust authority. Broadly speaking there are at least three main tasks regularly performed by most, if not all, antitrust agencies that are amenable to the advocacy function: addressing laws and regulations in order to remove unnecessary impediments to competition; engaging in sector enquiries to understand markets behavior and identify critical issues; explaining the benefits of open competitive markets to the public opinion. This article examines these three main tasks and outlines the challenges for competition agencies, with references to the experience of the Italian Competition Authority (ICA and the initiatives undertaken at international level.

  3. Practitioner Perceptions of School Library Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    School library advocacy is increasingly important due to decreases in funding and staff. National organizations attempt to engage school librarians in advocacy and have developed resources and tools to assist with this task. However, there is little research examining how practicing school librarians engage in advocacy and how their advocacy…

  4. Advocacy and policy issues Tutorial 2

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2007-01-01

    This tutorial is aimed at those who are new to the area of repositories and who want to learn more about key advocacy and policy issues. The tutorial will include information and advice on putting together an institutional advocacy campaign and developing policies for your repository. There will be opportunities for participants to share experiences and to ask questions. The tutorial will include a practical exercise in developing an advocacy presentation. Participants with experience of advocacy are welcome to attend the session to share their experiences, but should bear in mind that it is aimed primarily at those looking for help and advice in advocacy matters.

  5. Movimientos sociales y protestas en los mundos rurales latinoamericanos: nuevos escenarios y nuevos enfoques Social movements and protest in Latin-American rural worlds: new scenarios and new approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Giarracca

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Cuando el mundo agrario paracía haber entrado en la etapa agroindustrial, con aplicación de altas tecnologías e inexorables desplazamientos poblacionales, la cuestión de la tierra y del acceso a ella o la lucha por conservarla, se convierten en la América Latina atravesada por las políticas neoliberales, en problemas de primer orden. El trabajo trata de mostrar que esta nueva centralidad de las luchas por la tierra es una situación de fines de siglo XX y comienzos del XXI y amerita conceptualizaciones de estos nuevos tiempos. Para tal objetivo revisa los enfoques de mitad del siglo XX y presenta las nuevas conceptualizaciones postestructuralistas. Pero las nuevas conceptualizaciones, no clasistas, pueden dar lugar a considerar que toda lucha agraria es una lucha por una sociedad más justa e igualitaria. El trabajo toma, justamente, acciones de agricultores de Uruguay y Argentina, donde los reclamos son de tipo corporativos y no pueden asemejarse a las luchas de los sectores subalternos por sus derechos perdidos o nunca adquiridos. Para el caso argentino se agregan los nuevos movimientos de campesinos, chacareras endeudadas, etc. que en los noventa preanunciaron las grandes rebeliones de fines de 2001. Fue la "nueva protesta agraria".When the agrarian world seemed just to have stepped into the agroindustrial stage, with high technology application and inexorable population displacement, the issue of land and the access to it, as well as the struggle to keep it become top-level problems in neoliberal policy-stricken Latin America. This work shows that this new centrality of the struggle for land is a typical situation of the end of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st Century, allowing for conceptions about these new times. In order to do that, it reviews mid-20th-century approaches and presents new post-structuralist conceptualizations. However, the new nonclass conceptualizations might allow us to consider that any agrarian

  6. Gracious Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Kreft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984 Christopher Cordner offered a critical view on theories of graceful movement in sport developed by Ng. G. Wulk, David Best and Joseph Kupfer. In 2001 Paul Davis criticized his view. Cordner responded, rejecting all the criticism. More than a century before, Herbert Spencer and Jean-Marie Guyau had a similar controversy over grace. Both exchanges of opinion involve three positions: that grace is the most efficient movement and therefore something quantitative and measurable; that grace is expression of the wholeness of person and the world; and that grace is something which neither science nor philosophy can explain. To clarify these conflicting issues, this article proposes to examine the history of the notion which goes back to the Latin gratia and has root in the Ancient Greek charis, and to apply the concepts of cultural anchor and thin coherence, following John R. Searle’s explanation that we produce epistemically objective accounts of ontologically subjective reality.

  7. Antiscience and ethical concerns associated with advocacy of Lyme disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwaerter, Paul G; Bakken, Johan S; Dattwyler, Raymond J; Dumler, J Stephen; Halperin, John J; McSweegan, Edward; Nadelman, Robert B; O'Connell, Susan; Shapiro, Eugene D; Sood, Sunil K; Steere, Allen C; Weinstein, Arthur; Wormser, Gary P

    2011-09-01

    Advocacy for Lyme disease has become an increasingly important part of an antiscience movement that denies both the viral cause of AIDS and the benefits of vaccines and that supports unproven (sometimes dangerous) alternative medical treatments. Some activists portray Lyme disease, a geographically limited tick-borne infection, as a disease that is insidious, ubiquitous, difficult to diagnose, and almost incurable; they also propose that the disease causes mainly non-specific symptoms that can be treated only with long-term antibiotics and other unorthodox and unvalidated treatments. Similar to other antiscience groups, these advocates have created a pseudoscientific and alternative selection of practitioners, research, and publications and have coordinated public protests, accused opponents of both corruption and conspiracy, and spurred legislative efforts to subvert evidence-based medicine and peer-reviewed science. The relations and actions of some activists, medical practitioners, and commercial bodies involved in Lyme disease advocacy pose a threat to public health.

  8. The Benefits of Latin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holliday, Lisa R.

    2012-01-01

    Classicists have long claimed that the study of Latin has benefits that exceed knowledge of the language itself, and in the current economic times, these claims are made with urgency. Indeed, many contend that Latin improves English grammar and writing skills, cognitive abilities, and develops transferable skills necessary for success in the…

  9. Advocacy and education in Wisconsin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wisconsin's Radioactive Waste Review Board is required by law to advocate for and educate the public on the high-level nuclear waste issue. The goal of its education program is to empower people by giving them information and skills. Environmental advocacy and public activism are part of the State's Progressive political tradition. The Board seeks and uses public input while developing education programs, and helps local areas organize committees to develop their own programs

  10. Patient Advocacy in an Obstetric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan-Fancher, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    A correlation study design was used to examine the interrelatedness of power, attitudes regarding intermittent fetal monitoring, and perceived barriers to research utilization with a labor and delivery nurse's attitude toward patient advocacy using the conceptual framework of the science of unitary human beings. The linear combination of the three independent variables was significantly correlated to attitude toward patient advocacy and power as knowing participation in change had the greatest impact on patient advocacy. PMID:27641281

  11. Patient Advocacy in an Obstetric Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heelan-Fancher, Lisa M

    2016-10-01

    A correlation study design was used to examine the interrelatedness of power, attitudes regarding intermittent fetal monitoring, and perceived barriers to research utilization with a labor and delivery nurse's attitude toward patient advocacy using the conceptual framework of the science of unitary human beings. The linear combination of the three independent variables was significantly correlated to attitude toward patient advocacy and power as knowing participation in change had the greatest impact on patient advocacy.

  12. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  13. 78 FR 73586 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project..., Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  14. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee scheduled... Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  15. 78 FR 73587 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel; Meeting Cancellation. AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... cancellation of the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee..., Acting Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  16. Development of regional network for nuclear information in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebinuma, Yukio

    Among the recent INIS activities several interesting items are reported. In particular Latin America area where active movements have been seen recently is described in detail in terms of INIS information services. The author reports Latin America regional nuclear information project which has been implemented as 5-year project since 1985 supported by IAEA, and its progress, and describes information service system in Brazil which plays the core role in promoting this project.

  17. Women in insurgent groups in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Roberto-Cáez, Omar Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In Latin America, the use of political violence against authoritarian regimes increased after the Cuban Revolution. In the 1970s, women began to join revolutionary movements in ever-growing numbers, to the point that the presence of female guerrillas or terrorists was no longer remarkable. The most important factors that influenced women to join insurgencies were political ideology, state and domestic violence, culture, social networks, and changes in guerilla tactics. Women took on various i...

  18. Gender, power, and feminisms in breast cancer advocacy: Lessons from the United States and Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Sulik, Gayle; Zierkiewicz, Edyta

    2014-01-01

    The United States breast cancer movement helped to transform breast cancer’s social and medical landscape domestically and, in some ways, internationally. However, differences in gender identities, power relations, and the role of feminism(s) cross‐culturally also shaped breast cancer advocacy itself. After giving a brief introduction to the socio‐historical context of the U.S. and Polish breast cancer movements, this article illuminates some of the linkages and divergences bet...

  19. Healthy Municipios in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, H E; Llanos, G; Contreras, A; Rocabado, F; Gross, S; Suárez, J; González, J

    1995-09-01

    This article describes the Healthy Municipios movement in Latin America and gives examples of some PAHO projects that could become demonstration projects. The Healthy Municipios movement was established in the early 1990s. The movement aims to promote healthy municipalities according to objectives set forth in the 1987 Ottawa Charter on Health Promotion, the 1992 Declaration of Bogota, and the 1993 Caribbean Health Promotion Charter. The movement is a joint effort of government, the health sector, and the community in promoting health locally. Key features of the movement are its creativity, variety, political strength, and adaptation to local conditions. Technical cooperation serves the purpose of facilitating information exchange and promotes the use of modern techniques of analysis and scientific and technical information. All projects shared the following common features: initiation by the local community with strong political commitment, intersectoral organizational structure, widespread community mobilization and participation, problem solving activities, and a recognizable leader. Pioneering projects include the Comprehensive Project for Cienfuegos, Cuba; the Health Manizales, Colombia; the Network in Mexico; Baruta and El Hatillo, Venezuela; Valdivia, Chile; and San Carlos Canton, Costa Rica. It is concluded that these projects and most others aim to assure equity. These efforts are important for placing health on the political agenda and implementing healthy policies. The Valdivia project, for example, serves a population of about 120,000 in the urban city of Valdivia, the semi-urban area, and rural areas. The project was officially sanctioned by the President of Chile on World Health Day in 1993. Progress was reported in mass communication and school-based programs. Attention was directed also to prevention of risk factors for noncommunicable diseases and to the problem of traffic accidents.

  20. Advocacy: AASL Puts the Puzzle Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Sara Kelly

    2007-01-01

    School librarians work with people of all ages, abilities, and personalities; those people are the puzzle pieces that make advocacy for libraries effective. School librarians contribute to and use the resources of their state and national organizations' advocacy efforts. The completed picture of the puzzle is an excellent program with…

  1. Building Evidence for Music Education Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorner-Johnson, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    The economic challenges facing public schools and music education are immense. In this context, music teachers and supporters will need to engage in persuasive advocacy to protect resource allocations to music programs. It is worthwhile to consider the model of music education advocacy that allowed music to be adopted into the Boston Public…

  2. Autism Advocacy: A Network Striving for Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkonen, Tiina; Ream, Robert

    2013-01-01

    In this exploratory case study, we examine the rise of autism on the policy agenda and the new generation of autism advocacy. We focus especially on interconnections between the rhetoric about autism in the media and the emergence and political effectiveness of Autism Speaks, the nation's largest autism advocacy group. We portray how…

  3. 45 CFR 1321.13 - Advocacy responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advocacy responsibilities. 1321.13 Section 1321.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES... AND COMMUNITY PROGRAMS ON AGING State Agency Responsibilities § 1321.13 Advocacy responsibilities....

  4. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  5. Advocacy for Development: Effectiveness, Monitoring and Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barrett, J.B.; Wessel, van M.G.J.; Hilhorst, D.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring and evaluation of advocacy for development is an emerging field. Many CSOs, donors and evaluators are now involved with advocacy. Questions of how to understand and assess programmes are urgent. This e-book seeks to contribute to practical capacity on this front on the basis of lessons le

  6. Succeeding in Postsecondary Ed through Self-Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lock, Robin H.; Layton, Carol A.

    2001-01-01

    Discussion of self-advocacy for postsecondary students with learning disabilities considers learning characteristics, self-advocacy as a critical transition skill, identification of intrinsic processing abilities, developing a self-advocacy plan, and the increasing need for postsecondary accommodations. Insets include a sample self-advocacy plan,…

  7. Assessment of the adequacy of advocacy as a strategy for championing the citizenry of persons with disabilities in Zimbabwe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Sibanda

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This Different civic movements and advocacy groups the world over have committed much effort to championing the rights of persons with disabilities within the equality of rights and opportunities complex. These advocacy efforts have more often been targeted at rights to equal access and opportunities in social services and employment by persons with disabilities. It appears from literature that advocacy has not done enough in demanding those fundamental rights and freedoms which are central to the citizenship of persons with disabilities. As compared to their peers, persons with disabilities have limited, or to say the least, constrained citizenship rights. For a very long time, advocacy has been seen as a powerful strategy for championing the rights of persons with disabilities. This paper provides a critical analysis of the adequacy of the various advocacy initiatives to establish the extent to which the initiatives have addressed the citizenry issues affecting persons with disabilities. The author argues that citizenship rights form the basis for the equal opportunity complex inherent in the different types of advocacy. Thus, without addressing the issue of citizenry of persons with disabilities, the different types of advocacy cannot be endorsed as the panacea to the equal rights and opportunity problems facing people with disabilities in communities. From these arguments, the paper concludes that what has compromised the adequacy of advocacy for the citizenry of persons with disabilities is that the strategy has been patronized by non-disabled people. The author therefore recommends a multiple-advocacy approach coupled with practical policies, a genuine political will and strong political representation as the best way forward.

  8. Community Health Worker Professional Advocacy: Voices of Action from the 2014 National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabo, Samantha; Wennerstrom, Ashley; Phillips, David; Haywoord, Catherine; Redondo, Floribella; Bell, Melanie L; Ingram, Maia

    2015-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explores community health worker (CHW) engagement in professional advocacy. Data from the National Community Health Worker Advocacy Survey (n = 1661) assessed the relationship between CHW professional advocacy and CHW demographics, and work characteristics. Qualitative data articulated the quality of professional advocacy efforts. Approximately, 30% of CHW respondents advocated for professional advancement or collaborated with other CHWs to advance the workforce. Advocacy was more prevalent among CHWs affiliated with a professional network. CHW advocacy targeted recognition of the field, appropriate training and compensation, and sustainable funding. CHW professional advocacy is imperative to advancement of the field.

  9. The voice of Florence Nightingale on advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selanders, Louise C; Crane, Patrick C

    2012-01-01

    Modern nursing is complex, ever changing, and multi focused. Since the time of Florence Nightingale, however, the goal of nursing has remained unchanged, namely to provide a safe and caring environment that promotes patient health and well being. Effective use of an interpersonal tool, such as advocacy, enhances the care-giving environment. Nightingale used advocacy early and often in the development of modern nursing. By reading her many letters and publications that have survived, it is possible to identify her professional goals and techniques. Specifically, Nightingale valued egalitarian human rights and developed leadership principles and practices that provide useful advocacy techniques for nurses practicing in the 21st century. In this article we will review the accomplishments of Florence Nightingale, discuss advocacy in nursing and show how Nightingale used advocacy through promoting both egalitarian human rights and leadership activities. We will conclude by exploring how Nightingale's advocacy is as relevant for the 21st century as it was for the 19th century. PMID:22320877

  10. Advocacy evaluation: challenges and emerging trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devlin-Foltz, David; Fagen, Michael C; Reed, Ehren; Medina, Robert; Neiger, Brad L

    2012-09-01

    Devising, promoting, and implementing changes in policies and regulations are important components of population-level health promotion. Whether advocating for changes in school meal nutrition standards or restrictions on secondhand smoke, policy change can create environments conducive to healthier choices. Such policy changes often result from complex advocacy efforts that do not lend themselves to traditional evaluation approaches. In a challenging fiscal environment, allocating scarce resources to policy advocacy may be particularly difficult. A well-designed evaluation that moves beyond inventorying advocacy activities can help make the case for funding advocacy and policy change efforts. Although it is one thing to catalog meetings held, position papers drafted, and pamphlets distributed, it is quite another to demonstrate that these outputs resulted in useful policy change outcomes. This is where the emerging field of advocacy evaluation fits in by assessing (among other things) strategic learning, capacity building, and community organizing. Based on recent developments, this article highlights several challenges advocacy evaluators are currently facing and provides new resources for addressing them. PMID:22773623

  11. The Voice of Which People? Transnational Advocacy Networks and Governance Networks at the United Nations

    OpenAIRE

    Willetts, P.

    2013-01-01

    We can expand our understanding of the politics of global networks and how they relate to the United Nations, by closely examining the concept of a network. There is a long-established International Relations literature focusing on the more institutionalised, international non-governmental organisations. Keck and Sikkink have drawn on the Sociology literature covering social movements in global politics to discuss transnational advocacy networks. It is also necessary to distinguish a third ma...

  12. American Nations, Latin States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Nelson Ahumada

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The nation, as artifact of modernity, assumes particularities in America such as the colonization and genocide of original peoples which still weighs as a never ending comeback. Nevertheless, capital, with its overwhelming force, destroyed peoples, cultures, traditions and landscapes. Latin America faces the challenge of uniting beyond the necessities of capital, and beyond two languages, spanish and portuguese. All of which has full validity at present with the blocks UNASUR and ALBA. Ethnocentricity is postulated as the exclusive condition of all possible humanity and, as programme, racism without races; Latin American miscegenation, as the potential for unity and the strength of emancipation as a project. Our intellectuals, who constructed a unique and superlative literature, are the lighthouses in the development of a nationalism without races. Anthropology in debate with psychoanalysis can become a compass in rethinking our America.

  13. Three Latin Phonological Details

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Birgit Anette

    2006-01-01

    The present paper deals with three minor details of Latin phonology: 1) the development of the initial sequence *u¿l¿-, where it is suggested that an apparent vacillation between ul- and vol-/vul- represents sandhi variants going back to the proto-language, 2) the adjectives ama¯rus ‘bitter' and ......' and ava¯rus ‘greedy' and 3) the internal cluster -mpl- of the nouns exemplum and templum....

  14. Electricity in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breeze, P.

    1998-12-01

    The report provides an overview of the Latin American power market; analyses the power generation, transmission and distribution capabilities of 20 countries in central and south America; includes detailed comparative data on current capacity, shortfall and growth; investigates the existing network infrastructures and projected demand; examines the opportunities for independent power producers resulting from deregulation; assesses indigenous and imported fuel resources; and discusses the broad financial opportunities and restraints.

  15. Gender and advocacy in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray-ross, S

    1997-01-01

    The Centre for Development and Population Activities (CEDPA) and the Indonesian Midwives Association (IBI) have developed a two-phase training program regarding gender issues for the association's midwives. The first phase focuses on the leadership, management, and advocacy skills necessary to articulate program needs and to take part in making decisions regarding family planning and reproductive health. The second phase concerns the integration of gender into project design. Proposals developed by the midwives include the following: 1) to improve counseling services for women in a district where 70% of the women using contraception do not decide for themselves which methods to use; 2) to reduce maternal mortality in a district where it has increased by 20% and where women have died while waiting for husbands or fathers-in-law to make the decision to bring them to hospitals; 3) to develop gender-sensitive materials concerning HIV/AIDS; and 4) to expand gender training to all levels of IBI, to provide follow-up technical support, and to integrate gender into the mission statement of the organization. Dr. Nafsiah Mboi (member of Parliament and vice chair of the Global Commission on Women's Health), Dr. Widyastuti Wibisana (director of community participation in the Ministry of Health), Dr. Kokila Vaidya (WHO Medical Officer), Carla Bianpoen (gender specialist with the World Bank), and Titi Sumbung (director of the Melati Foundation) helped to develop and to conduct the program. IBI, which has 65,000 members, provides family planning, reproductive health, and maternal and child health services throughout Indonesia. PMID:12292791

  16. Reproductive governance in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lynn M; Roberts, Elizabeth F S

    2012-01-01

    This paper develops the concept of reproductive governance as an analytic tool for tracing the shifting political rationalities of population and reproduction. As advanced here, the concept of reproductive governance refers to the mechanisms through which different historical configurations of actors - such as state, religious, and international financial institutions, NGOs, and social movements - use legislative controls, economic inducements, moral injunctions, direct coercion, and ethical incitements to produce, monitor, and control reproductive behaviours and population practices. Examples are drawn from Latin America, where reproductive governance is undergoing a dramatic transformation as public policy conversations are coalescing around new moral regimes and rights-based actors through debates about abortion, emergency contraception, sterilisation, migration, and assisted reproductive technologies. Reproductive discourses are increasingly framed through morality and contestations over 'rights', where rights-bearing citizens are pitted against each other in claiming reproductive, sexual, indigenous, and natural rights, as well as the 'right to life' of the unborn. The concept of reproductive governance can be applied to other settings in order to understand shifting political rationalities within the domain of reproduction. PMID:22889430

  17. Family planning in Latin America's barriadas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-05-01

    In Latin America, many rural people build dwellings in settlements on the cities' fringes without permission from the authorities. The authorities make several unsuccessful attempts to drive them away, but eventually ignore them. In the 1960s, family planning (FP) associations were concerned about how they can serve the shantytowns, which needed their services but had no social services at all, e.g., water supply and sanitation. In the early 1970s, PROFAMILIA Colombia began a new form of FP service delivery in rural areas by training someone from the community who believed in FP to distribution (CBD) programs provided more FP than all of PROFAMILIA's 60 clinics. In 1973, PROFAMILIA started its URBAN CBD program in the slums of Bogota and learned that the people wanted FP. The CBD movement spread throughout urban and rural Latin America. Brazil's BEMFAM developed the world's largest CBD program. By 1985, 10,365 distribution posts operated in Latin America and, by 1991, there were 26,423. In urban slums in the 1980s, Mexico's MEXFAM began using community doctors, who tend to be new medical graduates. Often the community and the doctors respect each other so much that many doctors remain in the shantytowns beyond their required time. The residents' acceptance of FP provided by people who understand the community shows how they want to plan their lives and better themselves. In addition, they have taken the chance to seek a better life by leaving hopeless situations in rural areas and by building dwellings for themselves, even though they had no money, land, or even basic necessities. In Peru, shantytown residents were moved to the desert and supplied with basic construction materials. They built a community, Villa El Salvador, now complete with tree-lined streets, shops, schools, and movies. Shantytown dwellers may have the solution to Latin America's problems. PMID:12179848

  18. Inflation Targeting in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Vittorio Corbo; Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel

    2002-01-01

    This paper analyzes Latin America’s recent experience with the use of inflation targeting (IT) while the region has made substantial progress toward eradicating high inflation. The paper assesses the implementation and results of inflation targeting in Latin America from a broad perspective. It starts by reviewing the issues relevant for the choice of exchange-rate regimes and monetary frameworks, documenting the evolution of exchange rate and monetary regimes in Latin America during the last...

  19. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenby Marieah; Reeder Anthony I; Murdoch Linda; Richards Rosalina

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycl...

  20. Examining School Counselors' Commitments to Social Justice Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldwisch, Rachel P.

    2016-01-01

    Many school counselors endorse using social justice advocacy to close achievement gaps. In this study, school counselors from a single state scored in the moderate to high range on the Social Issues Advocacy Scale. Results showed alignment between school counselors' self-endorsement of social justice advocacy and scores on the Advocacy…

  1. Development and Assessment of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Johanna E.; Marszalek, Jacob M.; Linnemeyer, Rachel M.; Bahner, Angela D.; Misialek, Leah Hanson

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the development and the initial psychometric evaluation of the Social Issues Advocacy Scale in two studies. In the first study, an exploratory factor analysis (n = 278) revealed a four-factor scale, accounting for 71.4% of the variance, measuring different aspects of social issue advocacy: Political and Social Advocacy,…

  2. 77 FR 13390 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-06

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 19, 2012 through April 27, 2012. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  3. 76 FR 69799 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on...

  4. 76 FR 12418 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 14, 2011 through April 29, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  5. 77 FR 16895 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Burden Reduction Project Committee scheduled... cancelled pending renewal of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Charter. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Audrey...

  6. 75 FR 68403 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Treasury. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment, ideas, and suggestions on...

  7. 76 FR 75951 - Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Meeting Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service (IRS... the open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel scheduled for Tuesday, December 6, 2011, and Wednesday.... ] Dated: November 30, 2011. Shawn Collins, Director, Taxpayer Advocacy Panel. BILLING CODE 4830-01-P...

  8. 78 FR 13157 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: February 22, 2013, through April 1, 2013. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION... individuals to help improve the nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy...

  9. 75 FR 9028 - Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Recruitment Notice for the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel AGENCY: Internal Revenue... Advocacy Panel (TAP) Members. DATES: March 15, 2010 through April 30, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT... nation's tax agency by applying to be members of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP). The mission of...

  10. 78 FR 24694 - Family Advocacy Command Assistance Team (FACAT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-26

    ... of the Secretary 32 CFR Part 60 RIN 0790-AI40 Family Advocacy Command Assistance Team (FACAT) AGENCY... prescribe procedures for implementation and use of the multi-disciplinary Family Advocacy Command Assistant... establishes a DoD multi-disciplinary Family Advocacy Command Assistant Team (FACAT) to support...

  11. Aging Action: A Course in Senior Advocacy in Kansas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kansas State Advisory Council on Aging, Topeka.

    Skills useful in advocacy of senior citizens' needs are discussed in this manual. The topics included are: (1) the meaning of advocacy; (2) assertiveness training for aging-action; (3) identifying issues; (4) choosing issues; (5) developing a plan of action; (6) organizing; (7) legislative advocacy; (8) criteria to evaluate potential legislative…

  12. Convergence Patterns in Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Quiroga, Paola Andrea Barrientos

    Literature on convergence among Latin American countries is still scarce compared to other regions. Moreover, almost none of the research connects convergence to the economic history of Latin America and the usual finding is one speed of convergence. In this paper I analyze 32 countries and 108...

  13. Locking in on Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MICHAEL; RICE

    2006-01-01

    China cautious as it sets up generous investment in Latin America The United States is keeping a watchful eye as China bolsters political and economic ties with Latin America. The situation has U.S. political analysts trying to determine just how China s emerging influence

  14. Two Lefts in Latin America?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen Fryba

    In this working paper I list five researchers' categorizations of the Latin American left in power (april 2006) in a schematic form. The most important criteria for the categorizations are given.......In this working paper I list five researchers' categorizations of the Latin American left in power (april 2006) in a schematic form. The most important criteria for the categorizations are given....

  15. Science Advocacy in a Shifting Policy Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickford, E. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the last 50 years, federal investment in research as a share of total spending has declined from a little more than 10% in 1963 to less than 4% in 2013 (AAAS, 2013). In an era of sequestration and shrinking budgets, more and more scientists are advocating directly to policymakers (and their staff) to gain support for research programs and funding. The best advocates understand the political and policy processes, and anticipate policy shifts that may affect them. While scientists are trained with the technical skills to conduct their science, teach it to others, and market their work in order to win grants and publish papers, the policy advocacy arena is unfamiliar territory to many. Acquiring yet another area of expertise mid-career can be daunting, but science advocacy need not require another academic degree. Connecting with policymakers is the first step, and then an understanding of each policymaker's issue history and top priorities will inform the sales pitch. Here, I present some experiences on both the pitching and receiving ends of science advocacy from my year in the US Senate as an AGU/AAAS Congressional Science Fellow, and some guidance for meeting with policymakers and successful science advocacy.

  16. Composite Indicators between Analysis and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saltelli, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    We explore to what extent composite indicators, capable of aggregating multi-dimensional processes into simplified, stylised concepts, are up to the task of underpinning the development of data-based narratives for political advocacy. A recent OECD working paper (Nardo et al., 2005, Handbook on constructing composite indicators: methodology and…

  17. Advocacy and political convergence under preference uncertainty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Reuben; C. Traxler; F. van Winden

    2015-01-01

    We study the formation of advocacy groups and how they can impact policy outcomes by revealing information about voters׳ preferences to uninformed political candidates. We conduct a laboratory experiment based on a two-candidate spatial electoral competition setting where the policy preferences of v

  18. The state of advocacy in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, G Larry

    2015-12-01

    Non-profit advocacy organizations have been important in raising public awareness, promoting education, and enhancing political activism for issues related to cancer. Grassroots efforts aimed at fund-raising have substantially augmented federal funding for community outreach and research. The objective of this review was to evaluate successful accomplishments of several major non-profit organizations that are focused on cancer. A review of news media, medical literature, and financial records (using GuideStar) was performed to access the organizational structure and productivity of several successful cancer advocacy organizations. Compared to other cancer advocacy groups, the American Cancer Society is the oldest (>100years old) and worth the most with net assets of over $1.25 billion dollars and an annual total revenue of over $900 million dollars. The ACS also has the highest overhead at 41%. Most of the gynecologic cancer advocacy groups are approximately 20years old and have collective total annual revenue of over $17M dollars. The Ovarian Cancer Research Fund has been the most successful at raising funds and building net assets to date while maintaining an overhead of <10%. The most active and financially successful cancer organizations tend to be older, have higher overhead, spend less on total administration, spend more on fund-raising, have more events (rather than a limited number), and use aggressive social media strategies.

