WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced turbine design

  1. Advanced wind turbine design studies: Advanced conceptual study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, P; Sherwin, R [Atlantic Orient Corp., Norwich, VT (United States)

    1994-08-01

    In conjunction with the US Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory`s Advanced Wind Turbine Program, the Atlantic Orient Corporation developed preliminary designs for the next generation of wind turbines. These 50 kW and 350 kW turbines are based upon the concept of simplicity. By adhering to a design philosophy that emphasizes simplicity, we project that these turbines will produce energy at extremely competitive rates which will unlock the potential of wind energy domestically and internationally. The program consisted of three distinct phases. First, we evaluated the operational history of the Enertech 44 series wind turbines. As a result of this evaluation, we developed, in the second phase, a preliminary design for a new 50 kW turbine for the near-term market. In the third phase, we took a clean-sheet-of-paper approach to designing a 350 kW turbine focused on the mid-1990s utility market that incorporated past experience and advanced technology.

  2. Advances in wind turbine blade design and materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of wind turbine blades. The final part of the book describes advances in wind turbine blade materials, development and testing, including biobased composites, surface protection and coatings, structural performance testing and the design, manufacture and testing of small wind turbine blades. Advances......Wind energy is gaining critical ground in the area of renewable energy, with wind energy being predicted to provide up to 8% of the world’s consumption of electricity by 2021. Advances in wind turbine blade design and materials reviews the design and functionality of wind turbine rotor blades...... as well as the requirements and challenges for composite materials used in both current and future designs of wind turbine blades. Part one outlines the challenges and developments in wind turbine blade design, including aerodynamic and aeroelastic design features, fatigue loads on wind turbine blades...

  3. Advanced radial inflow turbine rotor program: Design and dynamic testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, C.

    1976-01-01

    The advancement of small, cooled, radial inflow turbine technology in the area of operation at higher turbine inlet temperature is discussed. The first step was accomplished by designing, fabricating, and subjecting to limited mechanical testing an advanced gas generator rotating assembly comprising a radial inflow turbine and two-stage centrifugal compressor. The radial inflow turbine and second-stage compressor were designed as an integrally machined monorotor with turbine cooling taking place basically by conduction to the compressor. Design turbine inlet rotor gas temperature, rotational speed, and overall gas generator compressor pressure ratio were 1422 K (2560 R), 71,222 rpm, and 10/1 respectively. Mechanical testing on a fabricated rotating assembly and bearing system covered 1,000 cold start/stop cycles and three spins to 120 percent design speed (85,466 rpm).

  4. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-31

    Achieving the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) goals of 60% efficiency, single-digit NO{sub x}, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NO{sub x} emission. Improved coatings and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. GE`s view of the market, in conjunction with the industrial and utility objectives, requires the development of Advanced Gas Turbine Systems which encompass two potential products: a new aeroderivative combined-cycle system for the industrial market, and a combined-cycle system for the utility sector that is based on an advanced frame machine. The GE Advanced Gas Turbine Development program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70 MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling methodology; (2) a 200 MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced Ge heavy-duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. Both of these activities required the identification and resolution of technical issues critical to achieving ATS goals. The emphasis for the industrial ATS was placed upon innovative cycle design and low emission combustion. The emphasis for the utility ATS was placed on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling, while utilizing demonstrated and planned improvements in low emission combustion. Significant overlap in the development programs will allow common technologies to be applied to both products. GE Power Systems is solely responsible for offering GE products for the industrial and utility markets.

  5. Development of environmentally advanced hydropower turbine system design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A team worked together on the development of environmentally advanced hydro turbine design concepts to reduce hydropower''s impact on the environment, and to improve the understanding of the technical and environmental issues involved, in particular, with fish survival as a result of their passage through hydro power sites. This approach brought together a turbine design and manufacturing company, biologists, a utility, a consulting engineering firm and a university research facility, in order to benefit from the synergy of diverse disciplines. Through a combination of advanced technology and engineering analyses, innovative design concepts adaptable to both new and existing hydro facilities were developed and are presented. The project was divided into 4 tasks. Task 1 investigated a broad range of environmental issues and how the issues differed throughout the country. Task 2 addressed fish physiology and turbine physics. Task 3 investigated individual design elements needed for the refinement of the three concept families defined in Task 1. Advanced numerical tools for flow simulation in turbines are used to quantify characteristics of flow and pressure fields within turbine water passageways. The issues associated with dissolved oxygen enhancement using turbine aeration are presented. The state of the art and recent advancements of this technology are reviewed. Key elements for applying turbine aeration to improve aquatic habitat are discussed and a review of the procedures for testing of aerating turbines is presented. In Task 4, the results of the Tasks were assembled into three families of design concepts to address the most significant issues defined in Task 1. The results of the work conclude that significant improvements in fish passage survival are achievable

  6. Development of environmentally advanced hydropower turbine system design concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franke, G.F.; Webb, D.R.; Fisher, R.K. Jr. [Voith Hydro, Inc. (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    A team worked together on the development of environmentally advanced hydro turbine design concepts to reduce hydropower`s impact on the environment, and to improve the understanding of the technical and environmental issues involved, in particular, with fish survival as a result of their passage through hydro power sites. This approach brought together a turbine design and manufacturing company, biologists, a utility, a consulting engineering firm and a university research facility, in order to benefit from the synergy of diverse disciplines. Through a combination of advanced technology and engineering analyses, innovative design concepts adaptable to both new and existing hydro facilities were developed and are presented. The project was divided into 4 tasks. Task 1 investigated a broad range of environmental issues and how the issues differed throughout the country. Task 2 addressed fish physiology and turbine physics. Task 3 investigated individual design elements needed for the refinement of the three concept families defined in Task 1. Advanced numerical tools for flow simulation in turbines are used to quantify characteristics of flow and pressure fields within turbine water passageways. The issues associated with dissolved oxygen enhancement using turbine aeration are presented. The state of the art and recent advancements of this technology are reviewed. Key elements for applying turbine aeration to improve aquatic habitat are discussed and a review of the procedures for testing of aerating turbines is presented. In Task 4, the results of the Tasks were assembled into three families of design concepts to address the most significant issues defined in Task 1. The results of the work conclude that significant improvements in fish passage survival are achievable.

  7. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND PRODUCT DEVELOPMENT - Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht H. Mayer

    2000-07-15

    Asea Brown Boveri (ABB) has completed its technology based program. The results developed under Work Breakdown Structure (WBS) 8, concentrated on technology development and demonstration have been partially implemented in newer turbine designs. A significant improvement in heat rate and power output has been demonstrated. ABB will use the knowledge gained to further improve the efficiency of its Advanced Cycle System, which has been developed and introduced into the marked out side ABB's Advanced Turbine System (ATS) activities. The technology will lead to a power plant design that meets the ATS performance goals of over 60% plant efficiency, decreased electricity costs to consumers and lowest emissions.

  8. Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

  9. Design of advanced turbopump drive turbines for National Launch System application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, F. W.; Johnson, P. D.; Montesdeoca, X. A.; Rowey, R. J.; Griffin, L. W.

    1992-01-01

    The aerodynamic design of advanced fuel and oxidizer pump drive turbine systems being developed for application in the main propulsion system of the National Launch System are discussed. The detail design process is presented along with the final baseline fuel and oxidizer turbine configurations. Computed airfoil surface static pressure distributions and flow characteristics are shown. Both turbine configurations employ unconventional high turning blading (approximately 160 deg) and are expected to provide significant cost and performance benefits in comparison with traditional configurations.

  10. Biological assessment of the advanced turbine design at Wanapum Dam, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauble, D. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Deng, Z. D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Richmond, M. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Moursund, R. A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, T. J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rakowski, C. L. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Duncan, J. P. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2007-08-01

    Three studies were conducted to evaluate the biological performance of an advanced design turbine installed at Unit 8 of Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River in 2005 versus a conventional Kaplan turbine, Unit 9. The studies included an evaluation of blade-strike using deterministic and probabilistic models, integrated analysis of the response of the Sensor Fish to sever hydraulic events within the turbine system, and a novel dye technique to measure injury to juvenile salmonids in the field.

  11. Advanced Turbine Systems Program -- Conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, August 1--October 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. A secondary objective is to begin early development of technologies critical to the success of ATS. This quarterly report, addresses only Task 4, conversion of a gas turbine to a coal-fired gas turbine, which was completed during the quarter and the nine subtasks included in Task 8, design and test of critical components. These nine subtasks address six ATS technologies as follows: catalytic combustion; recuperator; autothermal fuel reformer; high temperature turbine disc; advanced control system (MMI); and ceramic materials.

  12. Advanced multi-megawatt wind turbine design for utility application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijawka, W. C.

    1984-01-01

    A NASA/DOE program to develop a utility class multimegawatt wind turbine, the MOD-5A, is described. The MOD-5A features a 400 foot diameter rotor which is teetered and positioned upwind of the tower; a 7.3 megawatt power rating with a variable speed electric generating system; and a redundant rotor support and torque transmission structure. The rotor blades were fabricated from an epoxy-bonded wood laminate material which was a successful outgrowth of the MOD-OA airfoil design. Preliminary data from operational tests carried out at the NASA Plumbrook test facility are presented.

  13. Biological Assessment of the Advanced Turbine Design at Wanapum Dam, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dauble, Dennis D.; Deng, Zhiqun; Richmond, Marshall C.; Moursund, Russell A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Duncan, Joanne P.

    2007-09-12

    This report summarizes the results of studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to evaluate the biological performance (likelihood of injury to fish) from an advanced design turbine installed at Unit 8 of Wanapum Dam on the Columbia River in Washington State in 2005. PNNL studies included a novel dye technique to measure injury to juvenile fish in the field, an evaluation of blade-strike using both deterministic and stochastic models, and extended analysis of the response of the Sensor Fish Device to strike, pressure, and turbulence within the turbine system. Fluorescein dye was used to evaluate injuries to live fish passed through the advanced turbine and an existing turbine at two spill discharges (15 and 17 kcfs). Under most treatments the results were not significantly different for the two turbines, however, eye injury occurred in nearly 30% of fish passing through Unit 9 but in less than 10% of those passing through Unit 8 at 15 kcfs. Both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models were applied for the original and new AHTS turbines. The modeled probabilities were compared to the Sensor Fish results (Carlson et al. 2006) and the biological studies using juvenile fish (Normandeau et al. 2005) under the same operational parameters. The new AHTS turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the original turbine, but no statistical evidence to suggest that there is significant difference in blade-strike injury probabilities between the two turbines, which is consistent with the experiment results using Sensor Fish and juvenile fish. PNNL also conducted Sensor Fish studies at Wanapum Dam in 2005 concurrent with live fish studies. The probablility of severe collision events was similar for both turbine. The advanced turbine had a slightly lower probability of severe shear events but a slightly higher probability of slight shear.

  14. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1994--July 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    This report summarizes the tasks completed under this project during the period from August 1, 1994 through July 31, 1994. The objective of the study is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized by the year 2000. The tasks completed include a market study for the advanced turbine system; definition of an optimized recuperated gas turbine as the prime mover meeting the requirements of the market study and whose characteristics were, in turn, used for forecasting the total advanced turbine system (ATS) future demand; development of a program plan for bringing the ATS to a state of readiness for field test; and demonstration of the primary surface recuperator ability to provide the high thermal effectiveness and low pressure loss required to support the proposed ATS cycle.

  15. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Gaul

    2004-04-21

    Natural gas combustion turbines are rapidly becoming the primary technology of choice for generating electricity. At least half of the new generating capacity added in the US over the next twenty years will be combustion turbine systems. The Department of Energy has cosponsored with Siemens Westinghouse, a program to maintain the technology lead in gas turbine systems. The very ambitious eight year program was designed to demonstrate a highly efficient and commercially acceptable power plant, with the ability to fire a wide range of fuels. The main goal of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program was to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost effective competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Performance targets were focused on natural gas as a fuel and included: System efficiency that exceeds 60% (lower heating value basis); Less than 10 ppmv NO{sub x} emissions without the use of post combustion controls; Busbar electricity that are less than 10% of state of the art systems; Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) equivalent to current systems; Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals; and Commercial systems by the year 2000. In a parallel effort, the program was to focus on adapting the ATS engine to coal-derived or biomass fuels. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigators on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant LHV based efficiency greater than 60% was achievable. In Phase 2 the more promising cycles were evaluated in greater detail and the closed-loop steam-cooled combined cycle was selected for development because it offered the best solution with least risk for achieving the ATS Program goals for plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity and RAM. Phase 2 also involved conceptual ATS engine and plant design and technology developments in aerodynamics, sealing

  16. Advanced Turbine System (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Achieving the goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx, and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system: the turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase, leading also to increased NOx emission. However, improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal. The program is focused on two specific products: a 70MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology utilizing an innovative air cooling technology, and a 200MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy duty machine utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency.

  17. Computational thermo-fluid dynamics contributions to advanced gas turbine engine design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, R. W.; Adamczyk, J. J.; Rohlik, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    The design practices for the gas turbine are traced throughout history with particular emphasis on the calculational or analytical methods. Three principal components of the gas turbine engine will be considered: namely, the compressor, the combustor and the turbine.

  18. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Annual report, August 1993--July 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-11-01

    This Yearly Technical Progress Report covers the period August 3, 1993 through July 31, 1994 for Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program by Solar Turbines Incorporated under DOE Contract No. DE-AC421-93MC30246. As allowed by the Contract (Part 3, Section J, Attachment B) this report is also intended to fulfill the requirements for a fourth quarterly report. The objective of Phase 2 of the ATS Program is to provide the conceptual design and product development plan for an ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost-competitive industrial gas turbine system to be commercialized in the year 2000. During the period covered by this report, Solar has completed three of eight program tasks and has submitted topical reports. These three tasks included a Project Plan submission of information required by NEPA, and the selection of a Gas-Fueled Advanced Turbine System (GFATS). In the latest of the three tasks, Solar`s Engineering team identified an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine as the eventual outcome of DOE`s ATS program coupled with Solar`s internal New Product Introduction (NPI) program. This machine, designated ``ATS50`` will operate at a thermal efficiency (turbine shaft power/fuel LHV) of 50 percent, will emit less than 10 parts per million of NOx and will reduce the cost of electricity by 10 percent. It will also demonstrate levels of reliability, availability, maintainability, and durability (RAMD) equal to or better than those of today`s gas turbine systems. Current activity is concentrated in three of the remaining five tasks a Market Study, GFATS System Definition and Analysis, and the Design and Test of Critical Components.

  19. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly progress report, December 1, 1995--February 29, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    This report describes the overall program status of the General Electric Advanced Gas Turbine Development program, and reports progress on three main task areas. The program is focused on two specific products: (1) a 70-MW class industrial gas turbine based on the GE90 core technology, utilizing a new air cooling methodology; and (2) a 200-MW class utility gas turbine based on an advanced GE heavy-duty machine, utilizing advanced cooling and enhancement in component efficiency. The emphasis for the industrial system is placed on cycle design and low emission combustion. For the utility system, the focus is on developing a technology base for advanced turbine cooling while achieving low emission combustion. The three tasks included in this progress report are on: conversion to a coal-fueled advanced turbine system, integrated program plan, and design and test of critical components. 13 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Advanced turbine systems program -- Conceptual design and product development. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-26

    This Final Technical Report presents the accomplishments on Phase 2 of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The ATS is an advanced, natural gas fired gas turbine system that will represent a major advance on currently available industrial gas turbines in the size range of 1--20 MW. This report covers a market-driven development. The Market Survey reported in Section 5 identified the customer`s performance needs. This market survey used analyses performed by Solar turbine Incorporated backed up by the analyses done by two consultants, Research Decision Consultants (RDC) and Onsite Energy Corporation (Onsite). This back-up was important because it is the belief of all parties that growth of the ATS will depend both on continued participation in Solar`s traditional oil and gas market but to a major extent on a new market. This new market is distributed electrical power generation. Difficult decisions have had to be made to meet the different demands of the two markets. Available resources, reasonable development schedules, avoidance of schedule or technology failures, probable acceptance by the marketplace, plus product cost, performance and environmental friendliness are a few of the complex factors influencing the selection of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System described in Section 3. Section 4 entitled ``Conversion to Coal`` was a task which addresses the possibility of a future interruption to an economic supply of natural gas. System definition and analysis is covered in Section 6. Two major objectives were met by this work. The first was identification of those critical technologies that can support overall attainment of the program goals. Separate technology or component programs were begun to identify and parameterize these technologies and are described in Section 7. The second objective was to prepare parametric analyses to assess performance sensitivity to operating variables and to select design approaches to meet the overall program goals.

  1. Advanced Tools for Modelling, Design and Optimization of Wind Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Hansen, A. D.; Soerensen, P.;

    2004-01-01

    In the last decade, the high penetration of wind turbines in the power system has been closely related to the advancement of the wind turbine technology and control. The electric system of a large wind turbine as well as of an offshore wind farm with hundreds of MW power capacity has become more ...

  2. Integration of magnetic bearings in the design of advanced gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storace, Albert F.; Sood, Devendra K.; Lyons, James P.; Preston, Mark A.

    1994-01-01

    Active magnetic bearings provide revolutionary advantages for gas turbine engine rotor support. These advantages include tremendously improved vibration and stability characteristics, reduced power loss, improved reliability, fault-tolerance, and greatly extended bearing service life. The marriage of these advantages with innovative structural network design and advanced materials utilization will permit major increases in thrust to weight performance and structural efficiency for future gas turbine engines. However, obtaining the maximum payoff requires two key ingredients. The first key ingredient is the use of modern magnetic bearing technologies such as innovative digital control techniques, high-density power electronics, high-density magnetic actuators, fault-tolerant system architecture, and electronic (sensorless) position estimation. This paper describes these technologies. The second key ingredient is to go beyond the simple replacement of rolling element bearings with magnetic bearings by incorporating magnetic bearings as an integral part of the overall engine design. This is analogous to the proper approach to designing with composites, whereby the designer tailors the geometry and load carrying function of the structural system or component for the composite instead of simply substituting composites in a design originally intended for metal material. This paper describes methodologies for the design integration of magnetic bearings in gas turbine engines.

  3. Advanced HP/IP Blading Technologies for the Design of Highly Efficient Steam Turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mathias Deckers; Ernst Wilhelm Pfitzinger; Wilfried Ulm

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents Siemens' latest improvements in steam turbine blading and blading design tools. The technology offers improved performance and highest efficiencies for a wide range of steam turbine applications.

  4. Advanced HP/IP Blading Technologies for the Design of Highly Efficient Steam Turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MathiasDeckers; ErnstWilhelmPfitzinger; WilfriedUlm

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents Siemens’ latest improvements in steam turbine blading and blading design tools. The technology offers improved performance and highest efficiencies for a wide range of steam turbine applications.

  5. Advanced Turbine Systems Program conceptual design and product development. Task 3.0, Selection of natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report presents results of Task 3 of the Westinghouse ATS Phase II program. Objective of Task 3 was to analyze and evaluate different cycles for the natural gas-fired Advanced Turbine Systems in order to select one that would achieve all ATS program goals. About 50 cycles (5 main types) were evaluated on basis of plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability-availability-maintainability (RAM), and program schedule requirements. The advanced combined cycle was selected for the ATS plant; it will incorporate an advanced gas turbine engine as well as improvements in the bottoming cycle and generator. Cost and RAM analyses were carried out on 6 selected cycle configurations and compared to the baseline plant. Issues critical to the Advanced Combined Cycle are discussed; achievement of plant efficiency and cost of electricity goals will require higher firing temperatures and minimized cooling of hot end components, necessitating new aloys/materials/coatings. Studies will be required in combustion, aerodynamic design, cooling design, leakage control, etc.

  6. Advanced tools for modeling, design and optimization of wind turbine systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, F.; Hansen, A.D.; Jauch, C.;

    2005-01-01

    important in controlling the interaction between the mechanical system of the wind turbine and the main power system. The presence of power electronics in wind turbines improves their controllability with respect not only to its mechanical loads but also to its power quality [1]. This paper presents...... an overview of a developed simulation platform for the modeling, design and optimization of wind turbines. The ability to simulate the dynamic behavior of wind turbines and the wind turbine grid interaction using four simulation tools (Matlab, Saber, DIgSILENT and HAWC) is investigated, improved and extended....

  7. Advanced Tools for Modeling, Design and Optimization of Wind Turbine Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Hansen, Anca-Daniela; Jauch, Clemens;

    2005-01-01

    important in controlling the interaction between the mechanical system of the wind turbine and the main power system. The presence of power electronics in wind turbines improves their controllability with respect not only to its mechanical loads but also to its power quality [\\]. This paper presents...... an overview of a developed simulation platform for the modeling, design and optimization of wind turbines. The ability to simulate the dynamic behavior of wind turbines and the wind turbine grid interaction using four simulation tools (Matlab, Saber, DIgSILENT and HAWC) is investigated, improved and extended....

  8. Development of biological criteria for the design of advanced hydropower turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Coutant, Charles C. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Whitney, Richard R. [Leavenworth, WA (United States)

    1997-03-01

    A review of the literature related to turbine-passage injury mechanisms suggests the following biological criteria should be considered in the design of new turbines: (1) pressure; (2) cavitation; (3) shear and turbulence; and (4) mechanical injury. Based on the study’s review of fish behavior in relation to hydropower facilities, it provides a number of recommendations to guide both turbine design and additional research.

  9. Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program conceptual design and product development. Quarterly report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    GE has achieved a leadership position in the worldwide gas turbine industry in both industrial/utility markets and in aircraft engines. This design and manufacturing base plus our close contact with the users provides the technology for creation of the next generation advanced power generation systems for both the industrial and utility industries. GE has been active in the definition of advanced turbine systems for several years. These systems will leverage the technology from the latest developments in the entire GE gas turbine product line. These products will be USA based in engineering and manufacturing and are marketed through the GE Industrial and Power Systems. Achieving the advanced turbine system goals of 60% efficiency, 8 ppmvd NOx and 10% electric power cost reduction imposes competing characteristics on the gas turbine system. Two basic technical issues arise from this. The turbine inlet temperature of the gas turbine must increase to achieve both efficiency and cost goals. However, higher temperatures move in the direction of increased NOx emission. Improved coating and materials technologies along with creative combustor design can result in solutions to achieve the ultimate goal.

