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Sample records for advanced uracil-excision dna

  1. Accurate DNA assembly and genome engineering with optimized uracil excision cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Seppala, Susanna;

    2015-01-01

    Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway that pro......Simple and reliable DNA editing by uracil excision (a.k.a. USER cloning) has been described by several research groups, but the optimal design of cohesive DNA ends for multigene assembly remains elusive. Here, we use two model constructs based on expression of gfp and a four-gene pathway...... that produces β-carotene to optimize assembly junctions and the uracil excision protocol. By combining uracil excision cloning with a genomic integration technology, we demonstrate that up to six DNA fragments can be assembled in a one-tube reaction for direct genome integration with high accuracy, greatly...

  2. Uracil Excision for Assembly of Complex Pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Nielsen, Morten Thrane; Kim, Se Hyeuk

    2015-01-01

    Despite decreasing prices on synthetic DNA constructs, higher-order assembly of PCR-generated DNA continues to be an important exercise in molecular and synthetic biology. Simplicity and robustness are attractive features met by the uracil excision DNA assembly method, which is one of the most in...

  3. Accurate Dna Assembly And Direct Genome Integration With Optimized Uracil Excision Cloning To Facilitate Engineering Of Escherichia Coli As A Cell Factory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaleiro, Mafalda; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Nørholm, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Plants produce a vast diversity of valuable compounds with medical properties, but these are often difficult to purify from the natural source or produce by organic synthesis. An alternative is to transfer the biosynthetic pathways to an efficient production host like the bacterium Escherichia co......-excision-based cloning and combining it with a genome-engineering approach to allow direct integration of whole metabolic pathways into the genome of E. coli, to facilitate the advanced engineering of cell factories....

  4. Uracil excision by endogenous SMUG1 glycosylase promotes efficient Ig class switching and impacts on A:T substitutions during somatic mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dingler, Felix A; Kemmerich, Kristin; Neuberger, Michael S; Rada, Cristina

    2014-07-01

    Excision of uracil introduced into the immunoglobulin loci by AID is central to antibody diversification. While predominantly carried out by the UNG uracil-DNA glycosylase as reflected by deficiency in immunoglobulin class switching in Ung(-/-) mice, the deficiency is incomplete, as evidenced by the emergence of switched IgG in the serum of Ung(-/-) mice. Lack of switching in mice deficient in both UNG and MSH2 suggested that mismatch repair initiated a backup pathway. We now show that most of the residual class switching in Ung(-/-) mice depends upon the endogenous SMUG1 uracil-DNA glycosylase, with in vitro switching to IgG1 as well as serum IgG3, IgG2b, and IgA greatly diminished in Ung(-/-) Smug1(-/-) mice, and that Smug1 partially compensates for Ung deficiency over time. Nonetheless, using a highly MSH2-dependent mechanism, Ung(-/-) Smug1(-/-) mice can still produce detectable levels of switched isotypes, especially IgG1. While not affecting the pattern of base substitutions, SMUG1 deficiency in an Ung(-/-) background further reduces somatic hypermutation at A:T base pairs. Our data reveal an essential requirement for uracil excision in class switching and in facilitating noncanonical mismatch repair for the A:T phase of hypermutation presumably by creating nicks near the U:G lesion recognized by MSH2.

  5. UCE: A uracil excision (USERTM)-based toolbox for transformation of cereals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebelstrup, Kim H; Christiansen, Michael W; Carciofi, Massimiliano;

    2010-01-01

    Background Cloning of gene casettes and other DNA sequences into the conventional vectors for biolistic or Agrobacterium-mediated transformation is hampered by a limited amount of unique restriction sites and by the difficulties often encountered when ligating small single strand DNA overhangs...... (USER cereal), ready for use in cloning of complex constructs into the T-DNA. A series of the vectors were tested and shown to perform successfully in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) as well as in biolistic transformation of endosperm cells conferring transient...

  6. Advanced DNA assembly technologies in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsvetanova, Billyana; Peng, Lansha; Liang, Xiquan; Li, Ke; Hammond, Linda; Peterson, Todd C; Katzen, Federico

    2012-05-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have had a fundamental impact on drug discovery. The continuous emergence of unique gene assembly techniques resulted in the generation of a variety of therapeutic reagents such as vaccines, cancer treatment molecules and regenerative medicine precursors. With the advent of synthetic biology there is a growing need for precise and concerted assembly of multiple DNA fragments of various sizes, including chromosomes. In this article, we summarize the highlights of the recombinant DNA technology since its inception in the early 1970s, emphasizing on the most recent advances, and underscoring their principles, advantages and shortcomings. Current and prior cloning trends are discussed in the context of sequence requirements and scars left behind. Our opinion is that despite the remarkable progress that has enabled the generation and manipulation of very large DNA sequences, a better understanding of the cell's natural circuits is needed in order to fully exploit the current state-of-the-art gene assembly technologies.

  7. DNA sequencing by nanopores: advances and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agah, Shaghayegh; Zheng, Ming; Pasquali, Matteo; Kolomeisky, Anatoly B.

    2016-10-01

    Developing inexpensive and simple DNA sequencing methods capable of detecting entire genomes in short periods of time could revolutionize the world of medicine and technology. It will also lead to major advances in our understanding of fundamental biological processes. It has been shown that nanopores have the ability of single-molecule sensing of various biological molecules rapidly and at a low cost. This has stimulated significant experimental efforts in developing DNA sequencing techniques by utilizing biological and artificial nanopores. In this review, we discuss recent progress in the nanopore sequencing field with a focus on the nature of nanopores and on sensing mechanisms during the translocation. Current challenges and alternative methods are also discussed.

  8. What Advances Are Being Made in DNA Sequencing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Help Me Understand Genetics Home Help Me Understand Genetics Genomic Research What advances are being made in DNA ... Research Institute (NHGRI). The American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics (ACMG) has laid out their policies regarding whole ...

  9. Advances in DNA methylation: 5-hydroxymethylcytosine revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Christina; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Guldberg, Per

    2011-01-01

    Mammalian DNA contains two modified cytosine bases; 5-methylcytosine (5mC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC). Both of these have been known for decades but have received very different levels of attention in the scientific literature. 5mC has been studied extensively, and its role as an epigenet...

  10. Advancing taxonomy and bioinventories with DNA barcodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    We use three examples—field and ecology-based inventories in Costa Rica and Papua New Guinea and a museum and taxonomic-based inventory of the moth family Geometridae—to demonstrate the use of DNA barcoding (a short sequence of the mitochondrial COI gene) in biodiversity inventories, from facilitating workflows of identification of freshly collected specimens from the field, to describing the overall diversity of megadiverse taxa from museum collections, and most importantly linking the fresh specimens, the general museum collections and historic type specimens. The process also flushes out unexpected sibling species hiding under long-applied scientific names, thereby clarifying and parsing previously mixed collateral data. The Barcode of Life Database has matured to an essential interactive platform for the multi-authored and multi-process collaboration. The BIN system of creating and tracking DNA sequence-based clusters as proxies for species has become a powerful way around some parts of the ‘taxonomic impediment’, especially in entomology, by providing fast but testable and tractable species hypotheses, tools for visualizing the distribution of those in time and space and an interim naming system for communication. This article is part of the themed issue ‘From DNA barcodes to biomes’. PMID:27481791

  11. Plasmid DNA gene therapy by electroporation: principles and recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tatsufumi; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2011-12-01

    Simple plasmid DNA injection is a safe and feasible gene transfer method, but it confers low transfection efficiency and transgene expression. This non-viral gene transfer method is enhanced by physical delivery methods, such as electroporation and the use of a gene gun. In vivo electroporation has been rapidly developed over the last two decades to deliver DNA to various tissues or organs. It is generally considered that membrane permeabilization and DNA electrophoresis play important roles in electro-gene transfer. Skeletal muscle is a well characterized target tissue for electroporation, because it is accessible and allows for long-lasting gene expression ( > one year). Skin is also a target tissue because of its accessibility and immunogenicity. Numerous studies have been performed using in vivo electroporation in animal models of disease. Clinical trials of DNA vaccines and immunotherapy for cancer treatment using in vivo electroporation have been initiated in patients with melanoma and prostate cancer. Furthermore, electroporation has been applied to DNA vaccines for infectious diseases to enhance immunogenicity, and the relevant clinical trials have been initiated. The gene gun approach is also being applied for the delivery of DNA vaccines against infectious diseases to the skin. Here, we review recent advances in the mechanism of in vivo electroporation, and summarize the findings of recent preclinical and clinical studies using this technology.

  12. DNA Vaccines against Protozoan Parasites: Advances and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Dumonteil

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past 15 years, DNA vaccines have gone from a scientific curiosity to one of the most dynamic research field and may offer new alternatives for the control of parasitic diseases such as leishmaniasis and Chagas disease. We review here some of the advances and challenges for the development of DNA vaccines against these diseases. Many studies have validated the concept of using DNA vaccines for both protection and therapy against these protozoan parasites in a variety of mouse models. The challenge now is to translate what has been achieved in these models into veterinary or human vaccines of comparable efficacy. Also, genome-mining and new antigen discovery strategies may provide new tools for a more rational search of novel vaccine candidates.

  13. Folate deficiency increases mtDNA and D-1 mtDNA deletion in aged brain of mice lacking uracil-DNA glycosylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Overall, Rupert W; Harms, Christoph; Klein, Jeanette; Page, Melissa M; Stuart, Jeffrey A; Endres, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    Strong epidemiological and experimental evidence links folate deficiency and resultant hyperhomocysteinemia with cognitive decline and neurodegeneration. Here, we tested the hypothesis that uracil misincorporation contributes to mitochondrial pathology in aged brain following folate deprivation. In a 2 × 2 design, 14-month-old mice lacking uracil DNA glycosylase (Ung-/-) versus wild-type controls were subjected to a folate-deficient versus a regular diet for six weeks. Folate-deficient feeding significantly enhanced mtDNA content and overall abundance of the D-1 mtDNA deletion in brain of Ung-/-, but not of wild-type mice. Independent of folate status, the frequency of the D-1 mtDNA deletion in mtDNA was significantly increased in Ung-/- mice. The rate of mitochondrial biogenesis as assessed at six weeks of the experimental diet by mRNA expression levels of transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator (PGC)-1α and of mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam) was not affected by either Ung-/- genotype or short-term folate deficiency. Similarly, citrate synthase (CS) activity in the brain did not differ across experimental groups. By contrast, independent of genotype, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was significantly reduced in folate-deficient animals. Our results suggest that impaired uracil excision repair causes an increase in mitochondrial mutagenesis in aged brain along with a compensatory increase in mtDNA content in response to low folate status. Folate deficiency may contribute to neurodegeneration via mtDNA damage.

  14. Advances in Research on Hepatitis B Virus DNA Integration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ju-sheng LIN; Lin-lin GAO

    2008-01-01

    Since HBV DNA integration was discovered for the first time in 1980, various methods have been used to detect and study it, such as Southern Blot, in situ hybridization, polymerase chain reaction and so on. HBV DNA integration is thought to be random on the whole although some hot spots of integration were described by some researchers, one of which might be the repetitive sequences of the genomic DNA. Besides, DNA damage, especially double-strand breaks could promote HBV DNA integration into host genome. HBV DNA integration into cells may damage the stability of the genome, cause DNA rearrangement, promote DNA deletion and induce the formation of HCC.

  15. Recent advances towards the clinical application of DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bins, A D; van den Berg, J H; Oosterhuis, K; Haanen, J B A G

    2013-04-01

    DNA vaccination is an attractive method for therapeutic vaccination against intracellular pathogens and cancer. This review provides an introduction into the DNA vaccination field and discusses the pre-clinical successes and most interesting clinical achievements thus far. Furthermore, general attributes, mechanism of action and safety of DNA vaccination will be discussed. Since clinical results with DNA vaccination so far show room for improvement, possibilities to improve the delivery and immunogenicity of DNA vaccines are reviewed. In the coming years, these new developments should show whether DNA vaccination is able to induce clinically relevant responses in patients.

  16. Current advances of DNA barcoding study in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Shuping Ning; Haifei Yan; Gang Hao; Xuejun Ge

    2008-01-01

    DNA barcoding has become one of hotspots of biodiversity research in the last five years. It is a method of rapid and accurate species identification and recognition using a short, standardized DNA region. DNA barcoding is now well established for animals, using a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI or cox1) as the standard universal barcode. However, in plants, progress has been hampered by slow substitution rates in mitochondrial DNA. A number of different chlor...

  17. Recent advances in yeast molecular biology: recombinant DNA. [Lead abstract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-09-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 25 papers presented at a workshop focusing on chromosomal structure, gene regulation, recombination, DNA repair, and cell type control, that have been obtained by experimental approaches incorporating the new technologies of yeast DNA transformation, molecular cloning, and DNA sequence analysis. (KRM)

  18. Phosphorylated 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine for advanced DNA labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Siyoong; Onizuka, Kazumitsu; Nishioka, Chieko; Takahashi, Eiki; Tsuneda, Satoshi; Abe, Hiroshi; Ito, Yoshihiro

    2015-04-21

    The representative DNA-labeling agent 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) was chemically modified to improve its function. Chemical monophosphorylation was expected to enhance the efficiency of the substrate in DNA polymerization by circumventing the enzymatic monophosphorylation step that consumes energy. In addition, to enhance cell permeability, the phosphates were protected with bis-pivaloyloxymethyl that is stable in buffer and plasma, and degradable inside various cell types. The phosphorylated EdU (PEdU) was less toxic than EdU, and had the same or a slightly higher DNA-labeling ability in vitro. PEdU was also successfully applied to DNA labeling in vivo. In conclusion, PEdU can be used as a less toxic DNA-labeling agent for studies that require long-term cell survival or very sensitive cell lines.

  19. Current advances in DNA repair: regulation of enzymes and pathways involved in maintaining genomic stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neher, Tracy M; Turchi, John J

    2011-06-15

    Novel discoveries in the DNA repair field have lead to continuous and rapid advancement of our understanding of not only DNA repair but also DNA replication and recombination. Research in the field transcends numerous areas of biology, biochemistry, physiology, and medicine, making significant connections across these broad areas of study. From early studies conducted in bacterial systems to current analyses in eukaryotic systems and human disease, the innovative research into the mechanisms of repair machines and the consequences of ineffective DNA repair has impacted a wide scientific community. This Forum contains a select mix of primary research articles in addition to a number of timely reviews covering a subset of DNA repair pathways where recent advances and novel discoveries are improving our understanding of DNA repair, its regulation, and implications to human disease.

  20. Advances Achieved on Studies of East Asian mtDNA Phylogeny

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ Agroup of geneticists at the CAS Kunming Institute of Zoology (KIZ)succeeded in advancing out knowledge on the East Asian phylogeny of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Their work, which was finished by Dr. Kong Qingpeng under the guidance of ZHANG Yaping, was published by the journal Human Molecular Genetics.

  1. Levels of cell-free DNA and plasma KRAS during treatment of advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dowler Nygaard, Anneli; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2014-01-01

    be analysed in plasma and may increase the scientific use of such measurements. In the present study, we investigated: i) the dynamics of cfDNA and plasma mutated KRAS (pmKRAS) during the treatment of patients with advanced NSCLC; and ii) the prognostic value of baseline cfDNA and pmKRAS. Sixty‑nine patients...... were included in a prospective biomarker trial. Inclusion criteria included advanced NSCLC, candidate for first-line treatment, no previous cancer within the five years prior to this study. Blood samples were drawn at baseline, day 8 and at progression. Analyses of cfDNA and KRAS mutations in plasma...

  2. 酶促DNA合成研究的进展%Advance in Enzymatic DNA Synthesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向义和

    2011-01-01

    The advance in enzymatic DNA synthesis is introduced. Kornberg and his colleagues went through deoxyribonucleotide.de-oxynucleoside try phosphates and DNA synthesis. The immediate precursor of DNA synthesis was known. DNA polymerase was separated and purified. The chemical mechanism of DNA synthesis was revealed and infectious phage φX174DNA was synthesized.%笔者介绍了酶促DNA合成研究的进展.科恩伯格和他的同事经历了从合成核苷酸、核苷三磷酸到合成DNA的历程.他们分离并提纯了DNA聚合酶,弄清了合成DNA的最直接的前体,揭示了DNA合成的化学机理,合成了具有感染性的噬菌体φX174DNA.

  3. Advancing DNA-based Nanotechnology Capabilities and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Alexandria N.

    Biological systems have inspired interest in developing artificial molecular self-assembly techniques that imitate nature's ability to harness chemical forces to specifically position atoms within intricate assemblies. Of the biomolecules used to mimic nature's abilities, nucleic acids have gained special attention. Specifically, deoxyribonucleic acid is a stable molecule with a readily accessible code that exhibits predictable and programmable intermolecular interactions. These properties are exploited in the revolutionary structural DNA nanotechnology method known as scaffolded DNA origami. For DNA origami to establish itself as a widely used method for creating self-assembling, complex, functional materials, current limitations need to be overcome and new methods need to be established to move forward with developing structures for diverse applications in many fields. The limitations discussed in this dissertation include 1) pushing the scale of well-formed, fully-addressable origami to two and seven times the size of conventional origami, 2) testing cost-effective staple strand synthesis methods for producing pools of oligos for a specified origami, and 3) engineering mechanical properties using non-natural nucleotides in DNA assemblies. After accomplishing the above, we're able to design complex DNA origami structures that incorporate many of the current developments in the field into a useful material with applicability in wide-ranging fields, namely cell biology and photonics.

  4. Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.

  5. Advances on circulating fetal DNA in maternal plasma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Xian-hu; CHEN Han-ping

    2007-01-01

    @@ The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma in 1997 has opened up new possibilities for noninvasive diagnosis.1 By RT-PCR, circulating fetal DNA can be detected in the plasma of pregnant women,even in the first trimester of pregnancy,2,3 and thus can be used for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of sex-linked disorders,4-6 the RhD status of fetuses,7 and single gene disorders such as beta-thalassaemia,8,9 congenital adrenal hyperplasia,10 and achondroplasia.11 In addition,quantitative aberrations of circulating fetal DNA may indicate various pregnancy-associated disorders,including1 Preeclampsia,12-14 preterm labor15,16 and fetal trisomy 21.17

  6. Chemical Biology Probes from Advanced DNA-encoded Libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Hazem; Klika Škopić, Mateja; Jung, Kathrin; Bugain, Olivia; Brunschweiger, Andreas

    2016-02-19

    The identification of bioactive compounds is a crucial step toward development of probes for chemical biology studies. Screening of DNA-encoded small molecule libraries (DELs) has emerged as a validated technology to interrogate vast chemical space. DELs consist of chimeric molecules composed of a low-molecular weight compound that is conjugated to a DNA identifier tag. They are screened as pooled libraries using selection to identify "hits." Screening of DELs has identified numerous bioactive compounds. Some of these molecules were instrumental in gaining a deeper understanding of biological systems. One of the main challenges in the field is the development of synthesis methodology for DELs.

  7. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, Cinnamon L.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka; Hornstein, Benjamin D.; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic. PMID:28208635

  8. Advances in Non-Viral DNA Vectors for Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cinnamon L. Hardee

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Uses of viral vectors have thus far eclipsed uses of non-viral vectors for gene therapy delivery in the clinic. Viral vectors, however, have certain issues involving genome integration, the inability to be delivered repeatedly, and possible host rejection. Fortunately, development of non-viral DNA vectors has progressed steadily, especially in plasmid vector length reduction, now allowing these tools to fill in specifically where viral or other non-viral vectors may not be the best options. In this review, we examine the improvements made to non-viral DNA gene therapy vectors, highlight opportunities for their further development, address therapeutic needs for which their use is the logical choice, and discuss their future expansion into the clinic

  9. Advances in DNA metabarcoding for food and wildlife forensic species identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staats, Martijn; Arulandhu, Alfred J; Gravendeel, Barbara; Holst-Jensen, Arne; Scholtens, Ingrid; Peelen, Tamara; Prins, Theo W; Kok, Esther

    2016-07-01

    Species identification using DNA barcodes has been widely adopted by forensic scientists as an effective molecular tool for tracking adulterations in food and for analysing samples from alleged wildlife crime incidents. DNA barcoding is an approach that involves sequencing of short DNA sequences from standardized regions and comparison to a reference database as a molecular diagnostic tool in species identification. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards developing DNA metabarcoding strategies, which involves next-generation sequencing of DNA barcodes for the simultaneous detection of multiple species in complex samples. Metabarcoding strategies can be used in processed materials containing highly degraded DNA e.g. for the identification of endangered and hazardous species in traditional medicine. This review aims to provide insight into advances of plant and animal DNA barcoding and highlights current practices and recent developments for DNA metabarcoding of food and wildlife forensic samples from a practical point of view. Special emphasis is placed on new developments for identifying species listed in the Convention on International Trade of Endangered Species (CITES) appendices for which reliable methods for species identification may signal and/or prevent illegal trade. Current technological developments and challenges of DNA metabarcoding for forensic scientists will be assessed in the light of stakeholders' needs.

  10. Reproducibility of Digital PCR Assays for Circulating Tumor DNA Analysis in Advanced Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrebien, Sarah; O’Leary, Ben; Beaney, Matthew; Schiavon, Gaia; Fribbens, Charlotte; Bhambra, Amarjit; Johnson, Richard; Turner, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) analysis has the potential to allow non-invasive analysis of tumor mutations in advanced cancer. In this study we assessed the reproducibility of digital PCR (dPCR) assays of circulating tumor DNA in a cohort of patients with advanced breast cancer and assessed delayed plasma processing using cell free DNA preservative tubes. We recruited a cohort of 96 paired samples from 71 women with advanced breast cancer who had paired blood samples processed either immediately or delayed in preservative tubes with processing 48–72 hours after collection. Plasma DNA was analysed with multiplex digital PCR (mdPCR) assays for hotspot mutations in PIK3CA, ESR1 and ERBB2, and for AKT1 E17K. There was 94.8% (91/96) agreement in mutation calling between immediate and delayed processed tubes, kappa 0.88 95% CI 0.77–0.98). Discordance in mutation calling resulted from low allele frequency and likely stochastic effects. In concordant samples there was high correlation in mutant copies per ml plasma (r2 = 0.98; pprocessed tubes, although overall quantification of total cell free plasma DNA had similar prognostic effects in immediate (HR 3.6) and delayed (HR 3.0) tubes. There was moderate agreement in changes in allele fraction between sequential samples in quantitative mutation tracking (r = 0.84, p = 0.0002). Delayed processing of samples using preservative tubes allows for centralized ctDNA digital PCR mutation screening in advanced breast cancer. The potential of preservative tubes in quantitative mutation tracking requires further research. PMID:27760227

  11. Multi-purpose utility of circulating plasma DNA testing in patients with advanced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Geraldine; Yap, Timothy A; Pope, Lorna; Cassidy, Amy M; Dukes, Juliet P; Riisnaes, Ruth; Massard, Christophe; Cassier, Philippe A; Miranda, Susana; Clark, Jeremy; Denholm, Katie A; Thway, Khin; Gonzalez De Castro, David; Attard, Gerhardt; Molife, L Rhoda; Kaye, Stan B; Banerji, Udai; de Bono, Johann S

    2012-01-01

    Tumor genomic instability and selective treatment pressures result in clonal disease evolution; molecular stratification for molecularly targeted drug administration requires repeated access to tumor DNA. We hypothesized that circulating plasma DNA (cpDNA) in advanced cancer patients is largely derived from tumor, has prognostic utility, and can be utilized for multiplex tumor mutation sequencing when repeat biopsy is not feasible. We utilized the Sequenom MassArray System and OncoCarta panel for somatic mutation profiling. Matched samples, acquired from the same patient but at different time points were evaluated; these comprised formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) archival tumor tissue (primary and/or metastatic) and cpDNA. The feasibility, sensitivity, and specificity of this high-throughput, multiplex mutation detection approach was tested utilizing specimens acquired from 105 patients with solid tumors referred for participation in Phase I trials of molecularly targeted drugs. The median cpDNA concentration was 17 ng/ml (range: 0.5-1600); this was 3-fold higher than in healthy volunteers. Moreover, higher cpDNA concentrations associated with worse overall survival; there was an overall survival (OS) hazard ratio of 2.4 (95% CI 1.4, 4.2) for each 10-fold increase in cpDNA concentration and in multivariate analyses, cpDNA concentration, albumin, and performance status remained independent predictors of OS. These data suggest that plasma DNA in these cancer patients is largely derived from tumor. We also observed high detection concordance for critical 'hot-spot' mutations (KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA) in matched cpDNA and archival tumor tissue, and important differences between archival tumor and cpDNA. This multiplex sequencing assay can be utilized to detect somatic mutations from plasma in advanced cancer patients, when safe repeat tumor biopsy is not feasible and genomic analysis of archival tumor is deemed insufficient. Overall, circulating nucleic acid

  12. Multi-purpose utility of circulating plasma DNA testing in patients with advanced cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geraldine Perkins

    Full Text Available Tumor genomic instability and selective treatment pressures result in clonal disease evolution; molecular stratification for molecularly targeted drug administration requires repeated access to tumor DNA. We hypothesized that circulating plasma DNA (cpDNA in advanced cancer patients is largely derived from tumor, has prognostic utility, and can be utilized for multiplex tumor mutation sequencing when repeat biopsy is not feasible. We utilized the Sequenom MassArray System and OncoCarta panel for somatic mutation profiling. Matched samples, acquired from the same patient but at different time points were evaluated; these comprised formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE archival tumor tissue (primary and/or metastatic and cpDNA. The feasibility, sensitivity, and specificity of this high-throughput, multiplex mutation detection approach was tested utilizing specimens acquired from 105 patients with solid tumors referred for participation in Phase I trials of molecularly targeted drugs. The median cpDNA concentration was 17 ng/ml (range: 0.5-1600; this was 3-fold higher than in healthy volunteers. Moreover, higher cpDNA concentrations associated with worse overall survival; there was an overall survival (OS hazard ratio of 2.4 (95% CI 1.4, 4.2 for each 10-fold increase in cpDNA concentration and in multivariate analyses, cpDNA concentration, albumin, and performance status remained independent predictors of OS. These data suggest that plasma DNA in these cancer patients is largely derived from tumor. We also observed high detection concordance for critical 'hot-spot' mutations (KRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA in matched cpDNA and archival tumor tissue, and important differences between archival tumor and cpDNA. This multiplex sequencing assay can be utilized to detect somatic mutations from plasma in advanced cancer patients, when safe repeat tumor biopsy is not feasible and genomic analysis of archival tumor is deemed insufficient. Overall, circulating nucleic

  13. Advances in research of DNA vaccine%DNA 疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭杨(综述); 方刚(审校)

    2013-01-01

    DNA疫苗是20世纪90年代初出现的一种新型疫苗,近年来发展迅速,在预防和治疗病毒性疾病及肿瘤等方面效果显著。同传统的疫苗相比,DNA疫苗具有免疫效果好、生产成本低、临床应用方便等优点,但同样存在安全性的担忧。对DNA疫苗的发展及其作用机制、优势进行了综述,并对DNA疫苗的安全性提出了自己的观点与看法,可供DNA疫苗的研究者参考。%As a novel vaccine set up in early 1990 s, DNA vaccine has been developed rapidly in recent years and played an important role in the prevention and treatment of viral diseases and tumor .Compared with the traditional vaccines , it had some advantages , such as good immune effect , low production cost , and convenient usage for the clinical application , but it could also be found safety concerns .To provide the references for DNA vaccine researchers , the development , mecha-nism, and advantage are reviewed in this paper , and my personal viewpoint about its safety is presented as well .

  14. The Extraction and Partial Purification of Bacterial DNA as a Practical Exercise for GCE Advanced Level Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, A. C.; Hayes, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a relatively simple method of extraction and purification of bacterial DNA. This technique permits advanced secondary-level science students to obtain adequate amounts of DNA from very small pellets of bacteria and to observe some of its polymer properties. (ML)

  15. Recent advances in DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for heavy metal ion detection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidur, M R; Aziz, A R Abdul; Basirun, W J

    2017-04-15

    The presence of heavy metal in food chains due to the rapid industrialization poses a serious threat on the environment. Therefore, detection and monitoring of heavy metals contamination are gaining more attention nowadays. However, the current analytical methods (based on spectroscopy) for the detection of heavy metal contamination are often very expensive, tedious and can only be handled by trained personnel. DNA biosensors, which are based on electrochemical transduction, is a sensitive but inexpensive method of detection. The principles, sensitivity, selectivity and challenges of electrochemical biosensors are discussed in this review. This review also highlights the major advances of DNA-based electrochemical biosensors for the detection of heavy metal ions such as Hg(2+), Ag(+), Cu(2+) and Pb(2+).

  16. DNA-encoded chemical libraries: advancing beyond conventional small-molecule libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzini, Raphael M; Neri, Dario; Scheuermann, Jörg

    2014-04-15

    DNA-encoded chemical libraries (DECLs) represent a promising tool in drug discovery. DECL technology allows the synthesis and screening of chemical libraries of unprecedented size at moderate costs. In analogy to phage-display technology, where large antibody libraries are displayed on the surface of filamentous phage and are genetically encoded in the phage genome, DECLs feature the display of individual small organic chemical moieties on DNA fragments serving as amplifiable identification barcodes. The DNA-tag facilitates the synthesis and allows the simultaneous screening of very large sets of compounds (up to billions of molecules), because the hit compounds can easily be identified and quantified by PCR-amplification of the DNA-barcode followed by high-throughput DNA sequencing. Several approaches have been used to generate DECLs, differing both in the methods used for library encoding and for the combinatorial assembly of chemical moieties. For example, DECLs can be used for fragment-based drug discovery, displaying a single molecule on DNA or two chemical moieties at the extremities of complementary DNA strands. DECLs can vary substantially in the chemical structures and the library size. While ultralarge libraries containing billions of compounds have been reported containing four or more sets of building blocks, also smaller libraries have been shown to be efficient for ligand discovery. In general, it has been found that the overall library size is a poor predictor for library performance and that the number and diversity of the building blocks are rather important indicators. Smaller libraries consisting of two to three sets of building blocks better fulfill the criteria of drug-likeness and often have higher quality. In this Account, we present advances in the DECL field from proof-of-principle studies to practical applications for drug discovery, both in industry and in academia. DECL technology can yield specific binders to a variety of target

  17. Recent Advances in Cyclonucleosides: C-Cyclonucleosides and Spore Photoproducts in Damaged DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroki Takahata

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cyclonucleosides which are fixed in a specific conformation around the glycosyl bond by a carbon and heteroatom chain constitute a unique category of nucleoside derivatives. Because they are structural analogs, cyclonucleosides and oligodeoxynucleotides containing them would be useful tools for investigating the biological functions and conformations of DNA, RNA as well as their steric interactions with proteins. C-Cyclonucleosides bridged by a carbon chain between the base and sugar moieties are the most attractive from the synthetic points of view as well as for use as biological tools. In this review, recent progress of the synthesis of C-cyclonucleosides is surveyed. Among the C-cyclonucleosides, 5′,8-C-cyclodeoxyadenosine is one of the well-known derivatives of which the first practical synthesis was reported over 30 years ago. Recently, 5′,8-C-cyclodeoxyadenosine has attracted considerable interest as a biomarker, since its formation in oxidatively-damaged DNA is considered to be related to various diseases and aging. Another important analogue of cyclonucleosides is a unique thymidine phosphate dimer, a so-called spore photoproduct, which has been found in photo-damaged DNA. Recent advances in the synthesis, mechanism-studies, and stereochemical preference of repairing enzymes related to 5′,8-C-cyclodeoxyadenosine and spore photoproducts are also reviewed.

  18. The prognostic value of KRAS mutated plasma DNA in advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Anneli Dowler; Garm Spindler, Karen-Lise; Pallisgaard, Niels

    2013-01-01

    DNA) in the blood allows for tumour specific analyses, including KRAS-mutations, and the aim of the study was to investigate the possible prognostic value of plasma mutated KRAS (pmKRAS) in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with newly diagnosed, advanced NSCLC eligible......BACKGROUND: Lung cancer is one of the most common malignant diseases worldwide and associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. New agents targeting the epidermal growth factor system are emerging, but only a subgroup of the patients will benefit from the therapy. Cell free DNA (cf...... for chemotherapy were enrolled in a prospective biomarker trial. A pre-treatment blood sample was drawn and subsequently DNA was extracted and pmKRAS analysed. The patients received carboplatin (AUC5) i.v. day 1 and vinorelbine (30mg/m(2) i.v. day 1 and 60mg/m(2) p.o. day 8) for a maximum of six cycles. Response...

  19. Impact of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus-DNA and Tumor Volume on Prognosis of Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aims to examine the association of plasma Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- DNA levels with the tumor volume and prognosis in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A total of 165 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced NPC were identified from September 2011 to July 2012. EBV-DNA was detected using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification. The tumor volume was calculated by the systematic summation method of computer software. The median copy number of plasma EBV-DNA before treatment was 3790 copies/mL. The median gross tumor volume of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor (GTVnx, the lymph node lesions (GTVnd, and the total GTV before treatment were 72.46, 23.26, and 106.25 cm3, respectively; the EBV-DNA levels were significantly correlated with the GTVnd and the total GTV (P<0.01. The 2-year overall survival (OS rates in patients with positive and negative pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA were 100% and 98.4% (P=1.000, and the disease-free survival (DFS rates were 94.4% and 80.8% (P=0.044, respectively. These results indicate that high pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA levels in patients with locally advanced NPC are associated with the degree of lymph node metastasis, tumor burden, and poor prognosis.

  20. dnaK 操纵子研究进展%Advances in dnaK Operon Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴莹; 刘金凤; 牛雪薇(综述); 张志民(审校)

    2015-01-01

    dnaK operon contains grpE, dnaJ and hrcA etc in Gram-positive bacteria. Based on 16S rDNA sequence findings, Streptococcus, Lactococcus, Lactobacillus sake and mycobacteria have a close genetic relationship. This review summarizes the structure, function and possible mechanisms of dnaK operon.%dnaK操纵子在G+菌中包含grpE、dnaJ、hrcA等基因成员。基于16S rDNA序列的研究发现,链球菌、乳球菌、清酒乳杆菌、分支杆菌具有密切亲缘关系。本文就己发现的danK操纵子的基因及其结构、功能和可能的作用机制作一综述。

  1. Advances in the analysis of isothermal titration calorimetry data for ligand-DNA interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buurma, Niklaas J; Haq, Ihtshamul

    2007-06-01

    Isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) is a well established technique for the study of biological interactions. The strength of ITC is that it directly measures enthalpy changes associated with interactions. Experiments can also yield binding isotherms allowing quantification of equilibrium binding constants, hence an almost complete thermodynamic profile can be established. Principles and application of ITC have been well documented over recent years, experimentally the technique is simple to use and in ideal scenarios data analysis is trivial. However, ITC experiments can be designed such that previously inaccessible parameters can be evaluated. We outline some of these advances, including (1) exploiting different experimental conditions; (2) low affinity systems; (3) high affinity systems and displacement assays. In addition we ask the question: What if data cannot be fit using the fitting functions incorporated in the data-analysis software that came with your ITC? Examples where such data might be generated include systems following non 1:n binding patterns and systems where binding is coupled to other events such as ligand dissociation. Models dealing with such data are now appearing in literature and we summarise examples relevant for the study of ligand-DNA interactions.

  2. Recent advances in small organic molecules as DNA intercalating agents: synthesis, activity, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rescifina, Antonio; Zagni, Chiara; Varrica, Maria Giulia; Pistarà, Venerando; Corsaro, Antonino

    2014-03-03

    The interaction of small molecules with DNA plays an essential role in many biological processes. As DNA is often the target for majority of anticancer and antibiotic drugs, study about the interaction of drug and DNA has a key role in pharmacology. Moreover, understanding the interactions of small molecules with DNA is of prime significance in the rational design of more powerful and selective anticancer agents. Two of the most important and promising targets in cancer chemotherapy include DNA alkylating agents and DNA intercalators. For these last the DNA recognition is a critical step in their anti-tumor action and the intercalation is not only one kind of the interactions in DNA recognition but also a pivotal step of several clinically used anti-tumor drugs such as anthracyclines, acridines and anthraquinones. To push clinical cancer therapy, the discovery of new DNA intercalators has been considered a practical approach and a number of intercalators have been recently reported. The intercalative binding properties of such molecules can also be harnessed as diagnostic probes for DNA structure in addition to DNA-directed therapeutics. Moreover, the problem of intercalation site formation in the undistorted B-DNA of different length and sequence is matter of tremendous importance in molecular modeling studies and, nowadays, three models of DNA intercalation targets have been proposed that account for the binding features of intercalators. Finally, despite DNA being an important target for several drugs, most of the docking programs are validated only for proteins and their ligands. Therefore, a default protocol to identify DNA binding modes which uses a modified canonical DNA as receptor is needed.

  3. [Research advances on DNA extraction methods from peripheral blood mononuclear cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Ying; Yu, Chen-Xi

    2014-10-01

    DNA extraction is a basic technology of molecular biology. The purity and the integrality of DNA structure are necessary for different experiments of gene engineering. As commonly used materials in the clinical detection, the fast, efficient isolation and extraction of genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells is very important for the inspection and analysis of clinical blood. At present, there are many methods for extracting DNA, such as phenol-chloroform method, salting out method, centrifugal adsorption column chromatography method (artificial methods), magnetic beads (semi-automatic method) and DNA extraction kit. In this article, a brief review of the principle for existing DNA blood extraction method, the specific steps and the assessment of the specific methods briefly are summarized.

  4. [Recent advances in DNA vaccines against allergic airway disease: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jin; Xu, Yu; Shi, Wendan

    2013-12-01

    DNA vaccine is used in infectious diseases initially, and later is applied in neoplastic diseases, allergic diseases and other fields with the further understanding of DNA vaccine and the development of genetic engineering. DNA vaccine transfers the genes encoding exogenous antigens to plasmid vector and then is introduced into organism. It controls the antigen proteins synthesis, thus induces specific humoral and cellular immune responses. So it has a broad application prospect in allergic diseases. Compared with the traditional protein vaccines used in specific immunotherapy, DNA vaccine has many advantages, including high purity and specificity, and improvement of patients' compliance etc. However, there are still two unsolved problems. First, the transfection rate of unmodified naked DNA plasmid is not high, Second, it's difficult to induce ideal immune response. In this study, we will review the progress of DNA vaccine applications in respiratory allergic diseases and its various optimization strategies.

  5. Research advance of mitochondrial DNA%线粒体DNA研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王艳; 刘雅诚; 唐晖

    2002-01-01

    @@ 人类细胞内存在两套基因组,一套是细胞核内的基因组,即核DNA(nuclear DNA,nDNA);另一套是位于细胞质线粒体内的基因组,即线粒体DNA(mitochondrial DNA,mtDNA).由于线粒体在生命活动中的重要作用及其基因组自身特点,使得mtDNA在细胞遗传学、分子遗传学、发育遗传学和法庭科学等领域受到了广泛重视.

  6. An Advanced Model to Precisely Estimate the Cell-Free Fetal DNA Concentration in Maternal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huixin; Jiang, Haojun; Xie, Weiwei; Chen, Fang; Zeng, Peng; Li, Xuchao; Xie, Yifan; Liu, Hongtai; Huang, Guodong; Chen, Dayang; Liu, Ping; Jiang, Hui; Zhang, Xiuqing

    2016-01-01

    Background With the speedy development of sequencing technologies, noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) has been widely applied in clinical practice for testing for fetal aneuploidy. The cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) concentration in maternal plasma is the most critical parameter for this technology because it affects the accuracy of NIPT-based sequencing for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13. Several approaches have been developed to calculate the cffDNA fraction of the total cell-free DNA in the maternal plasma. However, most approaches depend on specific single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) allele information or are restricted to male fetuses. Methods In this study, we present an innovative method to accurately deduce the concentration of the cffDNA fraction using only maternal plasma DNA. SNPs were classified into four maternal-fetal genotype combinations and three boundaries were added to capture effective SNP loci in which the mother was homozygous and the fetus was heterozygous. The median value of the concentration of the fetal DNA fraction was estimated using the effective SNPs. A depth-bias correction was performed using simulated data and corresponding regression equations for adjustments when the depth of the sequencing data was below 100-fold or the cffDNA fraction is less than 10%. Results Using our approach, the median of the relative bias was 0.4% in 18 maternal plasma samples with a median sequencing depth of 125-fold. There was a significant association (r = 0.935) between our estimations and the estimations inferred from the Y chromosome. Furthermore, this approach could precisely estimate a cffDNA fraction as low as 3%, using only maternal plasma DNA at the targeted region with a sequencing depth of 65-fold. We also used PCR instead of parallel sequencing to calculate the cffDNA fraction. There was a significant association (r = 98.2%) between our estimations and those inferred from the Y chromosome. PMID:27662469

  7. Common genomic signaling among initial DNA damage and radiation-induced apoptosis in peripheral blood lymphocytes from locally advanced breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henríquez-Hernández, Luis Alberto; Pinar, Beatriz; Carmona-Vigo, Ruth

    2013-01-01

    suffering from locally advanced breast cancer and treated with high-dose hyperfractionated radiotherapy were recruited. Initial DNA damage was measured by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and radiation-induced apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry. Gene expression was assessed by DNA microarray. RESULTS...

  8. SERS as an advanced tool for investigating chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives complexation with DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Shweta; Ray, Bhumika; Mehrotra, Ranjana

    2015-11-01

    We report surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic (SERS) studies on free calf thymus DNA and its complexes with anti-tumor chloroethyl nitrosourea derivatives; semustine and nimustine. Since, first incident of SERS in 1974, it has rapidly established into an analytical tool, which can be used for the trace detection and characterization of analytes. Here, we depict yet another application of SERS in the field of drug-DNA interaction and thereby, its promising role in rational designing of new chemotherapeutic agents. Vibrational spectral analysis has been performed in an attempt to delineate the anti-cancer action mechanism of above mentioned nitrosourea derivatives. Strong SERS bands associated with the complexation of DNA with semustine and nimustine have been observed, which reveal binding of nitrosourea derivatives with heterocyclic nitrogenous base pair of DNA duplex. Formation of dG-dC interstrand cross-link in DNA double helices is also suggested by the SERS spectral outcomes of CENUs-DNA adduct. Results, demonstrated here, reflect recent progress in the newly developing field of drug-DNA interaction analysis via SERS.

  9. Advances in Human Mitochondrial Diseases Molecular Genetic Analysis of Pathogenic mtDNA Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, E; King, M P

    1997-01-01

    The mitochondrial diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders that have been defined by specific morphological alterations in muscle and by deficits of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. The morphological hallmarks of these diseases include ragged-red fibers (an extensive proliferation of mitochondria in muscle fibers) and abnormal paracrystalline inclusions and membrane structures in mitochondria. The identification of pathogenic mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) has resulted in a genetic classification of mitochondrial diseases. Investigations are being conducted to understand the molecular basis for the biochemical and morphological alterations of mitochondria associated with mtDNA mutations. © 1997, Elsevier Science Inc. (Trends Cardiovasc Med 1997;7:16-24).

  10. Bacterial DNA induces the complement system activation in serum and ascitic fluid from patients with advanced cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francés, Rubén; González-Navajas, José M; Zapater, Pedro; Muñoz, Carlos; Caño, Rocío; Pascual, Sonia; Márquez, Dorkas; Santana, Francia; Pérez-Mateo, Miguel; Such, José

    2007-07-01

    Translocation of intestinal bacteria to ascitic fluid is, probably, the first step in the development of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis in patients with cirrhosis. Proteins of the complement system are soluble mediators implicated in the host immune response to bacterial infections and its activation has been traditionally considered to be an endotoxin-induced phenomenon. The aim of this study was to compare the modulation of these proteins in response to the presence of bacterial DNA and/or endotoxin in patients with advanced cirrhosis and ascites in different clinical conditions. Groups I and II consisted of patients without/with bacterial DNA. Group III included patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and Group IV with patients receiving norfloxacin as secondary long-term prophylaxis of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. Serum and ascitic fluid levels of endotoxin and truncated residues of the complement system were measured by ELISA. The complement system is triggered in response to bacterial DNA, as evidenced by significantly increased levels of C3b, membrane attack complex, and C5a in patients from Groups II and III compared with patients without bacterial DNA (Group I) and those receiving norfloxacin (Group IV). Gram classification did not further differentiate the immune response between patients within groups II and III, even though endotoxin levels were, as expected, significantly higher in patients with bacterial DNA from gram-negative microorganisms. The complement protein activation observed in patients with bacterial DNA in blood and ascitic fluid is indistinguishable from that observed in patients with spontaneous bacterial peritonitis and may occur in an endotoxin-independent manner.

  11. DNA and RNA sensor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; Tao; LIN; Lin; ZHAO; Hong; JIANG; Long

    2005-01-01

    This review summarizes recent advances in DNA sensor. Major areas of DNA sensor covered in this review include immobilization methods of DNA, general techniques of DNA detection and application of nanoparticles in DNA sensor.

  12. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nicholas D., E-mail: nweber@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aubert, Martine, E-mail: maubert@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Dang, Chung H., E-mail: cdang@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Stone, Daniel, E-mail: dstone2@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Jerome, Keith R., E-mail: kjerome@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  13. Advances in host and vector development for the production of plasmid DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mairhofer, Juergen; Lara, Alvaro R

    2014-01-01

    Recent developments in DNA vaccine research provide a new momentum for this rather young and potentially disruptive technology. Gene-based vaccines are capable of eliciting protective immunity in humans to persistent intracellular pathogens, such as HIV, malaria, and tuberculosis, for which the conventional vaccine technologies have failed so far. The recent identification and characterization of genes coding for tumor antigens has stimulated the development of DNA-based antigen-specific cancer vaccines. Although most academic researchers consider the production of reasonable amounts of plasmid DNA (pDNA) for immunological studies relatively easy to solve, problems often arise during this first phase of production. In this chapter we review the current state of the art of pDNA production at small (shake flasks) and mid-scales (lab-scale bioreactor fermentations) and address new trends in vector design and strain engineering. We will guide the reader through the different stages of process design starting from choosing the most appropriate plasmid backbone, choosing the right Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain for production, and cultivation media and scale-up issues. In addition, we will address some points concerning the safety and potency of the produced plasmids, with special focus on producing antibiotic resistance-free plasmids. The main goal of this chapter is to make immunologists aware of the fact that production of the pDNA vaccine has to be performed with as much as attention and care as the rest of their research.

  14. Advance in Researches on DNA Barcoding%植物DNA条形码研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    鲁松

    2012-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a new life identification system which can distinguish species rapidly and accurately by analyzing standard short and easy amplying DNA sequences with enough variation.In order to promote the development of domestic studies in plant DNA barcoding and taxonomy,this paper deals with DNA barcoding screening,application,present studying status in China,challenges and future prospects for plant DNA barcoding development.%DNA条形码技术是利用标准的、具有足够变异的、易扩增且相对较短的DNA片段在物种内的特异性和种间的多样性而创建的一种新的生物身份识别系统,从而实现对物种的快速自动鉴定。本文从植物DNA条形码的开发、应用、国内研究现状、植物DNA条形码面临的挑战以及发展前景等进行了综合分析,以期推动我国植物DNA条形码和分类学研究的发展。

  15. Advances and challenges in the development of therapeutic DNA vaccines against hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cova, Lucyna

    2014-01-01

    Despite the existence of an effective prophylactic vaccine, chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major public health problem. Because very weak and functionally impaired virus-specific immune responses play a key role in the persistence of HBV infection, the stimulation of these responses appears to be of particular importance for virus clearance. In this regard DNA-based vaccination has emerged as novel, promising therapeutic approach for chronic hepatitis B. This review provides an update of preclinical studies in animal models (mouse, chimpanzee, duck, woodchuck), which evaluated the ability of DNA vaccines targeting hepadnaviral proteins to induce potent and sustained immune responses in naïve animals and to enhance virus clearance and break immune tolerance in chronic virus-carriers. Different strategies have been developed and evaluated in these models to optimize DNA vaccine including genetic adjuvants, combination with antiviral drugs, prime-boost regimens and plasmid delivery. The delivery of DNA by in vivo electroporation appears to be of particular interest for increase of vaccine potency in both small and large animal models. Based on the promising results generated in preclinical studies, first clinical trials of DNA vaccines have been initiated, although effective therapy of chronic hepatitis B awaits further improvements in vaccine efficacy.