  19. Be Proactive with Parent Advocacy Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Mariam

    2012-01-01

    This article elaborates on parent advocacy groups, a key component in meeting the needs of gifted children. The case for parent groups couldn't be stronger--or more urgent. According to Nancy Green, Executive Director of the National Association for Gifted Children, "Quality gifted education exists in places where there are strong parent groups."…

  20. Cartographies of the Political Camp of Afro-Descendents in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Agustín Lao-Montes

    2009-01-01

    This article lays out, in general terms, what it calls the political camp of Afro-descendents in Latin America. After establishing a series of theoretical and methodological criteria for the historical analysis of black movements in modernity and the Afro-American movements in particular, the article focuses on the emergence of afro-descendant movements in Latin America during the last part of the 1980s. One of the principal arguments is that in the 1990s a political camp of afro-descendents ...

  1. Women's Theologies, Women's Pedagogies: Liberating Praxes of Latin American Women Educators in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Lauren Ila

    2009-01-01

    In this dissertation, through semi-structured interviews with 36 female social movement participants and 3 male participants in El Salvador, Nicaragua, Bolivia, and Argentina, I ask, "How do women in Latin American social movements perceive the influence of theology on these movements' pedagogies?" I argue that through this work, the women…

  2. A holistic model of advocacy: factors that influence its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsch, Sylvia M; Sternard, Marsha J; Hovarter, Rebecca; Matzke, Vicki

    2004-02-01

    Although advocacy is embraced by nursing as an essential component of holistic philosophy, its scope is often limited in practice. In this article, a research study that examined the use of an expanded definition of advocacy is described. A link to the role of advocacy as a complementary therapy and in relation to facilitating the use of complementary therapies by patients is provided. Fifty-two registered nurses completed a researcher developed advocacy research instrument that assessed the use of moral-ethical, legal, political, spiritual, and substitutive advocacy along with various factors thought to influence the use of advocacy including moral development, perceived assertiveness, and perceived job security. An additional 40 RN-BSN students generated case studies of advocacy enacted in practice that were used as examples of the five categories of advocacy and to support the findings of the survey. Results indicated that moral-ethical advocacy was used more often than the other four categories. Moral stage development had a significant effect on substitutive advocacy but assertiveness and job security were not significant factors influencing any category of advocacy. PMID:14744505

  3. A holistic model of advocacy: factors that influence its use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubsch, Sylvia M; Sternard, Marsha J; Hovarter, Rebecca; Matzke, Vicki

    2004-02-01

    Although advocacy is embraced by nursing as an essential component of holistic philosophy, its scope is often limited in practice. In this article, a research study that examined the use of an expanded definition of advocacy is described. A link to the role of advocacy as a complementary therapy and in relation to facilitating the use of complementary therapies by patients is provided. Fifty-two registered nurses completed a researcher developed advocacy research instrument that assessed the use of moral-ethical, legal, political, spiritual, and substitutive advocacy along with various factors thought to influence the use of advocacy including moral development, perceived assertiveness, and perceived job security. An additional 40 RN-BSN students generated case studies of advocacy enacted in practice that were used as examples of the five categories of advocacy and to support the findings of the survey. Results indicated that moral-ethical advocacy was used more often than the other four categories. Moral stage development had a significant effect on substitutive advocacy but assertiveness and job security were not significant factors influencing any category of advocacy.

  4. Recognizing new opportunities: reconceptualizing policy advocacy in everyday organizational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosley, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    Policy advocacy is a concept that is of both practical and historical importance to the profession of social work. To keep up with developments in how advocacy is practiced at the ground level, however, social work research on advocacy needs to expand in scope. Changes in government contracting and public management practices have reshaped the opportunity structure for policy advocacy, incentivizing a kind of advocacy that is routine, professionalized, and collaborative. At the same time, these practices have raised questions about democratic representation and the degree to which social work advocacy adequately reflects client concerns. This article presents a model for how policy advocacy can be usefully reconceptualized to account for changes in the policy and funding environment and concludes by suggesting ways that social work research and theory can better reflect practice realities. PMID:24032304

  5. Independent donor ethical assessment: aiming to standardize donor advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhury, Devasmita; Jotterand, Fabrice; Casenave, Gerald; Smith-Morris, Carolyn

    2014-06-01

    Living organ donation has become more common across the world. To ensure an informed consent process, given the complex issues involved with organ donation, independent donor advocacy is required. The choice of how donor advocacy is administered is left up to each transplant center. This article presents the experience and process of donor advocacy at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center administered by a multidisciplinary team consisting of physicians, surgeons, psychologists, medical ethicists and anthropologists, lawyers, a chaplain, a living kidney donor, and a kidney transplant recipient. To ensure that advocacy remains fair and consistent for all donors being considered, the donor advocacy team at University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center developed the Independent Donor Ethical Assessment, a tool that may be useful to others in rendering donor advocacy. In addition, the tool may be modified as circumstances arise to improve donor advocacy and maintain uniformity in decision making. PMID:24919733

  6. Harry Potter en latin

    OpenAIRE

    Elfassi, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    En 2003 et en 2007 ont été publiées les traductions latines des deux premiers tomes de Harry Potter de Joanne Kathleen Rowling : Harry Potter à l’école des sorciers et Harry Potter et la chambre des secrets . Sans doute ne faut-il pas accorder à ces traductions une importance disproportionnée. Ce ne sont certainement pas elles qui ont créé le succès de Harry Potter, elles ne font que l’accompagner ; et bien qu’on ne puisse pas les réduire à cette seule caractéristique, ce sont aussi des produ...

  7. Fermilab and Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, Leon M.

    2006-09-01

    As Director of Fermilab, starting in 1979, I began a series of meetings with scientists in Latin America. The motivation was to stir collaboration in the field of high energy particle physics, the central focus of Fermilab. In the next 13 years, these Pan American Symposia stirred much discussion of the use of modern physics, created several groups to do collaborative research at Fermilab, and often centralized facilities and, today, still provides the possibility for much more productive North-South collaboration in research and education. In 1992, I handed these activities over to the AAAS, as President. This would, I hoped, broaden areas of collaboration. Such collaboration is unfortunately very sensitive to political events. In a rational world, it would be the rewards, cultural and economic, of collaboration that would modulate political relations. We are not there yet.

  8. Embracing openness: the challenges of OER in Latin American education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadia Paola Mireles Torres

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Open Educational Resources (OER movement and the Open Access began only over a decade ago. During this period, the progress of the Open Educational Resources movement took place in developed countries for the most part. Recently, new projects have begun to emerge with a strong emphasis on open education. Yet, the concept of openness in education is a very innovative one, and it has not been embraced by many. In some regions, such as Latin America, OER is still in its early stages and faces many challenges that need to be addressed. Some of these challenges include awareness raising and capacity development. But there is a bigger challenge to face: embracing openness as a core value and an institutional strategy. In this paper, we offer a brief overview of the meaning of the term “open” in education and we analyze the challenges facing the OER in Latin American countries.

  9. Cartographies of the Political Camp of Afro-Descendents in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agustín Lao-Montes

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available This article lays out, in general terms, what it calls the political camp of Afro-descendents in Latin America. After establishing a series of theoretical and methodological criteria for the historical analysis of black movements in modernity and the Afro-American movements in particular, the article focuses on the emergence of afro-descendant movements in Latin America during the last part of the 1980s. One of the principal arguments is that in the 1990s a political camp of afro-descendents starts to emerge in the region of Latin America based on a series of developments, including the emergence of new social movements that included ethno-racial movements of Afros and indigenous people, events of regional importance like the contra-celebration of 1492 in 1992, the World Conference against Racism 2001 in Durban, South Africa, and the effects of the neoliberal pattern of globalization. The political camp of Afro-descendents is composed not only of social movements, but also of state actors and transnational actors (such as the World Bank and the Ford Foundation. The article concludes with an analysis of the challenges and perspectives of Afro-American politics in general and of Afro-Latin movements in particular considering the current crisis of the modern/colonial world-system.

  10. The later evolution of modern sport in Latin America: the North American influence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbena, J L

    2001-01-01

    American impact on modern sports in Latin America overlaps geographically and chronologically with the European, especially British, impact. Principally baseball in the Caribbean basin, more recently basketball and volleyball across the hemisphere and occasionally American football in more limited areas illustrate a north-to-south movement executed by businessmen, educators, missionaries, military personnel, returning travelers (often students), sports entrepreneurs and television. Often initially supported by promoters of development within Latin America, this transfer has altered local recreational patterns and attracted Latin athletes to pursue careers in North America, provoking accusations of cultural imperialism and exploitation. PMID:18592684

  11. CAN CIVIC SOCIETY CHANGE JOURNALISM? The experience of civic advocacy journalism in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Waisbord

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Following recent studies on “field theory” and “new institutionalism”in journalism studies (Benson 2004, 2006, the starting premise ofthis article is that the press maintains linkages with three externalfields: states, markets and civic society. Linkages are shaped bystructural relations as well as by newsmaking practices. Structuralfactors such as ownership, financing, and legislation determinethe connections of news organizations with states, business, andcivic actors. The processes of news production and consumptioninvolving newsrooms, sources, and audiences also affect theintensity of the relations between the press and external fields.

  12. Orientation professionnelle en amerique latine.

    OpenAIRE

    Agudelo Mejia S

    1982-01-01

    ILO pub. Article on vocational guidance practices in Latin America - discusses major results of a questionnaire survey showing that vocational guidance services are limited in terms of target group, and by lack of overall labour market information. References.

  13. Nuclear governance in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Layla Dawood

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides an outlook of the regional relations concerning nuclear technology in Latin America. For that purpose, we initially discuss the historic relationship of the Latin American countries with the set of rules, norms, principles and organizations involved in nuclear governance. The article provides an analysis of the connection between the multilateral institutional framework and the bilateral arrangements aimed at curbing the proliferation of nuclear weapons in the region. The current state of nuclear cooperation among the countries of the region is also mapped. In addition, the article assesses the peaceful use of nuclear technology in the region and the potential expansion of the use of nuclear energy by the Latin American countries. Considerations on the trends for nuclear cooperation among the countries of Latin America are also offered.

  14. Educational Research in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Abdeljalil Akkari; Soledad Perez

    1998-01-01

    The present paper consists of four primary sections. First, we describe the historical context of educational research in Latin America. In the second section, we focus on various theoretical frameworks that are applied to educational research in the region. We identify the main institutions involved in this research in the third section. Finally, in conclusion we offer suggestions that we consider to be of greatest priority for the future of educational research in Latin America.

  15. Latin America: emerging nuclear market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need for nuclear power in Latin American countries is surveyed. It is concluded that Latin America offers the greatest external market for all exporters of nuclear reactors and associated services in the near future. Mexico, Venezuela, Ecuador, and Bolivia are the only countries with fossil-fuel reserves adequate to meet their requirements in the next 20 to 30 years. Nuclear power is a necessity to maintain or improve the standard of living in the countries of Brazil, Argentina, Chile, and Peru

  16. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community. PMID:19061060

  17. Prison health advocacy and its changing boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awofeso, Niyi

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy is an important tool for translating population health objectives and research findings into policy and practice, as well as for enhancing stakeholder support for programmes and activities with a potential to improve the health of populations. At the inception of modern prisons, health advocacy approaches focused on appealing to humanitarian and religious sentiments of stakeholders to improve the well-being of prisoners. This approach achieved limited results, not least because of persistent apathy of custodial authorities and the public to prisoners' wellbeing. From the mid twentieth century onwards, a constitutional and human rights approach evolved, with courts becoming actively involved in mandating minimum health standards in prisons. Penal populism eroded public support for a judicial recourse to improving prison health services, and encouraged governments to institute procedural barriers to prisoner-initiated litigation. The author proposes an approach premised on public health principles as an appropriate platform to advocate for improvements in prison health services in this era. Such an advocacy platform combines the altruistic goals of the humanitarian and constitutional rights approaches with an appeal to community's self-interest by alerting the public to the social, financial and health implications inherent in released prisoners suffering from major communicable and chronic diseases re-entering the community.

  18. Advocacy to address disabling diseases: TDR holds brainstorming session.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-06-01

    The UN Development Program/World Bank/World Health Organization's Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases hosted a meeting in January 1998 to discuss new ways of generating sustained commitment to combat disabling tropical diseases, such as filariasis and onchocerciasis. The participants agreed that advocacy should be targeted to a wider audience than the health sector, including international donors, industry, national governments, and endemic communities themselves. Advocacy efforts will be supported by development of a standard protocol that will 1) identify and present the type of evidence that generates sustainable commitment, 2) develop and use appropriate messages for each audience, 3) evaluate new advocacy approaches for their impact on behavioral change and disease control, and 4) evaluate advocacy campaigns. Advocacy about lymphatic filariasis will target all levels, while advocacy about onchocerciasis will target national and local levels.

  19. Social Movements, Protest, and Policy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of Latin American social groups to mobilize has excited the imagination of students of the region since the birth of Latin American studies itself. Alongside the cultural turn, many social movement organizations continue to engage directly with politics. Aspirational goals notwithstanding, in order to improve conditions they devote much of their energy to influencing policy. Although scholars have begun to address the policy impact of Latin American social movements, we have limited systematized understanding of the conditions and mechanisms by which social movement protest affects policy outcomes. This essay argues that a policy process approach offers a useful first cut into more systematic analysis of social movements, protest, and their policy consequences in Latin America. Resumen: Movimientos Sociales, Protesta y Políticas de Gobierno La capacidad de movilización social que evidencia América Latina ha captado el imaginario de investigadores desde los albores de los estudios latinoamericanos. A pesar del giro cultural sobre el tema, muchos movimientos sociales siguen entablando la política de forma directa. Amén de sus metas aspiracionales, en pos de mejorar sus condiciones dedican una cantidad apreciable de sus esfuerzos a influenciar políticas de gobierno. Si bien es cierto que una cantidad no menospreciable de investigadores consideran esos impactos aún hace falta conocimiento sistematizado sobre las condiciones y los mecanismos a través de los cuales la protesta social afecta las políticas del estado. Este ensayo argumenta que enfoques centrados en los procesos de la política pública ofrecen una buena entrada al análisis más sistemático sobre los movimientos sociales, protesta, y sus consecuencias para políticas de gobierno.

  20. Southern voices on climate policy choices: Analysis of and lessons learned from civil society advocacy on climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reid, Hannah; Ampomah, Gifty; Prera, Maria Isabel Olazabal; Rabbani, Golam; Zvigadza, Shepard

    2012-05-15

    This report provides an analysis of the tools and tactics advocacy groups use to influence policy responses to climate change at international, regional, national and sub-national levels. More than 20 climate networks and their member organisations have contributed to the report with their experiences of advocacy on climate change, including over 70 case studies from a wide range of countries - including many of the poorest - in Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Pacific. These advocacy activities primarily target national governments, but also international and regional processes, donors and the private sector. Analyses and case studies show how civil society plays key roles in pushing for new laws, programmes, policies or strategies on climate change, in holding governments to account on their commitments; in identifying the lack of joined-up government responses to climate change; and in ensuring that national policy making does not forget the poor and vulnerable. The report is the first joint product of the Southern Voices Capacity Building Programme, or for short: Southern Voices on Climate Change.

  1. How interest group advocacy is shaped by state policy environments

    OpenAIRE

    Marchetti, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Group advocacy has achieved major policy successes in the past fifty years, anti-discrimination policies in employment, and the legalization of same-sex marriage to name two. But does this advocacy represent all groups that need it? In new research which surveys over 200 advocacy organizations Kathleen Marchetti looks at why some groups, such as black women and transgender individuals, are missing from some organizations’ policy discussions and representation. She finds that, among other fact...

  2. Developing the environment agency's capacity for policy advocacy

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Philip

    2002-01-01

    The overall rationale and aim of the project was to strengthen Environment Agency policy advocacy effectiveness. In addition to this overall aim, the project had two more specific aims: to identify key features to be included in any process for generating and embedding in the organisation broad policy advocacy positions relevant to UK and EU level policy development and to provide an assessment of Environment Agency policy advocacy effectiveness - alongside English Nature in comparative persp...

  3. Information politics, transnational advocacy and education for all

    OpenAIRE

    Magrath, Bronwen

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Successful advocacy requires research. Advocacy organizations need to gather evidence to show the extent of a particular social problem, the lack of official response to the problem, and solutions that could be fostered from the ground up. The process of gathering information and using it for political advocacy has been termed “information politics” (Keck & Sikkink 1998). In the past two decades, civil society organizations have played an increasingly prominent role in global...

  4. Latin America’s Subtle Racism: Salient Managerial Implications For Non-Latin American Managers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutilio Martinez

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the mid nineteen nineties most Latin American nations have implemented free market policies. The ensuing economic stability has attracted investment from non-Latin corporations, thereby causing the transfer of non-Latin executives to Latin nations. For many of these executives, their Latin assignments include an unexpected challenge: Dealing with Latin America’s subtle but pervasive racism. Such racism contributes to the mistreatment of labor and influences the promotion and hiring of executives. These behaviors, although unapologetically accepted in Latin America, hurt productivity. Non-Latin managers should, therefore, treat workers fairly and hire and promote executives based exclusively upon job related factors.  

  5. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  6. 75 FR 47348 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  7. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  8. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  9. 76 FR 56879 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  10. 76 FR 10941 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  11. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  12. 75 FR 10864 - Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  13. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  14. 75 FR 4140 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  15. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  16. 75 FR 55404 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  17. 75 FR 7540 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  18. 78 FR 64064 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  19. 75 FR 39333 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  20. 76 FR 17993 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  1. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  2. 75 FR 33893 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  3. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center.... SUMMARY: An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Assistance Center Improvements Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas,...

  4. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  5. 76 FR 37196 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  6. 75 FR 62629 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  7. 78 FR 78517 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Taxpayer Communications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  8. 76 FR 45005 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  9. 76 FR 2194 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  10. Cultural carrying capacity: Organ donation advocacy, discursive framing, and social media engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Christopher A

    2016-09-01

    Social media sites such as Facebook have become a powerful tool for public health outreach because they enable advocacy organizations to influence the rapidly increasing number of people who frequent these forums. Yet the very open-ness of social media sites creates fierce competition for public attention. The vast majority of social media messages provoke little or no reaction because of the sheer volume of information that confronts the typical social media user each day. In this article, I present a theory of the "cultural carrying capacity" of social media messaging campaigns. I argue that advocacy organizations inspire more endorsements, comments, and shares by social media users if they diversify the discursive content of their messages. Yet too much diversification creates large, disconnected audiences that lack the sense of shared purpose necessary to sustain an online movement. To evaluate this theory, I created a Facebook application that collects social media posts produced by forty-two organ donation advocacy organizations over 1.5 years, as well as supplemental information about the organization, its audience, and the broader social context in which they interact. Time series models provide strong evidence for my theory net of demographic characteristics of social media users, the resources and tactics of each organization, and broader external factors. I conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for public health, cultural sociology, and the nascent field of computational social science.

  11. Cultural carrying capacity: Organ donation advocacy, discursive framing, and social media engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Christopher A

    2016-09-01

    Social media sites such as Facebook have become a powerful tool for public health outreach because they enable advocacy organizations to influence the rapidly increasing number of people who frequent these forums. Yet the very open-ness of social media sites creates fierce competition for public attention. The vast majority of social media messages provoke little or no reaction because of the sheer volume of information that confronts the typical social media user each day. In this article, I present a theory of the "cultural carrying capacity" of social media messaging campaigns. I argue that advocacy organizations inspire more endorsements, comments, and shares by social media users if they diversify the discursive content of their messages. Yet too much diversification creates large, disconnected audiences that lack the sense of shared purpose necessary to sustain an online movement. To evaluate this theory, I created a Facebook application that collects social media posts produced by forty-two organ donation advocacy organizations over 1.5 years, as well as supplemental information about the organization, its audience, and the broader social context in which they interact. Time series models provide strong evidence for my theory net of demographic characteristics of social media users, the resources and tactics of each organization, and broader external factors. I conclude by discussing the implications of these findings for public health, cultural sociology, and the nascent field of computational social science. PMID:26879407

  12. Professionalizing a Global Social Movement: Universities and Human Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, David; Bromley, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Research on the human rights movement emphasizes direct changes in nation-states, focusing on the efficacy of treaties and the role of advocacy in mitigating immediate violations. However, more than 140 universities in 59 countries established academic chairs, research centers, and programs for human rights from 1968-2000, a development that…

  13. Lives Worth Living: Religious Education and Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayres, Jennifer R.

    2013-01-01

    When people of faith participate in movements for social change, how are their religious and moral identities formed, challenged, and transformed? Although they have explicit and tangible goals as they participate in advocacy, protest, and boycotts, religious social activists also, James Jasper argues, craft "lives worth living" (1997).…

  14. Disease Advocacy Organizations Catalyze Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Fontaine Terry

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Disease advocacy organizations have long played an important role in the continuum from basic science to therapy development in rare disease research. PXE International has sometimes led the field in innovative ways, venturing into specific activities that have traditionally been conducted by scientists. As lay founders, we have engaged in gene discovery, gene patenting, diagnostic development, epidemiological studies, clinical trials and therapy research and development. This article will describe the steps that we took, and the ways in which we have scaled these efforts for the larger community.

  15. Nursing advocacy for women veterans and suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conard, Patricia L; Armstrong, Myrna L; Young, Cathy; Hogan, La Micha

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about suicide variables in women Veterans. The authors reviewed numerous applicable health care and military literary sources regarding suicide in this population. The current article describes the surrounding circumstances, military war/conflict culture, and potential effects on women Veterans, including major collection problems with current Veteran data. Women Veterans are increasingly reporting more behavioral health issues (e.g., posttraumatic stress disorder) and attempting suicide upon civilian reintegration. Outcomes from this literature review suggest the importance of nursing advocacy to create better rapport and communication with women Veterans from Vietnam, Gulf I, Iraq, and Afghanistan wars seeking care at civilian health facilities, as some may present with suicidal ideologies.

  16. A Media Advocacy Intervention Linking Health Disparities and Food Insecurity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rock, Melanie J.; McIntyre, Lynn; Persaud, Steven A.; Thomas, Karen L.

    2011-01-01

    Media advocacy is a well-established strategy for transmitting health messages to the public. This paper discusses a media advocacy intervention that raised issues about how the public interprets messages about the negative effects of poverty on population health. In conjunction with the publication of a manuscript illustrating how income-related…

  17. Using Week of the Young Child as an Advocacy Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young Children, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Week of the Young Child 2009, April 19-25, presents a public policy advocacy opportunity for early childhood programs, faculty, and families. This article offers some ways one can use Week of the Young Child (WOYC) events specifically to further advocacy efforts.

  18. Using the Decision Case Method to Teach Legislative Policy Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfer, Terry A.; Gray, Karen A.

    2007-01-01

    Social work educators have long struggled with making policy practice real "more", especially to micro-oriented students (Sundet & Kelly, 2002). The decision case method can generate excitement about social policy advocacy while educating students about current advocacy work, particularly if the case involves state or local efforts to influence…

  19. School Counselors United in Professional Advocacy: A Systems Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cigrand, Dawnette L.; Havlik, Stacey Gaenzle; Malott, Krista M.; Jones, SaDohl Goldsmith

    2015-01-01

    Limited budgets may place educational positions in jeopardy and if school counseling positions become jeopardized, then school counselors must communicate their role and impact more effectively. However, school counselors may lack training and experience in professional self-advocacy practices, and advocacy efforts may be undermined by role…

  20. Speaking up about Advocacy: Findings from a Partnership Research Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Melanie; Bannister, Susan; Davies, Julie; Fleming, Simon; Graham, Claire; Mcmaster, Andrea; Seddon, Angela; Wheldon, Anita; Whittell, Bridget

    2012-01-01

    This article describes a partnership research project carried out by a research team consisting of people with learning disabilities and people without learning disabilities. The research explored people's understandings of advocacy and identified gaps in advocacy provision for people with learning disabilities and their families. Four focus…

  1. Cancer Advocacy in Africa: case studies of innovative practices

    OpenAIRE

    Odedina, Folakemi T; Rodrigues, Belmira

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present six case studies describing innovative cancer advocacy programs in Africa. For each case study, an example of an advocacy activity, list of factors contributing to the success of the organization, and an example of an obstacle addressed by the organization are described.

  2. Latin American Theology and Religious Pluralism: A Latin American Voice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cascante-Gomez, Fernando A.

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes recent efforts by Latin-American theologians concerned with developing a pluralist theology of liberation. The author highlights some of the most significant issues and themes of this emerging theological reflection among liberation theologians. Finally, he identifies some of the challenges a pluralist theology of…

  3. Reducing violent injuries: priorities for pediatrician advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolins, J C; Christoffel, K K

    1994-10-01

    A basic framework for developing an advocacy plan must systematically break down the large task of policy development implementation into manageable components. The basic framework described in detail in this paper includes three steps: Setting policy objectives by narrowing the scope of policy, by reviewing policy options, and by examining options against selected criteria. Developing strategies for educating the public and for approaching legislative/regulatory bodies. Evaluating the effectiveness of the advocacy action plan as a process and as an agent for change. To illustrate the variety of ways in which pediatricians can be involved in the policy process to reduce violent injuries among children and adolescents, we apply this systematic approach to three priority areas. Prohibiting the use of corporal punishment in schools is intended to curb the institutionalized legitimacy of violence that has been associated with future use of violence. Efforts to remove handguns from the environments of children and adolescents are aimed at reducing the numbers of firearm injuries inflicted upon and by minors. Comprehensive treatment of adolescent victims of assault is intended to decrease the reoccurrence of violent injuries.

  4. Credibility and advocacy in conservation science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Cristi C; Peterson, Tarla Rai; Banerjee, Paulami; Peterson, Markus J

    2016-02-01

    Conservation policy sits at the nexus of natural science and politics. On the one hand, conservation scientists strive to maintain scientific credibility by emphasizing that their research findings are the result of disinterested observations of reality. On the other hand, conservation scientists are committed to conservation even if they do not advocate a particular policy. The professional conservation literature offers guidance on negotiating the relationship between scientific objectivity and political advocacy without damaging conservation science's credibility. The value of this guidance, however, may be restricted by limited recognition of credibility's multidimensionality and emergent nature: it emerges through perceptions of expertise, goodwill, and trustworthiness. We used content analysis of the literature to determine how credibility is framed in conservation science as it relates to apparent contradictions between science and advocacy. Credibility typically was framed as a static entity lacking dimensionality. Authors identified expertise or trustworthiness as important, but rarely mentioned goodwill. They usually did not identify expertise, goodwill, or trustworthiness as dimensions of credibility or recognize interactions among these 3 dimensions of credibility. This oversimplification may limit the ability of conservation scientists to contribute to biodiversity conservation. Accounting for the emergent quality and multidimensionality of credibility should enable conservation scientists to advance biodiversity conservation more effectively.

  5. Urban Resistance to Neoliberal Democracy in Latin America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Eckstein.

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Redemocratization across Latin America restored labor and political rights denied under the military governments in the 1960s through the 1980s. Increased subjugation to global market forces, less fettered by institutional barriers under neoliberalism than under import substitution has, however, weakened, de facto while not de jure, the ability of laborers to deploy their restored rights to improve conditions at work. The article describes how and explains why protests against perceived economic injustices under the circumstances have shifted in cities across the region from the point of production to the point of consumption, and within the arena of consumption from proactive claims for affordable housing to defensive protests against statebacked increases in the cost of food and urban services and to solidarity movements in rich countries that threaten businesses that exploit Latin American workers with consumer boycotts.

  6. Language Politics in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopalan, Kanavillil

    2005-01-01

    This paper is an attempt to take stock of the politics of language as it has been playing out in Latin America, ever since the countries in this region were colonized by European powers, mainly Spain and Portugal. Linguistic imperialism is by no means a new phenomenon in this part of the world. In more recent times, the relentless advance of…

  7. Promoting PV in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nogarin, Mauro

    2010-07-01

    The Euro Solar Programme is financed by the European Commission's Office of Cooperation and its main goal is to promote renewable energy in eight Latin American countries: Bolivia, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Paraguay and Peru. (orig.)