  10. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the

  11. Exploring Advanced Technology Gas Turbine Engine Design and Performance for the Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    A Large Civil Tiltrotor (LCTR) conceptual design was developed as part of the NASA Heavy Lift Rotorcraft Systems Investigation in order to establish a consistent basis for evaluating the benefits of advanced technology for large tiltrotors. The concept has since evolved into the second-generation LCTR2, designed to carry 90 passengers for 1,000 nautical miles at 300 knots, with vertical takeoff and landing capability. This paper explores gas turbine component performance and cycle parameters to quantify performance gains possible for additional improvements in component and material performance beyond those identified in previous LCTR2 propulsion studies and to identify additional research areas. The vehicle-level characteristics from this advanced technology generation 2 propulsion architecture will help set performance levels as additional propulsion and power systems are conceived to meet ever-increasing requirements for mobility and comfort, while reducing energy use, cost, noise and emissions. The Large Civil Tiltrotor vehicle and mission will be discussed as a starting point for this effort. A few, relevant engine and component technology studies, including previous LCTR2 engine study results will be summarized to help orient the reader on gas turbine engine architecture, performance and limitations. Study assumptions and methodology used to explore engine design and performance, as well as assess vehicle sizing and mission performance will then be discussed. Individual performance for present and advanced engines, as well as engine performance effects on overall vehicle size and mission fuel usage, will be given. All results will be summarized to facilitate understanding the importance and interaction of various component and system performance on overall vehicle characteristics.

  12. Design of advanced automatic inspection system for turbine blade FPI analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J.; Xie, W. F.; Viens, M.; Birglen, L.; Mantegh, I.

    2013-01-01

    Aircraft engine turbine blade is the most susceptible part to discontinuities as it works in the extremely high pressure and temperature. Among various types of NDT method, Fluorescent Penetrant Inspection (FPI) is comparably cheap and efficient thus suitable for detecting turbine blade surface discontinuities. In this paper, we have developed an Advanced Automatic Inspection System (AAIS) with Image Processing and Pattern Recognition techniques to aid human inspector. The system can automatically detect, measure and classify the discontinuities from turbine blade FPI images. The tests on the sample images provided by industrial partner have been performed to evaluate the system.

  13. ADVANCED HYDROGEN TURBINE DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John

    2015-06-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: ⟂ A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant. ⟂ 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant. ₜ NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  14. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, John [Siemens Energy, Inc., Orlando, FL (United States)

    2015-09-30

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratories, Siemens has completed the Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development Program to develop an advanced gas turbine for incorporation into future coal-based Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants. All the scheduled DOE Milestones were completed and significant technical progress was made in the development of new technologies and concepts. Advanced computer simulations and modeling, as well as subscale, full scale laboratory, rig and engine testing were utilized to evaluate and select concepts for further development. Program Requirements of: A 3 to 5 percentage point improvement in overall plant combined cycle efficiency when compared to the reference baseline plant; 20 to 30 percent reduction in overall plant capital cost when compared to the reference baseline plant; and NOx emissions of 2 PPM out of the stack. were all met. The program was completed on schedule and within the allotted budget

  15. Wind Turbine Blade Design

    OpenAIRE

    Richard J. Crossley; Peter J. Schubel

    2012-01-01

    A detailed review of the current state-of-art for wind turbine blade design is presented, including theoretical maximum efficiency, propulsion, practical efficiency, HAWT blade design, and blade loads. The review provides a complete picture of wind turbine blade design and shows the dominance of modern turbines almost exclusive use of horizontal axis rotors. The aerodynamic design principles for a modern wind turbine blade are detailed, including blade plan shape/quantity, aerofoil selection ...

  16. Innovation in wind turbine design

    CERN Document Server

    Jamieson, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Innovation in Wind Turbine Design addresses the fundamentals of design, the reasons behind design choices, and describes the methodology for evaluating innovative systems and components. Always referencing a state of the art system for comparison, Jamieson discusses the basics of wind turbine theory and design, as well as how to apply existing engineering knowledge to further advance the technology, enabling the reader to gain a thorough understanding of current technology before assessing where it can go in the future. Innovation in Wind Turbine Design is divided into four mai

  17. Wind Turbine Blade Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J. Crossley

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A detailed review of the current state-of-art for wind turbine blade design is presented, including theoretical maximum efficiency, propulsion, practical efficiency, HAWT blade design, and blade loads. The review provides a complete picture of wind turbine blade design and shows the dominance of modern turbines almost exclusive use of horizontal axis rotors. The aerodynamic design principles for a modern wind turbine blade are detailed, including blade plan shape/quantity, aerofoil selection and optimal attack angles. A detailed review of design loads on wind turbine blades is offered, describing aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, gyroscopic and operational conditions.

  18. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sy Ali

    2002-03-01

    The market for power generation equipment is undergoing a tremendous transformation. The traditional electric utility industry is restructuring, promising new opportunities and challenges for all facilities to meet their demands for electric and thermal energy. Now more than ever, facilities have a host of options to choose from, including new distributed generation (DG) technologies that are entering the market as well as existing DG options that are improving in cost and performance. The market is beginning to recognize that some of these users have needs beyond traditional grid-based power. Together, these changes are motivating commercial and industrial facilities to re-evaluate their current mix of energy services. One of the emerging generating options is a new breed of advanced fuel cells. While there are a variety of fuel cell technologies being developed, the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC) are especially promising, with their electric efficiency expected around 50-60 percent and their ability to generate either hot water or high quality steam. In addition, they both have the attractive characteristics of all fuel cells--relatively small siting footprint, rapid response to changing loads, very low emissions, quiet operation, and an inherently modular design lending itself to capacity expansion at predictable unit cost with reasonably short lead times. The objectives of this project are to:(1) Estimate the market potential for high efficiency fuel cell hybrids in the U.S.;(2) Segment market size by commercial, industrial, and other key markets;(3) Identify and evaluate potential early adopters; and(4) Develop results that will help prioritize and target future R&D investments. The study focuses on high efficiency MCFC- and SOFC-based hybrids and competing systems such as gas turbines, reciprocating engines, fuel cells and traditional grid service. Specific regions in the country have been identified where these

  19. ADVANCED COMPOSITE WIND TURBINE BLADE DESIGN BASED ON DURABILITY AND DAMAGE TOLERANCE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galib Abumeri; Frank Abdi (PhD)

    2012-02-16

    The objective of the program was to demonstrate and verify Certification-by-Analysis (CBA) capability for wind turbine blades made from advanced lightweight composite materials. The approach integrated durability and damage tolerance analysis with robust design and virtual testing capabilities to deliver superior, durable, low weight, low cost, long life, and reliable wind blade design. The GENOA durability and life prediction software suite was be used as the primary simulation tool. First, a micromechanics-based computational approach was used to assess the durability of composite laminates with ply drop features commonly used in wind turbine applications. Ply drops occur in composite joints and closures of wind turbine blades to reduce skin thicknesses along the blade span. They increase localized stress concentration, which may cause premature delamination failure in composite and reduced fatigue service life. Durability and damage tolerance (D&DT) were evaluated utilizing a multi-scale micro-macro progressive failure analysis (PFA) technique. PFA is finite element based and is capable of detecting all stages of material damage including initiation and propagation of delamination. It assesses multiple failure criteria and includes the effects of manufacturing anomalies (i.e., void, fiber waviness). Two different approaches have been used within PFA. The first approach is Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) PFA while the second one is strength-based. Constituent stiffness and strength properties for glass and carbon based material systems were reverse engineered for use in D&DT evaluation of coupons with ply drops under static loading. Lamina and laminate properties calculated using manufacturing and composite architecture details matched closely published test data. Similarly, resin properties were determined for fatigue life calculation. The simulation not only reproduced static strength and fatigue life as observed in the test, it also showed composite

  20. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development. Task 3 -- System selection; Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.J.

    1994-07-01

    Solar Turbines Incorporated has elected to pursue an intercooled and recuperated (ICR) gas turbine system to exceed the goals of the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, which are to develop and commercialize an industrial gas turbine system that operates at thermal efficiencies at least 15% higher than 1991 products, and with emissions not exceeding eight ppmv NOx and 20 ppmv CO and UHC. Solar`s goal is to develop a commercially viable industrial system (3--20 MW) driven by a gas turbine engine with a thermal efficiency of 50% (ATS50), with the flexibility to meet the differing operational requirements of various markets. Dispersed power generation is currently considered to be the primary future target market for the ICR in the 5--15 MW size class. The ICR integrated system approach provides an ideal candidate for the assumed dispersed power market, with its small footprint, easy transportability, and environmental friendliness. In comparison with other systems that use water or toxic chemicals such as ammonia for NOx control, the ICR has no consumables other than fuel and air. The low pressure ratio of the gas turbine engine also is favorable in that less parasitic power is needed to pump the natural gas into the combustor than for simple-cycle machines. Solar has narrowed the ICR configuration to two basic approaches, a 1-spool, and a 2-spool version of the ATS50. The 1-spool engine will have a lower first-cost but lower part-power efficiencies. The 2-spool ATS may not only have better part-power efficiency, its efficiency will also be less sensitive to reduced turbine rotor inlet temperature levels. Thus hot-end parts life can be increased with only small sacrifices in efficiency. The flexibility of the 2-spool arrangement in meeting customer needs is its major advantage over the 1-spool. This Task 3 Topical Report is intended to present Solar`s preliminary system selection based upon the initial trade-off studies performed to date.

  1. Advanced low pressure steam turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, A.P.

    1998-07-01

    Low pressure steam turbines for fossil and nuclear power plants are designed to provide maximum exhaust area per flow in order to achieve high efficiency and at the same time reduce the number of flows and thereby minimize costs. Therefore they are characterized by very long last stage blades (LSB) mounted on a relatively small hub diameter compared to other axial turbines e.g. gas turbines. The paper summarizes how this very high length to diameter ratio of the LSB creates challenging flow conditions concerning stage and blading design. The turbine designer has to cope with very low hub reaction and the corresponding danger of flow separation. Due to the extreme change of circumferential velocity from hub to tip and flow pitch angles in the range of 45 or more the flow field is highly three-dimensional even without considering endwall flow phenomena. The LSB is subjected to high inlet Mach number at the hub as well as at the tip. Furthermore, the exit Mach number at the tip might reach twice the speed of sound. This leads to strong compression shocks with high shock losses. Many ways to master these challenges have been described in the literature. A summary of these design features is given in the paper. A common goal of all design measures is to reduce the significant radial pressure gradient at the exit of the last stage vane. Beside the well-known forced ``vortex design'', the effects of blade lean angle and sweep angle are explained. Both features generate an additional radial force on the flow which at least partly balances the radial pressure gradient due to swirl. Finally, the major objective of the paper is to present how all these design features have been applied in combination for an actual advanced large low pressure steam turbine design. A highly three-dimensional last stage vane is introduced. It can be shown that it is possible to optimize radial mass flow distribution and pressure distribution simultaneously.

  2. OUT Success Stories: Advanced Airfoils for Wind Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J.; Green, B.

    2000-08-01

    New airfoils have substantially increased the aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbines. It is clear that these new airfoils substantially increased energy output from wind turbines. Virtually all new blades built in this country today use these advanced airfoil designs.

  3. Advanced turbine systems phase II - conceptual design and product development. Final report, August 1993--July 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The National Energy Strategy (NES) calls for a balanced program of greater energy efficiency, use of alternative fuels, and the environmentally responsible development of all U.S. energy resources. Consistent with the NES, a Department of Energy (DOE) program has been created to develop Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS). The technical ATS requirements are based upon two workshops held in Greenville, SC that were sponsored by DOE and hosted by Clemson University. The objective of this 8-year program, managed jointly by DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, and, Office of Conservation and Renewable Energy, is to develop natural-gas-fired base load power plants that will have cycle efficiencies greater than 60%, lower heating value (LHV), be environmentally superior to current technology, and also be cost competitive. The program will include work to transfer advanced technology to the coal- and biomass-fueled systems being developed in other DOE programs.

  4. Evaluation of Erosion Resistance of Advanced Turbine Thermal Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Kuczmarski, Maria A.; Miller, Robert A.; Cuy, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    The erosion resistant turbine thermal barrier coating system is critical to aircraft engine performance and durability. By demonstrating advanced turbine material testing capabilities, we will be able to facilitate the critical turbine coating and subcomponent development and help establish advanced erosion-resistant turbine airfoil thermal barrier coatings design tools. The objective of this work is to determine erosion resistance of advanced thermal barrier coating systems under simulated engine erosion and/or thermal gradient environments, validating advanced turbine airfoil thermal barrier coating systems based on nano-tetragonal phase toughening design approaches.

  5. SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    The primary goal of the Solar Energy Research Institute's (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades is to convert the kinetic energy in the wind into mechanical energy in an inexpensive and efficient manner. To accomplish this goal, advanced wind turbine blades have been developed by SERI that utilize unique airfoil technology. Performance characteristics of the advanced blades were verified through atmospheric testing on fixed-pitch, stall-regulated horizontal-axis wind turbines (HAWTs). Of the various wind turbine configurations, the stall-regulated HAWT dominates the market because of its simplicity and low cost. Results of the atmospheric tests show that the SERI advanced blades produce 10 percent to 30 percent more energy than conventional blades.

  6. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, William [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Hughes, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Berry, Jonathan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Russell, Tamara [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lau, Y. C. [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Liu, Shan [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Arnett, Michael [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Peck, Arthur [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Tralshawala, Nilesh [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Weber, Joseph [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Benjamin, Marc [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Iduate, Michelle [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Kittleson, Jacob [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Garcia-Crespo, Andres [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Delvaux, John [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Casanova, Fernando [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Lacy, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Brzek, Brian [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Wolfe, Chris [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Palafox, Pepe [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Ding, Ben [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Badding, Bruce [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); McDuffie, Dwayne [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States); Zemsky, Christine [General Electric Company, Schenectady, NY (United States)

    2015-07-30

    stage hot gas path components, and systems analyses to determine benefits of all previously mentioned technologies to a gas turbine system in an IGCC configuration. This project built on existing gas turbine technology and product developments, and developed and validated the necessary turbine related technologies and sub-systems needed to meet the DOE turbine program goals. The scope of the program did not cover the design and validation of a full-scale prototype machine with the technology advances from this program incorporated. In summary, the DOE goals were met with this program. While the commercial landscape has not resulted in a demand for IGCC gas turbines many of the technologies that were developed over the course of the program are benefiting the US by being applied to new higher efficiency natural gas fueled gas turbines.

  7. Advanced IGCC/Hydrogen Gas Turbine Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    York, William; Hughes, Michael; Berry, Jonathan; Russell, Tamara; Lau, Y. C.; Liu, Shan; Arnett, Michael; Peck, Arthur; Tralshawala, Nilesh; Weber, Joseph; Benjamin, Marc; Iduate, Michelle; Kittleson, Jacob; Garcia-Crespo, Andres; Delvaux, John; Casanova, Fernando; Lacy, Ben; Brzek, Brian; Wolfe, Chris; Palafox, Pepe; Ding, Ben; Badding, Bruce; McDuffie, Dwayne; Zemsky, Christine

    2015-04-30

    stage hot gas path components, and systems analyses to determine benefits of all previously mentioned technologies to a gas turbine system in an IGCC configuration. This project built on existing gas turbine technology and product developments, and developed and validated the necessary turbine related technologies and sub-systems needed to meet the DOE turbine program goals. The scope of the program did not cover the design and validation of a full-scale prototype machine with the technology advances from this program incorporated. In summary, the DOE goals were met with this program. While the commercial landscape has not resulted in a demand for IGCC gas turbines many of the technologies that were developed over the course of the program are benefiting the US by being applied to new higher efficiency natural gas fueled gas turbines.

  8. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position

  9. Design of a family of new advanced airfoils for low wind class turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, Francesco

    2014-12-01

    In order to maximize the ratio of energy capture and reduce the cost of energy, the selection of the airfoils to be used along the blade plays a crucial role. Despite the general usage of existing airfoils, more and more, families of airfoils specially tailored for specific applications are developed. The present research is focused on the design of a new family of airfoils to be used for the blade of one megawatt wind turbine working in low wind conditions. A hybrid optimization scheme has been implemented, combining together genetic and gradient based algorithms. Large part of the work is dedicated to present and discuss the requirements that needed to be satisfied in order to have a consistent family of geometries with high efficiency, high lift and good structural characteristics. For each airfoil, these characteristics are presented and compared to the ones of existing airfoils. Finally, the aerodynamic design of a new blade for low wind class turbine is illustrated and compared to a reference shape developed by using existing geometries. Due to higher lift performance, the results show a sensitive saving in chords, wetted area and so in loads in idling position.

  10. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2001-10-30

    The objectives of this report period were to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, to complete the hardware and ancillary hardware fabrication, and commence the Test Preparations for the testing of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas generator. Focus during this report period has been on testing the Gas Generator. Because of unacceptable delays encountered in a previously competitively selected test site, CES initiated a re-competition of our testing program and selected an alternate test site. Following that selection, CES used all available resources to make preparations for testing the 10 Mw Gas Generator at the new testing site facilities of NTS at Saugus, CA. A substantial portion of this report period was devoted to Testing Preparations, i.e. test facility development, cold- flow testing, calibration testing, performing igniter ignition testing, and then commencement of the completely assembled Gas Generator Assembly Testing, in process at this writing.

  11. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-03-31

    The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

  12. DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-01-31

    The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

  13. ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEM FEDERAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank Macri

    2003-10-01

    Rolls-Royce Corporation has completed a cooperative agreement under Department of Energy (DOE) contract DE-FC21-96MC33066 in support of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program to stimulate industrial power generation markets. This DOE contract was performed during the period of October 1995 to December 2002. This final technical report, which is a program deliverable, describes all associated results obtained during Phases 3A and 3B of the contract. Rolls-Royce Corporation (formerly Allison Engine Company) initially focused on the design and development of a 10-megawatt (MW) high-efficiency industrial gas turbine engine/package concept (termed the 701-K) to meet the specific goals of the ATS program, which included single digit NOx emissions, increased plant efficiency, fuel flexibility, and reduced cost of power (i.e., $/kW). While a detailed design effort and associated component development were successfully accomplished for the 701-K engine, capable of achieving the stated ATS program goals, in 1999 Rolls-Royce changed its focus to developing advanced component technologies for product insertion that would modernize the current fleet of 501-K and 601-K industrial gas turbines. This effort would also help to establish commercial venues for suppliers and designers and assist in involving future advanced technologies in the field of gas turbine engine development. This strategy change was partly driven by the market requirements that suggested a low demand for a 10-MW aeroderivative industrial gas turbine, a change in corporate strategy for aeroderivative gas turbine engine development initiatives, and a consensus that a better return on investment (ROI) could be achieved under the ATS contract by focusing on product improvements and technology insertion for the existing Rolls-Royce small engine industrial gas turbine fleet.

  14. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  15. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  16. Advanced disk-type LP turbine rotors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper addresses the application of these design considerations. After twenty years experience with disk-type rotors, the Siemens/KWU ten-disk rotor for low-speed nuclear LP turbines was developed in 1969. Full volumetric disk hub inspections after 83,000 service hours did not reveal any stress corrosion cracking. In the meantime, this rotor design has been further improved. In 1987, two advanced eight-disk rotors went into operation at the Connecticut Yankee station. This rotor design together with the advanced LP turbine blading has been delivered to the Unterweser station. First test results indicated a remarkably improved thermodynamic performance. Avoidance of stress corrosion cracking can be accomplished by a combination of various measures: Proper keyway design; Low metal temperature; Low tensile stressing (by design); Low yield strength; High fracture toughness; Low surface stresses (by manufacturing); Proper steam/water cycle chemistry

  17. Offshore Wind Turbine Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Sten; Hansen, Erik Asp; Ibsen, Lars Bo;

    2006-01-01

    Current offshore wind turbine design methods have matured to a 1st generation state, manifested in the draft of a possible standard, IEC 61400-3 (2005). It is now time to investigate the possibilities of improving existing methods. To do so in an efficient manner a clear identification of the mos...... to shallow waters, integrated re-sponse modelling, wake effects, response extrapola-tion and clarification of the relevance of deterministic load cases in the operational regime....

  18. Advanced gas turbine systems program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeh, C.M.

    1995-06-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a program to develop fuel-efficient gas turbine-based power systems with low emissions. DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy (DOE/FE) and Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (DOE/EE) have initiated an 8-year program to develop high-efficiency, natural gas-fired advanced gas turbine power systems. The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program will support full-scale prototype demonstration of both industrial- and utility-scale systems that will provide commercial marketplace entries by the year 2000. When the program targets are met, power system emissions will be lower than from the best technology in use today. Efficiency of the utility-scale units will be greater than 60 percent on a lower heating value basis, and emissions of carbon dioxide will be reduced inversely with this increase. Industrial systems will also see an improvement of at least 15 percent in efficiency. Nitrogen oxides will be reduced by at least 10 percent, and carbon monoxide and hydrocarbon emissions will each be kept below 20 parts per million, for both utility and industrial systems.

  19. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, S. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of Phase II of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program is to develop conceptual designs of gas fired advanced turbine systems that can be adapted for operation on coal and biomass fuels. The technical, economic, and environmental performance operating on natural gas and in a coal fueled mode is to be assessed. Detailed designs and test work relating to critical components are to be completed and a market study is to be conducted.

  20. Turbine Aerodynamics Design Tool Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Frank W.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the Marshal Space Flight Center Fluids Workshop on Turbine Aerodynamic design tool development. The topics include: (1) Meanline Design/Off-design Analysis; and (2) Airfoil Contour Generation and Analysis. This paper is in viewgraph form.

  1. Advanced turbine systems program conceptual design and product development task 5 -- market study of the gas fired ATS. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-01

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), in partnership with the Department of Energy, will develop a family of advanced gas turbine-based power systems (ATS) for widespread commercialization within the domestic and international industrial marketplace, and to the rapidly changing electric power generation industry. The objective of the jointly-funded Program is to introduce an ATS with high efficiency, and markedly reduced emissions levels, in high numbers as rapidly as possible following introduction. This Topical Report is submitted in response to the requirements outlined in Task 5 of the Department of Energy METC Contract on Advanced Combustion Systems, Contract No, DE AC21-93MC30246 (Contract), for a Market Study of the Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System. It presents a market study for the ATS proposed by Solar, and will examine both the economic and siting constraints of the ATS compared with competing systems in the various candidate markets. Also contained within this report is an examination and analysis of Solar`s ATS and its ability to compete in future utility and industrial markets, as well as factors affecting the marketability of the ATS.