  16. Recent Advances in the Synthesis and Functions of Reconfigurable Interlocked DNA Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chun-Hua; Cecconello, Alessandro; Willner, Itamar

    2016-04-27

    Interlocked circular DNA nanostructures, e.g., catenanes or rotaxanes, provide functional materials within the area of DNA nanotechnology. Specifically, the triggered reversible reconfiguration of the catenane or rotaxane structures provides a means to yield new DNA switches and to use them as dynamic scaffolds for controlling chemical functions and positioning functional cargoes. The synthesis of two-ring catenanes and their switchable reconfiguration by pH, metal ions, or fuel/anti-fuel stimuli are presented, and the functions of these systems, as pendulum or rotor devices or as switchable catalysts, are described. Also, the synthesis of three-, five-, and seven-ring catenanes is presented, and their switchable reconfiguration using fuel/anti-fuel strands is addressed. Implementation of the dynamically reconfigured catenane structures for the programmed organization of Au nanoparticle (NP) assemblies, which allows the plasmonic control of the fluorescence properties of Au NP/fluorophore loads associated with the scaffold, and for the operation of logic gates is discussed. Interlocked DNA rotaxanes and their different synthetic approaches are presented, and their switchable reconfiguration by means of fuel/anti-fuel strands or photonic stimuli is described. Specifically, the use of the rotaxane as a scaffold to organize Au NP assemblies, and the control of the fluorescence properties with Au NP/fluorophore hybrids loaded on the rotaxane scaffold, are introduced. The future prospectives and challenges in the field of interlocked DNA nanostructures and the possible applications are discussed.

  17. Recent advances in ancient DNA research and their implications for archaeobotany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Terence A.; Cappellini, Enrico; Kistler, Logan

    2015-01-01

    The scope and ambition of biomolecular archaeology is undergoing rapid change due to the development of new ‘next generation’ sequencing (NGS) methods for analysis of ancient DNA in archaeological specimens. These methods have not yet been applied extensively to archaeobotanical material...... but their utility has been demonstrated with desiccated, waterlogged and charred remains. The future use of NGS is likely to open up new areas of investigation that have been difficult or impossible with the traditional approach to aDNA sequencing. Species identification should become more routine...

  18. DNA Advanced Glycation End Products (DNA-AGEs) Are Elevated in Urine and Tissue in an Animal Model of Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Richard; Shuck, Sarah C; Chan, Yin S; Liu, Xueli; Bates, Steven E; Lim, Punnajit P; Tamae, Daniel; Lacoste, Sandrine; O'Connor, Timothy R; Termini, John

    2017-02-20

    More precise identification and treatment monitoring of prediabetic/diabetic individuals will require additional biomarkers to complement existing diagnostic tests. Candidates include hyperglycemia-induced adducts such as advanced glycation end products (AGEs) of proteins, lipids, and DNA. The potential for DNA-AGEs as diabetic biomarkers was examined in a longitudinal study using the Lepr(db/db) animal model of metabolic syndrome. The DNA-AGE, N(2)-(1-carboxyethyl)-2'-deoxyguanosine (CEdG) was quantified by mass spectrometry using isotope dilution from the urine and tissue of hyperglycemic and normoglycemic mice. Hyperglycemic mice (fasting plasma glucose, FPG, ≥ 200 mg/dL) displayed a higher median urinary CEdG value (238.4 ± 112.8 pmol/24 h) than normoglycemic mice (16.1 ± 11.8 pmol/24 h). Logistic regression analysis revealed urinary CEdG to be an independent predictor of hyperglycemia. Urinary CEdG was positively correlated with FPG in hyperglycemic animals and with HbA1c for all mice. Average tissue-derived CEdG was also higher in hyperglycemic mice (18.4 CEdG/10(6) dG) than normoglycemic mice (4.4 CEdG/10(6) dG). Urinary CEdG was significantly elevated in Lepr(db/db) mice relative to Lepr(wt/wt), and tissue CEdG values increased in the order Lepr(wt/wt) < Lepr(wt/db) < Lepr(db/db). These data suggest that urinary CEdG measurement may provide a noninvasive quantitative index of glycemic status and augment existing biomarkers for the diagnosis and monitoring of diabetes.

  19. Research Advances in DNA Methylation of Plant%植物DNA甲基化研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张莉; 贾峰; 张广乐; 曾磊; 伊艳杰; 王金水

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] To review the research advances in DNA methylation of plants. [Method] The DNA methyltransferase and siRNA-guided DNA methylation process was reviewed and the relation between DNA methylation and other epigenetic modification was expounded. [ Result] DNA methylation played an important role in the epigenetic control system, it maintained the stability of genome and epigenetic modification in organic evolution process. siRNA played an irreplaceable role in RNA-mediated DNA methylation process, but the role of RdDM and methylation in gene regulation still needed further research. [ Conclusion ] The study gave a comprehensive summary of DNA methylation and its role in plant growth and response to adverse stress, which could enhance or inhibit epigenetic and endogenous gene silencing at the transcript level, so as to better improve the important transgenic crops.%[目的]概述植物DNA甲基化的研究进展.[方法]综述了植物DNA甲基转移酶、siRNA指导的DNA甲基化过程,阐明了DNA甲基化与其他表现遗传修饰的关系.[结果]DNA甲基化在表观遗传控制体系中起着重要作用,维持着生物进化过程中基因组和表观遗传的稳定性.RNA介导的DNA甲基化作用中,siRNA起着不可替代的作用,但RdDM和甲基化在基因调控中的作用需要更进一步研究.[结论]全面了解DNA甲基化及其在植物发育和逆境胁迫应答中的作用,可以在转录水平上增强或抑制外源基因和内源基因沉默,便于制定更合理的改良重要转基因作物的策略.

  20. Recent advances in design of immunogenic and effective naked DNA vaccines against cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fioretti, Daniela; Iurescia, Sandra; Rinaldi, Monica

    2014-01-01

    A variety of clinical trials for vaccines against cancer have provided evidence that DNA vaccines are well tolerated and have an excellent safety profile. DNA vaccines require much improvement to make them sufficiently effective against cancer in the clinic. Nowadays, it is clear that an increased antigen expression correlates with improved immunogenicity and it is critical to vaccine performance in large animals and humans. Similarly, additional strategies are required to activate effective immunity against poorly immunogenic tumour antigens. This review discusses very recent scientific references focused on the development of sophisticated DNA vaccines against cancer. We report a selection of novel and relevant patents employed to improve their immunogenicity through several strategies such as the use of tissue-specific transcriptional elements, nuclear localisation signalling, codon-optimisation and by targeting antigenic proteins to secretory pathway. Recent patents validating portions or splice variants of tumour antigens as candidates for cancer DNA vaccines with improved specificity, such as mesothelin and hTERT, are also discussed. Lastly, we review novel patents on the use of genetic immunomodulators, such as "universal" T helper epitopes derived from tetanus toxin, E. coli heat labile enterotoxin and vegetable proteins, as well as cytokines, chemokines or costimulatory molecules such as IL-6, IL-15, IL- 21 to amplify immunity against cancer.

  1. Dispersion of carbon nanotubes by single-stranded DNA wrapping for advanced biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, S; Biris, A R; Lupu, D M; Misan, I [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath, 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Clichici, S; Mocan, T [University of Medicine and Pharmacy ' Iuliu Hatieganu' , Department of Physiology, 1-3 Clinicilor, 400006 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Biris, A S, E-mail: stefania.simon@itim-cj.r [UARL Nanotechnologi Center, University of Arkansas, 2801 S University Ave, Little Rock, AR 72204 (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are novel materials with unique electrical, thermal, and structural proprieties, which make them attractive for applications in composites, medicine, biology, electronics, and energy management. There are more and more attempts to use CNT, especially single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT), in various biomedical applications, which require highly purified samples, with no contents of catalyst residual metal particles, good dispersion in an aqueous solution at relatively high concentrations. This report presents all these three main requirements as proved by Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis-NIR spectroscopy and thermogravimetrical analysis. The maximum achieved concentration of SWNTs dispersed in water when wrapped with single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) was of 400 mg/l.

  2. Usefulness of circulating free DNA for monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in advanced non-small cell lung cancer patients: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cao, Maria; Ramirez, Santiago Viteri; Ariza, Nuria Jordana; Balada, Ariadna; Garzón, Mónica; Teixidó, Cristina; Karachaliou, Niki; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Molina-Vila, Miguel Ángel; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analysis of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) released from cancer cells into the bloodstream has been proposed as a useful method to capture dynamic changes during the course of the disease. In particular, the ability to monitor epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation status in cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) isolated from advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients EGFR can help to the correct management of the disease and overcome the challenges associated with tumor heterogeneity and insufficient biopsied material to perform key molecular diagnosis. Here, we report a case of long term monitorization of EGFR mutation status in cfDNA from peripheral blood in an NSCLC patient in, with excellent correlation with clinical evolution. PMID:27826535

  3. Advanced DNA- and Protein-based Methods for the Detection and Investigation of Food Allergens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, M; Ortea, I; Vial, S; Rivas, J; Calo-Mata, P; Barros-Velázquez, J

    2016-11-17

    Currently, food allergies are an important health concern worldwide. The presence of undeclared allergenic ingredients or the presence of traces of allergens due to contamination during food processing poses a great health risk to sensitized individuals. Therefore, reliable analytical methods are required to detect and identify allergenic ingredients in food products. The present review addresses the recent developments regarding the application of DNA- and protein-based methods for the detection of allergenic ingredients in foods. The fitness-for-purpose of reviewed methodology will be discussed, and future trends will be highlighted. Special attention will be given to the evaluation of the potential of newly developed and promising technologies that can improve the detection and identification of allergenic ingredients in foods, such as the use of biosensors and/or nanomaterials to improve detection limits, specificity, ease of use, or to reduce the time of analysis. Such rapid food allergen test methods are required to facilitate the reliable detection of allergenic ingredients by control laboratories, to give the food industry the means to easily determine whether its product has been subjected to cross-contamination and, simultaneously, to identify how and when this cross-contamination occurred.

  4. DNA nanostructure meets nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guomei; Surwade, Sumedh P; Zhou, Feng; Liu, Haitao

    2013-04-07

    Recent advances in DNA nanotechnology have made it possible to construct DNA nanostructures of almost arbitrary shapes with 2-3 nm of precision in their dimensions. These DNA nanostructures are ideal templates for bottom-up nanofabrication. This review highlights the challenges and recent advances in three areas that are directly related to DNA-based nanofabrication: (1) fabrication of large scale DNA nanostructures; (2) pattern transfer from DNA nanostructure to an inorganic substrate; and (3) directed assembly of DNA nanostructures.

  5. The correlation between cell-free DNA and tumour burden was estimated by PET/CT in patients with advanced NSCLC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, A D; Holdgaard, Paw; Spindler, K-L G;

    2014-01-01

    -FDG) PET/computed tomography (CT) scan was performed and evaluated in terms of metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). Tumour contours were delineated semi-automatically by a threshold standardised uptake value (SUV) of 2.5. The primary end point was correlation among cfDNA, MTV...... and TLG. The secondary end point was overall survival (OS) according to cfDNA, MTV and TLG.Results:Fifty-three patients were included. There were no correlations between cfDNA and MTV (r=0.1) or TLG (r=0.1). cfDNA >75th percentile was correlated with shorter OS (P=0.02), confirmed in a multivariate...... burden defined by positron emission tomography (PET) parameters.Methods:Patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) were enrolled into a prospective biomarker trial. Before treatment, plasma was extracted and the level of cfDNA was determined by qPCR. An (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F...

  6. BRAF Mutation Testing in Cell-Free DNA from the Plasma of Patients with Advanced Cancers Using a Rapid, Automated Molecular Diagnostics System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janku, Filip; Huang, Helen J; Claes, Bart; Falchook, Gerald S; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Ramzanali, Nishma M; Nitti, Giovanni; Cabrilo, Goran; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Naing, Aung; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Wheler, Jennifer J; Karp, Daniel D; Holley, Veronica R; Zinner, Ralph G; Subbiah, Vivek; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Kopetz, Scott; Overman, Michael J; Kee, Bryan K; Patel, Sapna; Devogelaere, Benoit; Sablon, Erwin; Maertens, Geert; Mills, Gordon B; Kurzrock, Razelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2016-06-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA from plasma offers an easily obtainable material for BRAF mutation analysis for diagnostics and response monitoring. In this study, plasma-derived cfDNA samples from patients with progressing advanced cancers or malignant histiocytosis with known BRAF(V600) status from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors were tested using a prototype version of the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test, a fully integrated real-time PCR-based test with turnaround time about 90 minutes. Of 160 patients, BRAF(V600) mutations were detected in 62 (39%) archival FFPE tumor samples and 47 (29%) plasma cfDNA samples. The two methods had overall agreement in 141 patients [88%; κ, 0.74; SE, 0.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.63-0.85]. Idylla had a sensitivity of 73% (95% CI, 0.60-0.83) and specificity of 98% (95% CI, 0.93-1.00). A higher percentage, but not concentration, of BRAF(V600) cfDNA in the wild-type background (>2% vs. ≤ 2%) was associated with shorter overall survival (OS; P = 0.005) and in patients with BRAF mutations in the tissue, who were receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors, shorter time to treatment failure (TTF; P = 0.001). Longitudinal monitoring demonstrated that decreasing levels of BRAF(V600) cfDNA were associated with longer TTF (P = 0.045). In conclusion, testing for BRAF(V600) mutations in plasma cfDNA using the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test has acceptable concordance with standard testing of tumor tissue. A higher percentage of mutant BRAF(V600) in cfDNA corresponded with shorter OS and in patients receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors also with shorter TTF. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1397-404. ©2016 AACR.

  7. Prognostic Value of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus DNA for Local and Regionally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Treated With Cisplatin-Based Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy in Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Hui; Tang, Lin-Quan; Guo, Shan-Shan; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Zhang, Lu; Liu, Li-Ting; Qian, Chao-Nan; Guo, Xiang; Xie, Dan; Zeng, Mu-Sheng; Mai, Hai-Qiang

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the prognostic value of plasma Epstein-Barr Virus DNA (EBV DNA) for local and regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy in intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) era.In this observational study, 404 nonmetastatic local and regionally advanced NPC patients treated with IMRT and cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy were recruited. Blood samples were collected before treatment for examination of plasma EBV DNA levels. We evaluated the association of pretreatment plasma EBV DNA levels with progression-free survival rate (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival rate (DMFS), and overall survival rate (OS).Compared to patients with an EBV DNA level EBV DNA ≥ 4000  copies/mL had a lower rate of 3-year PFS (76%, 95% CI [68-84]) versus (93%, 95% CI [90-96], P EBV DNA levels (HR = 3.324, 95% CI, 1.80-6.138, P EBV DNA level was the only significant factor to predict DMFS (HR = 6.292, 95% CI, 2.647-14.956, P EBV DNA levels (HR = 3.753, 95% CI, 1.701-8.284, P EBV DNA levels still predicted a worse PFS, DMFS, and OS for the patients stage III or stage IVa-b, compared with those with low EBV DNA levels.Elevated plasma EBV DNA was still effective prognostic biomarker for local and regionally advanced NPC patients treated with IMRT and cisplatin-based concurrent chemotherapy. Future ramdomized clinical trials are needed to further evaluate whether plasma EBV DNA levels could be applied to guide concurrent chemotherapy regimen for local and regionally advanced NPC patients.

  8. Experimental and molecular docking studies on DNA binding interaction of adefovir dipivoxil: Advances toward treatment of hepatitis B virus infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahabadi, Nahid; Falsafi, Monireh

    The toxic interaction of adefovir dipivoxil with calf thymus DNA (CT-DNA) was investigated in vitro under simulated physiological conditions by multi-spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling study. The fluorescence spectroscopy and UV absorption spectroscopy indicated drug interacted with CT-DNA in a groove binding mode. The binding constant of UV-visible and the number of binding sites were 3.33 ± 0.2 × 104 L mol-1and 0.99, respectively. The fluorimetric studies showed that the reaction between the drug and CT-DNA is exothermic (ΔH = 34.4 kJ mol-1; ΔS = 184.32 J mol-1 K-1). Circular dichroism spectroscopy (CD) was employed to measure the conformational change of CT-DNA in the presence of adefovir dipivoxil, which verified the groove binding mode. Furthermore, the drug induces detectable changes in its viscosity. The molecular modeling results illustrated that adefovir strongly binds to groove of DNA by relative binding energy of docked structure -16.83 kJ mol-1. This combination of multiple spectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling methods can be widely used in the investigation on the toxic interaction of small molecular pollutants and drugs with bio macromolecules, which contributes to clarify the molecular mechanism of toxicity or side effect in vivo.

  9. Comparison of three methods for detecting epidermal growth factor receptor mutations in plasma DNA samples of Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Ling; ZHONG Wei; ZHANG Li; LI Long-yun; WANG Meng-zhao

    2011-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations can predict tumor response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). Detecting EGFR mutations in plasma DNA samples in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer is challenging and promising. We compared three methods for detecting plasma EGFR mutations, including direct DNA sequencing, denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) and Scorpions Amplification Refractory Mutation System (Scorpions ARMS).Methods Plasma DNA samples from 73 patients with stage ⅢB to Ⅳ adenocarcinoma were analyzed for EGFR mutations in exons 19 (deletion mutation) and 21(L858R mutation) using direct DNA sequencing, DHPLC and Scorpions ARMS. Sensitivities of the three methods were compared and the relationship between EGFR mutations and patients'survival was analyzed.Results In 73 patients, we detected EGFR mutations in 5 samples (6.9%) by direct DNA sequencing, in 22 samples (30.1%) by DHPLC, and in 28 samples (38.4%) by Scorpions ARMS. EGFR mutations were found in 13 samples in exon 19 and in 9 samples in exon 21 by DHPLC, while we found mutations in 15 samples in exon 19 and in 13 samples in exon 21 by Scorpions ARMS. Among the 73 patients, there was 90.4% concordance between DHPLC and Scorpions ARMS (66/73, K=0.79, P=0.07). Of the 73 patients, 46 patients were treated with gefitinib, including 18 patients with mutations and 28 patients without mutations as determined by Scorpions ARMS. The 18 patients with mutations had a significantly longer progression-free survival (PFS) time (median PFS was 21.0 months) than the 28 patients without mutations (median PFS was 7.0 months) (P=0.022).Conclusions Among the three methods for detecting EGFR mutations in plasma DNA samples of patients with advanced lung adenocarcinoma, direct gene sequencing had the lowest sensitivity, while Scorpion ARMS showed the highest mutation detecting capability. DHPLC is slightly less sensitive than Scorpion ARMS. EGFR

  10. Advances in the research of adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines%DNA疫苗佐剂的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋丽明; 叶琳

    2009-01-01

    DNA疫苗是一种很有希望的免疫方法,经多途径接种质粒DNA能引起有效的免疫应答,重复给予不会产生抗载体免疫.然而,质粒DNA疫苗在小型实验动物中诱导的免疫应答远强于在人类和其他非人灵长类动物中.已设计多种佐剂通过直接刺激免疫系统或增强DNA表达来提高疫苗的免疫原性,这些佐剂包括免疫协同刺激分子、细胞因子、补体分子、脂质体、核酸、聚合物、纳米粒和微粒类佐剂.此文对DNA疫苗佐剂的研究进展作一综述.%Plasmid DNA vaccine is a promising modality for immunization. Immunization with plasmid DNA by various routes can trigger effective iimnune responses. The immunogens can be administered repeatedly without inducing anti-vector immunity. However, the immune responses induced by plasmid DNA vaccines are much stronger in small laboratory animal models than in non-human primates and humans. A number of adjuvants, including immune co-stimulatory molecules, cytokines, complement molecules, liposomes, nucleic acids, polymers, micro-and nano-particles, have been designed to improve the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines by directly stimulating the immune system or by enhancing plasmid DNA expression. This review introduces the progress in development of these adjuvants for plasmid DNA vaccines.

  11. Advances in recombinant DNA technology : corifollitropin alfa, a hybrid molecule with sustained follicle-stimulating activity and reduced injection frequency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fauser, B. C. J. M.; Mannaerts, B. M. J. L.; Devroey, P.; Leader, A.; Boime, I.; Baird, D. T.

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant DNA technologies have been used to develop longer-acting therapeutic proteins. One approach is to introduce sequences containing additional glycosylation sites. Using this technique, a new chimeric gene has been developed containing the coding sequences of the FSH beta-subunit and the C-

  12. Advances on the damage factors of sperm DNA%精子DNA损伤因素研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    葛少钦; 赵峥辉; 殷会莹; 梁群; 王川川; 丁高朋; 许振国

    2014-01-01

    人类精子DNA损伤是男性生育力减退的重要原因之一,其可由多种因素诱发精子DNA链断裂或使其双链变性为单链等而形成。具有DNA损伤的精子可在一定程度上逃避体内精子的优化选择机制而将遗传缺陷传递给后代,精子DNA损伤可导致胚胎发育异常、早期流产和先天畸形等相关疾病。文章通过分析评价年龄、禁欲时间、环境、精子冷冻、氧化应激、微量元素以及染色质包装异常等因素对精子DNA损伤,阐述精子DNA损伤的研究现状,为进一步阐明精子DNA损伤的发生机制以及男性不育的预防、治疗和辅助生殖技术选用高质量精子提供基础材料。%Human sperm DNA damage is one of the common causes of reducing male reproductive capacity. A number of factors can bring out the DNA strand breaks or make double-stranded DNA into single-stranded DNA. To a certain extent, some sperm with damaged DNA may escape from the sperm surveillance mechanism and transmit the damage to the offspring, which may give rise to the associated diseases such as abnormal embryonic development, early natural abortion, congenital anomalies and so on. This review assessses the damage factors of sperm DNA, which include ages, time of celibation, environment, freezing of sperm, oxidative stresse, minor element and the abnormal assembling of chromatin, which provides some basic information for elucidating the mechanism of DNA damage, prevention and treatment of male infertility as well as optimal spermatozoa selection in assisted reproductive technique.

  13. Increased Levels of Plasma Epstein Barr Virus DNA Identify a Poor-Risk Subset of Patients With Advanced Stage Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Gru, Alejandro A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Bingman, Anissa K.; Hemminger, Jessica A.; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Discovering prognostic factors that simultaneously describe tumor characteristics and improve risk stratification is a priority in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). More than a third of advanced stage CTCL patients in this cohort had detectable cell free plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-DNA (pEBVd) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. An increased level of pEBVd was highly concordant with EBV (ie, Epstein–Barr virus RNAs) in tumor tissue and was associated with inferior survival. Introduction Outcomes in advanced stage (AS) cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are poor but with great variability. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Frequency of plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) detection, concordance with EBV RNA (EBER) in tumor tissue, codetection of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA (pCMVd), and prognostic effect in AS CTCL are unknown. Patients and Methods Patients (n = 46; 2006–2013) with AS CTCL (≥IIB) were retrospectively studied. pEBVd and pCMVd were longitudinally measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on tumor samples. Survival from time of diagnosis (ToD) and time of progression to AS was assessed. Results Plasma EBV-DNA and pCMVd were detected in 37% (17 of 46) and 17% (8 of 46) of AS CTCL patients, respectively. pCMVd detection was significantly more frequent in pEBVd-positive (pEBVd+) than pEBVd− patients (35% vs. 7%; P = .038). Tumor tissue for EBER-ISH was available in 14 of 17 pEBVd+ and 22 of 29 pEBVd− patients; 12 of 14 (85.7%) pEBVd+ patients were EBER+ versus 0 of 22 pEBVd− patients. Frequency of large cell transformation (LCT) tended to be greater in pEBVd+ patients, but was not significant (10 of 14 pEBVd+ vs. 10 of 23 pEBVd−; P = .17). No notable differences in rates of increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were observed (17 of 17 pEBVd+ vs. 27 of 29 pEBVd−). pEBVd detection was associated with

  14. Monitoring of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor-sensitizing and resistance mutations in the plasma DNA of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer during treatment with erlotinib

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, Boe S; Wu, Lin; Wei, Wen;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The feasibility of monitoring epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations in plasma DNA from patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) during treatment with erlotinib and its relation to disease progression was investigated. METHODS: The amount of EGFR-mutant DNA...... was tested in plasma DNA from patients with advanced NSCLC with allele-specific polymerase chain reaction assays. Blood samples from 23 patients with adenocarcinoma of NSCLC that carried tyrosine kinase inhibitor-sensitizing EGFR mutations were taken immediately before treatment with erlotinib. Additional...... blood samples were taken at timed intervals until erlotinib treatment was withdrawn. RESULTS: The amount of plasma DNA with sensitizing EGFR mutations was found to be reduced after the first cycle of erlotinib treatment in 22 of 23 patients (96%). No patients presented with the resistant T790M mutation...

  15. Advances on DNA barcoding in fungi%真菌DNA条形码技术研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周均亮; 赵瑞琳

    2013-01-01

    DNA条形码(DNA barcoding)技术作为一门新兴的物种鉴定方法以其灵敏、精确、方便和客观的优势,在动植物和微生物的分类鉴定中已经得到广泛应用.真菌鉴定中常用作标准条形码的是核核糖体DNA内转录间隔区(Internal transcribed spacer,ITS),如今也有一些新型条形码被发现和应用到实际操作中,如微条形码、ND6、EF3.本文对DNA条形码技术的产生和发展做出了总结,通过研究其在真菌中应用的实际案例分析了DNA条形码技术的优缺点及发展趋势,并指出DNA条形码技术将以全新的视角来弥补传统分类学的不足,最终实现生物自身的序列变异信息与现有形态分类学的结合.%As an emerging organism identification method,DNA barcoding has been widely used in plants,animals and microorganisms for its advantage of higher sensitivity,accuracy,and objectivity.Even the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS) is used as a standard barcode in fungal identification frequently,nowadays,there are more and more newbarcodes,such as the microcoding,ND6 and EF3.In this article we summarized the generation and developing history of DNA barcoding,also we present the advantage,shortcomings and the development trend based on fungal barcoding case studies.We indicated that DNA barcoding technique will be a good supplementary to the traditional morphology-based taxonomy,and towards a combination of natural evolutional relationships and morphological taxonomy in fungi.

  16. Missense mutations in the TP53 DNA-binding domain predict outcomes in patients with advanced oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapke, Nina; Lu, Yen-Jung; Liao, Chun-Ta; Lee, Li-Yu; Lin, Chien-Yu; Wang, Hung-Ming; Ng, Shu-Hang; Chen, Shu-Jen; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2016-07-12

    TP53 mutations have been linked to reduced survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). However, the impact of different types of TP53 mutations remains unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the carriage of missense mutations in the TP53 DNA binding domain (DBD missense mutations) is associated with decreased disease-specific survival (DSS) compared with wild-type TP53 (P=0.002) in a cohort of 345 OSCC patients. In contrast, DSS of patients bearing all of the remaining TP53 mutations did not differ from that observed in wild-type TP53 patients (P=0.955). Our classification method for TP53 mutations was superior to previously reported approaches (disruptive, truncating, Evolutionary Action score, mutations in L2/L3/LSH) for distinguishing between low- and high-risk patients. When analyzed in combination with traditional clinicopathological factors, TP53 DBD missense mutations were an independent prognostic factor for shorter DSS (P=0.014) alongside with advanced AJCC T- and N-classifications and the presence of extracapsular spread. A scoring system that included the four independent prognostic factors allowed a reliable patient stratification into distinct risk groups (high-risk patients, 16.2%). Our results demonstrate the usefulness of TP53 DBD missense mutations combined with clinicopathological factors for improving the prognostic stratification of OSCC patients.

  17. DNA aptamer raised against advanced glycation end products (AGEs) improves glycemic control and decreases adipocyte size in fructose-fed rats by suppressing AGE-RAGE axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, A; Matsui, T; Nakamura, N; Higashimoto, Y; Ueda, S; Fukami, K; Okuda, S; Yamagishi, S

    2015-04-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) decrease adiponectin expression and suppress insulin signaling in cultured adipocytes through the interaction with a receptor for AGEs (RAGE) via oxidative stress generation. We have recently found that high-affinity DNA aptamer directed against AGE (AGE-aptamer) prevents the progression of experimental diabetic nephropathy by blocking the harmful actions of AGEs in the kidney. This study examined the effects of AGE-aptamer on adipocyte remodeling, AGE-RAGE-oxidative stress axis, and adiponectin expression in fructose-fed rats. Although AGE-aptamer treatment by an osmotic mini pump for 8 weeks did not affect serum insulin levels, it significantly decreased average fasting blood glucose and had a tendency to inhibit body weight gain in fructose-fed rats. Furthermore, AGE-aptamer significantly suppressed the increase in adipocyte size and prevented the elevation in AGEs, RAGE, and an oxidative stress marker, 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), levels in adipose tissues of fructose-fed rats at 14-week-old, while it restored the decrease in adiponectin mRNA levels. Our present study suggests that AGE-aptamer could improve glycemic control and prevent adipocyte remodeling in fructose-fed rats partly by suppressing the AGE-RAGE-mediated oxidative stress generation. AGE-aptamer might be a novel therapeutic strategy for fructose-induced metabolic derangements.

  18. DNA repair protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergbæk, Lotte

    In its 3rd edition, this Methods in Molecular Biology(TM) book covers the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including advanced protocols and standard techniques in the field of DNA repair. Offers expert guidance for DNA repair, recombination, and replication. Current knowledge of the mechanisms...... that regulate DNA repair has grown significantly over the past years with technology advances such as RNA interference, advanced proteomics and microscopy as well as high throughput screens. The third edition of DNA Repair Protocols covers various aspects of the eukaryotic response to genomic insult including...... recent advanced protocols as well as standard techniques used in the field of DNA repair. Both mammalian and non-mammalian model organisms are covered in the book, and many of the techniques can be applied with only minor modifications to other systems than the one described. Written in the highly...

  19. ex vivo DNA assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam B Fisher

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Even with decreasing DNA synthesis costs there remains a need for inexpensive, rapid and reliable methods for assembling synthetic DNA into larger constructs or combinatorial libraries. Advances in cloning techniques have resulted in powerful in vitro and in vivo assembly of DNA. However, monetary and time costs have limited these approaches. Here, we report an ex vivo DNA assembly method that uses cellular lysates derived from a commonly used laboratory strain of Escherichia coli for joining double-stranded DNA with short end homologies embedded within inexpensive primers. This method concurrently shortens the time and decreases costs associated with current DNA assembly methods.

  20. DNA adductomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balbo, Silvia; Turesky, Robert J; Villalta, Peter W

    2014-03-17

    Systems toxicology is a broad-based approach to describe many of the toxicological features that occur within a living system under stress or subjected to exogenous or endogenous exposures. The ultimate goal is to capture an overview of all exposures and the ensuing biological responses of the body. The term exposome has been employed to refer to the totality of all exposures, and systems toxicology investigates how the exposome influences health effects and consequences of exposures over a lifetime. The tools to advance systems toxicology include high-throughput transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics, and adductomics, which is still in its infancy. A well-established methodology for the comprehensive measurement of DNA damage resulting from every day exposures is not fully developed. During the past several decades, the (32)P-postlabeling technique has been employed to screen the damage to DNA induced by multiple classes of genotoxicants; however, more robust, specific, and quantitative methods have been sought to identify and quantify DNA adducts. Although triple quadrupole and ion trap mass spectrometry, particularly when using multistage scanning (LC-MS(n)), have shown promise in the field of DNA adductomics, it is anticipated that high-resolution and accurate-mass LC-MS(n) instrumentation will play a major role in assessing global DNA damage. Targeted adductomics should also benefit greatly from improved triple quadrupole technology. Once the analytical MS methods are fully mature, DNA adductomics along with other -omics tools will contribute greatly to the field of systems toxicology.

  1. Ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Willerslev, Eske; Cooper, Alan

    2004-01-01

    ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair......ancient DNA, palaeontology, palaeoecology, archaeology, population genetics, DNA damage and repair...

  2. Advanced microscopy techniques used for comparison of UVA- and γ-irradiation-induced DNA damage in the cell nucleus and nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stixová, L; Hrušková, T; Sehnalová, P; Legartová, S; Svidenská, S; Kozubek, S; Bártová, E

    2014-01-01

    Every day, genomes are affected by genotoxic factors that create multiple DNA lesions. Several DNA repair systems have evolved to counteract the deleterious effects of DNA damage. These systems include a set of DNA repair mechanisms, damage tolerance processes, and activation of cell-cycle checkpoints. This study describes selected confocal microscopy techniques that investigate DNA damage-related nuclear events after UVA- and γ-irradiation and compare the DNA damage response (DDR) induced by the two experimental approaches. In both cases, we observed induction of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway and formation of localized double-strand breaks (DSBs). This was confirmed by analysis of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in the DNA lesions and by increased levels of γH2AX and 53BP1 proteins in the irradiated genome. DNA damage by UVA-lasers was potentiated by either BrdU or Hoechst 33342 pre-sensitization and compared to non-photosensitized cells. DSBs were also induced without BrdU or Hoechst 33342 pre-treatment. Interestingly, no cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) were detected after 405 nm UVA laser micro-irradiation in non-photosensitized cells. The effects of UVA and γ-irradiation were also studied by silver staining of nucleolar organizer regions (AgNORs). This experimental approach revealed changes in the morphology of nucleoli after genome injury. Additionally, to precisely characterize DDR in locally induced DNA lesions, we analysed the kinetics of the 53BP1 protein involved in DDR by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP).

  3. DNA Media Storage

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field...

  4. Research advance in noninvasive prenatal testing based on cell-free fetal DNA%基于胎儿游离DNA的无创产前检测的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张展; 赵小辰

    2016-01-01

    母血血浆中胎儿游离DNA( cffDNA)的发现为无创产前检测提供了新思路。虽然目前已经发现多种胎儿DNA标志物,但是如何准确地从母血血浆总游离DNA中区分出cffDNA对我们来说仍然是个难题。目前,基于cffDNA的无创产前检测已被用于多种疾病的检测和研究,随着技术的不断进步和发展,它将会有更广阔的应用前景。本文将从cffDNA的生物学特征、标志物,cffDNA的无创产前检测的临床应用及其现阶段存在的问题和发展前景等方面进行阐述。(中华检验医学杂志,2016,39:307-310)%The discovery of cell-free fetal DNA ( cffDNA) in maternal plasma provides a new idea for noninvasive prenatal testing( NIPT).Though some studies to date have shown several fetal DNA markers, how to accurately distinguish cffDNA from the pool of maternal plasma free DNA is still a challenge.So far, NIPT based on cffDNA has been used for detection and study of a variety of diseases, along with the advance and development of technology, it will have a more broad application prospects.This article will make a review for the research status from the biological characteristics and the markers of cffDNA, the clinical applications and the existing issues and development prospects of NIPT based on cffDNA.

  5. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of DNA nanotechnology for such use. We summarize which requirements DNA nanostructures must fulfil to function in cellular...... environments and inside living organisms. In addition, we highlight recent advances in interfacing DNA nanostructures with biology....

  6. Next generation DNA led technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Jyothsna, G; Kashyap, Amita

    2016-01-01

    This brief highlights advances in DNA technologies and their wider applications. DNA is the source of life and has been studied since a generation, but very little is known as yet. Several sophisticated technologies of the current era have laid their foundations on the principle of DNA based mechanisms. DNA based technologies are bringing a new revolution of Advanced Science and Technology. Forensic Investigation, Medical Diagnosis, Paternity Disputes, Individual Identity, Health insurance, Motor Insurance have incorporated the DNA testing and profiling technologies for settling the issues.

  7. Advances in the Application of DNA Chip in Animal Medicine%DNA芯片技术在动物医学中的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马艳平; 陈豪泰; 马丽娜; 周建华; 张杰; 丁耀忠; 王猛; 刘文倩; 刘永生

    2011-01-01

    从基因表达谱研究、病原微生物检测、细菌分型、基因突变和多态学研究等多方面概述了DNA芯片技术在动物医学中的应用进展,并对DNA芯片技术的原理和分类进行综述.%Accompanying with the increasingly saturated genome figures, DNA chip has been widely applied. Thanks to its advantages of integration, miniaturization and automation, DNA chip becomes a powerful research tool in various research fields including biology, medicine and chemistry. This article overviews the application of DNA chip technology in animal medicine from gene expression spectrum research, pathogenic microbial detection, bacterial typing, genetic mutations and polymorphism detection, pathogenic microbial genomics research, as well as its principle and classification.

  8. DNA骨架磷硫酰化修饰的研究进展%Recent Advances in DNA Phosphorothioation Modification Studies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡中培; 王呈坤; 蓝文贤; 李芳; 曹春阳

    2013-01-01

    x DNA phosphorothioate (PT) modification is a sulfur modification on DNA backbone, in which a non-bridging P-O bond is changed into a non-bridging P-S bond, being the first physiological modification described on the DNA backbone. It is found that the DNA with backbone phosphoration has DNA degradation (Dnd) phenotype upon running electro-phoresis in Tris buffer. Moreover, this DNA phosphorothioation belongs to a kind of post-replication modification, where sulfur is incorporated stereo-specifically (i.e., it's a chiral Rp-type modification, not Sp-type configuration) into DNA backbone at specific sequences. For example, a high frequency of GA was found to be phosphorothioated in Bermanella marisru-bri RED65 and Hahella chejuensis KCTC2396, determined by using high pressure or high performance liquid chromatogra-phy (HPLC) and mass methods. DNA phosphorothioation is widespread and quantized in bacterial genomes. It was reported that this DNA PT modification is controlled by the five proteins (DndA-E) encoded by dna degradation (dnd) genes cluster (dndA-E) in a sequence found in bacteria and archaea, but the mechanism about how these five proteins function during the pathway of DNA backbone PT modification remains elusive. Among these five genes, four of them, dndA and dndC-E, are essential for the PT modification, while inactivation of dndB resulted in increased phosphorothioation and altered sequence preference. In this paper, we reviewed the discovery history, the features of DNA phosphorothioation modification, and the recent research progresses on the structures and functions of the five proteins involved in DNA backbone phosphorothioation. We also discussed the antioxidant activities of phosphorothioated DNA in biological systems. Finally, for easily understanding the research direction in DNA phosphorothioation, we summarized several questions in the future studies on DNA PT modification, which includes: (1) How sulfur is incorporated into DNA backbone in

  9. Concordance of Hypermethylated DNA and the Tumor Markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA in Serum during Monitoring of Patients with Advanced Breast Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Søren; Jørgensen, Lars Mønster; Høgh Hansen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    The serological protein tumor markers CA 15-3, CEA, and TPA are frequently used to monitor tumor burden among metastatic breast cancer patients. Breast cancer is associated with global DNA hypomethylation and hypermethylation of some promoter regions. No monitoring study has yet investigated the ...

  10. Advances in the study of surface antigens of Toxoplasm gondii and DNA vaccines for the parasite%弓形虫主要抗原及核酸疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    白杨; 何深一

    2011-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is widely distributed and infection of humans and animals can have very serious consequences, so researchers from various countries have had difficulty preventing and treating toxoplasmosis. In recent years, T. Gondii DNA vaccines have made considerable progress with in-depth study of T. Gondii and advances in molecular biology. This paper reviews the state of development of DNA vaccines for T. Gondii utilizing its major membrane antigens. This paper also explores prospects for the development of T. Gondii vaccines and it discusses the advantages and disadvantages of DNA vaccines.%弓形虫分布广泛,且人畜感染弓形虫会带来很严重的后果,所以弓形虫病的防治一直困扰着各国学者.近年来,随着对弓形虫研究的深入以及分子生物学的发展,弓形虫核酸疫苗的研究也取得了较大的进展.本文综述了弓形虫主要抗原以及弓形虫核酸疫苗的研究现状,探索弓形虫疫苗的发展前景,并对核酸疫苗的优缺点进行讨论.

  11. LASER SCANNING CYTOMETRIC DNA ANALYSES AND EXPRE- SSION OF P53 PROTEIN,KI67 AND BCL-X IN EARLY AND ADVANCED CARCINOMAS OF THE VOCAL CORD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林梅绥; 金嘉平; 陈颖; 花井淳

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study DNA ploidy and genetic changes in the different stages of neoplastic growth in the vocal cord, as well as their biological behavior, for further recognition of the lesions of carcinoma in situ and early carcinoma. Methods 18 tumor lesions of the vocal cord were DNA analyzed by laser scanning cytometry and followed up, and 62 lesions were immunohistochemically investigated for p53, Ki67 and Bcl-X, and with main observation on carcinomas in situ (CISs) and early microinvasive carcinomas (EMICs) which were compared with invasive carcinomas and polyps. Results DNA analysis showed that almost all the CISs and EMICs were diploidy, while 90% invasive carcinomas were aneuploidy. Follow-up data displayed that no one died of the tumor in CIS and EMIC, as well as in the patients with diploidy tumor, and all the patients died of the tumors were with anueploidy tumor. Immunohistochemically, 86% of CIS and EMIC and 91% of invasive carcinoma expressed p53 protein, and the positivities for Ki67 in them were respectively 29% and 27%, which were very significantly different from those of polyps of the vocal cord(P<0. 001). In contrast, expression of Bcl-X were decreasing from benign to malignant lesions, and it was lowest in the invasive carcinomas, significantly different from that of polyp(P=0. 002). Conclusion The present study showed that there were differences of DNA ploidy and genetic expressions among benign lesions, CISs and EMICs, and invasive carcinomas of the vocal cord, indicating that they might be different in biological entities. CIS of the vocal cord could be considered as a borderline lesion, and is better to receive conservative treatment. Moreover, p53 protein determination combined with Ki67 would be helpful in diagnosis of the carcinomas of the vocal cord.

  12. DNA media storage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christy M.Bogard; Eric C.Rouchka; Benjamin Arazi

    2008-01-01

    In 1994. University of Southern California computer scientist,Dr.Leonard Adleman solved the Hamiltonian path problem using DNA as a computational mechanism.He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems.Because of the limitations in discovery time,resource requirements,and sequence mismatches,DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice.However,advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA computing.Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone.This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files.Through the use of multiple sequence alignment combined with intelligent heuristics,the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors.

  13. DNA supercoiling during transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jie; Wang, Michelle D.

    2017-01-01

    The twin-supercoiled-domain model describes how transcription can drive DNA supercoiling, and how DNA supercoiling, in turn plays an important role in regulating gene transcription. In vivo and in vitro experiments have disclosed many details of the complex interactions in this relationship, and recently new insights have been gained with the help of genome-wide DNA supercoiling mapping techniques and single molecule methods. This review summarizes the general mechanisms of the interplay between DNA supercoiling and transcription, considers the biological implications, and focuses on recent important discoveries and technical advances in this field. We highlight the significant impact of DNA supercoiling in transcription, but also more broadly in all processes operating on DNA.

  14. DNA Media Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogard, Christy M; Rouchka, Eric C

    2007-09-01

    In 1994, University of Southern California computer scientist Dr. Leonard Adelman solved the Hamiltonian Path Problem using DNA as a computational mechanism. He proved the principle that DNA computing could be used to solve computationally complex problems. Because of the limitations in discovery time, resource requirements, and sequence mismatches, DNA computing has not yet become a commonly accepted practice. However, advancements are continually being discovered that are evolving the field of DNA Computing. Practical applications of DNA are not restricted to computation alone. This research presents a novel approach in which DNA could be used as a means of storing files. Through the use of Multiple Sequence Alignment combined with intelligent heuristics, the most probabilistic file contents can be determined with minimal errors.

  15. 基于DNA自组装过程的纳米结构研究%Advances on Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    俞洋; 李江; 张钊; 樊春海

    2015-01-01

    基于DNA自组装的纳米结构在近年来取得了巨大的发展。回顾了DNA纳米结构的原理和发展历程,介绍了DNA纳米结构的特点和优势,对DNA纳米结构在生物检测、纳米反应器、可控排布、纳米机器人和药物递送领域的新进展和应用进行了综述,并对DNA纳米技术的未来进行了展望。%Studies on self-assembled DNA nanostructures have achieved great progress in recent decades. In this article, we introduced the general principles of DNA nanostructures and the history of their development. Their features and advantages are also summarized. Their applications in biosensing, nanoreactors, nanoscale spatial arrangement, nanorobots, and drug delivery have been reviewed. The future of DNA nanotechnology has also been prospected.

  16. Advances in DNA Extraction and Gene Detection for Vegetable Oils%植物油DNA提取和基因检测研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐玲倩; 刘秀; 丁梦璇; 刘远远; 柯润辉; 尹建军

    2016-01-01

    Methods for gene detection have been widely used in the authentication and GMO detection for vegetable oils because of their rapidity, efficiency, sensitivity and accuracy. While, as for vegetable oils, the low quantity and integrity of DNA caused by being refined increase the difficulties of DNA extraction and gene detection. In this paper, we review the progress of DNA extraction and gene detection for vegetable oils and make some respect for their future , so as to provide theoretical reference for the researchers in some degree.%基因检测方法以其快速、高效、灵敏、准确的特点而广泛应用在植物油真实性和转基因成分鉴定中。但植物油大都经过精制加工,DNA含量极少且完整度低,这对植物油的基因提取和检测造成了极大的困扰。本文对植物油DNA提取和基因检测进展进行了综述,并对以后的发展进行了展望,以期为研究者提供一定的理论参考。

  17. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.). In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen

  18. Epidermal growth factor receptor genotype in plasma DNA and outcome of chemotherapy in the Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUO Ming-lei; DUAN Jian-chun; WANG Yu-yan; GUO Qing-zhi; LIU Xu-yi; LIU Ning-hong; WANG Jie; WU Mei-na; ZHAO Jun; Sonya Wei Song; BAI Hua; WANG Shu-hang; YANG Lu; AN Tong-tong; WANG Xin

    2011-01-01

    Background The genotype of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is associated with tyrosine kinase inhibitor and effectiveness of therapy,but its role in cytotoxic chemotherapy is still unknown.Previous studies indicated that certain EGFR mutations were associated with response and progression free survival following platinum based chemotherapy.Our recent studies have identified that EGFR genotypes in the tumour tissues were not associated with response to the first-line chemotherapy in Chinese patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC).In this study,we investigated associations of EGFR genotypes from plasma of patients with advanced NSCLC and response to first-line chemotherapy and prognosis.Methods We enrolled 145 advanced NSCLC patients who had received first-line chemotherapy in our department.We examined plasma EGFR genotypes for these patients and associations of EGFR mutations with response to chemotherapy and clinical outcomes.Results There were 54 patients with known EGFR mutations and 91 cases of wild types.No significant difference was detected in the response rate to first-line chemotherapy between mutation carriers and wild-type patients (37.0% vs.31.9%).The median survival time and 1-,2-year survival rates were higher in mutation carriers than wild-types (24months vs.18 months,85.7% vs.65.7% and 43.7% vs.25.9%,P=0.047).Clinical stage (IV vs.Ⅲb),response to the first-line chemotherapy (partial vs.no) and EGFR genotype were independent prognostic factors.Conclusion Plasma EGFR mutations in the Chinese patients with advanced NSCLC is not a predictor for the response to first-line chemotherapy,but an independent prognostic factor indicating longer survival.

  19. Advances in rapid amplification of cDNA ends%cDNA末端快速扩增试剂盒研发进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段静波; 白方文; 白林含

    2008-01-01

    DNA扩增的方法有许多种,其中cDNA末端快速扩增(rapid amplification of cDNA ends,RACE)因其操作简单、成功率相对较高、重复性好,被广泛应用于真核生物基因全长的克隆与分析.本文比较了市售的RACE试剂盒所采用的模板制备策略及改进的扩增方法.

  20. Advances in the study of multivalent recombinant DNA vaccines utilizing the hepatitis B virus surface antigen gene%乙肝表面抗原载体多价重组核酸疫苗研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖婷; 郭根灵; 辛宪云; 魏庆宽

    2012-01-01

    研究表明,乙肝病毒的包膜蛋白HBsAg不仅可以作为疫苗的理想候选分子,还可作为基因工程疫苗的理想载体,用来成功构建多种重组核酸疫苗.本文概述了以乙肝表面抗原为载体,重组或联合其他病毒、寄生虫、细胞因子等其他基因制作多价核酸疫苗的研究进展.%Studies have shown that hepatitis B virus envelope protein HBsAg can be used as an ideal candidate molecule for vaccines and also as an ideal vehicle for genetically engineered vaccines to successfully build a variety of recombinant DNA vaccines. This article provides an overview of advances in recombinant DNA vaccines prepared by using hepatitis B virus surface antigen as a carrier to restructure or join it to other viruses, parasites, cell factors, or other genes.

  1. Advances of DNA Sequencing Technology and Its Applications%DNA测序技术及其应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘朋虎; 林冬梅; 林占熺; 李晶

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we introduced principles and characteristics of the first, second and third generation of sequencing technology, then the applications of second sequencing technology were described. Because of complicated operation and high cost, the first generation DNA sequencing technology represented by Sanger sequencing method can not meet the needs of large - scale sequencing. The second generation DNA sequencing technology characterized by high-throughout and low cost including Solexa sequencing technology of Illumina, and Applied Biosystems SOLiD and Roche 454 now has been used in many fields of life science research. The third-generation sequencing technology which can sequence single DNA molecular has also been arisen, but not been widely used in life science research Key words .%本文首先介绍了第一代、第二代、第三代DNA测序技术的原理、特点,在此基础上介绍了第二代测序技术在基因组测序、重测序,RNA测序,宏基因组,DNA甲基化等方面的应用.第一代测序技术以Sanger测序法为代表,操作繁琐、成本较高,不能满足大规模测序的需要.第二代测序技术以高通量、低成本为主要特点,主要包括Illumina公司的Solexa测序技术、罗氏公司的454测序技术和ABI公司的SOLiD测序技术,目前已广泛应用于生命科学研究的各个领域.第三代测序技术以单分子测序为主要特点,目前已经初见端倪,但是还没有被大规模广泛应用.