  8. Improvisation in Latin American Musics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behague, Gerard

    1980-01-01

    Improvisation implies a relative freedom to choose elements within stylistic norms of rules proper to a given culture. Improvisatory processes for music from several cultures are described. These cultures are: Indian, Spanish, African, and Afro-Cuban (rumba). A few resources focusing on improvisation in Latin American music are presented. (KC)

  9. Women in Latin American History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavrin, Asuncion

    1981-01-01

    Presents a bibliography and suggests a number of topics around which a college level history course on Latin American women could be organized. Course topics include migration of women, definition of sex roles, legal status of women, women's work and society, feminism, politics, religion, women and the family, and women's education and…

  10. Identifying important breast cancer control strategies in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East/North Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niessen Louis W

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is the most frequent cause of cancer death in women worldwide, but global disparities in breast cancer control persist, due to a lack of a comprehensive breast cancer control strategy in many countries. Objectives To identify and compare the need for breast cancer control strategies in Asia, Latin America and the Middle East/North Africa and to develop a common framework to guide the development of national breast cancer control strategies. Methods Data were derived from open-ended, semi-structured interviews conducted in 2007 with 221 clinicians, policy makers, and patient advocates; stratified across Asia (n = 97, Latin America (n = 46, the Middle East/North Africa (ME/NA (n = 39 and Australia and Canada (n = 39. Respondents were identified using purposive and snowballing sampling. Interpretation of the data utilized interpretive phenomenological analysis where transcripts and field notes were coded and analyzed and common themes were identified. Analysis of regional variation was conducted based on the frequency of discussion and the writing of the manuscript followed the RATS guidelines. Results Analysis revealed four major themes that form the foundation for developing national breast cancer control strategies: 1 building capacity; 2 developing evidence; 3 removing barriers; and 4 promoting advocacy - each specified across five sub-ordinate dimensions. The propensity to discuss most dimensions was similar across regions, but managing advocacy was discussed more frequently (p = 0.004 and organized advocacy was discussed less frequently (p Conclusions This unique research identified common themes for the development of breast cancer control strategies, grounded in the experience of local practitioners, policy makers and advocacy leaders across diverse regions. Future research should be aimed at gathering a wider array of experiences, including those of patients.

  11. 42 CFR 51.31 - Conduct of protection and advocacy activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conduct of protection and advocacy activities. 51... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Protection and Advocacy Services § 51.31 Conduct of protection and advocacy activities. (a) Consistent with...

  12. 45 CFR 1386.23 - Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.23 Periodic reports: Protection and Advocacy System. (a) By January 1 of each year the Protection and Advocacy System shall...

  13. 77 FR 8327 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, March 28, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  14. 78 FR 56269 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, October 23, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  15. 78 FR 11277 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, March 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  16. 77 FR 20488 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-04

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  17. 78 FR 48231 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, September 25, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  18. 75 FR 62631 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint ] Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, November 23, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  19. 75 FR 33894 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-15

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, July 8,...

  20. 77 FR 55526 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, October 24, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  1. 78 FR 64063 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  2. 78 FR 3500 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, February 27, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  3. 76 FR 56880 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, October 27, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  4. 77 FR 67736 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, December 13, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  5. 77 FR 47166 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, September 26, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  6. 75 FR 4141 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, February 23, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  7. 75 FR 18957 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee AGENCY... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Issue Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel....C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement...

  8. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, August 6 from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m....

  9. 77 FR 40410 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, August 22, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  10. 75 FR 47347 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint ] Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, September 28, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time...

  11. 75 FR 18958 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy...

  12. 77 FR 74921 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-18

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, January 23, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  13. 76 FR 63717 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 23, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  14. 77 FR 5313 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, February 22, 2012, 2 p.m., Eastern Time...

  15. 78 FR 15126 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, April 24, 2013 at 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  16. 76 FR 37197 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, August 25, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  17. 75 FR 55407 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, October 26, 2010, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  18. 77 FR 37102 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting ] public... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, July 19, 2012, at 8 a.m....

  19. 75 FR 76522 - Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Tuesday, January 25, 2011, at 3 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  20. 76 FR 32021 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-02

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments...) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Monday, July 25,...

  1. 76 FR 2193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Monday, February 24, 2011, at 2 p.m. Eastern Time via...

  2. 77 FR 61054 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Wednesday, November 28, 2012, 2:00 p.m. Eastern Time...

  3. 76 FR 45006 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-27

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be held Thursday, September 22, 2011, 2 p.m. Eastern Time...

  4. 75 FR 40033 - Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax Check Waiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-13

    ... Internal Revenue Service Proposed Collection; Comment Request for Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax Check...(c)(2)(A)). Currently, the IRS is soliciting comments concerning Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax...: Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP) Tax Check Waiver. OMB Number: 1545-2092. Abstract: Taxpayer Advocacy...

  5. The "New Cooperativism" in Latin America: Worker-Recuperated Enterprises and Socialist Production Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabure, Manuel; Vieta, Marcelo; Schugurensky, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    In the first decade of the 21st century, efforts to create alternatives to neoliberalism emerged in many parts of Latin America. Social movements across the region took to the streets, occupied abandoned factories, and started to create new democratic spaces, solidarity networks, and social economy initiatives. In one country after another,…

  6. A Novel Latin Square Image Cipher

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Yue; Noonan, Joseph P; Agaian, Sos; Chen, C L Philip

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a symmetric-key Latin square image cipher (LSIC) for grayscale and color images. Our contributions to the image encryption community include 1) we develop new Latin square image encryption primitives including Latin Square Whitening, Latin Square S-box and Latin Square P-box ; 2) we provide a new way of integrating probabilistic encryption in image encryption by embedding random noise in the least significant image bit-plane; and 3) we construct LSIC with these Latin square image encryption primitives all on one keyed Latin square in a new loom-like substitution-permutation network. Consequently, the proposed LSIC achieve many desired properties of a secure cipher including a large key space, high key sensitivities, uniformly distributed ciphertext, excellent confusion and diffusion properties, semantically secure, and robustness against channel noise. Theoretical analysis show that the LSIC has good resistance to many attack models including brute-force attacks, ciphertext-only at...

  7. Climate Change: On Scientists and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.

    2014-01-01

    Last year, I asked a crowd of a few hundred geoscientists from around the world what positions related to climate science and policy they would be comfortable publicly advocating. I presented a list of recommendations that included increased research funding, greater resources for education, and specific emission reduction technologies. In almost every case, a majority of the audience felt comfortable arguing for them. The only clear exceptions were related to geo-engineering research and nuclear power. I had queried the researchers because the relationship between science and advocacy is marked by many assumptions and little clarity. This despite the fact that the basic question of how scientists can be responsible advocates on issues related to their expertise has been discussed for decades most notably in the case of climate change by the late Stephen Schneider.

  8. Communication practices and citizens' participation in the Colombian water movement

    OpenAIRE

    Llano Arias, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    In the last decade, social movements' struggles for water and environmental justice have noticeably increased in Colombia and Latin America. These struggles have largely been a consequence of the implementation of neoliberal policies of water privatisation and the rise of large-scale projects such as mining and dams. These emerging social movements have produced new expressions of collective democratic participation. This thesis analyses communication practices in the Colombian water movement...

  9. The neglected zoonoses--the case for integrated control and advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welburn, S C; Beange, I; Ducrotoy, M J; Okello, A L

    2015-05-01

    The neglected zoonotic diseases (NZDs) have been all but eradicated in wealthier countries, but remain major causes of ill-health and mortality across Africa, Asia, and Latin America. This neglect is, in part, a consequence of under-reporting, resulting in an underestimation of their global burden that downgrades their relevance to policy-makers and funding agencies. Increasing awareness about the causes of NZDs and how they can be prevented could reduce the incidence of many endemic zoonoses. Addressing NZDs by targeting the animal reservoir can deliver a double benefit, as enhanced animal health means a reduced risk of infection for humans, as well as improved livelihoods through increased animal productivity. Advocacy for NZD control is increasing, but with it comes a growing awareness that NZD control demands activities both in the short term and over a long period of time. Moreover, despite the promise of cheap, effective vaccines or other control tools, these endemic diseases will not be sustainably controlled in the near future without long-term financial commitment, particularly as disease incidence decreases and other health priorities take hold. NZD intervention costs can seem high when compared with the public health benefits alone, but these costs are easily outweighed when a full cross-sector analysis is carried out and monetary/non-monetary benefits--particularly regarding the livestock sector--are taken into account. Public-private partnerships have recently provided advocacy for human disease control, and could prove equally effective in addressing endemic zoonoses through harnessing social impact investments. Evidence of the disease burdens imposed on communities by the NZDs and demonstration of the cost-effectiveness of integrated control can strengthen the case for a One Health approach to endemic zoonotic disease control. PMID:25911990

  10. Pinta: Latin America's Forgotten Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Lola V

    2015-11-01

    Pinta is a neglected, chronic skin disease that was first described in the sixteenth century in Mexico. The World Health Organization lists 15 countries in Latin America where pinta was previously endemic. However, the current prevalence of pinta is unknown due to the lack of surveillance data. The etiological agent of pinta, Treponema carateum, cannot be distinguished morphologically or serologically from the not-yet-cultivable Treponema pallidum subspecies that cause venereal syphilis, yaws, and bejel. Although genomic sequencing has enabled the development of molecular techniques to differentiate the T. pallidum subspecies, comparable information is not available for T. carateum. Because of the influx of migrants and refugees from Latin America, U.S. physicians should consider pinta in the differential diagnosis of skin diseases in children and adolescents who come from areas where pinta was previously endemic and have a positive reaction in serological tests for syphilis. All stages of pinta are treatable with a single intramuscular injection of penicillin. PMID:26304920

  11. MICROSCALE CHEMISTRY IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge G. Ibáñez

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A brief account of the development of Microscale Chemistry in Latin America is here presented. The US National Microscale Chemistry Center (Merrimack College, Massachusetts was instrumental in the initiationof several centers. Its Mexican counterpart, the Mexican Microscale Chemistry Center (CMQM, has been a key player in this process. Other participating countries include Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Cuba,Guatemala, Perú and Uruguay.

  12. Developing nanotechnology in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Kay, Luciano; Shapira, Philip

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates the development of nanotechnology in Latin America with a particular focus on Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Uruguay. Based on data for nanotechnology research publications and patents and suggesting a framework for analyzing the development of R&D networks, we identify three potential strategies of nanotechnology research collaboration. Then, we seek to identify the balance of emphasis upon each of the three strategies by mapping the current research profile of those...

  13. Biomass in Latin America -- overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the interest of the Organization of American States as a participant in this hemispheric conference on biomass, provides an introduction to the Latin American experience in biomass energy through open-quotes snapshotsclose quotes of various country activities, and concludes with a discussion of four conditions that form strong incentives for new north/south and south/north ventures in the biomass energy and chemical arena in this hemisphere

  14. Regional Convergence in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Bennett Sutton; Genevieve Lindow; Maria Isabel Serra; Gustavo Ramirez; Maria Fernanda Pazmino

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents empirical evidence on convergence of per capita output for regions within six large middle-income Latin American countries: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, and Peru. It explores the role played by several exogenous sectoral shocks and differences in steady states within each country. It finds that poor and rich regions within each country converged at very low rates over the past three decades. It also finds evidence of regional "convergence clubs" within Brazi...

  15. Latin American and Comparative Literature

    OpenAIRE

    González Echevarría, Roberto

    2002-01-01

    In his paper, "Latin American and Comparative Literature," Roberto González Echevarría asks whether comparative literature, a literary discipline dedicated to the proposition that linguistic boundaries must be transcended, can overcome the "cultural arrogance" of the "Eurocentrism" that he believes pervades it currently. González Echevarría argues that if it is to endure, comparative literature will have to undergo "a truly pitiless redefinition," one that effectively displaces "the hegemonic...

  16. NGO Advocacy on Women's Health and Rights in Southeast Asia

    OpenAIRE

    Rashidah Abdullah

    2003-01-01

    Rashidah Abdullah highlights strategies used in advocacy work by women NGOs in the Southeast Asia region based on the work of ARROW. Development (2003) 46, 33–37. doi:10.1057/palgrave.development.1110442

  17. Handicapped Infants and Euthanasia: A Challenge to Our Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David

    1985-01-01

    The issue of pediatric euthanasia for handicapped newborns is examined and contrasting viewpoints emphasizing the quality and the sanctity of life are considered. The author asserts that advocacy for handicapped children involves decisions regarding the euthanasia question. (CL)

  18. Natural gas in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Despite having proven reserves equal to that of North America, natural gas has traditionally played a minor role in the energy policies of Latin American countries, being considered secondary to oil. There has, therefore, been a neglect of the sector with a resultant lack of an adequate infrastructure throughout the region, perhaps with the exception of Argentina. However, with a massive increase in energy demand, growing concerns with environmental matters and a need to reduce the massive pollution levels in major cities in the region, natural gas is forecast to play a much greater role in Latin America's energy profile, with final consumption forecast to rise at 5.4% per annum for the next 15 years. This book assesses both the development of the use of natural gas in the power industrial sector and proposals for its growth into the residential, commercial and transport sectors. It analyses the significant investment required and the governments' need to turn to the private sector for investment and innovation. Natural Gas in Latin America analyses the possibilities and pitfalls of investing in the sector and describes the key trends and issues. It analyses all aspects of the gas industry from exploration and production to transportation and distribution to end users. (Author)

  19. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well define...... affect the movements. Furthermore, I discuss differences in movement organization, and visual information from striking movements.......Like all music performance, percussion playing requires high control over timing and sound properties. Specific to percussionists, however, is the need to adjust the movement to different instruments with varying physical properties and tactile feedback to the player. Furthermore, the well defined...... note onsets and short interaction times between player and instrument do not allow for much adjustment once a stroke is initiated. The paper surveys research that shows a close relationship between movement and sound production, and how playing conditions such as tempo and the rebound after impact...

  20. Report on China's Latin America Policy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    The Latin America Research Group,CICIR

    2004-01-01

    @@ Latin America is the only underdeveloped region in the Western Hemisphere, and China is the largest developing country in the Eastern Hemisphere. Across the vast Pacific Ocean, the Chinese and the Latin American people have a history of nearly 500 years of exchanges. Starting from the 1980s, both China and the Latin American states adopted the reform and opening-up strategies for development,which led to profound political, economic, and social transformations in the two areas.

  1. Cohabitation in Latin America: a comparative perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Sussai Soares, Maira Covre

    2014-01-01

    The coexistence of marriage and cohabitation is an intriguing feature of Latin American nuptiality. Historically common among lower social classes in Central America and the Caribbean, the incidence of cohabitation is also increasing among higher educated groups and southern Latin American countries. This study uses census and survey data to investigate the characteristics of Latin American cohabitation.First, the countries’ socioeconomic characteristics, related to the incidence of cohabitat...

  2. Preface - rethinking structural reform in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen J. Kay; Michael J. Chriszt

    2004-01-01

    The process of structural reform in Latin America has thus far been uneven, and various economic crises have raised doubts about reforms’ effectiveness and have caused public support for further reforms to wane. To promote and highlight research exploring structural reform’s impact on economic growth and income distribution in Latin America, the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) cosponsored the conference “Rethinking Structural Reform in Latin Ameri...

  3. Friedman versus Keynes in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Westphalen, Jürgen

    1982-01-01

    In a number of Latin American countries, the influence of John Maynard Keynes and his Latin American proponent Raúl Prebisch, was forced during the seventies to give way to the liberal-monetarist principles of Milton Friedman. What advantages and disadvantages have ensued from this change of course? Do Friedman's theories point a way out of Latin America's present economic and social problems?

  4. HELEN brings Latin Americans to CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximiliem Brice

    2006-01-01

    Latin American students who have arrived at CERN to take up fellowships during the first months of 2006 relax in front of the LHC collaboration buildings, together with the deputy coordinator of HELEN, Veronica Riquer (centre), from Rome University and INFN. The training programme supported by the High Energy Physics Latin American- European Network (HELEN) is in full swing. For 2006, the programme has assigned about 70 fellowships to be spent at CERN by Latin American students and young physicists.

  5. Endeavors to Make Global Connections. Latin American Contacts and Strategies with Mediterranean Non-Alignment in the Early Cold Wars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rinna Kullaa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This article explores linkages between Yugoslavia’s influence and the roots of the Non-Aligned Movement in the Mediterranean with Latin America as a region through which the Soviet Union sought to challenge the independence of Yugoslavia and the Movement. It answers directly the question: To what extent did the foundation of the coalition of non-aligned states in 1961 in Belgrade have an impact on relations between Yugoslavia and some Latin American states? The sources used for this article consist principally of primary sources from the Foreign Policy Archive of the Russian Federation and the Archive of the Foreign Ministry of Yugoslavia.

  6. American Science Advocacy Organizations: Examining Their Strategies and Engagements with Religion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Jason T.

    Over the past several decades, science advocacy organizations have increasingly participated in discussions of the relationship between science and religion to the public, mainly to counteract the resurgence of anti-evolution activities across the country, to address misconceptions and misunderstandings about science and religion, and to help make science more palatable and less threatening to religious believers. These engagements with religion have primarily involved four organizations: the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Center for Science Education (NCSE), and the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History (SNMNH). In their engagements with religion, each of these organizations has simultaneously employed two distinct lines of operation: (1) defending science against anti-science religions and movements and (2) engaging science-friendly religions and the religious public. These lines of operation are driven by key objectives and supported by specific strategies and tactics to achieve those objectives, which this paper seeks to explore and analyze. Key findings and recommendations for science advocacy organizations' ongoing and future engagements with religion are provided.

  7. Latin American guidelines on hypertension. Latin American Expert Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ramiro A; Ayala, Miryam; Baglivo, Hugo; Velazquez, Carlos; Burlando, Guillermo; Kohlmann, Oswaldo; Jimenez, Jorge; Jaramillo, Patricio López; Brandao, Ayrton; Valdes, Gloria; Alcocer, Luis; Bendersky, Mario; Ramirez, Agustín José; Zanchetti, Alberto

    2009-05-01

    Hypertension is a highly prevalent cardiovascular risk factor in the world and particularly overwhelming in low and middle-income countries. Recent reports from the WHO and the World Bank highlight the importance of chronic diseases such as hypertension as an obstacle to the achievement of good health status. It must be added that for most low and middle-income countries, deficient strategies of primary healthcare are the major obstacles for blood pressure control. Furthermore, the epidemiology of hypertension and related diseases, healthcare resources and priorities, the socioeconomic status of the population vary considerably in different countries and in different regions of individual countries. Considering the low rates of blood pressure control achieved in Latin America and the benefits that can be expected from an improved control, it was decided to invite specialists from different Latin American countries to analyze the regional situation and to provide a consensus document on detection, evaluation and treatment of hypertension that may prove to be cost-utility adequate. The recommendations here included are the result of preparatory documents by invited experts and a subsequent very active debate by different discussion panels, held during a 2-day sessions in Asuncion, Paraguay, in May 2008. Finally, in order to improve clinical practice, the publication of the guidelines should be followed by implementation of effective interventions capable of overcoming barriers (cognitive, behavioral and affective) preventing attitude changes in both physicians and patients.

  8. Latin American traditions and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Celina

    1983-09-01

    Educational and related non-pedagogical issues are generally described and discussed. Implicitly or explicitly, the theology of liberation, educación popular and traditional education tend to perpetuate male/female roles and very often incite violence. Peace education in Latin America should concentrate more on the pathology of the violent man. The so-called `weaknesses' associated with women and their `powerlessness' in Western civilization are precisely those which are absolutely essential to our survival. It is important for women to reject Western patterns of violence and participate actively in finding a viable alternative.

  9. Latin squares and their applications

    CERN Document Server

    Keedwell, A Donald

    2015-01-01

    Latin Squares and Their Applications Second edition offers a long-awaited update and reissue of this seminal account of the subject. The revision retains foundational, original material from the frequently-cited 1974 volume but is completely updated throughout. As with the earlier version, the author hopes to take the reader 'from the beginnings of the subject to the frontiers of research'. By omitting a few topics which are no longer of current interest, the book expands upon active and emerging areas. Also, the present state of knowledge regarding the 73 then-unsolved problems given at the

  10. THE SOLITUDE OF LATIN AMERICA IN THE GREAT PRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandre Barbosa

    2007-01-01

    In this article, it is investigated the reasons why Latin America has a little qualitative and quantitative space in great press. This study is based on sociohistorical and journalistic aspects. This research demonstrates that the Latin-American continent is separated, because of historical processes, in the “official Latin America” and the “popular Latin America”. While the great press represents the “official Latin America”, the “popular Latin America” is represented by the alternative pres...

  11. Epidemiology and 'developing countries': writing pesticides, poverty and political engagement in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brisbois, Ben W

    2014-08-01

    The growth of the field of global health has prompted renewed interest in discursive aspects of North-South biomedical encounters, but analysis of the role of disciplinary identities and writing conventions remains scarce. In this article, I examine ways of framing pesticide problems in 88 peer-reviewed epidemiology papers produced by Northerners and their collaborators studying pesticide-related health impacts in Latin America. I identify prominent geographic frames in which truncated and selective histories of Latin America are used to justify research projects in specific research sites, which nevertheless function rhetorically as generic 'developing country' settings. These frames legitimize health sector interventions as solutions to pesticide-related health problems, largely avoiding more politically charged possibilities. In contrast, some epidemiologists appear to be actively pushing the bounds of epidemiology's traditional journal article genre by engaging with considerations of political power, especially that of the international pesticide industry. I therefore employ a finer-grained analysis to a subsample of 20 papers to explore how the writing conventions of epidemiology interact with portrayals of poverty and pesticides in Latin America. Through analysis of a minor scientific controversy, authorial presence in epidemiology articles, and variance of framing strategies across genres, I show how the tension between 'objectivity' and 'advocacy' observed in Northern epidemiology and public health is expressed in North-South interaction. I end by discussing implications for postcolonial and socially engaged approaches to science and technology studies, as well as their relevance to the actual practice of global health research. In particular, the complicated interaction of the conflicted traditions of Northern epidemiology with Latin American settings on paper hints at a far more complex interaction in the form of public health programming involving

  12. A World of Hurt: Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaswami, Rama

    2009-01-01

    Massive socioeconomic problems have left Latin American education in a dire condition, and decades behind the rest of the globe in integrating technology into teaching and learning. But a few spots in the region offer signs of hope. In this article, the author describes several efforts at tech-based educational reform in Latin America.

  13. IFRS READINESS IN LATIN AMERICAN BUSINESS CURRICULA

    OpenAIRE

    Myrna R. Berríos

    2012-01-01

    Multinational companies doing business in Latin America, and elsewhere in the world, must comply with individual countries’ financial reporting and financial market rules and local legislation when disclosing financial information. This research assesses international financial reporting standards (IFRS) readiness in the finance, accounting, and taxation curricula in Latin American universities.

  14. Micro Insurance Matters in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Goldberg , Mike; Ramanathan, C S

    2008-01-01

    This note discusses the rapidly evolving issue of micro insurance in Latin America and how microfinance institutions (MFIs), insurance companies and donors can respond to its challenges. This note is part of a series summarizing the Department of International Development-Latin American Markets and International Trade Program (DFID-LAMIT) eight-part distance learning program with South Ame...

  15. Electricity and gas regulation in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, Peter N.

    1998-08-01

    Contains Executive Summary and Chapters on: Background Information; The Electricity Chain; The Gas Chain; The Regulatory Structure; International Activity; Argentina; Bolivia; Brazil; Chile; Colombia; Mexico; Peru; Venezuela; Central America; Other Latin American Markets; Non-Latin America Markets; The Caribbean. (Author)

  16. Education and Globalisation: A Latin American Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pineau, Pablo

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines the historical relationship between education and globalisation in Latin America. This is no straightforward task. Hegel's vision of a continent without history and the rapacious expansion of Western culture from the sixteenth century profoundly transformed Latin America, and in turn stimulated a search for a distinctive "Latin…

  17. BAT-BORNE RABIES IN LATIN AMERICA

    OpenAIRE

    Luis E. Escobar; A. Townsend Peterson; Myriam Favi; Verónica Yung; Gonzalo Medina-Vogel

    2015-01-01

    The situation of rabies in America is complex: rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, but bats are increasingly recognized as natural reservoirs of other rabies variants. Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America. Rabies virus is widespread in Latin American bat species, 22.5%75...

  18. Latin America: Intercultural Experiential Learning Aid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT. Language Research Center.

    This learning aid is intended to help Americans become more effective in understanding and communicating with Latin Americans. The book consists of the following: (1) a map of Latin America, with area and population statistics for the various countries; (2) a brief description of the land, the people, the economy, diet, religion, government,…

  19. Atomic energy in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most countries in Latin America, including all those on the mainland, are Members of the Agency. Interest in the possibilities of nuclear energy has led to considerable activity, much of it in direct collaboration with the IAEA. Member States in the region are: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, Honduras, Jamaica, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Uruguay, Venezuela. Of these, Argentina, Brazil, Colombia and Venezuela are operating, and Mexico and Uruguay are constructing, research reactors, while Chile and Peru are studying proposals. Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Uruguay have all agreed to accept Agency safeguards for reactors. The possibility of future needs for nuclear power is under examination by several countries, in some cases being related to desalination of water. All atomic work in Latin America is devoted to peaceful uses, and note-worthy progress has been made with proposals for a treaty which would make the whole region a militarily de-nuclearized zone. It is proposed that when this comes into effect the Agency will be asked to apply the controls developed in its safeguards system, and to carry out the inspections necessary to establish that work in progress is solely for peaceful purposes

  20. Gastroenterology training in Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Henry Cohen; Roque Saenz; Luiz E de Almeida Troncon; Maribel Lizarzabal; Carolina Olano

    2011-01-01

    Latin America is characterized by ethnic, geographical, cultural, and economic diversity; therefore, training in gastroenterology in the region must be considered in this context. The continent's medical education is characterized by a lack of standards and the volume of research continues to be relatively small. There is a multiplicity of events in general gastroenterology and in sub-disciplines, both at regional and local levels, which ensure that many colleagues have access to information. Medical education programs must be based on a clinical vision and be considered in close contact with the patients. The programs should be properly supervised, appropriately defined,and evaluated on a regular basis. The disparity between the patients' needs, the scarce resources available, and the pressures exerted by the health systems on doctors are frequent cited by those complaining of poor professionalism. Teaching development can play a critical role in ensuring the quality of teaching and learning in universities.Continuing professional development programs activities must be planned on the basis of the doctors' needs, with clearly defined objectives and using proper learning methodologies designed for adults. They must be evaluated and accredited by a competent body, so that they may become the basis of a professional regulatory system. The specialty has made progress in the last decades, offering doctors various possibilities for professional development. The world gastroenterology organization has contributed to the speciality through three distinctive, but closely inter-related, programs: Training Centers, Train-the-Trainers, and Global Guidelines, in which Latin America is deeply involved.

  1. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy.

  2. Patient advocacy from the clinical nurses' viewpoint: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davoodvand, Shirmohammad; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Ahmadi, Fazlollah

    2016-01-01

    One of the advanced nursing care procedures emphasized by nursing organizations around the world is patient or nursing advocacy. In addition to illustrating the professional power of nursing, it helps to provide effective nursing care. The aim of the present study was to explain the concept of patient advocacy from the perspective of Iranian clinical nurses. This was a qualitative study that examined the viewpoint and experiences of 15 clinical nurses regarding patient advocacy in nursing. The nurses worked in intensive care units (ICUs), coronary care units (CCUs), and emergency units. The study participants were selected via purposeful sampling. The data was collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using content analysis. Data analysis showed that patient advocacy consisted of the two themes of empathy with the patient (including understanding, being sympathetic with, and feeling close to the patient) and protecting the patients (including patient care, prioritization of patients' health, commitment to the completion of the care process, and protection of patients' rights). The results of this study suggest that nurses must be empathetic toward and protective of their patients. The results of the present study can be used in health care delivery, nursing education, and nursing management and planning systems to help nurses accomplish their important role as patient advocates. It is necessary to further study the connections between patient advocacy and empathy. PMID:27471588

  3. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p advocacy engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p advocacy engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed.

  4. 77 FR 37101 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  5. 77 FR 55525 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  6. 77 FR 2611 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  7. 77 FR 47165 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Bankruptcy Compliance Project Committee will be conducted....

  8. Protest movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the development of protest movements in postwar Germay and outlines two essential overlapping 'flow cycles'. The first of these was characterised by the restaurative postwar years. It culminated and ended in the students' revolt. This revolt is at the same time the start of a second cycle of protest which encompasses all subsequent individual movement and is initated by an economic, political and sociocultural procrastination of modernisation. This cycle culminates in the late 70s and early 80s and clearly lost momentum over the last few years. The follwoing phases and themes are described profoundly: against restauration and armament in the 1950; the revolutionary impatience of the students' movement, politisation of everyday life by the womens' movement and citizens' action groups, antinuclear- and ecological movement, differentiation and stabilisation of the movement in the 70s and 80s; break-up and continuity in the German protest behaviour. The paper contains a detailed chronicle of protest activities since 1945. (orig.)