  2. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-Strike Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqun Deng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydropower is the largest renewable energy source in the world. However, in the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon and steelhead have been listed for protection under the Endangered Species Act due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making hydroelectric facilities more fish friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for relicensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to compare fish passage performance of the newly installed advanced turbine to an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live-fish survival study and a Sensor Fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury, while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experimental results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, no statistical evidence suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines, thus the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal to or higher than that for fish passing through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  3. Fish passage assessment of an advanced hydropower turbine and conventional turbine using blade-strike modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Z.; Carlson, T. J.; Dauble, D. D.; Ploskey, G. R. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    Hydropower is the largest renewable energy source in the world. However, in the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon and steelhead have been listed for protection under the Endangered Species Act due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making hydroelectric facilities more fish friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for relicensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to compare fish passage performance of the newly installed advanced turbine to an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live-fish survival study and a Sensor Fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury, while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experimental results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, no statistical evidence suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines, thus the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal to or higher than that for fish passing through the conventional turbine could not be rejected. (authors)

  4. Advanced Wind Turbine Drivetrain Concepts. Workshop Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2010-12-01

    This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy’s Advanced Drivetrain Workshop, held on June 29-30, 2010, to assess different advanced drivetrain technologies, their relative potential to improve the state-of-the-art in wind turbine drivetrains, and the scope of research and development needed for their commercialization in wind turbine applications.

  5. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  6. Advanced Vibration Analysis Tools and New Strategies for Robust Design of Turbine Engine Rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The adverse effects of small, random structural irregularities among the blades, called mistuning, can result in blade forced-response amplitudes and stresses that are much larger than those predicted for a perfectly tuned rotor. Manufacturing tolerances, deviations in material properties, or nonuniform operational wear causes mistuning; therefore, mistuning is unavoidable. Furthermore, even a small mistuning can have a dramatic effect on the vibratory behavior of a rotor because it can lead to spatial localization of the vibration energy (see the following photographs). As a result, certain blades may experience forced response amplitudes and stresses that are substantially larger than those predicted by an analysis of the nominal (tuned) design. Unfortunately, these random uncertainties in blade properties, and the immense computational effort involved in obtaining statistically reliable design data, combine to make this aspect of rotor design cumbersome.

  7. Aerodynamic design and analysis of a highly loaded turbine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, F. W.; Montesdeoca, X. A.; Rowey, R. J.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and analysis of a turbine exhaust volute manifold is described. This turbine exhaust system will be used with an advanced gas generator oxidizer turbine designed for very high specific work. The elevated turbine stage loading results in increased discharge Mach number and swirl velocity which, along with the need for minimal circumferential variation of fluid properties at the turbine exit, represent challenging volute design requirements. The design approach, candidate geometries analyzed, and steady state/unsteady CFD analysis results are presented.

  8. Fish Passage Assessment of an Advanced Hydropower Turbine and Conventional Turbine Using Blade-strike Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.; Ploskey, Gene R.

    2011-01-04

    In the Columbia and Snake River basins, several species of Pacific salmon were listed under the Endangered Species Act of 1973 due to significant declines of fish population. Dam operators and design engineers are thus faced with the task of making those hydroelectric facilities more ecologically friendly through changes in hydro-turbine design and operation. Public Utility District No. 2 of Grant County, Washington, applied for re-licensing from the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to replace the 10 turbines at Wanapum Dam with advanced hydropower turbines that were designed to increase power generation and improve fish passage conditions. We applied both deterministic and stochastic blade-strike models to the newly installed turbine and an existing turbine. Modeled probabilities were compared to the results of a large-scale live fish survival study and a sensor fish study under the same operational parameters. Overall, injury rates predicted by the deterministic model were higher than experimental rates of injury while those predicted by the stochastic model were in close agreement with experiment results. Fish orientation at the time of entry into the plane of the leading edges of the turbine runner blades was an important factor contributing to uncertainty in modeled results. The advanced design turbine had slightly higher modeled injury rates than the existing turbine design; however, there was no statistical evidence that suggested significant differences in blade-strike injuries between the two turbines and the hypothesis that direct fish survival rate through the advanced hydropower turbine is equal or better than that through the conventional turbine could not be rejected.

  9. Update on DOE Advanced IGCC/H2 Gas Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chupp, Ray

    2009-01-01

    Cooling Flow Reduction: a) Focus on improving turbine hot gas path part cooling efficiency. b) Applicable to current metallic turbine components and synergistic with advanced materials. c) Address challenges of IGCC/hydrogen fuel environment (for example, possible cooling hole plugging). Leakage Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing turbine parasitic leakages, i.e. between static-to-static, static-to-rotating turbine parts. b) Develop improved seal designs in a variety of important areas. Purge Flow Reduction: a) Focus on decreasing required flows to keep rotor disk cavities within temperature limits. b) Develop improved sealing at the cavity rims and modified flow geometries to minimize hot gas ingestion and aerodynamic impact.

  10. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems Program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esbeck, D.W. [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in partnership with industry, has set new performance standards for industrial gas turbines through the creation of the Industrial Advanced Turbine System Program. Their leadership will lead to the development of an optimized, energy efficient, and environmentally friendly gas turbine power systems in this size class (3-to-20 MW). The DOE has already created a positive effect by encouraging gas turbine system manufacturers to reassess their product and technology plans using the new higher standards as the benchmark. Solar Turbines has been a leader in the industrial gas turbine business, and is delighted to have joined with the DOE in developing the goals and vision for this program. We welcome the opportunity to help the national goals of energy conservation and environmental enhancement. The results of this program should lead to the U.S. based gas turbine industry maintaining its international leadership and the creation of highly paid domestic jobs.

  11. Combustion modeling in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, L.D.; Hedman, P.O.; Fletcher, T.H. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program is to help develop and commercialize ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base-load applications in the utility, independent power producer, and industrial markets. Combustion modeling, including emission characteristics, has been identified as a needed, high-priority technology by key professionals in the gas turbine industry.

  12. Advanced multistage turbine blade aerodynamics, performance, cooling, and heat transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleeter, S.; Lawless, P.B. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The gas turbine has the potential for power production at the highest possible efficiency. The challenge is to ensure that gas turbines operate at the optimum efficiency so as to use the least fuel and produce minimum emissions. A key component to meeting this challenge is the turbine. Turbine performance, both aerodynamics and heat transfer, is one of the barrier advanced gas turbine development technologies. This is a result of the complex, highly three-dimensional and unsteady flow phenomena in the turbine. Improved turbine aerodynamic performance has been achieved with three-dimensional highly-loaded airfoil designs, accomplished utilizing Euler or Navier-Stokes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. These design codes consider steady flow through isolated blade rows. Thus they do not account for unsteady flow effects. However, unsteady flow effects have a significant impact on performance. Also, CFD codes predict the complete flow field. The experimental verification of these codes has traditionally been accomplished with point data - not corresponding plane field measurements. Thus, although advanced CFD predictions of the highly complex and three-dimensional turbine flow fields are available, corresponding data are not. To improve the design capability for high temperature turbines, a detailed understanding of the highly unsteady and three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbines is necessary. Thus, unique data are required which quantify the unsteady three-dimensional flow through multi-stage turbine blade rows, including the effect of the film coolant flow. This requires experiments in appropriate research facilities in which complete flow field data, not only point measurements, are obtained and analyzed. Also, as design CFD codes do not account for unsteady flow effects, the next logical challenge and the current thrust in CFD code development is multiple-stage analyses that account for the interactions between neighboring blade rows.

  13. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Garrett Auxiliary Power Division (GAPD), a unit of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, during calendar year 1992, toward development and demonstration of structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract DEN3-335, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). GAPD utilized the AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine developed under the previous DOE/NASA Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) program as the ATTAP test bed for ceramic engine technology demonstration. ATTAP focussed on improving AGT101 test bed reliability, development of ceramic design methodologies, and improvement of fabrication and materials processing technology by domestic US ceramics fabricators. A series of durability tests was conducted to verify technology advancements. This is the fifth in a series of technical summary reports published annually over the course of the five-year contract.

  14. Probabilistic Design of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Toft, H.S.

    2010-01-01

    Probabilistic design of wind turbines requires definition of the structural elements to be included in the probabilistic basis: e.g., blades, tower, foundation; identification of important failure modes; careful stochastic modeling of the uncertain parameters; recommendations for target reliability....... It is described how uncertainties in wind turbine design related to computational models, statistical data from test specimens, results from a few full-scale tests and from prototype wind turbines can be accounted for using the Maximum Likelihood Method and a Bayesian approach. Assessment of the optimal...... reliability level by cost-benefit optimization is illustrated by an offshore wind turbine example. Uncertainty modeling is illustrated by an example where physical, statistical and model uncertainties are estimated....

  15. Materials for advanced ultrasupercritical steam turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purgert, Robert [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Shingledecker, John [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Saha, Deepak [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Thangirala, Mani [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Booras, George [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Powers, John [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Riley, Colin [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States); Hendrix, Howard [Energy Industries Of Ohio Inc., Independence, OH (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Ohio Coal Development Office (OCDO) have sponsored a project aimed at identifying, evaluating, and qualifying the materials needed for the construction of the critical components of coal-fired power plants capable of operating at much higher efficiencies than the current generation of supercritical plants. This increased efficiency is expected to be achieved principally through the use of advanced ultrasupercritical (A-USC) steam conditions. A limiting factor in this can be the materials of construction for boilers and for steam turbines. The overall project goal is to assess/develop materials technology that will enable achieving turbine throttle steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F)/35MPa (5000 psi). This final technical report covers the research completed by the General Electric Company (GE) and Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), with support from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) – Albany Research Center, to develop the A-USC steam turbine materials technology to meet the overall project goals. Specifically, this report summarizes the industrial scale-up and materials property database development for non-welded rotors (disc forgings), buckets (blades), bolting, castings (needed for casing and valve bodies), casting weld repair, and casting to pipe welding. Additionally, the report provides an engineering and economic assessment of an A-USC power plant without and with partial carbon capture and storage. This research project successfully demonstrated the materials technology at a sufficient scale and with corresponding materials property data to enable the design of an A-USC steam turbine. The key accomplishments included the development of a triple-melt and forged Haynes 282 disc for bolted rotor construction, long-term property development for Nimonic 105 for blading and bolting, successful scale-up of Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 castings using

  16. High efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morehead, H. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-19

    An outline of the Westinghouse high-efficiency fuel cell/advanced turbine power cycle is presented. The following topics are discussed: The Westinghouse SOFC pilot manufacturing facility, cell scale-up plan, pressure effects on SOFC power and efficiency, sureCell versus conventional gas turbine plants, sureCell product line for distributed power applications, 20 MW pressurized-SOFC/gas turbine power plant, 10 MW SOFC/CT power plant, sureCell plant concept design requirements, and Westinghouse SOFC market entry.

  17. Turbine Aerodynamic Design System Improvements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Frank W.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Simpson, Steven P.

    2003-01-01

    Presentation outline includes the following: 1. Volute manifold design and analysis methodology. 2. Meanline modification for compatibility with engine analysis code. Objective is to develop a manifold design methodology for turbines and pumps, and to enable rapid screening of candidate flow paths.

  18. Energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine detailed design report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thulin, R. D.; Howe, D. C.; Singer, I. D.

    1982-01-01

    The energy efficient engine high-pressure turbine is a single stage system based on technology advancements in the areas of aerodynamics, structures and materials to achieve high performance, low operating economics and durability commensurate with commercial service requirements. Low loss performance features combined with a low through-flow velocity approach results in a predicted efficiency of 88.8 for a flight propulsion system. Turbine airfoil durability goals are achieved through the use of advanced high-strength and high-temperature capability single crystal materials and effective cooling management. Overall, this design reflects a considerable extension in turbine technology that is applicable to future, energy efficient gas-turbine engines.

  19. A Summary of Environmentally Friendly Turbine Design Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Odeh, Mufeed [United States Geological Survey - BRD, Turners Falls, MA (United States)

    1999-07-01

    The Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program (AHTS) was created in 1994 by the U.S. Department of Energy, Electric Power Research Institute, and the Hydropower Research Foundation. The Program’s main goal is to develop “environmentally friendly” hydropower turbines. The Program’s first accomplishment was the development of conceptual designs of new environmentally friendly turbines. In order to do so, two contractors were competitively selected. The ARL/NREC team of engineers and biologists provided a conceptual design for a new turbine runner*. The new runner has the potential to generate hydroelectricity at close to 90% efficiency. The Voith team produced new fish-friendly design criteria for Kaplan and Francis turbines that can be incorporated in units during rehabilitation projects or in new hydroelectric facilities**. These include the use of advanced plant operation, minimum gap runners, placement of wicket gates behind stay vanes, among others. The Voith team will also provide design criteria on aerating Francis turbines to increase dissolved oxygen content. Detailed reviews of the available literature on fish mortality studies, causation of injuries to fish, and available biological design criteria that would assist in the design of fish-friendly turbines were performed. This review identified a need for more biological studies in order to develop performance criteria to assist turbine manufacturers in designing a more fish-friendly turbine.

  20. The design of modern gas turbine design : beyond CFD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, D.P. [Pratt and Whitney Canada, Longueuil, PQ (Canada)

    1998-09-01

    The progress that has been made in recent years of applying computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to the design of advanced turbine engines was discussed. Pratt and Whitney has successfully transitioned the design of the company`s advanced turbine engines from a five-year design cycle based on a succession of design-test-redesign cycles to a three-year design cycle based on an analytical design methodology. The development of 3-D viscous CFD and computational structural mechanics (CSM) codes as primary design tools and a multi-disciplinary approach to applications have been major factors in achieving this success. The company also made significant progress in the development of a fully implicit unsteady stage scheme, with marked impact on performance and durability. Improvements also have been made in the life of the hot end components and in aero-acoustics. 9 figs.

  1. Design and Analysis of Turbines for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Lisa W.; Dorney, Daniel J.; Huber, Frank W.

    2003-01-01

    In order to mitigate the risk of rocket propulsion development, efficient, accurate, detailed fluid dynamics analysis of the turbomachinery is necessary. This analysis is used for component development, design parametrics, performance prediction, and environment definition. To support this requirement, a task was developed at NASAh4arshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to improve turbine aerodynamic performance through the application of advanced design and analysis tools. There are four major objectives of this task: 1) to develop, enhance, and integrate advanced turbine aerodynamic design and analysis tools; 2) to develop the methodology for application of the analytical techniques; 3) to demonstrate the benefits of the advanced turbine design procedure through its application to a relevant turbine design point; and 4) to verify the optimized design and analysis with testing. The turbine chosen on which to demonstrate the procedure was a supersonic design suitable for a reusable launch vehicle (RLV). The hot gas path and blading were redesigned to obtain an increased efficiency. The redesign of the turbine was conducted with a consideration of system requirements, realizing that a highly efficient turbine that, for example, significantly increases engine weight, is of limited benefit. Both preliminary and detailed designs were considered. To generate an improved design, one-dimensional (1D) design and analysis tools, computational fluid dynamics (CFD), response surface methodology (RSM), and neural nets (NN) were used.

  2. Overview of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannister, R.L.; Bevc, F.P.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Westinghouse`s experience with land based gas turbines started in 1945 with the development of a 2000 hp gas turbine-generator set that consisted of a single reduction gear, compressor, 12 combustors and turbine. A thermal efficiency of 18% was obtained. By 1954, Westinghouse had developed a 15 MW unit (with a regenerator and intercooler) that was designed for a full-load simple cycle efficiency of 29%. As the initial step in the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program, Westinghouse has already developed a 230 MW gas turbine that has a simple cycle efficiency of 38.5% without the use of regeneration and intercooler concepts. In 1967, Westinghouse developed its first gas turbine combined cycle, a synergistic combination of the Brayton and the Rankine cycles. In a combined cycle the heat rejected by the higher temperature topping cycle is recovered in the lower temperature bottoming cycle to produce additional power from the energy initially released by the fuel. In this first Westinghouse combined cycle, a 1450{degrees}F burner outlet temperature gas turbine, rated at 25 MW, supplied exhaust heat which was used in a boiler to furnish steam to drive an 85 MW steam turbine. This plant achieved an annual average efficiency of 39.6%.

  3. Oxidation of advanced steam turbine alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, B.S., Jr.; Bullard, S.J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.

    2006-03-01

    Advanced or ultra supercritical (USC) steam power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  4. A novel strategy for the design of advanced engineering alloys - strengthening turbine disk superalloys via twinning structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuan, Yong; Gu, Yuefeng; Cui, Chuanyong; Osada, Toshio; Yokokawa, Tadaharu; Harada, Hiroshi [High Temperature Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science 1-2-1 Sengen, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-04-15

    A novel strategy for designing advanced engineering superalloys using twin structure is presented. By inducing numerous annealing and deformation twins, a new advanced polycrystalline Ni-Co-base superalloy (TMW-4M3 alloy) has been developed, which has low stacking fault energy, enhanced tensile and creep strength without degrading other mechanical properties such as low cycle fatigue and crack growth resistance. Based on TEM analysis, the twin strengthening mechanism is proposed. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Advanced Micro Turbine System (AMTS) -C200 Micro Turbine -Ultra-Low Emissions Micro Turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capstone Turbine Corporation

    2007-12-31

    In September 2000 Capstone Turbine Corporation commenced work on a US Department of Energy contract to develop and improve advanced microturbines for power generation with high electrical efficiency and reduced pollutants. The Advanced MicroTurbine System (AMTS) program focused on: (1) The development and implementation of technology for a 200 kWe scale high efficiency microturbine system (2) The development and implementation of a 65 kWe microturbine which meets California Air Resources Board (CARB) emissions standards effective in 2007. Both of these objectives were achieved in the course of the AMTS program. At its conclusion prototype C200 Microturbines had been designed, assembled and successfully completed field demonstration. C65 Microturbines operating on natural, digester and landfill gas were also developed and successfully tested to demonstrate compliance with CARB 2007 Fossil Fuel Emissions Standards for NOx, CO and VOC emissions. The C65 Microturbine subsequently received approval from CARB under Executive Order DG-018 and was approved for sale in California. The United Technologies Research Center worked in parallel to successfully execute a RD&D program to demonstrate the viability of a low emissions AMS which integrated a high-performing microturbine with Organic Rankine Cycle systems. These results are documented in AMS Final Report DOE/CH/11060-1 dated March 26, 2007.

  6. Offshore Wind Turbine Foundation Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passon, Patrik; Hvenekær Rasmussen, Jørgen

    continued into 2015 it is even more important to drive down the costs of energy for renewable energy sources such as offshore wind energy in order to arrive at a sustainable future on a global level.Cost of energy reductions for offshore wind turbines (OWTs) can be achieved by optimizations on different......-wave correlations are typically subjected to sequential load calculation approaches in an iterative and collaborative process between foundation designer and wind turbine manufacturer. Involvement of these different design parties may be motivated by various aspects such as introduction of state-of-the-art design...... in the specific context of OWTs and individual foundation type characteristics. For example, modelling and load calculation approaches for jacket type foundations of OWTs are often inherited from existing experiences of monopile type foundations or from their counterparts in the offshore oil & gas industry...

  7. Oxidation of alloys for advanced steam turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David E.

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions. Current goals of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Power Systems Initiatives include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which would require steam temperatures of up to 760°C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections.

  8. Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is an ambitious program to develop the necessary technologies, which will result in a significant increase in natural gas-fired power generation plant efficiency, a decrease in cost of electricity and a decrease in harmful emissions. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigations on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant efficiency greater than 60% could be achieved. The more promising cycles were evaluated in more detail in Phase 2 in order to select the one that would achieve all of the program goals. The closed-loop cooled combined cycle was selected because it offered the best solution with the least risk for exceeding the ATS Program goals of net plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), and commercialization in the year 2000. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam. turbine and a high efficiency generator. To enhance achievement of the challenging performance, emissions, and RAM goals, current technologies are being extended and new technologies developed. The attainment of ATS performance goal necessitates advancements in aerodynamics, sealing, cooling, coatings, and materials technologies. To reduce emissions to the required levels, demands a development effort in the following combustion technology areas: premixed ultra low NOx combustion, catalytic combustion, combustion instabilities, and optical diagnostics. To achieve the RAM targets, requires the utilization of proven design features, with quantified risk analysis, and advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technologies. Phase 2 research and development projects currently in progress, as well as those planned for Phase 3, will result in advances in gas turbine technology and greatly contribute to ATS Program success.

  9. Modern control design for flexible wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Alan Duane

    Control can improve energy capture and reduce dynamic loads in wind turbines. In the 1970s and 1980s wind turbines used classical control designs to regulate power and speed. The methods used, however, were not always successful. These systems often had bandwidths large enough to destabilize low-damped flexible modes leading to high dynamic load fatigue failures. Modern turbines are larger, mounted on taller towers, and are more dynamically active than their predecessors. Control systems to regulate turbine power and maintain stable closed-loop behavior in the presence of turbulent wind inflow will be critical for these designs. New advanced control approaches and paradigms must account for low-damped flexible modes in order to reduce structural dynamic loading and achieve the 20--25 year operational life required of today's machines. This thesis applies modern state-space control design methods to a two-bladed teetering hub upwind machine located at the National Wind Technology Center. The design objective is to regulate turbine speed and enhance damping in several low-damped flexible modes of the turbine. Starting with simple control algorithms based on linear models, complexity is added incrementally until the desired performance is firmly established. The controls approach is based on the Disturbance Accommodating Control (DAC) method and provides accountability for wind-speed fluctuations. First, controls are designed using the single control input rotor collective pitch to stabilize the 1st drive-train torsion as well as the tower 1st fore-aft bending modes. Generator torque is then incorporated as an additional control input. This reduces some of the demand placed on the rotor collective pitch control system and enhances 1st drive train torsion mode damping. Individual blade pitch control is then used to attenuate wind disturbances having spatial variation over the rotor and effectively reduces blade flap deflections due to wind shear. Finally, results from

  10. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) power-train system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, H. E.; Johnson, R. A.; Gibson, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Technical work on the design and component testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) advanced automotive gas turbine is described. Selected component ceramic component design, and procurement were tested. Compressor tests of a modified rotor showed high speed performance improvement over previous rotor designs; efficiency improved by 2.5%, corrected flow by 4.6%, and pressure ratio by 11.6% at 100% speed. The aerodynamic design is completed for both the gasifier and power turbines. Ceramic (silicon carbide) gasifier rotors were spin tested to failure. Improving strengths is indicated by burst speeds and the group of five rotors failed at speeds between 104% and 116% of engine rated speed. The emission results from combustor testing showed NOx levels to be nearly one order of magnitude lower than with previous designs. A one piece ceramic exhaust duct/regenerator seal platform is designed with acceptable low stress levels.