  2. Role of DNA profiling in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakari, S Leena; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K M K; Jacobina, Jenita

    2015-04-01

    The recent advances in DNA profiling have made DNA evidence to be more widely accepted in courts. This has revolutionized the aspect of forensic odontology. DNA profiling/DNA fingerprinting has come a long way from the conventional fingerprints. DNA that is responsible for all the cell's activities, yields valuable information both in the healthy and diseased individuals. When other means of traditional identification become impossible following mass calamities or fire explosions, teeth provide a rich source of DNA as they have a high chemical as well as physical resistance. The recent evolution in the isolation of DNA and the ways of running a DNA fingerprint are highlighted in this literature review.

  3. Advances in the use of DNA barcodes to build a community phylogeny for tropical trees in a Puerto Rican forest dynamics plot.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W John Kress

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Species number, functional traits, and phylogenetic history all contribute to characterizing the biological diversity in plant communities. The phylogenetic component of diversity has been particularly difficult to quantify in species-rich tropical tree assemblages. The compilation of previously published (and often incomplete data on evolutionary relationships of species into a composite phylogeny of the taxa in a forest, through such programs as Phylomatic, has proven useful in building community phylogenies although often of limited resolution. Recently, DNA barcodes have been used to construct a robust community phylogeny for nearly 300 tree species in a forest dynamics plot in Panama using a supermatrix method. In that study sequence data from three barcode loci were used to generate a well-resolved species-level phylogeny. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we expand upon this earlier investigation and present results on the use of a phylogenetic constraint tree to generate a community phylogeny for a diverse, tropical forest dynamics plot in Puerto Rico. This enhanced method of phylogenetic reconstruction insures the congruence of the barcode phylogeny with broadly accepted hypotheses on the phylogeny of flowering plants (i.e., APG III regardless of the number and taxonomic breadth of the taxa sampled. We also compare maximum parsimony versus maximum likelihood estimates of community phylogenetic relationships as well as evaluate the effectiveness of one- versus two- versus three-gene barcodes in resolving community evolutionary history. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As first demonstrated in the Panamanian forest dynamics plot, the results for the Puerto Rican plot illustrate that highly resolved phylogenies derived from DNA barcode sequence data combined with a constraint tree based on APG III are particularly useful in comparative analysis of phylogenetic diversity and will enhance research on the interface between community

  4. ADVANCED IN VIVO USE OF CRISPR/CAS9 AND ANTI-SENSE DNA INHIBITION FOR GENE MANIPULATION IN THE BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon J Walters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene-editing tools are essential for uncovering how genes mediate normal brain-behaviour relationships and contribute to neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric disorders. Recent progress in gene-editing technology is now allowing neuroscientists unprecedented access to edit the genome efficiently. Although many important tools have been developed, here we focus on approaches that allow for rapid gene-editing in the mature nervous system, particularly CRISPR/Cas9 and anti-sense nucleotide-based techniques. CRISPR/Cas9 is a flexible gene-editing tool, allowing the genome to be manipulated in diverse ways. For instance, CRISPR/Cas9 has been successfully used to knock-out genes, knock-in mutations, overexpress or inhibit gene activity, and provide scaffolding for recruiting specific epigenetic regulators to individual genes and gene regions. Moreover, the CRISPR/Cas9 system may be modified to target multiple genes at one time, affording simultaneous inhibition and overexpression of distinct genetic targets. Although many of the more advanced applications of CRISPR/Cas9 have not been applied to the nervous system, the tool-box is widely-accessible, such that it is poised to help advance neuroscience. Anti-sense nucleotide-based technologies can be used to rapidly knock down genes in the brain and are simple to use. A main advantage of anti-sense based tools is their independence of viral packaging, allowing for rapid gene delivery with minimal technical expertise. Here, we describe the main applications and functions of each of these systems with an emphasis on their many potential applications in neuroscience laboratories.

  5. Enzymatic Ligation of Large Biomolecules to DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rasmus Schøler; Okholm, Anders Hauge; Schaffert, David Henning;

    2013-01-01

    The ability to synthesize, characterize, and manipulate DNA forms the foundation of a range of advanced disciplines including genomics, molecular biology, and biomolecular engineering. In particular for the latter field, DNA has proven useful as a structural or functional component in nanoscale s....... As a proof of principle, parallelly labeled oligonucleotides were used to produce nanopatterned DNA origami structures, demonstrating rapid and versatile incorporation of non-DNA components into DNA nanoarchitectures....

  6. Recent advances in silage microbiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in our understanding of silage microbiology are reviewed. The ability to extract microbial DNA from silages, amplify portions of DNA, and use the amplified regions to identify strains of microorganisms is at the core of the changes occurring recently in silage microbiology. These dev...

  7. Recent Advances of Repeat-induced Point Mutation (RIP) of DNA Sequence in Fungi%真菌中 DNA 重复序列诱导点突变的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯凤鹃; 曲志才; 田李; 王转斌

    2014-01-01

    Repeat -induced point mutations ( RIP) was discovered in Neurospora crassa in 1987 by Selker. RIP searches for sequence duplications in haploid nuclei of premeiotic tissue and then litters them with numerous C to T mutations.T+A rich fragments so that the G-C pairs in duplications can be mutated to A -T.In addition, RIP’ s sequences , which are concentrated in centromeric regions , and are predominantly relics of transposons , are left methylated .Mobile transposable elements are among the primary drivers of the evolution of eukaryotic genomes . For fungi , repeat-induced point mutation ( RIP) silencing minimizes deleterious effects of transposons by mutating multicopy DNA during meiosis .To explore the impact of RIP-mutated transposons is conducive to generate evolu-tionary inferences for phylogenetic and population genetic analyses .The paper has reviewed the mechanism of RIP and the progress of RIP in fungi .%1987年,由Selker等在粗糙脉孢菌中首次发现重复序列诱导点突变( repeat-induced point mu-tation,RIP)。在重复序列诱导点突变过程中,搜寻前减数分裂组织单倍体核中DNA的重复序列,然后发生众多的碱基C到T的突变,产生富碱基T+A片段,从而使重复序列中的G-C碱基对发生转换突变成为A-T碱基对。此外,发生RIP的序列多集中在着丝粒区域,主要是转座子甲基化后的遗迹。移动转座子是真核生物基因组进化的主要驱动力。对于真菌,重复序列诱导点突变( RIP)在减数分裂过程中通过突变多拷贝DNA,能最大限度地减少转座子的影响,因此对RIP的研究在一定程度上能有助于了解基因组进化的真谛。综述了重复序列诱导点突变的产生机制,以及真菌中重复序列诱导点突变的研究进展。

  8. DNA Nanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2002-11-01

    DNA is one candidate of promising molecules for molecular electronic devices, since it has the double helix structure with pi-electron bases for electron transport, the address at 0.4 nm intervals, and the self-assembly. Electrical conductivity and nanostructure of DNA and modified DNA molecules are investigated in order to research the application of DNA in nanoelectronic devices. It has been revealed that DNA is a wide-gap semiconductor in the absence of doping. The conductivity of DNA has been controlled by chemical doping, electric field doping, and photo-doping. It has found that Poly(dG)[middle dot]Poly(dC) has the best conductivity and can function as a conducting nanowire. The pattern of DNA network is controlled by changing the concentration of the DNA solution.

  9. Novel encoding methods for DNA-templated chemical libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Zheng, Wenlu; Liu, Ying; Li, Xiaoyu

    2015-06-01

    Among various types of DNA-encoded chemical libraries, DNA-templated library takes advantage of the sequence-specificity of DNA hybridization, enabling not only highly effective DNA-templated chemical reactions, but also high fidelity in library encoding. This brief review summarizes recent advances that have been made on the encoding strategies for DNA-templated libraries, and it also highlights their respective advantages and limitations for the preparation of DNA-encoded libraries.

  10. DNA Methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Alokail, Majed S.; Alenad, Amal M.

    2015-01-01

    The DNA of E. coli contains 19,120 6-methyladenines and 12,045 5-methylcytosines in addition to the four regular bases and these are formed by the postreplicative action of three DNA methyltransferases. The majority of the methylated bases are formed by the Dam and Dcm methyltransferases encoded by the dam (DNA adenine methyltransferase) and dcm (DNA cytosine methyltransferase) genes. Although not essential, Dam methylation is important for strand discrimination during repair of replication e...

  11. Development of dengue DNA vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danko, Janine R; Beckett, Charmagne G; Porter, Kevin R

    2011-09-23

    Vaccination with plasmid DNA against infectious pathogens including dengue is an active area of investigation. By design, DNA vaccines are able to elicit both antibody responses and cellular immune responses capable of mediating long-term protection. Great technical improvements have been made in dengue DNA vaccine constructs and trials are underway to study these in the clinic. The scope of this review is to highlight the rich history of this vaccine platform and the work in dengue DNA vaccines accomplished by scientists at the Naval Medical Research Center. This work resulted in the only dengue DNA vaccine tested in a clinical trial to date. Additional advancements paving the road ahead in dengue DNA vaccine development are also discussed.

  12. Dna Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabor, Stanley; Richardson, Charles C.

    1995-04-25

    A method for sequencing a strand of DNA, including the steps off: providing the strand of DNA; annealing the strand with a primer able to hybridize to the strand to give an annealed mixture; incubating the mixture with four deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, a DNA polymerase, and at least three deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates in different amounts, under conditions in favoring primer extension to form nucleic acid fragments complementory to the DNA to be sequenced; labelling the nucleic and fragments; separating them and determining the position of the deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates by differences in the intensity of the labels, thereby to determine the DNA sequence.

  13. DNA-Conjugated Organic Chromophores in DNA Stacking Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V.; Pedersen, Erik Bjerregaard

    2009-01-01

    Since the discovery of the intercalation of acridine derivatives into DNA (1961), chemists have synthesized many intercalators tethered to DNA. Advances in the chemical synthesis of modified nucleosides along with progress in oligonucleotide synthesis have made it possible to introduce organic ch...... review presents those efforts in the design of intercalators/organic chromophores as oligonucleotide conjugates that form a foundation for the generation of novel nucleic acid architectures...

  14. Forensic DNA typing in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Y P

    2009-04-01

    In the field of forensic genetics, essential developmental impulses come from the advances of the molecular biology and human genome projects. This paper overviews existing technologies for forensic genetics in China and gives a perspective of forensic DNA analysis. In China, work has been done in the development of blood group serology of the conventional markers. Forensic scientists in China also contributed to the progress of DNA analysis by the validation of numerous test methods and by optimization of these methods. During these years, forensic DNA analysis in China has experienced tremendous progress towards development of robust, efficient and precise protocols, including the development of short tandem repeat analysis, mitochondrial DNA and Y-chromosome analysis. Forensic scientists are constantly looking for new methods to further improve DNA typing. Therefore, this paper also focuses on emerging new technologies in China, which represent an interest for forensic genetics.

  15. DNA nanotechnology-enabled biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Zhu, Dan; Zhang, Yinan; Wang, Lianhui; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-02-15

    Biosensors employ biological molecules to recognize the target and utilize output elements which can translate the biorecognition event into electrical, optical or mass-sensitive signals to determine the quantities of the target. DNA-based biosensors, as a sub-field to biosensor, utilize DNA strands with short oligonucleotides as probes for target recognition. Although DNA-based biosensors have offered a promising alternative for fast, simple and cheap detection of target molecules, there still exist key challenges including poor stability and reproducibility that hinder their competition with the current gold standard for DNA assays. By exploiting the self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, researchers have dedicated to make versatile DNA nanostructures in a highly rigid, controllable and functionalized manner, which offers unprecedented opportunities for developing DNA-based biosensors. In this review, we will briefly introduce the recent advances on design and fabrication of static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and summarize their applications for fabrication and functionalization of DNA-based biosensors.

  16. DNA glue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filichev, Vyacheslav V; Astakhova, Irina V.; Malakhov, Andrei D.

    2008-01-01

    Significant alterations in thermal stability of parallel DNA triplexes and antiparallel duplexes were observed upon changing the attachment of ethynylpyrenes from para to ortho in the structure of phenylmethylglycerol inserted as a bulge into DNA (TINA). Insertions of two ortho-TINAs as a pseudo...

  17. Advance care directives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advance directive; Do-not-resuscitate - advance directive; Durable power of attorney - advance care directive; POA - advance care directive; Health care agent - advance care directive; Health care proxy - ...

  18. Role of DNA profiling in forensic odontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Leena Sakari

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in DNA profiling have made DNA evidence to be more widely accepted in courts. This has revolutionized the aspect of forensic odontology. DNA profiling/DNA fingerprinting has come a long way from the conventional fingerprints. DNA that is responsible for all the cell′s activities, yields valuable information both in the healthy and diseased individuals. When other means of traditional identification become impossible following mass calamities or fire explosions, teeth provide a rich source of DNA as they have a high chemical as well as physical resistance. The recent evolution in the isolation of DNA and the ways of running a DNA fingerprint are highlighted in this literature review.

  19. Role of DNA profiling in forensic odontology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakari, S. Leena; Jimson, Sudha; Masthan, K. M. K.; Jacobina, Jenita

    2015-01-01

    The recent advances in DNA profiling have made DNA evidence to be more widely accepted in courts. This has revolutionized the aspect of forensic odontology. DNA profiling/DNA fingerprinting has come a long way from the conventional fingerprints. DNA that is responsible for all the cell's activities, yields valuable information both in the healthy and diseased individuals. When other means of traditional identification become impossible following mass calamities or fire explosions, teeth provide a rich source of DNA as they have a high chemical as well as physical resistance. The recent evolution in the isolation of DNA and the ways of running a DNA fingerprint are highlighted in this literature review. PMID:26015692

  20. Molecular Advancements in Forensic Odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu Rs, A; Rose, D

    2015-05-11

    Forensic odontology explores the field of human identification through dental tissues in cases where there is destruction of body tissues in criminal investigations and mass disasters. Forensic odontology involves dentists participating in legal and criminal issues. Parameters such as age and gender identification are important in identifying the person or persons. Over the last two decades, the molecular aspect of forensic sciences has increased, and these molecular techniques now provide a novel approach to forensic odontology. Molecular advancements in science like DNA analysis has extended the range of forensic dentistry as teeth possess the character of resistance toward physical or chemical aggressions. Teeth provide the abundant space for DNA, and hence teeth represent an excellent source of genomic DNA. The present paper focusses on molecular advancements in the field of forensic odontology.

  1. DNA methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Helin, Kristian

    2012-01-01

    DNA methylation is involved in key cellular processes, including X-chromosome inactivation, imprinting and transcriptional silencing of specific genes and repetitive elements. DNA methylation patterns are frequently perturbed in human diseases such as imprinting disorders and cancer. The recent...... discovery that the three members of the TET protein family can convert 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) has provided a potential mechanism leading to DNA demethylation. Moreover, the demonstration that TET2 is frequently mutated in haematopoietic tumours suggests that the TET...... proteins are important regulators of cellular identity. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding the function of the TET proteins, and discuss various mechanisms by which they contribute to transcriptional control. We propose that the TET proteins have an important role in regulating DNA methylation...

  2. DNA data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Raw DNA chromatogram data produced by the ABI 373, 377, 3130 and 3730 automated sequencing machines in ABI format. These are from fish (primarily Sebastes spp.,...

  3. Advance payments

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2003-01-01

    Administrative Circular N 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  4. ADVANCE PAYMENTS

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative Circular Nº 8 makes provision for the granting of advance payments, repayable in several monthly instalments, by the Organization to the members of its personnel. Members of the personnel are reminded that these advances are only authorized in exceptional circumstances and at the discretion of the Director-General. In view of the current financial situation of the Organization, and in particular the loans it will have to incur, the Directorate has decided to restrict the granting of such advances to exceptional or unforeseen circumstances entailing heavy expenditure and more specifically those pertaining to social issues. Human Resources Division Tel. 73962

  5. DNA expressions - A formal notation for DNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliet, Rudy van

    2015-01-01

    We describe a formal notation for DNA molecules that may contain nicks and gaps. The resulting DNA expressions denote formal DNA molecules. Different DNA expressions may denote the same molecule. Such DNA expressions are called equivalent. We examine which DNA expressions are minimal, which

  6. DNA损伤修复机制和糖尿病造成的动脉粥样硬化%Advances in the Relationship between DNA Damage Repair Mechanism and Diabetic Atherosclerosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    曾理(综述); 丁群芳(审校)

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis and the subsequent cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarc-tion,stroke,and coronary atherosclerotic heart disease are major causes of death among the elderly. DNA damage is the cause of the activation of the DNA damage repair pathway resulting in cell senescence,and the evidence that DNA damage and DNA damage repair mechanism participate in the process of atherosclerosis has been found in some studies. Diabetes,as a risk factor of cardiovascular disease,can lead to DNA damage, so as to accelerate the aging of blood vessels. Here is to make a review of the research development of DNA damage and DNA double strand damage repair mechanism,to provide a new method to prevent and treat ath-erosclerosis.%动脉粥样硬化及其所引起的心肌梗死、脑卒中、冠状动脉粥样硬化性心脏病(冠心病)等是导致老年人病死率增加的重要原因。 DNA损伤是激活DNA损伤修复路径导致细胞早衰的重要原因,而动脉粥样硬化中存在DNA损伤及DNA损伤修复机制参与的证据。糖尿病作为心血管疾病危险因素具有导致DNA损伤,从而加速血管老化的作用。该文综述了动脉粥样硬化疾病中DNA损伤和DNA双链损伤修复机制的研究进展,从而为防治动脉粥样硬化疾病提供新的思路。

  7. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  8. Advanced nanoelectronics

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Razali

    2012-01-01

    While theories based on classical physics have been very successful in helping experimentalists design microelectronic devices, new approaches based on quantum mechanics are required to accurately model nanoscale transistors and to predict their characteristics even before they are fabricated. Advanced Nanoelectronics provides research information on advanced nanoelectronics concepts, with a focus on modeling and simulation. Featuring contributions by researchers actively engaged in nanoelectronics research, it develops and applies analytical formulations to investigate nanoscale devices. The

  9. Mitogenomic analyses from ancient DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paijmans, Johanna L.A.; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Hofreiter, Michael

    2013-01-01

    analyses (whether using modern or ancient DNA) were largely restricted to the analysis of short fragments of the mitochondrial genome. However, due to many technological advances during the past decade, a growing number of studies have explored the power of complete mitochondrial genome sequences...... (mitogenomes). Such studies were initially limited to analyses of extant organisms, but developments in both DNA sequencing technologies and general methodological aspects related to working with degraded DNA have resulted in complete mitogenomes becoming increasingly popular for ancient DNA studies as well....... To date, at least 124 partially or fully assembled mitogenomes from more than 20 species have been obtained, and, given the rapid progress in sequencing technology, this number is likely to dramatically increase in the future. The increased information content offered by analysing full mitogenomes has...

  10. Food Fish Identification from DNA Extraction through Sequence Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.

    2015-01-01

    This experiment exposed 3rd and 4th y undergraduates and graduate students taking a course in advanced food analysis to DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and DNA sequence analysis. Students provided their own fish sample, purchased from local grocery stores, and the class as a whole extracted DNA, which was then subjected to PCR,…

  11. AdvancED Flex 4

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Shashank; Schulze, Charlie

    2010-01-01

    AdvancED Flex 4 makes advanced Flex 4 concepts and techniques easy. Ajax, RIA, Web 2.0, mashups, mobile applications, the most sophisticated web tools, and the coolest interactive web applications are all covered with practical, visually oriented recipes. * Completely updated for the new tools in Flex 4* Demonstrates how to use Flex 4 to create robust and scalable enterprise-grade Rich Internet Applications.* Teaches you to build high-performance web applications with interactivity that really engages your users.* What you'll learn Practiced beginners and intermediate users of Flex, especially

  12. DNA vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter

    2001-12-01

    Immunization by genes encoding immunogens, rather than with the immunogen itself, has opened up new possibilities for vaccine research and development and offers chances for new applications and indications for future vaccines. The underlying mechanisms of antigen processing, immune presentation and regulation of immune responses raise high expectations for new and more effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines, particularly for vaccines against chronic or persistent infectious diseases and tumors. Our current knowledge and experience of DNA vaccination is summarized and critically reviewed with particular attention to basic immunological mechanisms, the construction of plasmids, screening for protective immunogens to be encoded by these plasmids, modes of application, pharmacokinetics, safety and immunotoxicological aspects. DNA vaccines have the potential to accelerate the research phase of new vaccines and to improve the chances of success, since finding new immunogens with the desired properties is at least technically less demanding than for conventional vaccines. However, on the way to innovative vaccine products, several hurdles have to be overcome. The efficacy of DNA vaccines in humans appears to be much less than indicated by early studies in mice. Open questions remain concerning the persistence and distribution of inoculated plasmid DNA in vivo, its potential to express antigens inappropriately, or the potentially deleterious ability to insert genes into the host cell's genome. Furthermore, the possibility of inducing immunotolerance or autoimmune diseases also needs to be investigated more thoroughly, in order to arrive at a well-founded consensus, which justifies the widespread application of DNA vaccines in a healthy population.

  13. DNA nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadrian C Seeman

    2003-01-01

    We are all aware that the DNA found in cells is a double helix consisting of two antiparallel strands held together by specific hydrogen-bonded base pairs; adenine (A always pairs with thymine (T, and guanine (G always pairs with cytosine (C. The specificity of this base pairing and the ability to ensure that it occurs in this fashion (and not some other1 is key to the use of DNA in materials applications. The double helical arrangement of the two molecules leads to a linear helix axis, linear not in the geometrical sense of being a straight line, but in the topological sense of being unbranched. Genetic engineers discovered in the 1970s how to splice together pieces of DNA to add new genes to DNA molecules2, and synthetic chemists worked out convenient syntheses for short pieces of DNA (up to ∼100–150 units in the 1980s3. Regardless of the impact of these technologies on biological systems, hooking together linear molecules leads only to longer linear molecules, with circles, knots, and catenanes perhaps resulting from time to time.

  14. Advances of Total DNA Extraction Technology for Soil Microbial Diversity Research%土壤微生物多样性研究中总DNA提取技术进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    肖斌; 蒋代华; 刘立龙; 刘全东

    2012-01-01

    The influencing factors and application aspects, as well as the potentials and limitations of DNA extraction techniques for microbial diversity analysis were reviewed. Applying appropriate methods to extract microorganism DNA fragment that have right purity and appropriate size from soil were the precondition in soil microbial study on the molecular level, and the subsequent molecular biotechnology operations were all rely on these methods.%综述了在土壤微生物多样性研究中总DNA提取技术的研究进展,分析了DNA提取过程中的主要影响因素及存在的问题.

  15. Choosing and using a plant DNA barcode.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter M Hollingsworth

    Full Text Available The main aim of DNA barcoding is to establish a shared community resource of DNA sequences that can be used for organismal identification and taxonomic clarification. This approach was successfully pioneered in animals using a portion of the cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1 mitochondrial gene. In plants, establishing a standardized DNA barcoding system has been more challenging. In this paper, we review the process of selecting and refining a plant barcode; evaluate the factors which influence the discriminatory power of the approach; describe some early applications of plant barcoding and summarise major emerging projects; and outline tool development that will be necessary for plant DNA barcoding to advance.

  16. Specific incorporation of an artificial nucleotide opposite a mutagenic DNA adduct by a DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyss, Laura A; Nilforoushan, Arman; Eichenseher, Fritz; Suter, Ursina; Blatter, Nina; Marx, Andreas; Sturla, Shana J

    2015-01-14

    The ability to detect DNA modification sites at single base resolution could significantly advance studies regarding DNA adduct levels, which are extremely difficult to determine. Artificial nucleotides that are specifically incorporated opposite a modified DNA site offer a potential strategy for detection of such sites by DNA polymerase-based systems. Here we investigate the action of newly synthesized base-modified benzimidazole-derived 2'-deoxynucleoside-5'-O-triphosphates on DNA polymerases when performing translesion DNA synthesis past the pro-mutagenic DNA adduct O(6)-benzylguanine (O(6)-BnG). We found that a mutated form of KlenTaq DNA polymerase, i.e., KTqM747K, catalyzed O(6)-BnG adduct-specific processing of the artificial BenziTP in favor of the natural dNTPs. Steady-state kinetic parameters revealed that KTqM747K catalysis of BenziTP is 25-fold more efficient for template O(6)-BnG than G, and 5-fold more efficient than natural dTMP misincorporation in adduct bypass. Furthermore, the nucleotide analogue BenziTP is required for full-length product formation in O(6)-BnG bypass, as without BenziTP the polymerase stalls at the adduct site. By combining the KTqM747K polymerase and BenziTP, a first round of DNA synthesis enabled subsequent amplification of Benzi-containing DNA. These results advance the development of technologies for detecting DNA adducts.

  17. 基于色谱法的超螺旋质粒DNA纯化与分析进展%Advances on Purification Process and Analysis of Supercoiled Plasmid DNA Based on Chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亮; 柳方方; 宛煜嵩; 金芜军

    2014-01-01

    质粒DNA含有独立复制的遗传结构,是基因工程的常用工具,广泛应用于分子生物学基础研究、农业转基因检测、医疗诊断与基因治疗等领域。质粒DNA的构型一般分为超螺旋、开口环状及线性3种。初步纯化的质粒DNA溶液中常混有3种构型,并且掺杂一定量的蛋白质、RNA、内毒素以及宿主基因组DNA,这些杂质会影响后续的应用,因此质粒DNA需要进一步精细纯化。该文对质粒DNA的新应用领域、基于色谱的精细纯化技术及产物质量分析体系进行了综述,并展望了高纯度质粒DNA精细纯化及产物分析的发展方向。%Plasmid DNA,a common tool of genetic engineering containing the independent genetic structure of the replication,is widely used in basic research of molecular biology,genetically modi-fied detection,medical diagnosis and gene therapy. Plasmid DNA conformations are generally divided into three types:supercoiled,open circle and linear. Crude plasmid DNA often mixes with three configurations,and the amount of protein,RNA,endotoxin with the host genome DNA. These im-purities need to be further refined as they affect subsequent applications. The new applications of plasmid DNA,refined technologies and products based on chromatography system,and quality anal-ysis of purified plasmid DNA is reviewed in this paper. Finally,the trends of technology of high pu-rity plasmid DNA and analysis of refined product are presented.

  18. Wireframe and tensegrity DNA nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmel, Stephanie S; Nickels, Philipp C; Liedl, Tim

    2014-06-17

    nanotechnology starting with the construction of four-way junctions and then allude to simple geometric objects such as the wireframe cube presented by Nadrian Seeman along with a variety of triangulated wireframe constructions. We examine DNA tensegrity triangles that self-assemble into crystals with sizes of several hundred micrometers as well as prestressed DNA origami tensegrity architecture, which uses single-stranded DNA with its entropic spring behavior as tension bearing components to organize stiff multihelix bundles in three dimensions. Finally, we discuss emerging applications of the aforementioned design principles in diverse fields such as diagnostics, drug delivery, or crystallography. Despite great advances in related research fields like protein and RNA engineering, DNA self-assembly is currently the most accessible technique to organize matter on the nanoscale, and we expect many more exciting applications to emerge.

  19. DNA origami nanopores for controlling DNA translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Thacker, Vivek V; Göpfrich, Kerstin; Misiunas, Karolis; Fuentes-Perez, Maria Eugenia; Moreno-Herrero, Fernando; Keyser, Ulrich F

    2013-07-23

    We combine DNA origami structures with glass nanocapillaries to reversibly form hybrid DNA origami nanopores. Trapping of the DNA origami onto the nanocapillary is proven by imaging fluorescently labeled DNA origami structures and simultaneous ionic current measurements of the trapping events. We then show two applications highlighting the versatility of these DNA origami nanopores. First, by tuning the pore size we can control the folding of dsDNA molecules ("physical control"). Second, we show that the specific introduction of binding sites in the DNA origami nanopore allows selective detection of ssDNA as a function of the DNA sequence ("chemical control").

  20. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Nickerson, HK; Steenrod, NE

    2011-01-01

    ""This book is a radical departure from all previous concepts of advanced calculus,"" declared the Bulletin of the American Mathematics Society, ""and the nature of this departure merits serious study of the book by everyone interested in undergraduate education in mathematics."" Classroom-tested in a Princeton University honors course, it offers students a unified introduction to advanced calculus. Starting with an abstract treatment of vector spaces and linear transforms, the authors introduce a single basic derivative in an invariant form. All other derivatives - gradient, divergent, curl,

  1. Advanced ferroelectricity

    CERN Document Server

    Blinc, R

    2011-01-01

    Advances in the field of ferroelectricity have implications both for basic physics and for technological applications such as memory devices, spintronic applications and electro-optic devices, as well as in acoustics, robotics, telecommunications and medicine. This book provides an account of recent developments in the field.

  2. Clinical significance of plasma epstein-barr virus DNA quantitative monitoring in the treatment and follow-up for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma%血浆EB病毒DNA定量监测在局部晚期鼻咽癌治疗及随访中的临床意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张倩; 孙秀锦; 宋丹

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical significance of plasma epstein⁃barr virus DNA( EBV⁃DNA) quantitative moni⁃toring in the treatment and follow⁃up for locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Methods Plasma EBV⁃DNA levels of 156 locally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer patients were detected during concurrent radiochemotherapy with 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 weeks, and plasma EBV⁃DNA levels of patients with who plasma EBV⁃DNA⁃positive before the treatment and followed up were detected after 6, 12, 18, 24 months, using quantitative PCR technique. The efficacy and recurrence and metastasis situation during two years after treatment were evaluated respectively. Results Plasma EBV⁃DNA⁃positive rate of 156 patients was 91�0% (142/156) before concurrent radio⁃chemotherapy, and positive rate of 9�6% ( 15/156) after 8 weeks of the treatment. One hundred and twenty⁃seven out of 142 plasma EBV⁃DNA⁃positive patients with pre⁃treatment, plasma EBV⁃DNA levels showed a trend of decline from the treatment of 2 weeks. On 6 weeks of the treatment, DNA replication were not detected in 127 patients. The other plasma EBV⁃DNA level of 15 cases maintained the positive level after 8 weeks of the treatment. One hundred and nineteen cases were complete response and 37 cases were partial re⁃sponse, of which the plasma EBV⁃DNA positive rate of 8 weeks after the treatment was 3�4% (4/119) and 29�7% (11/37), respec⁃tively. 135 out of 142 patients with pre⁃treatment plasma EBV⁃DNA⁃positive were followed up for two years, 1⁃, 2⁃year recurrence rate was 14�1% (19/135) and 23�0% (31/135), respectively. By receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, 1⁃, 2⁃year plasma EBV⁃DNA levels were higher judged on accuracy of 1⁃, 2⁃year recurrence rate (Az1=0�944,Az2=0�925;P<0�05). Conclusion Quantification of plasma EBV⁃DNA level can better reflect the efficacy of locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma after comprehen⁃sive treatment

  3. DNA methylation in mouse embryonic stem cells and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Tom; Gilbert, Nick; Ramsahoye, Bernard

    2008-01-01

    Mammalian development is associated with considerable changes in global DNA methylation levels at times of genomic reprogramming. Normal DNA methylation is essential for development but, despite considerable advances in our understanding of the DNA methyltransferases, the reason that development fails when DNA methylation is deficient remains unclear. Furthermore, although much is known about the enzymes that cause DNA methylation, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms or significance of active demethylation in early development. In this review, we discuss the roles of the various DNA methyltransferases and their likely functions in development.

  4. DNA nanostructure immobilization to lithographic DNA arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrete, Omar D.

    Although DNA is well known for its genetic role in biology, DNA has also been sought-after as a material for the self-assembly of biological and electronic devices. Examples of DNA nanostructure construction include DNA tiled self-assembly and DNA Origami, where by controlling the sequence and concentration of DNA molecules, the rational design of geometric DNA nanostructures is possible. The assembly of DNA nanostructures takes place in solution and thus they are in disorder and require further organization to construct circuitry or devices. Hence, it is essential for future applications of this technology to develop methods to direct the placement of DNA nanostructures on a surface. To address this challenge my research examines the use of DNA microarrays to capture DNA nanostructures via DNA hybridization. Modern DNA arrays offer a high-density of sequence-specific molecular recognition sites where the addressable placement of DNA nanostructures can be achieved. Using Maskless Array Synthesizer (MAS) technology, I have characterized photolithographic DNA arrays for the hybridization of DNA complexes like large DNA molecules (> 1 kb), DNA-gold nanoparticle conjugates, and DNA Origami. Although modern photolithographic DNA arrays can possess a high-density of sequence (106/cm2), the printed DNA areas are on the order of tens of microns. Thus, I have also developed a method to reduce the DNA array spot size to nanoscale dimensions through the combined use of electron beam lithography with photolithographic DNA synthesis. This work addresses the key elements towards developing a surface patterning technology that takes advantage of DNA base-pairing for both molecular sub-assembly and surface patterning.

  5. Advances of nanoparticle-DNA vaccine of house dust mite%纳米粒子-DNA疫苗治疗屋尘螨抗原过敏的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    崔运勇; 杨慧

    2011-01-01

    Der p 1 and Der p 2 are the most characteristic allergic antigen during the research of house dust mite desensitization therapy, Der p 2 is substituting the former because of its stability and resistance to degradation. The traditional specific immunotherapy is limited because of long cure cycle,side effect and the lack of patients' compliance. Though oral DNA vaccine don't have these drawbacks, it's difficult to overcome the substance during GI tract. Nanoparticles-DNA vaccine is widely used in recent years,the main advantage of nanoparticles embed with DNA vaccines is it can effectively protect the DNA vaccine. This article is a review of the research of using nanoparticles in curing house dust mite allergy.%在屋尘螨多种变应原中,Der p1和Der p2是研制屋尘螨变应原疫苗主要的特异性抗原,而Der p2由于较Der p1更稳定和耐降解正逐渐取代后者.传统的过敏原特异性治疗的周期长、易产生不良反应、患者依从性差,口服DNA疫苗可以消除上述困难,但又难以克服消化道中的各种屏障,利用纳米粒子包被DNA疫苗可以有效保护DNA疫苗不被降解,因此得到了广泛认可.本文就纳米粒子-DNA疫苗治疗屋尘螨抗原过敏的研究进展作一综述.

  6. Mendel Meets CSI: Forensic Genotyping as a Method to Teach Genetics & DNA Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurowski, Scotia; Reiss, Rebecca

    2007-01-01

    This article describes a forensic DNA science laboratory exercise for advanced high school and introductory college level biology courses. Students use a commercial genotyping kit and genetic analyzer or gene sequencer to analyze DNA recovered from a fictitious crime scene. DNA profiling and STR genotyping are outlined. DNA extraction, PCR, and…

  7. Advancing Leadership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penny L. Tenuto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Preparing students to become active citizens and contributors to a democratic society is premised on teaching democratic principles and modeling standards of democratic practice at all levels of education. The purpose of this integrative literature review is to establish a conceptual framework grounded in literature and a model for cultivating democratic professional practice in education (DPPE to advance leadership for school improvement. This work is presented in three parts: (a a review of historical references, reports, and legislation that culminated in increased accountability and standards in P-12 public education; (b a discussion of social patterns in education generally associated with bureaucracy versus democracy; and (c a new contribution to the literature, a model for cultivating DPPE is conceptualized to encourage leading and teaching professionals to reflect on beliefs and evaluate practices in advancing leadership for school improvement. Recommendations are included for further research.

  8. Advanced Virgo

    CERN Multimedia

    Virgo, a first-generation interferometric gravitational wave (GW) detector, located in the European Gravitational Observatory, EGO, Cascina (Pisa-Italy) and constructed by the collaboration of French and Italian institutes (CNRS and INFN) has successfully completed its long-duration data taking runs. It is now undergoing a fundamental upgrade that exploits available cutting edges technology to open an exciting new window on the universe, with the first detection of a gravitational wave signal. Advanced Virgo (AdV) is the project to upgrade the Virgo detector to a second-generation instrument. AdV will be able to scan a volume of the Universe 1000 times larger than initial Virgo. AdV will be hosted in the same infrastructures as Virgo. The Advanced VIRGO project is funded and at present carried on by a larger collaboration of institutes belonging to CNRS- France , RMKI - Hungary, INFN- Italy, Nikhef - The Netherlands Polish Academy of Science - Poland.

  9. Advanced LIGO

    OpenAIRE

    Aasi, J.; Abbott, B.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O.; Ain, A.

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry–Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recyc...

  10. Advanced Combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R. [NETL

    2013-03-11

    The activity reported in this presentation is to provide the mechanical and physical property information needed to allow rational design, development and/or choice of alloys, manufacturing approaches, and environmental exposure and component life models to enable oxy-fuel combustion boilers to operate at Ultra-Supercritical (up to 650{degrees}C & between 22-30 MPa) and/or Advanced Ultra-Supercritical conditions (760{degrees}C & 35 MPa).

  11. Conducting polymers for electrochemical DNA sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hui; Zhang, Lijuan; Soeller, Christian; Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka

    2009-04-01

    Conducting polymers (CPs) are a class of polymeric materials that have attracted considerable interest because of their unique electronic, chemical and biochemical properties, making them suitable for numerous applications such as energy storage, memory devices, chemical sensors, and in electrocatalysis. Conducting polymer-based electrochemical DNA sensors have shown applicability in a number of areas related to human health such as diagnosis of infectious diseases, genetic mutations, drug discovery, forensics and food technology due to their simplicity and high sensitivity. This review paper summarizes the advances in electrochemical DNA sensing based on conducting polymers as active substrates. The various conducting polymers used for DNA detection, along with different DNA immobilization and detection methodologies are presented. Current trends in this field and newly developed applications due to advances in nanotechnology are also discussed.

  12. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369] PMID:27099236

  13. Forensic DNA methylation profiling from evidence material for investigative leads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hwan Young; Lee, Soong Deok; Shin, Kyoung-Jin

    2016-07-01

    DNA methylation is emerging as an attractive marker providing investigative leads to solve crimes in forensic genetics. The identification of body fluids that utilizes tissue-specific DNA methylation can contribute to solving crimes by predicting activity related to the evidence material. The age estimation based on DNA methylation is expected to reduce the number of potential suspects, when the DNA profile from the evidence does not match with any known person, including those stored in the forensic database. Moreover, the variation in DNA implicates environmental exposure, such as cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption, thereby suggesting the possibility to be used as a marker for predicting the lifestyle of potential suspect. In this review, we describe recent advances in our understanding of DNA methylation variations and the utility of DNA methylation as a forensic marker for advanced investigative leads from evidence materials. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(7): 359-369].

  14. Reduction of adverse effects by a mushroom product, active hexose correlated compound (AHCC) in patients with advanced cancer during chemotherapy--the significance of the levels of HHV-6 DNA in saliva as a surrogate biomarker during chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Toshinori; Urushima, Hayato; Sakaue, Miki; Yukawa, Sayoko; Honda, Hatsumi; Hirai, Kei; Igura, Takumi; Hayashi, Noriyuki; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Kitagawa, Toru; Kondo, Kazuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Chemotherapy improves the outcome of cancer treatment, but patients are sometimes forced to discontinue chemotherapy or drop out of a clinical trial due to adverse effects, such as gastrointestinal disturbances and suppression of bone marrow function. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a mushroom product, active hexose correlated compound (AHCC), on chemotherapy-induced adverse effects and quality of life (QOL) in patients with cancer. Twenty-four patients with cancer received their first cycle of chemotherapy without AHCC and then received their second cycle with AHCC. During chemotherapy, we weekly evaluated adverse effects and QOL via a blood test, EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire, and DNA levels of herpes virus type 6 (HHV-6) in saliva. The DNA levels of HHV-6 were significantly increased after chemotherapy. Interestingly, administration of AHCC significantly decreased the levels of HHV-6 in saliva during chemotherapy and improved not only QOL scores in the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire but also hematotoxicity and hepatotoxicity. These findings suggest that salivary HHV-6 levels may be a good biomarker of QOL in patients during chemotherapy, and that AHCC may have a beneficial effect on chemotherapy-associated adverse effects and QOL in patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.

  15. Advanced trigonometry

    CERN Document Server

    Durell, C V

    2003-01-01

    This volume will provide a welcome resource for teachers seeking an undergraduate text on advanced trigonometry, when few are readily available. Ideal for self-study, this text offers a clear, logical presentation of topics and an extensive selection of problems with answers. Contents include the properties of the triangle and the quadrilateral; equations, sub-multiple angles, and inverse functions; hyperbolic, logarithmic, and exponential functions; and expansions in power-series. Further topics encompass the special hyperbolic functions; projection and finite series; complex numbers; de Moiv

  16. Flotation advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clifford, D.

    1998-11-01

    This paper describes recent advances in flotation cell and mechanism design. OutoKumpu have designed larger cells, suitable for the flotation of smaller particles, with differing mechanisms for particles of different types. Froth handling is also closely controlled. Flotation cells from BQR are also described. Flotation columns are also increasingly being adopted, complementing the use of conventional flotation cells. Designs by Wemco, Multotec, VERTI-MIX, Jameson, Suedala, Quinn and Cytec are detailed, giving improvements in fine coal separation coarse particle separation, and other innovations. 8 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Avner

    2007-01-01

    This rigorous two-part treatment advances from functions of one variable to those of several variables. Intended for students who have already completed a one-year course in elementary calculus, it defers the introduction of functions of several variables for as long as possible, and adds clarity and simplicity by avoiding a mixture of heuristic and rigorous arguments.The first part explores functions of one variable, including numbers and sequences, continuous functions, differentiable functions, integration, and sequences and series of functions. The second part examines functions of several

  18. Advanced calculus

    CERN Document Server

    Widder, David V

    2012-01-01

    This classic text by a distinguished mathematician and former Professor of Mathematics at Harvard University, leads students familiar with elementary calculus into confronting and solving more theoretical problems of advanced calculus. In his preface to the first edition, Professor Widder also recommends various ways the book may be used as a text in both applied mathematics and engineering.Believing that clarity of exposition depends largely on precision of statement, the author has taken pains to state exactly what is to be proved in every case. Each section consists of definitions, theorem

  19. Tumorigenic DNA viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, G.

    1989-01-01

    The eighth volume of Advances in Viral Oncology focuses on the three major DNA virus groups with a postulated or proven tumorigenic potential: papillomaviruses, animal hepatitis viruses, and the Epstein-Bar virus. In the opening chapters, the contributors analyze the evidence that papillomaviruses and animal hepatitis viruses are involved in tumorigenesis and describe the mechanisms that trigger virus-host cell interactions. A detailed section on the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) - comprising more than half the book - examines the transcription and mRNA processing patterns of the virus genome; the mechanisms by which EBV infects lymphoid and epithelial cells; the immunological aspects of the virus; the actions of EBV in hosts with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; and the involvement of EBV in the etiology of Burkitt's lymphoma.

  20. Advanced LIGO

    CERN Document Server

    ,

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, ...

  1. Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Aasi, J.; Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T.; Abernathy, M. R.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V.; Affeldt, C.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Alemic, A.; Allen, B.; Amariutei, D.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C.; Areeda, J. S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, S.; Aston, S. M.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Aylott, B. E.; Babak, S.; Baker, P. T.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barbet, M.; Barclay, S.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Bartlett, J.; Barton, M. A.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Behnke, B.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C.; Benacquista, M.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Biscans, S.; Biwer, C.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blackburn, L.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bork, R.; Born, M.; Bose, Sukanta; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Brau, J. E.; Bridges, D. O.; Brinkmann, M.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchman, S.; Buikema, A.; Buonanno, A.; Cadonati, L.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Caride, S.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cepeda, C.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chen, Y.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Collette, C.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Countryman, S.; Couvares, P.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Creighton, T. D.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cutler, C.; Dahl, K.; Dal Canton, T.; Damjanic, M.; Danilishin, S. L.; Danzmann, K.; Dartez, L.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; DeBra, D.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dergachev, V.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; D´ıaz, M.; Di Palma, I.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dominguez, E.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Dwyer, S.; Eberle, T.; Edo, T.; Edwards, M.; Edwards, M.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Essick, R.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T.; Factourovich, M.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Feldbaum, D.; Ferreira, E. C.; Fisher, R. P.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fuentes-Tapia, S.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gair, J. R.; Gaonkar, S.; Gehrels, N.; Gergely, L. Á.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Gleason, J.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gordon, N.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S.; Goßler, S.; Gräf, C.; Graff, P. B.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Gretarsson, A. M.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guido, C. J.; Guo, X.; Gushwa, K.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Hanke, M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Hee, S.; Heintze, M.; Heinzel, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hewitson, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huerta, E.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh, M.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Islas, G.; Isler, J. C.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacobson, M.; Jang, H.; Jawahar, S.; Ji, Y.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Ju, L.; Haris, K.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, H.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Keiser, G. M.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Keppel, D. G.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kim, C.; Kim, K.; Kim, N. G.; Kim, N.; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Klimenko, S.; Kline, J.; Koehlenbeck, S.; Kokeyama, K.; Kondrashov, V.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Landry, M.; Lantz, B.; Larson, S.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Le, J.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Leong, J. R.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B.; Lewis, J.; Li, T. G. F.; Libbrecht, K.; Libson, A.; Lin, A. C.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Lockett, V.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; Lormand, M.; Lough, J.; Lubinski, M. J.

    2015-04-01

    The Advanced LIGO gravitational wave detectors are second-generation instruments designed and built for the two LIGO observatories in Hanford, WA and Livingston, LA, USA. The two instruments are identical in design, and are specialized versions of a Michelson interferometer with 4 km long arms. As in Initial LIGO, Fabry-Perot cavities are used in the arms to increase the interaction time with a gravitational wave, and power recycling is used to increase the effective laser power. Signal recycling has been added in Advanced LIGO to improve the frequency response. In the most sensitive frequency region around 100 Hz, the design strain sensitivity is a factor of 10 better than Initial LIGO. In addition, the low frequency end of the sensitivity band is moved from 40 Hz down to 10 Hz. All interferometer components have been replaced with improved technologies to achieve this sensitivity gain. Much better seismic isolation and test mass suspensions are responsible for the gains at lower frequencies. Higher laser power, larger test masses and improved mirror coatings lead to the improved sensitivity at mid and high frequencies. Data collecting runs with these new instruments are planned to begin in mid-2015.

  2. DNA detection using recombination proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf Piepenburg

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available DNA amplification is essential to most nucleic acid testing strategies, but established techniques require sophisticated equipment or complex experimental procedures, and their uptake outside specialised laboratories has been limited. Our novel approach, recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA, couples isothermal recombinase-driven primer targeting of template material with strand-displacement DNA synthesis. It achieves exponential amplification with no need for pretreatment of sample DNA. Reactions are sensitive, specific, and rapid and operate at constant low temperature. We have also developed a probe-based detection system. Key aspects of the combined RPA amplification/detection process are illustrated by a test for the pathogen methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. The technology proves to be sensitive to fewer than ten copies of genomic DNA. Furthermore, products can be detected in a simple sandwich assay, thereby establishing an instrument-free DNA testing system. This unique combination of properties is a significant advance in the development of portable and widely accessible nucleic acid-based tests.

  3. Nucleotide Metabolism and DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Digby F; Evans, Joanna C; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2014-10-01

    The development and application of a highly versatile suite of tools for mycobacterial genetics, coupled with widespread use of "omics" approaches to elucidate the structure, function, and regulation of mycobacterial proteins, has led to spectacular advances in our understanding of the metabolism and physiology of mycobacteria. In this article, we provide an update on nucleotide metabolism and DNA replication in mycobacteria, highlighting key findings from the past 10 to 15 years. In the first section, we focus on nucleotide metabolism, ranging from the biosynthesis, salvage, and interconversion of purine and pyrimidine ribonucleotides to the formation of deoxyribonucleotides. The second part of the article is devoted to DNA replication, with a focus on replication initiation and elongation, as well as DNA unwinding. We provide an overview of replication fidelity and mutation rates in mycobacteria and summarize evidence suggesting that DNA replication occurs during states of low metabolic activity, and conclude by suggesting directions for future research to address key outstanding questions. Although this article focuses primarily on observations from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, it is interspersed, where appropriate, with insights from, and comparisons with, other mycobacterial species as well as better characterized bacterial models such as Escherichia coli. Finally, a common theme underlying almost all studies of mycobacterial metabolism is the potential to identify and validate functions or pathways that can be exploited for tuberculosis drug discovery. In this context, we have specifically highlighted those processes in mycobacterial DNA replication that might satisfy this critical requirement.