  9. Political activity for physical activity: health advocacy for active transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amun Qa-t-a

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Effective health advocacy is a priority for efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Local councils are an important audience for this advocacy. The aim of the current study was to describe features of advocacy for active transport via submissions to city council annual plans in New Zealand, and the impact of an information sheet to encourage the health sector to be involved in this process. Written submissions to city council's annual consultation process were requested for 16 city councils over the period of three years (2007/08, 2008/09, and 2009/10. Submissions were reviewed and categories of responses were created. An advocacy information sheet encouraging health sector participation and summarising some of the evidence-base related to physical activity, active transport and health was released just prior to the 2009/10 submission time. Over the period of the study, city councils received 47,392 submissions, 17% of which were related to active transport. Most submissions came from city residents, with a small proportion (2% from the health sector. The largest category of submissions was in support of pedestrian and cycling infrastructure, design and maintenance of facilities and additional features to support use of these transport modes. Health arguments featured prominently in justifications for active transport initiatives, including concerns about injury risk, obesity, physical inactivity, personal safety and facilities for people with disabilities. There was evidence that the information sheet was utilised by some health sector submitters (12.5%, providing tentative support for initiatives of this nature. In conclusion, the study provides novel information about the current nature of health advocacy for active transport and informs future advocacy efforts about areas for emphasis, such as health benefits of active transport, and potential alliances with other sectors such as environmental

  10. Advocacy and Accessibility Standards in the New "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Ashley K.; Blackwell, Terry L.

    2010-01-01

    This article addresses the changes in the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification's 2010 "Code of Professional Ethics for Rehabilitation Counselors" as they relate to Section C: Advocacy and Accessibility. Ethical issues are identified and discussed in relation to advocacy skills and to advocacy with, and on behalf of, the client; to…

  11. The Nature, Correlates, and Conditions of Parental Advocacy in Special Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Meghan M.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Although parents often advocate for the best educational services for their children with disabilities, few studies examine parents' advocacy activities; identify parent-school relationship, parent, and student correlates of advocacy; or describe the conditions of advocacy. Responding to a national, web-based survey, 1087 parents of students with…

  12. 45 CFR 1386.20 - Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency... Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.20 Designated State Protection and Advocacy agency. (a) The designating official must designate the State official or public...

  13. 45 CFR 1386.21 - Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.21 Section 1386.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.21 Requirements and authority of the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) In order for a State to receive...

  14. 42 CFR 51.7 - Eligibility for protection and advocacy services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Eligibility for protection and advocacy services... REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.7 Eligibility for protection and advocacy services. In accordance with section...

  15. 45 CFR 1386.24 - Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Advocacy System. 1386.24 Section 1386.24 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Protection and Advocacy of the Rights of Individuals with Developmental Disabilities § 1386.24 Non-allowable costs for the Protection and Advocacy System. (a) Federal financial participation is not allowable...

  16. 34 CFR 381.1 - What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights program? 381.1 Section 381.1 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education... ADVOCACY OF INDIVIDUAL RIGHTS General § 381.1 What is the Protection and Advocacy of Individual...

  17. 75 FR 11999 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-12

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  18. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  19. 78 FR 41193 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  20. 75 FR 25316 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  1. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Tax Forms and Publications Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer...

  2. 76 FR 10945 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-28

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  3. 75 FR 39332 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  4. 75 FR 7542 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-19

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comment... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  5. 76 FR 6190 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-03

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  6. 78 FR 78516 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-26

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  7. 76 FR 17996 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-31

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  8. 78 FR 22948 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  9. 78 FR 36303 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  10. 76 FR 22170 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  11. 77 FR 30591 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee. AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  12. 77 FR 21156 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  13. 76 FR 22168 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-20

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  14. 78 FR 22947 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-17

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  15. 78 FR 41194 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notices and Correspondence Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer...

  16. 78 FR 28945 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-16

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Joint Committee AGENCY: Internal... Advocacy Panel Joint Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments... the Federal Advisory Committee Act, 5 U.S.C. App. (1988) that an open meeting of the Taxpayer...

  17. 75 FR 25316 - Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee... of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Notice Improvement Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas and suggestions on improving customer service at...

  18. Anatomy of Advocacy: A Case Study of the White House Petition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Elizabeth; Kimmel, Sue; Dickinson, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Little research has been conducted examining advocacy efforts in the school library field despite the fact that program advocate is a prominent role for school librarians. One element of advocacy is the engagement in political initiatives that may affect school library programs. This case study investigates the effectiveness of one advocacy effort…

  19. LATIN AMERICAN INFLUENCE ON THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Balant, Anka

    2013-01-01

    In the first part of my graduation thesis I speak about Latin America because that is where English Spanish cognates came from. There are twenty countries in Latin America and they generally lie south of the United States. Europeans began to influence the people and culture of Latin America with the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492. He "discovered" many islands in the Caribbean and mapped the coast of Central and South America. Spain built its empire in the central and southern parts o...

  20. Organic and alike farming in Latin America: state and relevance for small-scale livestock keepers

    OpenAIRE

    Siegmund-Schultze, Marianna; Valle Zárate, Anne

    2007-01-01

    While the organic movement is growing, its contribution to small-scale livestock farm-ing in Latin America is contentious. Secondary literature and available statistics were used for this study. Farms and area under certified organic agriculture are rising, but small-scale livestock farming is little represented. The latter is yet to be found in non-certified organic-like farms, offering locally adapted paths to securing livelihoods.

  1. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...... levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  2. Corporate Advocacy: A Selected Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisopoulos, George N.; Hellweg, Susan A.

    This paper provides a selected review of the literature pertaining to corporate advocacy (non-product advertising by corporations, addressing political or social issues). More specifically, the paper examines research from the communication, business, public relations, and advertising literature dealing with justifications for the practice of…

  3. Exploring the Future of Lifelong Learning: Advocacy, Research and Footprinting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Lynne

    2013-01-01

    This reflective think-tank contribution begins by comparing advocacy and research as distinct modalities of professional and social action. In practice they frequently elide and merge into one another. While alliance and complementarity between the two modalities is constructive for shaping policy and practice, it poses risks when governments and…

  4. Critical Literacy as Policy and Advocacy: Lessons from Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Raúl Alberto

    2014-01-01

    This article, the first column for this issue's Policy and Advocacy department, features a discussion about a recent experience in a graduate program in Medellín, Colombia introducing students to critical literacy. Graduate students used ideas from critical literacy to engage in an in-depth analysis of textbooks they had used in their…

  5. Participatory Video: Toward a Method, Advocacy and Voice (MAV) Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sitter, Kathleen C.

    2012-01-01

    Using the new conceptual framework of participatory visual media as method, advocacy and voice (MAV), the author explores an action research study using an exemplar in which advocates from the disability community created and distributed a series of videos about love and sexuality as a critical human rights issue in the disability community. The…

  6. Citizen Advocacy for the Handicapped, Impaired, and Disadvantaged: An Overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfensberger, Wolf

    Discussed in terms of instrumental and expressive functions are citizen advocacy programs for mentally or physically handicapped children and adults. Instrumental functions are defined as meeting the practical needs of everyday life while expressive functions are said to involve an exchange of affection which meets emotional needs. Major types of…

  7. Latina/o School Principals: Identity, Leadership and Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Elizabeth T.; Hernandez, Frank; Mendez-Morse, Sylvia; Byrne-Jimenez, Monica

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to further define and inform about the influence of Latina/o principals in schools as an alternative to traditional forms of leadership. The principals' Latina/o identity, their leadership styles and advocacy towards the improvement of student achievement were examined. This research focused on three questions: (a) How did…

  8. Teaching Advocacy in Early Years Initial Teacher Education Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebovich, Betty J.; Matoba Adler, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Teacher education programmes in the United States and in England with early childhood certification usually include courses with topics such as early childhood theory and curriculum, child development, model programs, and history of early childhood education but less often include courses with content focused specifically on advocacy. This article…

  9. Service Learning as Justice Advocacy: Can Political Scientists Do Politics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Tony

    2000-01-01

    Provides background information on the topic of service learning and discusses the two variations of service learning: (1) providing charitable services; and (2) engaging students in political organizing and social advocacy. Focuses on the Westside Outreach Center and the Urban Citizen Project at the University of Colorado (Denver). (CMK)

  10. Advocacy for active transport: advocate and city council perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenby Marieah

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective advocacy is an important part of efforts to increase population participation in physical activity. Research about effective health advocacy is scarce, however, the health sector can learn from the experiences and knowledge of community advocates and those who are on the receiving end of this advocacy. The aim of this study is to explore advocacy for active transport from the perspectives of community advocates and representatives from City councils. Methods Cycling and walking advocates were identified from the local contact list of Cycling Advocates Network and Living Streets Aotearoa. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with cycle and walking advocates from throughout New Zealand. Advocates also nominated a suitable council officer at their local City council to be interviewed. Interviews were recorded and transcribed and categories of responses for each of the questions created. Results Several processes were used by advocates to engage with council staff, including formal council submissions, meetings, stakeholder forums and partnership in running community events promoting active transport. Several other agencies were identified as being influential for active transport, some as potential coalition partners and others as potential adversaries. Barriers to improving conditions for active transport included a lack of funding, a lack of will-power among either council staff or councillors, limited council staff capacity (time or training and a culture of providing infrastructure for motor vehicles instead of people. Several suggestions were made about how the health sector could contribute to advocacy efforts, including encouraging political commitment, engaging the media, communicating the potential health benefits of active transport to the general public and being role models in terms of personal travel mode choice and having workplaces that support participation in active transport

  11. Mineral Operations of Latin America and Canada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries...

  12. Microfinance: Lessons Learned in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Tomas C. Miller-Sanabria

    2000-01-01

    The relative success of microfinance in rural credit programs in Latin America is the result of a decentralized development approach stressing a large microenterprise sector, stable and permanent institutions, an appropriate regulatory framework, and a stable economy as essential prerequisites

  13. Voices from the Margins: Policy Advocacy and Marginalized Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria DeSantis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to explore policy advocacy processes facilitated by social service nonprofit organizations (NPOs using a social justice lens. Qualitative interview results from 39 NPOs from 18 communities provide a deeper understanding of advocacy, revealing that NPOs perceive that policy advocacy is not a discrete phenomenon, that advocacy activity differs in visibility and scale, and that advocacy strategies are clearly informed by NPOs' front-line service delivery work. A typology of policy advocacy showing different advocacy types and their fluid nature is presented. The results also show that marginalized people's involvement varies depending on a diversity of influential conditions. Conclusions and implications focus on social inclusion/exclusion, the varied and fluid nature of policy advocacy, challenges for practitioners, and the complex nature of "advocacy chill. / "Les organismes sans but lucratif (OSBL de services sociaux ont pour mission de préserver la santé des communautés au moyen de défense de politiques sociales. Toutefois, peu d'études concrètes au Canada portent sur la nature des processus en cause, en particulier lorsqu'il s'agit de politiques mises en œuvre au sein de collectivités marginalisées. Cet article a pour but d'explorer sous l'angle de la justice sociale la nature des processus défense des politiques tels qu'ils sont pratiqués par les OSBL de services sociaux. Un entretien qualitatif avec 39 OSBL issues de 18 collectivités permet une meilleure compréhension des processus. Les OSBL ne conçoivent pas défense des politiques comme un phénomène discret; les activités qui y sont reliées varient en visibilité et en étendue, et les stratégies employées sont clairement influencées par les services de première ligne qu'offrent les OSBL. Nous proposons une typologie des processus défense des politiques exposant les différents types d'approches et leur nature changeante. Les résultats indiquent

  14. Breast cancer advocacy: changing perceptions Abogacía y cáncer de mama: el cambio en las percepciones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenia P Koon

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is a significant health burden worldwide. In the United States, the Breast Cancer Advocacy Movement has increased awareness, enhanced dialogue, and provided significant funding opportunities that previously did not exist. Various advocacy programs are beginning to emerge in developing countries in response to the increasing impact breast cancer is having in these regions of the world. This paper discusses the influence of the Breast Cancer Advocacy Movement in the US and proposes a format for working in conjunction with medical experts, political leaders and patient advocates to stimulate discussion and encourage sustainable outcomes in breast cancer internationally.El cáncer de mama es una carga significativa de salud en el mundo. En Estados Unidos, el Movimiento de Abogacía para el Control del Cáncer de Mama ha hecho conciencia, mejorado el diálogo y provisto de oportunidades de financiamiento antes inexistentes. En los países en desarrollo, están emergiendo programas para el combate del cáncer de mama en respuesta al impacto creciente de la enfermedad en estas regiones. Este artículo aborda la influencia del movimiento en Estados Unidos y propone un formato para trabajar en conjunto con expertos en medicina, líderes políticos y defensores de pacientes y estimular la discusión y promoción de resultados sostenibles internacionalmente en cuanto al cáncer de mama.

  15. 8th Latin American School of Mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Figueiredo, Djairo; Iório, Rafael; Lopes, Orlando

    1988-01-01

    The Latin American School of Mathematics (ELAM) is one of the most important mathematical events in Latin America. It has been held every other year since 1968 in a different country of the region, and its theme varies according to the areas of interest of local research groups. The subject of the 1986 school was Partial Differential Equations with emphasis on Microlocal Analysis, Scattering Theory and the applications of Nonlinear Analysis to Elliptic Equations and Hamiltonian Systems.

  16. The International Crisis and Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Vittorio Corbo; Klaus Schmidt-Hebbel

    2013-01-01

    Latin America has been strongly affected by the international crisis and recession since late 2008. Compared with previous crises, how Latin America has faced this global crisis, what has been the role of different transmission mechanisms and how the structural conditions of the region have affected its vulnerability to external shocks? This paper aims at addressing these questions by assessing growth in the region’s seven major economies during 1990-2009; in particular, it examines the effec...

  17. Movement disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis describes the measurement of brain-tissue functions in patients with movement disorders using positron emission tomography (PET). This scanning technique is a method for direct in vivo quantitation of the regional tissue content of positron emitting radionuclides in brain (or other organs) in an essentially non-invasive way. Ch. 2 outlines some general features of PET and describes the scanner which has been used for the studies in this thesis. Also the tracer methodology, as applied to data investigations of movement disorders, are discussed. Ch. 3 contains the results of the PET investigations which were performed in the study of movement disorders. The results are presented in the form of 12 papers. The main goals of these studies were the understanding of the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease, Huntington's chorea, Steele-Richardson-Olzewski syndrome and special case reports. Ch. 4 summarizes the results of these publications and Ch. 5 concludes the main part of this thesis with a general discussion of movement disorders in relation to PET investigations. 697 refs.; 60 figs.; 31 tabs

  18. Psychodynamic Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This chapter/article describes the historical development of the disciplin Psychodynamic Movement. The importance of this disciplin for self-experience and for training in developing a therapist identy for the music therapy students are emphasized. Prototypeexercises developed and simplified...

  19. From Individuals to International Policy: Achievements and Ongoing Needs in Diabetes Advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Marisa E; Oser, Sean M; Close, Kelly L; Liu, Nancy F; Hood, Korey K; Anderson, Barbara J

    2015-09-01

    Diabetes impacts tens of millions of people in the United States of America and 9 % of the worldwide population. Given the public health implications and economic burden of diabetes, the needs of people with diabetes must be addressed through strategic and effective advocacy efforts. Diabetes advocacy aims to increase public awareness about diabetes, raise funds for research and care, influence policy impacting people with diabetes, and promote optimal individual outcomes. We present a framework for diabetes advocacy activities by individuals and at the community, national, and international levels and identify challenges and gaps in current diabetes advocacy. Various groups have organized successful diabetes advocacy campaigns toward these goals, and lessons for further advancing diabetes advocacy can be learned from other health-related populations. Finally, we discuss the role of healthcare providers and mental/behavioral health professionals in advocacy efforts that can benefit their patients and the broader population of people with diabetes.

  20. Political Participation of Civil Society in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peadar Kirby

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Review Essay of:– Social Movements and Leftist Governments in Latin America: Confrontation or co-optation?, edited by Gary Prevost, Carlos Oliva Campos and Harry E. Vanden, Zed Books, 2012. – Culturas políticas en la región andina, edited by Christian Buschges, Olaf Kaltmeier and Sebastian Thies, Iberoamericana, 2011.– La plasmación política de la diversidad: Autonomía y participación política indígena en América Latina, edited by Felipe Gómez Isa and Susana Ardanaz Iriarte, Universidad de Deusto, 2011.– Venezuela's Bolivarian Democracy: Participation, Politics, and Culture under Chávez, edited by David Smilde and Daniel Hellinger, Duke University Press, 2011.

  1. Continuity of care in addictions treatment: the role of advocacy and coordination in case management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, K; Timney, C B; Bois, C; Wedgerfield, K

    1995-11-01

    Although advocacy and coordination are recognized as important aspects of the addictions treatment process, little research has been done in these areas. The present study examined advocacy and coordination at two programs where the mandate was assessment, referral, and case management. Both programs spent a similar proportion of client-related effort on advocacy and/or coordination (about 25% of contact time, accounting for about half of contacts made regarding clients). The majority of advocacy and coordination contacts were with other agencies about clients (the remainder with family and friends of clients). A framework for advocacy and coordination was developed that allowed contacts to be categorized into mutually exclusive advocacy or coordination activities. Advocacy was defined as any activity undertaken to obtain something for clients; coordination involved the giving or receiving of information regarding specific clients. Sources of variability in the provision of advocacy and coordination were found between the programs that could be attributed to differences between the systems within which the programs operated, as well as differences in program clientele. In terms of client characteristics, it was found that females were more likely than males to receive advocacy; those over 65 years were most likely to receive both advocacy and coordination; those who were referred by school or employer or by corrections were most likely to receive coordination; those with no prior treatment were most likely to receive advocacy; and self-referrals and those who had had prior treatment were most likely to receive neither advocacy nor coordination. Receiving advocacy or coordination was not found to reduce the need by clients for other case management services, such as supportive counseling. The findings are discussed in terms of the need for knowledge regarding highly variable aspects of treatment such as advocacy and coordination. New research approaches (as taken in

  2. Ocular allergy latin american consensus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna Serapião dos Santos

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To establish current definition, classification and staging, and to develop diagnosis and treatment recommendations for ocular allergy, by using Delphi approach. METHODS: Ten Latin American experts on ocular allergy participated in a 4-round Delphi panel approach. Four surveys were constructed and answered by panelists. A two-thirds majority was defined as consensus. Definition, classification, staging and diagnosis and treatment recommendations were the main outcomes. RESULTS: "Ocular allergy" was proposed as the general term to describe ocular allergic diseases. Consensus regarding classification was not reached. Signs and symptoms were considered extremely important for the diagnosis. It was consensus that a staging system should be proposed based on the disease severity. Environmental control, avoidance of allergens and the use of artificial tears were recommended as first line treatment. The secondary treatment should include topical anti-histamines, mast cell stabilizers and multi actions drugs. Topical non-steroidal anti-inflammatory and vasoconstrictors were not recommended. Topical corticosteroids were recommended as third line of treatment for the most severe keratoconjunctivitis. Consensus was not reached regarding the use of systemic corticosteroids or immunosuppressant. Surgical approach and unconventional treatments were not recommended as routine. CONCLUSION: The task of creating guidelines for ocular allergies showed to be very complex. Many controversial topics remain unsolved. A larger consensus including experts from different groups around the world may be needed to further improve the current recommendations for several aspects of ocular allergy.

  3. Internet Use in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Salzman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este documento analiza el desarrollo del uso de Internet en América Latina. Los análisis exploran las expectativas y realidades macro y micro sociales del uso de Internet en la región. Mientras se conjetura tanto acerca de la penetración de Internet en América Latina, este documento establece las tasas reales de penetración, e intenta comprender qué ha fomentado su crecimiento en la región. Diferentes niveles de desarrollo económico, tecnológico y gubernamental impulsan la expansión de la penetración de Internet en la región. Al observar el consumo en un nivel micro, esta investigación emplea datos de encuestas de varios años del Proyecto de Opinión Pública de América Latina (Latin American Public Opinion Project y ofrece un análisis inicial de los factores determinantes del uso de Internet. En comparación con otras formas de consumo de medios de comunicación, los usuarios de Internet son más jóvenes y más escépticos a los medios de prensa locales.

  4. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  5. A Latin American perspective of periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffesse, Raúl G

    2015-02-01

    Periodontal diseases occur worldwide, and Latin American populations are significantly affected by different manifestations of periodontal disease. The interest in periodontics and periodontal therapy first developed in the early 1930s in the southernmost countries of Latin America, and spread, as the years went by, throughout the region. Today, periodontal research is vibrant in Latin America. The aim of this volume of Periodontology 2000 was to present an overview of the periodontal research currently being performed in different countries of Latin America. The epidemiology of periodontal diseases in adults, children and adolescents, and the pathogenesis of such diseases (including microbiological characteristics and risk factors), are discussed. The role of systemic antibiotic therapy and the effect of smoking are discussed in relation to the progression and the treatment of periodontitis. In addition, the benefit of lasers in periodontal therapy is evaluated. Latin American research groups have been active in exploring new venues of regenerative periodontal treatment, addressing the role of cementum proteins, growth factors and oral mesenchymal stem cells in tissue engineering. Finally, basic research to study cancerization is reported. PMID:25494595

  6. [Inequities in cardiovascular diseases in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleischer, Nancy L; Diez Roux, Ana V

    2013-01-01

    In high-income countries, social inequalities in cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk are well-documented. Although Latin America has a rich history of theory and conceptual discussion regarding social inequalities in health, empirical research has been more limited. In this commentary we summarize recent empirical work on social inequalities in CVD risk in Latin America, and highlight key research needs as well as implications for prevention. Although much remains unknown about the social patterning of CVD in Latin America, the limited studies to date indicate that inequalities in CVD risk vary across populations and markers of socioeconomic position, as well as disease risk marker. The strongest social inequalities are seen among women, and in urban areas, with regards to obesity, diabetes, and diet. Few studies, though, have been conducted in some parts of Latin America, including the countries of Central America and northern South America. Vital registration systems and nationally-representative risk factor surveys can be important sources of data, as long as information on socioeconomic indicators is collected. Longitudinal studies will also be important for investigating factors driving social inequalities. As policies and prevention strategies are put into place to reduce CVD in Latin America, they must also address factors generating social inequalities in CVD risk.

  7. Patient advocacy groups: Need and opportunity in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunal Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With an increasing number of corporate hospitals, healthcare related issues, research trials and undue attention by media in India, there is a need to focus more on patient′s rights and protection. In India, multiple agencies like regulatory bodies, scientific review committees, ethics committees, NGOs, etc. work toward patient rights and protection. However, these agencies are inadequate to cater to the general issues related to patient′s rights. There′s a need to have a separate group of people who provide advocacy to the patient, or simply, a patient advocacy group which will work explicitly in these areas to increase transparency and credibility of healthcare system in India. This group will provide special attention to patient care and protection of rights from the planning stage rather than at the troubleshooting stage.

  8. Nursing Actions in practicing inpatient advocacy in a Burn Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Carniato Dalle Nogario

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVEUnderstanding nursing actions in the practice of inpatient advocacy in a burn unit.METHODA single and descriptive case study, carried out with nurses working in a referral burn center in southern Brazil. Data were collected through focus group technique, between February and March 2014, in three meetings. Data was analysed through discursive textual analysis.RESULTSThree emerging categories were identified, namely: (1 instructing the patient; (2 protecting the patient; and (3 ensuring the quality of care.CONCLUSIONSThis study identified that the nurses investigated exercised patient advocacy and that the recognition of their actions is an advance for the profession, contributing to the autonomy of nurses and the effectiveness of patients' rights and social justice.

  9. The Social Work Reinvestment Initiative: advocacy and social work practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Elizabeth Peffer; McMillin, Joan A

    2014-07-01

    In 2006, NASW launched the Social Work Reinvestment Initiative by granting each state chapter $15,000 in seed money to address the most pressing social work needs in the state. This article describes how NASW-SD, with 246 members, launched an epic campaign that resulted in the establishment of the only MSW program in South Dakota. Using historical research methods, this article demonstrates the power of social work advocacy when members unify in pursuit of a common goal and describes how the social workers rallied to educate policymakers and the public on the value of social work and its delivery of necessary social services at all levels and in all fields of practice. The research highlights an uphill battle of advocacy and the skillful planning and implementation of a campaign to secure state funding to establish the first MSW program in the state, at the beginning of the most difficult economic recession since the Great Depression.

  10. Training self-advocacy skills to adults with mild handicaps.

    OpenAIRE

    Sievert, A L; Cuvo, A J; Davis, P K

    1988-01-01

    We developed and empirically evaluated an instructional program to teach self-advocacy skills to eight young adults with mild handicaps. Participants were taught to discriminate whether or not possible violations of legal rights occurred in socially validated scenarios and, if so, to role-play how to redress rights violations. Experimental control was demonstrated with a multiple probe design across four general legal rights categories for the discrimination component of training, and a multi...

  11. Ethics and the choice of animal advocacy campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Waters, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines how different ethical positions view various types of animal advocacy campaigns concerning a product produced using animals. The ethical positions represent common company, social, and animal advocate viewpoints. Working in a market model with a monopolistic supplier, we determine whether the ethical positions support or oppose each campaign, and in what conditions. We describe three easily implemented campaign strategies that combine animal welfare and rights goals.

  12. Rivalry of Advocacy Coalitions in the Czech Pension Reform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potůček Martin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Czech Republic, as many other countries of Central and Eastern Europe, faced and is still facing a pension-reform challenge. The diversification of pension pillars led to the massive displacements of participant contributions from the public PAYG pension pillars to the newly constructed private, defined-contribution, fully-funded pillars. In the Czech Republic, the adoption of the relevant law was preceded by serious political conflict between supporters and opponents of this step (both among different political actors and among professionals. In an analysis of the conflict we critically apply the Advocacy Coalition Framework. We work mainly with the analysis of policy documents, public statements of the individual actors and an analysis of voting on the relevant law in both chambers of the Czech Parliament towards the identification of the crystallization process of two clear-cut coalitions between actors from both sides of the spectrum. The Advocacy Coalition Framework in exploring the dynamics of the public-policy process proved to be able to explain situations where there is sharp political conflict. Through the lens of the devil-shift of both camps (advocacy coalitions with different beliefs, each fell into extreme positions within the coalition to affirm the correctness of their arguments and positions.

  13. Haematopoietic cell transplants in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, R P; Seber, A; Bonfim, C; Pasquini, M

    2016-07-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done predominately in Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplant activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of >600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. These data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  14. Predicting Levels of Policy Advocacy Engagement Among Acute-Care Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Bird, Melissa; Ward, Cathy Rogers; Brown-Saltzman, Katherine; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2016-02-01

    This study aims to describe the factors that predict health professionals' engagement in policy advocacy. The researchers used a cross-sectional research design with a sample of 97 nurses, 94 social workers, and 104 medical residents from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven predictor scales were associated with health professionals' policy advocacy engagement and revealed that five of the eight factors were significantly associated with it (p engagement, eagerness, skills, tangible support, and organizational receptivity. Regression analysis examined whether the seven scales, when controlling for sociodemographic variables and hospital site, predicted levels of policy advocacy engagement. Results revealed that patient advocacy engagement (p engagement. Ethical commitment did not predict policy advocacy engagement. The model explained 36% of the variance in policy advocacy engagement. Limitations of the study and its implications for future research, practice, and policy are discussed. PMID:27151835

  15. Action Plan of TIPI, the Technology Innovation Platform of the International Federation of Organic Agriculture Movements (IFOAM - Organics International)

    OpenAIRE

    Baker, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Proposed Goals for TIPI Facilitate global access to information on organic farming and food systems. Facilitate interactions between researchers and the beneficiaries of research, development, and technology transfer. Assist IFOAM and the entire organic movement with scientific evidence-based advocacy. Capacity Building: Increase the number of researchers, educators and extensionists working with organic farming systems.

  16. A New Era of Sino-Latin American Relations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Hongying; Li Huan

    2007-01-01

    @@ The year 2006 saw enhanced political trust, even closer economic interdependency, and deepened strategic partnership between China and many Latin American countries. It is fair to say that Sino-Latin American relations have entered a new phase.

  17. WELFARE REGIMES IN LATIN AMERICA AND CARIBBEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melisa Campana-Alabarce

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This article provides a characterization of Latin American and Caribbean Welfare regimes in historiographical perspective. Firstly, it makes a review of the emergence conditions of Welfare States in Western Europe and its core features, with particular emphasis on its role as a method to regulate inequalities in industrial capitalism. Dialoguing with it, then stops in the specific configurations that welfare regimes have taken in Latin America during the course of the twentieth century. Finally, it provides a map of its contemporary features and the major challenges that the States of the region face in his capacity as right guarantors for the future.