  11. Advanced hydropower turbine: AHTS-Advanced Hydropower Turbine System Program; Turbinas hidraulicas avancadas: Programa AHTS-Advanced Hydropower Turbine System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macorin, Adriano De Figueiredo; Tomisawa, Alessandra Terumi; Van Deursen, Gustavo Jose Ferreira; Bermann, Celio [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil)], email: brunosilva@usp.br

    2010-07-01

    Due to a privileged hydrography and energy policies that remounts to the beginning of the 20th century, Brazilian's electrical grid can be considered one of the cleanest in the world regarding the emission of atmospheric pollutants. Nevertheless, as in every human large enterprise, it is well known that hydroelectric power plants also lead to harmful environmental impacts. This article presents the AHTS Program (Advanced Hydropower Turbine System) started in 1994 in USA and developed to assess and conceive new hydro turbines to mitigate two of the main negative impacts of the installation and operation of this kind of power plant: (a) turbine-passed fish mortality and (b) the low dissolved oxygen - DO - levels downstream of the dams. The criteria used to concept the turbines are also justified in this article. As well as the modifications made in each case by the following companies: Alden Research Lab e o Northern Research and Engineering Corporation (ARL/NREC) and Voith Hydro (Voith). (author)

  12. Ceramics technology for advanced industrial gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the fabrication of high strength ceramic materials and in their application to automotive and aerospace gas turbine engines may lead also to significant improvements in the performance of industrial gas turbines. This paper presents a brief review of the improvements projected in a study initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy. The future costs of power generated by small gas turbines (up to 25 MW) are predicted, as well as the potential for fuel savings. Gas turbines in this size range are used extensively for gas compression and for cogeneration, as well as in a variety of more diverse applications. This paper includes results of analyses of the ways in which changes in gas turbine cost and performance are likely to affect market penetration. These results lead to predictions of future savings in U.S. fuel consumption in the industrial sector that would result. The paper also presents a brief overview of the scope of a suggested R and D program, with an appropriate schedule, which would provide a technical basis for achieving the projected results. Important parts of this program would cover ceramic design and fabrication technology, engine development and demonstration, and combustion technology

  13. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  14. Design of Wind Turbine Vibration Monitoring System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoubin Wang

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to ensure safety of wind turbine operation and to reduce the occurrence of faults as well as to improve the reliability of wind turbine operation, a vibration monitoring for wind turbine is developed. In this paper, it analyses the enlargement of all the parts of the structure and the working mechanism, the research method of wind turbine operation vibration is introduced, with the focus being the use of the sensor principle. Finally the hardware design and software of this system is introduced and the main function of this system is described, which realizes condition monitoring of the work state of wind turbines.

  15. LQG Controller Design for Pitch Regulated Variable Speed Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Imran, Raja Muhammed; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Chen, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    Variable speed wind turbine is a complex and nonlinear system, a sophisticated control is required to meet the challenges posed by these systems. This paper is presenting a pitch regulation strategy based on LQG (Linear Quadratic Gaussian) to regulate turbine at its rated power and to reject...... the effect of disturbance acting on its rotor blades by wind. CART2 (Control Advanced Research Turbine) linear model is produced/generated by FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures and Turbulence) code to test its simulation on MATLAB/Simulink and various results are compared. The designed controller...

  16. Design evolution of large wind turbine generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spera, D. A.

    1979-01-01

    During the past five years, the goals of economy and reliability have led to a significant evolution in the basic design--both external and internal--of large wind turbine systems. To show the scope and nature of recent changes in wind turbine designs, development of three types are described: (1) system configuration developments; (2) computer code developments; and (3) blade technology developments.

  17. Hydraulic design development of Xiluodu Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y. L.; Li, G. Y.; Shi, Q. H.; Wang, Z. N.

    2012-11-01

    Hydraulic optimization design with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) method, hydraulic optimization measures and model test results in the hydraulic development of Xiluodu hydropower station by DFEM (Dongfang Electric Machinery) of DEC (Dongfang Electric Corporation) of China were analyzed in this paper. The hydraulic development conditions of turbine, selection of design parameter, comparison of geometric parameters and optimization measure of turbine flow components were expatiated. And the measures of improving turbine hydraulic performance and the results of model turbine acceptance experiment were discussed in details.

  18. Engineered Materials for Advanced Gas Turbine Engine Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop innovative composite powders and composites that will surpass the properties of currently identified materials for advanced gas turbine...

  19. Design Mining Interacting Wind Turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preen, Richard J; Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    An initial study has recently been presented of surrogate-assisted evolutionary algorithms used to design vertical-axis wind turbines wherein candidate prototypes are evaluated under fan-generated wind conditions after being physically instantiated by a 3D printer. Unlike other approaches, such as computational fluid dynamics simulations, no mathematical formulations were used and no model assumptions were made. This paper extends that work by exploring alternative surrogate modelling and evolutionary techniques. The accuracy of various modelling algorithms used to estimate the fitness of evaluated individuals from the initial experiments is compared. The effect of temporally windowing surrogate model training samples is explored. A surrogate-assisted approach based on an enhanced local search is introduced; and alternative coevolution collaboration schemes are examined.

  20. Design Mining Interacting Wind Turbines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preen, Richard J; Bull, Larry

    2016-01-01

    An initial study has recently been presented of surrogate-assisted evolutionary algorithms used to design vertical-axis wind turbines wherein candidate prototypes are evaluated under fan-generated wind conditions after being physically instantiated by a 3D printer. Unlike other approaches, such as computational fluid dynamics simulations, no mathematical formulations were used and no model assumptions were made. This paper extends that work by exploring alternative surrogate modelling and evolutionary techniques. The accuracy of various modelling algorithms used to estimate the fitness of evaluated individuals from the initial experiments is compared. The effect of temporally windowing surrogate model training samples is explored. A surrogate-assisted approach based on an enhanced local search is introduced; and alternative coevolution collaboration schemes are examined. PMID:25635699

  1. Probabilistic Design of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard

    During the last decades, wind turbines have been continuously developed with the aim of maximizing the life cycle benefits (production of electricity) minus the costs of planning, materials, installation, operation & maintenance as well as possible failure. In order to continue this development...... turbines and the central topics considered are statistical load extrapolation of extreme loads during operation and reliability assessment of wind turbine blades. Wind turbines differ from most civil engineering structures by having a control system which highly influences the loading. In the literature......, methods for estimating the extreme load-effects on a wind turbine during operation, where the control system is active, have been proposed. But these methods and thereby the estimated loads are often subjected to a significant uncertainty which influences the reliability of the wind turbine...

  2. Wind turbine technology principles and design

    CERN Document Server

    Adaramola, Muyiwa

    2014-01-01

    IntroductionPart I: AerodynamicsWind Turbine Blade Design; Peter J. Schubel and Richard J. CrossleyA Shrouded Wind Turbine Generating High Output Power with Wind-Lens Technology; Yuji Ohya and Takashi KarasudaniEcomoulding of Composite Wind Turbine Blades Using Green Manufacturing RTM Process; Brahim AttafAerodynamic Shape Optimization of a Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine Using Differential Evolution; Travis J. Carrigan, Brian H. Dennis, Zhen X. Han, and Bo P. WangPart II: Generators and Gear Systems

  3. Gas-turbine critical research and advanced technology support project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Hodge, P. E.; Lowell, C. E.; Anderson, D. N.; Schultz, D. F.

    1981-01-01

    A technology data base for utility gas turbine systems capable of burning coal derived fuels was developed. The following areas are investigated: combustion; materials; and system studies. A two stage test rig is designed to study the conversion of fuel bound nitrogen to NOx. The feasibility of using heavy fuels in catalytic combustors is evaluated. A statistically designed series of hot corrosion burner rig tests was conducted to measure the corrosion rates of typical gas turbine alloys with several fuel contaminants. Fuel additives and several advanced thermal barrier coatings are tested. Thermal barrier coatings used in conjunction with low critical alloys and those used in a combined cycle system in which the stack temperature was maintained above the acid corrosion temperature are also studied.

  4. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s−1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s−1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ∼1 mm microscale Tesla turbines. (paper)

  5. Wind conditions for wind turbine design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maribo Pedersen, B.

    1999-04-01

    Delegates from Europe and USA attended the meeting and discussed general aspects of wind conditions for wind turbine design. The subjects and the presented papers covered a very broad range of aspects of wind conditions and related influence on the wind turbine. (EHS)

  6. Design and scaling of microscale Tesla turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vedavalli G.; Romanin, Vince; Carey, Van P.; Maharbiz, Michel M.

    2013-12-01

    We report on the scaling properties and loss mechanisms of Tesla turbines and provide design recommendations for scaling such turbines to the millimeter scale. Specifically, we provide design, fabrication and experimental data for a low-pressure head hydro Tesla micro-turbine. We derive the analytical turbine performance for incompressible flow and then develop a more detailed model that predicts experimental performance by including a variety of loss mechanisms. We report the correlation between them and the experimental results. Turbines with 1 cm rotors, 36% peak efficiency (at 2 cm3 s-1 flow) and 45 mW unloaded peak power (at 12 cm3 s-1 flow) are demonstrated. We analyze the causes for head loss and shaft power loss and derive constraints on turbine design. We then analyze the effect of scaling down on turbine efficiency, power density and rotor revolutions/min. Based on the analysis, we make recommendations for the design of ˜1 mm microscale Tesla turbines.

  7. Design study of an advanced gas generator. [which can be ignited during start-up period of turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S.; Trinh, H. P.

    1993-01-01

    A gas generator which can be ignited reliably during the initial start-up period and offers fairly uniform gas temperature at the exit was studied numerically. Various sizes and shapes of the mixing enhancement devices and their positions were examined to evaluate the uniformity of the exit gas temperature and the change of internal pressure drop incurred by introducing the mixing enhancement devices. By introducing a turbulence ring and a splash plate with an appropriate size and position, it was possible to obtain fairly uniform gas temperature distributions and a maximum gas temperature that is within the design limit temperature of 1600 R at the generator exit. However, with the geometry studied, the pressure drop across the generator was great, approximately 1150 psi, to satisfy the assigned design limit temperature. If the design limit temperature is increased to 1650 R, the pressure drop across the generator could be lowered by as much as 350 psi.

  8. Design and experimental evaluation of compact radial-inflow turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredmonski, A. J.; Huber, F. W.; Roelke, R. J.; Simonyi, S.

    1991-01-01

    The application of a multistage 3D Euler solver to the aerodynamic design of two compact radial-inflow turbines is presented, along with experimental results evaluating and validating the designs. The objectives of the program were to design, fabricate, and rig test compact radial-inflow turbines with equal or better efficiency relative to conventional designs, while having 40 percent less rotor length than current traditionally-sized radial turbines. The approach to achieving these objectives was to apply a calibrated 3D multistage Euler code to accurately predict and control the high rotor flow passage velocities and high aerodynamic loadings resulting from the reduction in rotor length. A comparison of the advanced compact designs to current state-of-the-art configurations is presented.

  9. Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine Program. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.; Ekstedt, E.E.; Gal, E.; Jackson, M.R.; Kimura, S.G.; Lavigne, R.G.; Lucas, C.; Rairden, J.R.; Sabla, P.E.; Savelli, J.F.; Slaughter, D.M.; Spiro, C.L.; Staub, F.W.

    1989-02-01

    The objective of the original Request for Proposal was to establish the technological bases necessary for the subsequent commercial development and deployment of advanced coal-fueled gas turbine power systems by the private sector. The offeror was to identify the specific application or applications, toward which his development efforts would be directed; define and substantiate the technical, economic, and environmental criteria for the selected application; and conduct such component design, development, integration, and tests as deemed necessary to fulfill this objective. Specifically, the offeror was to choose a system through which ingenious methods of grouping subcomponents into integrated systems accomplishes the following: (1) Preserve the inherent power density and performance advantages of gas turbine systems. (2) System must be capable of meeting or exceeding existing and expected environmental regulations for the proposed application. (3) System must offer a considerable improvement over coal-fueled systems which are commercial, have been demonstrated, or are being demonstrated. (4) System proposed must be an integrated gas turbine concept, i.e., all fuel conditioning, all expansion gas conditioning, or post-expansion gas cleaning, must be integrated into the gas turbine system.

  10. Design of ETO Propulsion Turbine Using CFD Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dejong, F. J.; Chan, Y. T.; Gibeling, H. J.

    1995-01-01

    As one of the activities of the NASA/MSFC Turbine Technology Team, the present effort focused on using CFD in the design and analysis of high performance rocket engine pumps. A three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code was used for various turbine flow field calculations, with emphasis on the tip clearance flow and the associated losses. Both a baseline geometry and an advanced-concept geometry (with a mini-shroud at the blade tip) were studied at several tip clearances. The calculations performed under the present effort demonstrate that a state-of-the-art CFD code can be applied successfully to turbine design and the development of advanced hardware concepts.

  11. Advanced combustion turbines and cycles: An EPRI perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Touchton, G.; Cohn, A. [Electric Power Research Institute, Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    EPRI conducts a broad program of research in combustion turbine technology on behalf of its funders which is directed toward improving their competitive positions through lower cost of generation and risk mitigation. The major areas of EPRI interest are: (1) Combustion Turbine Technology Development, Assessment, and Procurement Information and Products. (2) Risk mitigation of emerging combustion turbines through durability surveillance. (3) Existing Fleet Management and Improvement Technology. In the context of the DOE ATS Review, the present paper will address new advanced turbines and cycles and durability surveillance, of emerging combustion turbines. It will touch on existing fleet management and improvement technology as appropriate.

  12. The design of an air-cooled metallic high temperature radial turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Philip H.; Roelke, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent trends in small advanced gas turbine engines call for higher turbine inlet temperatures. Advances in radial turbine technology have opened the way for a cooled metallic radial turbine capable of withstanding turbine inlet temperatures of 2500 F while meeting the challenge of high efficiency in this small flow size range. In response to this need, a small air-cooled radial turbine has been designed utilizing internal blade coolant passages. The coolant flow passage design is uniquely tailored to simultaneously meet rotor cooling needs and rotor fabrication constraints. The rotor flow-path design seeks to realize improved aerodynamic blade loading characteristics and high efficiency while satisfying rotor life requirements. An up-scaled version of the final engine rotor is currently under fabrication and, after instrumentation, will be tested in the warm turbine test facility at the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  13. Flow and Combustion in Advanced Gas Turbine Combustors

    CERN Document Server

    Janicka, Johannes; Schäfer, Michael; Heeger, Christof

    2013-01-01

    With regard to both the environmental sustainability and operating efficiency demands, modern combustion research has to face two main objectives, the optimization of combustion efficiency and the reduction of pollutants. This book reports on the combustion research activities carried out within the Collaborative Research Center (SFB) 568 “Flow and Combustion in Future Gas Turbine Combustion Chambers” funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). This aimed at designing a completely integrated modeling and numerical simulation of the occurring very complex, coupled and interacting physico-chemical processes, such as turbulent heat and mass transport, single or multi-phase flows phenomena, chemical reactions/combustion and radiation, able to support the development of advanced gas turbine chamber concepts.

  14. Analysis and design of a vertical axis wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Goyena Iriso, Joseba

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this project is to design a new vertical axis wind turbine, specifically one Giromill wind turbine. The project development requires performing a previous study of the vertical axis wind turbines currently development. This study has to be performed before starting to design the wind turbine. Other very important aim is the development of a new vertical axis wind turbine. The after analyses that will result in the final design of the wind turbine will b...

  15. The development of advanced hydroelectric turbines to improve fish passage survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2001-09-01

    Recent efforts to improve the survival of hydroelectric turbine-passed juvenile fish have explored modifications to both operation and design of the turbines. Much of this research is being carried out by power producers in the Columbia River basin (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the public utility districts), while the development of low impact turbines is being pursued on a national scale by the U.S. Department of Energy. Fisheries managers are involved in all aspects of these efforts. Advanced versions of conventional Kaplan turbines are being installed and tested in the Columbia River basin, and a pilot scale version of a novel turbine concept is undergoing laboratory testing. Field studies in the last few years have shown that improvements in the design of conventional turbines have increased the survival of juvenile fish. There is still much to be learned about the causes and extent of injuries in the turbine system (including the draft tube and tailrace), as well as the significance of indirect mortality and the effects of turbine passage on adult fish. However, improvements in turbine design and operation, as well as new field, laboratory, and modeling techniques to assess turbine-passage survival, are contributing toward resolution of the downstream fish passage issue at hydroelectric power plants.

  16. Controller Design Automation for Aeroservoelastic Design Optimization of Wind Turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ashuri, T.; Van Bussel, G.J.W.; Zaayer, M.B.; Van Kuik, G.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to integrate the controller design of wind turbines with structure and aerodynamic analysis and use the final product in the design optimization process (DOP) of wind turbines. To do that, the controller design is automated and integrated with an aeroelastic simulation t

  17. SCC free design for nuclear steam turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the major material degradation experiences in the nuclear turbine industry was LP rotor disc stress corrosion cracking (SCC). Besides basic laboratory researches, field monitoring tests in actual steam condition in service have been continuously conducted for 30 years to confirm the long term operation effects on SCC. Based on test results, blade/rotor design and material selection guidelines to prevent SCC were established. Principles to prevent SCC in nuclear turbines are: 1) using clean rotor materials with less inclusions or impurities, 2) using lower yield strength materials, and 3) reducing stresses. These requirements are achieved by the full integral or welded rotor design with integral shroud LP end blade design. Nuclear steam turbines applying these technologies have been operating without any SCC problems for more than 20 years. This paper presents the outline of SCC free solutions and review the SCC problems of nuclear steam turbines at present. (authors)

  18. Advanced Turbine Blade Cooling Techniques Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Gas turbine engine technology is constantly challenged to operate at higher combustor outlet temperatures. In a modern gas turbine engine, these temperatures can...

  19. Tribological advancements for reliable wind turbine performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotzalas, Michael N; Doll, Gary L

    2010-10-28

    Wind turbines have had various limitations to their mechanical system reliability owing to tribological problems over the past few decades. While several studies show that turbines are becoming more reliable, it is still not at an overall acceptable level to the operators based on their current business models. Data show that the electrical components are the most problematic; however, the parts are small, thus easy and inexpensive to replace in the nacelle, on top of the tower. It is the tribological issues that receive the most attention as they have higher costs associated with repair or replacement. These include the blade pitch systems, nacelle yaw systems, main shaft bearings, gearboxes and generator bearings, which are the focus of this review paper. The major tribological issues in wind turbines and the technological developments to understand and solve them are discussed within. The study starts with an overview of fretting corrosion, rolling contact fatigue, and frictional torque of the blade pitch and nacelle yaw bearings, and references to some of the recent design approaches applied to solve them. Also included is a brief overview into lubricant contamination issues in the gearbox and electric current discharge or arcing damage of the generator bearings. The primary focus of this review is the detailed examination of main shaft spherical roller bearing micropitting and gearbox bearing scuffing, micropitting and the newer phenomenon of white-etch area flaking. The main shaft and gearbox are integrally related and are the most commonly referred to items involving expensive repair costs and downtime. As such, the latest research and developments related to the cause of the wear and damage modes and the technologies used or proposed to solve them are presented. PMID:20855322

  20. Cogeneration power plant concepts using advanced gas turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huettenhofer, K.; Lezuo, A. [Siemens Power Generation, Erlangen (Germany)

    2001-07-01

    Cogeneration of heat and power (CHP) is undeniably the environmentally most favourable way of making efficient use of energy in the power generation industry. Cogeneration is also particularly appreciated by political decision makers because of its high yield from primary energy sources, and thus its contribution to the protection of the environment and the conservation of resources. Advanced gas turbines, along with an intelligent power plant design consisting of pre-engineered, modular power plant items, will help cogeneration to play an important role in future energy markets also from an economic point of view. (orig.)

  1. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS(ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2001-06-01

    The following paper provides an overview of GE's H System{trademark} technology, and specifically, the design, development, and test activities associated with the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program. There was intensive effort expended in bringing this revolutionary advanced technology program to commercial reality. In addition to describing the magnitude of performance improvement possible through use of H System{trademark} technology, this paper discusses the technological milestones during the development of the first 9H (50Hz) and 7H (60 Hz) gas turbines. To illustrate the methodical product development strategy used by GE, this paper discusses several technologies that were essential to the introduction of the H System{trademark}. Also included are analyses of the series of comprehensive tests of materials, components and subsystems that necessarily preceded full scale field testing of the H System{trademark}. This paper validates one of the basic premises with which GE started the H System{trademark} development program: exhaustive and elaborate testing programs minimized risk at every step of this process, and increase the probability of success when the H System{trademark} is introduced into commercial service. In 1995, GE, the world leader in gas turbine technology for over half a century, in conjunction with the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory's ATS program, introduced its new generation of gas turbines. This H System{trademark} technology is the first gas turbine ever to achieve the milestone of 60% fuel efficiency. Because fuel represents the largest individual expense of running a power plant, an efficiency increase of even a single percentage point can substantially reduce operating costs over the life of a typical gas-fired, combined-cycle plant in the 400 to 500 megawatt range. The H System{trademark} is not simply a state-of-the-art gas turbine. It is an advanced, integrated, combined-cycle system in which every

  2. Part A - Advanced turbine systems. Part B - Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnitz, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    The DOE Offices of Fossil Energy and Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy have initiated a program to develop advanced turbine systems for power generation. The objective of the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial applications. One of the supporting elements of the ATS Program is the Materials/Manufacturing Technologies Task. The objective of this element is to address the critical materials and manufacturing issues for both industrial and utility gas turbines.

  3. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-05-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted horn DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include fill speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  4. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-09-15

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  5. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1998-10-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between Ge and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially be GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q97 through 3Q98.

  6. Advanced Materials for Mercury 50 Gas Turbine Combustion System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Price, Jeffrey

    2008-09-30

    Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar), under cooperative agreement number DE-FC26-0CH11049, has conducted development activities to improve the durability of the Mercury 50 combustion system to 30,000 hours life and reduced life cycle costs. This project is part of Advanced Materials in the Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines program in DOE's Office of Distributed Energy. The targeted development engine was the Mercury{trademark} 50 gas turbine, which was developed by Solar under the DOE Advanced Turbine Systems program (DOE contract number DE-FC21-95MC31173). As a generator set, the Mercury 50 is used for distributed power and combined heat and power generation and is designed to achieve 38.5% electrical efficiency, reduced cost of electricity, and single digit emissions. The original program goal was 20,000 hours life, however, this goal was increased to be consistent with Solar's standard 30,000 hour time before overhaul for production engines. Through changes to the combustor design to incorporate effusion cooling in the Generation 3 Mercury 50 engine, which resulted in a drop in the combustor wall temperature, the current standard thermal barrier coated liner was predicted to have 18,000 hours life. With the addition of the advanced materials technology being evaluated under this program, the combustor life is predicted to be over 30,000 hours. The ultimate goal of the program was to demonstrate a fully integrated Mercury 50 combustion system, modified with advanced materials technologies, at a host site for a minimum of 4,000 hours. Solar was the Prime Contractor on the program team, which includes participation of other gas turbine manufacturers, various advanced material and coating suppliers, nationally recognized test laboratories, and multiple industrial end-user field demonstration sites. The program focused on a dual path development route to define an optimum mix of technologies for the Mercury 50 and future gas turbine products. For liner and

  7. Cost/benefit studies of advanced materials technologies for future aircraft turbine engines: Materials for advanced turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stearns, M.; Wilbers, L.