  4. The bacteriophage DNA packaging motor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Venigalla B; Feiss, Michael

    2008-01-01

    An ATP-powered DNA translocation machine encapsidates the viral genome in the large dsDNA bacteriophages. The essential components include the empty shell, prohead, and the packaging enzyme, terminase. During translocation, terminase is docked on the prohead's portal protein. The translocation ATPase and the concatemer-cutting endonuclease reside in terminase. Remarkably, terminases, portal proteins, and shells of tailed bacteriophages and herpes viruses show conserved features. These DNA viruses may have descended from a common ancestor. Terminase's ATPase consists of a classic nucleotide binding fold, most closely resembling that of monomeric helicases. Intriguing models have been proposed for the mechanism of dsDNA translocation, invoking ATP hydrolysis-driven conformational changes of portal or terminase powering DNA motion. Single-molecule studies show that the packaging motor is fast and powerful. Recent advances permit experiments that can critically test the packaging models. The viral genome translocation mechanism is of general interest, given the parallels between terminases, helicases, and other motor proteins.

  5. DNA sequencing by CE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karger, Barry L; Guttman, András

    2009-06-01

    Sequencing of human and other genomes has been at the center of interest in the biomedical field over the past several decades and is now leading toward an era of personalized medicine. During this time, DNA-sequencing methods have evolved from the labor-intensive slab gel electrophoresis, through automated multiCE systems using fluorophore labeling with multispectral imaging, to the "next-generation" technologies of cyclic-array, hybridization based, nanopore and single molecule sequencing. Deciphering the genetic blueprint and follow-up confirmatory sequencing of Homo sapiens and other genomes were only possible with the advent of modern sequencing technologies that were a result of step-by-step advances with a contribution of academics, medical personnel and instrument companies. While next-generation sequencing is moving ahead at breakneck speed, the multicapillary electrophoretic systems played an essential role in the sequencing of the Human Genome, the foundation of the field of genomics. In this prospective, we wish to overview the role of CE in DNA sequencing based in part of several of our articles in this journal.

  6. Distinct DNA methylomes of newborns and centenarians

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heyn, Holger; Li, Ning; Ferreira, Humberto J.

    2012-01-01

    Human aging cannot be fully understood in terms of the constrained genetic setting. Epigenetic drift is an alternative means of explaining age-associated alterations. To address this issue, we performed whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS) of newborn and centenarian genomes. The centenarian DNA...... was observed in CpG island promoters. We extended the study to a larger cohort of newborn and nonagenarian samples using a 450,000 CpG-site DNA methylation microarray that reinforced the observation of more hypomethylated DNA sequences in the advanced age group. WGBS and 450,000 analyses of middle-age...

  7. 维生素D缺乏和 DNA甲基化在年龄相关性黄斑变性中的研究现状%Advances in vitamin D deficiency and DNA methylation in age - related macular degeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张博; 白洁; 董丽; 刘平; 郑轶

    2016-01-01

    年龄相关性黄斑变性( age-related macular degeneration,  AMD)是世界范围内中老年人视力丧失的主要疾病之一,是多病因多因素多机制介导的慢性退行性眼科疾病。AMD确切发病机制仍不明确,众多研究发现年龄、遗传、营养失衡、表观遗传学、氧化应激、补体激活和炎症反应等多种因素参与其发病。近年来研究发现机体维生素D水平和DNA甲基化与AMD发病有一定关系。以下将维生素D缺乏和DNA甲基化在AMD发病机制的作用进行简要综述。%•Age-related macular degeneration ( AMD) is one of the main diseases in the world leading to vision loss in the elderly, and is a multi-factorial and multi-mechanism mediated chronic degenerative eye disease. The exact pathogenesis of AMD is still not clear, and many studies found that age, genetic factors, nutritional imbalance, epigenetics, oxidative stress, a variety of complement factors activation and inflammatory reaction were involved in the pathogenesis. Recent studies have found that vitamin D levels and DNA methylation were closely related to AMD. Thus, a simple generalization of vitamin D deficiency and DNA methylation in the pathogenesis of AMD were made.

  8. Molecular Mechanisms of DNA Polymerase Clamp Loaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelch, Brian; Makino, Debora; Simonetta, Kyle; O'Donnell, Mike; Kuriyan, John

    Clamp loaders are ATP-driven multiprotein machines that couple ATP hydrolysis to the opening and closing of a circular protein ring around DNA. This ring-shaped clamp slides along DNA, and interacts with numerous proteins involved in DNA replication, DNA repair and cell cycle control. Recently determined structures of clamp loader complexes from prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases have revealed exciting new details of how these complex AAA+ machines perform this essential clamp loading function. This review serves as background to John Kuriyan's lecture at the 2010 Erice School, and is not meant as a comprehensive review of the contributions of the many scientists who have advanced this field. These lecture notes are derived from recent reviews and research papers from our groups.

  9. ATRF Houses the Latest DNA Sequencing Technologies | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    By Ashley DeVine, Staff Writer By the end of October, the Advanced Technology Research Facility (ATRF) will be one of the few facilities in the world to house all of the latest DNA sequencing technologies.

  10. Efficient Production of Single-Stranded Phage DNA as Scaffolds for DNA Origami

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami enables the fabrication of a variety of complex nanostructures that promise utility in diverse fields of application, ranging from biosensing over advanced therapeutics to metamaterials. The broad applicability of DNA origami as a material beyond the level of proof-of-concept studies critically depends, among other factors, on the availability of large amounts of pure single-stranded scaffold DNA. Here, we present a method for the efficient production of M13 bacteriophage-derived genomic DNA using high-cell-density fermentation of Escherichia coli in stirred-tank bioreactors. We achieve phage titers of up to 1.6 × 1014 plaque-forming units per mL. Downstream processing yields up to 410 mg of high-quality single-stranded DNA per one liter reaction volume, thus upgrading DNA origami-based nanotechnology from the milligram to the gram scale. PMID:26028443

  11. DNA fingerprinting, DNA barcoding, and next generation sequencing technology in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sucher, Nikolaus J; Hennell, James R; Carles, Maria C

    2012-01-01

    DNA fingerprinting of plants has become an invaluable tool in forensic, scientific, and industrial laboratories all over the world. PCR has become part of virtually every variation of the plethora of approaches used for DNA fingerprinting today. DNA sequencing is increasingly used either in combination with or as a replacement for traditional DNA fingerprinting techniques. A prime example is the use of short, standardized regions of the genome as taxon barcodes for biological identification of plants. Rapid advances in "next generation sequencing" (NGS) technology are driving down the cost of sequencing and bringing large-scale sequencing projects into the reach of individual investigators. We present an overview of recent publications that demonstrate the use of "NGS" technology for DNA fingerprinting and DNA barcoding applications.

  12. Efficient Production of Single-Stranded Phage DNA as Scaffolds for DNA Origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kick, Benjamin; Praetorius, Florian; Dietz, Hendrik; Weuster-Botz, Dirk

    2015-07-08

    Scaffolded DNA origami enables the fabrication of a variety of complex nanostructures that promise utility in diverse fields of application, ranging from biosensing over advanced therapeutics to metamaterials. The broad applicability of DNA origami as a material beyond the level of proof-of-concept studies critically depends, among other factors, on the availability of large amounts of pure single-stranded scaffold DNA. Here, we present a method for the efficient production of M13 bacteriophage-derived genomic DNA using high-cell-density fermentation of Escherichia coli in stirred-tank bioreactors. We achieve phage titers of up to 1.6 × 10(14) plaque-forming units per mL. Downstream processing yields up to 410 mg of high-quality single-stranded DNA per one liter reaction volume, thus upgrading DNA origami-based nanotechnology from the milligram to the gram scale.

  13. Superstatistical model of bacterial DNA architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Markelov, Oleg A.; Kayumov, Airat R.; Bunde, Armin

    2017-02-01

    Understanding the physical principles that govern the complex DNA structural organization as well as its mechanical and thermodynamical properties is essential for the advancement in both life sciences and genetic engineering. Recently we have discovered that the complex DNA organization is explicitly reflected in the arrangement of nucleotides depicted by the universal power law tailed internucleotide interval distribution that is valid for complete genomes of various prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Here we suggest a superstatistical model that represents a long DNA molecule by a series of consecutive ~150 bp DNA segments with the alternation of the local nucleotide composition between segments exhibiting long-range correlations. We show that the superstatistical model and the corresponding DNA generation algorithm explicitly reproduce the laws governing the empirical nucleotide arrangement properties of the DNA sequences for various global GC contents and optimal living temperatures. Finally, we discuss the relevance of our model in terms of the DNA mechanical properties. As an outlook, we focus on finding the DNA sequences that encode a given protein while simultaneously reproducing the nucleotide arrangement laws observed from empirical genomes, that may be of interest in the optimization of genetic engineering of long DNA molecules.

  14. Prosthetic advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Zach T; Potter, Benjamin K; Vandersea, James; Wolf, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Much of the current prosthetic technology is based on developments that have taken place during or directly following times of war. These developments have evolved and improved over the years, and now there are many more available options to provide a comfortable, cosmetic, and highly functional prosthesis. Even so, problems with fit and function persist. Recent developments have addressed some of the limitations faced by some military amputees. On-board microprocessor-controlled joints are making prosthetic arms and legs more responsive to environmental barriers and easier to control by the user. Advances in surgical techniques will allow more intuitive control and secure attachment to the prosthesis. As surgical techniques progress and permeate into standard practice, more sophisticated powered prosthetic devices will become commonplace, helping to restore neuromuscular loss of function. Prognoses following amputation will certainly rise, factoring into the surgeon's decision to attempt to save a limb versus perform an amputation.

  15. Advances in intracellular DNA sensors of PYHIN family and mechanisms of viral evasion of innate immune responses%DNA 识别受体 PYHIN 家族及相关病毒免疫逃逸机制的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏巍; 汪速飞; 倪明; 余冰

    2016-01-01

    宿主细胞内的DNA识别受体可识别病毒核酸分子并激活细胞天然免疫反应,从而产生抗病毒效应;同时,病毒也进化出相应机制来逃避或抑制这种免疫反应。本文总结了宿主细胞内 DNA识别受体PYHIN家族识别病毒核酸并激活细胞天然免疫反应的特点和分子机制,并讨论了病毒逃避宿主天然免疫应答的方式。%The intracellular DNA sensors in host cells recognize viral nucleic acid and activate the innate immunity , then resulting in antiviral effects . However , the viral pathogens have also evolved with appropriate strategies to evade or suppress the innate immune responses .In this review ,the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of the immune effects of PYHIN family ,one of the DNA sensors in host cells that could recognize viral DNA and activate innate immunity are discussed .The strategies of how viruses escape from the immune surveillance are also summarized .

  16. DNA双链断裂与同源重组修复的研究进展%Advance in Research of Homologous Recombination Repair in DNA Double Strands Breakage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董隽; 张天; 碧秀

    2015-01-01

    DNA双链断裂(DSB)是细胞受到电离辐射后最严重的DNA损伤,导致细胞凋亡、细胞周期阻滞以及DNA损伤修复。DNA损伤发生后,激活细胞内DNA损伤应答,启动DSB修复通路同源重组(HR)和非同源重组末端连接(NHEJ)。HR修复分为联会前期、联会期和联会后期,以姐妹染色单体为模板,进行无错误修复,是保护基因组完整性的主要机制。对IR导致的DSB HR和NHEJ具有互补关系,G2和S期HR是主要修复方式。HR是肿瘤发病风险、预后指标和治疗靶点,合成致死是HR用于肿瘤靶向治疗的重要机制。本文主要对DSB修复过程中所涉及HR修复通路中的分子机制、合成致死概念及其与NHEJ修复的关系作一综述,并探讨其成为转化医学研究和潜在临床应用的可能性。%DNA double strand breakage (DSB) is the most significantly biological effect when cells are exposed to ionizing radiation (IR) which may result in apoptosis, checkpoint arrest, cellular senescence and DSB repair. DNA damage response (DDR) is activated with induction of DNA damage. The mechanisms involved in DSB repair include homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). HR, a template-dependent and mostly error-free pathway, plays a crucial role in protecting genome fidelity from DSB. It can be divided into three phases including presynaptic, synaptic and postsynaptic phases. For the repair of DSBs caused by IR, HR is mainly restricted in G2 and S phases while NHEJ and HR function complementarily. HR is related to the risk of tumorigenesis, predicts the survival of several kinds of carcinoma and is a novel target of cancer therapy. This article has comprehensively reviewed the progress in understanding of the mechanism of HR repair, its associated factors affecting the fidelity in DSB repair, the concept of synthetic lethality and its association with NHEJ repair. The potential of its clinical application by

  17. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  18. Number matters: control of mammalian mitochondrial DNA copy number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay Montier, Laura L; Deng, Janice J; Bai, Yidong

    2009-03-01

    Regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis is essential for proper cellular functioning. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) depletion and the resulting mitochondrial malfunction have been implicated in cancer, neurodegeneration, diabetes, aging, and many other human diseases. Although it is known that the dynamics of the mammalian mitochondrial genome are not linked with that of the nuclear genome, very little is known about the mechanism of mtDNA propagation. Nevertheless, our understanding of the mode of mtDNA replication has advanced in recent years, though not without some controversies. This review summarizes our current knowledge of mtDNA copy number control in mammalian cells, while focusing on both mtDNA replication and turnover. Although mtDNA copy number is seemingly in excess, we reason that mtDNA copy number control is an important aspect of mitochondrial genetics and biogenesis and is essential for normal cellular function.

  19. DNA Microarray-Based Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzancola, Mahsa Gharibi; Sedighi, Abootaleb; Li, Paul C H

    2016-01-01

    The DNA microarray technology is currently a useful biomedical tool which has been developed for a variety of diagnostic applications. However, the development pathway has not been smooth and the technology has faced some challenges. The reliability of the microarray data and also the clinical utility of the results in the early days were criticized. These criticisms added to the severe competition from other techniques, such as next-generation sequencing (NGS), impacting the growth of microarray-based tests in the molecular diagnostic market.Thanks to the advances in the underlying technologies as well as the tremendous effort offered by the research community and commercial vendors, these challenges have mostly been addressed. Nowadays, the microarray platform has achieved sufficient standardization and method validation as well as efficient probe printing, liquid handling and signal visualization. Integration of various steps of the microarray assay into a harmonized and miniaturized handheld lab-on-a-chip (LOC) device has been a goal for the microarray community. In this respect, notable progress has been achieved in coupling the DNA microarray with the liquid manipulation microsystem as well as the supporting subsystem that will generate the stand-alone LOC device.In this chapter, we discuss the major challenges that microarray technology has faced in its almost two decades of development and also describe the solutions to overcome the challenges. In addition, we review the advancements of the technology, especially the progress toward developing the LOC devices for DNA diagnostic applications.

  20. Osmylated DNA, a novel concept for sequencing DNA using nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanavarioti, Anastassia

    2015-03-01

    Saenger sequencing has led the advances in molecular biology, while faster and cheaper next generation technologies are urgently needed. A newer approach exploits nanopores, natural or solid-state, set in an electrical field, and obtains base sequence information from current variations due to the passage of a ssDNA molecule through the pore. A hurdle in this approach is the fact that the four bases are chemically comparable to each other which leads to small differences in current obstruction. ‘Base calling’ becomes even more challenging because most nanopores sense a short sequence and not individual bases. Perhaps sequencing DNA via nanopores would be more manageable, if only the bases were two, and chemically very different from each other; a sequence of 1s and 0s comes to mind. Osmylated DNA comes close to such a sequence of 1s and 0s. Osmylation is the addition of osmium tetroxide bipyridine across the C5-C6 double bond of the pyrimidines. Osmylation adds almost 400% mass to the reactive base, creates a sterically and electronically notably different molecule, labeled 1, compared to the unreactive purines, labeled 0. If osmylated DNA were successfully sequenced, the result would be a sequence of osmylated pyrimidines (1), and purines (0), and not of the actual nucleobases. To solve this problem we studied the osmylation reaction with short oligos and with M13mp18, a long ssDNA, developed a UV-vis assay to measure extent of osmylation, and designed two protocols. Protocol A uses mild conditions and yields osmylated thymidines (1), while leaving the other three bases (0) practically intact. Protocol B uses harsher conditions and effectively osmylates both pyrimidines, but not the purines. Applying these two protocols also to the complementary of the target polynucleotide yields a total of four osmylated strands that collectively could define the actual base sequence of the target DNA.

  1. The DNA methylome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Yingrui; Zhu, Jingde; Tian, Geng;

    2010-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in biological processes in human health and disease. Recent technological advances allow unbiased whole-genome DNA methylation (methylome) analysis to be carried out on human cells. Using whole-genome bisulfite sequencing at 24.7-fold coverage (12.3-fold pe...

  2. Synthesis of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariella, Jr., Raymond P.

    2008-11-18

    A method of synthesizing a desired double-stranded DNA of a predetermined length and of a predetermined sequence. Preselected sequence segments that will complete the desired double-stranded DNA are determined. Preselected segment sequences of DNA that will be used to complete the desired double-stranded DNA are provided. The preselected segment sequences of DNA are assembled to produce the desired double-stranded DNA.

  3. Advanced capacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennis, J. B.; Buritz, R. S.

    1984-10-01

    This report describes an experimental program to develop and test advanced dielectric materials for capacitors for airborne power systems. Five classes of capacitors were considered: high rep rate and low rep rate pulse capacitors for use in pulse-forming networks, high voltage filter capacitors, high frequency AC capacitors for series resonant inverters, and AC filter capacitors. To meet these requirements, existing dielectric materials were modified, and new materials were developed. The initial goal was to develop an improved polysulfone film with fewer imperfections that could operate at significantly higher electrical stresses. It was shown that contaminants enter the film via the resin and solvent, and that they can be partially removed. As far as developed, however, these treatments did not significantly improved the breakdown characteristics. The technique of casting films on a roughened drum was demonstrated, and found useful in preparing textured films -- the first step toward a replacement for Kraft paper. A new material, Ultem, was proposed for use in high energy density capacitors. This new polyetherimide resin has properties similar to polysulfone and polyimide, with improvement in breakdown characteristics and temperature capability. This material was selected for further study in model capacitor designs.

  4. Addressing the Instability of DNA Nanostructures in Tissue Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Jaeseung; Wickham, Shelley F. J.; Shih, William M.; Perrault, Steven D.

    2014-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is an advanced technique that could contribute diagnostic, therapeutic, and biomedical research devices to nanomedicine. Although such devices are often developed and demonstrated using in vitro tissue culture models, these conditions may not be compatible with DNA nanostructure integrity and function. The purpose of this study was to characterize the sensitivity of 3D DNA nanostructures produced via the origami method to the in vitro tissue culture environment and identify...

  5. Programming and inheritance of parental DNA methylomes in vertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ci, Weimin; Liu, Jiang

    2015-01-01

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) is a major epigenetic modification in animals. The programming and inheritance of parental DNA methylomes ensures the compatibility for totipotency and embryonic development. In vertebrates, the DNA methylomes of sperm and oocyte are significantly different. During early embryogenesis, the paternal and maternal methylomes will reset to the same state. Herein, we focus on recent advances in how offspring obtain the DNA methylation information from parents in vertebrates.

  6. Advances in understanding clinical significance of circulating tumor cells and cell-free DNA methylation in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma%循环肿瘤细胞及游离DNA甲基化在肝细胞癌患者中的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邱必军; 薛峰; 余坚; 夏强

    2012-01-01

    During the early formation and growth of a primary tumor, tumor cells can be detached from the primary tumor and circulate through the bloodstream to form circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Also during the early stage of tumor development, apoptotic and necrotic tumor cells can release DNA into the bloodstream to form circulating cell-free DNA. Therefore, analysis of CTCs and circulating cell-free DNA is considered as a real-time "liquid biopsy" for cancer patients. CTCs are very heterogeneous and can be enriched and detected using different technologies based on their physical and biological properties. The use of modern molecular biological techniques to extract the cell-free DNA in circulating blood and detect aberrant genetic and epigenetic alterations can provide valuable information for the early diagnosis, prediction of response to therapy, recurrence monitoring and prognosis evaluation in cancer patients. In this paper, we will give a review of recent advances in understanding the clinical significance of CTCs and cell-free DNA in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma.%随着对肿瘤认识的不断深入,人们发现在原发肿瘤形成和生长的早期阶段,肿瘤细胞即可以脱离原发肿瘤组织释放到外周血形成循环肿瘤细胞,同样在肿瘤形成的早期阶段就会出现肿瘤细胞的坏死和凋亡,这些凋亡或坏死的肿瘤细胞也可以释放其DNA入外周血形成血浆或血清游离的DNA,因此对肿瘤患者循环肿瘤细胞及游离DNA的分析被认为是实时的“液相活检”,肿瘤患者中的循环肿瘤细胞具有非常强的异质性,我们可以根据其物理和生物学性质采用不同的技术对其进行富集和检测;可以借助现代分子生物学手段对循环游离DNA进行提取,并对其遗传学和表观遗传学的异常改变进行分析,这可为肿瘤的早期诊断、疗效评估、复发监测及预后判断提供重要的信息.本文结合本课题组的研究重点,就循环肿

  7. Dynamics and control of DNA sequence amplification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marimuthu, Karthikeyan [Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Advanced Process Decision-Making, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Chakrabarti, Raj, E-mail: raj@pmc-group.com, E-mail: rajc@andrew.cmu.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering and Center for Advanced Process Decision-Making, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15213 (United States); Division of Fundamental Research, PMC Advanced Technology, Mount Laurel, New Jersey 08054 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    DNA amplification is the process of replication of a specified DNA sequence in vitro through time-dependent manipulation of its external environment. A theoretical framework for determination of the optimal dynamic operating conditions of DNA amplification reactions, for any specified amplification objective, is presented based on first-principles biophysical modeling and control theory. Amplification of DNA is formulated as a problem in control theory with optimal solutions that can differ considerably from strategies typically used in practice. Using the Polymerase Chain Reaction as an example, sequence-dependent biophysical models for DNA amplification are cast as control systems, wherein the dynamics of the reaction are controlled by a manipulated input variable. Using these control systems, we demonstrate that there exists an optimal temperature cycling strategy for geometric amplification of any DNA sequence and formulate optimal control problems that can be used to derive the optimal temperature profile. Strategies for the optimal synthesis of the DNA amplification control trajectory are proposed. Analogous methods can be used to formulate control problems for more advanced amplification objectives corresponding to the design of new types of DNA amplification reactions.

  8. Molecular DNA switches and DNA chips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabanayagam, Chandran R.; Berkey, Cristin; Lavi, Uri; Cantor, Charles R.; Smith, Cassandra L.

    1999-06-01

    We present an assay to detect single-nucleotide polymorphisms on a chip using molecular DNA switches and isothermal rolling- circle amplification. The basic principle behind the switch is an allele-specific oligonucleotide circularization, mediated by DNA ligase. A DNA switch is closed when perfect hybridization between the probe oligonucleotide and target DNA allows ligase to covalently circularize the probe. Mismatches around the ligation site prevent probe circularization, resulting in an open switch. DNA polymerase is then used to preferentially amplify the closed switches, via rolling-circle amplification. The stringency of the molecular switches yields 102 - 103 fold discrimination between matched and mismatched sequences.

  9. Synthetic yeast based cell factories for vanillin-glucoside production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strucko, Tomas

    allowing for the introduction of large and complex metabolic pathways need to be added to the existing repertoire. To reduce the number of gene engineering steps required for cell factory construction, a new set of integrative “EasyClone” vectors have been developed in this study. This platform enables...... simultaneous integration of multiple genes with an option of recycling selection markers. Moreover, EasyClone vectors combine the advantage of efficient uracil-excision reaction based cloning that allows integration of one or two genes per plasmid and Cre-LoxP mediated marker recycling system. As a proof...... of concept, it was demonstrated that using EasyClone system it is possible to simultaneously integrate three DNA fragments carrying genes encoding for either yellow, cyan or red fluorescent proteins. In addition, all genetic markers were successfully removed using Cre-mediated recombination without...

  10. DNA Origami: Folded DNA-Nanodevices That Can Direct and Interpret Cell Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Cathal J; Lucas, Christopher R; O'Brien, Fergal J; Castro, Carlos E

    2016-07-01

    DNA origami is a DNA-based nanotechnology that utilizes programmed combinations of short complementary oligonucleotides to fold a large single strand of DNA into precise 2D and 3D shapes. The exquisite nanoscale shape control of this inherently biocompatible material is combined with the potential to spatially address the origami structures with diverse cargoes including drugs, antibodies, nucleic acid sequences, small molecules, and inorganic particles. This programmable flexibility enables the fabrication of precise nanoscale devices that have already shown great potential for biomedical applications such as: drug delivery, biosensing, and synthetic nanopore formation. Here, the advances in the DNA-origami field since its inception several years ago are reviewed with a focus on how these DNA-nanodevices can be designed to interact with cells to direct or probe their behavior.

  11. Germinal transmission of site-specific excised genomic DNA by the bacterial ParA resolvase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genome engineering is an essential tool in research and product development. Behind some of the recent advances in plant gene transfer is the development of site-specific recombination systems that enable the precise manipulation of DNA, e.g. the deletion, integration or translocation of DNA. DNA ...

  12. Conjugated Polymers/DNA Hybrid Materials for Protein Inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Likun; Zhang, Jiangyan; Xu, Huiming; Geng, Hao; Cheng, Yongqiang

    2016-09-01

    Chromophore-assisted light inactivation (CALI) is a powerful tool for analyzing protein functions due to the high degree of spatial and temporal resolution. In this work, we demonstrate a CALI approach based on conjugated polymers (CPs)/DNA hybrid material for protein inactivation. The target protein is conjugated with single-stranded DNA in advance. Single-stranded DNA can form CPs/DNA hybrid material with cationic CPs via electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Through the formation of CPs/DNA hybrid material, the target protein that is conjugated with DNA is brought into close proximity to CPs. Under irradiation, CPs harvest light and generate reactive oxygen species (ROS), resulting in the inactivation of the adjacent target protein. This approach can efficiently inactivate any target protein which is conjugated with DNA and has good specificity and universality, providing a new strategy for studies of protein function and adjustment of protein activity.

  13. DNA Damage Response and Immune Defence: Links and Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Björn Schumacher

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available DNA damage plays a causal role in numerous human pathologies including cancer, premature aging and chronic inflammatory conditions. In response to genotoxic insults, the DNA damage response (DDR orchestrates DNA damage checkpoint activation and facilitates the removal of DNA lesions. The DDR can also arouse the immune system by for example inducing the expression of antimicrobial peptides as well as ligands for receptors found on immune cells. The activation of immune signalling is triggered by different components of the DDR including DNA damage sensors, transducer kinases, and effectors. In this review, we describe recent advances on the understanding of the role of DDR in activating immune signalling. We highlight evidence gained into (i which molecular and cellular pathways of DDR activate immune signalling, (ii how DNA damage drives chronic inflammation, and (iii how chronic inflammation causes DNA damage and pathology in humans.

  14. MICROENCAPSULATION: ADVANCEMENTS IN APPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsh Chanana

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Microcapsule is a tiny sphere including core material/internal phase or fill, coated with/surrounded by wall know as shell, coating or membrane. The usual size range of the microcapsule lies between 1 to 1000 μm. The technique is usually applied for targeted drug delivery, protection of the molecule and stability if the core material. Microencapsulation system offers potential advantages over conventional drug delivery systems and also established as unique carrier systems for many pharmaceuticals. This article contains the traditional and the recent pharmaceutical applications of microecapsules. The microcapsules are widely applied in pharmaceutical for Novel drug Delivery System (NDDS, latest formulations, Delivery of DNA Vaccines, Pro Drug Approach, Biodegradable and biocompatible material. Other then pharmaceutical microcapsules are widely used in delivery of probiotic, pesticide industry, food technology, beverages and cell immobilization etc. Although significant advances have been made in the field of microencapsulation, still many challenges need to be rectified during the appropriate selection of core materials, coating materials and process techniques.

  15. Dental DNA fingerprinting in identification of human remains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K L Girish

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The recent advances in molecular biology have revolutionized all aspects of dentistry. DNA, the language of life yields information beyond our imagination, both in health or disease. DNA fingerprinting is a tool used to unravel all the mysteries associated with the oral cavity and its manifestations during diseased conditions. It is being increasingly used in analyzing various scenarios related to forensic science. The technical advances in molecular biology have propelled the analysis of the DNA into routine usage in crime laboratories for rapid and early diagnosis. DNA is an excellent means for identification of unidentified human remains. As dental pulp is surrounded by dentin and enamel, which forms dental armor, it offers the best source of DNA for reliable genetic type in forensic science. This paper summarizes the recent literature on use of this technique in identification of unidentified human remains.

  16. Electronic Activation of a DNA Nanodevice Using a Multilayer Nanofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Hyejoong; Ranallo, Simona; Rossetti, Marianna; Heo, Jiwoong; Shin, Jooseok; Park, Kwangyong; Ricci, Francesco; Hong, Jinkee

    2016-10-01

    A method to control activation of a DNA nanodevice by supplying a complementary DNA (cDNA) strand from an electro-responsive nanoplatform is reported. To develop functional nanoplatform, hexalayer nanofilm is precisely designed by layer-by-layer assembly technique based on electrostatic interaction with four kinds of materials: Hydrolyzed poly(β-amino ester) can help cDNA release from the film. A cDNA is used as a key building block to activate DNA nanodevice. Reduced graphene oxides (rGOs) and the conductive polymer provide conductivity. In particular, rGOs efficiently incorporate a cDNA in the film via several interactions and act as a barrier. Depending on the types of applied electronic stimuli (reductive and oxidative potentials), a cDNA released from the electrode can quantitatively control the activation of DNA nanodevice. From this report, a new system is successfully demonstrated to precisely control DNA release on demand. By applying more advanced form of DNA-based nanodevices into multilayer system, the electro-responsive nanoplatform will expand the availability of DNA nanotechnology allowing its improved application in areas such as diagnosis, biosensing, bioimaging, and drug delivery.

  17. Structural DNA nanotechnology for intelligent drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Jie; Liu, Huajie; Su, Shao; Wang, Lianhui; Huang, Wei; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-11-01

    Drug delivery carriers have been popularly employed to improve solubility, stability, and efficacy of chemical and biomolecular drugs. Despite the rapid progress in this field, it remains a great challenge to develop an ideal carrier with minimal cytotoxicity, high biocompatibility and intelligence for targeted controlled release. The emergence of DNA nanotechnology offers unprecedented opportunities in this regard. Due to the unparalleled self-recognition properties of DNA molecules, it is possible to create numerous artificial DNA nanostructures with well-defined structures and DNA nanodevices with precisely controlled motions. More importantly, recent studies have proven that DNA nanostructures possess greater permeability to the membrane barrier of cells, which pave the way to developing new drug delivery carriers with nucleic acids, are summarized. In this Concept, recent advances on the design and fabrication of both static and dynamic DNA nanostructures, and the use of these nanostructures for the delivery of various types of drugs, are highlighted. It is also demonstrated that dynamic DNA nanostructures provide the required intelligence to realize logically controlled drug release.

  18. Mitochondrial diseases: advances and issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpelli, Mauro; Todeschini, Alice; Volonghi, Irene; Padovani, Alessandro; Filosto, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial diseases (MDs) are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be related to mutation of genes encoded using either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. The advent of next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in studying the molecular bases of MDs will bring about a revolution in the field of mitochondrial medicine, also opening the possibility of better defining pathogenic mechanisms and developing novel therapeutic approaches for these devastating disorders. The canonical rules of mitochondrial medicine remain milestones, but novel issues have been raised following the use of advanced diagnostic technologies. Rigorous validation of the novel mutations detected using deep sequencing in patients with suspected MD, and a clear definition of the natural history, outcome measures, and biomarkers that could be usefully adopted in clinical trials, are mandatory goals for the scientific community. Today, therapy is often inadequate and mostly palliative. However, important advances have been made in treating some clinical entities, eg, mitochondrial neuro-gastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, for which approaches using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, orthotopic liver transplantation, and carrier erythrocyte entrapped thymidine phosphorylase enzyme therapy have recently been developed. Promising new treatment methods are being identified so that researchers, clinicians, and patients can join forces to change the history of these untreatable disorders. PMID:28243136

  19. IHF and HU: flexible architects of bent DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swinger, Kerren K; Rice, Phoebe A

    2004-02-01

    The energetic cost of bending short segments of DNA is very high. This bending is critical for the packaging of DNA and is exploited to regulate many cellular processes. In prokaryotes, IHF and HU are key architectural proteins present at high concentrations. New protein-DNA co-crystal structures, and the adaptation of advanced biophysical and biochemical techniques have led to an improved understanding of how these proteins interact with DNA. These techniques include time-resolved synchrotron X-ray footprinting, differential scanning calorimetry, isothermal titration calorimetry and single-molecule experiments.

  20. Carbon-based electrode materials for DNA electroanalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Dai; Niwa, Osamu

    2013-01-01

    This review addresses recent studies of newly developed carbon-based electrode materials and their use for DNA electroanalysis. Recently, new carbon materials including carbon nanotubes (CNT), graphene and diamond-based nanocarbon electrodes have been actively developed as sensing platforms for biomolecules, such as DNA and proteins. Electrochemical techniques using these new material-based electrodes can provide very simple and inexpensive sensing platforms, and so are expected to be used as one of the "post-light" DNA analysis methods, which include coulometric detection, amperometric detection with electroactive tags or intercalators, and potentiometric detection. DNA electroanalysis using these new carbon materials is summarized in view of recent advances on electrodes.

  1. DNA fragmentation in apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cleavage of chromosomal DNA into oligonucleosomal size fragments is an integral part of apoptosis. Elegant biochemical work identified the DNA fragmentation factor (DFF) as a major apoptotic endonuclease for DNA fragmentation in vitro. Genetic studies in mice support the importance of DFF in DNA fragmentation and possibly in apoptosis in vivo. Recent work also suggests the existence of additional endonucleases for DNA degradation. Understanding the roles of individual endonucleases in apoptosis, and how they might coordinate to degrade DNA in different tissues during normal development and homeostasis, as well as in various diseased states, will be a major research focus in the near future.

  2. Gibberellic Acid enhancement of DNA turnover in barley aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taiz, L; Starks, J E

    1977-08-01

    When imbibed, deembryonated halfseeds from barley (Hordeum vulgare L., var. Himalaya) are incubated in buffer, the DNA content of the aleurone layer increases 25 to 40% over a 24-hour period. In contrast, the DNA of isolated aleurone layers declines by 20% over the same time period. Gibberellic acid (GA) causes a reduction in DNA levels in both halfseed aleurone layers and isolated aleurone layers. GA also increases the specific radioactivity of [(3)H]thymidine-labeled halfseed aleurone layer DNA during the first 12 hours of treatment. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that the newly synthesized DNA is metabolically labile.The buoyant density on CsCl density gradients of hormone-treated aleurone DNA is identical with that of DNA extracted from whole seedlings. After density-labeling halfseed DNA with 5-bromodeoxyuridine, a bimodal absorption profile is obtained in neutral CsCl. The light band (1.70 g/ml) corresponds to unsubstituted DNA, while the heavy band (1.725-1.74 g/ml) corresponds to a hybrid density-labeled species. GA increases the relative amount of the heavy (hybrid) peak in halfseed aleurone layer DNA, further suggesting that the hormone enhances semiconservative replication in halfseeds.DNA methylation was also demonstrated. Over 60% of the radioactivity from [(3)H-Me]methionine is incorporated into 5-methylcytosine. GA has no effect on the percentage distribution of label among the bases.It was concluded that GA enhances the rate of DNA degradation and DNA synthesis (turnover) in halfseeds, but primarily DNA degradation in isolated aleurone layers. Incorporation by isolated aleurone layers is due to DNA repair. Semiconservative replication apparently plays no physiological role in the hormone response, since both isolated aleurone layers and gamma-irradiated halfseeds respond normally. The hypothesis was advanced that endoreduplication and DNA degradation are means by which the seed stores and mobilizes deoxyribonucleotides for the embryo during

  3. [Uracil-DNA glycosylases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pytel, Dariusz; Słupianek, Artur; Ksiazek, Dominika; Skórski, Tomasz; Błasiak, Janusz

    2008-01-01

    Uracil is one of four nitrogen bases, most frequently found in normal RNA. Uracyl can be found also in DNA as a result of enzymatic or non-enzymatic deamination of cytosine as well as misincorporation of dUMP instead of dTMP during DNA replication. Uracil from DNA can be removed by DNA repair enzymes with apirymidine site as an intermediate. However, if uracil is not removed from DNA a pair C:G in parental DNA can be changed into a T:A pair in the daughter DNA molecule. Therefore, uracil in DNA may lead to a mutation. Uracil in DNA, similarly to thymine, forms energetically most favorable hydrogen bonds with adenine, therefore uracil does not change the coding properties of DNA. Uracil in DNA is recognized by uracil DNA glycosylase (UDGs), which initiates DNA base excision repair, leading to removing of uracil from DNA and replacing it by thymine or cytosine, when arose as a result of cytosine deamination. Eukaryotes have at least four nuclear UDGs: UNG2, SMUG1, TDG i MBD4, while UNG1 operates in the mitochondrium. UNG2 is involved in DNA repair associated with DNA replication and interacts with PCNA and RPA proteins. Uracil can also be an intermediate product in the process of antigen-dependent antibody diversification in B lymphocytes. Enzymatic deamination of viral DNA by host cells can be a defense mechanism against viral infection, including HIV-1. UNG2, MBD4 and TDG glycosylases may cooperate with mismatch repair proteins and TDG can be involved in nucleotide excision repair system.

  4. DNA damage and autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Rocha, Humberto; Garcia-Garcia, Aracely [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States); Panayiotidis, Mihalis I. [School of Community Health Sciences, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557 (United States); Franco, Rodrigo, E-mail: rfrancocruz2@unl.edu [Redox Biology Center and School of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE 68583 (United States)

    2011-06-03

    Both exogenous and endogenous agents are a threat to DNA integrity. Exogenous environmental agents such as ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation, genotoxic chemicals and endogenous byproducts of metabolism including reactive oxygen species can cause alterations in DNA structure (DNA damage). Unrepaired DNA damage has been linked to a variety of human disorders including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. Thus, efficient mechanisms to detect DNA lesions, signal their presence and promote their repair have been evolved in cells. If DNA is effectively repaired, DNA damage response is inactivated and normal cell functioning resumes. In contrast, when DNA lesions cannot be removed, chronic DNA damage triggers specific cell responses such as cell death and senescence. Recently, DNA damage has been shown to induce autophagy, a cellular catabolic process that maintains a balance between synthesis, degradation, and recycling of cellular components. But the exact mechanisms by which DNA damage triggers autophagy are unclear. More importantly, the role of autophagy in the DNA damage response and cellular fate is unknown. In this review we analyze evidence that supports a role for autophagy as an integral part of the DNA damage response.

  5. DNA Sequencing Sensors: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Antonio Garrido-Cardenas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The first sequencing of a complete genome was published forty years ago by the double Nobel Prize in Chemistry winner Frederick Sanger. That corresponded to the small sized genome of a bacteriophage, but since then there have been many complex organisms whose DNA have been sequenced. This was possible thanks to continuous advances in the fields of biochemistry and molecular genetics, but also in other areas such as nanotechnology and computing. Nowadays, sequencing sensors based on genetic material have little to do with those used by Sanger. The emergence of mass sequencing sensors, or new generation sequencing (NGS meant a quantitative leap both in the volume of genetic material that was able to be sequenced in each trial, as well as in the time per run and its cost. One can envisage that incoming technologies, already known as fourth generation sequencing, will continue to cheapen the trials by increasing DNA reading lengths in each run. All of this would be impossible without sensors and detection systems becoming smaller and more precise. This article provides a comprehensive overview on sensors for DNA sequencing developed within the last 40 years.

  6. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George Roy; Leif, Roald N; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2015-05-05

    A simulant that includes a carrier and DNA encapsulated in the carrier. Also a method of making a simulant including the steps of providing a carrier and encapsulating DNA in the carrier to produce the simulant.

  7. Modeling DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Recommends the use of a model of DNA made out of Velcro to help students visualize the steps of DNA replication. Includes a materials list, construction directions, and details of the demonstration using the model parts. (DDR)

  8. DNA evidence: current perspective and future challenges in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sunil K; Goswami, Gajendra K

    2014-08-01

    Since the discovery of DNA fingerprinting technology in 1985 it has been used extensively as evidence in the court of law world-wide to establish the individual identity both in civil and criminal matters. In India, the first case of parentage dispute solved by the use of DNA fingerprinting technology was in 1989. Since then till date, the DNA technology has been used not only to resolve the cases of paternity and maternity disputes, but also for the establishment of individual identity in various criminal cases and for wildlife forensic identification. Since last half a decade, India is exercising to enact legislation on the use of DNA in the judicial realm and the draft 'Human DNA Bill-2012' is pending in the parliament. Largely, the promoters of forensic DNA testing have anticipated that DNA tests are nearly infallible and DNA technology could be the greatest single advance step in search for truth, conviction of the perpetrator, and acquittal of the innocent. The current article provides a comprehensive review on the status of DNA testing in India and elucidates the consequences of the admissibility of DNA as 'evidence' in the judicial dominion. In this backdrop of civil and criminal laws and changing ethical and societal attitudes, it is concluded that the DNA legislation in India and world-wide needs to be designed with utmost care.

  9. A novel constraint for thermodynamically designing DNA sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Zhang

    Full Text Available Biotechnological and biomolecular advances have introduced novel uses for DNA such as DNA computing, storage, and encryption. For these applications, DNA sequence design requires maximal desired (and minimal undesired hybridizations, which are the product of a single new DNA strand from 2 single DNA strands. Here, we propose a novel constraint to design DNA sequences based on thermodynamic properties. Existing constraints for DNA design are based on the Hamming distance, a constraint that does not address the thermodynamic properties of the DNA sequence. Using a unique, improved genetic algorithm, we designed DNA sequence sets which satisfy different distance constraints and employ a free energy gap based on a minimum free energy (MFE to gauge DNA sequences based on set thermodynamic properties. When compared to the best constraints of the Hamming distance, our method yielded better thermodynamic qualities. We then used our improved genetic algorithm to obtain lower-bound DNA sequence sets. Here, we discuss the effects of novel constraint parameters on the free energy gap.

  10. Click chemistry with DNA

    OpenAIRE

    El-Sagheer, Afaf H.; Brown, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The advent of click chemistry has led to an influx of new ideas in the nucleic acids field. The copper catalysed alkyne–azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) reaction is the method of choice for DNA click chemistry due to its remarkable efficiency. It has been used to label oligonucleotides with fluorescent dyes, sugars, peptides and other reporter groups, to cyclise DNA, to synthesise DNA catenanes, to join oligonucleotides to PNA, and to produce analogues of DNA with modified nucleobases and backbone...

  11. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    nanotubes with an irreversible energy consumption reaction, analogous to nucleotide hydrolysis in actin and microtubule polymerization. Finally, we integrated the DNA strand displacement circuits with DNA nanotube polymerization to achieve programmable kinetic control of behavior within artificial cytoskeleton. Our synthetic approach may provide insights into natural cytoskeleton dynamics, such as minimal architectural or reaction mechanism requirements for non-equilibrium behaviors including treadmilling and dynamic instability. The outgrowth of DNA nanotechnology beyond its own boundaries, serving as a general model system for biomolecular dynamics, can lead to an understanding of molecular processes that advances both basic and applied sciences.

  12. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  13. Self-assembly of DNA-functionalized colloids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.E. Theodorakis

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Colloidal particles grafted with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA chains can self-assemble into a number of different crystalline structures, where hybridization of the ssDNA chains creates links between colloids stabilizing their structure. Depending on the geometry and the size of the particles, the grafting density of the ssDNA chains, and the length and choice of DNA sequences, a number of different crystalline structures can be fabricated. However, understanding how these factors contribute synergistically to the self-assembly process of DNA-functionalized nano- or micro-sized particles remains an intensive field of research. Moreover, the fabrication of long-range structures due to kinetic bottlenecks in the self-assembly are additional challenges. Here, we discuss the most recent advances from theory and experiment with particular focus put on recent simulation studies.

  14. Three-Dimensional DNA Nanostructures Assembled from DNA Star Motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cheng; Zhang, Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Tile-based DNA self-assembly is a promising method in DNA nanotechnology and has produced a wide range of nanostructures by using a small set of unique DNA strands. DNA star motif, as one of DNA tiles, has been employed to assemble varieties of symmetric one-, two-, three-dimensional (1, 2, 3D) DNA nanostructures. Herein, we describe the design principles, assembly methods, and characterization methods of 3D DNA nanostructures assembled from the DNA star motifs.

  15. Fast phylogenetic DNA barcoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Terkelsen, Kasper Munch; Boomsma, Wouter Krogh; Willerslev, Eske

    2008-01-01

    We present a heuristic approach to the DNA assignment problem based on phylogenetic inferences using constrained neighbour joining and non-parametric bootstrapping. We show that this method performs as well as the more computationally intensive full Bayesian approach in an analysis of 500 insect...... DNA sequences obtained from GenBank. We also analyse a previously published dataset of environmental DNA sequences from soil from New Zealand and Siberia, and use these data to illustrate the fact that statistical approaches to the DNA assignment problem allow for more appropriate criteria...... for determining the taxonomic level at which a particular DNA sequence can be assigned....

  16. DNA: Structure and function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sinden, Richard R.; E. Pearson, Christopher; N. Potaman, Vladimir

    1998-01-01

    This chapter discusses the structure and function of DNA. DNA occupies a critical role in cells, because it is the source of all intrinsic genetic information. Chemically, DNA is a very stable molecule, a characteristic important for a macromolecule that may have to persist in an intact form...... for a long period of time before its information is accessed by the cell. Although DNA plays a critical role as an informational storage molecule, it is by no means as unexciting as a computer tape or disk drive. The structure of the DNA described by Watson and Crick in 1953 is a right handed helix of two...

  17. Archaeal DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelman, Lori M; Kelman, Zvi

    2014-01-01

    DNA replication is essential for all life forms. Although the process is fundamentally conserved in the three domains of life, bioinformatic, biochemical, structural, and genetic studies have demonstrated that the process and the proteins involved in archaeal DNA replication are more similar to those in eukaryal DNA replication than in bacterial DNA replication, but have some archaeal-specific features. The archaeal replication system, however, is not monolithic, and there are some differences in the replication process between different species. In this review, the current knowledge of the mechanisms governing DNA replication in Archaea is summarized. The general features of the replication process as well as some of the differences are discussed.

  18. Racemic DNA crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Pradeep K; Collie, Gavin W; Kauffmann, Brice; Huc, Ivan

    2014-12-22

    Racemates increase the chances of crystallization by allowing molecular contacts to be formed in a greater number of ways. With the advent of protein synthesis, the production of protein racemates and racemic-protein crystallography are now possible. Curiously, racemic DNA crystallography had not been investigated despite the commercial availability of L- and D-deoxyribo-oligonucleotides. Here, we report a study into racemic DNA crystallography showing the strong propensity of racemic DNA mixtures to form racemic crystals. We describe racemic crystal structures of various DNA sequences and folded conformations, including duplexes, quadruplexes, and a four-way junction, showing that the advantages of racemic crystallography should extend to DNA.

  19. DNA analysis for mysteries buried in history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanuj Kanchan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the years DNA technology has proved to be a path breaking invention and this technological advancement in modern investigations will hopefully solve many more mysteries in the time to come. However, the developing world is lagging far behind owing to financial constraints and has resorted to relatively less reliable methods during investigations. Hopefully, developing nations too will follow suit in utilizing this technology to its potential.

  20. Looking for new DNA : The world around IMT-advanced

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fledderus, E.R.

    2008-01-01

    Technology, such as IMT-2000 and IMT-A, plays an important role in our society. A number of prominent authors and thinkers have judged the impact of technology as being increasingly radical. This paper connects different visions on technology, thereby bringing different perspectives on innovation in

  1. DNA barcoding for plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vere, Natasha; Rich, Tim C G; Trinder, Sarah A; Long, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    DNA barcoding uses specific regions of DNA in order to identify species. Initiatives are taking place around the world to generate DNA barcodes for all groups of living organisms and to make these data publically available in order to help understand, conserve, and utilize the world's biodiversity. For land plants the core DNA barcode markers are two sections of coding regions within the chloroplast, part of the genes, rbcL and matK. In order to create high quality databases, each plant that is DNA barcoded needs to have a herbarium voucher that accompanies the rbcL and matK DNA sequences. The quality of the DNA sequences, the primers used, and trace files should also be accessible to users of the data. Multiple individuals should be DNA barcoded for each species in order to check for errors and allow for intraspecific variation. The world's herbaria provide a rich resource of already preserved and identified material and these can be used for DNA barcoding as well as by collecting fresh samples from the wild. These protocols describe the whole DNA barcoding process, from the collection of plant material from the wild or from the herbarium, how to extract and amplify the DNA, and how to check the quality of the data after sequencing.

  2. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Maia E.; Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2012-01-01

    Although good quality DNA can be recovered from the base of the calamus of freshly sampled feathers, as from other fully keratinized tissues such as nail or hair shaft, the quality and quantity of DNA in the majority of feather structures is much poorer. Little research has been performed...... to characterize the quality of this DNA is, and thus what a researcher might be able to achieve when using feathers as a source of DNA. In this review, we expand on our companion article detailing the quality of DNA in nail and hair, by synthesizing published, and new preliminary genetic data obtained from...... feathers. As with nail and hair, we demonstrate that although DNA can, in general, be recovered from all parts of the feather, the quality of such DNA varies. As such, although one can expect a priori that genetic analyses are possible on the feather, for PCR based analyses, it is extremely difficult...