  18. Understanding China's Relations with Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    This essay deals with the fast growing Sino-Latin American relations,touching upon the issues of the importance of Latin America to China;pros and cons of the bilateral relations;the U.S.factor;the opportunities that might be emerged from the financial crisis for the bilateral relations;China's first policy paper towards the region;the overseas Chinese contribution to the bilateral relations;Taiwan problem;the so-called neo-colonialism and the role of Europe.

  19. Development and Psychometric Evaluation of the Instrument: Attitudes Towards Organ Donor Advocacy Scale (ATODAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Flodén, Anne; Lennerling, Annette; Fridh, Isabell; Rizell, Magnus; Forsberg, Anna

    2011-01-01

    The consequences of advocacy in nursing are critical when caring for a potential organ donor. No specific instrument has been available to measure attitudes toward organ donor advocacy. The aim of this study was to develop and psychometrically evaluate an instrument for measuring intensive and critical care (ICU) nurses’ attitudes toward organ donor advocacy. The study was conducted in two stages: instrument development and instrument evaluation and refinement. A questionnaire was developed (...

  20. Assessment of tobacco control advocacy behavioural capacity among students at schools of public health in China

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Tingzhong; Abdullah, Abu S.; Rockett, Ian R. H.; Li, Mu; Zhou, Yuhua; Jun MA; Ji, Huaping; Zheng, Jianzhong; Zhang, Yuhong; Wang, Liming

    2010-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate student tobacco control advocacy behavioural capacity using longitudinal trace data. Methods A tobacco control advocacy curriculum was developed and implemented at schools of public health (SPH) or departments of public health in seven universities in China. Participants comprised undergraduate students studying the public health curriculum in these 13 Universities. A standardised assessment tool was used to evaluate their tobacco control advocacy behavioural capacity. ...

  1. [Scientific journals of medical students in Latin-America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Samith, Ignacio; Oróstegui-Pinilla, Diana; Angulo-Bazán, Yolanda; Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2010-11-01

    This article deals with the history and evolution of student's scientific journals in Latin-America, their beginnings, how many still exist and which is their future projection. Relevant events show the growth of student's scientific journals in Latin-America and how are they working together to improve their quality. This article is addressed not only for Latin American readers but also to worldwide readers. Latin American medical students are consistently working together to publish scientific research, whose quality is constantly improving.

  2. Advocacy Priorities and Strategies for ASAHP: A Survey of the ASAHP Membership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, Donna; Demo, David H; Devine, Nancy; Butler, Andrew; Saladin, Lisa

    2015-01-01

    The Association of Schools of Allied Health Professions (ASAHP) recently established a strategic goal to increase advocacy efforts. The purpose of this study was to identify advocacy priorities and preferred advocacy strategies among the ASAHP membership. A brief Advocacy Priorities and Strategies Survey was sent to 234 ASAHP members included in the ASAHP email list using an online survey software. Forty-eight members (20%) completed the survey. Data were analyzed using the online survey software and response frequency counts. ASAHP members identified the following federal advocacy priorities: 1) support for students entering allied health professions, 2) support for faculty seeking higher degrees to enhance quality of education in allied health programs, 3) support for higher education institutions to increase capacity of professional programs to address projected allied health workforce needs identified by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and 4) support for research funding from federal agencies for allied health. The need for education regarding allied health professions to enhance advocacy efforts was also reported. Preferred advocacy strategies included scheduling ASAHP conferences in Washington, DC, to facilitate trips to Capitol Hill and visiting legislators in home states. Members also indicated a need to participate in advocacy training to enhance their advocacy skills.

  3. Promoting Sex and Reproductive Health Education among Adolescent Should Place Emphasis on Advocacy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-liang LIU; Jin WANG

    2006-01-01

    Objective To make a exploration of the function of advocacy in the promotion of sex and reproductive health education for adolescents.Methods The advocacy played a key role on the promotion of adolescent sex and reproductive education by taking "International cooperation project to promote Chinese youth reproductive health "(YRH project) as example.Results The successful experience of YRH project indicated advocacy's important function in the promotion of sex and reproductive health education for adolescents.Conclusion Advocacy is a crucial element in promoting adolescent sex and reproductive health education.

  4. Claiming Rosa Parks: conservative Catholic bids for 'rights' in contemporary Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lynn M

    2014-01-01

    When the Rosa Parks Prize was awarded to a conservative Argentine senator in 2009 for her outspoken opposition to contraception, sterilisation and abortion, it was clear that something odd was happening. This paper documents the appropriation of 'human rights' discourses by conservative Catholics in Latin America, where the recent success of reproductive and sexual rights social movements has generated a significant backlash. It specifically traces an effort by Catholic legal scholars to justify what they term 'a distinctively Latin American approach to human rights' while ignoring decades of human rights activism by others. Opponents of reproductive and sexual rights are deploying rights-talk selectively and strategically, it is argued, using this as secular cover to advance pro-life and pro-family policies. PMID:24592819

  5. Sino-Latin American Trade,Closer Tie

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Liqin

    2009-01-01

    @@ The financial crisis has provided a new opportunity for Sino-Latin American cooperation.In the past few years,China's economic ties to Latin America have witnessed comparable growth:from 1993 to 2003,China's trade with Latin America increased by 600 percent.

  6. Apuntes sobre Latinismos en Espanol (Notes on Latinisms in Spanish)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez B., L. A.

    1977-01-01

    Several Latinisms appear in Latin American Spanish, which would logically be farther from its Latin roots than Spanish in Spain. The existence of these elements and their importance as linguistic facts is analyzed here. Four words are treated: "Cliente,""cuadrar,""cuarto" and "rabula." (Text is in Spanish.) (CHK)

  7. Latin American Immigrant Women and Intergenerational Sex Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalde, Maria Cristina; Quelopana, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    People of Latin American descent make up the largest and fastest-growing minority group in the USA. Rates of pregnancy, childbirth, and sexually transmitted infections among people of Latin American descent are higher than among other ethnic groups. This paper builds on research that suggests that among families of Latin American descent, mothers…

  8. Internationalizing Business Education in Latin America: Issues and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elahee, Mohammad; Norbis, Mario

    2009-01-01

    This article examines the extent of internationalization of business education in Latin America and identifies the key challenges facing the Latin American business schools. Based on a survey of the business schools that are members of CLADEA (Consejo Latinoamericano de Escuelas de Administracion--Latin American Council of Management Schools), and…

  9. Bibliography on open access in Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Babini, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Bibliography on open access in Latin America and the Caribbean. Selection mainly based on open access publications describing open access initiatives in Latin America and the Caribbean. Prepared for UNESCO-Latin America and the Caribbean Section of the UNESCO-GOAP Global Open Access Portal.

  10. Social Movements and Critical Pedagogy in Brazil: From the Origins of Popular Education to the Proposal of a Permanent Forum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leher, Roberto; Vittoria, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of anti-capitalist social movements in Latin America is the incorporation of self-organizing processes of political education and involvement in the educational process of their children and youth. This article discusses popular education and critical pedagogy upheld by historical and contemporary Brazilian social movements,…

  11. Dancing on the Deck of the Titanic? Adult Education, the Nation-State and New Social Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos Alberto

    2011-01-01

    This article begins with a discussion of the implications of CONFINTEA VI having been organised in Brazil--the author uses the term "Brazilian effect"--and the role of social movements challenging neoliberalism. Next, drawing from the experience of Latin America, this paper analyses the counter-hegemonic practice of the new social movements. The…

  12. Movement in Architecture: A Spacial Movement Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Lauren Coleen

    2010-01-01

    As the body moves through space ephemeral lines of movement are created. These lines of movement are influenced by body tendencies. We learn from the body by watching the path and patterning of movement. From the study of the movement of the body, theories of spacial movement were developed. The goal of my project is to draw from spacial movement theory to create an architectural expression that motivates movement of the body on my site and through my building. The focus of my thesis is ...

  13. Teachers and Human Rights in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmes, Jo-Ann

    1981-01-01

    Presents country-by-country information on teacher militancy and the repression and victimization of teachers by Latin American military regimes, as reported to the World Confederation of Organizations of the Teaching Profession (WCOTP). Condensed from "ATA Magazine," published by the Alberta (Canada) Teacher's Association, January 1981, pp4-9.…

  14. Sustainable transport practices in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogat, J.; Hinostroza, M. [UNEP Risoe Centre (Denmark)

    2007-05-15

    The rapid growth of Latin American cities beginning in the 70s has led to, among other things, growing mobility and demand for transportation. The lack of efficient, reliable and safe public transport systems has promoted the switch away from buses and trains towards private cars. Some of the impacts of a steadily increasing car fleet have been increased congestion, number of accidents and environmental deterioration. Recognising the potential implications of such a development, policy makers and officials found it necessary and went ahead to reformulate transport policies with the aim of providing safe, cost-effective and environmental-friendly public transport systems. Bus rapid transit (BRT) became the answer in a number of Latin American cities. The successful experiences of Curitiba in Brazil and Bogota in Colombia have served as the source of inspiration for other cities in Latin America, Asia, Europe and the USA. Thus, the BRT represents a unique example of South-South, South-North technology transfer. This paper presents some of the Latin American experiences and discusses their achievement and drawbacks. (au)

  15. School Facility Projects in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Jeffrey; de Cassia Alves Vaz, Rita; Honorio, Joao; Baza, Jadille; Origel, Ricardo; Gomez, Fredys

    2004-01-01

    Many Latin American countries are undertaking projects, in line with practices disseminated by PEB, to share school facilities with the local community, to adapt traditional schools for students with disabilities, and to collaborate with private companies to finance educational buildings. The articles below describe current initiatives in five…

  16. The legislative process in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mercedes GARCÍA MONTERO

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses through comparative analysis the stages of the ordinary legislative process in eighteen Latin American countries. Through a study of the national Constitutions and internal regulations, it aims to track for the different cases, the variety of forms of presentation, debate and approval of laws in the region.

  17. Evaluating Multigrade School Reform in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwan, Patrick J.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes three multigrade school reforms in Latin America: (1) Colombia's "Escuela Nueva", (2) Guatemala's "Nueva Escuela Unitaria", and (3) Chile's MECE-Rural. Each reform endowed primary teachers and students with special training and instructional materials, and encouraged new kinds of instruction in rural classrooms, with the goal…

  18. Latin American petroleum sector at crossroads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that Latin America's petroleum industry stands at a precarious crossroads of change. Fundamental changes of democratization, privatization, and economic reform that have marked South America's petroleum sectors since the late 1980s are seeping into other Latin American regions. An unprecedented return of capital that had fled the region in the 1980s - Latin America's lost decade - is under way in full force. That demonstrates the improved credibility of the region's economic reform programs, reports the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB). Even as those reform efforts marked progress in South America in 1991, however, that progress has been threatened in 1992 by political scandal, government crisis, and environmental controversy. Just as the fitful transition to capitalism in the former U.S.S.R. has threatened to collapse the former Soviet republics into chaos because of its economic fallout, so has economic reform in such nations as Brazil, Peru, and Venezuela stumbled. On the other hand, privatization continues apace in Argentina and Mexico. Those Latin American nations and others caught in the rising tide of privatization pulled by an increasingly market oriented global economy continue to avow their commitment to economic reform

  19. Imagining Globalization through Latin American Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seminet, Georgia

    2009-01-01

    Through a combination of practical applications and theoretical underpinnings, this article explores the question of how to approach the teaching of Latin American Literature in the current period of globalization. Many theorists argue that we need new epistemologies in which to ground our pedagogy for the 21st century. Understanding the effects…

  20. Educational Neuromyths among Teachers in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Lira Luttges, Benjamin; Salvarezza, Florencia; Campos, Anna Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Neuroscientific knowledge has undeniably gained interest among educators worldwide. However, not all "brain facts" believed by teachers are supported by science. This study sought to evaluate the belief in these so-called "neuromyths" among 3,451 Latin American teachers. We found that, consistent with prior research among…

  1. Irrigation Water Management in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aureo S de Oliveira

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Latin American countries show a great potential for expanding their irrigated areas. Irrigation is important for strengthening local and regional economy and for enhancing food security. The present paper aimed at providing a brief review on key aspects of irrigation management in Latin America. Poor irrigation management can have great impact on crop production and on environment while good management reduces the waste of soil and water and help farmers maximizing their profits. It was found that additional research is needed to allow a better understanding of crop water requirements under Latin American conditions as well as to provide farmers with local derived information for irrigation scheduling. The advantages of deficit irrigation practices and the present and future opportunities with the application of remote sensing tools for water management were also considered. It is clear that due to the importance of irrigated agriculture, collaborative work among Latin American researchers and institutions is of paramount importance to face the challenges imposed by a growing population, environment degradation, and competition in the global market.

  2. Population communication: the Latin American experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborga, A

    1985-06-01

    Latin America is the 5th most populous area in the world; in Central America 40% of the population is made up of indigenous groups, the remaining 60% comprise mixed European and Africa strains. The entire Latin American are faces a set of similar problems: 1) an inadequate agrarian structure, 2) unchecked urban growth, 3) high illiteracy and school drop-out rates, and 4) the undervaluation of the area's natural products by the developed countries. The increased Latin American population has had to face the additional problem of increasing unemployment rates; 10.29% in 1983 and 11.19% in 1984. The deterioration of rural living conditions, falling investment in the sector, and their lack of opportunities invariably constitute a stimulus for the endless rural exodus toward the cities. The Regional Program of Rural Communication for Latin America and the Caribbean helps national organizations (both official and private) and conducts activities related to communication and population issues by creating systems for diffusion, personnel training, and intermediate and mass communication. The basic components of the direct training program have been regional and subregional seminar courses and workshops; since 1973, 700 professional personnel have been trained directly. The Regional Program collaborates with member states in solving the zone's important population problem. PMID:12268118

  3. Nineteenth Latin-American congress on chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication deals with different in-scope papers presented at the 19. Latin-American congress on chemistry, held in Buenos Aires (Argentine Republic) from November 5-9, 1990. The original document where these papers are contained, consists of 567 pages

  4. Evaluation of resident attitudes and self-reported competencies in health advocacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fok Mark C

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The CanMEDS Health Advocate role, one of seven roles mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons Canada, pertains to a physician's responsibility to use their expertise and influence to advance the wellbeing of patients, communities, and populations. We conducted our study to examine resident attitudes and self-reported competencies related to health advocacy, due to limited information in the literature on this topic. Methods We conducted a pilot experience with seven internal medicine residents participating in a community health promotion event. The residents provided narrative feedback after the event and the information was used to generate items for a health advocacy survey. Face validity was established by having the same residents review the survey. Content validity was established by inviting an expert physician panel to review the survey. The refined survey was then distributed to a cohort of core Internal Medicine residents electronically after attendance at an academic retreat teaching residents about advocacy through didactic sessions. Results The survey was completed by 76 residents with a response rate of 68%. The majority agreed to accept an advocacy role for societal health needs beyond caring for individual patients. Most confirmed their ability to identify health determinants and reaffirmed the inherent requirements for health advocacy. While involvement in health advocacy was common during high school and undergraduate studies, 76% of residents reported no current engagement in advocacy activity, and 36% were undecided if they would engage in advocacy during their remaining time as residents, fellows or staff. The common barriers reported were insufficient time, rest and stress. Conclusions Medical residents endorsed the role of health advocate and reported proficiency in determining the medical and bio-psychosocial determinants of individuals and communities. Few residents, however, were

  5. Emerging Latin American air quality regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosmer, A.W.; Vitale, E.M.; Guerrero, C.R.; Solorzano-Vincent, L. [ICF Kaiser International, Fairfax, VA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    Latin America is the most urbanized region in the developing world. In recent years, significant economic growth has resulted in population migration from rural areas to urban centers, as well as in a substantial rise in the standard of living within the Region. These changes have impacted the air quality of Latin American countries as increased numbers of industrial facilities and motor vehicles release pollutants into the air. With the advent of new free trade agreements such as MERCOSUR and NAFTA, economic activity and associated pollutant levels can only be expected to continue to expand in the future. In order to address growing air pollution problems, many Latin America countries including Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Columbia, Costa Rica, and Mexico have passed, or will soon pass, new legislation to develop and strengthen their environmental frameworks with respect to air quality. As a first step toward understanding the impacts that this increased environmental regulation will have, this paper will examine the regulatory systems in six Latin American countries with respect to ambient air quality and for each of these countries: review a short history of the air quality problems within the country; outline the legal and institutional framework including key laws and implementing institutions; summarize in brief the current status of the country in terms of program development and implementation; and identify projected future trends. In addition, the paper will briefly review the international treaties that have bearing on Latin American air quality. Finally, the paper will conclude by identifying and exploring emerging trends in individual countries and the region as a whole.

  6. Direct Spanish Investments in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Arahuetes García

    1995-11-01

    Full Text Available In the period 1981-1992, the international flow of direct investments witnessed significant changes which affected their magnitude, geographical orientation, sectorial distribution, forms of investment and sources of financing. This happened in such a way that traditional distribution among industrialized and developing countries was modified as was the capacity for attraction of the different areas in development. In this sense, the main contrast could be seen in the growing importance of East and South East Asia and the decline of Latin American countries which traditionally have been the largest receivers of direct investments within the group of developing countries. The expansive phase of direct investments begun in 1986 threatened to exclude Latin American countries but the establishment of a new framework for the treatment of the problem of external debt -the Brady Plan-, the change in the context of theinternational economy in 1990 and the stability and economic growth of the countries of the region favoured, without a doubt, the recovery of the capacity for attraction for new flows of direct investments regarding Latin American countries.In this way, Latin America registered once again a growing participation in the international flow of direct investments. The evolution of direct Spanish investment in Latin America followed a path similar to that of wider international flows and, after the intense absorption of the first years of the Eighties, the rest of the decade registered a discreet attraction for investors which only began to change course from 1989 onwards with the reestablishment of the new phase of the economic cycle in the countries of the region.

  7. Movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoessl, A Jon; Mckeown, Martin J

    2016-01-01

    Movement disorders can be hypokinetic (e.g., parkinsonism), hyperkinetic, or dystonic in nature and commonly arise from altered function in nuclei of the basal ganglia or their connections. As obvious structural changes are often limited, standard imaging plays less of a role than in other neurologic disorders. However, structural imaging is indicated where clinical presentation is atypical, particularly if the disorder is abrupt in onset or remains strictly unilateral. More recent advances in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may allow for differentiation between Parkinson's disease and atypical forms of parkinsonism. Functional imaging can assess regional cerebral blood flow (functional MRI (fMRI), positron emission tomography (PET), or single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)), cerebral glucose metabolism (PET), neurochemical and neuroreceptor status (PET and SPECT), and pathologic processes such as inflammation or abnormal protein deposition (PET) (Table 49.1). Cerebral blood flow can be assessed at rest, during the performance of motor or cognitive tasks, or in response to a variety of stimuli. In appropriate situations, the correct imaging modality and/or combination of modalities can be used to detect early disease or even preclinical disease, and to monitor disease progression and the effects of disease-modifying interventions. Various approaches are reviewed here. PMID:27430452

  8. Political Violence in Latin America. A Cross-Case Comparison of the Urban Insurgency Campaigns of Montoneros, M-19, and FSLN in a Historical Perspective

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    le Blanc, J.H.C.

    2012-01-01

    The investigation reconstructs and examines the processes of escalation and de-escalation of political violence in internal conflicts in Latin America. The study analyses and compares the urban insurgent campaigns of the Argentinean Montoneros, the Colombian Movement 19 April (M-19) and the Nicaragu

  9. Advocacy in the Western Hemisphere Region: some FPA success stories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, D J

    1996-01-01

    The International Planned Parenthood Federation's Vision 2000 Strategic Plan has emphasized advocacy and the training of family planning associations (FPAs) in the Western Hemisphere region. During the summer of 1995 training programs in advocacy leadership management were sponsored for six FPAs in the Bahamas, Suriname, Belize, Colombia, Honduras, and Brazil. At the Western Hemisphere Regional Council Meeting in September 1995 awards were presented to FPAs for media outstanding projects. These FPAs used outreach to the community to promote the goals of Vision 2000. The Bahamas FPA won the Rosa Cisneros Award for articles published in a magazine that is distributed in primary and secondary schools and deals with the activities, achievements, and opinions of students. Issues include: love, relationships, responsibility, and teen pregnancy. A weekly television talk show also addresses the issues facing youth including education, music, community work, sexuality, pregnancy, and the relationship between teenagers and adults. The Family Planning Association of Honduras was also nominated for the award for a radio show on the health of mothers and children, the problems of adolescents, and FP. The newspaper Tiempo received the award for feature articles on social issues and FP. In 1994 the Association distributed thousands of booklets on contraceptives as well as fliers on vasectomy, female sterilization, oral contraceptives, IUDs, condoms, responsible parenthood, high-risk pregnancy, vaginal cytology, and cervical cancer. Similar posters were placed in hospitals and health centers, in 1997 FP posts, and 400 commercial outlets. The Family Planning Association of Suriname also carried out an impressive advocacy program during the period of 1968-93 with the goals of establishing a balance between population growth and the available resources to achieve well-being with regard to education, health care, nutrition, and housing. PMID:12291093

  10. 76 FR 78342 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-16

    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  11. 77 FR 37101 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-20

    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  12. 77 FR 30591 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  13. 77 FR 47166 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-07

    ...An open meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted. The Taxpayer Advocacy Panel is soliciting public comments, ideas, and suggestions on improving customer service at the Internal Revenue...

  14. Generating sociability to drive science: patient advocacy organizations and genetics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panofsky, Aaron

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines how patient advocacy organizations (PAOs) representing those with rare genetic disorders drive research to their concerns. The rarity of the diseases produces a basic condition of marginalization: small numbers of widely distributed disease sufferers. The lack of promise of an eventual market makes it difficult to attract the economic and biological resources necessary for sustained research. My analysis relies mainly on 21 interviews with leaders from nine PAOs and scientists involved with them, and seeks to understand how PAOs try to attract and influence scientific research. Using a comparative framework, I find that the five main mechanisms emphasized in the literature--economic resources, social movement-style mobilization, moving early, lay expertise, and organizational controls--cannot fully explain the differences in strategies and relationships among members of my PAO sample. I propose instead to show how 'sociability'--forging close relationships with scientists and orchestrating relationships among them--enables PAOs to drive research to their concerns. I show how the strategic manipulation of sociability can give PAOs substantial influence over the research process. However, the forms of sociability that yield the greatest effects are difficult to achieve, and most forms of relationship-building offer PAOs much less influence on research.

  15. 76 FR 78931 - Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy Day; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Rare Disease Patient Advocacy... Disease Patient Advocacy Day. This meeting is intended to enhance the awareness of the rare disease..., and devices) intended for the diagnosis, prevention, and/or treatment of rare diseases or...

  16. Being a Member of a Self-Advocacy Group: Experiences of Intellectually Disabled People

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmartin, Ann; Slevin, Eamonn

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenological methodology was used to explore the lived experiences of belonging to a self-advocacy group for people with intellectual disabilities. Thirteen persons with intellectual disabilities who attend three self-advocacy day centre based groups in a city in the west of Ireland were the sample identified for the study. Changes affected…

  17. POLICY ADVOCACY IN SCIENCE: PREVALENCE, PERSPECTIVES, AND IMPLICATIONS FOR CONSERVATION BIOLOGISTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Much debate and discussion has focused on the relationship between science and advocacy, and the role of scientists in influencing public policy. Some argue that advocacy is widespread within scientific literature, however, data to evaluate that contention are lacking. We examine...

  18. Weber's Critique of Advocacy in the Classroom: Critical Thinking and Civic Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the four aspects of Max Weber's argument against including advocacy in the political science classroom. Believes that Weber's critique is a useful starting point for considering the issue in relation to contemporary education. Describes two models, critical thinking and civic education, that present advocacy in the political science…

  19. What History Is Teaching Us: 100 Years of Advocacy in "Music Educators Journal"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedgecoth, David M.; Fischer, Sarah H.

    2014-01-01

    As "Music Educators Journal" celebrates its centennial, it is appropriate to look back over the past century to see how advocacy in music education has evolved. Of the more than 200 submitted articles on advocacy, four main themes emerged: music education in community, the relevancy of music education, the value of music education, and…

  20. Whistle-Blowing as a Form of Advocacy: Guidelines for the Practitioner and Organization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Annette D.; Latting, Jean Kantambu

    2004-01-01

    Advocacy has been an inherent component of social work since the mid-1800s. The NASW Code of Ethics explicitly promotes advocacy as an ethical stance against inhumane conditions. Whistle-blowing, on the other hand, occurs mostly in the business and public administration disciplines and is relatively unknown in the social work profession. Using…

  1. Advocacy and Empowerment in Parent Consultation: Implications for Theory and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holcomb-McCoy, Cheryl; Bryan, Julia

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors expand the view of parental consultation to include advocacy and empowerment as important contextual considerations. A brief review of existing approaches to parent consultation is provided. Selected advances in multicultural parent consultation are also presented. An advocacy- and empowerment-focused perspective is…

  2. Fighting for Their Rights: Advocacy Experiences of Parents of Children Identified with Intellectual Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Cheryll; Orders, Shari; Fullarton, Stephanie; Robertson-Grewal, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    This research examined the advocacy experiences of 16 parents of adolescents and young adults who had been assessed as intellectually gifted. The purpose was to determine the applicability of the four dimensions of advocacy to their experiences (awareness, information seeking, presenting the case, and monitoring). Participants responded to a…

  3. Insider, Outsider, Ally, or Adversary: Parents of Youth with Learning Disabilities Engage in Educational Advocacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duquette, Cheryll; Fullarton, Stephanie; Orders, Shari; Robertson-Grewal, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to examine the educational advocacy experiences of parents of adolescents and young adults identified as having a learning disability (LD) through the lens of four dimensions of advocacy. Seventeen mothers of youth with LD responded to items in a questionnaire and 13 also engaged in in-depth interviews. It…

  4. Assessing the Efficacy of a School Health Education Advocacy Lesson with College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallen, Michele; Chaney, Beth H.; Birch, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The researchers evaluated the efficacy of an advocacy lesson to assess change in intentions to advocate for school health education. This study also measured changes in participants' understanding the importance of school health education and perceived effectiveness in applying advocacy skills. Methods: A convenience sample of college…

  5. Exploration of Undergraduate Preservice Teachers' Experiences Learning Advocacy: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massengale, Kelley; Childers-McKee, Cherese; Benavides, Aerin

    2014-01-01

    Applying transformational critical advocacy research in college instruction can be a powerful way to engage students in challenging inequity in society and promoting positive changes. Few studies systematically measure the impact of such pedagogy on the development of college students' beliefs about advocacy. In this mixed methods study, we…

  6. Understanding Parent Advocacy during the Transition to School of Children with Developmental Disabilities: Three Canadian Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Nancy L.; Pyle, Angela; Villeneuve, Michelle; Dods, Jennifer; Dalton, C. J.; Minnes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown the benefits of parent involvement for student participation in education. Parent advocacy is a critical form of involvement by parents for children who are young, have disabilities, and are making transitions. Studies have classified forms of parent advocacy but have not illuminated the components necessary for effective parent…

  7. Fostering Skills in Self-Advocacy: A Key to Access in School and Beyond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckner, John L.; Becker, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Self-advocacy occurs when deaf or hard of hearing individuals explain to hearing teachers, classmates, bosses, and officemates the nature of their hearing loss, their language skills, and the accommodations they require in order to effectively do their work, participate in conversations, and get involved in other activities. Self-advocacy may be…

  8. Development of the Policy Advocacy Behavior Scale: Initial Reliability and Validity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson, Linda Plitt; Shields, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary trends in social service delivery systems require human service agencies to engage in greater levels of advocacy to reform structures and protect programs that serve vulnerable populations. Objective: The purpose of this study was to develop an instrument to measure the policy advocacy behavior of nonprofit human service agencies.…

  9. Management, Leadership, and User Control in Self-Advocacy: An English Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disability, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive…

  10. Questioning the Role of "21st-Century Skills" in Arts Education Advocacy Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logsdon, Leann F.