    1982-01-01

    Cost benefit studies were conducted on six advanced materials and processes technologies applicable to commercial engines planned for production in the 1985 to 1990 time frame. These technologies consisted of thermal barrier coatings for combustor and high pressure turbine airfoils, directionally solidified eutectic high pressure turbine blades, (both cast and fabricated), and mixers, tail cones, and piping made of titanium-aluminum alloys. A fabricated titanium fan blisk, an advanced turbine disk alloy with improved low cycle fatigue life, and a long-life high pressure turbine blade abrasive tip and ceramic shroud system were also analyzed. Technologies showing considerable promise as to benefits, low development costs, and high probability of success were thermal barrier coating, directionally solidified eutectic turbine blades, and abrasive-tip blades/ceramic-shroud turbine systems.

  8. Design optimization method for Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawajiri, H.; Enomoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a design optimization system coupled CFD. Optimization algorithm of the system employs particle swarm optimization (PSO). Blade shape design is carried out in one kind of NURBS curve defined by a series of control points. The system was applied for designing the stationary vanes and the runner of higher specific speed francis turbine. As the first step, single objective optimization was performed on stay vane profile, and second step was multi-objective optimization for runner in wide operating range. As a result, it was confirmed that the design system is useful for developing of hydro turbine.

  9. Development and application of steam turbines with advanced HLP single-cylinder rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, A.; Tsuda, Y.; Suzuki, M. [Toshiba Corp. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Recently, the Gas Turbine capacity has been increased step by step to improve initial cost of the Gas turbine and plant efficiency as well as to improve cycle conditions that is, temperature, pressure and cycle. In accordance with this improvement, the steam turbine capacity has been increased gradually in combined-cycle plants. In this application, the steam turbine became larger and the steam turbine is generally equipped with multiple rotors. When the rotor forging with a good combination of creep rupture strength in the HP section and toughness in the LP section is available, the steam turbine can be designed as a single rotor, instead of multiple rotors, which makes the steam turbine to be compact and to be simple. The authors have already developed an HLP rotor forging (first generation), which has been applied to turbine rotors of units having capacities up to around 100 MW with a last stage blade (LSB) of a maximum 26 inch (660 mm) class. Recently, the advanced HLP rotor forging has been developed, which can be applied to longer LSBs of 42 inch (1070 mm) for 50 Hz machines, and 40 inch (1016 mm) for 60 Hz machines. As a result of the development, the steam turbines of 100 to 250 MW capacity in thermal power plants and advanced combined-cycle plants can be made more compact through this single-cylinder design. This paper describes development and application of the steam turbine with the advanced HLP rotor for advanced combined-cycle plants as well as for conventional thermal plants.

  10. Reliability design method for steam turbine blades

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jinyuan SHI

    2008-01-01

    Based on theories of probability and statistics, and taking static stresses, dynamic stresses, endurance strength, safety ratios, vibration frequencies and exciting force frequencies of blades as random variables, a reliabil-ity design method for steam turbine blades is presented. The purport and calculation method for blade reliability are expounded. The distribution parameters of random variables are determined after analysis and numerical cal-culation of test data. The fatigue strength and the vibra-tion design reliability of turbine blades are determined with the aid of a probabilistic design method and by inter-ference models for stress distribution and strength distri-bution. Some blade reliability design calculation formulas for a dynamic stress design method, a safety ratio design method for fatigue strength, and a vibration reliability design method for the first and second types of tuned blades and a packet of blades on a disk connected closely, are given together with some practical examples. With these methods, the design reliability of steam turbine blades can be guaranteed in the design stage. This research may provide some scientific basis for reliability design of steam turbine blades.

  11. Power control design for variable-speed wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Francesc Pozo; Mauricio Zapateiro; Ningsu Luo; Leonardo Acho; Yolanda Vidal

    2014-01-01

    This important book presents a selection of new research on wind turbine technology, including aerodynamics, generators and gear systems, towers and foundations, control systems, and environmental issues. This book introduces some of the basic principle of wind turbine design. The different chapters discuss ways to analyze wind turbine performance, approaches for wind turbine improvement, fault detection in wind turbines, and how to mediate the adverse effects of wind turbine use. The boo...

  12. Development of a hydraulic turbine design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassanos, Ioannis; Anagnostopoulos, John; Papantonis, Dimitris

    2013-10-01

    In this paper a hydraulic turbine parametric design method is presented which is based on the combination of traditional methods and parametric surface modeling techniques. The blade of the turbine runner is described using Bezier surfaces for the definition of the meridional plane as well as the blade angle distribution, and a thickness distribution applied normal to the mean blade surface. In this way, it is possible to define parametrically the whole runner using a relatively small number of design parameters, compared to conventional methods. The above definition is then combined with a commercial CFD software and a stochastic optimization algorithm towards the development of an automated design optimization procedure. The process is demonstrated with the design of a Francis turbine runner.

  13. New Urban Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandru-Mihai CISMILIANU

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops a different approach for enhancing the performance of Vertical Axis Wind Turbines for the use in the urban or rural environment and remote isolated residential areas. Recently the vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT have become more attractive due to the major advantages of this type of turbines in comparison to the horizontal axis wind turbines. We aim to enhance the overall performance of the VAWT by adding a second set of blades (3 x 2=6 blades following the rules of biplane airplanes. The model has been made to operate at a maximum power in the range of the TSR between 2 to 2.5. The performances of the VAWT were investigated numerically and experimentally and justify the new proposed design.

  14. Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

  15. Helium gas turbine conceptual design by genetic/gradient optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium gas turbine is the key component of the power conversion system for direct cycle High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGR), of which an optimal design is essential for high efficiency. Gas turbine design currently is a multidisciplinary process in which the relationships between constraints, objective functions and variables are very noisy. Due to the ever-increasing complexity of the process, it has becomes very hard for the engineering designer to foresee the consequences of changing certain parts. With classic design procedures which depend on adaptation to baseline design, this problem is usually averted by choosing a large number of design variables based on the engineer's judgment or experience in advance, then reaching a solution through iterative computation and modification. This, in fact, leads to a reduction of the degree of freedom of the design problem, and therefore to a suboptimal design. Furthermore, helium is very different in thermal properties from normal gases; it is uncertain whether the operation experiences of a normal gas turbine could be used in the conceptual design of a helium gas turbine. Therefore, it is difficult to produce an optimal design with the general method of adaptation to baseline. Since their appearance in the 1970s, Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been broadly used in many research fields due to their robustness. GAs have also been used recently in the design and optimization of turbo-machines. Researchers at the General Electronic Company (GE) developed an optimization software called Engineous, and used GAs in the basic design and optimization of turbines. The ITOP study group from Xi'an Transportation University also did some work on optimization of transonic turbine blades. However, since GAs do not have a rigorous theory base, many problems in utilities have arisen, such as premature convergence and uncertainty; the GA doesn't know how to locate the optimal design, and doesn't even know if the optimal solution

  16. Advanced turbine systems sensors and controls needs assessment study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, R.L.; Fry, D.N.; McEvers, J.A.

    1997-02-01

    The Instrumentation and Controls Division of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory performed an assessment of the sensors and controls needs for land-based advanced gas turbines being designed as a part of the Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program for both utility and industrial applications. The assessment included visits to five turbine manufacturers. During these visits, in-depth discussions were held with design and manufacturing staff to obtain their views regarding the need for new sensors and controls for their advanced turbine designs. The Unsteady Combustion Facilities at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center was visited to assess the need for new sensors for gas turbine combustion research. Finally, a workshop was conducted at the South Carolina Energy Research and Development Center which provided a forum for industry, laboratory, and university engineers to discuss and prioritize sensor and control needs. The assessment identified more than 50 different measurement, control, and monitoring needs for advanced turbines that cannot currently be met from commercial sources. While all the identified needs are important, some are absolutely critical to the success of the ATS Program.

  17. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer conflation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. The objective of this task is to design 7H and 9H compressor rotor and stator structures with the goal of achieving high efficiency at lower cost and greater durability by applying proven GE Power Systems (GEPS) heavy-duty use design practices. The designs will be based on the GE Aircraft Engines (GEAE) CF6-80C2 compressor. Transient and steady-state thermo-mechanical stress analyses will be run to ensure compliance with GEPS life standards. Drawings will be prepared for forgings, castings, machining, and instrumentation for full speed, no load (FSNL) tests of the first unit on both 9H and 7H applications.

  18. Design and optimization of tidal turbine airfoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grasso, F. [ECN Wind Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-03-15

    To increase the ratio of energy capture to the loading and, thereby, to reduce cost of energy, the use of specially tailored airfoils is needed. This work is focused on the design of an airfoil for marine application. Firstly, the requirements for this class of airfoils are illustrated and discussed with reference to the requirements for wind turbine airfoils. Then, the design approach is presented. This is a numerical optimization scheme in which a gradient-based algorithm is used, coupled with the RFOIL solver and a composite Bezier geometrical parameterization. A particularly sensitive point is the choice and implementation of constraints .A section of the present work is dedicated to address this point; particular importance is given to the cavitation phenomenon. Finally, a numerical example regarding the design of a high-efficiency hydrofoil is illustrated, and the results are compared with existing turbine airfoils, considering also the effect on turbine performance due to different airfoils.

  19. Dual-Spool Turbine Facility Design Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giel, Paul; Pachlhofer, Pete

    2003-01-01

    The next generation of aircraft engines, both commercial and military, will attempt to capitalize on the benefits of close-coupled, vaneless, counter-rotating turbine systems. Experience has shown that significant risks and challenges are present with close-coupled systems in terms of efficiency and durability. The UEET program needs to demonstrate aerodynamic loading and efficiency goals for close-coupled, reduced-stage HP/LP turbine systems as a Level 1 Milestone for FY05. No research facility exists in the U.S. to provide risk reduction for successful development of close-coupled, high and low pressure turbine systems for the next generations of engines. To meet these objectives, the design, construction, and integrated systems testing of a Dual-Spool Turbine Facility (DSTF) facility has been initiated at the NASA Glenn Research Center. The facility will be a warm (-IOOO'F), continuous flow facility for overall aerodynamic performance and detailed flow field measurement acquisition. The facility will have state-of-the-art instrumentation to capture flow physics details. Accurate and reliable speed control will be achieved by utilizing the existing Variable Frequency Drive System. Utilization of this and other existing GRC centralized utilities will reduce the overall construction costs. The design allows for future installation of a turbine inlet combustor profile simulator. This presentation details the objectives of the facility and the concepts used in specifying its capabilities. Some preliminary design results will be presented along with a discussion of plans and schedules.

  20. Baseline Design of a Hurricane-Resilient Wind Turbine (Poster)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Schreck, S.; Maples, B.; Anderson, M.; Finucane, Z.; Raina, A.

    2014-10-01

    Under U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored research FOA 415, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory led a team of research groups to produce a complete design of a large wind turbine system to be deployable in the western Gulf of Mexico region. As such, the turbine and its support structure would be subjected to hurricane-loading conditions. Among the goals of this research was the exploration of advanced and innovative configurations that would help decrease the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) of the design, and the expansion of the basic IEC design load cases (DLCs) to include hurricane environmental conditions. The wind turbine chosen was a three-bladed, downwind, direct-drive, 10-MW rated machine. The rotor blade was optimized based on an IEC load suite analysis. The drivetrain and nacelle components were scaled up from a smaller sized turbine using industry best practices. The tubular steel tower was sized using ultimate load values derived from the rotor optimization analysis. The substructure is an innovative battered and raked jacket structure. The innovative turbine has also been modeled within an aero-servo-hydro-elastic tool, and future papers will discuss results of the dynamic response analysis for select DLCs. Although multiple design iterations could not be performed because of limited resources in this study, and are left to future research, the obtained data will offer a good indication of the expected LCOE for large offshore wind turbines to be deployed in subtropical U.S. waters, and the impact design innovations can have on this value.

  1. Refinements and Tests of an Advanced Controller to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

    2010-12-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated 3-D turbulent wind inflow field, with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, while maximizing energy capture. Active damping should be added to these dynamic structures to maintain stability for operation in a complex environment. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), we have designed, implemented, and tested advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we present field test results of an advanced control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads in Region 3.

  2. Innovative multi rotor wind turbine designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kale, S.A.; Sapali, S.N. [College of Engineering. Mechanical Engineering Dept, Pune (India)

    2012-07-01

    Among the renewable energy sources, today wind energy is the most recognized and cost effective. Developers and researchers in this sector are optimistic and continuously working innovatively to improve the technology. The wind power obtained is proportional to the swept area of wind turbine. The swept area is increased by using a single rotor of large diameter or multi rotors in array. The rotor size is growing continuously with mature technology. Multi rotor technology has a long history and the multi rotor concept persists in a variety of modern innovative systems but the concept has fallen out of consideration in mainstream design from the perception that is complex and unnecessary as very large single rotor units are now technically feasible. This work addresses the evaluation of different multi rotor wind turbine systems. These innovative wind turbines are evaluated on the basis of feasibility, technological advantages, security of expected power performance, cost, reliability, impact of innovative system, comparison with existing wind turbine design. The findings of this work will provide guidelines for the practical and economical ways for further research on the multi rotor wind turbines. (Author)

  3. Integral rotor design for large nuclear low pressure turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering corrosion assisted incidents of shrunk-on discs in nuclear low pressure turbines experienced in foreign utilities and recent progress of large forging manufacturing capability, the integral rotor have been developed and will be applied to 870 MW nuclear turbines as the first application in the world. The present nuclear integral rotor eliminating shrunk-on disc construction for the area of upstream discs where stress corrosion crackings have been experienced and will be potentially estimated due to dry and wet steam condition is considered to be the most reliable and advanced design at present from the view points of design and manufacturing. Design features and forging material properties of present nuclear integral rotors including monoblock rotor development as a future design, are presented in this paper. (author)

  4. Large Wind Turbine Rotor Design using an Aero-Elastic / Free-Wake Panel Coupling Code

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sessarego, Matias; Ramos García, Néstor; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2016-01-01

    Despite the advances in computing resources in the recent years, the majority of large wind-turbine rotor design problems still rely on aero-elastic codes that use blade element momentum (BEM) approaches to model the rotor aerodynamics. The present work describes an approach to wind-turbine rotor...

  5. Noise Pollution Prevention in Wind Turbines: Status and Recent Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Naterer

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The global push towards sustainability has led to increased interest in alternative power sources other than coal and fossil fuels. One of these sustainable sources is to harness energy from the wind through wind turbines. However, a significant hindrance preventing the widespread use of wind turbines is the noise they produce. This study reviews recent advances in the area of noise pollution from wind turbines. To date, there have been many different noise control studies. While there are many different sources of noise, the main one is aerodynamic noise. The largest contributor to aerodynamic noise comes from the trailing edge of wind turbine blades. The aim of this paper is to critically analyse and compare the different methods currently being implemented and investigated to reduce noise production from wind turbines, with a focus on the noise generated from the trailing edge.

  6. Final turbine and test facility design report Alden/NREC fish friendly turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Thomas C. [Alden Research Lab., Holden, MA (United States); Cain, Stuart A. [Alden Research Lab., Holden, MA (United States); Fetfatsidis, Paul [Alden Research Lab., Holden, MA (United States); Hecker, George E. [Alden Research Lab., Holden, MA (United States); Stacy, Philip S. [Alden Research Lab., Holden, MA (United States)

    2000-09-01

    The final report provides an overview of the Alden/NREC Fish Friendly turbine design phase, turbine test plan, preliminary test results, costs, schedule, and a hypothetical application at a real world project.

  7. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-10-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of a highly efficient, environmentally superior, and cost-competitive utility ATS for base-load utility-scale power generation, the GE 7H (60 Hz) combined cycle power system, and related 9H (50 Hz) common technology. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown in Figure 1-1. Information specifically related to 9H production is presented for continuity in H program reporting, but lies outside the ATS program. This report summarizes work accomplished from 4Q98 through 3Q99. The most significant accomplishments are listed.

  8. Structural Reliability Aspects in Design of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    Reliability assessment, optimal design and optimal operation and maintenance of wind turbines are an area of significant interest for the fast growing wind turbine industry for sustainable production of energy. Offshore wind turbines in wind farms give special problems due to wake effects inside...... turbines are described. Further, aspects are presented related to reliability-based optimization of wind turbines, assessment of optimal reliability level and operation and maintenance....

  9. Fluid and structural measurements to advance gas turbine technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    In the present paper, the current status of fluid and structural measurements is reviewed, and some potential improvements in gas turbine machinery, directly associated with the new measuring capability are discussed. Some considerations concerning the impact of the new capability on the methods and approaches that will be used in the further development of advanced technology, in general, and to aeropropulsion gas turbine machinery, in particular, are presented.

  10. Advanced solidification processing of an industrial gas turbine engine component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemens, Mei Ling; Price, Allen; Bellows, Richard S.

    2003-03-01

    This paper will describe the efforts of the Advanced Turbine Airfoil Manufacturing Technology Program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy through the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Howmet Research Corporation. The purpose of the program is to develop single-crystal and directionally solidified casting technologies to benefit Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) industrial and utility gas turbine engines. The focus is on defining and implementing advanced Vacuum Induction Melting (VIM) furnace enhancements that provide precise control of mold temperatures during solidification. Emphasis was placed on increasing the total magnitude of thermal gradients while minimizing the difference in maximum and minimum gradients produced during the solidification process. Advanced VIM casting techniques were applied to Solar Turbines Incorporated’s Titan 130 First Stage High Pressure Turbine Blade under the ATS program. A comparison of the advanced VIM casting process to the conventional Bridgeman casting process will be presented as it pertains to the thermal gradients achieved during solidification, microstructure, elemental partitioning characterization, and solution heat treat response.

  11. BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Liscinsky

    2002-10-20

    A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated

  12. Advanced Turbine Systems annual program review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koop, W.E. [Air Force, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, OH (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Integrated High Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) is a joint Air Force, Navy, Army, NASA, ARPA, and industry program focused on developing turbine engine technologies, with the goal of doubling propulsion capability by around the turn-of-the-century, and thus providing smaller, lighter, more durable, more affordable turbine engines in the future. IHPTET`s technology development plan for increasing propulsion capability with respect to time is divided into three phases. This phased approach reduces the technological risk of taking one giant leap, and also reduces the {open_quotes}political{close_quotes} risk of not delivering a product for an extended period of time, in that the phasing allows continuous transfer of IHPTET technologies to our warfighters and continuous transfer to the commercial sector (dual-use). The IHPTET program addresses the three major classes of engines: turbofan/turbojet, turboshaft/turboprop, and expendables.

  13. Tolerance Stack Analysis in Francis Turbine Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indra Djodikusumo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The tolerance stacking problem arises in the context of assemblies from interchangeable parts because of the inability to produce or to join parts exactly according to nominal dimensions. Either the relevant part’s dimension varies around some nominal values from part to part or the act of assembly that leads to variation. For example, as runner of Francis turbine is joined with turbine shaft via mechanical lock, there is not only variation in the diameter of runner and the concentricity between the runner hole and turbine shaft, but also the variation in concentricity between the outer parts of runner to runner hole. Thus, there is the possibility that the assembly of such interacting parts won’t function or won’t come together as planned. Research in this area has been conducted and 2 mini hydro Francis turbines (800 kW and 910 kW have been designed and manufactured for San Sarino and Sawi Dago 2 in Central Sulawesi. Experiences in analyzing the tolerance stacks have been documented. In this paper it will be demonstrated how the requirements of assembling performance are derived to be the designed tolerances of each interacting component, such a way that the assembling would be functioning and come together as planned.

  14. Fuel cell and advanced turbine power cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, D.J. [Solar Turbines, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-19

    Solar Turbines, Incorporated (Solar) has a vested interest in the integration of gas turbines and high temperature fuel cells and in particular, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Solar has identified a parallel path approach to the technology developments needed for future products. The primary approach is to move away from the simple cycle industrial machines of the past and develop as a first step more efficient recuperated engines. This move was prompted by the recognition that the simple cycle machines were rapidly approaching their efficiency limits. Improving the efficiency of simple cycle machines is and will become increasingly more costly. Each efficiency increment will be progressively more costly than the previous step.

  15. Methods for probabilistic design of wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braam, H.; Dam, J.J.D. van [ECN (Netherlands); Christensen, C.J.; Thoegersen, M.L.; Larsen, G. [Risoe National Lab. (Denmark); Ronold, K.O. [Det Norske Veritas (Denmark)

    1998-12-01

    This report gives a brief introduction to the project `Probabilistic Design Tool for Wind Turbines` - PRODETO - which was carried out during the years 1996-98 with partial funding from the European Commission under the Non-Nuclear Energy Programme JOULE III. The report gives an overview of the objectives and motivation for the project, and the methodology used. In this context, an example of reliability-based wind turbine design against fatigue failure is outlined with emphasis on the various important steps herein, which include probabilistic load and resistance modelling, calculation of failure probability, and calibration of partial safety factors for use with a deterministic design code format. The results of the project are presented with emphasis on a developed computer program and its capabilities, and the various elements of an executed case study are outlined. A list of project reports concludes the report. (au)

  16. CFD Aided Design and Optimization of Francis Turbine Runners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayancik, Fatma; Demirel, Gizem; Celebioglu, Kutay; Acar, Erdem; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    Francis turbines are commonly used for hydroelectric power plants with their wide range of flow rate and head values. They are composed of five main components and they generate energy with the help of the runner connected to the generator. Therefore, runner is the most important part of a Francis turbine. All components of turbines are linked and they are designed to maximize the turbine efficiency. The dimensions of the runner vary depending on the design discharge, head and the speed of the rotor of the generators. In this study, a design methodology is developed to design turbine runners with the help of computational fluid dynamics and is applied to the runner design of three different hydroelectric power plant turbines. Multi objective design optimization is also performed and the response surfaces are investigated to obtain maximum turbine efficiency and cavitation free design. This study is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  17. Rotation Motion of Designed Nano-Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingyuan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Zhao, Lina; Gao, Xingfa; Zhao, Yuliang; Zhou, Ruhong

    2014-07-01

    Construction of nano-devices that can generate controllable unidirectional rotation is an important part of nanotechnology. Here, we design a nano-turbine composed of carbon nanotube and graphene nanoblades, which can be driven by fluid flow. Rotation motion of nano-turbine is quantitatively studied by molecular dynamics simulations on this model system. A robust linear relationship is achieved with this nano-turbine between its rotation rate and the fluid flow velocity spanning two orders of magnitude, and this linear relationship remains intact at various temperatures. More interestingly, a striking difference from its macroscopic counterpart is identified: the rotation rate is much smaller (by a factor of ~15) than that of the macroscopic turbine with the same driving flow. This discrepancy is shown to be related to the disruption of water flow at nanoscale, together with the water slippage at graphene surface and the so-called ``dragging effect''. Moreover, counterintuitively, the ratio of ``effective'' driving flow velocity increases as the flow velocity increases, suggesting that the linear dependence on the flow velocity can be more complicated in nature. These findings may serve as a foundation for the further development of rotary nano-devices and should also be helpful for a better understanding of the biological molecular motors.