  3. Biophysics of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Surveying the last sixty years of research, this book describes the physical properties of DNA in the context of its biological functioning. It is designed to enable both students and researchers of molecular biology, biochemistry and physics to better understand the biophysics of DNA, addressing key questions and facilitating further research. The chapters integrate theoretical and experimental approaches, emphasising throughout the importance of a quantitative knowledge of physical properties in building and analysing models of DNA functioning. For example, the book shows how the relationship between DNA mechanical properties and the sequence specificity of DNA-protein binding can be analyzed quantitatively by using our current knowledge of the physical and structural properties of DNA. Theoretical models and experimental methods in the field are critically considered to enable the reader to engage effectively with the current scientific literature on the physical properties of DNA.

  4. Antiparasitic DNA vaccines in 21st century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedrychowicz, Halina

    2015-06-01

    Demands for effective vaccines to control parasitic diseases of humans and livestock have been recently exacerbated by the development of resistance of most pathogenic parasites to anti-parasitic drugs. Novel genomic and proteomic technologies have provided opportunities for the discovery and improvement of DNA vaccines which are relatively easy as well as cheap to fabricate and stable at room temperatures. However, their main limitation is rather poor immunogenicity, which makes it necessary to couple the antigens with adjuvant molecules. This paper review recent advances in the development of DNA vaccines to some pathogenic protozoa and helminths. Numerous studies were conducted over the past 14 years of 21st century, employing various administration techniques, adjuvants and new immunogenic antigens to increase efficacy of DNA vaccines. Unfortunately, the results have not been rewarding. Further research is necessary using more extensive combinations of antigens; alternate delivery systems and more efficient adjuvants based on knowledge of the immunomodulatory capacities of parasitic protozoa and helminths.

  5. Gold nanocrystals with DNA-directed morphologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xingyi; Huh, June; Park, Wounjhang; Lee, Luke P.; Kwon, Young Jik; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-09-01

    Precise control over the structure of metal nanomaterials is important for developing advanced nanobiotechnology. Assembly methods of nanoparticles into structured blocks have been widely demonstrated recently. However, synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures remains challenging. Here we show a directed crystallization of gold by a single DNA molecular regulator in a sequence-independent manner and its applications in three-dimensional topological controls of crystalline nanostructures. We anchor DNA onto gold nanoseed with various alignments to form gold nanocrystals with defined topologies. Some topologies are asymmetric including pushpin-, star- and biconcave disk-like structures, as well as more complex jellyfish- and flower-like structures. The approach of employing DNA enables the solution-based synthesis of nanocrystals with controlled, three-dimensional structures in a desired direction, and expands the current tools available for designing and synthesizing feature-rich nanomaterials for future translational biotechnology.

  6. [DNA methylation and epigenetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniushin, B F

    2006-09-01

    In eukaryotic cells, nuclear DNA is subject to enzymatic methylation with the formation of 5-methylcytosine residues, mostly within the CG and CNG sequences. In plants and animals this DNA methylation is species-, tissue-, and organelle-specific. It changes (decreases) with age and is regulated by hormones. On the other hand, genome methylation can control hormonal signal. Replicative and post-replicative DNA methylation types are distinguished. They are mediated by multiple DNA methyltransferases with different site-specificity. Replication is accompanied by the appearance of hemimethylated DNA sites. Pronounced asymmetry of the DNA strand methylation disappears to the end of the cell cycle. A model of methylation-regulated DNA replication is proposed. DNA methylation controls all genetic processes in the cell (replication, transcription, DNA repair, recombination, and gene transposition). It is the mechanism of cell differentiation, gene discrimination and silencing. In animals, suppression of DNA methylation stops development (embryogenesis), switches on apoptosis, and is usually lethal. Disruption of DNA methylation pattern results in the malignant cell transformation and serves as one of the early diagnostic features of carcinogenesis. In malignant cell the pattern of DNA methylation, as well as the set of DNA methyltransferase activities, differs from that in normal cell. In plants inhibition of DNA methylation is accompanied by the induction of seed storage and florescence genes. In eukaryotes one and the same gene can be simultaneously methylated both at cytosine and adenine residues. It can be thus suggested, that the plant cell contains at least two different, and probably, interdependent systems of DNA methylation. The first eukaryotic adenine DNA methyltransferase was isolated from plants. This enzyme methylates DNA with the formation of N6-methyladenine residues in the sequence TGATCA (TGATCA-->TGm6ATCA). Plants possess AdoMet-dependent endonucleases

  7. Novel DNA probes for sensitive DNA detection

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, James Alistair

    2010-01-01

    The ability to detect and interrogate DNA sequences allows further understanding and\\ud diagnosis of genetic disease. The ability to perform such analysis of genetic material\\ud requires highly selective and reliable technologies. Furthermore techniques which can use\\ud simple and cheap equipment allow the use of such technologies for point of care analysis.\\ud \\ud Described in this thesis are two novel DNA probe systems designed for mutation\\ud discrimination and sequence recognition of PCR ...

  8. Profiling genome-wide DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Wai-Shin; Hsu, Fei-Man; Chen, Pao-Yang

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic modification that plays an important role in regulating gene expression and therefore a broad range of biological processes and diseases. DNA methylation is tissue-specific, dynamic, sequence-context-dependent and trans-generationally heritable, and these complex patterns of methylation highlight the significance of profiling DNA methylation to answer biological questions. In this review, we surveyed major methylation assays, along with comparisons and biological examples, to provide an overview of DNA methylation profiling techniques. The advances in microarray and sequencing technologies make genome-wide profiling possible at a single-nucleotide or even a single-cell resolution. These profiling approaches vary in many aspects, such as DNA input, resolution, genomic region coverage, and bioinformatics analysis, and selecting a feasible method requires knowledge of these methods. We first introduce the biological background of DNA methylation and its pattern in plants, animals and fungi. We present an overview of major experimental approaches to profiling genome-wide DNA methylation and hydroxymethylation and then extend to the single-cell methylome. To evaluate these methods, we outline their strengths and weaknesses and perform comparisons across the different platforms. Due to the increasing need to compute high-throughput epigenomic data, we interrogate the computational pipeline for bisulfite sequencing data and also discuss the concept of identifying differentially methylated regions (DMRs). This review summarizes the experimental and computational concepts for profiling genome-wide DNA methylation, followed by biological examples. Overall, this review provides researchers useful guidance for the selection of a profiling method suited to specific research questions.

  9. DNA repair in species with extreme lifespan differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Sheila L.; Croken, Matthew McKnight; Calder, R.B.; Aliper, Alexander; Milholland, Brandon; White, Ryan R.; Zhavoronkov, Alexander; Gladyshev, Vadim N.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera; Zhang, Zhengdong D.; Vijg, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Differences in DNA repair capacity have been hypothesized to underlie the great range of maximum lifespans among mammals. However, measurements of individual DNA repair activities in cells and animals have not substantiated such a relationship because utilization of repair pathways among animals—depending on habitats, anatomical characteristics, and life styles—varies greatly between mammalian species. Recent advances in high-throughput genomics, in combination with increased knowledge of the genetic pathways involved in genome maintenance, now enable a comprehensive comparison of DNA repair transcriptomes in animal species with extreme lifespan differences. Here we compare transcriptomes of liver, an organ with high oxidative metabolism and abundant spontaneous DNA damage, from humans, naked mole rats, and mice, with maximum lifespans of ∼120, 30, and 3 years, respectively, with a focus on genes involved in DNA repair. The results show that the longer-lived species, human and naked mole rat, share higher expression of DNA repair genes, including core genes in several DNA repair pathways. A more systematic approach of signaling pathway analysis indicates statistically significant upregulation of several DNA repair signaling pathways in human and naked mole rat compared with mouse. The results of this present work indicate, for the first time, that DNA repair is upregulated in a major metabolic organ in long-lived humans and naked mole rats compared with short-lived mice. These results strongly suggest that DNA repair can be considered a genuine longevity assurance system. PMID:26729707

  10. Fructosylation induced structural changes in mammalian DNA examined by biophysical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaman, Asif; Arif, Zarina; Alam, Khursheed

    2017-03-01

    Glycosylation of DNA, proteins, lipids, etc. by reducing sugars, can lead to the formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). These products may accumulate and involve in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, contributing to tissue injury via several mechanisms. In this study, fructosylation of calf thymus dsDNA was carried out with varying concentrations of fructose. The neo-structure of fructosylated-DNA was studied by various biophysical techniques and morphological characterization. Fructosylated-DNA showed hyperchromicity, increase in fluorescence intensity and decrease in melting temperature. The CD signal of modified-DNA shifted in the direction of higher wavelength indicative of structural changes in DNA. FTIR results indicated shift in specific band positions in fructosylated-DNA. Morphological characterization of fructosylated-DNA exhibited strand breakage and aggregation. The results suggest that the structure and conformation of DNA may be altered under high concentrations of fructose.

  11. Recent advances of aptamer sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Aptamers are a series of high-affinity and high-specificity oligoneucleotides (single-stranded DNA or RNA) to the target, usually selected by the combinatorial chemistry SELEX technique (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Aptamers have proved to be one kind of novel functional molecules in life science and chemistry. After being labeled by signaling groups, the aptamer probe can conveniently transfer the characteristics of aptamer-target recognition to a form of high-sensitive signal, and the high-affinity, high-specificity measurements of metal ion, organic molecules, nucleic acid, proteins, or cells become possible. This article summarizes the recent advances of aptamer probes in different sensing fields, with special emphasis on aptamer probes as fluorescent sensors.

  12. Recent advances of aptamer sensors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI YiLin; GUO Lei; ZHANG ZhaoYang; TANG JiJun; XIE JianWei

    2008-01-01

    Aptamers are a series of high-affinity and high-specificity oligoneucleotides (single-stranded DNA or RNA) to the target, usually selected by the combinatorial chemistry SELEX technique (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Aptamers have proved to be one kind of novel func-tional molecules in life science and chemistry. After being labeled by signaling groups, the aptamer probe can conveniently transfer the characteristics of aptamer-target recognition to a form of high-sensitive signal, and the high-affinity, high-specificity measurements of metal ion, organic mole-cules, nucleic acid, proteins, or cells become possible. This article summarizes the recent advances of aptamer probes in different sensing fields, with special emphasis on aptamer probes as fluorescent sensors.

  13. Advances in forefoot trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, J Randolph; Schopf, Robert

    2013-07-01

    Forefoot traumas, particularly involving the metatarsals, are commonly occurring injuries. There have been several advances in management of these injuries. These advances include updates in operative technique, internal fixation options, plating constructs, and external fixation. In addition, the advances of soft tissue management have improved outcomes. This article outlines these injuries and provides an update on techniques, principles, and understanding of managing forefoot trauma.

  14. Non-invasive aneuploidy detection using free fetal DNA and RNA in maternal plasma: recent progress and future possibilities.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Go, A.T.; Vugt, J.M.G. van; Oudejans, C.B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cell-free fetal DNA (cff DNA) and RNA can be detected in maternal plasma and used for non-invasive prenatal diagnostics. Recent technical advances have led to a drastic change in the clinical applicability and potential uses of free fetal DNA and RNA. This review summarizes the latest cl

  15. Mitochondrial diseases: advances and issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scarpelli M

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mauro Scarpelli,1 Alice Todeschini,2 Irene Volonghi,2 Alessandro Padovani,2 Massimiliano Filosto2 1Department of Neuroscience, Unit of Neurology, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata Verona, Verona, Italy; 2Center for Neuromuscular Diseases and Neuropathies, Unit of Neurology, ASST “Spedali Civili”, University of Brescia, Brescia, Italy Abstract: Mitochondrial diseases (MDs are a clinically heterogeneous group of disorders caused by a dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. They can be related to mutation of genes encoded using either nuclear DNA or mitochondrial DNA. The advent of next generation sequencing and whole exome sequencing in studying the molecular bases of MDs will bring about a revolution in the field of mitochondrial medicine, also opening the possibility of better defining pathogenic mechanisms and developing novel therapeutic approaches for these devastating disorders. The canonical rules of mitochondrial medicine remain milestones, but novel issues have been raised following the use of advanced diagnostic technologies. Rigorous validation of the novel mutations detected using deep sequencing in patients with suspected MD, and a clear definition of the natural history, outcome measures, and biomarkers that could be usefully adopted in clinical trials, are mandatory goals for the scientific community. Today, therapy is often inadequate and mostly palliative. However, important advances have been made in treating some clinical entities, eg, mitochondrial neuro-gastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, for which approaches using allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, orthotopic liver transplantation, and carrier erythrocyte entrapped thymidine phosphorylase enzyme therapy have recently been developed. Promising new treatment methods are being identified so that researchers, clinicians, and patients can join forces to change the history of these untreatable disorders. Keywords: mitochondrial diseases

  16. DNA-Grafted Janus Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Ching; Lin, Keng-Hui; Juan, Wen-Tau

    2008-03-01

    Recently there have been advances in generating Janus microspheres whose two hemispheres have different chemical compositions [1-4]. The new types of particles open up possibilities for assembly of complex structures. Here we attach DNA molecules onto one side of Janus microspheres. The new type of colloidal particles resembles surfactant molecules and may give us interesting new structures.Reference: [1] Y. Lu, H. Xiong, X. Jiang, Y.Xia, M. Prentiss and G. M.Whitesides, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 125, 12724 (2003) [2] O.Cayre, V. N.Paunov and O. D. Velev, J. Mater. Chem. 13, 2445 (2003) [3] R. F. Shepherd, J. C. Conrad, S. K. Rhodes, D. R. Link, M. Marquez, D. A. Weitz and J. A. Lewis, Langmuir 22, 8618 (2006) [4] L. Hong, S. Jiang and S. Granick, Langmuir 22, 9495 (2006)

  17. DNA methylation in hepatocellular carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Iris Tischoff; Andrea Tannapfel

    2008-01-01

    As for many other tumors, development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) must be understood as a multistep process with accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations in regulatory genes, leading to activation of oncogenes and inactivation or loss of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In the last decades, in addition to genetic alterations, epigenetic inactivation of (tumor suppressor) genes by promoter hypermethylation has been recognized as an important and alternative mechanism in tumorigenesis. In HCC, aberrant methylation of promoter sequences occurs not only in advanced tumors, it has been also observed in premalignant conditions just as chronic viral hepatitis B or C and cirrhotic liver. This review discusses the epigenetic alterations in hepatocellular carcinoma focusing DNA methylation.

  18. Detecting hybridization using ancient DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Nathan K; Shapiro, Beth; Green, Richard E

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that related species hybridize and that this can have varied but significant effects on speciation and environmental adaptation. It should therefore come as no surprise that hybridization is not limited to species that are alive today. In the last several decades, advances in technologies for recovering and sequencing DNA from fossil remains have enabled the assembly of high-coverage genome sequences for a growing diversity of organisms, including many that are extinct. Thanks to the development of new statistical approaches for detecting and quantifying admixture from genomic data, genomes from extinct populations have proven useful both in revealing previously unknown hybridization events and informing the study of hybridization between living organisms. Here, we review some of the key recent statistical innovations for detecting ancient hybridization using genomewide sequence data and discuss how these innovations have revised our understanding of human evolutionary history.

  19. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series presents contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study o

  20. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2012-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics field with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of chemical physics. This volume explores: Quantum Dynamical Resonances in Ch

  1. ACR-700 advanced technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tapping, R.L.; Turner, C.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Yu, S.K.W. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Mississauga, Ontario (Canada); Olmstead, R.; Speranzini, R.A. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2004-12-01

    A successful advanced reactor plant will have optimized economics including reduced operating and maintenance costs, improved performance, and enhanced safety. Incorporating improvements based on advanced technologies ensures cost, safety and operational competitiveness of the ACR-700. These advanced technologies include modern configuration management; construction technologies; operational technology for the control centre and information systems for plant monitoring and analysis. This paper summarizes the advanced technologies used to achieve construction and operational improvements to enhance plant economic competitiveness, advances in the operational technology used for reactor control, and presents the development of the Smart CANDU suite of tools and its application to existing operating reactors and to the ACR-700. (author)

  2. Advances in chemical Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  3. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The Advances in Chemical Physics series-the cutting edge of research in chemical physics The Advances in Chemical Physics series provides the chemical physics and physical chemistry fields with a forum for critical, authoritative evaluations of advances in every area of the discipline. Filled with cutting-edge research reported in a cohesive manner not found elsewhere in the literature, each volume of the Advances in Chemical Physics series offers contributions from internationally renowned chemists and serves as the perfect supplement to any advanced graduate class devoted to the study of che

  4. DNA replication and cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-01-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways...... to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby...... causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy....

  5. DNA topology and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions.

  6. DNA profiles from fingermarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Linacre, Adrian

    2014-11-01

    Criminal investigations would be considerably improved if DNA profiles could be routinely generated from single fingermarks. Here we report a direct DNA profiling method that was able to generate interpretable profiles from 71% of 170 fingermarks. The data are based on fingermarks from all 5 digits of 34 individuals. DNA was obtained from the fingermarks using a swab moistened with Triton-X, and the fibers were added directly to one of two commercial DNA profiling kits. All profiles were obtained without increasing the number of amplification cycles; therefore, our method is ideally suited for adoption by the forensic science community. We indicate the use of the technique in a criminal case in which a DNA profile was generated from a fingermark on tape that was wrapped around a drug seizure. Our direct DNA profiling approach is rapid and able to generate profiles from touched items when current forensic practices have little chance of success.

  7. Disentangling DNA molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  8. DNA ELECTROPHORESIS AT SURFACES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAFAILOVICH, MIRIAM; SOKOLOV, JONATHAN; GERSAPPE, DILIP

    2003-09-01

    During this year we performed two major projects: I. We developed a detailed theoretical model which complements our experiments on surface DNA electrophoresis. We found that it was possible to enhance the separation of DNA chains by imposing a chemical nanoscale pattern on the surface. This approach utilized the surface interaction effect of the DNA chains with the substrate and is a refinement to our previous method in which DNA chains were separated on homogeneous flat surfaces. By introducing the nano-patterns on the surface, the conformational changes of DNA chains of different lengths can be amplified, which results in the different friction strengths with the substrate surface. Our results also show that, when compared to the DNA electrophoresis performed on homogeneous flat surfaces, nanopatterned surfaces offer a larger window in choosing different surface interactions to achieve separation. II. In collaboration with a large international manufacturer of skin care products we also embarked on a project involving photo toxicity of titanium dioxide nanoparticles, which are a key ingredient in sunscreen and cosmetic lotions. The results clearly implicated the nanoparticles in catalyzing damage to chromosomal DNA. We then used this knowledge to develop a polymer/anti-oxidant coating which prevented the photocatalytic reaction on DNA while still retaining the UV absorptive properties of the nanoparticles. The standard gel electrophoresis was not sufficient in determining the extent of the DNA damage. The conclusions of this study were based predominantly on analysis obtained with the surface electrophoresis method.

  9. Disentangling DNA molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vologodskii, Alexander

    2016-09-01

    The widespread circular form of DNA molecules inside cells creates very serious topological problems during replication. Due to the helical structure of the double helix the parental strands of circular DNA form a link of very high order, and yet they have to be unlinked before the cell division. DNA topoisomerases, the enzymes that catalyze passing of one DNA segment through another, solve this problem in principle. However, it is very difficult to remove all entanglements between the replicated DNA molecules due to huge length of DNA comparing to the cell size. One strategy that nature uses to overcome this problem is to create the topoisomerases that can dramatically reduce the fraction of linked circular DNA molecules relative to the corresponding fraction at thermodynamic equilibrium. This striking property of the enzymes means that the enzymes that interact with DNA only locally can access their topology, a global property of circular DNA molecules. This review considers the experimental studies of the phenomenon and analyzes the theoretical models that have been suggested in attempts to explain it. We describe here how various models of enzyme action can be investigated computationally. There is no doubt at the moment that we understand basic principles governing enzyme action. Still, there are essential quantitative discrepancies between the experimental data and the theoretical predictions. We consider how these discrepancies can be overcome.

  10. DNA Microarray Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakare SP

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available DNA Microarray is the emerging technique in Biotechnology. The many varieties of DNA microarray or DNA chip devices and systems are described along with their methods for fabrication and their use. It also includes screening and diagnostic applications. The DNA microarray hybridization applications include the important areas of gene expression analysis and genotyping for point mutations, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, and short tandem repeats (STRs. In addition to the many molecular biological and genomic research uses, this review covers applications of microarray devices and systems for pharmacogenomic research and drug discovery, infectious and genetic disease and cancer diagnostics, and forensic and genetic identification purposes.

  11. DNA Based Molecular Scale Nanofabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-04

    water adsorption on DNA origami template and its impact on DNA- mediated chemical reactions. We also extended the concept of DNA- mediated reaction to...addition, we have expanded our efforts to include DNA- mediated HF etching of SiÜ2, DNA- mediated nanoimprinting lithography, DNA-based patterning of self...detailed kinetics study of DNA- mediated chemical reactions. Examples of such reactions include chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of inorganic oxide and HF

  12. REVIEW ARTICLE: DNA protein interactions and bacterial chromosome architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavans, Joel; Oppenheim, Amos

    2006-12-01

    Bacteria, like eukaryotic organisms, must compact the DNA molecule comprising their genome and form a functional chromosome. Yet, bacteria do it differently. A number of factors contribute to genome compaction and organization in bacteria, including entropic effects, supercoiling and DNA-protein interactions. A gamut of new experimental techniques have allowed new advances in the investigation of these factors, and spurred much interest in the dynamic response of the chromosome to environmental cues, segregation, and architecture, during both exponential and stationary phases. We review these recent developments with emphasis on the multifaceted roles that DNA-protein interactions play.

  13. Probe Microscopic Studies of DNA Molecules on Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuo Umemura

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hybrids of DNA and carbon nanotubes (CNTs are promising nanobioconjugates for nanobiosensors, carriers for drug delivery, and other biological applications. In this review, nanoscopic characterization of DNA-CNT hybrids, in particular, characterization by scanning probe microscopy (SPM, is summarized. In many studies, topographical imaging by atomic force microscopy has been performed. However, some researchers have demonstrated advanced SPM operations in order to maximize its unique and valuable functions. Such sophisticated approaches are attractive and will have a significant impact on future studies of DNA-CNT hybrids.

  14. Roles of histone ubiquitylation in DNA damage signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sui-Sui DONG; Michael S. Y. HUEN

    2011-01-01

    Histone ubiquitylation has emerged as an important chromatin modification associated with DNA damage signaling and repair pathways.These histone marks,laid down by E3 ubiquitin ligases that include RNF8 and RNF168,decorate chromatin domains surrounding DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs).Recent work implicated ubiquitylated histones in orchestrating cell cycle checkpoints,DNA repair and gene transcription.Here we summarize recent advances that contribute to our current knowledge of the highly dynamic nature of DSB-associated histone ubiquitylation,and discuss major challenges ahead in understanding the versatility of ubiquitin conjugation in maintaining genome stability.

  15. Stability and dynamics of membrane-spanning DNA nanopores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maingi, Vishal; Burns, Jonathan R.; Uusitalo, Jaakko J.; Howorka, Stefan; Marrink, Siewert J.; Sansom, Mark S. P.

    2017-03-01

    Recently developed DNA-based analogues of membrane proteins have advanced synthetic biology. A fundamental question is how hydrophilic nanostructures reside in the hydrophobic environment of the membrane. Here, we use multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to explore the structure, stability and dynamics of an archetypical DNA nanotube inserted via a ring of membrane anchors into a phospholipid bilayer. Coarse-grained MD reveals that the lipids reorganize locally to interact closely with the membrane-spanning section of the DNA tube. Steered simulations along the bilayer normal establish the metastable nature of the inserted pore, yielding a force profile with barriers for membrane exit due to the membrane anchors. Atomistic, equilibrium simulations at two salt concentrations confirm the close packing of lipid around of the stably inserted DNA pore and its cation selectivity, while revealing localized structural fluctuations. The wide-ranging and detailed insight informs the design of next-generation DNA pores for synthetic biology or biomedicine.

  16. Binding and Transformation of Extracellular DNA in Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI Peng; HUANG Qiao-Yun; ZHANG Xue-Wen; CHEN Hao

    2005-01-01

    DNA is the genetic material of various organisms. Extracellular DNA adsorbed or bound on surface-active particles in soils has been shown to persist for long periods against nucleases degradation and still retain the ability to transform competent cells. This paper reviews some recent advances on the binding and transformation of extracellular DNA in soils,which is fundamental to understanding the nature of the soil, regulating biodiversity, and assessing the risk of releasing genetically engineered microorganisms (GEMs) as well as being helpful for development of the genetic evolutional theory of bacteria. Several influencing factors, such as soil pH, ionic strength, soil surface properties, and characteristics of the DNA polymer, are discussed. To date, the understanding of the type of molecular binding sites and the conformation of adsorbed and bound DNA to soil particles is still in its infancy.

  17. Exploring Multiscale Materials From Water, DNA to Bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Song, Jie

    2014-01-01

    multifunctional biomaterials at nanoscale on water, DNA, and bacteria. With this scale-up outline, the condensation of water atmospheric water, the self-assembly of DNA and the electron transfer of filamentous bacteria are discussed in the each chapter, along with the advanced function of AFM and TEM engaging....... In the water condensation project, the condensation of water vapor was investigated by in situ thermally controlled atomic force microscopy. Comparison with molecular dynamics simulation reveals that the Stranski-Krastanov growth model is more reasonable to describe the whole water condensation process...... and kinetics of the DNA nanotechnology from 2D to 3D DNA origami and tiles. After that, inspiration from the thermodynamic information gives us a possibility to explore the method for self-assembly DNA nanostructures at room temperature. And for the filamentous bacteria project, we report the finding of long...

  18. Spectroscopic investigation on the telomeric DNA base sequence repeat

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Telomeres are protein-DNA complexes at the terminals of linear chromosomes, which protect chromosomal integrity and maintain cellular replicative capacity.From single-cell organisms to advanced animals and plants,structures and functions of telomeres are both very conservative. In cells of human and vertebral animals, telomeric DNA base sequences all are (TTAGGG)n. In the present work, we have obtained absorption and fluorescence spectra measured from seven synthesized oligonucleotides to simulate the telomeric DNA system and calculated their relative fluorescence quantum yields on which not only telomeric DNA characteristics are predicted but also possibly the shortened telomeric sequences during cell division are imrelative fluorescence quantum yield and remarkable excitation energy innerconversion, which tallies with the telomeric sequence of (TTAGGG)n. This result shows that telomeric DNA has a strong non-radiative or innerconvertible capability.``

  19. Development of DNA-Free Sediment for Ecological Assays with Genomic Endpoints (NAC SETAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in genomics are currently being exploited to discern ecological changes that have conventionally been measured using laborious counting techniques. For example, next generation sequencing technologies can be used to create DNA libraries from benthic community ass...

  20. Development of DNA-Free Sediment for Ecological Assays with Genomic Endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent advances in genomics are currently being exploited to discern ecological changes that have conventionally been measured using laborious counting techniques. For example, next generation sequencing technologies can be used to create DNA libraries from benthic community ass...

  1. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN HUMAN FECAL MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, the use of these approaches to discern key genomic differences between natural microbial communities remains prohibitively expensive for mo...

  2. From molecules to management: adopting DNA-based methods for monitoring biological invasions in aquatic environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Recent technological advances have driven rapid development of DNA-based methods designed to facilitate detection and monitoring of invasive species in aquatic environments. These tools promise to significantly alleviate difficulties associated with traditional monitoring approac...

  3. Analysis of sequence variation in Gnathostoma spinigerum mitochondrial DNA by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and DNA sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngarmamonpirat, Charinthon; Waikagul, Jitra; Petmitr, Songsak; Dekumyoy, Paron; Rojekittikhun, Wichit; Anantapruti, Malinee T

    2005-03-01

    Morphological variations were observed in the advance third stage larvae of Gnathostoma spinigerum collected from swamp eel (Fluta alba), the second intermediate host. Larvae with typical and three atypical types were chosen for partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene sequence analysis. A 450 bp polymerase chain reaction product of the COI gene was amplified from mitochondrial DNA. The variations were analyzed by single-strand conformation polymorphism and DNA sequencing. The nucleotide variations of the COI gene in the four types of larvae indicated the presence of an intra-specific variation of mitochondrial DNA in the G. spinigerum population.

  4. DNA testing in hereditary neuropathies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Murphy, Sinéad M

    2013-01-01

    The inherited neuropathies are a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders in which there have been rapid advances in the last two decades. Molecular genetic testing is now an integral part of the evaluation of patients with inherited neuropathies. In this chapter we describe the genes responsible for the primary inherited neuropathies. We briefly discuss the clinical phenotype of each of the known inherited neuropathy subgroups, describe algorithms for molecular genetic testing of affected patients and discuss genetic counseling. The basic principles of careful phenotyping, documenting an accurate family history, and testing the available genes in an appropriate manner should identify the vast majority of individuals with CMT1 and many of those with CMT2. In this chapter we also describe the current methods of genetic testing. As advances are made in molecular genetic technologies and improvements are made in bioinformatics, it is likely that the current time-consuming methods of DNA sequencing will give way to quicker and more efficient high-throughput methods, which are briefly discussed here.

  5. In vivo expression of a single viral DNA-binding protein generates systemic lupus erythematosus-related autoimmunity to double-stranded DNA and histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, U; Seternes, O M; Hey, A W; Silsand, Y; Traavik, T; Johansen, B; Rekvig, O P

    1995-01-01

    Although the origin of autoimmune antibodies to double-stranded DNA is not known, the variable-region structures of such antibodies indicate that they are produced in response to antigen-selective stimulation. In accordance with this, results from experiments using artificial complexes of DNA and DNA-binding polypeptides for immunizations have indicated that DNA may induce these antibodies. Hence, the immunogenicity of DNA in vivo may depend upon other structures or processes that may render DNA immunogenic. We report that in vivo expression of a single DNA-binding protein, the polyoma virus T antigen, is sufficient to initiate production of anti-double-stranded DNA and anti-histone antibodies but not a panel of other autoantigens. Expression of a mutant, non-DNA-binding T antigen did result in strong production of antibodies to the T antigen, but only borderline levels of antibodies to DNA and no detectable antibodies to histones. Nonexpressing plasmid DNA containing the complete cDNA sequence for T antigen did not evoke such immune responses, indicating that DNA by itself is not immunogenic in vivo. The results represent a conceptual advance in understanding a potential molecular basis for initiation of autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:8618908

  6. CSI-FID: high throughput label-free detection of DNA binding molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauschild, Karl E; Stover, James S; Boger, Dale L; Ansari, Aseem Z

    2009-07-15

    Determining the sequence specifity of DNA binding molecules is a non-trivial task. Here we describe the development of a platform for assaying the sequence specificity of DNA ligands using label free detection on high density DNA microarrays. This is achieved by combining Cognate Site Identification (CSI) with Fluorescence Intercalation Displacement (FID) to create CSI-FID. We use the well-studied small molecule DNA ligand netropsin to develop this high throughput platform. Analysis of the DNA binding properties of protein- and small molecule-based libraries with CSI-FID will advance the development of genome-anchored molecules for therapeutic purposes.

  7. DNA and RNA analysis of blood and muscle from bodies with variable postmortem intervals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob; Lesnikova, Iana; Funder, Anette Mariane Daa;

    2014-01-01

    % of the formalin fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) muscle specimens. A quality assessment of muscle-derived DNA showed increased fragmentation with advancing body decomposition and generally more fragmentation in DNA from FFPE tissue than in DNA from frozen tissue. It was possible to amplify 1,000 basepair (bp......) DNA fragments from all samples with postmortem intervals below 3 days whereas 400-600 bp long fragments typically could be amplified from the most decomposed muscle specimens. RNA was less stable than DNA in postmortem muscle tissue, yet selected mRNA molecules could be detected by reverse...

  8. DNA-cell conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Shih-Chia; Francis, Matthew B.; Bertozzi, Carolyn; Mathies, Richard; Chandra, Ravi; Douglas, Erik; Twite, Amy; Toriello, Nicholas; Onoe, Hiroaki

    2016-05-03

    The present invention provides conjugates of DNA and cells by linking the DNA to a native functional group on the cell surface. The cells can be without cell walls or can have cell walls. The modified cells can be linked to a substrate surface and used in assay or bioreactors.

  9. Extended DNA Tile Actuators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Martin; Kryger, Mille; Zhang, Zhao

    2012-01-01

    A dynamic linear DNA tile actuator is expanded to three new structures of higher complexity. The original DNA actuator was constructed from a central roller strand which hybridizes with two piston strands by forming two half-crossover junctions. A linear expansion of the actuator is obtained...

  10. DNA sequences encoding erythropoietin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, F.K.

    1987-10-27

    A purified and isolated DNA sequence is described consisting essentially of a DNA sequence encoding a polypeptide having an amino acid sequence sufficiently duplicative of that of erythropoietin to allow possession of the biological property of causing bone marrow cells to increase production of reticulocytes and red blood cells, and to increase hemoglobin synthesis or iron uptake.

  11. Characterization of muntjac DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, R.C.

    1981-05-27

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) in muntjac chromosomes is generally proportional to the chromosomal DNA content, but the SCE frequency is reduced in the heterochromatic neck region of the X chromosome. The physical properties of muntjac DNA and the kinetics of repair of UV damage in muntjac heterochromatin and euchromatin were examined and compared with the distribution of sister chromatid exchange.

  12. Workshop on DNA repair.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Lehmann (Alan); J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); A.A. van Zeeland (Albert); C.M.P. Backendorf (Claude); B.A. Bridges; A. Collins; R.P.D. Fuchs; G.P. Margison; R. Montesano; E. Moustacchi; A.T. Natarajan; M. Radman; A. Sarasin; E. Seeberg; C.A. Smith; M. Stefanini (Miria); L.H. Thompson; G.P. van der Schans; C.A. Weber (Christine); M.Z. Zdzienika

    1992-01-01

    textabstractA workshop on DNA repair with emphasis on eukaryotic systems was held, under the auspices of the EC Concerted Action on DNA Repair and Cancer, at Noordwijkerhout (The Netherlands) 14-19 April 1991. The local organization of the meeting was done under the auspices of the Medical Genetic C

  13. Recombinant DNA for Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvall, James G., III

    1992-01-01

    A science teacher describes his experience at a workshop to learn to teach the Cold Spring Harbor DNA Science Laboratory Protocols. These protocols lead students through processes for taking E. coli cells and transforming them into a new antibiotic resistant strain. The workshop featured discussions of the role of DNA recombinant technology in…

  14. Advance Care Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallworthy, Elizabeth J

    2013-04-16

    Advance care planning should be available to all patients with chronic kidney disease, including end-stage kidney disease on renal replacement therapy. Advance care planning is a process of patient-centred discussion, ideally involving family/significant others, to assist the patient to understand how their illness might affect them, identify their goals and establish how medical treatment might help them to achieve these. An Advance Care Plan is only one useful outcome from the Advance Care Planning process, the education of patient and family around prognosis and treatment options is likely to be beneficial whether or not a plan is written or the individual loses decision making capacity at the end of life. Facilitating Advance Care Planning discussions requires an understanding of their purpose and communication skills which need to be taught. Advance Care Planning needs to be supported by effective systems to enable the discussions and any resulting Plans to be used to aid subsequent decision making.

  15. Premeltons in DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobell, Henry M

    2016-03-01

    Premeltons are examples of emergent-structures (i.e., structural-solitons) that arise spontaneously in DNA due to the presence of nonlinear-excitations in its structure. They are of two kinds: B-B (or A-A) premeltons form at specific DNA-regions to nucleate site-specific DNA melting. These are stationary and, being globally-nontopological, undergo breather-motions that allow drugs and dyes to intercalate into DNA. B-A (or A-B) premeltons, on the other hand, are mobile, and being globally-topological, act as phase-boundaries transforming B- into A-DNA during the structural phase-transition. They are not expected to undergo breather motions. A key feature of both types of premeltons is the presence of an intermediate structural-form in their central regions (proposed as being a transition-state intermediate in DNA-melting and in the B- to A-transition), which differs from either A- or B-DNA. Called beta-DNA, this is both metastable and hyperflexible--and contains an alternating sugar-puckering pattern along the polymer backbone combined with the partial unstacking (in its lower energy-forms) of every-other base-pair. Beta-DNA is connected to either B- or to A-DNA on either side by boundaries possessing a gradation of nonlinear structural-change, these being called the kink and the antikink regions. The presence of premeltons in DNA leads to a unifying theory to understand much of DNA physical chemistry and molecular biology. In particular, premeltons are predicted to define the 5' and 3' ends of genes in naked-DNA and DNA in active-chromatin, this having important implications for understanding physical aspects of the initiation, elongation and termination of RNA-synthesis during transcription. For these and other reasons, the model will be of broader interest to the general-audience working in these areas. The model explains a wide variety of data, and carries with it a number of experimental predictions--all readily testable--as will be described in this review.

  16. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly...... talk considerably different languages. It thus is fundamental to address this issue of communication about results of forensic DNA analyses, and open a dialogue with practicing non-scientists at large who need to make meaningful use of scientific results to approach and help solve judicial cases...

  17. Whose DNA is this?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taroni, Franco; Biedermann, Alex; Vuille, Joëlle;

    2013-01-01

    This communication seeks to draw the attention of researchers and practitioners dealing with forensic DNA profiling analyses to the following question: is a scientist's report, offering support to a hypothesis according to which a particular individual is the source of DNA detected during...... evoked during the international conference "The hidden side of DNA profiles. Artifacts, errors and uncertain evidence" held in Rome (April 27th to 28th, 2012). Indeed, despite the fact that this conference brought together some of the world's leading forensic DNA specialists, it appeared clearly....... This paper intends to emphasize the actuality of this topic and suggest beneficial ways ahead towards a more reasoned use of forensic DNA in criminal proceedings....

  18. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses.

  19. Advances in Applied Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Applied Mechanics draws together recent significant advances in various topics in applied mechanics. Published since 1948, Advances in Applied Mechanics aims to provide authoritative review articles on topics in the mechanical sciences, primarily of interest to scientists and engineers working in the various branches of mechanics, but also of interest to the many who use the results of investigations in mechanics in various application areas, such as aerospace, chemical, civil, en...

  20. Advanced Photon Source (APS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Argonne National Laboratoryprovides this nation's (in fact, this hemisphere's) brightest storage...

  1. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  2. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratory The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  3. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  4. The chromatin response to DNA breaks: leaving a mark on genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smeenk, Godelieve; van Attikum, Haico

    2013-01-01

    Genetic, biochemical, and cellular studies have uncovered many of the molecular mechanisms underlying the signaling and repair of chromosomal DNA breaks. However, efficient repair of DNA damage is complicated in that genomic DNA is packaged, through histone and nonhistone proteins, into chromatin. The DNA repair machinery has to overcome this physical barrier to gain access to damaged DNA and repair DNA lesions. Posttranslational modifications of chromatin as well as ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling factors help to overcome this barrier and facilitate access to damaged DNA by altering chromatin structure at sites of DNA damage. Here we review and discuss our current knowledge of and recent advances in chromatin changes induced by chromosome breakage in mammalian cells and their implications for genome stability and human disease.

  5. Left-handed DNA crossovers. Implications for DNA-DNA recognition and structural alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timsit, Y; Shatzky-Schwartz, M; Shakked, Z

    1999-02-01

    The close approach of DNA segments participates in many biological functions including DNA condensation and DNA processing. Previous crystallographic studies have shown that B-DNA self-fitting by mutual groove-backbone interaction produces right-handed DNA crossovers. These structures have opened new perspectives on the role of close DNA-DNA interactions in the architecture and activity the DNA molecule. In the present study, the analysis of the crystal packing of two B-DNA decamer duplexes d(CCIIICCCGG) and d(CCGCCGGCGG) reveals the existence of new modes of DNA crossing. Symmetric left-handed crossovers are produced by mutual fitting of DNA grooves at the crossing point. New sequence patterns contribute to stabilize longitudinal fitting of the sugar-phosphate backbone into the major groove. In addition, the close approach of DNA segments greatly influences the DNA conformation in a sequence dependent manner. This study provides new insights into the role of DNA sequence and structure in DNA-DNA recognition. In providing detailed molecular views of DNA crossovers of opposite chirality, this study can also help to elucidate the role of symmetry and chirality in the recognition of complex DNA structures by protein dimers or tetramers, such as topoisomerase II and recombinase enzymes. These results are discussed in the context of the possible relationships between DNA condensation and DNA processing.

  6. Simple & Safe Genomic DNA Isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A procedure for purifying DNA using either bacteria or rat liver is presented. Directions for doing a qualitative DNA assay using diphenylamine and a quantitative DNA assay using spectroscopy are included. (KR)

  7. Forensic Analysis of Canine DNA Samples in the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Tobin M.; Bradley, Sharonda Q.; Fekete, Brenda L.; Millard, Julie T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in canine genomics have allowed the development of highly distinguishing methods of analysis for both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA. We describe a laboratory exercise suitable for an undergraduate biochemistry course in which the polymerase chain reaction is used to amplify hypervariable regions of DNA from dog hair and saliva…

  8. Dynamics of DNA replication loops reveal temporal control of lagging-strand synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamdan, Samir M.; Loparo, Joseph J.; Takahashi, Masateru; Richardson, Charles C.; Oijen, Antoine M. van

    2009-01-01

    In all organisms, the protein machinery responsible for the replication of DNA, the replisome, is faced with a directionality problem. The antiparallel nature of duplex DNA permits the leading-strand polymerase to advance in a continuous fashion, but forces the lagging-strand polymerase to synthesiz

  9. VISUALIZING DNA REPLICATION AT THE SINGLE-MOLECULE LEVEL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.; van Oijen, Antoine M.; Walter, NG

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule methodology have made it possible to study the dynamic behavior of individual enzymes and their interactions with other proteins in multiprotein complexes. Here, we describe newly developed methods to study the coordination of DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis

  10. Visualizing DNA Replication at the Single-Molecule Level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanner, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in single-molecule methodology have made it possible to study the dynamic behavior of individual enzymes and their interactions with other proteins in multiprotein complexes. Here, we describe newly developed methods to study the coordination of DNA unwinding, priming, and synthesis

  11. DNA from soil mirrors plant taxonomic and growth form diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yoccoz, N.G.; Bråthen, K.A.; Gielly, L.

    2012-01-01

    Ecosystems across the globe are threatened by climate change and human activities. New rapid survey approaches for monitoring biodiversity would greatly advance assessment and understanding of these threats. Taking advantage of next-generation DNA sequencing, we tested an approach we call metabar...

  12. DNA vaccines against influenza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachyra, Anna; Góra-Sochacka, Anna; Sirko, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    Genetic vaccine technology has been considerably developed within the last two decades. This cost effective and promising strategy can be applied for therapy of cancers and for curing allergy, chronic and infectious diseases, such as a seasonal and pandemic influenza. Despite numerous advantages, several limitations of this technology reduce its performance and can retard its commercial exploitation in humans and its veterinary applications. Inefficient delivery of the DNA vaccine into cells of immunized individuals results in low intracellular supply of suitable expression cassettes encoding an antigen, in its low expression level and, in turn, in reduced immune responses against the antigen. Improvement of DNA delivery into the host cells might significantly increase effectiveness of the DNA vaccine. A vast array of innovative methods and various experimental strategies have been applied in order to enhance the effectiveness of DNA vaccines. They include various strategies improving DNA delivery as well as expression and immunogenic potential of the proteins encoded by the DNA vaccines. Researchers focusing on DNA vaccines against influenza have applied many of these strategies. Recent examples of the most successful modern approaches are discussed in this review.

  13. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  14. What Controls DNA Looping?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela J. Perez

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The looping of DNA provides a means of communication between sequentially distant genomic sites that operate in tandem to express, copy, and repair the information encoded in the DNA base sequence. The short loops implicated in the expression of bacterial genes suggest that molecular factors other than the naturally stiff double helix are involved in bringing the interacting sites into close spatial proximity. New computational techniques that take direct account of the three-dimensional structures and fluctuations of protein and DNA allow us to examine the likely means of enhancing such communication. Here, we describe the application of these approaches to the looping of a 92 base-pair DNA segment between the headpieces of the tetrameric Escherichia coli Lac repressor protein. The distortions of the double helix induced by a second protein—the nonspecific nucleoid protein HU—increase the computed likelihood of looping by several orders of magnitude over that of DNA alone. Large-scale deformations of the repressor, sequence-dependent features in the DNA loop, and deformability of the DNA operators also enhance looping, although to lesser degrees. The correspondence between the predicted looping propensities and the ease of looping derived from gene-expression and single-molecule measurements lends credence to the derived structural picture.

  15. DNA mini-barcodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajibabaei, Mehrdad; McKenna, Charly

    2012-01-01

    Conventional DNA barcoding uses an approximately 650 bp DNA barcode of the mitochondrial gene COI for species identification in animal groups. Similar size fragments from chloroplast genes have been proposed as barcode markers for plants. While PCR amplification and sequencing of a 650 bp fragment is consistent in freshly collected and well-preserved specimens, it is difficult to obtain a full-length barcode in older museum specimens and samples which have been preserved in formalin or similar DNA-unfriendly preservatives. A comparable issue may prevent effective DNA-based authentication and testing in processed biological materials, such as food products, pharmaceuticals, and nutraceuticals. In these cases, shorter DNA sequences-mini-barcodes-have been robustly recovered and shown to be effective in identifying majority of specimens to a species level. Furthermore, short DNA regions can be utilized via high-throughput sequencing platforms providing an inexpensive and comprehensive means of large-scale species identification. These properties of mini-barcodes, coupled with the availability of standardized and universal primers make mini-barcodes a feasible option for DNA barcode analysis in museum samples and applied diagnostic and environmental biodiversity analysis.

  16. DNA修复率与晚期消化道肿瘤含铂化疗方案疗效相关性的研究%Correlation between DNA repair rates and platinum-containing chemotherapy efficacy for patients with ad-vanced gastrointestinal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王丹丹; 顾康生

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the relationship between the DNA repair rate( DRR) of peripheral blood lymphocytes ( PBLC) and platinum⁃containing chemotherapy efficacy in advanced gastrointestinal malignancies. Methods The DRR of PBLC from 112 patients with advanced gastrointestinal cancer patients( cancer group) were detected by single cell gel electrophoresis( SCGE) , and other 60 patients with healthy subjects were selected as controls( control group) . Cancer patients were treated in parallel platinum⁃con⁃taining chemotherapy regimens to evaluate the short⁃term effect. In cancer group, the DRR of the two platinum groups before and after exposure to platinum were analyzed. Then, the correlation between the DRR of cancer group and clinical pathological features and effi⁃cacy of chemotherapy regimens containing platinum was also investigated. Results Tail length( TL) and tail moment( TM) were uti⁃lized to detect the DRR of esophageal cancer(Z=-4�687, P=0�000; Z=-4�939, P=0�000), gastric cancer(Z=-5�473, P=0�000;Z=-3�789, P=0�000) and colorectal cancer( Z=-5�796, P=0�000;Z=-5�206, P=0�000) . The PBLC DRRs of cancer group were lower than that of control group counterpart. The PBLC DRR of cancer group exhibit no correlation to sex, age, ECOG score, alcohol habits and tissue differentiation of the tumor( P>0�05) . Among 112 patients, 110 cases were evaluable for efficacy. For esophageal cancer, there were 3 cases of PR, 6 cases of SD and 12 cases of PD with response rate( RR) of 14�3% and disease control rate( DCR) of 42�9%. For gastric cancer, there were 1 case of CR, 5 cases of PR, 10 cases of SD and 20 cases of PD with RR of 16�7% and DCR of 44�4%. For colorectal cancer, there were 2 cases of CR, 8 cases of PR, 13 cases of SD and 30 cases of PD with RR of 18�9% and DCR of 43�4%.When TL was utilized as an evaluation index of DRR, the DRR of esophageal cancer(r=-0�500, P=0�021), gastric cancer(r=-0�546, P=0�001

  17. DNA Bending elasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivak, David Alexander

    DNA bending elasticity on length scales of tens of basepairs is of critical importance in numerous biological contexts. Even the simplest models of DNA bending admit of few simple analytic results, thus there is a need for numerical methods to calculate experimental observables, such as distance distributions, forces, FRET efficiencies, and timescales of particular large-scale motions. We have implemented and helped develop a coarse-grained representation of DNA and various other covalently-linked groups that allows simple calculation of such observables for varied experimental systems. The simple freely-jointed chain (FJC) model and extremely coarse resolution proved useful in understanding DNA threading through nanopores, identifying steric occlusion by other parts of the chain as a prime culprit for slower capture as distance to the pore decreased. Enhanced sampling techniques of a finer resolution discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model permitted calculation of cyclization rates for small chains and identified the ramifications of a thermodynamically-sound treatment of thermal melts. Adding treatment of double-stranded DNA's helical nature and single-stranded DNA provided a model system that helped demonstrate the importance of statistical fluctuations in even highly-stressed DNA mini-loops, and allowed us to verify that even these constructs show no evidence of excitation-induced softening. Additional incorporation of salt-sensitivity to the model allowed us to calculate forces and FRET efficiencies for such mini-loops and their uncircularized precursors, thereby furthering the understanding of the nature of IHF binding and bending of its recognition sequence. Adding large volume-excluding spheres linked to the ends of the dsDNA permits calculation of distance distributions and thus small-angle X-ray scattering, whereby we demonstrated the validity of the WLC in describing bending fluctuations in DNA chains as short as 42 bp. We also make important connections

  18. DNA-PK assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Carl W.; Connelly, Margery A.

    2004-10-12

    The present invention provides a method for detecting DNA-activated protein kinase (DNA-PK) activity in a biological sample. The method includes contacting a biological sample with a detectably-labeled phosphate donor and a synthetic peptide substrate defined by the following features to provide specific recognition and phosphorylation by DNA-PK: (1) a phosphate-accepting amino acid pair which may include serine-glutamine (Ser-Gln) (SQ), threonine-glutamine (Thr-Gln) (TQ), glutamine-serine (Gln-Ser) (QS), or glutamine-threonine (Gln-Thr) (QT); (2) enhancer amino acids which may include glutamic acid or glutamine immediately adjacent at the amino- or carboxyl- side of the amino acid pair and forming an amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (3) a first spacer sequence at the amino terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit; (4) a second spacer sequence at the carboxyl terminus of the amino acid pair-enhancer unit, which spacer sequences may include any combination of amino acids that does not provide a phosphorylation site consensus sequence motif; and, (5) a tag moiety, which may be an amino acid sequence or another chemical entity that permits separating the synthetic peptide from the phosphate donor. A compostion and a kit for the detection of DNA-PK activity are also provided. Methods for detecting DNA, protein phosphatases and substances that alter the activity of DNA-PK are also provided. The present invention also provides a method of monitoring protein kinase and DNA-PK activity in living cells. -A composition and a kit for monitoring protein kinase activity in vitro and a composition and a kit for monitoring DNA-PK activities in living cells are also provided. A method for identifying agents that alter protein kinase activity in vitro and a method for identifying agents that alter DNA-PK activity in living cells are also provided.