    2013-01-01

    The revised Core Arts Standards offer music educators the chance to examine the contradictions that currently permeate the arts advocacy discourse. This article examines the emphasis on 21st-century workplace skills in claims made by arts advocacy proponents. An alternative approach focuses instead on lifelong learning in the arts and the array of…

  11. Impact of a Legal Advocacy Program on Services in a State Residential Facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holburn, C. Steve

    1982-01-01

    The impact of a unique, federally funded legal advocacy system on service delivery within a New Mexico state residential care facility for the mentally retarded is examined. Judicial attempts to improve institutional service provision are discussed. Some implications for further use of similar advocacy programs are presented. (Author/CL)

  12. Learning about Advocacy, A Case-Study of Challenges, Everyday Practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ringsing, B.; Leeuwis, C.

    2008-01-01

    Advocacy has become an important area of development support. Simultaneously, the interest in learning-oriented monitoring of advocacy programmes has increased. Starting from the premise that learning has sociopolitical dimensions, this article explores how the challenges and contradictions of such

  13. The Effects of Advocacy Advertising and Situational Crisis on Perceptions of Social Responsibility, Potential Supportive Behavior and Attitudes Toward Advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozby, Jeanie G.; And Others

    Data were collected from 176 college students in a study of the effects of corporate advocacy advertising in crisis situations. The subjects read one of two sets of oil company advertisements, one set using a low advocacy and the other set using a high advocacy approach to explain company activities in relation to current events and social issues.…

  14. 77 FR 40411 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...

  15. 77 FR 55525 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-10

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...

  16. 77 FR 8328 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will ] be conducted....C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...

  17. 77 FR 61053 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-05

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted....C. App. (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods...

  18. 77 FR 21157 - Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-09

    ... Internal Revenue Service Open Meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project... meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee will be conducted.... (1988) that a meeting of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Face-to-Face Service Methods Project Committee...

  19. The Commissioning and Provision of Advocacy for Problem Drug Users in English DATS: A Cross-Sectional Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargill, Tamsin; Weaver, Tim D.; Patterson, Sue

    2012-01-01

    Aims: This study investigated the commissioning and delivery of advocacy for problem drug users. We aimed to quantify provision, describe the commissioning of advocacy services in Drug Action Teams (DATs) and to identify factors influencing advocacy provision. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of a randomly selected sample of 50 English DATs. The…

  20. Developing advocacy for geothermal energy in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is little public advocacy for geothermal energy in the United States outside of the geothermal community itself. Yet, broad-based advocacy is needed to provide impetus for a nourishing economic, regulatory and R and D environment. If such an environment could be created, the prosperity of the geothermal industry would improve and positive environmental effects compared to most other energy sources would be realized. We need an organized sustained effort to provide information and education to all segments of our society, including market-makers and end users, administrators, legislators, regulators, educators, special-interest groups and the public. This effort could be provided by an organization of three main components, a network to gather and disseminate pertinent information on marketing, educational and lobbying opportunities to action committees, a repository of current information on geothermal energy, and action committees each responsible for certain parts of the total marketing, education and lobbying task. In this paper, the author suggests a mechanism for forming such an organization and making it work. The author proposes an informal organization staffed largely by volunteered labor in which no one person would have to devote more than a few percent of his or her work time

  1. Inefficiency in Latin-American market indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunino, L.; Tabak, B. M.; Pérez, D. G.; Garavaglia, M.; Rosso, O. A.

    2007-11-01

    We explore the deviations from efficiency in the returns and volatility returns of Latin-American market indices. Two different approaches are considered. The dynamics of the Hurst exponent is obtained via a wavelet rolling sample approach, quantifying the degree of long memory exhibited by the stock market indices under analysis. On the other hand, the Tsallis q entropic index is measured in order to take into account the deviations from the Gaussian hypothesis. Different dynamic rankings of inefficieny are obtained, each of them contemplates a different source of inefficiency. Comparing with the results obtained for a developed country (US), we confirm a similar degree of long-range dependence for our emerging markets. Moreover, we show that the inefficiency in the Latin-American countries comes principally from the non-Gaussian form of the probability distributions.

  2. VI Latin American Congress on Biomedical Engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Hadad, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of the CLAIB 2014, held in Paraná, Entre Ríos, Argentina 29, 30 & 31 October 2014. The proceedings, presented by the Regional Council of Biomedical Engineering for Latin America (CORAL) offer research findings, experiences and activities between institutions and universities to develop Bioengineering, Biomedical Engineering and related sciences. The conferences of the American Congress of Biomedical Engineering are sponsored by the International Federation for Medical and Biological Engineering (IFMBE), Society for Engineering in Biology and Medicine (EMBS) and the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), among other organizations and international agencies and bringing together scientists, academics and biomedical engineers in Latin America and other continents in an environment conducive to exchange and professional growth. The Topics include: - Bioinformatics and Computational Biology - Bioinstrumentation; Sensors, Micro and Nano Technologies - Biomaterials, Tissu...

  3. The phonological basis of Latin case patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emonds Joseph Embley

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on accounting for allomorphy in Latin case/number inflection. It attributes essentially all of it to the influence of adjacent features of standard segmental phonology on morphemes expressing case assignment. Indeed, other languages lead linguists to expect that allomorphy at a stem-suffix border can depend on any feature of a final vowel: ±Low, ±High, ±Round, ±Back, ±Consonantal or ±Syllabic. Empirically, it turns out that no two Latin stem-final vowels induce identical allomorphy in case/number suffixes, nor the same allomorphy as final consonants. Moreover, some (not much phonologically conditioned allomorphy is phonetically opaque.

  4. Intercultural otherness philosophy in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro B. Márquez-Fernández

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Intercultural philosophy in Latin America takes it that the only way to achieve the liberation from the rationality and thinking of the hegemonic colonial culture, present in their countries from the “discovery” of America until now, would be through the recognition of the other in its identity and origin. This philosophy of ‘decolonization’ stresses that it is there where intersubjectivity comes ontologically into being where the authentic origins of their cultures in their ancestral practices emerge. Therefore, the emergence of the other is the dialectical result of a fenomenological consciousness that becomes aware of the existence of being as otherness; that is, a being that is there for another. This liberty makes possible an encounter without the kind of alienations that take place when a culture boasts of its superiority upon another. The intercultural discourse of Latin-American philosophy emphasizes the evolvement of being with others in favor of liberation for all.

  5. The Regulation of Biosimilars in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Ricardo; Araujo, Denizar Vianna

    2016-03-01

    This article summarizes the regulatory scenario on biological medications in Latin America focusing on comparability studies, extrapolation of indications, interchangeability and pharmacovigilance issues. In the case of comparability studies, what is being discussed is the possibility of decreasing the clinical trials requirement, but that the molecule should be well characterized in the studies of pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. With the worldwide-level approval of the first monoclonal antibody biosimilar, infliximab, extrapolation of indications are being discussed, since the behavior of the Latin America regulatory agencies has been different with regard to such issue. Another issue discussed by the regulatory agencies is the interchangeability between biological medications and their biosimilars, mainly due to the fact that there is a clear confusion on interchangeability and substitution concepts. Finally, the pharmacovigilance debate, according to what takes place globally, is related to the need for identifying and differentiating the reference biological medication and its biosimilars for traceability purposes. PMID:26951254

  6. Rural territorial dynamics in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Chiriboga

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article draws from the preliminary findings of an ongoing appliedresearch program on rural territorial dynamics carried out by the Latin American Center for Rural Development (RIMISP. The article provides some initial findings on 4 territories, of the 11 territories that are part of the overall study. The case studies include the island of Chiloé in southern Chile, the province of Tungurahua in Ecuador, a dairy farm region of Santo Tomás Nicaragua and Cuatro Lagunas near Cuzco Perú. Rural areas in Latin America are characterized by their dual nature with agro-exporting enclaves linked to global value chains alongside impoverished peasant economies, leading to differentiated policy recommendations. The research attempts to find relationships between reduced poverty and inequality in winning regions, measured by three variables, with issues of access to resources, human capital, political empowerment, markets and institutions, with particular attention to innovative social coalitions.

  7. Middle Class and Democracy in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Fierro

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The consolidation of the middle class has been interpreted by modernization and postmodernization theories as a key factor for the functioning and stability of the democratic system. However, in Latin America the middle class has tended to be associated with two contradictory positions. On the one hand, it is emphasized that it plays a stabilizing and democratic role while, on the other hand, it is linked to supporting military coups. With the purpose of elucidate such a dilemma, the relationship that can be established between the socioeconomic status and the degree of support for democracy will be examined. In order to do this, an empirical analysis from Latinbarometer surveys databases will be conducted, covering seventeen countries in the region for the period from 1996 to 2011. It will be concluded that the middle class in Latin America does not have particularly more favorable attitudes toward democracy than other social segments.

  8. Social movements in a globalized world: something new? Los movimientos sociales en un mundo globalizado: ¿alguna novedad?

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador MARTÍ I PUIG

    2010-01-01

    The article develops a number of issues regarding the impact of globalization on collective political actors which we tend to term social movements, or «networks of movements», placing particular emphasis –but not exclusively– on those movements which have emerged in Latin America. To this effect the article has three sections. Firstly, it present a discussion of the global context and its impact on political. Secondly, it develops different explanatory perspectives –which coincide with diffe...

  9. Latin American regionalism in a multipolar world

    OpenAIRE

    Garzón, Jorge F.

    2015-01-01

    The landscape of Latin American regionalism has experienced profound transformations in a relatively short period of time. Regional organizations have proliferated; the open regionalism of the 1990s has gone into decay; new organizations, often referred to as belonging to a new wave of a more political “posthegemonic regionalism,” took center stage; only to be displaced in the attention of observers by newer trade-oriented organizations such as the Pacific Alliance. These developments have be...

  10. Entrepreneurship and Growth: A Latin American Paradox?

    OpenAIRE

    Cristián Larroulet Vignau; Couyoumdjian, Juan Pablo

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we examine the evolution of entrepreneurship in Latin America as presented in the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) studies. These studies present a key set of internationally comparable statistics on entrepreneurship, which have supplied the data for important studies of the role and determinants of entrepreneurship. Here we propose another study along these lines, relating changes in entrepreneurship to changes in economic performance. We obtain an apparently paradoxica...

  11. High magnetic field facilities in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, R.; Grössinger, R.; Bertorello, H.; Broto, J. M.; Davies, H. A.; Estevez-Rams, E.; Gonzalez, J.; Matutes, J.; Sinnecker, J. P.; Sagredo, V.

    2006-11-01

    The EC supported a network (under the Framework 5 ALFA Programme) designated HIFIELD (Project number II0147FI) and entitled: "Measurement methods involving high magnetic fields for advanced and novel materials". As a result, high field facilities were initiated, constructed or extended at the following laboratories in Latin America: University Cordoba (Argentina), CES, Merida (Venezuela), CIMAV, Chihuahua (Mexico), University Federal de Rio de Janeiro (Brazil).

  12. Friendship in Latin American Social Comparative Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Agnaldo Garcia; Julia Sursis Nobre Ferro Bucher-Maluschke; Daniela Marisol Pérez-Angarita; Fábio Nogueira Pereira

    2016-01-01

    Friendship has been traditionally investigated in the field of interpersonal relationships using different theoretical frameworks and approaches. This paper discusses the possibility of investigating friendship from a comparative Latin American perspective, based on a wide literature review on the subject. Based on the theoretical proposals of Hinde (1997) for the investigation of interpersonal relationships, the paper considers that friendship involves several levels of complexity and affect...

  13. Psychology, Ethics and Globalitation in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Osorio, Jorge Mario Flores

    2001-01-01

    The present communication has the intention of helping to the realization of the dream of a Latin-American psychology, structured throw the word and maybe poetry ,because both of them contains the main postulated of one ethic of liberation that permits to valorize the process of the modern capitalism who expands threw the world like a irreversible history, so it results to the professional psychology practice, to understand the place that the psychology must play and in particular the collect...

  14. Essays on microfinance in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Servin Juarez, R.

    2012-01-01

      In the early 1970s, microfinance came to public attention as a promising tool to reduce poverty. However, some people began to claim that microcredit is unsuitable for sustainable development. Nevertheless, the lack of scientific support for both viewpoints has created a need for empirical studies to disentangle whether microfinance interventions should be implemented, and if so, how. The objective of this thesis is to provide evidence on the role of microfinance in Latin America, with...

  15. Deforestation and Property Rights in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Carlos Felipe Jaramillo; Thomas Kelly

    1997-01-01

    This paper analyzes the property rights/deforestation linkage in Latin America. The analysis recognizes two separate areas where tenure issues have an effect on land clearing pressures. The first deals with the security of individual property rights on established agricultural lands and their effects on agricultural production and employment. The second involves tenurial arrangements on forested areas and their impact on the sustainable management of resources. The analysis concludes that str...

  16. Monetary policy alternatives for Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Myriam Quispe-Agnoli

    2001-01-01

    During the 1990s, many Latin American countries began to address their problems with recession, inflation, and unemployment through dramatic economic reforms and monetary policy strategies that included exchange rate pegs, monetary aggregate targeting, or inflation targeting. Inflation targeting, in particular, had begun to lower inflation rates and to stabilize or increase real economic growth in countries such as New Zealand, Canada, and the United Kingdom. But has inflation targeting prove...

  17. Counting Child Domestic Servants in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Levison, Deborah; Langer, Anna

    2010-01-01

    This paper summarizes trends in the use of child domestic servants in six Latin American countries using IPUMS-International census samples for 1960 to 2000. Child domestics are among the most vulnerable of child workers, and the most invisible. They may be treated kindly and allowed to attend school, or they may be secluded in their employers’ home, overworked, verbally abused, beaten, and unable to leave or report their difficulties to kin. Estimates and imputations are based on labor force...

  18. BAT-BORNE RABIES IN LATIN AMERICA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The situation of rabies in America is complex: rabies in dogs has decreased dramatically, but bats are increasingly recognized as natural reservoirs of other rabies variants. Here, bat species known to be rabies-positive with different antigenic variants, are summarized in relation to bat conservation status across Latin America. Rabies virus is widespread in Latin American bat species, 22.5%75 of bat species have been confirmed as rabies-positive. Most bat species found rabies positive are classified by the International Union for Conservation of Nature as “Least Concern”. According to diet type, insectivorous bats had the most species known as rabies reservoirs, while in proportion hematophagous bats were the most important. Research at coarse spatial scales must strive to understand rabies ecology; basic information on distribution and population dynamics of many Latin American and Caribbean bat species is needed; and detailed information on effects of landscape change in driving bat-borne rabies outbreaks remains unassessed. Finally, integrated approaches including public health, ecology, and conservation biology are needed to understand and prevent emergent diseases in bats.

  19. Mineral Facilities of Latin America and Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Rachel; Eros, Mike; Quintana-Velazquez, Meliany

    2006-01-01

    This data set consists of records for over 900 mineral facilities in Latin America and Canada. The mineral facilities include mines, plants, smelters, or refineries of aluminum, cement, coal, copper, diamond, gold, iron and steel, nickel, platinum-group metals, salt, and silver, among others. Records include attributes such as commodity, country, location, company name, facility type and capacity if applicable, and generalized coordinates. The data were compiled from multiple sources, including the 2003 and 2004 USGS Minerals Yearbooks (Latin America and Candada volume), data to be published in the 2005 Minerals Yearbook Latin America and Canada Volume, minerals statistics and information from the USGS minerals information Web site (minerals.usgs.gov/minerals), and data collected by USGS minerals information country specialists. Data reflect the most recent published table of industry structure for each country. Other sources include statistical publications of individual countries, annual reports and press releases of operating companies,and trade journals. Due to the sensitivity of some energy commodity data, the quality of these data should be evaluated on a country-by-country basis. Additional information and explanation is available from the country specialists.

  20. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described. PMID:26009558

  1. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere.

  2. A Public Policy Advocacy Project to Promote Food Security: Exploring Stakeholders' Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkey, Kayla M; Raine, Kim D; Storey, Kate E; Willows, Noreen D

    2016-09-01

    To achieve food security in Canada, comprehensive approaches are required, which involve action at the public policy level. This qualitative study explored the experiences of 14 stakeholders engaging in a 9-month participatory public policy advocacy project to promote community food security in the province of Alberta through the initiation of a campaign to develop a Universal School Food Strategy. Through this exploration, four main themes were identified; a positive and open space to contribute ideas, diversity and common ground, confidence and capacity, and uncertainty. Findings from this study suggest that the participatory advocacy project provided a positive and open space for stakeholders to contribute ideas, through which the group was able to narrow its focus and establish a goal for advocacy. The project also seems to have contributed to the group's confidence and capacity to engage in advocacy by creating a space for learning and knowledge sharing, though stakeholders expressed uncertainty regarding some aspects of the project. Findings from this study support the use of participatory approaches as a strategy for facilitating engagement in public policy advocacy and provide insight into one group's advocacy experience, which may help to inform community-based researchers and advocates in the development of advocacy initiatives to promote community food security elsewhere. PMID:27199148

  3. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences. PMID:25846573

  4. Kentucky Teen Institute: Results of a 1-Year, Health Advocacy Training Intervention for Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Kristi M; Rice, Jason A; Steinbock, Stacie; Reno-Weber, Ben; Okpokho, Ime; Pile, Amanda; Carrico, Kelly

    2015-11-01

    The Kentucky Teen Institute trains youth throughout the state to advocate for policies that promote health in their communities. By evaluating two program summits held at universities, regularly scheduled community meetings, ongoing technical support, and an advocacy day at the state Capitol, the aims of this study were to assess the impact of the intervention on correlates of youths' advocacy intentions and behaviors and to assess youth participants' and other key stakeholders' perceptions of the intervention. An ecological model approach and the theory of planned behavior served as theoretical frameworks from which pre-post, one-group survey and qualitative data were collected (June 2013-June 2014). An equal number of low-income and non-low-income youth representing five counties participated in the Summer Summit pretest (n = 24) and Children's Advocacy Day at the Capitol posttest (n = 14). Survey data revealed that youths' attitude toward advocacy, intentions to advocate, and advocacy behaviors all improved over the intervention. Observations, interviews, a focus group, and other written evaluations identified that the youths', as well as their mentors' and advocacy coaches', confidence, communities' capacity, and mutually beneficial mentorship strengthened. Stronger public speaking skills, communication among the teams, and other recommendations for future advocacy interventions are described.

  5. Patient Education vs. Patient Experiences of Self-advocacy: Changing the Discourse to Support Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Teresa L; Medberry, Elizabeth

    2016-06-01

    A growing emphasis on patient self-advocacy has emerged in the public discourse on cancer survivorship. This discourse shapes patients' conceptualizations about self-advocacy and in turn influences their health care attitudes and behaviors. The purpose of this discourse analysis is to explore the language of self-advocacy by comparing a published self-advocacy guide with the lived experiences of women with ovarian cancer. Data sources include (1) a self-advocacy patient education guide published by the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship and (2) transcripts of focus groups conducted with ovarian cancer survivors. Discourse analysis techniques were used to take a close look at the language used by both to uncover the meaning each group ascribed to self-advocacy. Challenges and inconsistencies were noted between the patient education guide and transcripts including viewing self-advocacy as a skill set to assert one's needs as opposed to a means by which to preserve a positive attitude and maintain a trusting relationship with health care providers, respectively. Some women saw themselves as self-advocates yet struggled to locate relevant health information and hesitated to upset their relationship with their health care providers. This analysis highlights tensions between the discourses and points to ways in which patient education materials can be adjusted to support cancer survivors in advocating for their needs according to their unique situations and preferences.

  6. Igniting the fire within: a primer on political advocacy for pharmacy professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohlke, Angela L; Murphy, Katherine M; Cannell, Megan E; Ray, David B; Burnworth, Melinda J

    2013-06-01

    Due to the expanding role of pharmacy in health care, it is imperative that pharmacy professionals work together to advocate for the profession. An English-language only literature search was conducted of the PubMed and Medline databases using the key words advocacy, grassroots, political action committee, lobbying, politics, political action, legislation, letter writing, pharmacy, pharmacist, Capitol Hill. Up-to-date information regarding pharmacy-specific advocacy was limited and difficult to locate. Information from the literature search was supplemented with interviews of professionals actively engaged in advocacy, personal experience, and Web sites of national pharmacy organizations. This primer ignites the fire for political advocacy within pharmacy professionals by reinforcing the significant impact that advocacy has on the profession and by providing information on how to become involved. The primer provides a comprehensive "pocket guide" of resources combined into an easy-to-use reference for pharmacy professionals and outlines a structured approach on how to become a pharmacy advocate, ranging from a minimal level of involvement to master political activist, and to promote interest among pharmacy professionals to become more engaged with advocacy. Even a small act of advocacy or volunteerism can transform a spark into a raging fire. PMID:23553545

  7. OWNERSHIP STRUCTURE AND CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN LATIN AMERICA

    OpenAIRE

    FERNANDO LEFORT

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of corporate governance practices in Latin American countries, surveying the available empirical literature, reviewing the reports on the subject prepared by multinational organizations, and providing new data for ownership and control structures of companies in different Latin American economies. Like in other emerging economies corporate governance in Latin America is conditioned by the high level of ownership concentration and the profusion of industrial and...

  8. China-Latin America Relations: Main Themes, Main Problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Steen Fryba; Silva Ramos Becard, Danielly

    2016-01-01

    The article discusses the research field of China-Latin American relations and suggests a broad and encompassing approach to the topic. It discusses the main themes and problem areas that analysts mostly emphasize in analyses of China-Latin America relations.......The article discusses the research field of China-Latin American relations and suggests a broad and encompassing approach to the topic. It discusses the main themes and problem areas that analysts mostly emphasize in analyses of China-Latin America relations....

  9. [Scientific journals of medical students in Latin-America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Samith, Ignacio; Oróstegui-Pinilla, Diana; Angulo-Bazán, Yolanda; Mayta-Tristán, Percy; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2010-11-01

    This article deals with the history and evolution of student's scientific journals in Latin-America, their beginnings, how many still exist and which is their future projection. Relevant events show the growth of student's scientific journals in Latin-America and how are they working together to improve their quality. This article is addressed not only for Latin American readers but also to worldwide readers. Latin American medical students are consistently working together to publish scientific research, whose quality is constantly improving. PMID:21279260

  10. Advocacy--answering old mail. Canadian Association of General Surgeons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, R G

    1999-06-01

    Since its inception in 1977, the Canadian Association of General Surgeons (CAGS) has struggled with its responsibility to represent general surgeons in practices across this country. The CAGS has tended to be mute in the presentation of many of its accomplishments, which have improved the role of specialists in community practice, training programs and the subspecialties of general surgery. With the forthcoming changes in direction for the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada, based on a recent external survey, the CAGS has a golden opportunity to advocate for a clear identity, autonomous from the Royal College for the purposes of scientific meetings, continuing professional development, scientific and practice affiliation with other surgical specialty societies, and new developments with corporate sector support for advancements in science technology and education. Advocacy for general surgery must be stressed as the priority for the CAGS into the future.

  11. Client-Centered Advocacy: Every Occupational Therapy Practitioner's Responsibility to Understand Medical Necessity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stover, Alyson D

    2016-01-01

    Occupational therapy practitioners must advocate for clients in multiple ways. The Occupational Therapy Practice Framework: Domain and Process as well as the Occupational Therapy Code of Ethics lend support to advocacy. Recognizing one's responsibility to provide advocacy for clients is different from knowing how to provide that advocacy. One aspect of health care affected by the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) is the definition and implementation of medical necessity. This article outlines some major concepts around medical necessity, particularly in relation to the passage of the ACA, and outlines guidance on how to advocate effectively to meet both individual and community needs. PMID:27548855

  12. What does Latin Aamerican social medicine do when it governs? The case of the Mexico City government.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurell, Asa Cristina

    2003-12-01

    Latin American social medicine (LASM) emerged as a movement in the 1970s and played an important role in the Brazilian health care reform of the 1980s, both of which focused on decentralization and on health care as a social right. The dominant health care reform model in Latin America has included a market-driven, private subsystem for the insured and a public subsystem for the uninsured and the poor. In contrast, the Mexico City government has launched a comprehensive policy based on social rights and redistribution of resources. A universal pension for senior citizens and free medical services are financed by grants, eliminating routine government corruption and waste. The Mexico City policy reflects the influence of Latin American social medicine. In this article, I outline the basic traits of LASM and those of the prevailing health care reform model in Latin America and describe the Mexico City social and health policy, emphasizing the influence of LASM in values, principles, and concrete programs.

  13. Dreaming of Science: Undocumented Latin@s' Testimonios across the Borderlands of High School Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar-Valdez, Jean Rockford

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study uncovers the voices of five Latin@ students who are high-"achieving" and undocumented and have strong aspirations in science, in a Southern, Title I high school. Through critical race methodology and these students' "testimonios"/counter-stories, these students' struggles and successes reveal their…

  14. Antigone and the Latin American Theater

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan David González Betancur

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relevancy of Greek myth in Latin American theatrical practice, through the diverse existent versions of Antigone in its dramaturgy, but concentrating particularly on two works: Antígona Vélez, by Leopoldo Marechal, and The passion according to Antígona Pérez, by Luis Rafael Sánchez. Additionally, the tradition of political theater in the continent that is found behind this phenomenon is revised and the aesthetic task that this exercise represents.

  15. Psychology, Ethics and Globalitation in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Mario Flores Osorio

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The present communication has the intention of helping to the realization of the dream of a Latin-American psychology, structured throw the word and maybe poetry ,because both of them contains the main postulated of one ethic of liberation that permits to valorize the process of the modern capitalism who expands threw the world like a irreversible history, so it results to the professional psychology practice, to understand the place that the psychology must play and in particular the collective function on concrete reality.

  16. Transnational citizenship: Latin Americans in Portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Padilla

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This article is a reflection upon the exercising of transnational citizenship as a consequence of international migration, applied to Latin Americans resident in Portugal. In order to do this we have adopted the concept of transnational citizenship, as its malleability allows us to consider the whole concept of countries of origin and destination and the influence of bilateral and international relations. We ask how transnational citizenship is exercised in the European Union, Ibero-American and, particularly, Portuguese spaces, and whether it is affected by the economic crisis in Europe and, in particular, Portugal, by analysing the cases of Argentines, Brazilians and Uruguayans living in Portugal.

  17. Financial cooperation benefits China and Latin America

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    According to Xinhua,financial cooperation between China and Latin American coun.tries has created substantial benefits for both sides,the president of the China Development Bank (CDB)said in Beijing.Chen Yang,president of the CDB,made the remarks ahead of Vice President Xi Jinping's upcoming visits to Cuba,Uruguay and Chile.Xi will visit the three countries between June 4 and 13.“Xi's visits will be of great importance in further promoting economic and financial cooperation between China and these three countries,” Chen said.

  18. Family health advocacy: an empowerment model for pregnant and parenting African American women in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baffour, Tiffany D; Jones, Maurine A; Contreras, Linda K

    2006-01-01

    The model of family health advocacy built firmly upon principles of empowerment theory seeks to help individuals, families, and communities to improve their circumstances by incorporating multiple levels of intervention. The goal of family health advocacy is to improve the well-being of pregnant women and mothers of children younger than 2 years by providing social support and health education about risk factors related to infant mortality and prematurity. This program primarily targets rural African American women, a group at high risk. Advocacy and referral for needed medical and social services are provided. This article presents a comprehensive model of health advocacy, including social marketing strategies, recruitment efforts, and curriculum development. PMID:16775472

  19. Nursing beliefs and actions in exercising patient advocacy in a hospital context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamila Geri Tomaschewski Barlem

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AbstractOBJECTIVEAnalyzing beliefs and actions of nurses in exercising patient advocacy in a hospital context.METHODA quantitative cross-sectional exploratory and descriptive study, conducted with 153 nurses from two hospitals in southern Brazil, one public and one philanthropic, by applying Protective Nursing Advocacy Scale - Brazilian version. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and analysis of variance.RESULTSNurses believe they are advocating for patients in their workplaces, and agree that they should advocate, especially when vulnerable patients need their protection. Personal values and professional skills have been identified as major sources of support for the practice of advocacy.CONCLUSIONNurses do not disagree nor agree that advocating for patients in their working environments can bring them negative consequences. It is necessary to recognize how the characteristics of public and private institutions have helped or not helped in exercising patient advocacy by nurses.