  18. Materials/manufacturing element of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karnitz, M.A.; Holcomb, R.S.; Wright, I.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The technology based portion of the Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) contains several subelements which address generic technology issues for land-based gas-turbine systems. One subelement is the Materials/Manufacturing Technology Program which is coordinated by DOE-Oak Ridge Operations and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work in this subelement is being performed predominantly by industry with assistance from universities and the national laboratories. Projects in this subelement are aimed toward hastening the incorporation of new materials and components in gas turbines. A materials/manufacturing plan was developed in FY 1994 with input from gas turbine manufacturers, materials suppliers, universities, and government laboratories. The plan outlines seven major subelements which focus on materials issues and manufacturing processes. Work is currently under way in four of the seven major subelements. There are now major projects on coatings and process development, scale-up of single crystal airfoil manufacturing technology, materials characterization, and technology information exchange.

  19. Advanced Turbine Systems Program industrial system concept development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gates, S.

    1995-12-31

    Solar approached Phase II of ATS program with the goal of 50% thermal efficiency. An intercolled and recuperated gas turbine was identified as the ultimate system to meet this goal in a commercial gas turbine environment. With commercial input from detailed market studies and DOE`s ATS program, Solar redefined the company`s proposed ATS to fit both market and sponsor (DOE) requirements. Resulting optimized recuperated gas turbine will be developed in two sizes, 5 and 15 MWe. It will show a thermal efficiency of about 43%, a 23% improvement over current industrial gas turbines. Other ATS goals--emissions, RAMD (reliability, availability, maintainability, durability), cost of power--will be met or exceeded. During FY95, advanced development of key materials, combustion and component technologies proceeded to the point of acceptance for inclusion in ATS Phase III.

  20. Aerodynamic design of a free power turbine for a 75 KW gas turbine automotive engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofskey, M. G.; Katsanis, T.; Schumann, L. F.

    1975-01-01

    A single stage axial-flow turbine having a tip diameter of 15.41 centimeters was designed. The design specifications are given and the aerodynamic design procedure is described. The design includes the transition duct and the turbine exit diffuser. The aerodynamic information includes typical results of a parametric study, velocity diagrams, blade surface and wall velocities, and blade profile and wall coordinates.

  1. Grid integration impacts on wind turbine design and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar;

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an overall perspective on contemporary issues like wind power plants and grid integration. The purpose is to present and discuss the impacts of emerging new grid connection requirements on modern wind turbines. The grid integration issue has caused several new challenges to the...... wind turbine design and development. The survival of different wind turbine concepts and controls is strongly conditioned by their ability to comply with stringent grid connection requirements, imposed by utility companies. Beside its impact on the mechanical design and control of wind turbines, the...... grid integration aspect has also an effect on wind turbines' role in the power system, on wind turbine technologies' survival on the market, as well as on the wind turbines' loads. Over the last years, it became obviously, that there it is an increasing need for design and research of wind turbines...

  2. Optimal design of a tidal turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueny, J. L.; Lalande, T.; Herou, J. J.; Terme, L.

    2012-11-01

    An optimal design procedure has been applied to improve the design of an open-center tidal turbine. A specific software developed in C++ enables to generate the geometry adapted to the specific constraints imposed to this machine. Automatic scripts based on the AUTOGRID, IGG, FINE/TURBO and CFView software of the NUMECA CFD suite are used to evaluate all the candidate geometries. This package is coupled with the optimization software EASY, which is based on an evolutionary strategy completed by an artificial neural network. A new technique is proposed to guarantee the robustness of the mesh in the whole range of the design parameters. An important improvement of the initial geometry has been obtained. To limit the whole CPU time necessary for this optimization process, the geometry of the tidal turbine has been considered as axisymmetric, with a uniform upstream velocity. A more complete model (12 M nodes) has been built in order to analyze the effects related to the sea bed boundary layer, the proximity of the sea surface, the presence of an important triangular basement supporting the turbine and a possible incidence of the upstream velocity.

  3. Optimization and Reliability Problems in Structural Design of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2007-01-01

    reliability index equal to 3. An example with fatigue failure indicates that the reliability level is almost the same for single wind turbines and for wind turbines in wind farms if the wake effects are modeled equivalently in the design equation and the limit state equation.......Reliability-based cost-benefit optimization formulations for wind turbines are presented. Some of the improtant aspects for stochastic modeling of loads, strengths and models uncertainties for wind turbines are described. Single wind turbines and wind turbines in wind farms with wake effects...

  4. CFD Aided Design and Production of Hydraulic Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Alper; Cetinturk, Huseyin; Demirel, Gizem; Ayli, Ece; Celebioglu, Kutay; Aradag, Selin; ETU Hydro Research Center Team

    2014-11-01

    Hydraulic turbines are turbo machines which produce electricity from hydraulic energy. Francis type turbines are the most common one in use today. The design of these turbines requires high engineering effort since each turbine is tailor made due to different head and discharge. Therefore each component of the turbine is designed specifically. During the last decades, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) has become very useful tool to predict hydraulic machinery performance and save time and money for designers. This paper describes a design methodology to optimize a Francis turbine by integrating theoretical and experimental fundamentals of hydraulic machines and commercial CFD codes. Specific turbines are designed and manufactured with the help of a collaborative CFD/CAD/CAM methodology based on computational fluid dynamics and five-axis machining for hydraulic electric power plants. The details are presented in this study. This study is financially supported by Turkish Ministry of Development.

  5. Reliability-Based Design of Wind Turbine Components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2010-01-01

    Application of reliability-based design for wind turbines requires a definition of the probabilistic basis for the individual components of the wind turbine. In the present paper reliability-based design of structural wind turbine components is considered. A framework for the uncertainties which...... influence the reliability is presented. For wind turbines tests with the basic materials or structural components are often performed during the design process. By adopting a reliability based design approach information from these tests can be taken into account in the design process. However, in normal...... wind turbine design a deterministic design approach based on partial safety factors is normally used. In the present paper a numerical example demonstrates how information from tests with wind turbine blades can be used to establish a probabilistic basis for reliabilitybased design. It is also...

  6. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M.A.; Pettit, F.; Meier, G.; Yanar, N.; Chyu, M.; Mazzotta, D.; Slaughter, W.; Karaivanov, V.; Kang, B.; Feng, C.; Chen, R.; Fu, T-C.

    2008-10-01

    In order to meet the 2010-2020 DOE Fossil Energy goals for Advanced Power Systems, future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbines will need to be operated at higher temperatures for extended periods of time, in environments that contain substantially higher moisture concentrations in comparison to current commercial natural gas-fired turbines. Development of modified or advanced material systems, combined with aerothermal concepts are currently being addressed in order to achieve successful operation of these land-based engines. To support the advanced turbine technology development, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has initiated a research program effort in collaboration with the University of Pittsburgh (UPitt), and West Virginia University (WVU), working in conjunction with commercial material and coating suppliers as Howmet International and Coatings for Industry (CFI), and test facilities as Westinghouse Plasma Corporation (WPC) and Praxair, to develop advanced material and aerothermal technologies for use in future oxy-fuel and hydrogen-fired turbine applications. Our program efforts and recent results are presented.

  7. Design, Licensing and Construction of the Turbine Island

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivier Mandement, Business Development Director of Alstom Thermal Power, presented the different specificities of turbine and explained to the audience the different steps of the construction of the Turbine Island. He made a focus on the ARABELLE turbine design that is used for the Flamanville 3 EPR reactor

  8. PRELIMINARY DESIGN ANALYSIS OF AXIAL FLOW TURBINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    A computer program has been developed for the preliminary design analysis of axial-flow turbines. Rapid approximate generalized procedures requiring minimum input are used to provide turbine overall geometry and performance adequate for screening studies. The computations are based on mean-diameter flow properties and a stage-average velocity diagram. Gas properties are assumed constant throughout the turbine. For any given turbine, all stages, except the first, are specified to have the same shape velocity diagram. The first stage differs only in the value of inlet flow angle. The velocity diagram shape depends upon the stage work factor value and the specified type of velocity diagram. Velocity diagrams can be specified as symmetrical, zero exit swirl, or impulse; or by inputting stage swirl split. Exit turning vanes can be included in the design. The 1991 update includes a generalized velocity diagram, a more flexible meanline path, a reheat model, a radial component of velocity, and a computation of free-vortex hub and tip velocity diagrams. Also, a loss-coefficient calibration was performed to provide recommended values for airbreathing engine turbines. Input design requirements include power or pressure ratio, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative speed. The design variables include inlet and exit diameters, stator angle or exit radius ratio, and number of stages. Gas properties are input as gas constant, specific heat ratio, and viscosity. The program output includes inlet and exit annulus dimensions, exit temperature and pressure, total and static efficiencies, flow angles, blading angles, and last stage absolute and relative Mach numbers. This program is written in FORTRAN 77 and can be ported to any computer with a standard FORTRAN compiler which supports NAMELIST. It was originally developed on an IBM 7000 series computer running VM and has been implemented on IBM PC computers and compatibles running MS-DOS under Lahey FORTRAN, and

  9. Operation Design of Wind Turbines in Strong Wind Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Wen Zhong; Montes, Melissa Barroso; Odgaard, Peter Fogh;

    2012-01-01

    optimally. In order to reduce the possible increased loading, fatigue due to the wind gusts, control strategies have been considered for both constant sped and variable speed pitch regulated wind turbines. The control study shows that the designed controllers can reduce the standard deviations efficiently......In order to reduce the impact on the electrical grid from the shutdown of MW wind turbines at wind speeds higher than the cut-out wind speed of 25 m/s, we propose in this paper to run the turbines at high wind speeds up to 40 m/s. Two different operation designs are made for both constant speed...... and variable speed pitch regulated wind turbines. The variable speed design is more suitable for wind turbines to run at very high wind speeds which can help the turbine braking system to stop the turbine at the new "cut-out" wind speed. Reference power, rotational speed and pitch angle have been designed...

  10. Concurrent Aeroservoelastic Design and Optimization of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tibaldi, Carlo

    This work develops and investigates methods to integrate controllers in the wind turbine design process and to perform wind turbine optimization. These techniques can exploit the synergy between wind turbine components and generate new design solutions. Two frameworks to perform wind turbine...... optimization design are presented. These tools handle workflows to model a wind turbine and to evaluate loads and performances under specific conditions. Three approaches to evaluate loads are proposed and integrated in the optimization codes. The first method is based on time domain simulations, the second...... simulations, allows the selection of any controller parameter. The methods to evaluate loads and the pole-placement technique are then employed to carry out wind turbine optimization design from an aeroservoelastic prospective. Several analysis of the NREL 5 MW Reference Wind Turbine and the DTU 10 MW...

  11. AERODYNAMIC OPTIMIZATION DESIGN OF LOW ASPECT RATIO TRANSONIC TURBINE STAGE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Liming; LI Jun; FENG Zhenping

    2006-01-01

    The advanced optimization method named as adaptive range differential evolution (ARDE)is developed. The optimization performance of ARDE is demonstrated using a typical mathematical test and compared with the standard genetic algorithm and differential evolution. Combined with parallel ARDE, surface modeling method and Navier-Stokes solution, a new automatic aerodynamic optimization method is presented. A low aspect ratio transonic turbine stage is optimized for the maximization of the isentropic efficiency with forty-one design variables in total. The coarse-grained parallel strategy is applied to accelerate the design process using 15 CPUs. The isentropic efficiency of the optimum design is 1.6% higher than that of the reference design. The aerodynamic performance of the optimal design is much better than that of the reference design.

  12. RESEARCH AND DESIGN OF THE STRAFLO-FRANCIS TURBINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    A new type of hydraulic turbine and its design theory is presentedThis turbine has the advantages of the most widely used Francis turbine and Straflo tubine,has its own specific theoretical basis,compact structure,small volume,low cost and steady operationAnd it is convenient to be transported,installed and maintained,and has good hydraulic and cavitation performanceIt is named StrafloFrancis turbine

  13. Advanced turbine systems program. Final report, August 3, 1993--August 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    Six tasks were approved under the Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) extension program. The six tasks include the following: Task 5.0 -- Market Study. The objective of the market study task is to focus on distributed generation prospects for an industrial ATS, using the Allison ATS family as the primary gas turbine systems. Task 6.0 -- Gas Fired Advanced Turbine System (GFATS) Definition and Analysis. Task 8.01 -- Castcool{reg_sign} Blades Fabrication Process Development. Task 8.04 -- ATS Low Emission Combustion System. Task 8.07 -- Ceramic Vane Design and Evaluation. Task 9.0 -- Program Management. Each of these tasks is described, progress is discussed, and results are given.

  14. Materials and Component Development for Advanced Turbine Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvin, M A; Pettit, F; Meier, G H; Yanar, M; Helminiak, M; Chyu, M; Siw, S; Slaughter, W S; Karaivanov, V; Kang, B S; Feng, C; Tannebaum, J M; Chen, R; Zhang, B; Fu, T; Richards, G A; Sidwell, T G; Straub, D; Casleton, K H; Dogan, O M

    2008-07-01

    Hydrogen-fired and oxy-fueled land-based gas turbines currently target inlet operating temperatures of ~1425-1760°C (~2600-3200°F). In view of natural gas or syngas-fired engines, advancements in both materials, as well as aerothermal cooling configurations are anticipated prior to commercial operation. This paper reviews recent technical accomplishments resulting from NETL’s collaborative research efforts with the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University for future land-based gas turbine applications.

  15. Advanced coal-fueled gas turbine systems: Subscale combustion testing. Topical report, Task 3.1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-01

    This is the final report on the Subscale Combustor Testing performed at Textron Defense Systems` (TDS) Haverhill Combustion Laboratories for the Advanced Coal-Fueled Gas Turbine System Program of the Westinghouse Electric Corp. This program was initiated by the Department of Energy in 1986 as an R&D effort to establish the technology base for the commercial application of direct coal-fired gas turbines. The combustion system under consideration incorporates a modular staged, rich-lean-quench, Toroidal Vortex Slogging Combustor (TVC) concept. Fuel-rich conditions in the first stage inhibit NO{sub x} formation from fuel-bound nitrogen; molten coal ash and sulfated sorbent are removed, tapped and quenched from the combustion gases by inertial separation in the second stage. Final oxidation of the fuel-rich gases, and dilution to achieve the desired turbine inlet conditions are accomplished in the third stage, which is maintained sufficiently lean so that here, too, NO{sub x} formation is inhibited. The primary objective of this work was to verify the feasibility of a direct coal-fueled combustion system for combustion turbine applications. This has been accomplished by the design, fabrication, testing and operation of a subscale development-type coal-fired combustor. Because this was a complete departure from present-day turbine combustors and fuels, it was considered necessary to make a thorough evaluation of this design, and its operation in subscale, before applying it in commercial combustion turbine power systems.

  16. Design and Fabrication of cm-scale Tesla Turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Krishnan, Vedavalli Gomatam

    2015-01-01

    This dissertation discusses the design and scaling characteristics of Tesla – or so-called “friction” – turbines, and offers design solutions for achieving optimum performance given the input specifications. The research covers turbines ranging from sub-watt power scavenging designs to watt-range mobile applications to kilowatt-range renewable energy applications. The characteristics of the turbine are demonstrated using micro fabrication, theoretical analysis, and ANSYS, COMSOL, and MATLAB...

  17. Wind Turbine Control Design to Reduce Capital Costs: 7 January 2009 - 31 August 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darrow, P. J.

    2010-01-01

    This report first discusses and identifies which wind turbine components can benefit from advanced control algorithms and also presents results from a preliminary loads case analysis using a baseline controller. Next, it describes the design, implementation, and simulation-based testing of an advanced controller to reduce loads on those components. The case-by-case loads analysis and advanced controller design will help guide future control research.

  18. Integrated analysis of wind turbines - The impact of power systems on wind turbine design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barahona Garzón, Braulio

    Megawatt-size wind turbines nowadays operate in very complex environmental conditions, and increasingly demanding power system requirements. Pursuing a cost-effective and reliable wind turbine design is a multidisciplinary task. However nowadays, wind turbine design and research areas...... system frequency control studies of variable-speed wind turbines with the integrated simulation environment, show that is possible to make a sensible estimation of the contribution of a wind farm to power system frequency control, while studying the impact on wind turbine structural loads. Finally......, studies of the impact that voltage faults have on wind turbine loads are presented. The case of unbalanced faults is addressed, the possibilities and drawbacks for reduction of structural loads using electrical control actions is investigated. Load reduction using resonant damping control is proven...

  19. Advanced turbine systems study system scoping and feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    United Technologies Research Center, Pratt Whitney Commercial Engine Business, And Pratt Whitney Government Engine and Space Propulsion has performed a preliminary analysis of an Advanced Turbine System (ATS) under Contract DE-AC21-92MC29247 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The natural gas-fired reference system identified by the UTC team is the Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle in which the gas turbine exhaust heat and heat rejected from the intercooler is used in a saturator to humidify the high pressure compressor discharge air. This results in a significant increase in flow through the turbine at no increase in compressor power. Using technology based on the PW FT4000, the industrial engine derivative of the PW4000, currently under development by PW, the system would have an output of approximately 209 MW and an efficiency of 55.3%. Through use of advanced cooling and materials technologies similar to those currently in the newest generation military aircraft engines, a growth version of this engine could attain approximately 295 MW output at an efficiency of 61.5%. There is the potential for even higher performance in the future as technology from aerospace R D programs is adapted to aero-derivative industrial engines.

  20. Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollenbacher, R.; Kesser, K.; Beishon, D.

    1994-12-01

    The Collaborative Advanced Gas Turbine (CAGT) Program is an advanced gas turbine research and development program whose goal is to accelerate the commercial availability, to within the turn of the century, of high efficiency aeroderivative gas turbines for electric power generating applications. In the first project phase, research was conducted to prove or disprove the research hypothesis that advanced aeroderivative gas turbine systems can provide a promising technology alternative, offering high efficiency and good environmental performance characteristics in modular sizes, for utility applications. This $5 million, Phase 1 research effort reflects the collaborative efforts of a broad and international coalition of industries and organizations, both public and private, that have pooled their resources to assist in this research. Included in this coalition are: electric and gas utilities, the Electric Power Research Institute, the Gas Research Institute and the principal aircraft engine manufacturers. Additionally, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Energy Commission have interacted with the CAGT on both technical and executive levels as observers and sources of funding. The three aircraft engine manufacturer-led research teams participating in this research include: Rolls-Royce, Inc., and Bechtel; the Turbo Power and Marine Division of United Technologies and Fluor Daniel; and General Electric Power Generation, Stewart and Stevenson, and Bechtel. Each team has investigated advanced electric power generating systems based on their high-thrust (60,000 to 100,000 pounds) aircraft engines. The ultimate goal of the CAGT program is that the community of stakeholders in the growing market for natural-gas-fueled, electric power generation can collectively provide the right combination of market-pull and technology-push to substantially accelerate the commercialization of advanced, high efficiency aeroderivative technologies.

  1. Rotor Design for Diffuser Augmented Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Hjort

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Diffuser augmented wind turbines (DAWTs can increase mass flow through the rotor substantially, but have often failed to fulfill expectations. We address high-performance diffusers, and investigate the design requirements for a DAWT rotor to efficiently convert the available energy to shaft energy. Several factors can induce wake stall scenarios causing significant energy loss. The causality between these stall mechanisms and earlier DAWT failures is discussed. First, a swirled actuator disk CFD code is validated through comparison with results from a far wake swirl corrected blade-element momentum (BEM model, and horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT reference results. Then, power efficiency versus thrust is computed with the swirled actuator disk (AD code for low and high values of tip-speed ratios (TSR, for different centerbodies, and for different spanwise rotor thrust loading distributions. Three different configurations are studied: The bare propeller HAWT, the classical DAWT, and the high-performance multi-element DAWT. In total nearly 400 high-resolution AD runs are generated. These results are presented and discussed. It is concluded that dedicated DAWT rotors can successfully convert the available energy to shaft energy, provided the identified design requirements for swirl and axial loading distributions are satisfied.

  2. Site-specific design optimization of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Schepers, J.G.;

    2002-01-01

    This article reports results from a European project, where site characteristics were incorporated into the design process of wind turbines, to enable site-specific design. Two wind turbines of different concept were investigated at six different sites comprising normal flat terrain, offshore...... of a new wind turbine. Both annual energy yield and design-determining loads depended on site characteristics, and this represented a potential for site-specific design. The maximum variation in annual energy yield was 37% and the maximum variation in blade root fatigue loads was 62%. Optimized site...... advantage of high-wind-speed sites. It was not possible to design a single wind turbine for all wind climates investigated, since the differences in the design loads were too large. Multiple-site wind turbines should be designed for generic wind conditions, which cover wind parameters encountered at flat...

  3. Advanced Control of Photovoltaic and Wind Turbines Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    and wind renewables. Thus, in this chapter, advanced control strategies, which can enable the power conversion efficiently and reliably, for both photovoltaic (PV) and wind turbines power systems are addressed in order to enhance the integration of those technologies. Related grid demands have been...... presented firstly, where much more attention has been paid on specific requirements, like Low Voltage Ride-Through (LVRT) and reactive power injection capability. To perform the functions of those systems, advanced control strategies are presented with much more emphasis on the LVRT operation with reactive...... power injection for both single-phase and three-phase systems. Other control strategies like constant power generation control for PV systems to further increase the penetration level, and the improvements of LVRT performance for a doubly fed induction generator based wind turbine system by means...