  19. Advances in dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J P

    2014-05-01

    The dental market is replete with new resorative materials marketed on the basis of novel technological advances in materials chemistry, bonding capability or reduced operator time and/or technique sensitivity. This paper aims to consider advances in current materials, with an emphasis on their role in supporting contemporary clinical practice.

  20. Advancement of Molecular Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江

    2004-01-01

    @@ Molecular morphology is a new discipline of medical science that studies morphology at the molecular level. This includes the investigation of occurrence and distribution of proteins, peptides, DNA and RNA sequences at the tissue, cellular, and ultrastructural levels.

  1. "Artifactual" arsenate DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter E

    2012-01-01

    The recent claim by Wolfe-Simon et al. that the Halomonas bacterial strain GFAJ-1 when grown in arsenate-containing medium with limiting phosphate is able to substitute phosphate with arsenate in biomolecules including nucleic acids and in particular DNA(1) arose much skepticism, primarily due...... to the very limited chemical stability of arsenate esters (see ref. 2 and references therein). A major part of the criticisms was concerned with the insufficient (bio)chemical evidence in the Wolfe-Simon study for the actual chemical incorporation of arsenate in DNA (and/or RNA). Redfield et al. now present...... evidence that the identification of arsenate DNA was artifactual....

  2. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meng, Huan X.; Hackett, James A. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Nestor, Colm [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Dunican, Donncha S.; Madej, Monika; Reddington, James P. [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Pennings, Sari [Queen' s Medical Research Institute, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH16 4TJ (United Kingdom); Harrison, David J. [Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Meehan, Richard R., E-mail: Richard.Meehan@hgu.mrc.ac.uk [MRC Human Genetics Unit, IGMM, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom); Breakthrough Research Unit, University of Edinburgh, Western General Hospital, Edinburgh EH4 2XU (United Kingdom)

    2011-04-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  3. Apoptosis and DNA Methylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard R. Meehan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms assist in maintaining gene expression patterns and cellular properties in developing and adult tissues. The molecular pathology of disease states frequently includes perturbation of DNA and histone methylation patterns, which can activate apoptotic pathways associated with maintenance of genome integrity. This perspective focuses on the pathways linking DNA methyltransferases and methyl-CpG binding proteins to apoptosis, and includes new bioinformatic analyses to characterize the evolutionary origin of two G/T mismatch-specific thymine DNA glycosylases, MBD4 and TDG.

  4. Spatial distribution of environmental DNA in a nearshore marine habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P.; Shelton, Andrew Olaf; Samhouri, Jameal F.; Lowell, Natalie C.; Williams, Gregory D.

    2017-01-01

    In the face of increasing threats to biodiversity, the advancement of methods for surveying biological communities is a major priority for ecologists. Recent advances in molecular biological technologies have made it possible to detect and sequence DNA from environmental samples (environmental DNA or eDNA); however, eDNA techniques have not yet seen widespread adoption as a routine method for biological surveillance primarily due to gaps in our understanding of the dynamics of eDNA in space and time. In order to identify the effective spatial scale of this approach in a dynamic marine environment, we collected marine surface water samples from transects ranging from the intertidal zone to four kilometers from shore. Using PCR primers that target a diverse assemblage of metazoans, we amplified a region of mitochondrial 16S rDNA from the samples and sequenced the products on an Illumina platform in order to detect communities and quantify their spatial patterns using a variety of statistical tools. We find evidence for multiple, discrete eDNA communities in this habitat, and show that these communities decrease in similarity as they become further apart. Offshore communities tend to be richer but less even than those inshore, though diversity was not spatially autocorrelated. Taxon-specific relative abundance coincided with our expectations of spatial distribution in taxa lacking a microscopic, pelagic life-history stage, though most of the taxa detected do not meet these criteria. Finally, we use carefully replicated laboratory procedures to show that laboratory treatments were remarkably similar in most cases, while allowing us to detect a faulty replicate, emphasizing the importance of replication to metabarcoding studies. While there is much work to be done before eDNA techniques can be confidently deployed as a standard method for ecological monitoring, this study serves as a first analysis of diversity at the fine spatial scales relevant to marine ecologists

  5. Spatial distribution of environmental DNA in a nearshore marine habitat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L. O’Donnell

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In the face of increasing threats to biodiversity, the advancement of methods for surveying biological communities is a major priority for ecologists. Recent advances in molecular biological technologies have made it possible to detect and sequence DNA from environmental samples (environmental DNA or eDNA; however, eDNA techniques have not yet seen widespread adoption as a routine method for biological surveillance primarily due to gaps in our understanding of the dynamics of eDNA in space and time. In order to identify the effective spatial scale of this approach in a dynamic marine environment, we collected marine surface water samples from transects ranging from the intertidal zone to four kilometers from shore. Using PCR primers that target a diverse assemblage of metazoans, we amplified a region of mitochondrial 16S rDNA from the samples and sequenced the products on an Illumina platform in order to detect communities and quantify their spatial patterns using a variety of statistical tools. We find evidence for multiple, discrete eDNA communities in this habitat, and show that these communities decrease in similarity as they become further apart. Offshore communities tend to be richer but less even than those inshore, though diversity was not spatially autocorrelated. Taxon-specific relative abundance coincided with our expectations of spatial distribution in taxa lacking a microscopic, pelagic life-history stage, though most of the taxa detected do not meet these criteria. Finally, we use carefully replicated laboratory procedures to show that laboratory treatments were remarkably similar in most cases, while allowing us to detect a faulty replicate, emphasizing the importance of replication to metabarcoding studies. While there is much work to be done before eDNA techniques can be confidently deployed as a standard method for ecological monitoring, this study serves as a first analysis of diversity at the fine spatial scales relevant to

  6. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  7. Using Plasmids as DNA Vaccines for Infectious Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregoning, John S; Kinnear, Ekaterina

    2014-12-01

    DNA plasmids can be used to induce a protective (or therapeutic) immune response by delivering genes encoding vaccine antigens. That naked DNA (without the refinement of coat proteins or host evasion systems) can cross from outside the cell into the nucleus and be expressed is particularly remarkable given the sophistication of the immune system in preventing infection by pathogens. As a result of the ease, low cost, and speed of custom gene synthesis, DNA vaccines dangle a tantalizing prospect of the next wave of vaccine technology, promising individual designer vaccines for cancer or mass vaccines with a rapid response time to emerging pandemics. There is considerable enthusiasm for the use of DNA vaccination as an approach, but this enthusiasm should be tempered by the successive failures in clinical trials to induce a potent immune response. The technology is evolving with the development of improved delivery systems that increase expression levels, particularly electroporation and the incorporation of genetically encoded adjuvants. This review will introduce some key concepts in the use of DNA plasmids as vaccines, including how the DNA enters the cell and is expressed, how it induces an immune response, and a summary of clinical trials with DNA vaccines. The review also explores the advances being made in vector design, delivery, formulation, and adjuvants to try to realize the promise of this technology for new vaccines. If the immunogenicity and expression barriers can be cracked, then DNA vaccines may offer a step change in mass vaccination.

  8. Segrosome complex formation during DNA trafficking in bacterial cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Oliva

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial extrachromosomal DNAs often contribute to virulence in pathogenic organisms or facilitate adaptation to particular environments. The transmission of genetic information from one generation to the next requires sufficient partitioning of DNA molecules to ensure that at least one copy reaches each side of the division plane and is inherited by the daughter cells. Segregation of the bacterial chromosome occurs during or after replication and probably involves a strategy in which several protein complexes participate to modify the folding pattern and distribution first of the origin domain and then of the rest of the chromosome. Low-copy number plasmids rely on specialised partitioning systems, which in some cases use a mechanism that show striking similarity to eukaryotic DNA segregation. Overall, there have been multiple systems implicated in the dynamic transport of DNA cargo to a new cellular position during the cell cycle but most seem to share a common initial DNA partitioning step, involving the formation of a nucleoprotein complex called the segrosome. The particular features and complex topologies of individual segrosomes depend on both the nature of the DNA binding protein involved and on the recognized centromeric DNA sequence, both of which vary across systems. The combination of in vivo and in vitro approaches, with structural biology has significantly furthered our understanding of the mechanisms underlying DNA trafficking in bacteria. Here, I discuss recent advances and the molecular details of the DNA segregation machinery, focusing on the formation of the segrosome complex.

  9. Fecal DNA Screening in Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzanne Richter

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal cancer (CRC is the third most common type of cancer diagnosed in Canada, and is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in nonsmokers. Although CRC is considered to be 90% curable if detected early, the majority of patients present with advanced stage III or IV disease. An effective screening test may significantly decrease disease burden. The present paper examines the rationale and potential of fecal DNA testing as an alternative and adjunct to other CRC screening tests. The most efficacious fecal DNA test developed to date has a sensitivity and specificity of 87.5% and 82%, respectively. The approach has a higher positive predictive value than the currently used fecal occult blood test and offers a noninvasive option to patients. It is not reliant on the presence of bleeding, which may be intermittent or altogether absent. The test is now commercially available and is supported by a number of American insurers. Current challenges include cost reduction and demonstration of mortality benefit in a rigorous clinical trial. Despite current challenges, fecal DNA testing is worth pursuing. Both the American Gastroenterological Society and the American Cancer Society maintain that molecular testing is in its infancy but is promising. Fecal DNA testing has the potential to be an exciting addition to the current armament of CRC screening options.

  10. Mitochondrial DNA disease: new options for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Lyndsey; Elson, Joanna L; Irving, Laura; Tuppen, Helen A; Lister, Lisa M; Greggains, Gareth D; Byerley, Samantha; Murdoch, Alison P; Herbert, Mary; Turnbull, Doug

    2011-10-15

    Very recently, two papers have presented intriguing data suggesting that prevention of transmission of human mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) disease is possible. [Craven, L., Tuppen, H.A., Greggains, G.D., Harbottle, S.J., Murphy, J.L., Cree, L.M., Murdoch, A.P., Chinnery, P.F., Taylor, R.W., Lightowlers, R.N. et al. (2010) Pronuclear transfer in human embryos to prevent transmission of mitochondrial DNA disease. Nature, 465, 82-85. Tachibana, M., Sparman, M., Sritanaudomchai, H., Ma, H., Clepper, L., Woodward, J., Li, Y., Ramsey, C., Kolotushkina, O. and Mitalipov, S. (2009) Mitochondrial gene replacement in primate offspring and embryonic stem cells. Nature, 461, 367-372.] These recent advances raise hopes for families with mtDNA disease; however, the successful translational of these techniques to clinical practice will require further research to test for safety and to maximize efficacy. Furthermore, in the UK, amendment to the current legislation will be required. Here, we discuss the clinical and scientific background, studies we believe are important to establish safety and efficacy of the techniques and some of the potential concerns about the use of these approaches.

  11. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla F.; Olsen, Maja E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2011-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle – although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  12. DNA fusion gene vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Peter Johannes; Bassi, Maria Rosaria; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2010-01-01

    DNA vaccines are versatile and safe, but limited immunogenicity has prevented their use in the clinical setting. Experimentally, immunogenicity may be enhanced by the use of new delivery technologies, by coadministration of cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular patterns, or by fusion...... of antigens into molecular domains that enhance antigen presentation. More specifically, the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines may benefit from increased protein synthesis, increased T-cell help and MHC class I presentation, and the addition of a range of specific cytokines and pathogen-associated molecular...... with viral-vectored vaccines, various synergistic components may need to be incorporated into DNA vaccines. From the perspective of the future clinical use of DNA vaccines, it has been suggested that antigen presentation should be improved and cytokine coadministration attempted. However, even...

  13. DNA from keratinous tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bengtsson, Camilla Friis; Olsen, Maia E.; Brandt, Luise Ørsted

    2012-01-01

    Keratinous tissues such as nail, hair, horn, scales and feather have been used as a source of DNA for over 20 years. Particular benefits of such tissues include the ease with which they can be sampled, the relative stability of DNA in such tissues once sampled, and, in the context of ancient...... genetic analyses, the fact that sampling generally causes minimal visual damage to valuable specimens. Even when freshly sampled, however, the DNA quantity and quality in the fully keratinized parts of such tissues is extremely poor in comparison to other tissues such as blood and muscle - although little...... systematic research has been undertaken to characterize how such degradation may relate to sample source. In this review paper we present the current understanding of the quality and limitations of DNA in two key keratinous tissues, nail and hair. The findings indicate that although some fragments of nuclear...

  14. DNA Sampling Hook

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The DNA Sampling Hook is a significant improvement on a method of obtaining a tissue sample from a live fish in situ from an aquatic environment. A tissue sample...

  15. Kink solitons in DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Zdravković, S; Daniel, M

    2012-01-01

    We here examine the nonlinear dynamics of artificial homogeneous DNA chain relying on the plain-base rotator model. It is shown that such dynamics can exhibit kink and antikink solitons of sine-Gordon type. In that respect we propose possible experimental assays based on single molecule micromanipulation techniques. The aim of these experiments is to excite the rotational waves and to determine their speeds along excited DNA. We propose that these experiments should be conducted either for the case of double stranded (DS) or single stranded (SS) DNA. A key question is to compare the corresponding velocities of the rotational waves indicating which one is bigger. The ratio of these velocities appears to be related with the sign of the model parameter representing ratio of the hydrogen-bonding and the covalent-bonding interaction within the considered DNA chain.

  16. DNA sequencing conference, 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook-Deegan, R.M. [Georgetown Univ., Kennedy Inst. of Ethics, Washington, DC (United States); Venter, J.C. [National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Strokes, Bethesda, MD (United States); Gilbert, W. [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States); Mulligan, J. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Mansfield, B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-06-19

    This conference focused on DNA sequencing, genetic linkage mapping, physical mapping, informatics and bioethics. Several were used to study this sequencing and mapping. This article also discusses computer hardware and software aiding in the mapping of genes.

  17. DNA-Origami

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Voigt, Niels Vinther; Tørring, Thomas; Gothelf, Kurt Vesterager

    2010-01-01

    DNA-nanostrukturer giver nye muligheder for studier af individuelle molekyler. Ved at udnytte DNAs unikke selvsamlende egenskaber kan man designe systemer, hvorpå der kan studeres kemiske reaktioner, fluoroforer og biiomolekyler på enkeltmolekyle-niveau....

  18. DNA-templated nanofabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becerril, Héctor A; Woolley, Adam T

    2009-02-01

    Nanofabrication, or the organizational control over matter at the nanometre scale, is an intriguing scientific challenge requiring multidisciplinary tools for its solution. DNA is a biomolecule that can be combined with other nanometre-scale entities through chemical self-assembly to form a broad variety of nanomaterials. In this tutorial review we present the principles that allow DNA to interact with other chemical species, and describe the challenges and potential applications of DNA as a template for making both biological and inorganic features with nanometre resolution. As such, this report should be of interest to chemists, surface and materials scientists, biologists, and nanotechnologists, as well as others who seek to use DNA in nanofabrication.

  19. DNA damage and carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stelow, R B

    1980-01-01

    Although cancer may arise as a result of many different types of molecular changes, there is little reason to doubt that changes to DNA are one of the more important ones in cancer initiation. Although DNA repair mechanisms seem able to eliminate a very large fraction of deleterious changes to DNA, we not only have little insight into the molecular mechanisms involved in such repair, but have a negligible amount of information to permit us to estimate the shape of dose response relations at low doses. The case of skin cancer is a special one, in that the average population is exposed to sufficient solar uv so that the effects of small increments in uv dose may be estimated. An approximate 85% reduction in DNA repair increases skin cancer incidence 10/sup 4/ fold.

  20. Interaction of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to fibronectin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, R.C.; Simpson, W.A.; Raghow, R.; Hasty, K.

    1986-03-01

    Fibronectin (Fn) is a large multidomain glycoprotein found in the basement membrane, on cell surface and in plasma. The interactions of Fn with DNA may be significant in glomerular deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The authors examined the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn by a solid phase assay in which Fn was coated to microtiter plates and reacted with (/sup 3/H)DNA or DNA complexes with a monoclonal anti-DNA antibody. The optimal interaction of DNA with Fn occurs at <0.1M NaCl suggesting that the binding is charge dependent; the specificity of this binding was shown by competitive inhibition and locking experiments using anti-Fn. The binding was maximum at pH 6.5 and in the absence of Ca/sup 2 +/. The addition of Clq enhanced the binding of DNA and DNA-anti-DNA complexes to Fn, whereas heparan sulfate inhibited such binding. The monomeric or aggregated IgC did not bind Fn but aggregated IgG bound to Fn in the presence of Clq. Furthermore, DNA-anti-DNA complexes in sera from active SLE patients bound Fn which was enhanced in the presence of Clq; DNase abolished this binding indicating that the interaction of these complexes was mediated by DNA. These observations may partially explain the molecular mechanism(s) of the deposition of DNA-anti-DNA complexes in basement membrane.

  1. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Hurt

    Full Text Available Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap. The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  2. Sequencing intractable DNA to close microbial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Richard A; Brown, Steven D; Podar, Mircea; Palumbo, Anthony V; Elias, Dwayne A

    2012-01-01

    Advancement in high throughput DNA sequencing technologies has supported a rapid proliferation of microbial genome sequencing projects, providing the genetic blueprint for in-depth studies. Oftentimes, difficult to sequence regions in microbial genomes are ruled "intractable" resulting in a growing number of genomes with sequence gaps deposited in databases. A procedure was developed to sequence such problematic regions in the "non-contiguous finished" Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ND132 genome (6 intractable gaps) and the Desulfovibrio africanus genome (1 intractable gap). The polynucleotides surrounding each gap formed GC rich secondary structures making the regions refractory to amplification and sequencing. Strand-displacing DNA polymerases used in concert with a novel ramped PCR extension cycle supported amplification and closure of all gap regions in both genomes. The developed procedures support accurate gene annotation, and provide a step-wise method that reduces the effort required for genome finishing.

  3. Patterning nanocrystals using DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Shara Carol

    2003-09-01

    One of the goals of nanotechnology is to enable programmed self-assembly of patterns made of various materials with nanometer-sized control. This dissertation describes the results of experiments templating arrangements of gold and semiconductor nanocrystals using 2'-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). Previously, simple DNA-templated linear arrangements of two and three nanocrystals structures have been made.[1] Here, we have sought to assemble larger and more complex nanostructures. Gold-DNA conjugates with 50 to 100 bases self-assembled into planned arrangements using strands of DNA containing complementary base sequences. We used two methods to increase the complexity of the arrangements: using branched synthetic doublers within the DNA covalent backbone to create discrete nanocrystal groupings, and incorporating the nanocrystals into a previously developed DNA lattice structure [2][3] that self-assembles from tiles made of DNA double-crossover molecules to create ordered nanoparticle arrays. In the first project, the introduction of a covalently-branched synthetic doubler reagent into the backbone of DNA strands created a branched DNA ''trimer.'' This DNA trimer templated various structures that contained groupings of three and four gold nanoparticles, giving promising, but inconclusive transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results. Due to the presence of a variety of possible structures in the reaction mixtures, and due to the difficulty of isolating the desired structures, the TEM and gel electrophoresis results for larger structures having four particles, and for structures containing both 5 and 10 nm gold nanoparticles were inconclusive. Better results may come from using optical detection methods, or from improved sample preparation. In the second project, we worked toward making two-dimensional ordered arrays of nanocrystals. We replicated and improved upon previous results for making DNA lattices, increasing the size of the lattices

  4. Teacher-to-Teacher: An Annotated Bibliography on DNA and Genetic Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Thomas R., Comp.

    1984-01-01

    Presented is an annotated bibliography of 24 books on DNA and genetic engineering. Areas considered in these books include: basic biological concepts to help understand advances in genetic engineering; applications of genetic engineering; social, legal, and moral issues of genetic engineering; and historical aspects leading to advances in…

  5. PDA: Pooled DNA analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chin-Yu

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Association mapping using abundant single nucleotide polymorphisms is a powerful tool for identifying disease susceptibility genes for complex traits and exploring possible genetic diversity. Genotyping large numbers of SNPs individually is performed routinely but is cost prohibitive for large-scale genetic studies. DNA pooling is a reliable and cost-saving alternative genotyping method. However, no software has been developed for complete pooled-DNA analyses, including data standardization, allele frequency estimation, and single/multipoint DNA pooling association tests. This motivated the development of the software, 'PDA' (Pooled DNA Analyzer, to analyze pooled DNA data. Results We develop the software, PDA, for the analysis of pooled-DNA data. PDA is originally implemented with the MATLAB® language, but it can also be executed on a Windows system without installing the MATLAB®. PDA provides estimates of the coefficient of preferential amplification and allele frequency. PDA considers an extended single-point association test, which can compare allele frequencies between two DNA pools constructed under different experimental conditions. Moreover, PDA also provides novel chromosome-wide multipoint association tests based on p-value combinations and a sliding-window concept. This new multipoint testing procedure overcomes a computational bottleneck of conventional haplotype-oriented multipoint methods in DNA pooling analyses and can handle data sets having a large pool size and/or large numbers of polymorphic markers. All of the PDA functions are illustrated in the four bona fide examples. Conclusion PDA is simple to operate and does not require that users have a strong statistical background. The software is available at http://www.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/%7Ecsjfann/first%20flow/pda.htm.

  6. Advanced electron microscopy for advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Bals, Sara; Van Aert, Sandra; Verbeeck, Jo; Van Dyck, Dirk

    2012-11-08

    The idea of this Review is to introduce newly developed possibilities of advanced electron microscopy to the materials science community. Over the last decade, electron microscopy has evolved into a full analytical tool, able to provide atomic scale information on the position, nature, and even the valency atoms. This information is classically obtained in two dimensions (2D), but can now also be obtained in 3D. We show examples of applications in the field of nanoparticles and interfaces.

  7. DNA Sequencing Using capillary Electrophoresis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Barry Karger

    2011-05-09

    The overall goal of this program was to develop capillary electrophoresis as the tool to be used to sequence for the first time the Human Genome. Our program was part of the Human Genome Project. In this work, we were highly successful and the replaceable polymer we developed, linear polyacrylamide, was used by the DOE sequencing lab in California to sequence a significant portion of the human genome using the MegaBase multiple capillary array electrophoresis instrument. In this final report, we summarize our efforts and success. We began our work by separating by capillary electrophoresis double strand oligonucleotides using cross-linked polyacrylamide gels in fused silica capillaries. This work showed the potential of the methodology. However, preparation of such cross-linked gel capillaries was difficult with poor reproducibility, and even more important, the columns were not very stable. We improved stability by using non-cross linked linear polyacrylamide. Here, the entangled linear chains could move when osmotic pressure (e.g. sample injection) was imposed on the polymer matrix. This relaxation of the polymer dissipated the stress in the column. Our next advance was to use significantly lower concentrations of the linear polyacrylamide that the polymer could be automatically blown out after each run and replaced with fresh linear polymer solution. In this way, a new column was available for each analytical run. Finally, while testing many linear polymers, we selected linear polyacrylamide as the best matrix as it was the most hydrophilic polymer available. Under our DOE program, we demonstrated initially the success of the linear polyacrylamide to separate double strand DNA. We note that the method is used even today to assay purity of double stranded DNA fragments. Our focus, of course, was on the separation of single stranded DNA for sequencing purposes. In one paper, we demonstrated the success of our approach in sequencing up to 500 bases. Other

  8. Toward larger DNA origami.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi, Alexandria N; Saaem, Ishtiaq; Vogen, Briana N; Brown, Stanley; LaBean, Thomas H

    2014-10-08

    Structural DNA nanotechnology, and specifically scaffolded DNA origami, is rapidly developing as a versatile method for bottom-up fabrication of novel nanometer-scale materials and devices. However, lengths of conventional single-stranded scaffolds, for example, 7,249-nucleotide circular genomic DNA from the M13mp18 phage, limit the scales of these uniquely addressable structures. Additionally, increasing DNA origami size generates the cost burden of increased staple-strand synthesis. We addressed this 2-fold problem by developing the following methods: (1) production of the largest to-date biologically derived single-stranded scaffold using a λ/M13 hybrid virus to produce a 51 466-nucleotide DNA in a circular, single-stranded form and (2) inexpensive DNA synthesis via an inkjet-printing process on a chip embossed with functionalized micropillars made from cyclic olefin copolymer. We have experimentally demonstrated very efficient assembly of a 51-kilobasepair origami from the λ/M13 hybrid scaffold folded by chip-derived staple strands. In addition, we have demonstrated two-dimensional, asymmetric origami sheets with controlled global curvature such that they land on a substrate in predictable orientations that have been verified by atomic force microscopy.

  9. DNA vaccines and intradermal vaccination by DNA tattooing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oosterhuis, K; van den Berg, J H; Schumacher, T N; Haanen, J B A G

    2012-01-01

    Over the past two decades, DNA vaccination has been developed as a method for the induction of immune responses. However, in spite of high expectations based on their efficacy in preclinical models, immunogenicity of first generation DNA vaccines in clinical trials was shown to be poor, and no DNA vaccines have yet been licensed for human use. In recent years significant progress has been made in the development of second generation DNA vaccines and DNA vaccine delivery methods. Here we review the key characteristics of DNA vaccines as compared to other vaccine platforms, and recent insights into the prerequisites for induction of immune responses by DNA vaccines will be discussed. We illustrate the development of second generation DNA vaccines with the description of DNA tattooing as a novel DNA delivery method. This technique has shown great promise both in a small animal model and in non-human primates and is currently under clinical evaluation.

  10. Advanced Aircraft Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Kumar Prince

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available There has been long debate on “advanced aircraft material” from past decades & researchers too came out with lots of new advanced material like composites and different aluminum alloys. Now days a new advancement that is in great talk is third generation Aluminum-lithium alloy. Newest Aluminum-lithium alloys are found out to have low density, higher elastic modulus, greater stiffness, greater cryogenic toughness, high resistance to fatigue cracking and improved corrosion resistance properties over the earlier used aircraft material as mentioned in Table 3 [1-5]. Comparison had been made with nowadays used composite material and is found out to be more superior then that

  11. Advanced healthcare materials

    CERN Document Server

    Tiwari, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Advanced materials are attracting strong interest in the fundamental as well as applied sciences and are being extensively explored for their potential usage in a range of healthcare technological and biological applications. Advanced Healthcare Nanomaterials summarises the current status of knowledge in the fields of advanced materials for functional therapeutics, point-of-care diagnostics, translational materials, up and coming bio-engineering devices. The book highlights the key features which enable engineers to design stimuli-responsive smart nanoparticles, novel biomaterials, nan

  12. Advanced Computer Typography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-01

    ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY .(U) DEC 81 A V HERSHEY UNCLASSIFIED NPS012-81-005 M MEEEIEEEII IIUJIL15I.4 MICROCQP RE SO.JjI ON ft R NPS012-81-005...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 0Monterey, California DTIC SELECTEWA APR 5 1982 B ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY by A. V. HERSHEY December 1981 OApproved for...Subtitle) S. TYPE Or REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final ADVANCED COMPUTER TYPOGRAPHY Dec 1979 - Dec 1981 S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) S CONTRACT

  13. Superimposed Code Theorectic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008 IEEE Proceedings of International Symposium on Information Theory, pp. 2292...5, June 2008, pp. 525-34. 32 28. A. Macula, et al., “Random Coding Bounds for DNA Codes Based on Fibonacci Ensembles of DNA Sequences ”, 2008...combinatorial method of bio-memory design and detection that encodes item or process information as numerical sequences represented in DNA. ComDMem is a

  14. Basic principles and clinical advancements of muscle electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille

    2010-01-01

    Muscle electrotransfer covers the delivery of molecules to muscle tissue by means of electric pulses. This method has proven highly efficient in transferring, in particular, plasmid DNA to muscles, resulting in long-term expression of the transferred genes. DNA electrotransfer to muscle tissue has...... clinical potential within DNA vaccination, systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and correction of gene defects in muscles. In the recent years, DNA electrotransfer to muscle tissue has reached clinical advancement with 8 on-going clinical trials. In the present review, I will draw on the experiences...... obtained from the clinical studies, in understanding the mechanistic and practical advantages and limits of muscle electrotransfer. The effect of applying electric pulses to muscle tissue will be described in details, while present and future clinical applications are reviewed....

  15. Simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lan-Tian; Meng, Zhenyu; Shao, Fangwei; Zhang, Li-Feng

    2016-01-01

    A highly useful tool for studying lncRNAs is simultaneous RNA-DNA FISH, which reveals the localization and quantitative information of RNA and DNA in cellular contexts. However, a simple combination of RNA FISH and DNA FISH often generates disappointing results because the fragile RNA signals are often damaged by the harsh conditions used in DNA FISH for denaturing the DNA. Here, we describe a robust and simple RNA-DNA FISH protocol, in which amino-labeled nucleic acid probes are used for RNA FISH. The method is suitable to detect single-RNA molecules simultaneously with DNA.

  16. Defects of mitochondrial DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, William C

    2014-09-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is replicated by DNA polymerase γ in concert with accessory proteins such as the mitochondrial DNA helicase, single-stranded DNA binding protein, topoisomerase, and initiating factors. Defects in mitochondrial DNA replication or nucleotide metabolism can cause mitochondrial genetic diseases due to mitochondrial DNA deletions, point mutations, or depletion, which ultimately cause loss of oxidative phosphorylation. These genetic diseases include mitochondrial DNA depletion syndromes such as Alpers or early infantile hepatocerebral syndromes, and mitochondrial DNA deletion disorders, such as progressive external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia-neuropathy, or mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy. This review focuses on our current knowledge of genetic defects of mitochondrial DNA replication (POLG, POLG2, C10orf2, and MGME1) that cause instability of mitochondrial DNA and mitochondrial disease.

  17. Catalytic DNA: Scope, Applications, and Biochemistry of Deoxyribozymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Scott K

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of natural RNA enzymes (ribozymes) prompted the pursuit of artificial DNA enzymes (deoxyribozymes) by in vitro selection methods. A key motivation is the conceptual and practical advantages of DNA relative to proteins and RNA. Early studies focused on RNA-cleaving deoxyribozymes, and more recent experiments have expanded the breadth of catalytic DNA to many other reactions. Including modified nucleotides has the potential to widen the scope of DNA enzymes even further. Practical applications of deoxyribozymes include their use as sensors for metal ions and small molecules. Structural studies of deoxyribozymes are only now beginning; mechanistic experiments will surely follow. Following the first report 21 years ago, the field of deoxyribozymes has promise for both fundamental and applied advances in chemistry, biology, and other disciplines.

  18. Role of TET enzymes in DNA methylation, development, and cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Kasper Dindler

    2016-01-01

    The pattern of DNA methylation at cytosine bases in the genome is tightly linked to gene expression, and DNA methylation abnormalities are often observed in diseases. The ten eleven translocation (TET) enzymes oxidize 5-methylcytosines (5mCs) and promote locus-specific reversal of DNA methylation. TET genes, and especially TET2, are frequently mutated in various cancers, but how the TET proteins contribute to prevent the onset and maintenance of these malignancies is largely unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances in understanding the physiological function of the TET proteins and their role in regulating DNA methylation and transcription. In addition, we discuss some of the key outstanding questions in the field. PMID:27036965

  19. The translational potential of circulating tumour DNA in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, K M; Tsui, D W Y

    2015-10-01

    The recent understanding of tumour heterogeneity and cancer evolution in response to therapy has raised questions about the value of historical or single site biopsies for guiding treatment decisions. The ability of ctDNA analysis to reveal de novo mutations (i.e., without prior knowledge), allows monitoring of clonal heterogeneity without the need for multiple tumour biopsies. Additionally, ctDNA monitoring of such heterogeneity and novel mutation detection will allow clinicians to detect resistant mechanisms early and tailor treatment therapies accordingly. If ctDNA can be used to detect low volume cancerous states, it will have important applications in treatment stratification post-surgery/radical radiotherapy and may have a role in patient screening. Mutant cfDNA can also be detected in other bodily fluids that are easily accessible and may aid detection of rare mutant alleles in certain cancer types. This article outlines recent advances in these areas.

  20. Advances in Sleep Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Sleep Disorders Advances in Sleep Studies Past Issues / Summer 2015 ... is the director of the National Center on Sleep Disorders Research (NCSDR) in the NIH's National Heart, Lung, ...

  1. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  2. Advanced urology nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Helen

    2014-03-01

    Urology nursing has developed as a specialty over the past few decades in response to several factors, workload demands being a prime reason. Nurses are taking on additional roles and activities including procedures such as cystoscopy and prostate biopsy, and running nurse-led clinics for a variety of urological conditions. Audits of advanced urological nursing practice have shown this care to be of a high standard and investigative procedures performed by these nurses match the diagnostic quality of existing services. Professional urological nursing organizations support the professional needs of these nurses, but the provision of education and training for advanced practice activities remains an unaddressed need. A range of confusing advanced urology nursing titles exists, and uncertainty regarding the roles and scope of practice for these nurses remains a concern. Acceptance and support from medical colleagues is required for the success of advanced urological nursing practice, but opinions on these roles remain divided.

  3. [Advanced resuscitation of adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lippert, F.K.; Lauritsen, T.L.; Torp-Pedersen, C.

    2008-01-01

    International and European Resuscitation Council (ERC) Guidelines for Resuscitation 2005 implicate major changes in resuscitation, including new universal treatment algorithms. This brief summary of Guidelines 2005 for advanced resuscitation of adult cardiac arrest victims is based upon the ERC...

  4. Advance Payment ACO Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Advance Payment Model is designed for physician-based and rural providers who have come together voluntarily to give coordinated high quality care to the...

  5. Advanced Welding Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Four advanced welding techniques and their use in NASA are briefly reviewed in this poster presentation. The welding techniques reviewed are: Solid State Welding, Friction Stir Welding (FSW), Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) and Ultrasonic Stir Welding.

  6. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature...

  7. Advanced Microanalysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Microanalysis Facility fully integrates capabilities for chemical and structural analysis of electronic materials and devices for the U.S. Army and DoD....

  8. Advanced Light Source (ALS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a world leader in soft x-ray science, generates light in the wavelengths needed for examining the atomic and electronic structure of...

  9. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  10. A Single Nucleotide Resolution Model for Large-Scale Simulations of Double Stranded DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Fosado, Y A G; Allan, J; Brackley, C; Henrich, O; Marenduzzo, D

    2016-01-01

    The computational modelling of DNA is becoming crucial in light of new advances in DNA nanotechnology, single-molecule experiments and in vivo DNA tampering. Here we present a mesoscopic model for double stranded DNA (dsDNA) at the single nucleotide level which retains the characteristic helical structure, while being able to simulate large molecules -- up to a million base pairs -- for time-scales which are relevant to physiological processes. This is made possible by an efficient and highly-parallelised implementation of the model which we discuss here. We compare the behaviour of our model with single molecule experiments where dsDNA is manipulated by external forces or torques. We also present some results on the kinetics of denaturation of linear DNA.

  11. Complexation of DNA with ruthenium organometallic compounds: the high complexation ratio limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despax, Stéphane; Jia, Fuchao; Pfeffer, Michel; Hébraud, Pascal

    2014-06-14

    Interactions between DNA and ruthenium organometallic compounds are studied by using visible light absorption and circular dichroism measurements. A titration technique allowing for the absolute determination of the advancement degree of the complexation, without any assumption about the number of complexation modes is developed. When DNA is in excess, complexation involves intercalation of one of the organometallic compound ligands between DNA base pairs. But, in the high complexation ratio limit, where organometallic compounds are in excess relative to the DNA base pairs, a new mode of interaction is observed, in which the organometallic compound interacts weakly with DNA. The weak interaction mode, moreover, develops when all the DNA intercalation sites are occupied. A regime is reached in which one DNA base pair is linked to more than one organometallic compound.

  12. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lu, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in advanced packaging in recent years. Several new packaging techniques have been developed and new packaging materials have been introduced. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the recent developments in this industry, particularly in the areas of microelectronics, optoelectronics, digital health, and bio-medical applications. The book discusses established techniques, as well as emerging technologies, in order to provide readers with the most up-to-date developments in advanced packaging.

  13. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1997-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is primarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  14. Joining of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Messler, Robert W

    1993-01-01

    Provides an unusually complete and readable compilation of the primary and secondary options for joining conventional materials in non-conventional ways. Provides unique coverage of adhesive bonding using both organic and inorganic adhesives, cements and mortars. Focuses on materials issues without ignoring issues related to joint design, production processing, quality assurance, process economics, and joining performance in service.Joining of advanced materials is a unique treatment of joining of both conventional and advanced metals andalloys, intermetallics, ceramics, glasses, polymers, a

  15. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  16. Advances in Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Jordan BF, Sonveaux P

    2011-01-01

    The book "Advances in Cancer Therapy" is a new addition to the Intech collection of books and aims at providing scientists and clinicians with a comprehensive overview of the state of current knowledge and latest research findings in the area of cancer therapy. For this purpose research articles, clinical investigations and review papers that are thought to improve the readers' understanding of cancer therapy developments and/or to keep them up to date with the most recent advances in this fi...

  17. Advanced Stellar Compass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Thuesen, Gøsta;

    1997-01-01

    This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described.......This document describes all interface properties for the Advanced Stellar Compass, developed for the German Research Satellite "CHAMP". Basic operations, modes, software protocol, calibration methods and closed loop test strategies are described....

  18. Advanced Welding Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Some of the applications of advanced welding techniques are shown in this poster presentation. Included are brief explanations of the use on the Ares I and Ares V launch vehicle and on the Space Shuttle Launch vehicle. Also included are microstructural views from four advanced welding techniques: Variable Polarity Plasma Arc (VPPA) weld (fusion), self-reacting friction stir welding (SR-FSW), conventional FSW, and Tube Socket Weld (TSW) on aluminum.

  19. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2008-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in advanced packaging in recent years. Several new packaging techniques have been developed and new packaging materials have been introduced. This book provides a comprehensive overview of the recent developments in this industry, particularly in the areas of microelectronics, optoelectronics, digital health, and bio-medical applications. The book discusses established techniques, as well as emerging technologies, in order to provide readers with the most up-to-date developments in advanced packaging.

  20. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1995-01-01

    This series describes selected advances in the area of atomic spectroscopy. It is promarily intended for the reader who has a background in atmoic spectroscopy; suitable to the novice and expert. Although a widely used and accepted method for metal and non-metal analysis in a variety of complex samples, Advances in Atomic Spectroscopy covers a wide range of materials. Each Chapter will completely cover an area of atomic spectroscopy where rapid development has occurred.

  1. Forensic DNA profiling and database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panneerchelvam, S; Norazmi, M N

    2003-07-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  2. Forensic DNA Profiling and Database

    OpenAIRE

    Panneerchelvam, S.; Norazmi, M. N.

    2003-01-01

    The incredible power of DNA technology as an identification tool had brought a tremendous change in crimnal justice . DNA data base is an information resource for the forensic DNA typing community with details on commonly used short tandem repeat (STR) DNA markers. This article discusses the essential steps in compilation of COmbined DNA Index System (CODIS) on validated polymerase chain amplified STRs and their use in crime detection.

  3. Initiation of adenovirus DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    Reiter, T; Fütterer, J; Weingärtner, B; Winnacker, E L

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to study the mechanism of initiation of adenovirus DNA replication, an assay was developed to investigate the pattern of DNA synthesis in early replicative intermediates of adenovirus DNA. By using wild-type virus-infected cells, it was possible to place the origin of adenovirus type 2 DNA replication within the terminal 350 to 500 base pairs from either of the two molecular termini. In addition, a variety of parameters characteristic of adenovirus DNA replication were compared ...

  4. An advance triage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, W W H; Heeney, L; Pound, J L

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the redesign of the triage process in an Emergency Department with the purpose of improving the patient flow and thus increasing patient satisfaction through the reduction of the overall length of stay. The process, Advance Triage, allows the triage nurse to initiate diagnostic protocols for frequently occurring medical problems based on physician-approved algorithms. With staff and physician involvement and medical specialist approval, nine Advance Triage algorithms were developed-abdominal pain, eye trauma, chest pain, gynaecological symptoms, substance abuse, orthopaedic trauma, minor trauma, paediatric fever and paediatric emergent. A comprehensive educational program was provided to the triage nurses and Advance Triage was initiated. A process was established at one year to evaluate the effectiveness of the Advance Triage System. The average length of stay was found to be 46 min less for all patients who were advance triaged with the greatest time-saving of 76 min for patients in the 'Urgent' category. The most significant saving was realized in the patient's length of stay (LOS) after the Emergency Physician assessed them because diagnostic results, available during the initial patient assessment, allowed treatment decisions to be made at that time. Advance Triage utilizes patient waiting time efficiently and increases the nurses' and physicians' job satisfaction.

  5. Local chromatin microenvironment determines DNMT activity : from DNA methyltransferase to DNA demethylase or DNA dehydroxymethylase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wijst, Monique G. P.; Venkiteswaran, Muralidhar; Chen, Hui; Xu, Guo-Liang; Plosch, Torsten; Rots, Marianne G.

    2015-01-01

    Insights on active DNA demethylation disproved the original assumption that DNA methylation is a stable epigenetic modification. Interestingly, mammalian DNA methyltransferases 3A and 3B (DNMT-3A and -3B) have also been reported to induce active DNA demethylation, in addition to their well-known fun

  6. Evidence for DNA Damage as a Biological Link Between Diabetes and Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Chin Lee; Juliana CN Chan

    2015-01-01

    Objective:This review examines the evidence that:Diabetes is a state of DNA damage;pathophysiological factors in diabetes can cause DNA damage;DNA damage can cause mutations;and DNA mutation is linked to carcinogenesis.Data Sources:We retrieved information from the PubMed database up to January,2014,using various search terms and their combinations including DNA damage,diabetes,cancer,high glucose,hyperglycemia,free fatty acids,palmitic acid,advanced glycation end products,mutation and carcinogenesis.Study Selection:We included data from peer-reviewed journals and a textbook printed in English on relationships between DNA damage and diabetes as well as pathophysiological factors in diabetes.Publications on relationships among DNA damage,mutagenesis,and carcinogenesis,were also reviewed.We organized this information into a conceptual framework to explain the possible causal relationship between DNA damage and carcinogenesis in diabetes.Results:There are a large amount of data supporting the view that DNA mutation is a typical feature in carcinogenesis.Patients with type 2 diabetes have increased production of reactive oxygen species,reduced levels of antioxidant capacity,and increased levels of DNA damage.The pathophysiological factors and metabolic milieu in diabetes can cause DNA damage such as DNA strand break and base modification (i.e.,oxidation).Emerging experimental data suggest that signal pathways (i.e.,Akt/tuberin) link diabetes to DNA damage.This collective evidence indicates that diabetes is a pathophysiological state of oxidative stress and DNA damage which can lead to various types of mutation to cause aberration in cells and thereby increased cancer risk.Conclusions:This review highlights the interrelationships amongst diabetes,DNA damage,DNA mutation and carcinogenesis,which suggests that DNA damage can be a biological link between diabetes and cancer.

  7. Eukaryotic DNA Replicases

    KAUST Repository

    Zaher, Manal S.

    2014-11-21

    The current model of the eukaryotic DNA replication fork includes three replicative DNA polymerases, polymerase α/primase complex (Pol α), polymerase δ (Pol δ), and polymerase ε (Pol ε). The primase synthesizes 8–12 nucleotide RNA primers that are extended by the DNA polymerization activity of Pol α into 30–35 nucleotide RNA-DNA primers. Replication factor C (RFC) opens the polymerase clamp-like processivity factor, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and loads it onto the primer-template. Pol δ utilizes PCNA to mediate highly processive DNA synthesis, while Pol ε has intrinsic high processivity that is modestly stimulated by PCNA. Pol ε replicates the leading strand and Pol δ replicates the lagging strand in a division of labor that is not strict. The three polymerases are comprised of multiple subunits and share unifying features in their large catalytic and B subunits. The remaining subunits are evolutionarily not related and perform diverse functions. The catalytic subunits are members of family B, which are distinguished by their larger sizes due to inserts in their N- and C-terminal regions. The sizes of these inserts vary among the three polymerases, and their functions remain largely unknown. Strikingly, the quaternary structures of Pol α, Pol δ, and Pol ε are arranged similarly. The catalytic subunits adopt a globular structure that is linked via its conserved C-terminal region to the B subunit. The remaining subunits are linked to the catalytic and B subunits in a highly flexible manner.

  8. Strandwise translocation of a DNA glycosylase on undamaged DNA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Yan; Nam, Kwangho; Spong, Marie C.; Banerjee, Anirban; Sung, Rou-Jia; Zhang, Michael; Karplus, Martin; Verdine, Gregory L. (Harvard)

    2012-05-14

    Base excision repair of genotoxic nucleobase lesions in the genome is critically dependent upon the ability of DNA glycosylases to locate rare sites of damage embedded in a vast excess of undamaged DNA, using only thermal energy to fuel the search process. Considerable interest surrounds the question of how DNA glycosylases translocate efficiently along DNA while maintaining their vigilance for target damaged sites. Here, we report the observation of strandwise translocation of 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase, MutM, along undamaged DNA. In these complexes, the protein is observed to translocate by one nucleotide on one strand while remaining untranslocated on the complementary strand. We further report that alterations of single base-pairs or a single amino acid substitution (R112A) can induce strandwise translocation. Molecular dynamics simulations confirm that MutM can translocate along DNA in a strandwise fashion. These observations reveal a previously unobserved mode of movement for a DNA-binding protein along the surface of DNA.

  9. Advances in Soft Matter Mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shaofan

    2012-01-01

    "Advances in Soft Matter Mechanics" is a compilation and selection of recent works in soft matter mechanics by a group of active researchers in the field. The main objectives of this book are first to disseminate the latest developments in soft matter mechanics in the field of applied and computational mechanics, and second to introduce soft matter mechanics as a sub-discipline of soft matter physics. As an important branch of soft matter physics, soft matter mechanics has developed rapidly in recent years. A number of the novel approaches discussed in this book are unique, such as the coarse grained finite element method for modeling colloidal adhesion, entropic elasticity, meshfree simulations of liquid crystal elastomers, simulations of DNA, etc. The book is intended for researchers and graduate students in the field of mechanics, condensed matter physics and biomaterials. Dr. Shaofan Li is a professor of the University of California-Berkeley, U.S.A; Dr. Bohua Sun is a professor of Cape Peninsula Universit...