  20. Explaining variation in gun control policy advocacy tactics among local organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakocs, Ronda C; Earp, Jo Anne L

    2003-06-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how well four organizational characteristics (structure, resources, motivation, or political capacity) explained local organizations' use of a variety of advocacy tactics aimed at promoting state gun control laws. In 1998, 679 local organizations were identified as potentially active on state gun control issues; a questionnaire was mailed to each group's leader. Seventy-nine percent (n = 538) responded to the survey, with 81% (n = 207) of eligible organizations completing questionnaires. The four organizational characteristics explained approximately half the variation in local groups' use of a wide range of advocacy tactics. Organizations with stronger motivation to address the gun control issue and greater political capacity engaged in more diverse gun control advocacy tactics; the authors found organizational structure and resources unlikely to be related. Leaders of advocacy organizations should consider ways to encourage members' motivations on the issue while fostering greater capacity for political action. PMID:19731501

  1. Coleman Advocates for Children And Youth: a pioneering child advocacy organization (1974-2008).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnochan, Sarah; Austin, Michael J

    2011-01-01

    Coleman Advocates for Youth and Children is a pioneering 30-year-old child advocacy organization founded by several affluent community members and children's service professionals to stop housing abused and neglected children in juvenile hall. Today, low-income youth and parents in families of color are now assuming leadership in developing a unique hybrid approach that integrates community organizing with more traditional child advocacy strategies and focuses on increasing affordable housing and improving the city's educational system. The strategies employed by Coleman have also evolved, shifting from insider advocacy with administrative officials to public campaigns targeting the city budget process, to local initiative campaigns, and most recently to electoral politics. This organizational history features the issues mission and structure, leadership, managing issues, advocacy strategies and community relations, and funding.

  2. Planning for the next generation of public health advocates: evaluation of an online advocacy mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Emily; Stoneham, Melissa; Saunders, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Despite being viewed as a core competency for public health professionals, public health advocacy lacks a prominent place in the public health literature and receives minimal coverage in university curricula. The Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) sought to fill this gap by establishing an online e-mentoring program for public health professionals to gain knowledge through skill-based activities and engaging in a mentoring relationship with an experienced public health advocate. This study is a qualitative evaluation of the online e-mentoring program. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants at the conclusion of the 12-month program to examine program benefits and determine the perceived contribution of individual program components to overall advocacy outcomes. Results Increased mentee knowledge, skills, level of confidence and experience, and expanded public health networks were reported. Outcomes were dependent on participants' level of commitment, time and location barriers, mentoring relationship quality, adaptability to the online format and the relevance of activities for application to participants' workplace context. Program facilitators had an important role through the provision of timely feedback and maintaining contact with participants. Conclusion An online program that combines public health advocacy content via skill-based activities with mentoring from an experienced public health advocate is a potential strategy to build advocacy capacity in the public health workforce. So what? Integrating advocacy as a core component of professional development programs will help counteract current issues surrounding hesitancy by public health professionals to proactively engage in advocacy, and ensure that high quality, innovative and effective advocacy leadership continues in the Australian public health workforce.

  3. Management, leadership and user control in self-advocacy: an English case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tilley, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents findings from a qualitative research project on an English self-advocacy organization. In light of recent political and economic developments that have threatened the sustainability of a number of self-advocacy groups for people with intellectual disabilities, I seek to explore how one particular organization managed to survive and grow. In particular, the paper explores themes of management, leadership, and user control, linking these to external perceptions about self-ad...

  4. “We Are Not Really Marketing Mental Health”: Mental Health Advocacy in Zimbabwe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendler, Reuben; Kidia, Khameer; Machando, Debra; Crooks, Megan; Mangezi, Walter; Abas, Melanie; Katz, Craig; Thornicroft, Graham; Semrau, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Few people with mental disorders in low and middle-income countries (LMICs) receive treatment, in part because mental disorders are highly stigmatized and do not enjoy priority and resources commensurate with their burden on society. Advocacy has been proposed as a means of building political will and community support for mental health and reducing stigma, but few studies have explored the practice and promise of advocacy in LMICs. Methods We conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with leaders in health and mental health in Zimbabwe to explore key stakeholder perceptions on the challenges and opportunities of the country’s mental health system. We coded the transcripts using the constant comparative method, informed by principles of grounded theory. Few interview questions directly concerned advocacy, yet in our analysis, advocacy emerged as a prominent, cross-cutting theme across participants and interview questions. Results Two thirds of the respondents discussed advocacy, often in depth, returning to the concept throughout the interview and emphasizing their belief in advocacy’s importance. Participants described six distinct components of advocacy: the advocates, to whom they advocate (“targets”), what they advocate for (“asks”), how advocates reach their targets (“access”), how they make their asks (“arguments”), and the results of their advocacy (“outcomes”). Discussion Despite their perception that mental health is widely misunderstood and under-appreciated in Zimbabwe, respondents expressed optimism that strategically speaking out can reduce stigma and increase access to care. Key issues included navigating hierarchies, empowering service users to advocate, and integrating mental health with other health initiatives. Understanding stakeholder perceptions sets the stage for targeted development of mental health advocacy in Zimbabwe and other LMICs. PMID:27607240

  5. Planning for the next generation of public health advocates: evaluation of an online advocacy mentoring program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Emily; Stoneham, Melissa; Saunders, Julie

    2016-04-01

    Issue addressed Despite being viewed as a core competency for public health professionals, public health advocacy lacks a prominent place in the public health literature and receives minimal coverage in university curricula. The Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) sought to fill this gap by establishing an online e-mentoring program for public health professionals to gain knowledge through skill-based activities and engaging in a mentoring relationship with an experienced public health advocate. This study is a qualitative evaluation of the online e-mentoring program. Methods Semi-structured interviews were conducted with program participants at the conclusion of the 12-month program to examine program benefits and determine the perceived contribution of individual program components to overall advocacy outcomes. Results Increased mentee knowledge, skills, level of confidence and experience, and expanded public health networks were reported. Outcomes were dependent on participants' level of commitment, time and location barriers, mentoring relationship quality, adaptability to the online format and the relevance of activities for application to participants' workplace context. Program facilitators had an important role through the provision of timely feedback and maintaining contact with participants. Conclusion An online program that combines public health advocacy content via skill-based activities with mentoring from an experienced public health advocate is a potential strategy to build advocacy capacity in the public health workforce. So what? Integrating advocacy as a core component of professional development programs will help counteract current issues surrounding hesitancy by public health professionals to proactively engage in advocacy, and ensure that high quality, innovative and effective advocacy leadership continues in the Australian public health workforce. PMID:27468984

  6. Preparing Teachers for Inclusive Education in Latin America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaillant, Denise

    2011-01-01

    This article analyzes the current challenges facing inclusive education in Latin America and explores some possible solutions. The author suggests that teachers play a key role in providing education that is inclusive for all. In Latin America, today, however, inclusive education often does not respond to the needs of children and young people,…

  7. The Latin-Greek Connection: Building Vocabulary through Morphological Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasinski, Timothy V.; Padak, Nancy; Newton, Joanna; Newton, Evangeline

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors make a case for teaching vocabulary in the elementary grades through a focus on the morphological structure of words, in particular English words that are derived through Latin and Greek roots and affixes. The authors present a set of engaging instructional ideas for the use of Latin and Greek derivations to teach…

  8. Updated site compilation of the Latin American Pollen Database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G.A. Flantua; H. Hooghiemstra; E.C. Grimm; H. Behling; M.B Bush; C. González-Arrango; W.D. Gosling; M.-P. Ledru; S. Lozano-Garciá; A. Maldonado; A.R. Prieto; V. Rull; J.H. van Boxel

    2015-01-01

    The updated inventory of the Latin American Pollen Database (LAPD) offers a wide range of new insights. This paper presents a systematic compilation of palynological research in Latin America. A comprehensive inventory of publications in peer-reviewed and grey literature shows a major expansion of s

  9. Latin America Policies of European NGOs: Recent Trends and Perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Biekart (Kees)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractSummary: Many Latin American partner organisations that received support from European donor NGOs in recent years for contributing to structural poverty alleviation had expected that these agencies will gradually withdraw from the Latin American region. It is feared that funding will dec

  10. "Latin" and "Anglo" America Geographic Regions Do Not Exist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardes DaSilva, Edmar; Kvasnak, Robert Neil

    2015-01-01

    The regional divisions termed as "Latin America" versus "Anglo-America" used by many geographers do not fully reflect the cultural and political trends in the world today. "Latin" is a term that was coined by the French Emperor Napoleon the III in order to justify Mexico's being ruled by Maximillian, and later picked…

  11. Algunos Animales de Latino America = Some Animals of Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Kathryn F. B.

    Developed by the Latin American Culture Studies Project for educators of elementary level children, these materials are designed to teach students the Spanish and English names of animals found in Latin America. The lesson includes coloring sheets, duplicating masters, fact sheets, the card game Maymayguashi, and directions for preparation. (DB)

  12. Manual for Reducing Educational Unit Costs in Latin American Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centro Multinacional de Investigacion Educativa, San Jose (Costa Rica).

    Designed for educational administrators, this manual provides suggestions for reducing educational unit costs in Latin America without reducing the quality of the education. Chapter one defines unit cost concepts and compares the costs of the Latin American countries. Chapter two deals with the different policies which could affect the principal…

  13. Aquatic risk assessment of pesticides in Latin America

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carriquiriborde, P.; Mirabella, P.; Waichman, A.; Solomon, K.; Brink, van den P.J.; Maund, S.J.

    2014-01-01

    Latin America is anticipated to be a major growth market for agriculture and production is increasing with use of technologies such as pesticides. Reports of contamination of aquatic ecosystems by pesticides in Latin America have raised concerns about potential for adverse ecological effects. In the

  14. Human norovirus infection in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Poló, Tatiane; Peiró, Juliana R; Mendes, Luiz Cláudio Nogueira; Ludwig, Louisa F; de Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F; Bucardo, Filemon; Huynen, Pascale; Melin, Pierrette; Thiry, Etienne; Mauroy, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Noroviruses are important enteric pathogens involved in non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Noroviruses mainly occur from person to person via the fecal-oral route but also through contaminated food or water; indirect contamination is also possible due to the resistance of the virus in the environment. Latin American countries as a whole cover a vast North-to-South range, which is highly heterogeneous in terms of climate, ecosystem, human population distribution (urban areas with high human densities versus closed communities), economic development and genetic backgrounds resulting from each particular historical context. This review aims to present epidemiological and clinical patterns of human norovirus infections in Latin American countries. Divergent prevalences were observed depending on the country and the surveyed population. In particular, a shift in rotavirus/norovirus ratio in the etiologies of gastroenteritis was detected in some countries and could be attributed partly to rotavirus vaccine coverage in their infant population. While GII.4 noroviruses were seen to constitute the most common genotype, differences in genotype distribution were observed both in the environment (via sewage sampling proxy) and between genotypes circulating in healthy and diarrheic patients. Due to high climatic discrepancies, different patterns of seasonality were observed. Accordingly, this continent may condense the different particular epidemiological features encountered for HuNoV infections worldwide.

  15. A new survey in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A broad survey of the prospects of atomic development in five Latin American countries - El Salvador, Guatemala, Mexico, Paraguay and Peru - was made by a team of the International Atomic Energy Agency in October-November 1960. This was the sixth mission of its kind to be sent out by the Agency at the request of its Member States, the earlier five having visited some other Latin American States as well as a number of countries in South East Asia, the Far East, the Middle East, Africa and Southern Europe. The purpose of these preliminary assistance missions - as they are called - is to study at first hand the atomic energy programs and plans of the countries concerned, evaluate the possible lines of further development, and determine how best the Agency can assist in this development. In all the five countries covered by the last mission, the Agency experts visited the main centers of work in the atomic and allied fields, held discussions with the national authorities, advised them on different aspects of their plans, and helped them in formulating specific requests for Agency assistance. The information collected by the mission and its main recommendations a r e briefly summarized in the following sections

  16. Multiple sclerosis care in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Victor M; Medina, Marco Tulio; Duron, Reyna M; Macias, Miguel Angel

    2014-05-01

    Before the advent of diagnostic criteria for multiple sclerosis (MS), it was reported that the prevalence of MS in Mexico was "one of the lowest in the world" (1.6/100,000).(1) The notion that MS was a rare neurologic disease among those living in the tropics of the Americas and Southern latitudes was widely accepted. The geopolitical boundaries of the region identified as Latin America (LA) extend from the southern border of United States with Mexico (32° North latitude) to the Argentinian and Chilean Patagonia in South America (56° South latitude). The largest Spanish-speaking island countries in the Caribbean-Cuba, Dominican Republic, and Puerto Rico-are also traditionally considered part of LA. The continental mass includes 17 countries with a population of more than 550 million. Due to centuries of racial intermixing, it is a heterogeneous and genetically complex population. The blended cultures of native Amerindians with white Caucasian Europeans and black Africans has resulted in the predominant ethnic Latin American Mestizo. The influence of African genetics is notable in many areas of the subcontinent and the Caribbean. A common observation across LA is the absence of identification of MS in non-mixed Amerindians(2); the reason for this phenomenon is unclear.

  17. CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES IN LATIN AMERICAN ADMINISTRATIVE JUSTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Perlingeiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This study consists of a critical comparative analysis of the administrative justice systems in eighteen Latin-American signatory countries of the American Convention on Human Rights (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, El Salvador, Ecuador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, the Dominican Republic, Uruguay, and Venezuela. According to this article, the excessive litigation in Latin-American courts that has seriously hampered the effectiveness of the administrative justice systems may be explained as follows: as former Iberian colonies, the aforementioned countries have a Continental European legal culture originating in civil law but nevertheless have improperly integrated certain aspects of the unified judicial system (generalized courts typical of administrative law in common-law countries. This situation, according to the author, could be rectified through strengthening the public administrative authorities with respect to their dispute-resolution and purely executive functions by endowing them with prerogatives to act independently and impartially, oriented by the principle of legality understood in the sense of supremacy of fundamental rights, in light of the doctrine of diffuse conventionality control adopted by the InterAmerican Court of Human Rights.

  18. Human norovirus infection in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Poló, Tatiane; Peiró, Juliana R; Mendes, Luiz Cláudio Nogueira; Ludwig, Louisa F; de Oliveira-Filho, Edmilson F; Bucardo, Filemon; Huynen, Pascale; Melin, Pierrette; Thiry, Etienne; Mauroy, Axel

    2016-05-01

    Noroviruses are important enteric pathogens involved in non-bacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. Noroviruses mainly occur from person to person via the fecal-oral route but also through contaminated food or water; indirect contamination is also possible due to the resistance of the virus in the environment. Latin American countries as a whole cover a vast North-to-South range, which is highly heterogeneous in terms of climate, ecosystem, human population distribution (urban areas with high human densities versus closed communities), economic development and genetic backgrounds resulting from each particular historical context. This review aims to present epidemiological and clinical patterns of human norovirus infections in Latin American countries. Divergent prevalences were observed depending on the country and the surveyed population. In particular, a shift in rotavirus/norovirus ratio in the etiologies of gastroenteritis was detected in some countries and could be attributed partly to rotavirus vaccine coverage in their infant population. While GII.4 noroviruses were seen to constitute the most common genotype, differences in genotype distribution were observed both in the environment (via sewage sampling proxy) and between genotypes circulating in healthy and diarrheic patients. Due to high climatic discrepancies, different patterns of seasonality were observed. Accordingly, this continent may condense the different particular epidemiological features encountered for HuNoV infections worldwide. PMID:27018574

  19. Medical Advocacy and Supportive Environments for African-Americans Following Abnormal Mammograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, Yamile; Hempstead, Bridgette H; Thompson-Dodd, Jacci; Weatherby, Shauna Rae; Dunbar, Claire; Hohl, Sarah D; Malen, Rachel C; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2015-09-01

    African-American women experience disproportionately adverse outcomes relative to non-Latina White women after an abnormal mammogram result. Research has suggested medical advocacy and staff support may improve outcomes among this population. The purpose of the study was to understand reasons African-American women believe medical advocacy to be important and examine if and how staff can encourage and be supportive of medical advocacy. A convenience-based sample of 30-74-year-old women who self-identified as African-American/Black/of African descent and who had received an abnormal mammogram result was recruited from community-based organizations, mobile mammography services, and the local department of health. This qualitative study included semi-structured interviews. Patients perceived medical advocacy to be particularly important for African-Americans, given mistrust and discrimination present in medical settings and their own familiarity with their bodies and symptoms. Respondents emphasized that staff can encourage medical advocacy through offering information in general in a clear, informative, and empathic style. Cultural competency interventions that train staff how to foster medical advocacy may be a strategy to improve racial disparities following an abnormal mammogram.

  20. Review: Malaria chemoprophylaxis for travelers to Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhardt, Laura C; Magill, Alan J; Arguin, Paul M

    2011-12-01

    Because of recent declining malaria transmission in Latin America, some authorities have recommended against chemoprophylaxis for most travelers to this region. However, the predominant parasite species in Latin America, Plasmodium vivax, can form hypnozoites sequestered in the liver, causing malaria relapses. Additionally, new evidence shows the potential severity of vivax infections, warranting continued consideration of prophylaxis for travel to Latin America. Individualized travel risk assessments are recommended and should consider travel locations, type, length, and season, as well as probability of itinerary changes. Travel recommendations might include no precautions, mosquito avoidance only, or mosquito avoidance and chemoprophylaxis. There are a range of good options for chemoprophylaxis in Latin America, including atovaquone-proguanil, doxycycline, mefloquine, and--in selected areas--chloroquine. Primaquine should be strongly considered for nonpregnant, G6PD-nondeficient patients traveling to vivax-endemic areas of Latin America, and it has the added benefit of being the only drug to protect against malaria relapses.

  1. Musculoskeletal evaluation in severe haemophilia A patients from Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozelo, M C; Villaça, P R; Pérez-Bianco, R; Candela, M; Garcia-Chavez, J; Moreno-Rodriguez, B; Rodrigues, M B; Rodriguez-Grecco, I; Solano, M H; Chumpitaz, G; Morales-Gana, M M; Ruiz-Sáez, A

    2014-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature on haemophilia treatment in Latin American countries, a region characterized by rapidly improving systems of care, but with substantial disparities in treatment between countries. The aim of this study was to evaluate the musculoskeletal status of haemophilia patients from Latin America and to examine the relationship between musculoskeletal status and treatment practices across countries. The Committee of Latin America on the Therapeutics of Inhibitor Groups conducted a survey of its member country representatives on key aspects of haemophilia treatment in 10 countries. Musculoskeletal status of patients was obtained during routine comprehensive evaluations between March 2009 and March 2011. Eligible patients had severe haemophilia A (factor VIII Latin America, the musculoskeletal status of patients with severe haemophilia without inhibitors has improved significantly in association with the provision of long-term prophylaxis. As more countries in Latin America institute this practice, further improvements are anticipated.

  2. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder ... of the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over ...

  3. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  4. Social Security privatization in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritzer, B E

    2000-01-01

    The new, partially privatized social security system adopted by Chile in 1981 has attracted attention in many parts of the world. Since then, a number of Latin American countries have implemented the Chilean model, with some variations: either with a single- or multi-tier system, or with a period of transition to take care of those in the labor force at the time of the change. The single-tier version consists of a privatized program with individual accounts in pension fund management companies. Multi-tier systems have a privatized component and retain some form of public program. This article describes each of the new programs in Latin America, their background, and similarities and differences among them. Much more information is available for Chile than for the other countries (in part because Chile has the oldest system), enough to be able to evaluate what, in most cases, is the most accurate information. That is often not the case for the other countries, especially when dealing with subjects such as transition costs and net rates of return (rates of return minus administrative fees). No country has copied the Chilean system exactly. Bolivia, El Salvador, and Mexico have closed their public systems and set up mandatory individual accounts. Argentina has a mixed public/private system with three tiers. In Colombia and Peru, workers have a choice between the public and private programs. Uruguay created a two-tier mixed system. Costa Rica has a voluntary program for individual accounts as a supplement to the pay-as-you-go program and has just passed a law setting up mandatory accounts containing employer contributions for severance pay. All of the countries continue to face unresolved issues, including: High rates of noncompliance--the percentage of enrollees who do not actively and regularly contribute to their accounts--which could lead to low benefits and greater costs to the governments that offer a guaranteed minimum benefit; Proportionately lower benefits for

  5. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  6. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  7. The Vicious Worm - a cysticercosis advocacy information tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Trevisan, Chiara; Mejer, Helena;

    Porcine cysticercosis is an infection of pigs caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium, a tapeworm that causes taeniosis in humans. The disease is common in developing countries and is a serious public health risk. Cysticercosis implicates significant economic losses, both in pig production an...... practitioners; MD’s in health centres, veterinary and agricultural extension officers and pig traders. Furthermore there will be a policy brief aimed at the key decision makers at ministry level....... cysticercosis must be on health education engaging the communities and creating public awareness. Enhancing basic conditions such as hygiene has an important effect on reducing the risk of transmission. In addition some very simple but effective changes in people’s day-to-day practices such as use of latrines...... Health neglected zoonotic diseases projects, funded by the European Commission through its 7th framework program. Part of University of Copenhagen’s tasks in these projects is to develop an improved advocacy tool for teaching about cysticercosis, including information on how to diagnose and treat...

  8. Healthy pigs for healthy people. A cysticercosis advocacy information tool

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saarnak, Christopher; Johansen, Maria Vang; Mejer, Helena;

    2013-01-01

    Saarnak, C., M. V. Johansen, H. Mejer, C. Trevisan, and U. C. Braae Porcine cysticercosis is an infection of pigs caused by the larval stage of Taenia solium, a tapeworm that causes taeniosis in humans. The disease is common in developing countries and is a serious public health risk. Cysticercos...... to the laymen in the villages, information for supporting practitioners; MD’s in health centres, veterinary and agricultural extension officers and pig traders. Furthermore there will be a policy brief aimed at the key decision makers at ministry level........ Consequently, the intervention strategies to prevent and control cysticercosis must be on health education engaging the communities and creating public awareness. Enhancing basic conditions such as hygiene has an important effect on reducing the risk of transmission. In addition some very simple but effective...... but also other endemic zoonotic diseases. ICONZ and ADVANZ are two One Health neglected zoonotic diseases projects, funded by the European Commission through its 7th framework program. Part of University of Copenhagen’s tasks in these projects is to develop an improved advocacy tool for teaching about...

  9. From Advocacy to Action in Global Adolescent Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patton, George C; Sawyer, Susan M; Ross, David A; Viner, Russell M; Santelli, John S

    2016-10-01

    In May 2016, The Lancet published a report titled, "Our Future: A Lancet Commission on Adolescent Health and Wellbeing," the culmination of three years of work from a geographically diverse interdisciplinary group. The report argued that healthy growth across adolescence and young adulthood shapes life course and intergenerational trajectories so that health investments yield a "triple dividend." With current global interest in adolescent health at an unprecedented level, it outlines three next steps to advance from advocacy to effective action: (1) there is a pressing need for comprehensive and integrated strategies, inclusive of, but extending beyond, sexual and reproductive health, and HIV; (2) interventions should address both adolescent health service coverage and determinants of health that lie in sectors such as education, justice, transport, and industry and employment, as well as families and local communities; and (3) scale-up of responses will require not only investments in country-level capacities for measuring need and responding with evidence-based practice but also the establishment of processes for accountability and meaningful youth engagement.

  10. Delegation of China-Latin America Friendship Association Visits Four Latin American Countries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    <正>Cheng Siwei,former Vice Chairman of the Standing Committee of the National People’s Congress and President of the China -Latin America Friendship Association (CLAFA),led a CLAFA delegation on a visit to four Central and South American countries from October 25 to November 11,2009 during which they met national leaders and other influential persons in the fields of foreign and cul-

  11. Institutional Diversity of Bicameralism in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Reynoso

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper centers on the study of institutions in bicameral legislative systems in Latin America, paying attention to their variations and the potentially different results affecting the decision making system. It aims to identify the impact each institutional arrangement may have on the legislators' strategies and behavior and on various aspects of public policy development. For this purpose, various institutional characteristics are examined, such as: the rules of legislators' selection, the representation basis, chambers' size, election requirements, term duration, partial seat renewal, and the different modalities for treating legislative bills. The sample of countries for systematic comparison is composed of Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Mexico, Paraguay and Uruguay. Secondarily, the following countries that formerly had bicameral systems were included: Ecuador, Nicaragua, Peru and Venezuela.

  12. Latin American forensic pathology: scope and needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel M. Fonseca

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Pathology pertains to the study of a disease; from ancient times it has sought to explain the cause of death through postmortem examination. The advancement of science and technology has led to a greater definition of roles and has favored its development through different subspecialties among which we stands out forensic pathology. This discipline has its own characteristics, scope, case series, procedures and terminology. Likewise, although forensic pathology does not differ substantially from clinical pathology, significant differences can be found between the Anglo American approach and the Latin American approach. Beyond semantics of these alleged differences, the article reviews the concepts involved and discusses the scope and requirements needed to qualify experts, in the understanding that globalizing criteria should establish new paradigms and define the specific roles of the specialty.

  13. Hepatitis B seroprevalence in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, T R; da Fonseca, J C; Rivera, L; Fay, O H; Tapia, R; Santos, J I; Urdeneta, E; Clemens, S A

    1999-12-01

    The seroprevalence of hepatitis B was investigated in over 12,000 subjects in six countries of Latin America: Argentina, Brazil, Chile, the Dominican Republic, Mexico, and Venezuela. Each study population was stratified according to age, gender, and socioeconomic status. Antibodies against hepatitis B core antigen (anti-HBc) were measured in order to determine hepatitis B infection. The highest overall seroprevalence was found in the Dominican Republic (21.4%), followed by Brazil (7.9%), Venezuela (3.2%), Argentina (2.1%), Mexico (1.4%), and Chile (0.6%). In all the countries an increase in seroprevalence was found among persons 16 years old and older, suggesting sexual transmission as the major route of infection. In addition, comparatively high seroprevalence levels were seen at an early age in the Dominican Republic and Brazil, implicating a vertical route of transmission.

  14. Lateinamerika oder -amerikas? Latin America or Americas?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Belén García Timón

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Anhand interdisziplinärer und empirischer Studien wird Lateinamerika als Bühne für die Entwicklung transkultureller Phänomene präsentiert. Geschlechterverhältnisse in unterschiedlichen Kontexten stehen im Mittelpunkt der Untersuchung. Begriffe wie Macht, Rasse oder Raum werden mit dem Ziel, weg von der bisherigen Vorstellung von homogenen kulturellen Einheiten zu kommen, revidiert.Latin America is presented as a stage for the development of transcultural phenomena through the use of interdisciplinary and empirical studies. Gender relations in different contexts lie at the heart of this study. Terms such as power, race, or space are revised with the goal of moving away from current perceptions of homogenous cultural unities.

  15. New physics schools in Latin America

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    From left to right : Professor Luis Masperi, Director of CLAF, John Ellis, Egil Lillestøl, and Professor Roger Cashmore, Director for Collider Programmes. On Monday 29 January, Professor Luis Masperi, Director of CLAF (Centro LatinoAmericano de Fisica), visited CERN to join Professor Roger Cashmore, in signing an agreement concerning a new programme of CERN-CLAF Schools in Latin America. The inaugural school will take place in Itacuruca, Brazil, in May 2001, and has been supported by Spain, Portugal, France and Italy. The signing was attended by John Ellis (the Director General's Non-Member State Advisor), Egil Lillestøl (Director of the Physics Schools), and Claire Earnshaw (School Administrator).

  16. [The cultural psychiatry in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaseñor-Bayardo, Sergio J; Rojas-Malpica, Carlos; Aceves-Pulido, Martha P

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents only some of the most important contributions in the development of cultural psychiatry in Latin America. The continental efforts to understand the role that culture plays in the manifestation and treatment of mental disorders have been fruitful. The authors included are: Fernando Pagés of Argentina; Mario G. Hollweg of Bolivia; Rubim Alvaro de Pinho and Adalberto Barreto of Brazil; Carlos A. Leon and Carlos A. Uribe of Colombia; Antonio José A. Bustamante and Santa Cruz de Cuba, Carlos Leon Andrade of Ecuador, Guatemala Cristina Chavez; Sergio Villasenor J. Bayardo of Mexico; Carlos A. Seguin, Hermilio Valdizán and Javier Mariátegui in Peru; Y. Bespaldi of Consens of Uruguay; Rojas and Carlos Malpica and Jacqueline Briceño Clarac of Venezuela.

  17. Polyphemus in Greek and Latin poems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panajiotis Asimopulos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to an intertextual approach to the personality of the Cyclops Polyphemus through poetic works of ancient Greek and Latin authors. Since the comparative method constitutes a reliable condition for every cognitive process, at least so far as the human thought is able to comply with the new knowledge to the existing notions and terms, the distinct physiognomy of poetic inspiration is clarified, but also the structural similarities and fundamental differences related to this famous mythical person are illustrated. Having as a reference point the Homeric “Odyssey” and the cruelty and inhumanity attributed to Polyphemus, we experience the gradual alleviation of the negative features of his character and unexpectedly witness an emotionally wounded, romantic, even gentle and helpless creature. In this way an impressive bridging is held between religion axioms and sociopolitical parameters that are effectively and creatively embodied in poetic works.