  4. Advanced Turbine System Program: Phase 2 cycle selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Latcovich, J.A. Jr. [ABB Power Generation, Inc., Midlothian, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objectives of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 2 Program were to define a commercially attractive ATS cycle and to develop the necessary technologies required to meet the ATS Program goals with this cycle. This program is part of an eight-year Department of Energy, Fossil Energy sponsored ATS Program to make a significant improvement in natural gas-fired power generation plant efficiency while providing an environmentally superior and cost-effective system.

  5. Design Tools to Assess Hydro-Turbine Biological Performance: Priest Rapids Dam Turbine Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Strickler, Brad; Weisbeck, Molly; Dotson, Curtis L.

    2013-06-25

    Over the past two decades, there have been many studies describing injury mechanisms associated with turbine passage, the response of various fish species to these mechanisms, and the probability of survival through dams. Although developing tools to design turbines that improve passage survival has been difficult and slow, a more robust quantification of the turbine environment has emerged through integrating physical model data, fish survival data, and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies. Grant County Public Utility District (GCPUD) operates the Priest Rapids Dam (PRD), a hydroelectric facility on the Columbia River in Washington State. The dam contains 10 Kaplan-type turbine units that are now almost 50 years old. The Utility District plans to refit all of these aging turbines with new turbines. The Columbia River at PRD is a migratory pathway for several species of juvenile and adult salmonids, so passage of fish through the dam is a major consideration when replacing the turbines. In this presentation, a method for turbine biological performance assessment (BioPA) is introduced. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a CFD model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. Using known relationships between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose–response) from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from proposed designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising alternatives. We will present application of the BioPA method for baseline risk assessment calculations for the existing Kaplan turbines at PRD that will be used as the minimum biological performance that a proposed new design must achieve.

  6. Optimization design of blade shapes for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Wen Zhong;

    2010-01-01

    For the optimization design of wind turbines, the new normal and tangential induced factors of wind turbines are given considering the tip loss of the normal and tangential forces based on the blade element momentum theory and traditional aerodynamic model. The cost model of the wind turbines...... and the optimization design model are developed. In the optimization model, the objective is the minimum cost of energy and the design variables are the chord length, twist angle and the relative thickness. Finally, the optimization is carried out for a 2 MW blade by using this optimization design model....... The performance of blades is validated through the comparison and analysis of the results. The reduced cost shows that the optimization model is good enough for the design of wind turbines. The results give a proof for the design and research on the blades of large scale wind turbines and also establish...

  7. Anisotropic beam model for analysis and design of passive controlled wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Branner, Kim; Blasques, José Pedro Albergaria Amaral; Kim, Taeseong;

    The main objective of the project was, through theoretical and experimental research, to develop and validate a fully coupled, general beam element that can be used for advanced and rapid analysis of wind turbine blades. This is fully achieved in the project and the beam element has even been...... modal analysis tests have been performed. The results from the project now make it possible to use structural couplings in an intelligent manner for the design of future wind turbine blades. The developed beam element is especially developed for wind turbine blades and can be used for modeling blades...

  8. Off-Design Performance of Radial-Inflow Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meitner, P. L.; Glassman, A. J.

    1986-01-01

    Computer code determines rotor exit flow from hub to tip. RTOD (Radial Turbine Off-Design), computes off-design performance of radial turbine by modeling flow with stator viscous and trailing-edge losses, and with vaneless space loss between stator and rotor, and with rotor incidence, viscous, clearance, trailing-edge, and disk friction losses.

  9. Functionally gradient materials for thermal barrier coatings in advanced gas turbine systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banovic, S.W.; Barmak, K.; Chan, H.M. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    New designs for advanced gas turbine engines for power production are required to have higher operating temperatures in order to increase efficiency. However, elevated temperatures will increase the magnitude and severity of environmental degradation of critical turbine components (e.g. combustor parts, turbine blades, etc{hor_ellipsis}). To offset this problem, the usage of thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) has become popular by allowing an increase in maximum inlet temperatures for an operating engine. Although thermal barrier technology is over thirty years old, the principle failure mechanism is the spallation of the ceramic coating at or near the ceramic/bond coat interface. Therefore, it is desirable to develop a coating that combines the thermal barrier qualities of the ceramic layer and the corrosion protection by the metallic bond coat without the detrimental effects associated with the localization of the ceramic/metal interface to a single plane.

  10. Advanced coal-fueled industrial cogeneration gas turbine system. Annual report, June 1990--June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCren, R.T.; Cowell, L.H.; Galica, M.A.; Stephenson, M.D.; Wen, C.S.

    1991-07-01

    Advances in coal-fueled gas turbine technology over the past few years, together with recent DOE-METC sponsored studies, have served to provide new optimism that the problems demonstrated in the past can be economically resolved and that the coal-fueled gas turbine can ultimately be the preferred system in appropriate market application sectors. The objective of the Solar/METC program is to prove the technical, economic, and environmental feasibility of a coal-fired gas turbine for cogeneration applications through tests of a Centaur Type H engine system operated on coal fuel throughout the engine design operating range. The five-year program consists of three phases, namely: (1) system description; (2) component development; (3) prototype system verification. A successful conclusion to the program will initiate a continuation of the commercialization plan through extended field demonstration runs.

  11. Design optimization of a portable, micro-hydrokinetic turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, W. Chris

    Marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technology is a growing field that encompasses many different types of turbomachinery that operate on the kinetic energy of water. Micro hydrokinetics are a subset of MHK technology comprised of units designed to produce less than 100 kW of power. A propeller-type hydrokinetic turbine is investigated as a solution for a portable micro-hydrokinetic turbine with the needs of the United States Marine Corps in mind, as well as future commercial applications. This dissertation investigates using a response surface optimization methodology to create optimal turbine blade designs under many operating conditions. The field of hydrokinetics is introduced. The finite volume method is used to solve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with the k ω Shear Stress Transport model, for different propeller-type hydrokinetic turbines. The adaptive response surface optimization methodology is introduced as related to hydrokinetic turbines, and is benchmarked with complex algebraic functions. The optimization method is further studied to characterize the size of the experimental design on its ability to find optimum conditions. It was found that a large deviation between experimental design points was preferential. Different propeller hydrokinetic turbines were designed and compared with other forms of turbomachinery. It was found that the rapid simulations usually under predict performance compare to the refined simulations, and for some other designs it drastically over predicted performance. The optimization method was used to optimize a modular pump-turbine, verifying that the optimization work for other hydro turbine designs.

  12. Off-Design Performance Prediction of Gas Turbines without the use of Compressor or Turbine Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suraweera, Janitha Kanishka

    A new method of predicting gas turbine off-design performance is presented. This method, referred to as the core control method, is based on the idea that performance across a gas turbine depends on a single parameter that controls the energy input to the said gas turbine. It is shown that only the design-point performance of a gas turbine is needed to predict its off-design performance, and that neither compressor nor turbine characteristics are required. A thermodynamic model is developed for predicting the off-design performance of a single-spool turbojet and a two-spool gas generator with a free power turbine. This model is further developed to simulate the effects of handling bleed schedules, performance limiters and performance deterioration. The core control method is then used to predict the off-design performance of a Rolls-Royce Viper Mark 521 as a proof-of-concept, after which, the new and deteriorated off-design performance of three Rolls-Royce RB211-24GT gas turbines is predicted. In addition to the discussions on the involved theories and the performance predictions, the process by which the deteriorated RB211-24GT performance data was analyzed, and the sources and propagation of measurement uncertainties are also discussed.

  13. Mechanical Augmentation Channel Design for Turbine Current Generators

    OpenAIRE

    E. García; R. Pizá; Benavides, X.; Quiles, E.; A. Correcher; Morant, F.

    2014-01-01

    We present the design and analysis of augmentation channels to increase the efficiency of shrouded marine current turbines in conditions of low intensity flows. These turbines are part of a prototype of a floating device composed of wind and marine current generators for generating renewable energy. It intends to exploit renewable energy resources in an integrated manner using wind and current turbines in offshore plants optimizing the economic investment.

  14. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  15. Proceedings of the Advanced Turbine Systems annual program review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Goals of the 8-year program are to develop cleaner, more efficient, and less expensive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial electric power generation, cogeneration, and mechanical drive units. During this Nov. 9-11, 1994, meeting, presentations on energy policy issues were delivered by representatives of regulatory, industry, and research institutions; program overviews and technical reviews were given by contractors; and ongoing and proposed future projects sponsored by university and industry were presented and displayed at the poster session. Panel discussions on distributed power and Advanced Gas Systems Research education provided a forum for interactive dialog and exchange of ideas. Exhibitors included US DOE, Solar Turbines, Westinghouse, Allison Engine Co., and GE.

  16. Design and test of a small two stage counter-rotating turbine for rocket engine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, F. W.; Branstrom, B. R.; Finke, A. K.; Johnson, P. D.; Rowey, R. J.; Veres, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    The aerodynamic design and rig test evaluation of a small counter-rotating turbine system is described. The technology represented by this turbine is being developed for application in an advanced upper stage rocket engine turbopump. This engine will employ an oxygen/hydrogen expander cycle and achieve high performance through efficient combustion, high combustion pressure, and high area ratio exhaust nozzle expansion. Engine performance goals require that the turbopump drive turbines achieve high efficiency at low gas flow rates. The low flow rates result in very small airfoil diameter, height and chord. The high efficiency and small size requirements present a challenging turbine design problem. The unconventional approach employed to meet this challenge is described, along with the detailed design process and resulting airfoil configurations. The method and results of full scale aerodynamic performance evaluation testing of both one and two stage configurations, as well as operation without the secondary stage stator are presented. The overall results of this effort illustrate that advanced aerodynamic design tools and hardware fabrication techniques have provided improved capability to produce small high performance turbines for advanced rocket engines.

  17. Design optimization of a cost-effective micro wind turbine

    OpenAIRE

    D.Y.C. Leung; Deng, Y.; M.K.H. Leung

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the performance of a specially designed micro wind turbine for urban environment where the wind speed is usually low. Differing from the traditional wind turbine that can be connected directly to the grid, the micro wind turbine is linked to a small generator and mainly used for local applications. The advantage of the micro wind turbine is that, apart from its low cost, it can be propelled by a wind speed as low as 2 m/s. In this paper, the performance...

  18. Overview of Modelling and Advanced Control Strategies for Wind Turbine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Simani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this paper comes from a real need to have an overview of the challenges of modelling and control for very demanding systems, such as wind turbine systems, which require reliability, availability, maintainability, and safety over power conversion efficiency. These issues have begun to stimulate research and development in the wide control community particularly for these installations that need a high degree of “sustainability”. Note that this represents a key point for offshore wind turbines, since they are characterised by expensive and/or safety critical maintenance work. In this case, a clear conflict exists between ensuring a high degree of availability and reducing maintenance times, which affect the final energy cost. On the other hand, wind turbines have highly nonlinear dynamics, with a stochastic and uncontrollable driving force as input in the form of wind speed, thus representing an interesting challenge also from the modelling point of view. Suitable control methods can provide a sustainable optimisation of the energy conversion efficiency over wider than normally expected working conditions. Moreover, a proper mathematical description of the wind turbine system should be able to capture the complete behaviour of the process under monitoring, thus providing an important impact on the control design itself. In this way, the control scheme could guarantee prescribed performance, whilst also giving a degree of “tolerance” to possible deviation of characteristic properties or system parameters from standard conditions, if properly included in the wind turbine model itself. The most important developments in advanced controllers for wind turbines are also briefly referenced, and open problems in the areas of modelling of wind turbines are finally outlined.

  19. Design of airborne wind turbine and computational fluid dynamics analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbreen, Faiqa

    Wind energy is a promising alternative to the depleting non-renewable sources. The height of the wind turbines becomes a constraint to their efficiency. Airborne wind turbine can reach much higher altitudes and produce higher power due to high wind velocity and energy density. The focus of this thesis is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat with a capacity of 8-10 passengers. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of higher velocities in the atmosphere. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software StarCCM+. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) with K-epsilon turbulence model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine and the increase in air velocity at the throat. The analysis has been done using two ambient velocities of 12 m/s and 6 m/s. At 12 m/s inlet velocity, the velocity of air at the turbine has been recorded as 16 m/s. The power generated by the turbine is 61 kW. At inlet velocity of 6 m/s, the velocity of air at turbine increased to 10 m/s. The power generated by turbine is 25 kW.

  20. A NOVEL DESIGN OF COMPOSITE WATER TURBINE USING CFD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Ji-feng; PIECHNA Janusz; M(U)LLER Norbert

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents computational investigation of a novel design of composite material axial water turbine using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD).Based on three-dimensional numerical flow analysis,the flow characteristics through the water turbine with nozzle,wheel and diffuser are predicted.The extract power and torque of a composite water turbine at different rotating speeds were calculated and analyzed for a specific flow speed.The simulation results show that using nozzle and diffuser can increase the pressure drop across the turbine and extract more power from available water energy.These results provide a fundamental understanding of the composite water turbine,and this design and analysis method is used in the design process.

  1. Development of a more fish tolerant turbine runner advanced hydropower turbine project. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Holden, MA (United States). Alden Research Lab.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W. [Northern Research and Engineering Corp., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. Flow characteristics of the new runner were analyzed using two- dimensional and three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) models. The basic runner geometry was initially selected using the two-dimensional model. The three-dimensional model was used to investigate the flow characteristics in detail through the entire runner and to refine the design by eliminating potential problem areas at the leading and trailing edges. Results of the analyses indicated that the runner has characteristics which should provide safe fish passage with an overall power efficiency of approximately 90%. The size of the new runner, which is larger than conventional turbine runners with the same design flow and head, will provide engineering, fabrication, and installation.challenges related to the turbine components and the civil works. A small reduction in the overall efficiency would reduce the size of the runner considerably, would simplify the turbine manufacturing operations, and would allow installation of the new turbine at more hydroelectric sites.

  2. Selection of References in Wind Turbine Model Predictive Control Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odgaard, Peter Fogh; Hovgaard, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Lowering the cost of energy is one of the major focus areas in the wind turbine industry. Recent research has indicated that wind turbine controllers based on model predictive control methods can be useful in obtaining this objective. A number of design considerations have to be made when designi...

  3. Reliability-based design of wind turbine blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2011-01-01

    Reliability-based design of wind turbine blades requires identification of the important failure modes/limit states along with stochastic models for the uncertainties and methods for estimating the reliability. In the present paper it is described how reliability-based design can be applied to wind...... turbine blades. For wind turbine blades, tests with the basic composite materials and a few full-scale blades are normally performed during the design process. By adopting a reliability-based design approach, information from these tests can be taken into account in a rational way during the design...... process. In the present paper, a probabilistic framework for design of wind turbine blades are presented and it is demonstrated how information from tests can be taken into account using the Maximum-Likelihood method and Bayesian statistics. In a numerical example, the reliability is estimated for a wind...

  4. Design and Optimization of a Turbine Intake Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Fošumpaur

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriate design of the turbine intake structure of a hydropower plant is based on assumptions about its suitable function, and the design will increase the total efficiency of operation. This paper deals with optimal design of the turbine structure of run-of-river hydropower plants. The study focuses mainly on optimization of the hydropower plant location with respect to the original river banks, and on the optimal design of a separating pier between the weir and the power plant. The optimal design of the turbine intake was determined with the use of 2-D mathematical modelling. A case study is performed for the optimal design of a turbine intake structure on the Nemen river in Belarus. 

  5. Fuel economy screening study of advanced automotive gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, J. L.

    1980-01-01

    Fuel economy potentials were calculated and compared among ten turbomachinery configurations. All gas turbine engines were evaluated with a continuously variable transmission in a 1978 compact car. A reference fuel economy was calculated for the car with its conventional spark ignition piston engine and three speed automatic transmission. Two promising engine/transmission combinations, using gasoline, had 55 to 60 percent gains over the reference fuel economy. Fuel economy sensitivities to engine design parameter changes were also calculated for these two combinations.

  6. Development of a more fish-tolerant turbine runner, advanced hydropower turbine project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, T.C.; Hecker, G.E. [Worcester Polytechnic Inst., Holden, MA (United States). Alden Research Lab.; Faulkner, H.B.; Jansen, W. [Northern Research and Engineering Corp., Woburn, MA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. (ARL) and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation (NREC) conducted a research program to develop a turbine runner which will minimize fish injury and mortality at hydroelectric projects. ARL?NREC have developed a runner shape which minimizes the number of blade leading edges, reduces the pressure versus time and the velocity versus distance gradients within the runner, minimizes or eliminates the clearance between the runner and runner housing, and maximizes the size of the flow passages, all with minimal penalty on turbine efficiency. An existing pump impeller provided the starting point for developing the fish tolerant turbine runner. The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Conceptual design of the new runner began with a re-evaluation of studies which have been previously conducted to identify probable sources of injury to fish passing through hydraulic turbines. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. 86 figs., 5 tabs.

  7. Development of a more fish-tolerant turbine runner, advanced hydropower turbine project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alden Research Laboratory, Inc. (ARL) and Northern Research and Engineering Corporation (NREC) conducted a research program to develop a turbine runner which will minimize fish injury and mortality at hydroelectric projects. ARL?NREC have developed a runner shape which minimizes the number of blade leading edges, reduces the pressure versus time and the velocity versus distance gradients within the runner, minimizes or eliminates the clearance between the runner and runner housing, and maximizes the size of the flow passages, all with minimal penalty on turbine efficiency. An existing pump impeller provided the starting point for developing the fish tolerant turbine runner. The Hidrostal pump is a single bladed combined screw/centrifugal pump which has been proven to transport fish with minimal injury. The focus of the ARL/NREC research project was to develop a new runner geometry which is effective in downstream fish passage and hydroelectric power generation. A flow of 1,000 cfs and a head in the range of 75 ft to 100 ft were selected for conceptual design of the new runner. Conceptual design of the new runner began with a re-evaluation of studies which have been previously conducted to identify probable sources of injury to fish passing through hydraulic turbines. Criteria relative to hydraulic characteristics which are favorable for fish passage were prepared based on a reassessment of the available information. Important criteria used to develop the new runner design included low pressure change rates, minimum absolute pressures, and minimum shear. Other criteria which are reflected in the runner design are a minimum number of blades (only two), minimum total length of leading edges, and large flow passages. 86 figs., 5 tabs

  8. Design of large steam turbines for PWR power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors review the thermodynamic cycle requirements for use with pressurized-water reactors, outline the way thermal efficiency is maximized, and discuss the special nature of the wet-steam cycle associated with turbines for this type of reactor. Machine and cycle parameters are optimized to achieve high thermal efficiency, particular attention being given to arrangements for water separation and steam reheating and to provisions for feedwater heating. Principles and details of mechanical design are considered for a range both of full-speed turbines running at 3000 rev/min on 50 Hz systems and of half-speed turbines running at 1800 rev/min on 60 Hz systems. The importance of service experience with nuclear wet-stream turbines, and its relevance to the design of modern turbines for PWR applications, is discussed. (author)

  9. Advanced technology's impact on compressor design and development - A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Calvin L.

    1989-01-01

    A historical perspective of the impact of advanced technologies on compression system design and development for aircraft gas turbine applications is presented. A bright view of the future is projected in which further advancements in compression system technologies will be made. These advancements will have a significant impact on the ability to meet the ever-more-demanding requirements being imposed on the propulsion system for advanced aircraft. Examples are presented of advanced compression system concepts now being studied. The status and potential impact of transitioning from an empirically derived design system to a computationally oriented system are highlighted. A current NASA Lewis Research Center program to enhance this transitioning is described.

  10. Advanced technologies impact on compressor design and development: A perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ball, Calvin L.

    1989-01-01

    A historical perspective of the impact of advanced technologies on compression system design and development for aircraft gas turbine applications is presented. A bright view of the future is projected in which further advancements in compression system technologies will be made. These advancements will have a significant impact on the ability to meet the ever-more-demanding requirements being imposed on the propulsion system for advanced aircraft. Examples are presented of advanced compression system concepts now being studied. The status and potential impact of transitioning from an empirically derived design system to a computationally oriented system are highlighted. A current NASA Lewis Research Center program to enhance this transitioning is described.

  11. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  12. High-temperature turbine technology program. Turbine subsystem design report: Low-Btu gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horner, M.W.

    1980-12-01

    The objective of the US Department of Energy High-Temperature Turbine Technology (DOE-HTTT) program is to bring to technology readiness a high-temperature (2600/sup 0/F to 3000/sup 0/F firing temperature) turbine within a 6- to 10-year duration, Phase II has addressed the performance of component design and technology testing in critical areas to confirm the design concepts identified in the earlier Phase I program. Based on the testing and support studies completed under Phase II, this report describes the updated turbine subsystem design for a coal-derived gas fuel (low-Btu gas) operation at 2600/sup 0/F turbine firing temperature. A commercial IGCC plant configuration would contain four gas turbines. These gas turbines utilize an existing axial flow compressor from the GE product line MS6001 machine. A complete description of the Primary Reference Design-Overall Plant Design Description has been developed and has been documented. Trends in overall plant performance improvement at higher pressure ratio and higher firing temperature are shown. It should be noted that the effect of pressure ratio on efficiency is significally enhanced at higher firing temperatures. It is shown that any improvement in overall plant thermal efficiency reflects about the same level of gain in Cost of Electricity (COE). The IGCC concepts are shown to be competitive in both performance and cost at current and near-term gas turbine firing temperatures of 1985/sup 0/F to 2100/sup 0/F. The savings that can be accumulated over a thirty-year plant life for a water-cooled gas turbine in an IGCC plant as compared to a state-of-the-art coal-fired steam plant are estimated. A total of $500 million over the life of a 1000 MW plant is projected. Also, this IGCC power plant has significant environmental advantages over equivalent coal-fired steam power plants.

  13. High power density, 60 Hz, single flow steam turbine with 42 inch titanium last row blade for advanced combined cycle applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabrecky, J.S.; Bezugly, J.A.; Brown, M.K.; Martin, H.F.

    1999-07-01

    Highly efficient, yet economical steam turbines with large exhaust areas and increased inlet pressure and temperature capability are required to complement the growth in combustion turbine power ratings and address the pursuit of higher combined cycle plant efficiencies. This paper discussed the design of a 130--190MW, 60 Hz steam turbine which addresses these requirements for 2 x 1F, 1 x 1G and Advanced Turbine Study (ATS) combined cycle plants. Features of interest include a compact, two casing, axial exhaust, single flow design with a two piece, welded IP-LP rotor and 42 inch titanium last row blade.