  10. DNA Origami with Double Stranded DNA as a Unified Scaffold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yang; Han, Dongran; Nangreave, Jeanette; Liu, Yan; Yan, Hao

    2013-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami is a widely used technology for self-assembling precisely structured nanoscale objects that contain a large number of addressable features. Typical scaffolds are long, single strands of DNA (ssDNA) that are folded into distinct shapes through the action of many, short ssDNA staples that are complementary to several different domains of the scaffold. However, sources of long single stranded DNA are scarce, limiting the size and complexity of structures that can be assembled. Here we demonstrated that dsDNA scaffolds can be directly used to fabricate integrated DNA origami structures that incorporate both of the constituent ssDNA molecules. Two basic principles were employed in the design of scaffold folding paths – folding path asymmetry and periodic convergence of the two ssDNA scaffold strands. Asymmetry in the folding path minimizes unwanted complementarity between staples, and incorporating an offset between the folding paths of each ssDNA scaffold strand reduces the number of times that complementary portions of the strands are brought into close proximity with one another, both of which decrease the likelihood of dsDNA scaffold recovery. Meanwhile, the folding paths of the two ssDNA scaffold strands were designed to periodically converge to promote the assembly of a single, unified structure rather than two individual ones. Our results reveal that this basic strategy can be used to reliably assemble integrated DNA nanostructures from dsDNA scaffolds. PMID:22830653

  11. Advanced Situation Awareness Technologies Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced Situation Awareness Technologies (ASAT) will facilitate exploration of the moon surface, and other planetary bodies. ASAT will create an Advanced Situation...

  12. Psychiatric Advance Directives: Getting Started

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More... Home Getting Started National Resource Center on Psychiatric Advance Directives - Getting Started Getting Started Psychiatric advance directives (PADs) are relatively new legal instruments ...

  13. DNA damage checkpoint recovery and cancer development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haiyong [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Zhang, Xiaoshan [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Teng, Lisong, E-mail: lsteng@zju.edu.cn [First affiliated hospital, Zhejiang University, School of medicine, Cancer Center, 79 Qingchun Road, Hangzhou 310003 (China); Legerski, Randy J., E-mail: rlegersk@mdanderson.org [Department of Genetics, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Department of Genetics Unit 1010, 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2015-06-10

    Cell cycle checkpoints were initially presumed to function as a regulator of cell cycle machinery in response to different genotoxic stresses, and later found to play an important role in the process of tumorigenesis by acting as a guard against DNA over-replication. As a counterpart of checkpoint activation, the checkpoint recovery machinery is working in opposition, aiming to reverse the checkpoint activation and resume the normal cell cycle. The DNA damage response (DDR) and oncogene induced senescence (OIS) are frequently found in precancerous lesions, and believed to constitute a barrier to tumorigenesis, however, the DDR and OIS have been observed to be diminished in advanced cancers of most tissue origins. These findings suggest that when progressing from pre-neoplastic lesions to cancer, DNA damage checkpoint barriers are overridden. How the DDR checkpoint is bypassed in this process remains largely unknown. Activated cytokine and growth factor-signaling pathways were very recently shown to suppress the DDR and to promote uncontrolled cell proliferation in the context of oncovirus infection. In recent decades, data from cell line and tumor models showed that a group of checkpoint recovery proteins function in promoting tumor progression; data from patient samples also showed overexpression of checkpoint recovery proteins in human cancer tissues and a correlation with patients' poor prognosis. In this review, the known cell cycle checkpoint recovery proteins and their roles in DNA damage checkpoint recovery are reviewed, as well as their implications in cancer development. This review also provides insight into the mechanism by which the DDR suppresses oncogene-driven tumorigenesis and tumor progression. - Highlights: • DNA damage checkpoint works as a barrier to cancer initiation. • DDR machinary response to genotoxic and oncogenic stress in similar way. • Checkpoint recovery pathways provide active signaling in cell cycle control. • Checkpoint

  14. Comparative epigenomics: a powerful tool to understand the evolution of DNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xuehua

    2016-04-01

    Understanding how developmental and functional complexity of organisms evolves is a longstanding challenge in biology. Genetic mutation has long been thought to be the cause of biological complexity. However, increasing evidence indicates that epigenetic variation provides a parallel path for the evolution of biological complexity. Cytosine DNA methylation, the addition of a chemical mark on DNA, is a conserved and essential gene regulatory mechanism. Recent studies have greatly advanced our understanding of the DNA methylation landscapes and key regulatory components across many species. In this review, I summarize recent advances in understanding DNA methylation from an evolutionary perspective. Using comparative approaches, I highlight the conservation and divergence of DNA methylation patterns and regulatory machinery in plants and other eukaryotic organisms.

  15. Dialects of the DNA uptake sequence in Neisseriaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan A Frye

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In all sexual organisms, adaptations exist that secure the safe reassortment of homologous alleles and prevent the intrusion of potentially hazardous alien DNA. Some bacteria engage in a simple form of sex known as transformation. In the human pathogen Neisseria meningitidis and in related bacterial species, transformation by exogenous DNA is regulated by the presence of a specific DNA Uptake Sequence (DUS, which is present in thousands of copies in the respective genomes. DUS affects transformation by limiting DNA uptake and recombination in favour of homologous DNA. The specific mechanisms of DUS-dependent genetic transformation have remained elusive. Bioinformatic analyses of family Neisseriaceae genomes reveal eight distinct variants of DUS. These variants are here termed DUS dialects, and their effect on interspecies commutation is demonstrated. Each of the DUS dialects is remarkably conserved within each species and is distributed consistent with a robust Neisseriaceae phylogeny based on core genome sequences. The impact of individual single nucleotide transversions in DUS on meningococcal transformation and on DNA binding and uptake is analysed. The results show that a DUS core 5'-CTG-3' is required for transformation and that transversions in this core reduce DNA uptake more than two orders of magnitude although the level of DNA binding remains less affected. Distinct DUS dialects are efficient barriers to interspecies recombination in N. meningitidis, N. elongata, Kingella denitrificans, and Eikenella corrodens, despite the presence of the core sequence. The degree of similarity between the DUS dialect of the recipient species and the donor DNA directly correlates with the level of transformation and DNA binding and uptake. Finally, DUS-dependent transformation is documented in the genera Eikenella and Kingella for the first time. The results presented here advance our understanding of the function and evolution of DUS and genetic

  16. An in silico DNA cloning experiment for the biochemistry laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2011-01-01

    This laboratory exercise introduces students to concepts in recombinant DNA technology while accommodating a major semester project in protein purification, structure, and function in a biochemistry laboratory for junior- and senior-level undergraduate students. It is also suitable for forensic science courses focused in DNA biology and advanced high school biology classes. Students begin by examining a plasmid map with the goal of identifying which restriction enzymes may be used to clone a piece of foreign DNA containing a gene of interest into the vector. From the National Center for Biotechnology Initiative website, students are instructed to retrieve a protein sequence and use Expasy's Reverse Translate program to reverse translate the protein to cDNA. Students then use Integrated DNA Technologies' OligoAnalyzer to predict the complementary DNA strand and obtain DNA recognition sequences for the desired restriction enzymes from New England Biolabs' website. Students add the appropriate DNA restriction sequences to the double-stranded foreign DNA for cloning into the plasmid and infecting Escherichia coli cells. Students are introduced to computational biology tools, molecular biology terminology and the process of DNA cloning in this valuable single session, in silico experiment. This project develops students' understanding of the cloning process as a whole and contrasts with other laboratory and internship experiences in which the students may be involved in only a piece of the cloning process/techniques. Students interested in pursuing postgraduate study and research or employment in an academic biochemistry or molecular biology laboratory or industry will benefit most from this experience.

  17. Timing, coordination, and rhythm: Acrobatics at the DNA replication fork

    KAUST Repository

    Hamdan, Samir

    2010-04-09

    In DNA replication, the antiparallel nature of the parental duplex imposes certain constraints on the activity of the DNA polymerases that synthesize new DNA. The leading-strand polymerase advances in a continuous fashion, but the lagging-strand polymerase is forced to restart at short intervals. In several prokaryotic systems studied so far, this problem is solved by the formation of a loop in the lagging strand of the replication fork to reorient the lagging-strand DNA polymerase so that it advances in parallel with the leading-strand polymerase. The replication loop grows and shrinks during each cycle of Okazaki fragment synthesis. The timing of Okazaki fragment synthesis and loop formation is determined by a subtle interplay of enzymatic activities at the fork. Recent developments in single-molecule techniques have enabled the direct observation of these processes and have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the dynamic nature of the replication fork. Here, we will review recent experimental advances, present the current models, and discuss some of the exciting developments in the field. 2010 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Pursuing DNA catalysts for protein modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Scott K

    2015-05-19

    nucleotides in the catalyst, which we have recently found to enable this cleavage reaction. In numerous other efforts, we have investigated DNA-catalyzed peptide side chain modification reactions. Key successes include nucleopeptide formation (attachment of oligonucleotides to peptide side chains) and phosphatase and kinase activities (removal and attachment of phosphoryl groups to side chains). Through all of these efforts, we have learned the importance of careful selection design, including the frequent need to develop specific "capture" reactions that enable the selection process to provide only those DNA sequences that have the desired catalytic functions. We have established strategies for identifying deoxyribozymes that accept discrete peptide and protein substrates, and we have obtained data to inform the key choice of random region length at the outset of selection experiments. Finally, we have demonstrated the viability of modular deoxyribozymes that include a small-molecule-binding aptamer domain, although the value of such modularity is found to be minimal, with implications for many selection endeavors. Advances such as those summarized in this Account reveal that DNA has considerable catalytic abilities for biochemically relevant reactions, specifically including covalent protein modifications. Moreover, DNA has substantially different, and in many ways better, characteristics than do small molecules or proteins for a catalyst that is obtained "from scratch" without demanding any existing information on catalyst structure or mechanism. Therefore, prospects are very strong for continued development and eventual practical applications of deoxyribozymes for peptide and protein modification.

  19. Highly Effective DNA Extraction Method from Fresh, Frozen, Dried and Clotted Blood Samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Today, with the tremendous potential of genomics and other recent advances in science, the role of science to improve reliable DNA extraction methods is more relevant than ever before. The ideal process for genomic DNA extraction demands high quantities of pure, integral and intact genomic DNA (gDNA from the sample with minimal co-extraction of inhibitors of downstream processes. Here, we report the development of a very rapid, less-hazardous, and high throughput protocol for extracting of high quality DNA from blood samples. Methods: Dried, clotted and ethylene diamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA treated fresh and frozen blood samples were extracted using this method in which the quality and integrity of the extracted DNA were corroborated by agarose gel electrophoresis, PCR reaction and DNA digestion using restricted enzyme. The UV spectrophotometric and gel electrophoresis analysis resulted in high A260/A280 ratio (>1.8 with high intactness of DNA. Results: PCR and DNA digestion experiments indicated that the final solutions of extracted DNA contained no inhibitory substances, which confirms that the isolated DNA is of good quality. Conclusion: The high quality and quantity of current method, no enzymatic processing and accordingly its low cost, make it appropriate for DNA extraction not only from human but also from animal blood samples in any molecular biology labs.

  20. Discovery of cyanophage genomes which contain mitochondrial DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Wah; Mohr, Remus; Millard, Andrew D; Holmes, Antony B; Larkum, Anthony W; Whitworth, Anna L; Mann, Nicholas H; Scanlan, David J; Hess, Wolfgang R; Clokie, Martha R J

    2011-08-01

    DNA polymerase γ is a family A DNA polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA in eukaryotes. The origins of DNA polymerase γ have remained elusive because it is not present in any known bacterium, though it has been hypothesized that mitochondria may have inherited the enzyme by phage-mediated nonorthologous displacement. Here, we present an analysis of two full-length homologues of this gene, which were found in the genomes of two bacteriophages, which infect the chlorophyll-d containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina. Phylogenetic analyses of these phage DNA polymerase γ proteins show that they branch deeply within the DNA polymerase γ clade and therefore share a common origin with their eukaryotic homologues. We also found homologues of these phage polymerases in the environmental Community Cyberinfrastructure for Advanced Microbial Ecology Research and Analysis (CAMERA) database, which fell in the same clade. An analysis of the CAMERA assemblies containing the environmental homologues together with the filter fraction metadata indicated some of these assemblies may be of bacterial origin. We also show that the phage-encoded DNA polymerase γ is highly transcribed as the phage genomes are replicated. These findings provide data that may assist in reconstructing the evolution of mitochondria.

  1. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  2. Duplication in DNA Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Masami; Kari, Lila; Kincaid, Zachary; Seki, Shinnosuke

    The duplication and repeat-deletion operations are the basis of a formal language theoretic model of errors that can occur during DNA replication. During DNA replication, subsequences of a strand of DNA may be copied several times (resulting in duplications) or skipped (resulting in repeat-deletions). As formal language operations, iterated duplication and repeat-deletion of words and languages have been well studied in the literature. However, little is known about single-step duplications and repeat-deletions. In this paper, we investigate several properties of these operations, including closure properties of language families in the Chomsky hierarchy and equations involving these operations. We also make progress toward a characterization of regular languages that are generated by duplicating a regular language.

  3. Optimality in DNA repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Morgiane; Fryett, Matthew; Miller, Samantha; Booth, Ian; Grebogi, Celso; Moura, Alessandro

    2012-01-07

    DNA within cells is subject to damage from various sources. Organisms have evolved a number of mechanisms to repair DNA damage. The activity of repair enzymes carries its own risk, however, because the repair of two nearby lesions may lead to the breakup of DNA and result in cell death. We propose a mathematical theory of the damage and repair process in the important scenario where lesions are caused in bursts. We use this model to show that there is an optimum level of repair enzymes within cells which optimises the cell's response to damage. This optimal level is explained as the best trade-off between fast repair and a low probability of causing double-stranded breaks. We derive our results analytically and test them using stochastic simulations, and compare our predictions with current biological knowledge.

  4. DNA display I. Sequence-encoded routing of DNA populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R Halpin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Recently reported technologies for DNA-directed organic synthesis and for DNA computing rely on routing DNA populations through complex networks. The reduction of these ideas to practice has been limited by a lack of practical experimental tools. Here we describe a modular design for DNA routing genes, and routing machinery made from oligonucleotides and commercially available chromatography resins. The routing machinery partitions nanomole quantities of DNA into physically distinct subpools based on sequence. Partitioning steps can be iterated indefinitely, with worst-case yields of 85% per step. These techniques facilitate DNA-programmed chemical synthesis, and thus enable a materials biology that could revolutionize drug discovery.

  5. Recruit and ADVANCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Sue V.

    2007-04-01

    Beginning in 2001, the National Science Foundation launched the ADVANCE Initiative, which has now awarded more than 70 million to some thirty institutions for transformations to advance women. Results of studies on how to attract and retain women students and faculty underpinned our ADVANCE Institutional Transformation grant funded by the NSF for 3.7 million for five years, beginning in 2001. As co-principal investigator on this grant, I insured that this research informed the five major threads of the grant: 1) Four termed ADVANCE professors to mentor junior women faculty in each college; 2) Collection of MIT-Report-like data indicators to assess whether advancement of women really occurs during and after the institutional transformation undertaken through ADVANCE; 3) Family-friendly policies and practices to stop the tenure clock and provide active service, modified duties, lactation stations and day care; 4) Mini-retreats to facilitate access for tenure-track women faculty to male decision-makers and administrators for informal conversations and discussion on topics important to women faculty; 5) Removal of subtle gender, racial, and other biases in promotion and tenure. The dynamic changes resulting from the grant in quality of mentoring, new understanding of promotion and tenure, numbers of women retained and given endowed chairs, and emergence of new family friendly policies gave me hope for genuine diversification of leadership in science and technology. As the grant funding ends, the absence of NSF prestige and monitoring, coupled with a change in academic leadership at the top, provide new challenges for institutionalization, recruitment, and advancement of women into leadership positions in science and engineering.

  6. DNA templated magnetic nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Joseph M.

    Recent discoveries in nanoscience are predicted to potentially revolutionize future technologies in an extensive number of fields. These developments are contingent upon discovering new and often unconventional methods to synthesize and control nanoscale components. Nature provides several examples of working nanotechnology such as the use of programmed self assembly to build and deconstruct complex molecular systems. We have adopted a method to control the one dimensional assembly of magnetic nanoparticles using DNA as a scaffold molecule. With this method we have demonstrated the ability to organize 5 nm particles into chains that stretch up to ˜20 mum in length. One advantage of using DNA compared is the ability of the molecule to interact with other biomolecules. After assembling particles onto DNA we have been able to cleave the molecule into smaller fragments using restriction enzymes. Using ligase enzymes we have re-connected these fragments, coated with either gold or iron oxide, to form long one-dimensional arrangements of the two different types of nanoparticles on a single molecular guide. We have also created a sensitive magnetic field sensor by incorporating magnetic nanoparticle coated DNA strands with microfabricated electrodes. The IV characteristics of the aligned nanoparticles are dependant on the magnitude of an externally applied magnetic field. This transport phenomenon known as tunneling magnetoresistance (TMR) shows room temperature resistance of our devices over 80% for cobalt ferrite coated DNA when a field of 20 kOe is applied. In comparison, studies using two dimensional nanoparticle films of irox oxides xii only exhibit a 35% MR effect. Confinement into one dimension using the DNA guide produces a TMR mechanism which produces significant increases in magnetoresistance. This property can be utilized for applications in magnetic field sensing, data storage, and logic elements.

  7. Plant DNA barcoding in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    De-Zhu LI; Jian-Quan LIU; Zhi-Duan CHEN; Hong WANG; Xue-Jun GE; Shi-Liang ZHOU; Lian-Ming GAO; Cheng-Xin FU; Shi-Lin CHEN

    2011-01-01

    @@ Identification is the keystone of biology (Bell, 1986).However, to biologists and students of biology, the total numbers of species that must be identified far outnumber the names commonly used in English, Chinese, or other living languages.In addition, the identification cues vary greatly between different taxonomical groups.Even for the taxonomists with long training and experience, it is difficult to remember all specific terms for a given group, e.g., Orchidaceae or Poaceae, without help of floristic books or monographs.It takes much time and effort to train a taxonomist, at a time when fewer and fewer young students are interested in this "classical" and "out-of-style", but extremely important, discipline.Many students elect to learn the more "advanced'' and "modem" biological disciples like molecular biology and biochemistry.Thus, in China and therest of the world, taxonomists are themselves becoming "endangered".The rise of the DNA barcoding is expected to mitigate, at least in part, this dilemma.

  8. Mitochondrial DNA disease—molecular insights and potential routes to a cure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russell, Oliver; Turnbull, Doug, E-mail: doug.turnbull@newcastle.ac.uk

    2014-07-01

    Mitochondrial DNA diseases are common neurological conditions caused by mutations in the mitochondrial genome or nuclear genes responsible for its maintenance. Current treatments for these disorders are focussed on the management of the symptoms, rather than the correction of biochemical defects caused by the mutation. This review focuses on the molecular effects of mutations, the symptoms they cause and current work focusing on the development of targeted treatments for mitochondrial DNA disease. - Highlights: • We discuss several common disease causing mtDNA mutations. • We highlight recent work linking pathogenicity to deletion size and heteroplasmy. • We discuss recent advances in the development of targeted mtDNA disease treatments.

  9. Rigidity of melting DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Tanmoy; Bhattacharjee, Somendra M.

    2016-05-01

    The temperature dependence of DNA flexibility is studied in the presence of stretching and unzipping forces. Two classes of models are considered. In one case the origin of elasticity is entropic due to the polymeric correlations, and in the other the double-stranded DNA is taken to have an intrinsic rigidity for bending. In both cases single strands are completely flexible. The change in the elastic constant for the flexible case due to thermally generated bubbles is obtained exactly. For the case of intrinsic rigidity, the elastic constant is found to be proportional to the square root of the bubble number fluctuation.

  10. Advancement of Molecular Morphology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    顾江

    2004-01-01

    Molecular morphology is a new discipline of medical science that studies morphology at the molecular level. This includes the investigation of occurrence and distribution of proteins, peptides, DNA and RNA sequences at the tissue, cellular, and uhrastructural levels. Morphology is defined as a field of science investigating the shape,

  11. Conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes: new insights from single base-resolution DNA methylomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhixi; Han, Leng; Zhao, Zhongming

    2011-02-01

    DNA methylation is one of the most important heritable epigenetic modifications of the genome and is involved in the regulation of many cellular processes. Aberrant DNA methylation has been frequently reported to influence gene expression and subsequently cause various human diseases, including cancer. Recent rapid advances in next-generation sequencing technologies have enabled investigators to profile genome methylation patterns at single-base resolution. Remarkably, more than 20 eukaryotic methylomes have been generated thus far, with a majority published since November 2009. Analysis of this vast amount of data has dramatically enriched our knowledge of biological function, conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes. Even so, many specific functions of DNA methylation and their underlying regulatory systems still remain unknown to us. Here, we briefly introduce current approaches for DNA methylation profiling and then systematically review the features of whole genome DNA methylation patterns in eight animals, six plants and five fungi. Our systematic comparison provides new insights into the conservation and divergence of DNA methylation in eukaryotes and their regulation of gene expression. This work aims to summarize the current state of available methylome data and features informatively.

  12. Statistical mechanics of topologically constrained DNA and nucleoprotein complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovan, Stefan Michael

    A complex connection exists between the 3 dimensional topological state of DNA in living organisms and biological processes including gene expression, DNA replication, recombination and repair. A significant limitation in developing a detailed, quantitative understanding of this connection is due to a lack of rigorous methods to calculate statistical mechanical properties of DNA molecules with complex topologies, including supercoiling, looping and knotting. This dissertation's main focus is on developing such methods and applying them to realistic DNA and nucleoprotein models. In chapter 2, a method is presented to calculate free energies and J factors of protein mediated DNA loops by normal mode analysis (NMA). This method is similar to calculations performed previously but with several significant advances. We apply the method to the specific case of DNA looping mediated by Cre recombinase protein. J factors calculated by our method are compared to experimental measurements to extract geometric and elastic properties of the Cre-DNA synaptic complex. In particular, the results suggest the existence of a synaptic complex that is more flexible than previously expected and may be explained by a stable intermediate in the reaction pathway that deviates significantly from the planar crystal structure. Calculating free energies of DNA looping is difficult in general, especially when considering intermediate length scales such as plasmid sized DNA which may readily adopt multiple topological states. In chapter 3, a novel method is presented to obtain free energies of semiflexible biopolymers with fixed topologies and arbitrary ratios of contour length L to persistence length P. High accuracy is demonstrated by calculating free energies of specific DNA knots with L/P = 20 and L/P = 40, corresponding to DNA lengths of 3000 and 6000 base pairs, respectively. We then apply the method to study the free-energy landscape for a model of a synaptic nucleoprotein complex

  13. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  14. Advances in business ICT

    CERN Document Server

    Pełech-Pilichowski, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Futurists and scientists alike profess the coming of a new era in the history – the knowledge era. The notion of knowledge is as old as humans’ self-consciousness, but new challenges appear. The meaning of the word “knowledge” is changing from cognitive notion to a technical term denoting a structured economic resource to be actively managed. This contributed volume is a result of vivid and extremely valuable discussions held at 3rd International Workshop on Advances in Business ICT (ABICT) in Wrocław, Poland, September 9-12, 2012. The workshop focused on Advances in Business ICT approached from a multidisciplinary perspective. It provided an international forum for scientists/experts from academia and industry to discuss and exchange current results, applications, new ideas of ongoing research and experience on all aspects of Business Intelligence. ABICT has also been an opportunity to demonstrate different ideas and tools for developing and supporting organizational creativity, as well as advances ...

  15. Advanced flip chip packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Lai, Yi-Shao; Wong, CP

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Flip Chip Packaging presents past, present and future advances and trends in areas such as substrate technology, material development, and assembly processes. Flip chip packaging is now in widespread use in computing, communications, consumer and automotive electronics, and the demand for flip chip technology is continuing to grow in order to meet the need for products that offer better performance, are smaller, and are environmentally sustainable. This book also: Offers broad-ranging chapters with a focus on IC-package-system integration Provides viewpoints from leading industry executives and experts Details state-of-the-art achievements in process technologies and scientific research Presents a clear development history and touches on trends in the industry while also discussing up-to-date technology information Advanced Flip Chip Packaging is an ideal book for engineers, researchers, and graduate students interested in the field of flip chip packaging.

  16. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  17. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-12-31

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  18. Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures

    CERN Document Server

    Sellmyer, David

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Magnetic Nanostructures is devoted to the fabrication, characterization, experimental investigation, theoretical understanding, and utilization of advanced magnetic nanostructures. Focus is on various types of 'bottom-up' and 'top-down' artificial nanostructures, as contrasted to naturally occurring magnetic nanostructures, such as iron-oxide inclusions in magnetic rocks, and to structures such as perfect thin films. Chapter 1 is an introduction into some basic concepts, such as the definitions of basic magnetic quantities. Chapters 2-4 are devoted to the theory of magnetic nanostructures, Chapter 5 deals with the characterization of the structures, and Chapters 6-10 are devoted to specific systems. Applications of advanced magnetic nanostructures are discussed in Chapters11-15 and, finally, the appendix lists and briefly discusses magnetic properties of typical starting materials. Industrial and academic researchers in magnetism and related areas such as nanotechnology, materials science, and theore...

  19. Advancement & Promotion Review: 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and promotion decisions were made at the end of June, following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 13/2003. These decisions were included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2003. The award of the periodic step was communicated to staff by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification. The names of staff receiving exceptional advancements or promotions are now published on the HR Division website and are accessible for consultation only at the following address: http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/personnel/advlist_2003.asp It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2003. Final decisions will be applied retroactively to 1 July 2003. Human Resources Division Tel:...

  20. ADVANCEMENT & PROMOTION REVIEW: 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Advancement, exceptional advancement and promotion decisions were made at the beginning of July, under the new career structure scheme and following the procedures published in Weekly Bulletin No. 11/2002. These decisions were included, where applicable, in the salaries for the month of July 2002. The award of the periodic step was communicated to staff by the salary shown on the July salary slip. All other decisions are communicated by separate notification. The names of staff receiving exceptional advancements or promotions will be published this year on the HR Division website and are accessible for consultation only at the following address : http://cern.ch/hr-div/internal/personnel/advlist.asp It is recalled that change of career path proposals submitted to the Technical Engineers and Administrative Careers Committee (TEACC) or to Human Resources Division are being examined with a view to preparing the latters' recommendations by the end of September 2002. Final decisions will be applied retroactivel...

  1. Quantification of human mitochondrial DNA using synthesized DNA standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavlick, Mark F; Lawrence, Helen S; Merritt, R Travis; Fisher, Constance; Isenberg, Alice; Robertson, James M; Budowle, Bruce

    2011-11-01

    Successful mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) forensic analysis depends on sufficient quantity and quality of mtDNA. A real-time quantitative PCR assay was developed to assess such characteristics in a DNA sample, which utilizes a duplex, synthetic DNA to ensure optimal quality assurance and quality control. The assay's 105-base pair target sequence facilitates amplification of degraded DNA and is minimally homologous to nonhuman mtDNA. The primers and probe hybridize to a region that has relatively few sequence polymorphisms. The assay can also identify the presence of PCR inhibitors and thus indicate the need for sample repurification. The results show that the assay provides information down to 10 copies and provides a dynamic range spanning seven orders of magnitude. Additional experiments demonstrated that as few as 300 mtDNA copies resulted in successful hypervariable region amplification, information that permits sample conservation and optimized downstream PCR testing. The assay described is rapid, reliable, and robust.

  2. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  3. DNA tagged microparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farquar, George R.; Leif, Roald N.; Wheeler, Elizabeth

    2016-03-22

    In one embodiment, a product includes a plurality of particles, each particle including: a carrier that includes a non-toxic material; and at least one DNA barcode coupled to the carrier, where the particles each have a diameter in a range from about 1 nanometer to about 100 microns.

  4. Field Deployable DNA analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, E; Christian, A; Marion, J; Sorensen, K; Arroyo, E; Vrankovich, G; Hara, C; Nguyen, C

    2005-02-09

    This report details the feasibility of a field deployable DNA analyzer. Steps for swabbing cells from surfaces and extracting DNA in an automatable way are presented. Since enzymatic amplification reactions are highly sensitive to environmental contamination, sample preparation is a crucial step to make an autonomous deployable instrument. We perform sample clean up and concentration in a flow through packed bed. For small initial samples, whole genome amplification is performed in the packed bed resulting in enough product for subsequent PCR amplification. In addition to DNA, which can be used to identify a subject, protein is also left behind, the analysis of which can be used to determine exposure to certain substances, such as radionuclides. Our preparative step for DNA analysis left behind the protein complement as a waste stream; we determined to learn if the proteins themselves could be analyzed in a fieldable device. We successfully developed a two-step lateral flow assay for protein analysis and demonstrate a proof of principle assay.

  5. Automated DNA Sequencing System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, G.A.; Ekkebus, C.P.; Hauser, L.J.; Kress, R.L.; Mural, R.J.

    1999-04-25

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is developing a core DNA sequencing facility to support biological research endeavors at ORNL and to conduct basic sequencing automation research. This facility is novel because its development is based on existing standard biology laboratory equipment; thus, the development process is of interest to the many small laboratories trying to use automation to control costs and increase throughput. Before automation, biology Laboratory personnel purified DNA, completed cycle sequencing, and prepared 96-well sample plates with commercially available hardware designed specifically for each step in the process. Following purification and thermal cycling, an automated sequencing machine was used for the sequencing. A technician handled all movement of the 96-well sample plates between machines. To automate the process, ORNL is adding a CRS Robotics A- 465 arm, ABI 377 sequencing machine, automated centrifuge, automated refrigerator, and possibly an automated SpeedVac. The entire system will be integrated with one central controller that will direct each machine and the robot. The goal of this system is to completely automate the sequencing procedure from bacterial cell samples through ready-to-be-sequenced DNA and ultimately to completed sequence. The system will be flexible and will accommodate different chemistries than existing automated sequencing lines. The system will be expanded in the future to include colony picking and/or actual sequencing. This discrete event, DNA sequencing system will demonstrate that smaller sequencing labs can achieve cost-effective the laboratory grow.

  6. DNA adsorption on graphene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Mansoor H.; Cox, Barry J.; Hill, James M.

    2013-11-01

    Here we use classical applied mathematical modeling to determine surface binding energies between both single-strand and double-strand DNA molecules interacting with a graphene sheet. We adopt basic mechanical principles to exploit the 6-12 Lennard-Jones potential function and the continuum approximation, which assumes that intermolecular interactions can be approximated by average atomic line or surface densities. The minimum binding energy occurs when the single-strand DNA molecule is centred 20.2 Å from the surface of the graphene and the double-strand DNA molecule is centred 20.3 Å from the surface, noting that these close values apply for the case when the axis of the helix is perpendicular to the surface of graphene. For the case when the axis of the helix is parallel to the surface, the minimum binding energy occurs when the axis of the single-strand molecule is 8.3 Å from the surface, and the double-strand molecule has axis 13.3 Å from the surface. For arbitrary tilted axis, we determine the optimal angles Ω of the axis of the helix, which give the minimum values of the binding energies, and we observe that the optimal angles tend to occur in the intervals Ω ∈ ( π /4 ,π/2) and Ω ∈ ( π /7 ,π/5) for the single and double-strand DNA molecules, respectively.

  7. Making environmental DNA count.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    The arc of reception for a new technology or method--like the reception of new information itself--can pass through predictable stages, with audiences' responses evolving from 'I don't believe it', through 'well, maybe' to 'yes, everyone knows that' to, finally, 'old news'. The idea that one can sample a volume of water, sequence DNA out of it, and report what species are living nearby has experienced roughly this series of responses among biologists, beginning with the microbial biologists who developed genetic techniques to reveal the unseen microbiome. 'Macrobial' biologists and ecologists--those accustomed to dealing with species they can see and count--have been slower to adopt such molecular survey techniques, in part because of the uncertain relationship between the number of recovered DNA sequences and the abundance of whole organisms in the sampled environment. In this issue of Molecular Ecology Resources, Evans et al. (2015) quantify this relationship for a suite of nine vertebrate species consisting of eight fish and one amphibian. Having detected all of the species present with a molecular toolbox of six primer sets, they consistently find DNA abundances are associated with species' biomasses. The strength and slope of this association vary for each species and each primer set--further evidence that there is no universal parameter linking recovered DNA to species abundance--but Evans and colleagues take a significant step towards being able to answer the next question audiences tend to ask: 'Yes, but how many are there?'

  8. Advances in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Jentoft, Friederike C

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Catalysis fills the gap between the journal papers and the textbooks across the diverse areas of catalysis research. For more than 60 years Advances in Catalysis has been dedicated to recording progress in the field of catalysis and providing the scientific community with comprehensive and authoritative reviews. This series is invaluable to chemical engineers and chemists working in the field of catalysis in academia or industry. Authoritative reviews written by experts in the field. Topics selected to reflect progress of the field. Insightful and critical articles, fully edite

  9. Advanced linear algebra

    CERN Document Server

    Cooperstein, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Advanced Linear Algebra, Second Edition takes a gentle approach that starts with familiar concepts and then gradually builds to deeper results. Each section begins with an outline of previously introduced concepts and results necessary for mastering the new material. By reviewing what students need to know before moving forward, the text builds a solid foundation upon which to progress. The new edition of this successful text focuses on vector spaces and the maps between them that preserve their structure (linear transformations). Designed for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate stud

  10. Advances in catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Gates, Bruce C

    2012-01-01

    Advances in Catalysis fills the gap between the journal papers and the textbooks across the diverse areas of catalysis research. For more than 60 years Advances in Catalysis has been dedicated to recording progress in the field of catalysis and providing the scientific community with comprehensive and authoritative reviews. This series in invaluable to chemical engineers, physical chemists, biochemists, researchers and industrial chemists working in the fields of catalysis and materials chemistry. * In-depth, critical, state-of-the-art reviews * Comprehensive, covers of all as

  11. Advanced higher English

    CERN Document Server

    Bridges, Ann

    2016-01-01

    The only book to support the compulsory Textual Analysis component of Advanced Higher English. Written by subject experts, this book contains short extracts of prose fiction, non-fiction, poetry and drama with analysis and commentary to assist students' understanding and their ability to critically assess their reading of literature. Short writing tasks, linked to the analysis of particular techniques, help to develop aspects of creative writing skills. The Textual Analysis component forms a compulsory section of the Advanced Higher English syllabus and accounts for 20% of the final grade;

  12. Advanced router architectures

    CERN Document Server

    Kloth, Axel K

    2005-01-01

    Routers, switches, and transmission equipment form the backbone of the Internet, yet many users and service technicians do not understand how these nodes really work.Advanced Router Architectures addresses how components of advanced routers work together and how they are integrated with each other. This book provides the background behind why these building blocks perform certain functions, and how the function is implemented in general use. It offers an introduction to the subject matter that is intended to trigger deeper interest from the reader. The book explains, for example, why traffic m

  13. Advanced Surface Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Per; Nielsen, Lars Pleht

    This new significant book on advanced modern surface technology in all its variations, is aimed at both teaching at engineering schools and practical application in industry. The work covers all the significant aspects of modern surface technology and also describes how new advanced techniques make......, nitriding, carbonitriding, and many other lesser-known thermochemical processes used for solving technological problems. The book is richly illustrated with pictures and figures showing how the technology creates new innovative solutions for industry and how surfaces are becoming integral to the function...

  14. Advances in chemical physics

    CERN Document Server

    Rice, Stuart A

    2014-01-01

    Advances in Chemical Physics is the only series of volumes available that explores the cutting edge of research in chemical physics. This is the only series of volumes available that presents the cutting edge of research in chemical physics.Includes contributions from experts in this field of research.Contains a representative cross-section of research that questions established thinking on chemical solutions.Structured with an editorial framework that makes the book an excellent supplement to an advanced graduate class in physical chemistry or chemical physics.

  15. Advances in quantum chemistry

    CERN Document Server

    Sabin, John R

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features detailed reviews written by leading international researchers. This volume focuses on the theory of heavy ion physics in medicine.Advances in Quantum Chemistry presents surveys of current topics in this rapidly developing field that has emerged at the cross section of the historically established areas of mathematics, physics, chemistry, and biology. It features

  16. Advanced Techniques in Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrondo, José Luis R

    2006-01-01

    Technical advancements are basic elements in our life. In biophysical studies, new applications and improvements in well-established techniques are being implemented every day. This book deals with advancements produced not only from a technical point of view, but also from new approaches that are being taken in the study of biophysical samples, such as nanotechniques or single-cell measurements. This book constitutes a privileged observatory for reviewing novel applications of biophysical techniques that can help the reader enter an area where the technology is progressing quickly and where a comprehensive explanation is not always to be found.

  17. Advances in periodontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonetti, M S

    2000-10-01

    Advances in periodontal science and practice over the last decade have radically changed the understanding of periodontal diseases and have opened new, exciting prospects for both medical and surgical therapy of periodontal diseases. Establishment of the aetiology and pathogenesis of periodontitis, understanding of the unique genetic and environmental susceptibility profile of affected subjects, and recognition of the systemic implications of periodontal infections are the key research findings. The use of randomised, controlled, clinical trials has allowed the development of evidence-based periodontology. Adjunctive antimicrobial therapy, regenerative periodontal surgery, periodontal plastic surgery, bone regeneration surgery in the light of implant treatment, and advanced soft tissue management at implant sites have radically changed practice.

  18. Advances in microwaves 3

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Microwaves, Volume 3 covers the advances and applications of microwave signal transmission and Gunn devices. This volume contains six chapters and begins with descriptions of ground-station antennas for space communications. The succeeding chapters deal with beam waveguides, which offer interesting possibilities for transmitting microwave energy, as well as with parallel or tubular beams from antenna apertures. A chapter discusses the electron transfer mechanism and the velocity-field characteristics, with a particular emphasis on the microwave properties of Gunn oscillators. The l

  19. Advances in attosecond science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegari, Francesca; Sansone, Giuseppe; Stagira, Salvatore; Vozzi, Caterina; Nisoli, Mauro

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond science offers formidable tools for the investigation of electronic processes at the heart of important physical processes in atomic, molecular and solid-state physics. In the last 15 years impressive advances have been obtained from both the experimental and theoretical points of view. Attosecond pulses, in the form of isolated pulses or of trains of pulses, are now routinely available in various laboratories. In this review recent advances in attosecond science are reported and important applications are discussed. After a brief presentation of various techniques that can be employed for the generation and diagnosis of sub-femtosecond pulses, various applications are reported in atomic, molecular and condensed-matter physics.

  20. Advanced Magnetic Metrology Instrumentation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The extraordinary progress in magnetic peripheral storage systems has been fueled by the ad vancements in heads (MR, GMR, spin valves) and in very high coercivity, Iow remanence thickness product (Mrt) media. These advancements are imposing new performance require ments on the magnetometers (VSMs) used to characterize these materials. At the same time, they have introduced a new paradigm for in-process (nondestructive, robotic) magnetic metrol ogy tools to assure the stringent product uniformity requirements. In this paper, we discuss the recent advancements in magnetometry for characterizing state-of-the-art media and heads, as well as other magnetic materials.

  1. Advanced number theory

    CERN Document Server

    Cohn, Harvey

    1980-01-01

    ""A very stimulating book ... in a class by itself."" - American Mathematical MonthlyAdvanced students, mathematicians and number theorists will welcome this stimulating treatment of advanced number theory, which approaches the complex topic of algebraic number theory from a historical standpoint, taking pains to show the reader how concepts, definitions and theories have evolved during the last two centuries. Moreover, the book abounds with numerical examples and more concrete, specific theorems than are found in most contemporary treatments of the subject.The book is divided into three parts

  2. Influenza Plasmid DNA Vaccines: Progress and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Diana; Queiroz, João António; Tomaz, Cândida Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Current influenza vaccines have long been used to fight flu infectious; however, recent advances highlight the importance of produce new alternatives. Even though traditional influenza vaccines are safe and usually effective, they need to be uploaded every year to anticipate circulating flu viruses. This limitation together with the use of embryonated chicken eggs as the substrate for vaccine production, is time-consuming and could involve potential biohazards in growth of new virus strains. Plasmid DNA produced by prokaryote microorganisms and encoding foreign proteins had emerged as a promising therapeutic tool. This technology allows the expression of a gene of interest by eukaryotic cells in order to induce protective immune responses against the pathogen of interest. In this review, we discuss the strategies to choose the best DNA vaccine to be applied in the treatment and prevention of influenza. Specifically, we give an update of influenza DNA vaccines developments, all involved techniques, their main characteristics, applicability and technical features to obtain the best option against influenza infections.

  3. The Current Status of DNA Microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Leming; Perkins, Roger G.; Tong, Weida

    DNA microarray technology that allows simultaneous assay of thousands of genes in a single experiment has steadily advanced to become a mainstream method used in research, and has reached a stage that envisions its use in medical applications and personalized medicine. Many different strategies have been developed for manufacturing DNA microarrays. In this chapter, we discuss the manufacturing characteristics of seven microarray platforms that were used in a recently completed large study by the MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) consortium, which evaluated the concordance of results across these platforms. The platforms can be grouped into three categories: (1) in situ synthesis of oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (Affymetrix GeneChip® arrays based on photolithography synthesis and Agilent's arrays based on inkjet synthesis); (2) spotting of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on microarrays (GE Healthcare's CodeLink system, Applied Biosystems' Genome Survey Microarrays, and the custom microarrays printed with Operon's oligonucleotide set); and (3) deposition of presynthesized oligonucleotide probes on bead-based microarrays (Illumina's BeadChip microarrays). We conclude this chapter with our views on the challenges and opportunities toward acceptance of DNA microarray data in clinical and regulatory settings.

  4. Interfacing DNA nanodevices with biology: challenges, solutions and perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther, Mathias; Kjems, Jørgen

    2016-08-01

    The cellular machinery performs millions of complex reactions with extreme precision at nanoscale. From studying these reactions, scientists have become inspired to build artificial nanosized molecular devices with programmed functions. One of the fundamental tools in designing and creating these nanodevices is molecular self-assembly. In nature, deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is inarguably one of the most remarkable self-assembling molecules. Governed by the Watson-Crick base-pairing rules, DNA assembles with a structural reliability and predictability based on sequence composition unlike any other complex biological polymer. This consistency has enabled rational design of hundreds of two- and three-dimensional shapes with a molecular precision and homogeneity not preceded by any other known technology at the nanometer scale. During the last two decades, DNA nanotechnology has undergone a rapid evolution pioneered by the work of Nadrian Seeman (Kallenbach et al 1983 Nature 205 829-31). Especially the introduction of the versatile DNA Origami technique by Rothemund (2006 Nature 440 297-302) led to an efflorescence of new DNA-based self-assembled nanostructures (Andersen et al 2009 Nature 459 73-6, Douglas et al 2009 Nature 459 414-8, Dietz et al 2009 Science 325 725-30, Han et al 2011 Science 332 342-6, Iinuma et al 2014 Science 344 65-9), and variations of this technique have contributed to an increasing repertoire of DNA nanostructures (Wei et al 2012 Nature 485 623-6, Ke et al 2012 Science 338 1177-83, Benson et al 2015 Nature 523 441-4, Zhang et al 2015 Nat. Nanotechnol. 10 779-84, Scheible et al 2015 Small 11 5200-5). These advances have naturally triggered the question: What can these DNA nanostructures be used for? One of the leading proposals of use for DNA nanotechnology has been in biology and biomedicine acting as a molecular ‘nanorobot’ or smart drug interacting with the cellular machinery. In this review, we will explore and examine the perspective of

  5. Fungal DNA barcoding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianping

    2016-11-01

    Fungi are ubiquitous in both natural and human-made environments. They play important roles in the health of plants, animals, and humans, and in broad ecosystem functions. Thus, having an efficient species-level identification system could significantly enhance our ability to treat fungal diseases and to monitor the spatial and temporal patterns of fungal distributions and migrations. DNA barcoding is a potent approach for rapid identification of fungal specimens, generating novel species hypothesis, and guiding biodiversity and ecological studies. In this mini-review, I briefly summarize (i) the history of DNA sequence-based fungal identification; (ii) the emergence of the ITS region as the consensus primary fungal barcode; (iii) the use of the ITS barcodes to address a variety of issues on fungal diversity from local to global scales, including generating a large number of species hypothesis; and (iv) the problems with the ITS barcode region and the approaches to overcome these problems. Similar to DNA barcoding research on plants and animals, significant progress has been achieved over the last few years in terms of both the questions being addressed and the foundations being laid for future research endeavors. However, significant challenges remain. I suggest three broad areas of research to enhance the usefulness of fungal DNA barcoding to meet the current and future challenges: (i) develop a common set of primers and technologies that allow the amplification and sequencing of all fungi at both the primary and secondary barcode loci; (ii) compile a centralized reference database that includes all recognized fungal species as well as species hypothesis, and allows regular updates from the research community; and (iii) establish a consensus set of new species recognition criteria based on barcode DNA sequences that can be applied across the fungal kingdom.

  6. The Dynamic Interplay Between DNA Topoisomerases and DNA Topology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C

    2016-09-01

    Topological properties of DNA influence its structure and biochemical interactions. Within the cell DNA topology is constantly in flux. Transcription and other essential processes including DNA replication and repair, alter the topology of the genome, while introducing additional complications associated with DNA knotting and catenation. These topological perturbations are counteracted by the action of topoisomerases, a specialized class of highly conserved and essential enzymes that actively regulate the topological state of the genome. This dynamic interplay among DNA topology, DNA processing enzymes, and DNA topoisomerases, is a pervasive factor that influences DNA metabolism in vivo. Building on the extensive structural and biochemical characterization over the past four decades that established the fundamental mechanistic basis of topoisomerase activity, the unique roles played by DNA topology in modulating and influencing the activity of topoisomerases have begun to be explored. In this review we survey established and emerging DNA topology dependent protein-DNA interactions with a focus on in vitro measurements of the dynamic interplay between DNA topology and topoisomerase activity.

  7. DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I in the initiation of plasmid DNA replication.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that mammalian DNA polymerase beta can substitute for DNA polymerase I of Escherichia coli in DNA replication and in base excision repair. We have now obtained genetic evidence suggesting that DNA polymerase beta can substitute for E. coli DNA polymerase I in the initiation of replication of a plasmid containing a pMB1 origin of DNA replication. Specifically, we demonstrate that a plasmid with a pMB1 origin of replication can be maintained in an E. coli polA mutant ...

  8. Conformation-dependent DNA attraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifeng; Nordenskiöld, Lars; Zhou, Ruhong; Mu, Yuguang

    2014-05-01

    Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by molecular dynamics simulations. Using umbrella sampling, we find that for both B- and Z-form DNA, surrounding Mg2+ ions always exert themselves to screen the Coulomb repulsion between DNA phosphates, resulting in very weak attractive force. On the contrary, a tight and stable bound state is discovered for Z-DNA in the presence of Mg2+ or Na+, benefiting from their hydrophobic nature. Based on the contact surface and a dewetting process analysis, a two-stage binding process of Z-DNA is outlined: two Z-DNA first attract each other through charge screening and Mg2+ bridges to phosphate groups in the same way as that of B-DNA, after which hydrophobic contacts of the deoxyribose groups are formed via a dewetting effect, resulting in stable attraction between two Z-DNA molecules. The highlighted hydrophobic nature of Z-DNA interaction from the current study may help to understand the biological functions of Z-DNA in gene transcription.Understanding how DNA molecules interact with other biomolecules is related to how they utilize their functions and is therefore critical for understanding their structure-function relationships. For a long time, the existence of Z-form DNA (a left-handed double helical version of DNA, instead of the common right-handed B-form) has puzzled the scientists, and the definitive biological significance of Z-DNA has not yet been clarified. In this study, the effects of DNA conformation in DNA-DNA interactions are explored by

  9. Esitleti kakskeelset luulekogu "Luule DNA"

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2007-01-01

    Magrelli, Valerio. Luule DNA = Il DNA della poesia / tõlkinud [ja saatesõna:] Maarja Kangro ja Kalju Kruusa. Tallinn : Koma, 2006. Sisaldab autori teksti. Esitlus 24. jaan. Kirjanike majas Tallinnas

  10. Mitochondrial Myopathy with DNA Deletions

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    1992-01-01

    Deletions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) are reported in 19 of 56 patients with mitochondrial myopathy examined in the Department of Neurology and Neuromuscular Research Laboratory, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

  11. Phenol-stacked carbon nanotubes: A new approach to genomic DNA isolation from plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farhad Nazarian-Firouzabadi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Extraction of intact quality DNA from plant tissues, especially those rich in secondary metabolites, is often challenging. Literally, hundreds of different DNA isolation protocols from various plant species have been published over the last decades. Although many commercial DNA isolation kits are convenient and designed to be safe, their cost and availability cause limitations in small molecular labs in many developing countries. In nearly all protocols and DNA isolation kits, phenol and chloroform are used to precipitate various classes of impurities. However, phenol is partially soluble in water, resulting in the co-existence of proteins in upper (aqueous phases. This phenomenon results in the contamination of the nucleic acids and low quality DNA. Nanotechnology advances have helped many areas of molecular biology such as the development of new diagnosis and purification kits. In this study, for the first time, we report a different approach to isolate DNA from plants based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs. The results show that the phenol reagent stack on CNTs can effectively remove proteins, polysaccharides and other polyphenol constituents. The A260/A280nm absorbance ratios of isolated DNA samples were 1.9 and 1.8 for chamomile and opium plants, respectively, indicating the high purity of the isolated DNA. DNA yield was more than two times the standard Doyle and Doyle method. Furthermore, the isolated DNA proved amenable to PCR amplification, using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis.