  18. Alice Amsden's impact on Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helen Shapiro

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available On March 15 2012, we lost Professor Alice Amsden, a great intellectual power in development economics. Her work was systematically marked by creativity, originality, relevance and her fearless commitment to always speak truth to power both in academic as well as in policy-making arenas. This In Memoriam concentrates on just one part of her great intellectual legacy: her impact to better understanding Latin America's development challenges, obstacles and policy options. Our paper focuses on three broad areas of her main influence in the region: the role of transnational corporations, the importance of manufactured exports for development, and industrial policy. As we here argue, in all of them, her work is and continues to be a substantial contribution to knowledge that policy makers will be well advised to take into account if the region is to finally enter a path of structural transformation and sustained economic and social development.

  19. II Latin American Conference on Bioimpedance

    CERN Document Server

    Bertemes-Filho, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents the proceedings of CLABIO 2015 - II Latin American Conference on Bioimpedance, held in Montevideo, Uruguay - September 30 - October 02, 2015. The works cover a broad range in Biomedical Engineering and Computing, Medical Physics and Medical Sciences, Environment, Biology and Chemistry. The topics are: ·Bioimpedance Applications ·Bioimpedance Instrumentation ·Body and Tissue Composition ·Cell Culture and Cell Suspension ·Electrical Impedance Tomography ·Electrode Modelling ·Magnetic Induction - Electrical Impedance Tomography ·Magnetic Resonance - Electrical Impedance Tomography ·Nonlinear Phenomena ·Organ and Tissue Impedance ·Plant Tissue Impedance ·Skin Impedance Modelling ·Technological Advances in Bioimpedance ·Theory and Modelling.

  20. Alleviating Urban Energy Poverty in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-02-15

    This regional study is comprised of three case studies, which concentrate on Greater Buenos Aires, Caracas and Rio de Janeiro - Caju. Each case focuses on the analysis of specific aspects of urban poverty, energy availability and policies to improve living conditions from the energy point of view. Unlike other developing regions in the world, the problem of energy poverty in Latin America has been concentrated increasingly in the large cities and urban areas. This problem has deep systemic, economic, political, structural and cultural roots. Providing basic energy services to the urban poor is an issue that requires far more attention and expertise than it is receiving today, and therefore WEC has taken the initiative to address this issue, and the results of their study are presented in this report.

  1. Sustainability of biofuels in Latin America: Risks and opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.janssen@wip-munich.de [WIP Renewable Energies, Sylvensteinstrasse 2, 81369 Munich (Germany); Rutz, Dominik Damian [WIP Renewable Energies, Sylvensteinstrasse 2, 81369 Munich (Germany)

    2011-10-15

    Several Latin American countries are setting up biofuel programmes to establish alternative markets for agricultural commodities. This is mainly triggered by the current success of Brazilian bioethanol production for the domestic market and for export. Furthermore, the global biofuel market is expected to increase due to ambitious biofuel programmes in the EU and in the USA. Colombia, Venezuela, Costa Rica and Guatemala are focusing on bioethanol production from sugarcane whereas biofuel production in Argentina is based on soy biodiesel. Recent developments of the biofuel sector take place extremely rapid especially in Argentina, which became one of the five largest biodiesel producers in the world in 2008. Till date no specific biofuel sustainability certification systems have been implemented in Latin American, as well as on global level. This fact and the predominant use of food crops for biofuel production raise concerns about the sustainability of biofuel production related to environmental and social aspects. This paper provides an overview of the hotspots of conflicts in biofuel production in Latin America. It investigates presently available sustainability tools and initiatives to ensure sustainable biofuel production in Latin America. Finally, it provides an outlook on how to integrate sustainability in the Latin American biofuel sector. - Research Highlights: > This study investigates risks and opportunities of biofuels in Latin America. > Latin American countries are setting up programmes to promote biofuel development. > Strong biofuel sectors provide opportunities for economic development. > Potential negative impact includes deforestation and effects on food security. > Sustainability initiatives exist to minimise negative impact.

  2. Sustainability of biofuels in Latin America: Risks and opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several Latin American countries are setting up biofuel programmes to establish alternative markets for agricultural commodities. This is mainly triggered by the current success of Brazilian bioethanol production for the domestic market and for export. Furthermore, the global biofuel market is expected to increase due to ambitious biofuel programmes in the EU and in the USA. Colombia, Venezuela, Costa Rica and Guatemala are focusing on bioethanol production from sugarcane whereas biofuel production in Argentina is based on soy biodiesel. Recent developments of the biofuel sector take place extremely rapid especially in Argentina, which became one of the five largest biodiesel producers in the world in 2008. Till date no specific biofuel sustainability certification systems have been implemented in Latin American, as well as on global level. This fact and the predominant use of food crops for biofuel production raise concerns about the sustainability of biofuel production related to environmental and social aspects. This paper provides an overview of the hotspots of conflicts in biofuel production in Latin America. It investigates presently available sustainability tools and initiatives to ensure sustainable biofuel production in Latin America. Finally, it provides an outlook on how to integrate sustainability in the Latin American biofuel sector. - Research Highlights: → This study investigates risks and opportunities of biofuels in Latin America. → Latin American countries are setting up programmes to promote biofuel development. → Strong biofuel sectors provide opportunities for economic development. → Potential negative impact includes deforestation and effects on food security. → Sustainability initiatives exist to minimise negative impact.

  3. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority.

  4. \\Defining Patient Advocacy for the Context of Clinical Ethics Consultation: A Review of the Literature and Recommendations for Consultants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brazg, Tracy; Lindhorst, Taryn; Dudzinski, Denise; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The idea of patient advocacy as a function of clinical ethics consultation (CEC) has been debated in the bioethics literature. In particular, opinion is divided as to whether patient advocacy inherently is in conflict with the other duties of the ethics consultant, especially that of impartial mediator. The debate is complicated, however, because patient advocacy is not uniformly conceptualized. This article examines two literatures that are crucial to understanding patient advocacy in the context of bioethical deliberations: the CEC literature and the literature on advocacy in the social work profession. A review of this literature identifies four distinct approaches to patient advocacy that are relevant to CEC: (1) the best interest approach, (2) the patient rights approach, (3) the representational approach, and (4) the empowerment approach. After providing a clearer understanding of the varied meanings of patient advocacy in the context of CEC, we assert that patient advocacy is not inherently inconsistent with the function of the ethics consultant and the CEC process. Finally, we provide a framework to help consultants determine if they should adopt an advocacy role.

  5. Building a Generation of Physician Advocates: The Case for Including Mandatory Training in Advocacy in Canadian Medical School Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhate, Tahara D; Loh, Lawrence C

    2015-12-01

    There is an increasing focus on the social accountability of physicians as individuals, and of medicine itself. This has led to increasing emphasis on physician advocacy from a wide variety of institutions. The physician advocacy concept is now part of the Health Advocacy competency mandated by the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada. Despite its growing prominence, physician advocacy remains poorly integrated into current medical undergraduate curricula. The authors recommend how and why curricular reform should proceed; they focus on Canadian medical education, although they hope their views will be useful in other countries as well.The authors discuss conflicting definitions of physician advocacy, which have previously hampered curriculum development efforts, and suggest a way of reconciling the conflicts. They review current gaps in advocacy-related curricula, suggest that these can be addressed by incorporating practice-based and skills acquisition elements into current didactic teaching, and offer several strategies by which an advocacy curriculum could be implemented, ranging from small modifications to current curriculum to developing new competencies in medical education nationally.The authors present a case for making an advocacy curriculum mandatory for every Canadian medical trainee; they argue that teaching trainees how to fulfill their professional responsibility to advocate may also help them meet the social accountability mandate of medical school education. Finally, the authors explain why making the development and implementation of a mandatory, skill-based curriculum in advocacy should be a priority. PMID:26200573

  6. Private hospitals in Latin America - An investor's perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleaton-Jones, Ioan P

    2015-01-01

    Private hospitals are expanding in Latin America, but the industry is less developed in this region than in some other emerging markets. Groups of hospitals are emerging in countries such as Brazil, Mexico, Colombia and Peru. However, they haven't reached the size of hospital groups in Malaysia, India and South Africa. They also remain domestically focused, while companies from the aforementioned three emerging markets outside Latin America have expanded to multiple other countries and have listed on stock exchanges to access more capital to finance their expansion. It is very likely that these trends seen in other emerging markets will manifest in Latin America as it continues to develop.

  7. Debating Democracy in Latin America: The Focus on Citizenship

    OpenAIRE

    Ton Salman

    2004-01-01

    – Ciudadanía e identidad, edited by Simón Pachano. Quito: FLACSO, 2003. – Struggles for Social Rights in Latin America, edited by Susan Eva Eckstein and Timothy P. Wickham-Crowley. New York/London: Routledge, 2003. – What Justice? Whose justice? Fighting for Fairness in Latin America, edited by Susan Eva Eckstein and Timothy P. Wickham-Crowley. Berkeley/Los Angeles/London: University of California Press, 2003. – Informal citizens – Poverty, Informality and Social Exclusion in Latin America, b...

  8. Latin America's agricultural exports to China: Recent trends

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Jorge; O'Connor, Ernesto; Amado, Blanca

    2011-01-01

    Latin America is becoming the fastest growing agricultural production region and Brazil has by far the fastest growing agricultural sector. China from being a small agricultural importer (1.4% of world imports in 1990/01), became the fifth largest importer at 5.4% of world imports in 2006/07. China's overall trade with Latin America has expanded substantially during the last two decades -the rate of growth has been greater than any other region in the world since 2005. Most exports from Latin...

  9. Latin American Universities and the Bologna Process: From Commercialisation to the "Tuning" Competencies Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboites, Hugo

    2010-01-01

    Through the "Tuning-Latin America" competencies project, Latin American universities have been incorporated into the Bologna Process. In 2003 the European Commission approved an initiative of this project for Latin America and began to promote it among ministries, university presidents' organisations and other institutions in Latin America. This…

  10. Health advocacy training: why are physicians withholding life-saving care?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Peter J; Gill, Harbir S

    2011-01-01

    The societal responsibility of physicians to be health advocates, both at the population and patient level is necessary to positively influence public health and policy. Physicians must commit to learn about policy reform and the legislative process. Several regulatory physician organizations emphasize the importance of health. In addition, the Association of American Medical Colleges' (AAMC) Medical Schools Objectives Project, the Medical Council of Canada Qualifying Examination objectives and several Canadian medical schools outline advocacy as an objective. As a result, several US medical schools have designed and incorporated health advocacy into their curricula. Canadian medical schools, however, have been lagging behind. To address this deficiency, the University of Alberta and the University of Calgary hosted the 1st Annual Alberta Political Action Day (PAD) to engage medical students in advocacy and the policy making process. The two-day time requirement of PAD makes it an efficient model to incorporate health advocacy into the already demanding undergraduate medical curriculum. Canadian medical schools must follow the American example and further integrate initiatives such as PAD to teach health advocacy. The skills developed will enhance student's comprehension of how they can shape health policy and truly advocate for optimal patient care. PMID:21070115

  11. Australia and Latin America : Challenges and Opportunities in the New Millennium

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, Barry; Minns, John

    2014-01-01

    This is a good time to reflect on opportunities and challenges for Australia in Latin America. Impressive economic growth and opportunities for trade and investment have made Latin America a dynamic area for Australia and the Asia Pacific region. A growing Latin American population, Australia’s attractiveness to Latin American students, a fascination with the cultural vibrancy of the Americas and an awareness of Latin America’s increasingly independent stance in politics and economic diplomac...

  12. Hopf C~* -algebras related to the Latin square

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭懋正; 蒋立宁; 钱敏

    2000-01-01

    A sufficient condition is given for the multiparametric Hopf algebras to be Hopf * -algebras. Then a special subclass of the * -algebra related to a Latin square is given. After being completed, its generators are all of norm one.

  13. Hopf C*-algebras related to the Latin square

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A sufficient condition is given for the multiparametric Hopf algebras to be Hopf*-algebras. Then a special subclass of the *-algebra related to a Latin square is given. After being completed, its generators are all of norm one.

  14. [An overview of telehealth initiatives in Latin America].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Alaneir de Fátima; D'Agostino, Marcelo; Bouskela, Maurício Simon; Fernandéz, Andrés; Messina, Luiz Ary; Alves, Humberto José

    2014-01-01

    This article aimed to systematize the views on telehealth in Latin America and to present the experience of building an instrument for monitoring the development of telehealth initiatives based on the reality of this region. A group was structured to coordinate telehealth efforts in Latin America, with members appointed by the ministries of health of 16 countries. Five thematic groups were also set up. Based on international experiences and focusing on the reality of telehealth in the continent, an instrument was created to monitor the development of telehealth in Latin America. Several countries have national telehealth projects: Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Mexico, Panama. Others are in the process of development and early deployment: Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, El Salvador, Guatemala, Peru, Venezuela. The instrument described in the article, which is still being tested, proposes a characterization of countries according to their telehealth development stage: nonexistent, nascent, intermediate, advanced, and exemplary. Currently, important telehealth initiatives are already underway in Latin America.

  15. Medical Terminology Borrowed into Romanian from Latin through German

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica Teodora BIRIŞ

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I have researched the Latin borrowings in medicine that have entered the Romanian language through German. These borrowings constitute a complex image of the linguistic interferences from the lexical – semantic field.The Romanian language is a “hospitable” language, which easily assimilates borrowings from other languages, and one of its main features is the ease with which it absorbs Latin neologisms, especially at the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th centuries, when important sectors of literary Romanian’s vocabulary were enriched with Latin terms.In this article we focused our attention on the Latin borrowings in the field of medicine.

  16. Black Populations and Identity Issues in Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wade

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I explore the basis for black identity in Latin America. I begin with a general consideration of the position of black populations in the framework of Latin American nationalism, taking into account the transnational dimensions of this position and then analyzing in theoretical terms the tension between particularism and universalism in ideologies of nationalism and racism. In the second part of the article, I examine some concrete historical cases of Afrodescendent mobilization and/or opening towards racial diversity in order to evaluate these as bases for a Latin American black identity in general (the racial war in Cuba in 1912, the Frente Negra Brasileira of the 1930s, the Creoles in the Sandinista regime in Nicaragua, the official multiculturalism of various Latin American countries in the 1990s, and the image of “Africa” as the basis for Afrodescendant identification.

  17. Marketing in the Emerging Markets of Latin America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinov, Marin Alexandrov

    Marketing in the Emerging Markets of Latin America provides a much needed analysis of business and marketing in Latin America. The book highlights the diverse characteristics of the Latin American business and marketing environment as well as the dynamic nature of regional and country markets....... Addressing a broad variety of historical, political, economic, social, cultural and legal issues, the book offers unique insights into the enormous opportunities and challenges the region presents for implementing effective marketing strategies. Macro marketing issues such as regional integration, foreign...... trade and direct investment are considered within the context of specific countries, as are the micro aspects of a company's marketing activities. The book is an extremely valuable resource for academics, practitioners and anyone interested in doing business in or with Latin America....

  18. Proceedings of the Latin American School of Physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main subjects covered by the Latin American School of Physics are nuclear physics and elementary particle physics. Some areas such as solid state physics, statistical mechanics and gravitation are also included. (M.C.K.)

  19. Latin American conference on the applications of the Moessbauer effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work includes all the papers presented at the LACAME'92 Latin American conference on the applications of the Moessbauer effect, held in Buenos Aires (Argentine Republic), from 5th. through 9th., 1992

  20. [Sleep related movement disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Keisuke; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Hirata, Koichi

    2015-06-01

    Sleep related movement disorders (SRMD) are characterized by simple, stereotyped movements occur during sleep, with the exception of restless legs syndrome (RLS). RLS has the following essential features; an urge to move the legs usually accompanied by uncomfortable sensation in the legs, improvement of symptoms after movement (non-stereotypical movements, such as walking and stretching, to reduce symptoms), and symptoms occur or worsen during periods of rest and in the evening and night. However, RLS is closely associated with periodic limb movement, which shows typical stererotyped limb movements. In the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, sleep disturbances or daytime symptoms are prerequiste for a diagnosis of SRMD. We here review diagnosis and treatment of SRMD. PMID:26065126

  1. Stock Market Liberalizations and Efficiency: The Case of Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Vieito, João Paulo; Wong, Wing-Keung; Chow, Sheung Chi

    2016-01-01

    This investigation is among the first to examine the impact of stock market liberalization on the efficiency of Latin American stock markets. It is also among the first to apply the martingale hypothesis test and a stochastic dominance approach to study the issue of efficient markets. Daily stock indices from Latin American countries, including Brazil, Mexico, Chile, Peru, Jamaica, and Trinidad and Tobago, are used in our analysis. To examine the impact of stock market liberalization on effic...

  2. Latin America wind market assessment. Forecast 2013-2022

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-10-15

    Wind Power Activities by Country: Developers/Owners, Wind Plant Sizes, Wind Turbines Deployed, Commissioning Dates, Market Share, and Capacity Forecasts Latin American markets are a subject of intense interest from the global wind industry. Wind plant construction across Latin America is modest compared to the more established markets like the United States, Europe, and China, but it is an emerging market that is taking off at a rapid pace. The region has become the hottest alternative growth market for the wind energy industry at a time when growth rates in other markets are flat due to a variety of policy and macroeconomic challenges. Globalization is driving sustainable economic growth in most Latin American countries, resulting in greater energy demand. Wind is increasingly viewed as a valuable and essential answer to increasing electricity generation across most markets in Latin America. Strong wind resources, coupled with today's sophisticated wind turbines, are providing cost-effective generation that is competitive with fossil fuel generation. Most Latin American countries also rely heavily on hydroelectricity, which balances well with variable wind generation. Navigant Research forecasts that if most wind plants under construction with planned commissioning go online as scheduled, annual wind power installations in Latin America will grow from nearly 2.2 GW in 2013 to 4.3 GW by 2022. This Navigant Research report provides a comprehensive view of the wind energy market dynamics at play in Latin America. It offers a country-by-country analysis, outlining the key energy policies and development opportunities and barriers and identifying which companies own operational wind plants and which wind turbine vendors supplied those projects. Market forecasts for wind power installations, capacity, and market share in Latin America, segmented by country and company, extend through 2022. The report also offers an especially close analysis of Brazil and Mexico

  3. Neo-Liberal Educational Reform in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Susana López Guerra; Marcelo Flores Chávez

    2006-01-01

    Using the argument that educational systems in Latin American are inefficient, political organizations and international financial institutions promoted reforms based on free market principles to modernize education in the region. Chile was used as a laboratory for these reforms, which were then applied to other Latin American countries. This paper analyzes the argument that educational quality is improved through competition—used as a strategy to privatize the educational system—by tr...

  4. Epidemiology of Invasive Fungal Infections in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Sifuentes-Osornio, Jose; Corzo-León, Dora E.; Ponce-de-León, L. Alfredo

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenic role of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) has increased during the past two decades in Latin America and worldwide, and the number of patients at risk has risen dramatically. Working habits and leisure activities have also been a focus of attention by public health officials, as endemic mycoses have provoked a number of outbreaks. An extensive search of medical literature from Latin America suggests that the incidence of IFIs from both endemic and opportunistic fungi has increa...

  5. TRACE Model in Pilot Cities in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2015-01-01

    This report, supported by the energy sector management assistance program (ESMAP), applies the tool for the rapid assessment of city energy (TRACE) to examine energy use in León, México. This study is one of three requested and conducted in 2013 by the World Bank Latin America and the Caribbean energy unit to begin a dialogue on energy efficiency (EE) potential in Latin America and Caribbe...

  6. Market-Based Policies for Pollution Control in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Sarah West; Ann Wolverton

    2003-01-01

    Rapid urbanization and increased industrialization have led to high pollution levels throughout Latin America. Economists tout policies based on market-based economic incentives as the most cost-effective methods for addressing a wide variety of environmental problems. This chapter examines market-based incentives and their applicability to Latin America. We first review the market-based incentives traditionally used to address pollution – emissions taxes, environmental subsidies, tax and sub...

  7. Visibility of Latin American Nursing Research (1959-2005).

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza-Parra, S.; Paravic-Klijn, T.; Muñoz-Muñoz, Ana-M.; Barriga, O.A.; Jiménez-Contreras, E.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze scientific activity in Latin American nursing using bibliometric indicators. Materials and Methods: This is a quantitative, descriptive study of the universe of Latin American nursing journals (119) and scientific documents(13,208) published according to current library databases including: the Web of Science (WOS), Medline, LILACS, Periodica, Cuiden, and SciELO. A database was prepared using ProCite. Results: The PAHO (Pan American Health Organization) Open-acces...

  8. Current Sino-Latin American Relations and the Corresponding Policies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2004-01-01

    @@ Ⅰ. History of the Relationship and Its Current Situation. The Sino-Latin American relationship has a long-standing history that starts from the trade exchanges in the middle of the 16th century.From the 18th century to the early 19th century,hundreds and thousands of Chinese laborers were seized and sold by the western colonists to Latin America as "coolies" who made contribution to the local economic development there.

  9. Integrated Water Resources Management in Latin America and the Caribbean

    OpenAIRE

    Inter-American Development Bank (IDB)

    1998-01-01

    This technical study contains the strategy of the Inter-American Development Bank for its involvement in integrated water resources management in Latin America and the Caribbean. The strategy was developed through an iterative step by step procedure in consultation with country water resource officials, Bank staff, nongovernmental organizations, and international lending and technical assistance organizations. The first part of the study is an overview of water resource management in Latin Am...

  10. Traditional and modern cohabitation in Latin America: A comparative typology

    OpenAIRE

    Maira Covre-Sussai; Bart Meuleman; Sarah Botterman; Koen Matthijs

    2015-01-01

    Background: The existence of cohabitation is a historical feature of nuptiality in Latin America. Traditionally, cohabitation was common in less developed regions, among the lower social classes. But today its occurrence is increasing and in social groups and regions in which it was not common. The features of this latter type of cohabitation remain unclear. Objective: We differentiate types of cohabitation in Latin America on the basis of relationship context at its outset and its outcome...

  11. Lower inflation in Latin America: Economic recovery begins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-30

    Throughout the 1980s, Latin American countries struggled with economic stagnation compounded by hyperinflation. A report by the Inter-American Development Bank finds marked improvement in the economies of Latin America, based upon its analysis of 1991 statistics. This issue taps two recent studies of the region, and its own Fuel Price/Tax Series, to track the trends for a view of a brighter future.

  12. Astroparticles in Latin America: current status and outlook

    OpenAIRE

    Sidelnik, Iván

    2014-01-01

    The successful installation and operation of the Pierre Auger Observatory in Argentina has been a milestone in Astroparticle research in Latin America, generating new regional research opportunities in the field. In this context, the LAGO project, begun in 2005 with the aim of studying the high-energy component of gamma ray bursts (GRBs). This observatory consists of different arrays of water-Cherenkov detectors installed in high altitude mountains throughout Latin America. Recently, it has d...

  13. Lost Decades? : economic performance in post-independence Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Prados de la Escosura, Leandro

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the economic performance of post-independence Latin America is assessed in comparative perspective. The release from the colonial fiscal burden was partly offset by higher costs of self-government, while the opening of independent Latin American countries to the international economy represented a handmaiden of growth. Regional disparities increased after independence, so generalisations about the region's long-run behaviour are not straightforward. However, on average, per capi...

  14. Black Populations and Identity Issues in Latin America

    OpenAIRE

    Peter Wade

    2008-01-01

    In this article, I explore the basis for black identity in Latin America. I begin with a general consideration of the position of black populations in the framework of Latin American nationalism, taking into account the transnational dimensions of this position and then analyzing in theoretical terms the tension between particularism and universalism in ideologies of nationalism and racism. In the second part of the article, I examine some concrete historical cases of Afrodescendent mobilizat...

  15. MOVEMENT DISORDERS IN CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujitnath

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Involuntary movements of different types are associated with many diseases in children. Movement disorders in adult have been published in different journals, but in children these disorders have been ignored, even in most of the paediatric neurology books. Here is a brief attempt to describe different types of movement disorders and their various names in different diseases. Possible investigations and treatment of the disorders have been described in short.

  16. Parental advocacy styles for special education students during the transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Roberta S; Fisher, Lucille T; Fuentes-Afflick, Elena; Chesla, Catherine A

    2013-10-01

    In an ethnographic study of planning for the transition to adulthood, we explored parental advocacy styles in special education settings for youth and young adults with chronic health conditions and developmental disabilities. Of 61 parents, 43 were satisfied with outcomes in negotiations for school services for their children. We identified three parental advocacy styles for these parents: (a) high-profile parents, who insisted on specific, wide-ranging services for their children that often resulted in conflict with educators; (b) strategic parents, who negotiated for selected goals and were willing to compromise, and (c) grateful-gratifier parents, who formed close relationships with educators and trusted them to make appropriate decisions. Eighteen parents were overwhelmed, burned out, or unfocused, and generally dissatisfied with outcomes of educational planning meetings. Professional efforts to enhance parental advocacy can target development of skills and strategies that have worked for successful negotiators.

  17. Effects of a promotor training on local school wellness advocacy capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Eddy A; Ritterman Weintraub, Miranda; Clifton-Hawkins, Nancy; Martinez, Nestor

    2014-01-01

    There is gap between the enactment and implementation of local school wellness policies. Building the capacity of promotores to engage parents in strengthening local school wellness policy implementation is an innovative strategy. This evaluation study examines the effects of 6 hours of promotor advocacy training to improve local school wellness policy implementation. Consistent with psychological empowerment theory, the training and the related toolkit were designed to increase promotores' knowledge and self-efficacy to engage parents in advocating for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Pre-post training questionnaires (n = 74), five posttraining participant focus groups, and four staff member focus groups explored changes in promotor and participating organization capacity. Findings show increased participant self-efficacy, knowledge, and attitudes to advocate for improved local school wellness policy implementation. Participating organizations reported intention to continue supporting promotor local school wellness policy advocacy. Findings illuminate strategies to strengthen promotor capacity to engage parents in local school wellness policy advocacy. PMID:23182862

  18. A Narrative Self-Study of Advocacy by an Educational Practitioner with Multiple Roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Rice

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This self-study follows my work on three professional knowledge landscapes (Clandinin & Connelly, 1996. It was an effort at revealing both my knowledge-in-practice and knowledge-of-practice (Cochran-Smith & Lytle, 2004 in order to uncover understandings about my own use advocacy as a classroom teacher, a new teacher mentor, and a teacher educator on a university campus. Through the course of the study, my attention turned toward my own use of advocacy as a classroom teacher, a new teacher mentor, and a teacher educator on a university campus—the places where tensions occurred. Advocacy experiences in all three of these roles tended to be dependent on maintaining a delicate balance of positioning between myself, the student, the new teacher, or mentee, and another school official. I was also able to see the ways my personal practical knowledge was lived in and out in the various situations.

  19. Advocacy Journalism and the Rights of Nigerian Children to Free and Compulsory Education: A Prescriptive Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ezekiel S. Asemah

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of advocacy journalism in safeguarding the rights of Nigerian child to free and compulsory education is the thrust of this paper. It highlights the strategic importance of journalists to the smooth functioning and development of the society. The paper adopts the analytical tool in examining the imperatives of advocacy journalism in creating awareness to the non-compliance with the constitutional provisions and the different court orders guaranteeing and protecting the rights of the Nigerian child to free, compulsory and basic education. The Nigerian governments at all levels, policy makers, development agencies, non-governmental and community based organisations, though have made interventions to correct this anomaly, yet their efforts cannot be said to have yielded the desired results. This paper, therefore recommends that journalists who want to create a meaningful change, to adopt advocacy journalism as the single most crucial element to facilitate protection of rights of Nigerian Child to free and compulsory education.

  20. Health advocacy organizations and the pharmaceutical industry: an analysis of disclosure practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Sheila M; Raveis, Victoria H; Friedman, Anne; Rothman, David J

    2011-04-01

    Health advocacy organizations (HAOs) are influential stakeholders in health policy. Although their advocacy tends to closely correspond with the pharmaceutical industry's marketing aims, the financial relationships between HAOs and the pharmaceutical industry have rarely been analyzed. We used Eli Lilly and Company's grant registry to examine its grant-giving policies. We also examined HAO Web sites to determine their grant-disclosure patterns. Only 25% of HAOs that received Lilly grants acknowledged Lilly's contributions on their Web sites, and only 10% acknowledged Lilly as a grant event sponsor. No HAO disclosed the exact amount of a Lilly grant. As highly trusted organizations, HAOs should disclose all corporate grants, including the purpose and the amount. Absent this disclosure, legislators, regulators, and the public cannot evaluate possible conflicts of interest or biases in HAO advocacy.