  12. Advanced Biosignal Processing

    CERN Document Server

    Nait-Ali, Amine

    2009-01-01

    Presents the principle of many advanced biosignal processing techniques. This title introduces the main biosignal properties and the acquisition techniques. It concerns one of the most intensively used biosignals in the clinical routine, namely the Electrocardiogram, the Elektroenzephalogram, the Electromyogram and the Evoked Potential

  13. Advances in tomographic PIV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novara, M.

    2013-01-01

    This research deals with advanced developments in 3D particle image velocimetry based on the tomographic PIV technique (Tomo-PIV). The latter is a relatively recent measurement technique introduced by Elsinga et al. in 2005, which is based on the tomographic reconstruction of particle tracers in thr

  14. Advanced Cell Technology, Inc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, William M

    2007-03-01

    Advanced Cell Technology, Inc. (OTCBB: ACTC) is a biotechnology company applying novel human embryonic stem cell technologies in the emerging field of regenerative medicine. We believe that regenerative medicine has the potential to revolutionize the field by enabling scientists to produce human cells of any kind for use in a wide array of therapies.

  15. Advanced instrumentation and teleoperation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Decreton, M

    1998-07-01

    SCK-CEN's advanced instrumentation and teleoperation project aims at evaluating the potential of a telerobotic approach in a nuclear environment and, in particular, the use of remote-perception systems. Main achievements in 1997 in the areas of R and D on radiation tolerance for remote sensing, optical fibres and optical-fibre sensors, and computer-aided teleoperation are reported.

  16. Advanced Distribution Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avazov, Artur R.; Sobinova, Liubov A.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the advisability of using advanced distribution management systems in the electricity distribution networks area and considers premises of implementing ADMS within the Smart Grid era. Also, it gives the big picture of ADMS and discusses the ADMS advantages and functionalities.

  17. Advances in Environmental Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Nasar, Jack L.

    2015-01-01

    When Plenum stopped publishing its edited series—Human Behavior and Environment and Advances in Environment, Behavior and Design—the field of environmental psychology suffered a loss. Scholars could go to one of the edited Plenum books to find state-of-the-art reviews on existing and emerging areas of research. [...

  18. Advances in Helium Cryogenics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciver, S. W. Van

    This review provides a survey of major advances that have occurred in recent years in the area of helium cryogenics. Helium-temperature cryogenics is the enabling technology for a substantial and growing number of low-temperature systems from superconducting magnets to space-based experimental facilities. In recent years there have been many advances in the technology of low-temperature helium, driven mostly by new applications. However, to keep the review from being too broad, this presentation focuses mainly on three of the most significant advances. These are: (1) the development of large-scale recuperative refrigeration systems mainly for superconducting magnet applications in accelerators and other research facilities; (2) the use of stored superfluid helium (He II) as a coolant for spacebased astrophysics experiments; and (3) the application of regenerative cryocoolers operating at liquid helium temperatures primarily for cooling superconducting devices. In each case, the reader should observe that critical technologies were developed to facilitate these applications. In addition to these three primary advances, other significant helium cryogenic technologies are briefly reviewed at the end of this chapter, along with some vision for future developments in these areas.

  19. Scapholunate advanced collapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeranz, Stephen J; Salazar, Peter

    2015-01-01

    This case study reviews the pathophysiology of scapholunate advanced collapse (SLAC), which is the most common etiology of degenerative arthritis in the wrist. The scapholunate ligament serves a critical role in stability of the carpus. Disruption of the scapholunate ligament, its sequela, and the magnetic resonance imaging evaluation are discussed, with review of the defining features of this disease and its progression.

  20. Advanced geometries and regimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulanov, S. S. [Univeristy of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720 (United States); Bulanov, S. V. [Kansai Photon Science Institute, JAEA, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Turchetti, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università di Bologna and INFN Sezione di Bologna, Via Irnerio, 46-I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Limpouch, J.; Klimo, O.; Psikal, J. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines/HiLASE project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague, Czech Republic and Czech Technical University in Prague, FNSPE, Brehova 7, 115 19 Prague (Czech Republic); Antici, P. [Dipartimento di Energetica ed INFM, Università di Roma, La Sapienza, 00165 Roma (Italy); Margarone, D.; Korn, G. [Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines/HiLASE project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2013-07-26

    We review and discuss different schemes of laser ion acceleration as well as advanced target geometries in connection with the development of the laser-driven proton source for hadron therapy of oncological diseases, which is a part of the ELIMED project.

  1. Advances in satellite communications

    CERN Document Server

    Minoli, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Discussing advances in modulation techniques and HTS spotbeam technologiesSurveying emerging high speed aeronautical mobility services and maritime and other terrestrial mobility servicesAssessing M2M (machine-to-machine) applications, emerging Ultra HD video technologies and new space technology

  2. Functionalizing Designer DNA Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekaran, Arun Richard

    Three-dimensional crystals have been self-assembled from a DNA tensegrity triangle via sticky end interaction. The tensegrity triangle is a rigid DNA motif containing three double helical edges connected pair-wise by three four-arm junctions. The symmetric triangle contains 3 unique strands combined in a 3:3:1 ratio: 3 crossover, 3 helical and 1 central. The length of the sticky end reported previously was two nucleotides (nt) (GA:TC) and the motif with 2-helical turns of DNA per edge diffracted to 4.9 A at beam line NSLS-X25 and to 4 A at beam line ID19 at APS. The purpose of these self-assembled DNA crystals is that they can be used as a framework for hosting external guests for use in crystallographic structure solving or the periodic positioning of molecules for nanoelectronics. This thesis describes strategies to improve the resolution and to incorporate guests into the 3D lattice. The first chapter describes the effect of varying sticky end lengths and the influence of 5'-phosphate addition on crystal formation and resolution. X-ray diffraction data from beam line NSLS-X25 revealed that the crystal resolution for 1-nt (G:C) sticky end was 3.4 A. Motifs with every possible combination of 1-nt and 2-nt sticky-ended phosphorylated strands were crystallized and X-ray data were collected. The position of the 5'-phosphate on either the crossover (strand 1), helical (strand 2), or central strand (3) had an impact on the resolution of the self-assembled crystals with the 1-nt 1P-2-3 system diffracting to 2.62 A at APS and 3.1 A at NSLS-X25. The second chapter describes the sequence-specific recognition of DNA motifs with triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs). This study examined the feasibility of using TFOs to bind to specific locations within a 3-turn DNA tensegrity triangle motif. The TFO 5'-TTCTTTCTTCTCT was used to target the tensegrity motif containing an appropriately embedded oligopurine.oligopyrimidine binding site. As triplex formation involving cytidine

  3. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  4. Ancient and modern environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Mikkel Winther; Overballe-Petersen, Søren; Ermini, Luca

    2015-01-01

    DNA obtained from environmental samples such as sediments, ice or water (environmental DNA, eDNA), represents an important source of information on past and present biodiversity. It has revealed an ancient forest in Greenland, extended by several thousand years the survival dates for mainland woo...

  5. Identification of E545k mutation in plasma from a PIK3CA wild-type metastatic breast cancer patient by array-based digital polymerase chain reaction: Circulating-free DNA a powerful tool for biomarker testing in advance disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, Atocha; Acosta-Eyzaguirre, Daniel; Sanz, Julián; Moreno, Fernando; Serrano, Gloria; Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Caldés, Trinidad; Garcia-Saenz, José Á

    2015-12-01

    PIK3CA gene is frequently mutated in patients with breast cancer and it has been the focus of intense research. Inhibitors of PI3K pathway are being evaluated in ongoing clinical trials but the impact of PIKC3A mutation status on tumor response is yet uncertain. In the metastatic setting, several studies are evaluating the predictive value of PIK3CA mutations. However, results could be biased by biopsy localization. Digital polymerase chain reaction is a new technology that enables detection and quantification of cancer DNA molecules from peripheral blood and can potentially overcome such situation. As a proof of the concept, we present the case of a metastatic patient with a PIK3CA wild-type primary tumor in which the PIK3CA E545K mutation was identified in both the circulating-free DNA obtained from a peripheral blood sample and in the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded liver metastasis.

  6. Electrochemical impedance-based DNA sensor using a modified single walled carbon nanotube electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Jessica E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Pillai, Shreekumar [Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL (United States); Ram, Manoj Kumar, E-mail: mkram@usf.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Kumar, Ashok [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Nanomaterials and Nanomanufacturing Research Center, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States); Singh, Shree R. [Center for NanoBiotechnology Research, Alabama State University, Montgomery, AL (United States)

    2011-07-20

    Carbon nanotubes have become promising functional materials for the development of advanced electrochemical biosensors with novel features which could promote electron-transfer with various redox active biomolecules. This paper presents the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium using chemically modified single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with single stranded DNA (ssDNA) on a polished glassy carbon electrode. Hybridization with the corresponding complementary ssDNA has shown a shift in the impedance studies due to a higher charge transfer in ssDNA. The developed biosensor has revealed an excellent specificity for the appropriate targeted DNA strand. The methodologies to prepare and functionalize the electrode could be adopted in the development of DNA hybridization biosensor.

  7. High molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo for synthetic biology applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juhas, Mario; Ajioka, James W

    2017-05-01

    DNA assembly is the key technology of the emerging interdisciplinary field of synthetic biology. While the assembly of smaller DNA fragments is usually performed in vitro, high molecular weight DNA molecules are assembled in vivo via homologous recombination in the host cell. Escherichia coli, Bacillus subtilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are the main hosts used for DNA assembly in vivo. Progress in DNA assembly over the last few years has paved the way for the construction of whole genomes. This review provides an update on recent synthetic biology advances with particular emphasis on high molecular weight DNA assembly in vivo in E. coli, B. subtilis and S. cerevisiae. Special attention is paid to the assembly of whole genomes, such as those of the first synthetic cell, synthetic yeast and minimal genomes.

  8. DNA repair mechanisms in eukaryotes: Special focus in Entamoeba histolytica and related protozoan parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Camarillo, César; Lopez-Casamichana, Mavil; Weber, Christian; Guillen, Nancy; Orozco, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A

    2009-12-01

    Eukaryotic cell viability highly relies on genome stability and DNA integrity maintenance. The cellular response to DNA damage mainly consists of six biological conserved pathways known as homologous recombination repair (HRR), non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ), base excision repair (BER), mismatch repair (MMR), nucleotide excision repair (NER), and methyltransferase repair that operate in a concerted way to minimize genetic information loss due to a DNA lesion. Particularly, protozoan parasites survival depends on DNA repair mechanisms that constantly supervise chromosomes to correct damaged nucleotides generated by cytotoxic agents, host immune pressure or cellular processes. Here we reviewed the current knowledge about DNA repair mechanisms in the most relevant human protozoan pathogens. Additionally, we described the recent advances to understand DNA repair mechanisms in Entamoeba histolytica with special emphasis in the use of genomic approaches based on bioinformatic analysis of parasite genome sequence and microarrays technology.

  9. Single Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy Studies of Photosensitized Singlet Oxygen Behavior on a DNA Origami Template

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helmig, Sarah Wendelboe; Rotaru, Alexandru; Arian, Dumitru;

    2010-01-01

    DNA origami, the folding of a long single-stranded DNA sequence (scaffold strand) by hundreds of short synthetic oligonucleotides (staple strands) into parallel aligned helices, is a highly efficient method to form advanced self-assembled DNA-architectures. Since molecules and various materials can...... be conjugated to each of the short staple strands, the origami method offers a unique possibility of arranging molecules and materials in well-defined positions on a structured surface. Here we combine the action of light with AFM and DNA nanostructures to study the production of singlet oxygen from a single...... photosensitizer molecule conjugated to a selected DNA origami staple strand on an origami structure. We demonstrate a distance-dependent oxidation of organic moieties incorporated in specific positions on DNA origami by singlet oxygen produced from a single photosensitizer located at the center of each origami....

  10. Methylated DNA is over-represented in whole-genome bisulfite sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lexiang eJi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS has led to a number of exciting discoveries about the role of DNA methylation leading to a plethora of novel testable hypotheses. Methods for constructing sodium bisulfite-converted and amplified libraries have recently advanced to the point that the bottleneck for experiments that use WGBS has shifted to data analysis and interpretation. Here we present empirical evidence for an over-representation of reads from methylated DNA in WGBS. This enrichment for methylated DNA is exacerbated by higher cycles of PCR and is influenced by the type of uracil-insensitive DNA polymerase used for amplifying the sequencing library. Future efforts to computationally correct for this enrichment bias will be essential to increasing the accuracy of determining methylation levels for individual cytosines. It is especially critical for studies that seek to accurately quantify DNA methylation levels in populations that may segregate for allelic DNA methylation states.

  11. Isolation of high molecular weight DNA suitable for the construction of genomic libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steven, J; McKechnie, D; Graham, A

    1988-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular biology have made it possible to construct complete gene libraries for any organism that uses DNA as its carrier of genetic information. A gene library should contain a large number of cloned DNA fragments that in total contain the entire donor genome. The construction of a genomic library first requires the isolation of DNA from the donor organism. To be of maximum use in the construction of genomic libraries, DNA isolated from the donor organism should fulfill the following criteria. First, the DNA must represent all sequences in the genome to be cloned. Second, it must be of high molecular weight. Third, no contaminants must taint the DNA so that its use as a substrate for restriction endonucleases and other enzymes used in genetic engineering is uninhibited.

  12. Quest for the binding mode of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan-Qing; Zhang, Hong-Mei; Cao, Jian

    2014-10-01

    The binding interaction of tetrabromobisphenol A with Calf thymus DNA was studied by multi-spectroscopic and molecular modeling methods. The UV-vis study revealed that an obvious interaction between tetrabromobisphenol A and Calf thymus DNA happened. The π-π∗ transitions and the electron cloud of tetrabromobisphenol A might be changed by entering the groove of Calf thymus DNA. From the fluorescence spectral and thermodynamics studies, it was concluded that the hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic force played a major role in the binding of tetrabromobisphenol A to Calf thymus DNA. The molecular modeling study showed that the possible sites of tetrabromobisphenol A in the groove of DNA. Circular dichroism study also depicted that tetrabromobisphenol A bond to DNA. These above results would further advance our knowledge on the molecular mechanism of the binding interactions of brominated flame-retardants with nucleic acid.

  13. DNA-water interactions distinguish messenger RNA genes from transfer RNA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandelwal, Garima; Jayaram, B

    2012-05-30

    Physicochemical properties of DNA sequences as a guide to developing insights into genome organization has received little attention. Here, we utilize the energetics of DNA to further advance the knowledge on its language at a molecular level. Specifically, we ask the question whether physicochemical properties of different functional units on genomes differ. We extract intramolecular and solvation energies of different DNA base pair steps from a comprehensive set of molecular dynamics simulations. We then investigate the solvation behavior of DNA sequences coding for mRNAs and tRNAs. Distinguishing mRNA genes from tRNA genes is a tricky problem in genome annotation without assumptions on length of DNA and secondary structure of the product of transcription. We find that solvation energetics of DNA behaves as an extremely efficient property in discriminating 2,063,537 genes coding for mRNAs from 56,251 genes coding for tRNAs in all (~1500) completely sequenced prokaryotic genomes.

  14. DNA Origami-Graphene Hybrid Nanopore for DNA Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Farimani, Amir; Dibaeinia, Payam; Aluru, Narayana R

    2017-01-11

    DNA origami nanostructures can be used to functionalize solid-state nanopores for single molecule studies. In this study, we characterized a nanopore in a DNA origami-graphene heterostructure for DNA detection. The DNA origami nanopore is functionalized with a specific nucleotide type at the edge of the pore. Using extensive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we computed and analyzed the ionic conductivity of nanopores in heterostructures carpeted with one or two layers of DNA origami on graphene. We demonstrate that a nanopore in DNA origami-graphene gives rise to distinguishable dwell times for the four DNA base types, whereas for a nanopore in bare graphene, the dwell time is almost the same for all types of bases. The specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between DNA origami and the translocating DNA strand yield different residence times and ionic currents. We also conclude that the speed of DNA translocation decreases due to the friction between the dangling bases at the pore mouth and the sequencing DNA strands.

  15. DNA Sequential Logic Gate Using Two-Ring DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Shen, Linjing; Liang, Chao; Dong, Yafei; Yang, Jing; Xu, Jin

    2016-04-13

    Sequential DNA detection is a fundamental issue for elucidating the interactive relationships among complex gene systems. Here, a sequential logic DNA gate was achieved by utilizing the two-ring DNA structure, with the ability to recognize "before" and "after" triggering sequences of DNA signals. By taking advantage of a "loop-open" mechanism, separations of two-ring DNAs were controlled. Three triggering pathways with different sequential DNA treatments were distinguished by comparing fluorescent outputs. Programmed nanoparticle arrangement guided by "interlocked" two-ring DNA was also constructed to demonstrate the achievement of designed nanostrucutres. Such sequential logic DNA operation may guide future molecular sensors to monitor more complex gene network in biological systems.

  16. Left-handed Z-DNA: structure and function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, A.; Rich, A.

    1999-01-01

    Z-DNA is a high energy conformer of B-DNA that forms in vivo during transcription as a result of torsional strain generated by a moving polymerase. An understanding of the biological role of Z-DNA has advanced with the discovery that the RNA editing enzyme double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase type I (ADAR1) has motifs specific for the Z-DNA conformation. Editing by ADAR1 requires a double-stranded RNA substrate. In the cases known, the substrate is formed by folding an intron back onto the exon that is targeted for modification. The use of introns to direct processing of exons requires that editing occurs before splicing. Recognition of Z-DNA by ADAR1 may allow editing of nascent transcripts to be initiated immediately after transcription, ensuring that editing and splicing are performed in the correct sequence. Structural characterization of the Z-DNA binding domain indicates that it belongs to the winged helix-turn-helix class of proteins and is similar to the globular domain of histone-H5.

  17. Multilayer DNA Origami Packed on a Square Lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yonggang; Douglas, Shawn M.; Liu, Minghui; Sharma, Jaswinder; Cheng, Anchi; Leung, Albert; Liu, Yan; Shih, William M.; Yan, Hao

    2009-01-01

    Molecular self-assembly using DNA as a structural building block has proven to be an efficient route to the construction of nanoscale objects and arrays of increasing complexity. Using the remarkable “scaffolded DNA origami” strategy, Rothemund demonstrated that a long single-stranded DNA from a viral genome (M13) can be folded into a variety of custom two-dimensional (2D) shapes using hundreds of short synthetic DNA molecules as staple strands. More recently, we generalized a strategy to build custom-shaped, three-dimensional (3D) objects formed as pleated layers of helices constrained to a honeycomb lattice, with precisely controlled dimensions ranging from 10 to 100 nm. Here we describe a more compact design for 3D origami, with layers of helices packed on a square lattice, that can be folded successfully into structures of designed dimensions in a one-step annealing process, despite the increased density of DNA helices. A square lattice provides a more natural framework for designing rectangular structures, the option for a more densely packed architecture, and the ability to create surfaces that are more flat than is possible with the honeycomb lattice. Thus enabling the design and construction of custom 3D shapes from helices packed on a square lattice provides a general foundational advance for increasing the versatility and scope of DNA nanotechnology. PMID:19807088

  18. Searching mixed DNA profiles directly against profile databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Jo-Anne; Taylor, Duncan; Curran, James; Buckleton, John

    2014-03-01

    DNA databases have revolutionised forensic science. They are a powerful investigative tool as they have the potential to identify persons of interest in criminal investigations. Routinely, a DNA profile generated from a crime sample could only be searched for in a database of individuals if the stain was from single contributor (single source) or if a contributor could unambiguously be determined from a mixed DNA profile. This meant that a significant number of samples were unsuitable for database searching. The advent of continuous methods for the interpretation of DNA profiles offers an advanced way to draw inferential power from the considerable investment made in DNA databases. Using these methods, each profile on the database may be considered a possible contributor to a mixture and a likelihood ratio (LR) can be formed. Those profiles which produce a sufficiently large LR can serve as an investigative lead. In this paper empirical studies are described to determine what constitutes a large LR. We investigate the effect on a database search of complex mixed DNA profiles with contributors in equal proportions with dropout as a consideration, and also the effect of an incorrect assignment of the number of contributors to a profile. In addition, we give, as a demonstration of the method, the results using two crime samples that were previously unsuitable for database comparison. We show that effective management of the selection of samples for searching and the interpretation of the output can be highly informative.

  19. A Structural Bisulfite Assay to Identify DNA Cruciforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Matthew; Hennig, Lars

    2016-09-06

    In the half century since the discovery of the double-helix structure of DNA, it has become increasingly clear that DNA functionality is based on much more than its sequence in a double-helical structure. Further advances have highlighted the importance of additional aspects of DNA structure: its packaging in the higher order chromatin structure, positioning of nucleosomes along the DNA, and the occurrence of non-helical DNA structures. Of these, the latter has been problematic to prove empirically. Here, we describe a method that uses non-denaturing bisulfite sequencing on isolated Arabidopsis thaliana nuclei to determine the location of cytosines positioned outside the double helix as a result of non-B-form DNA structures. We couple this with computational methods and S1 nuclease digest to reliably identify stable, non-B-form, cruciform structures. This enables us to identify a palindrome in the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS T that forms a stable non-B-form structure. The stronger conservation of the ability to form a non-helical secondary structure than of the sequence suggests that this structure is biologically relevant.

  20. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Qin; Vladimir A Ljubimov; Cuiqi Zhou; Yunguang Tong; Jimin Liang

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason under-lying difculties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive“liquid biopsy”from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials.

  1. Direct DNA Analysis with Paper-Based Ion Concentration Polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Max M; Nosrati, Reza; San Gabriel, Maria C; Zini, Armand; Sinton, David

    2015-11-01

    DNA analysis is essential for diagnosis and monitoring of many diseases. Conventional DNA testing is generally limited to the laboratory. Increasing access to relevant technologies can improve patient care and outcomes in both developed and developing regions. Here, we demonstrate direct DNA analysis in paper-based devices, uniquely enabled by ion concentration polarization at the interface of patterned nanoporous membranes in paper (paper-based ICP). Hepatitis B virus DNA targets in human serum are simultaneously preconcentrated, separated, and detected in a single 10 min operation. A limit of detection of 150 copies/mL is achieved without prior viral load amplification, sufficient for early diagnosis of hepatitis B. We clinically assess the DNA integrity of sperm cells in raw human semen samples. The percent DNA fragmentation results from the paper-based ICP devices strongly correlate (R(2) = 0.98) with the sperm chromatin structure assay. In all cases, agreement was 100% with respect to the clinical decision. Paper-based ICP can provide inexpensive and accessible advanced molecular diagnostics.

  2. Fleet DNA (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walkokwicz, K.; Duran, A.

    2014-06-01

    The Fleet DNA project objectives include capturing and quantifying drive cycle and technology variation for the multitude of medium- and heavy-duty vocations; providing a common data storage warehouse for medium- and heavy-duty vehicle fleet data across DOE activities and laboratories; and integrating existing DOE tools, models, and analyses to provide data-driven decision making capabilities. Fleet DNA advantages include: for Government - providing in-use data for standard drive cycle development, R&D, tech targets, and rule making; for OEMs - real-world usage datasets provide concrete examples of customer use profiles; for fleets - vocational datasets help illustrate how to maximize return on technology investments; for Funding Agencies - ways are revealed to optimize the impact of financial incentive offers; and for researchers -a data source is provided for modeling and simulation.

  3. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage Phi29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J; Smith, Douglas E

    2014-06-20

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine(3+) causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation.

  4. Repulsive DNA-DNA interactions accelerate viral DNA packaging in phage phi29

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Nicholas; delToro, Damian; Grimes, Shelley; Jardine, Paul J.; Smith, Douglas E.

    2016-01-01

    We use optical tweezers to study the effect of attractive versus repulsive DNA-DNA interactions on motor-driven viral packaging. Screening of repulsive interactions accelerates packaging, but induction of attractive interactions by spermidine3+ causes heterogeneous dynamics. Acceleration is observed in a fraction of complexes, but most exhibit slowing and stalling, suggesting that attractive interactions promote nonequilibrium DNA conformations that impede the motor. Thus, repulsive interactions facilitate packaging despite increasing the energy of the theoretical optimum spooled DNA conformation. PMID:24996111

  5. Geant4-DNA simulations using complex DNA geometries generated by the DnaFabric tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, S.; Vimont, U.; Incerti, S.; Clairand, I.; Villagrasa, C.

    2016-07-01

    Several DNA representations are used to study radio-induced complex DNA damages depending on the approach and the required level of granularity. Among all approaches, the mechanistic one requires the most resolved DNA models that can go down to atomistic DNA descriptions. The complexity of such DNA models make them hard to modify and adapt in order to take into account different biological conditions. The DnaFabric project was started to provide a tool to generate, visualise and modify such complex DNA models. In the current version of DnaFabric, the models can be exported to the Geant4 code to be used as targets in the Monte Carlo simulation. In this work, the project was used to generate two DNA fibre models corresponding to two DNA compaction levels representing the hetero and the euchromatin. The fibres were imported in a Geant4 application where computations were performed to estimate the influence of the DNA compaction on the amount of calculated DNA damage. The relative difference of the DNA damage computed in the two fibres for the same number of projectiles was found to be constant and equal to 1.3 for the considered primary particles (protons from 300 keV to 50 MeV). However, if only the tracks hitting the DNA target are taken into account, then the relative difference is more important for low energies and decreases to reach zero around 10 MeV. The computations were performed with models that contain up to 18,000 DNA nucleotide pairs. Nevertheless, DnaFabric will be extended to manipulate multi-scale models that go from the molecular to the cellular levels.

  6. Adenovirus DNA Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Hoeben, Rob C.; Uil, Taco G.

    2013-01-01

    Adenoviruses have attracted much attention as probes to study biological processes such as DNA replication, transcription, splicing, and cellular transformation. More recently these viruses have been used as gene-transfer vectors and oncolytic agents. On the other hand, adenoviruses are notorious pathogens in people with compromised immune functions. This article will briefly summarize the basic replication strategy of adenoviruses and the key proteins involved and will deal with the new deve...

  7. DNA repair. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Setlow, R.

    1978-01-01

    Some topics discussed are as follows: difficulty in extrapolating data from E. coli to mammalian systems; mutations caused by UV-induced changes in DNA; mutants deficient in excision repair; other postreplication mechanisms; kinds of excision repair systems; detection of repair by biochemical or biophysical means; human mutants deficient in repair; mutagenic effects of UV on XP cells; and detection of UV-repair defects among XP individuals. (HLW)

  8. Compressive Sensing DNA Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Baraniuk

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Compressive sensing microarrays (CSMs are DNA-based sensors that operate using group testing and compressive sensing (CS principles. In contrast to conventional DNA microarrays, in which each genetic sensor is designed to respond to a single target, in a CSM, each sensor responds to a set of targets. We study the problem of designing CSMs that simultaneously account for both the constraints from CS theory and the biochemistry of probe-target DNA hybridization. An appropriate cross-hybridization model is proposed for CSMs, and several methods are developed for probe design and CS signal recovery based on the new model. Lab experiments suggest that in order to achieve accurate hybridization profiling, consensus probe sequences are required to have sequence homology of at least 80% with all targets to be detected. Furthermore, out-of-equilibrium datasets are usually as accurate as those obtained from equilibrium conditions. Consequently, one can use CSMs in applications in which only short hybridization times are allowed.

  9. A physicist's view of DNA

    CERN Document Server

    Mashaghi, Alireza

    2013-01-01

    Nucleic acids, like DNA and RNA, are molecules that are present in any life form. Their most notable function is to encode biological information. Why then would a physicist be interested in these molecules? As we will see, DNA is an interesting molecular tool for physicists to test and explore physical laws and theories, like the ergodic theorem, the theory of elasticity and information theory. DNA also has unique material properties, which attract material scientists, nanotechnologists and engineers. Among interesting developments in this field are DNA-based hybrid materials and DNA origami.

  10. DNA nanotechnology and fluorescence applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichthaerle, Thomas; Strauss, Maximilian T; Schueder, Florian; Woehrstein, Johannes B; Jungmann, Ralf

    2016-06-01

    Structural DNA nanotechnology allow researchers to use the unique molecular recognition properties of DNA strands to construct nanoscale objects with almost arbitrary complexity in two and three dimensions. Abstracted as molecular breadboards, DNA nanostructures enable nanometer-precise placement of guest molecules such as proteins, fluorophores, or nanoparticles. These assemblies can be used to study biological phenomena with unprecedented control over number, spacing, and molecular identity. Here, we give a general introduction to structural DNA nanotechnology and more specifically discuss applications of DNA nanostructures in the field of fluorescence and plasmonics.

  11. DNA-functionalized solid state nanopore for biosensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mussi, V; Fanzio, P; Repetto, L; Firpo, G; Valbusa, U [Nanomed Labs, Physics Department, University of Genova, Advanced Biotechnology Center, Largo R. Benzi, 10 Genova, 16132 (Italy); Scaruffi, P; Stigliani, S; Tonini, G P, E-mail: mussi@fisica.unige.it [Translational Pediatric Oncology, National Institute for Cancer Research (IST), Largo R. Benzi, 10 Genova, 16132 (Italy)

    2010-04-09

    The possible use of nanopores for single DNA molecules biosensing has been demonstrated, but much remains to do in order to develop advanced engineered devices with enhanced stability, and controlled geometry and surface properties. Here we present morphological and electrical characterization of solid state silicon nitride nanopores fabricated by focused ion beam direct milling and chemically functionalized by probe oligonucleotides, with the final aim of developing a versatile tool for biosensing and gene expression profiling.

  12. Multiplex single-molecule interaction profiling of DNA barcoded proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Liangcai; Li, Chao; Aach, John; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Church, George M.

    2014-01-01

    In contrast with advances in massively parallel DNA sequencing1, high-throughput protein analyses2-4 are often limited by ensemble measurements, individual analyte purification and hence compromised quality and cost-effectiveness. Single-molecule (SM) protein detection achieved using optical methods5 is limited by the number of spectrally nonoverlapping chromophores. Here, we introduce a single molecular interaction-sequencing (SMI-Seq) technology for parallel protein interaction profiling le...

  13. Monitoring Biodiversity using Environmental DNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Philip Francis

    was less successful than acoustic detections. However, at one site, long-finned pilot whale – a species rarely sighted in the target area – was detected. Another study examines DNA extracted from leeches to account for biodiversity of terrestrial mammals, on which they have been feeding. The persistence......, a study tests the applicability of non-destructive DNA extraction from old and ancient insect remains. DNA is successfully retrieved, amplified and equenced from dried museum beetle specimens up to 188 years old, ermafrost-preserved macrofossils up to 26.000 years old and directly from 1800-3000 years old......As any species interacts with its environment, most of them will at some point expel DNA to their surroundings. Such DNA can be picked up in environmental samples, isolated and analysed. Within the last decade, this has become a multidisciplinary research field known as Environmental DNA (eDNA...

  14. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T R Rajalakshmi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde. This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers.

  15. DNA adducts-chemical addons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajalakshmi, T. R.; AravindhaBabu, N.; Shanmugam, K. T.; Masthan, K. M. K.

    2015-01-01

    DNA adduct is a piece of DNA covalently bond to a chemical (safrole, benzopyrenediol epoxide, acetaldehyde). This process could be the start of a cancerous cell. When a chemical binds to DNA, it gets damaged resulting in abnormal replication. This could be the start of a mutation and without proper DNA repair, this can lead to cancer. It is this chemical that binds with the DNA is our prime area of concern. Instead of performing the whole body analysis for diagnosing cancer, this test could be carried out for early detection of cancer. When scanning tunneling microscope is used, the DNA results can be obtained earlier. DNA adducts in scientific experiments are used as biomarkers. PMID:26015708

  16. Amplification of pico-scale DNA mediated by bacterial carrier DNA for small-cell-number transcription factor ChIP-seq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Janus S; Bagger, Frederik O; Hasemann, Marie S;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chromatin-Immunoprecipitation coupled with deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) is used to map transcription factor occupancy and generate epigenetic profiles genome-wide. The requirement of nano-scale ChIP DNA for generation of sequencing libraries has impeded ChIP-seq on in vivo tissues of low...... transcription factor (CEBPA) and histone mark (H3K4me3) ChIP. We further demonstrate that genomic profiles are highly resilient to changes in carrier DNA to ChIP DNA ratios. CONCLUSIONS: This represents a significant advance compared to existing technologies, which involve either complex steps of pre...... cell numbers. RESULTS: We describe a robust, simple and scalable methodology for ChIP-seq of low-abundant cell populations, verified down to 10,000 cells. By employing non-mammalian genome mapping bacterial carrier DNA during amplification, we reliably amplify down to 50 pg of ChIP DNA from...

  17. [Research advances in dendrochronology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke-Yan; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Chang-Zhi; Cao, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Fei-Fei

    2014-07-01

    Tree-ring studies in China have achieved great advances since the 1990s, particularly for the dendroclimatological studies which have made some influence around the world. However, because of the uneven development, limited attention has been currently paid on the other branches of dendrochronology. We herein briefly compared the advances of dendrochronology in China and of the world and presented suggestions on future dendrochronological studies. Large-scale tree-ring based climate reconstructions in China are highly needed by employing mathematical methods and a high quality tree-ring network of the ring-width, density, stable isotope and wood anatomy. Tree-ring based field climate reconstructions provide potentials on explorations of climate forcings during the reconstructed periods via climate diagnosis and process simulation.

  18. Recent Advances in Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-06-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler-Volmer and Marcus-Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of 'nano-impacts'.

  19. Advances in soil dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Advances in Soil Dynamics, Volume 3, represents the culmination of the work undertaken by the Advances in Soil Dynamics Monograph Committee, PM-45-01, about 15 years ago to summarize important developments in this field over the last 35 years. When this project was initiated, the main goal...... was to abridge major strides made in the general area of soil dynamics during the sixties, seventies, and eighties. However, by about the mid-nineties soil dynamics research in the US and much of the developed world had come to a virtual standstill. Although significant progress was made prior to the mid......-nineties, we still do not have a sound fundamental knowledge of soil-machine and soil-plant interactions. It is the hope of the editors that these three volumes will provide a ready reference for much needed future research in this area....

  20. Recent Advances in Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batchelor-McAuley, Christopher; Kätelhön, Enno; Barnes, Edward O; Compton, Richard G; Laborda, Eduardo; Molina, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Recent progress in the theory and practice of voltammetry is surveyed and evaluated. The transformation over the last decade of the level of modelling and simulation of experiments has realised major advances such that electrochemical techniques can be fully developed and applied to real chemical problems of distinct complexity. This review focuses on the topic areas of: multistep electrochemical processes, voltammetry in ionic liquids, the development and interpretation of theories of electron transfer (Butler–Volmer and Marcus–Hush), advances in voltammetric pulse techniques, stochastic random walk models of diffusion, the influence of migration under conditions of low support, voltammetry at rough and porous electrodes, and nanoparticle electrochemistry. The review of the latter field encompasses both the study of nanoparticle-modified electrodes, including stripping voltammetry and the new technique of ‘nano-impacts’. PMID:26246984

  1. Status of Advanced LIGO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Installation of Advanced LIGO, a second-generation interferometric gravitational wave observatory, began in earnest in October of 2010. Initial LIGO instrumentation was de-installed, vacuum chambers and envelope modified, and the installation of scientific payloads begun. At LIGO Hanford Observatory, optics and suspensions comprising one of two 4km Fabry-Perot arms have been deployed and commissioned, resonating green light in an experiment to test and understand the process of controlling cavity lengths (``lock acquisition''). At LIGO Livingston, cornerstation optic and seismic isolation installation has matured such that the primary infrared laser and a suspended mode cleaner cavity (employed to spacially clean the interferometer input beam) are locked and under commissioning test. In this talk we present the status of Advanced LIGO installation and integration, and sketch the promising future of gravitational wave observation and astronomy.

  2. Advances in atomic spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sneddon, J

    1998-01-01

    This volume continues the series'' cutting-edge reviews on developments in this field. Since its invention in the 1920s, electrostatic precipitation has been extensively used in industrial hygiene to remove dust and particulate matter from gases before entering the atmosphere. This combination of electrostatic precipitation is reported upon in the first chapter. Following this, chapter two reviews recent advances in the area of chemical modification in electrothermal atomization. Chapter three consists of a review which deal with advances and uses of electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry. Flow injection atomic spectroscopy has developed rapidly in recent years and after a general introduction, various aspects of this technique are looked at in chapter four. Finally, in chapter five the use of various spectrometric techniques for the determination of mercury are described.

  3. Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a new synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS will be a key component in a major new research facility, the National Center for Advanced Materials. The ALS will consist of an electron linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron, a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring, and a number of photon beam lines. Most or all photon beam lines will originate from wiggler and undulator magnets placed in the 12 long straight sections of the ALS. A very low electron beam emittance will provide photon beams of unsurpassed spectral brilliance from specially-designed undulators, and a high radiofrequency will produce very short pulse lengths.

  4. Advanced CCD camera developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condor, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    Two charge coupled device (CCD) camera systems are introduced and discussed, describing briefly the hardware involved, and the data obtained in their various applications. The Advanced Development Group Defense Sciences Engineering Division has been actively designing, manufacturing, fielding state-of-the-art CCD camera systems for over a decade. These systems were originally developed for the nuclear test program to record data from underground nuclear tests. Today, new and interesting application for these systems have surfaced and development is continuing in the area of advanced CCD camera systems, with the new CCD camera that will allow experimenters to replace film for x-ray imaging at the JANUS, USP, and NOVA laser facilities.

  5. Dietary advanced glycation endproducts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Malene Wibe

    High heat cooking induces flavor, aroma, and color of food, but leads to formation of advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) by the Maillard reaction. In addition to the formation in food, AGEs are also formed in vivo, and increased endogenous formation of AGEs has been linked to diabetic...... for biological effects of high heat-treated diets in humans. Studies with well-defined AGEs should be undertaken in order to advance our understanding of biological effects of specific AGEs....... sensitivity of cooking methods that induce or limit AGE formation were investigated in healthy overweight women. It was concluded that insulin sensitivity was improved with use of low heat cooking methods, compared with high heat cooking methods. In a rat study, effects on expression of AGE receptors, insulin...

  6. CADC Advanced Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, D. N.

    2012-09-01

    The Canadian Astronomy Data Centre's (CADC) Advanced Search web application is a modern search tool to access data across the CADC archives. It allows searching in different units, and is well averse in wild card characters and numeric operations. Search results are displayed in a sortable and filterable manner allowing quick and accurate access to downloadable data. The Advanced Search interface makes extremely good use of the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) to scour the Common Archive Observation Model (CAOM) Table Access Protocol (TAP) query service and the vast CADC Archive Data (AD) storage system. A new tabular view of the query form and the results data makes it easy to view the query, then return to the query form to make further changes, or, alternatively, filter the data from the paginated table. Results are displayed using a rich, open-source, JavaScript-based VOTable viewer called voview.

  7. Materials for advanced packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, CP

    2017-01-01

    This second edition continues to be the most comprehensive review on the developments in advanced electronic packaging technologies, with a focus on materials and processing. Recognized experts in the field contribute to 22 updated and new chapters that provide comprehensive coverage on various 3D package architectures, novel bonding and joining techniques, wire bonding, wafer thinning techniques, organic substrates, and novel approaches to make electrical interconnects between integrated circuit and substrates. Various chapters also address advances in several key packaging materials, including: Lead-free solders Flip chip underfills Epoxy molding compounds Conductive adhesives Die attach adhesives/films Thermal interface materials (TIMS) Materials for fabricating embedded passives including capacitors, inductors, and resistors Materials and processing aspects on wafer-level chip scale package (CSP) and MicroElectroMechanical system (MEMS) Contributors also review new and emerging technologies such as Light ...

  8. Advanced Agriculture system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shrinivas R. Zanwar

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the advanced system which improves agriculture processes like cultivation on ploughed land, based on robotic platform. We have developed a robotic vehicle having four wheels and steered by DC motor. The advanced autonomous system architecture gives us the opportunity to develop a complete new range of agricultural equipment based on small smart machines. The machine will cultivate the farm by considering particular rows and specific column at fixed distance depending on crop. The obstacle detection problem will also be considered, sensed by infrared sensor. The whole algorithm, calculation, processing, monitoring are designed with motors & sensor interfaced with microcontroller. The result obtained through example activation unit is also presented. The dc motor simulation with feedforward and feedback technique shows precise output. With the help of two examples, a DC motor and a magnetic levitation system, the use of MATLAB and Simulink for modeling, analysis and control is designed.

  9. Advanced intelligent systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ryoo, Young; Jang, Moon-soo; Bae, Young-Chul

    2014-01-01

    Intelligent systems have been initiated with the attempt to imitate the human brain. People wish to let machines perform intelligent works. Many techniques of intelligent systems are based on artificial intelligence. According to changing and novel requirements, the advanced intelligent systems cover a wide spectrum: big data processing, intelligent control, advanced robotics, artificial intelligence and machine learning. This book focuses on coordinating intelligent systems with highly integrated and foundationally functional components. The book consists of 19 contributions that features social network-based recommender systems, application of fuzzy enforcement, energy visualization, ultrasonic muscular thickness measurement, regional analysis and predictive modeling, analysis of 3D polygon data, blood pressure estimation system, fuzzy human model, fuzzy ultrasonic imaging method, ultrasonic mobile smart technology, pseudo-normal image synthesis, subspace classifier, mobile object tracking, standing-up moti...

  10. Recent advances in plant-herbivore interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkepile, Deron E.; Parker, John D.

    2017-01-01

    Plant-herbivore interactions shape community dynamics across marine, freshwater, and terrestrial habitats. From amphipods to elephants and from algae to trees, plant-herbivore relationships are the crucial link generating animal biomass (and human societies) from mere sunlight. These interactions are, thus, pivotal to understanding the ecology and evolution of virtually any ecosystem. Here, we briefly highlight recent advances in four areas of plant-herbivore interactions: (1) plant defense theory, (2) herbivore diversity and ecosystem function, (3) predation risk aversion and herbivory, and (4) how a changing climate impacts plant-herbivore interactions. Recent advances in plant defense theory, for example, highlight how plant life history and defense traits affect and are affected by multiple drivers, including enemy pressure, resource availability, and the local plant neighborhood, resulting in trait-mediated feedback loops linking trophic interactions with ecosystem nutrient dynamics. Similarly, although the positive effect of consumer diversity on ecosystem function has long been recognized, recent advances using DNA barcoding to elucidate diet, and Global Positioning System/remote sensing to determine habitat selection and impact, have shown that herbivore communities are probably even more functionally diverse than currently realized. Moreover, although most diversity-function studies continue to emphasize plant diversity, herbivore diversity may have even stronger impacts on ecosystem multifunctionality. Recent studies also highlight the role of risk in plant-herbivore interactions, and risk-driven trophic cascades have emerged as landscape-scale patterns in a variety of ecosystems. Perhaps not surprisingly, many plant-herbivore interactions are currently being altered by climate change, which affects plant growth rates and resource allocation, expression of chemical defenses, plant phenology, and herbivore metabolism and behavior. Finally, we conclude by

  11. Advances in microwaves 8

    CERN Document Server

    Young, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Microwaves, Volume 8 covers the developments in the study of microwaves. The book discusses the circuit forms for microwave integrated circuits; the analysis of microstrip transmission lines; and the use of lumped elements in microwave integrated circuits. The text also describes the microwave properties of ferrimagnetic materials, as well as their interaction with electromagnetic waves propagating in bounded waveguiding structures. The integration techniques useful at high frequencies; material technology for microwave integrated circuits; specific requirements on technology for d

  12. Microbiological Advances in Biohydrometallurgy

    OpenAIRE

    Helen Watling

    2016-01-01

    The most exciting advances in biohydrometallurgy are occurring in the field of microbiology. The two main technologies employed in biohydrometallurgy, agitated tanks for the processing of refractory concentrates and heaps and dumps for the processing of low-grade ores, are technologically sound and widely practised at commercial scale, but their development began at a time when very little was known of the microorganisms that assisted metals extraction from sulfide ores. During and subsequent...

  13. Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    V Air Force Research Laboratory ••• Advanced GPS Technologies (AGT) Integrity *Service *Excellence 1 May 2015 Kevin Slimak Program Manager...Detection Region Optical Rb Clock Oscillator replaced with COTS probe laser and ency comb Rb cell Detector Optical freq. doubler RL.;; I 7 \\.J...array • Features construction modularity and high efficiency • Minimum S/ V mass impact • Eliminates triplexer and high gain amplifier • Replaces

  14. Advances in geophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Sato, Haruo

    2012-01-01

    The critically acclaimed serialized review journal for over 50 years, Advances in Geophysics is a highly respected publication in the field of geophysics. Since 1952, each volume has been eagerly awaited, frequently consulted, and praised by researchers and reviewers alike. Now in its 52nd volume, it contains much material still relevant today--truly an essential publication for researchers in all fields of geophysics.Key features: * Contributions from leading authorities * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field

  15. Advances in bioethanol

    CERN Document Server

    Bajpai, Pratima

    2013-01-01

    The book provides an updated and detailed overview on advances in bioethanol. It looks at the historical perspectives, chemistry, sources and production of ethanol and discusses biotechnology breakthroughs and promising developments. The book also provides the details regarding the uses, advantages, problems, environmental effects and characteristics of bioethanol as a fuel. In addition, it presents information about ethanol in different parts of the world and also highlights the challenges and future of ethanol.

  16. Advanced Mechanics of Piezoelectricity

    CERN Document Server

    Qin, Qing-Hua

    2013-01-01

    "Advanced Mechanics of Piezoelectricity" presents a comprehensive treatment of piezoelectric materials using linear electroelastic theory, symplectic models, and Hamiltonian systems. It summarizes the current state of practice and presents the most recent research findings in piezoelectricity. It is intended for researchers and graduate students in the fields of applied mechanics, material science and engineering, computational engineering, and aerospace engineering. Dr. Qinghua Qin is a professor at the School of Engineering, Australian National University, Australia.

  17. Advances in respiratory therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozanski, Elizabeth A; Bach, Jonathan F; Shaw, Scott P

    2007-09-01

    Effective respiratory therapy depends on obtaining a definitive diagnosis and following established recommendations for treatment. Unfortunately, many respiratory conditions are idiopathic in origin or are attributable to nonspecific inflammation. In some situations, disorders are controlled rather than cured. Recent advances in pulmonary therapeutics include the use of new agents to treat common diseases and application of local delivery of drugs to enhance drug effect and minimize side effects.

  18. Advances in Crash Response

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2009-06-29

    In this podcast, Dr. Richard C. Hunt, Director of CDC's Division of Injury Response, provides an overview on the benefits of using an Advanced Automatic Collision Notification system, or AACN, to help with emergency triage of people injured in vehicle crashes.  Created: 6/29/2009 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC), Division of Injury Response (DIR).   Date Released: 6/29/2009.

  19. Silicene: Recent theoretical advances

    KAUST Repository

    Lew Yan Voon, L. C.

    2016-04-14

    Silicene is a two-dimensional allotrope of silicon with a puckered hexagonal structure closely related to the structure of graphene and that has been predicted to be stable. To date, it has been successfully grown in solution (functionalized) and on substrates. The goal of this review is to provide a summary of recent theoretical advances in the properties of both free-standing silicene as well as in interaction with molecules and substrates, and of proposed device applications.

  20. Advanced worker protection system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, B.; Duncan, P.; Myers, J.

    1995-12-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is in the process of defining the magnitude and diversity of Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) obligations at its numerous sites. The DOE believes that existing technologies are inadequate to solve many challenging problems such as how to decontaminate structures and equipment cost effectively, what to do with materials and wastes generated, and how to adequately protect workers and the environment. Preliminary estimates show a tremendous need for effective use of resources over a relatively long period (over 30 years). Several technologies are being investigated which can potentially reduce D&D costs while providing appropriate protection to DOE workers. The DOE recognizes that traditional methods used by the EPA in hazardous waste site clean up activities are insufficient to provide the needed protection and worker productivity demanded by DOE D&D programs. As a consequence, new clothing and equipment which can adequately protect workers while providing increases in worker productivity are being sought for implementation at DOE sites. This project will result in the development of an Advanced Worker Protection System (AWPS). The AWPS will be built around a life support backpack that uses liquid air to provide cooling as well as breathing gas to the worker. The backpack will be combined with advanced protective garments, advanced liquid cooling garment, respirator, communications, and support equipment to provide improved worker protection, simplified system maintenance, and dramatically improve worker productivity through longer duration work cycles. Phase I of the project has resulted in a full scale prototype Advanced Worker Protection Ensemble (AWPE, everything the worker will wear), with sub-scale support equipment, suitable for integrated testing and preliminary evaluation. Phase II will culminate in a full scale, certified, pre-production AWPS and a site demonstration.