  14. Application of Advanced CFD-Methods to the Design of Highly Efficient Steam Turbines%运用现代CFD方法设计高效率的汽轮机(续前期)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T.Thiemann; A.de Lazzer; M.Deckers

    2003-01-01

    论述了运用现代计算流体动力学(Computational Fluid Dynamics,CFD)技术设计高效率汽轮机的方法,典型应用的实例有全三维叶片级流场、叶片汽封和排汽蜗壳计算.计算结果和实际是相符的.进一步对结构性单元和非结构单元程序的计算结果进行了比较,已证明,非结构单元CFD程序用于复杂形状的流场计算时,结果与实际相当一致,并具有独特的功能.%The present paper involves the application of a modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) meth-od in the design process of highly efficient steam turbines. The method is applied to typical steam turbine de-sign cases, namely the calculation of the fully three-dimensional flow through steam turbine stages, blade sealsand turbine exhaust hoods. Remarkably good agreement was achieved. Furthermore, the results of structuredand unstructured codes were compared against each other. Excellent agreement was found and the unique abili-ties of an unstructured CFD code to model complex geometries are demonstrated.

  15. Application of Advanced CFD-Methods to the Design of Highly Efficient Steam Turbines%运用现代CFD方法设计高效率的汽轮机

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Thiemann; A. de Lazzer; M. Deckers

    2003-01-01

    论述了运用现代计算流体动力学(Computational Fluid Dynamics,CFD)技术设计高效率汽轮机的方法,典型应用的实例有全三维叶片级流场、叶片汽封和排汽蜗壳计算.计算结果和实际是相符的.进一步对结构性单元和非结构单元程序的计算结果进行了比较,已证明,非结构单元CFD程序用于复杂形状的流场计算时,结果与实际相当一致,并具有独特的功能.%The present paper involves the application of a modern computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method in the design process of highly efficient steam turbines. The method is applied to typical steam turbine design cases,namely the calculation of the fully three-dimensional flow through steam turbine stages, blade seals and turbine exhaust hoods. Remarkably good agreement was achieved. Furthermore, the results of structured and unstructured codes were compared against each other. Excellent agreement was found and the unique abilities of an unstructured CFD code to model complex geometries are demonstrated.

  16. SMART Wind Turbine Rotor: Design and Field Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Jonathan C. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Resor, Brian R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Paquette, Joshua A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); White, Jonathan R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-01-29

    This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This work established hypothetical approaches for integrating active aerodynamic devices (AADs) into the wind turbine structure and controllers.

  17. Turbine design and application volumes 1, 2, and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Arthur J. (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    NASA has an interest in turbines related primarily to aeronautics and space applications. Airbreathing turbine engines provide jet and turboshaft propulsion, as well as auxiliary power for aircraft. Propellant-driven turbines provide rocket propulsion and auxiliary power for spacecraft. Closed-cycle turbine engines using inert gases, organic fluids, and metal fluids have been studied for providing long-duration electric power for spacecraft. Other applications of interest for turbine engines include land-vehicle (cars, trucks, buses, trains, etc.) propulsion power and ground-based electrical power. In view of the turbine-system interest and efforts at Lewis Research Center, a course entitled 'Turbine Design and Application' was presented during 1968-69 as part of the In-house Graduate Study Program. The course was somewhat revised and again presented in 1972-73. Various aspects of turbine technology were covered including thermodynamic and fluid-dynamic concepts, fundamental turbine concepts, velocity diagrams, losses, blade aerodynamic design, blade cooling, mechanical design, operation, and performance. The notes written and used for the course have been revised and edited for publication. Such a publication can serve as a foundation for an introductory turbine course, a means for self-study, or a reference for selected topics. Any consistent set of units will satisfy the equations presented. Two commonly used consistent sets of units and constant values are given after the symbol definitions. These are the SI units and the U.S. customary units. A single set of equations covers both sets of units by including all constants required for the U.S. customary units and defining as unity those not required for the SI units. Three volumes are compiled into one.

  18. Large Wind Turbine Design Characteristics and R and D Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieblein, S. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Detailed technical presentations on large wind turbine research and development activities sponsored by public and private organizations are presented. Both horizontal and vertical axis machines are considered with emphasis on their structural design.

  19. Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (BP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path. The thermodynamic analyses of gas turbine cycles with modifications such as intercooling, recuperating, and reheating have shown that intercooling is important to achieving high efficiency gas turbines. The gas turbine industry has considerable interest in adopting intercooling to advanced gas turbines of different capacities. This observation is reinforced by the US Navys Intercooled-Recuperative (ICR) gas turbine development program to power the surface ships. In an intercooler system, the air exiting the LP compressor must be decelerated to provide the necessary residence time in the heat exchanger. The cooler air must subsequently be accelerated towards the inlet of the HP compressor. The circumferential flow nonuniformities inevitably introduced by the heat exchanger, if not isolated, could lead to rotating stall in the compressors, and reduce the overall system performance and efficiency. Also, the pressure losses in the intercooler flow path adversely affect the system efficiency and hence, must be minimized. Thus, implementing intercooling requires fluid dynamically efficient flow path with minimum flow nonuniformities and consequent pressure losses.

  20. Fatigue Design of Hydraulic Turbine Runners

    OpenAIRE

    Huth, Hans-Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Turbine runners experience start-stop cycles and vibration cycles. Cracks initiated from service or manufacturing defects and propagated by start-stop cycles become critical when the stress intensity range due to vibrational loading exceeds the threshold for fatigue crack growth.In Francis turbine runners, semi-elliptical surface cracks tend to propagate from the quarter-circular transition of the welded T-joint transition between the blade and the band or crown. Assuming a crack to grow unde...

  1. Hydraulic design of Francis turbine exposed to sediment erosion

    OpenAIRE

    Gogstad, Peter Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Sediment erosion is a large problem for turbines operated in sand laden water, especially in the Himalayas and the Andes Mountains, where the contents of hard minerals in the rivers are high. A program called RenewableNepal supports the development of a new design philosophy for hydraulic turbines. NTNU and Kathmandu University cooperate within this program, and this master thesis is part of that cooperation.The objective of this thesis is to carry out the hydraulic design...

  2. A new vertical axis wind turbine design for urban areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frunzulica, Florin; Cismilianu, Alexandru; Boros, Alexandru; Dumitrache, Alexandru; Suatean, Bogdan

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we aim at developing the model of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) with the short-term goal of physically realising this turbine to operate at a maximmum power of 5 kW. The turbine is designed for household users in the urban or rural areas and remote or isolated residential areas (hardly accsessible). The proposed model has a biplane configuration on each arm of the VAWT (3 × 2 = 6 blades), allowing for increased performance of the turbine at TSR between 2 and 2.5 (urban area operation) compared to the classic vertical axis turbines. Results that validate the proposed configuration as well as passive control methods to increase the performance of the classic VAWTs are presented.

  3. DESIGN ANALYSIS OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, A. J.

    1994-01-01

    This program performs a velocity-diagram analysis required for determining geometry and estimating performance for radial-inflow turbines. Input design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature and pressure, and rotative rate. The design variables include stator-exit angle, rotor-exit-tip to rotor-inlet radius ratio, rotor-exit-hub to tip radius ratio, and the magnitude and radial distribution of rotor-exit tangential velocity. The program output includes diameters, total and static efficiences, all absolute and relative temperatures, pressures, and velocities, and flow angles at stator inlet, stator exit, rotor inlet, and rotor exit. Losses accounted for in this program by the internal loss model are three-dimensional (profile plus end wall) viscous losses in the stator and the rotor, the disk-friction loss on the back side of the rotor, the loss due to the clearance between the rotor tip and the outer casing, and the exit velocity loss. The flow analysis is one-dimensional at the stator inlet, stator exit, and rotor inlet, each of these calculation stations being at a constant radius. At the rotor exit where there is a variation in flow-field radius, an axisymmetric two-dimensional analysis is made using constant height sectors. Simple radial equilibrium is used to establish the static pressure gradient at the rotor exit. This program is written in FORTRAN V and has been implemented on a UNIVAC 1100 series computer with a memory requirement of approximately 22K of 36 bit words.

  4. SSME HPFTP/AT Turbine Blade Platform Featherseal Damper Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, S. K.

    1999-01-01

    During the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSM) HPFtP/AT development program, engine hot fire testing resulted in turbine blade fatigue cracks. The cracks were noted after only a few tests and a several hundred seconds versus the design goal of 60 tests and >30,000 seconds. Subsequent investigation attributed the distress to excessive steady and dynamic loads. To address these excessive turbine blade loads, Pratt & Whitney Liquid Space Propulsion engineers designed and developed retrofitable turbine blade to blade platform featherseal dampers. Since incorporation of these dampers, along with other turbine blade system improvements, there has been no observed SSME HPFTP/AT turbine blade fatigue cracking. The high time HPFTP/AT blade now has accumulated 32 starts and 19,200 seconds hot fire test time. Figure #1 illustrates the HPFTP/AT turbine blade platform featherseal dampers. The approached selected was to improve the turbine blade structural capability while simultaneously reducing loads. To achieve this goal, the featherseal dampers were designed to seal the blade to blade platform gap and damp the dynamic motions. Sealing improves the steady stress margins by increasing turbine efficiency and improving turbine blade attachment thermal conditioning. Load reduction was achieved through damping. Thin Haynes 188 sheet metal was selected based on its material properties (hydrogen resistance, elongation, tensile strengths, etc.). The 36,000 rpm wheel speed of the rotor result in a normal load of 120#/blade. The featherseals then act as micro-slip dampers during actual SSME operation. After initial design and analysis (prior to full engine testing), the featherseal dampers were tested in P&W's spin rig facility in West Palm Beach, Florida. Both dynamic strain gages and turbine blade tip displacement measurements were utilized to quantify the featherseal damper effectiveness. Full speed (36,000 rpm), room temperature rig testing verified the elimination of fundamental mode

  5. Advanced Wind Turbine Drivetrain Concepts: Workshop Report, June 29-30, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE, EERE

    2010-12-01

    This report presents key findings from the Department of Energy's Advanced Drivetrain Workshop, held on June 29-30, 2010 in Broomfield, Colorado, to assess different advanced drivetrain technologies, their relative potential to improve the state-of-the-art in wind turbine drivetrains, and the scope of research and development needed for their commercialization in wind turbine applications.

  6. Environmental Barrier Coatings for Turbine Engines: A Design and Performance Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Fox, Dennis S.; Ghosn, Louis; Smialek, James L.; Miller, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ceramic thermal and environmental barrier coatings (TEBC) for SiC-based ceramics will play an increasingly important role in future gas turbine engines because of their ability to effectively protect the engine components and further raise engine temperatures. However, the coating long-term durability remains a major concern with the ever-increasing temperature, strength and stability requirements in engine high heat-flux combustion environments, especially for highly-loaded rotating turbine components. Advanced TEBC systems, including nano-composite based HfO2-aluminosilicate and rare earth silicate coatings are being developed and tested for higher temperature capable SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade applications. This paper will emphasize coating composite and multilayer design approach and the resulting performance and durability in simulated engine high heat-flux, high stress and high pressure combustion environments. The advances in the environmental barrier coating development showed promise for future rotating CMC blade applications.

  7. NWTC Researchers Field-Test Advanced Control Turbine Systems to Increase Performance, Decrease Structural Loading of Wind Turbines and Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2015-08-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) are studying component controls, including new advanced actuators and sensors, for both conventional turbines as well as wind plants. This research will help develop innovative control strategies that reduce aerodynamic structural loads and improve performance. Structural loads can cause damage that increase maintenance costs and shorten the life of a turbine or wind plant.

  8. A reference pelton turbine - design and efficiency measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pelton turbine has been subject to a varying degree of research interest since the debut of the technology over a century ago. Despite its age there are gaps in the knowledge concerning the flow mechanisms effecting the flow through the turbine. A Pelton turbine has been designed at the Waterpower Laboratory at NTNU. This has been done in connection to a Ph.D. project focusing on the flow in Pelton turbine buckets. The design of the turbine has been conducted using in-house knowledge in addition to some comments from a turbine producer. To describe the geometry multiple Bezier curves were used and the design strategy aimed to give a smooth and continuous gradient along the main flow directions in the bucket. The turbine has been designed for the operational conditions of the Pelton test rig installed at the Waterpower Laboratory which is a horizontal single jet test rig with a jet diameter(ds) of 35 mm. The diameter(D) of the runner was set to 513 mm and the width(W) of a bucket 114 mm, leading to a D/W ratio of 4.5. Manufacturing of the turbine has been carried out in aluminium and the turbine has undergone efficiency testing and visual inspection during operation at a head of 70 m. The turbine did not performed as expected and the maximum efficiency was found to be 77.75%. The low efficiency is mainly caused by a large amount of water leaving the bucket through the lip and hence transferring close to zero of its energy to the shaft. The reason for the large lip loss is discussed and two possible causes are found; the jet is located too close to the lip, and the inner surface of the bucket does not lead the water away from the lip. The turbine geometry and all data from both measurements and simulations will be available upon request in an effort to increase the amount of available data concerning Pelton turbines

  9. Finite element model for aero-elastically tailored residential wind turbine blade design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Eric Alan

    Advances in passive wind turbine control systems have allowed wind turbines to achieve higher efficiencies and operate in wider inflow conditions than ever before. Within recent years, the adoption of aero-elastically tailored (bend-twist coupled) composite blades have been a pursued strategy. Unfortunately, for this strategy to be applied, traditional means of modeling, designing and manufacturing are no longer adequate. New parameters regarding non-linearities in deflections, stiffness, and aerodynamic loadings must now be implemented. To aid in the development of passive wind turbine system design, a finite element based aero-elastic program capable of computationally predicting blade deflection and twist under loading was constructed. The program was built around the idea of iteratively solving a blade composite structure to reach a maximum aero-elastic twist configuration under elevated wind speeds. Adopting a pre-existing blade geometry, from a pitch controlled small scale (3.5kW) turbine design, the program was tested to discover the geometry bend-twist coupling potential. This research would be a contributing factor in designing a passive pitch control replacement system for the turbine. A study of various model loading configurations was first performed to insure model validity. Then, a final model was used to analyze composite layups for selected spar configurations. Results characterize the aero-elastic twist properties for the selected configurations.

  10. Industrial Advanced Turbine Systems: Development and Demonstration. Annual report, September 14, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The objective of the cooperative agreements granted under the program is to join the DOE with industry in research and development that will lead to commercial offerings in the private sector. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of U.S. industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled U.S. technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program (DE-FC21-95MC31173) by the DOE`s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EE). Technical administration of the Cooperative Agreement will be provided from EE`s Chicago Operations Office. Contract administration of the Cooperative Agreement will be provided from DOE`s Office of Fossil Energy, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC).

  11. Design Load Basis for onshore turbines - Revision 00

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten Hartvig; Thomsen, Kenneth; Natarajan, Anand;

    DTU Wind Energy is not designing and manufacturing wind turbines and do therefore not need a Design Load Basis (DLB) that is accepted by a certification body. However, to assess the load consequences of innovative features and devices added to existing turbine concepts or new turbine concept...... developed in our research, it is useful to have a full DLB that follows the current design standard and is representative of a general DLB used by the industry. It will set a standard for the design load evaluations performed at DTU Wind Energy, which is aligned with the challenges faced by the industry...... and therefore ensures that our research continues to have a strong foundation in this interaction. Furthermore, the use of a full DLB that follows the current standard can improve and increase the feedback from the research at DTU Wind Energy to the international standardization of design load calculations....

  12. THERMODYNAMIC DESIGN OF RADIAL TURBINE FOR TURBO-CHARGER

    OpenAIRE

    Sondkar Pratik *, Siddiqui Qasim, Sonawane Shubham, Phirke Indraneel.

    2016-01-01

    This is a report for design process of radial turbine used in turbocharger. Input for design requirements are power, mass flow rate, inlet temperature, pressure and rotation speed. The design variables include rotor radius ratios, stator-exit angle and rotor-exit tangential velocity distribution. The geometry was tested using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) where some modifications were introduced on the preliminary design to satisfy the design requirements. The turbine’s design poin...

  13. Design optimization of a high specific speed Francis turbine runner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enomoto, Y.; Kurosawa, S.; Kawajiri, H.

    2012-11-01

    Francis turbine is used in many hydroelectric power stations. This paper presents the development of hydraulic performance in a high specific speed Francis turbine runner. In order to achieve the improvements of turbine efficiency throughout a wide operating range, a new runner design method which combines the latest Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) and a multi objective optimization method with an existing design system was applied in this study. The validity of the new design system was evaluated by model performance tests. As the results, it was confirmed that the optimized runner presented higher efficiency compared with an originally designed runner. Besides optimization of runner, instability vibration which occurred at high part load operating condition was investigated by model test and gas-liquid two-phase flow analysis. As the results, it was confirmed that the instability vibration was caused by oval cross section whirl which was caused by recirculation flow near runner cone wall.

  14. Computer-Aided Design Of Turbine Blades And Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wayne Q.

    1988-01-01

    Quasi-three-dimensional method for determining aerothermodynamic configuration of turbine uses computer-interactive analysis and design and computer-interactive graphics. Design procedure executed rapidly so designer easily repeats it to arrive at best performance, size, structural integrity, and engine life. Sequence of events in aerothermodynamic analysis and design starts with engine-balance equations and ends with boundary-layer analysis and viscous-flow calculations. Analysis-and-design procedure interactive and iterative throughout.

  15. Fuzzy Regulator Design for Wind Turbine Yaw Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Theodoropoulos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness.

  16. Fuzzy regulator design for wind turbine yaw control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoropoulos, Stefanos; Kandris, Dionisis; Samarakou, Maria; Koulouras, Grigorios

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the development of an advanced fuzzy logic controller which aims to perform intelligent automatic control of the yaw movement of wind turbines. The specific fuzzy controller takes into account both the wind velocity and the acceptable yaw error correlation in order to achieve maximum performance efficacy. In this way, the proposed yaw control system is remarkably adaptive to the existing conditions. In this way, the wind turbine is enabled to retain its power output close to its nominal value and at the same time preserve its yaw system from pointless movement. Thorough simulation tests evaluate the proposed system effectiveness. PMID:24693237

  17. Analytical investigation of thermal barrier coatings on advanced power generation gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amos, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical investigation of present and advanced gas turbine power generation cycles incorporating thermal barrier turbine component coatings was performed. Approximately 50 parametric points considering simple, recuperated, and combined cycles (including gasification) with gas turbine inlet temperatures from current levels through 1644K (2500 F) were evaluated. The results indicated that thermal barriers would be an attractive means to improve performance and reduce cost of electricity for these cycles. A recommended thermal barrier development program has been defined.

  18. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT): Power-train system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, H. E.; Johnson, R. A.; Gibson, R. K.; Smith, L. B.

    1983-01-01

    Technical work on the design and effort leading to the testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) automotive gas turbine is described. The general effort was concentrated on building an engine for test starting in July. The buildup progressed with only routine problems and the engine was delivered to the test stand 9 July. In addition to the engine build effort, work continued in selected component areas. Ceramic turbine parts were built and tested. Burst tests of ceramic rotors show strengths are approaching that achieved in test bars; proof testing is required for acceptable strength ceramic vanes. Over 25 hours was accumulated on the combustor rig in three test modes: pilot nozzle only, start nozzle, and main nozzle operation. Satisfactory ignition was achieved for a wide range of starting speeds and the lean blowout limit was as low as 0.06 kg/b (0.14 lb/hr). Lean blowout was more a function of nozzle atomization than fuel/air ratio. A variety of cycle points were tested. Transition from start nozzle flow to main nozzle flow was done manually without difficulty. Regenerator parts were qualification tested without incident and the parts were assembled on schedule. Rig based performance matched first build requirements. Repeated failures in the harmonic drive gearbox during rig testing resulted in that concept being abandoned for an alternate scheme.

  19. DESIGN OF BACKWARD SWEPT TURBINE WHEEL FOR CRYOGENIC TURBOEXPANDER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BALAJI K. CHOUDHURY

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available With support from the Department of Atomic Energy, our institute has initiated a programme on development and study of a low capacity (20 liters/hr. turboexpander based Nitrogen liquefier. Hence a process design was carried out and a turboexpander was designed to meet the requirement of the liquefier. The turboexpander is used for lowering the temperature of the process gas (Nitrogen by the isenthalpic expansion. The efficiency of the turboexpander mainly depends on the specific speed and specific diameter of the turbine wheel. The paper explains a general methodology for the design of any type of turbine wheel (radial, backward swept and forward swept for any pressure ratio with different process gases. The design of turbine wheel includes the determination of dimensions, blade profile and velocity triangles at inlet and outlet of the turbine wheel. Generally radial turbine wheels are used but in this case to achieve the high efficiency at desired speed, backward curved blades are used to maintain the Mach number of the process gas at the nozzle exit, close to unity. If the velocity of fluid exceeds the speed of sound, the flow gets choked leading to the creation of shock waves and flow at the exit of the nozzle will be non-isentropic.

  20. Probabilistic Fatigue Design of Composite Material for Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2011-01-01

    In the present paper a probabilistic design approach to fatigue design of wind turbine blades is presented. The physical uncertainty on the fatigue strength for composite material is estimated using public available fatigue tests. Further, the model uncertainty on Miner rule for damage accumulation...

  1. UTILITY ADVANCED TURBINE SYSTEMS (ATS) TECHNOLOGY READINESS TESTING: PHASE 3R

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1999-09-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed, including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE's request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q99.

  2. Airfoil family design for large offshore wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez, B.; Munduate, X.; San Miguel, U.

    2014-06-01

    Wind turbine blades size has scaled-up during last years due to wind turbine platform increase especially for offshore applications. The EOLIA project 2007-2010 (Spanish Goverment funded project) was focused on the design of large offshore wind turbines for deep waters. The project was managed by ACCIONA Energia and the wind turbine technology was designed by ACCIONA Windpower. The project included the design of a wind turbine airfoil family especially conceived for large offshore wind turbine blades, in the order of 5MW machine. Large offshore wind turbines suffer high extreme loads due to their size, in addition the lack of noise restrictions allow higher tip speeds. Consequently, the airfoils presented in this work are designed for high Reynolds numbers with the main goal of reducing blade loads and mantainig power production. The new airfoil family was designed in collaboration with CENER (Spanish National Renewable Energy Centre). The airfoil family was designed using a evolutionary algorithm based optimization tool with different objectives, both aerodynamic and structural, coupled with an airfoil geometry generation tool. Force coefficients of the designed airfoil were obtained using the panel code XFOIL in which the boundary layer/inviscid flow coupling is ineracted via surface transpiration model. The desing methodology includes a novel technique to define the objective functions based on normalizing the functions using weight parameters created from data of airfoils used as reference. Four airfoils have been designed, here three of them will be presented, with relative thickness of 18%, 21%, 25%, which have been verified with the in-house CFD code, Wind Multi Block WMB, and later validated with wind tunnel experiments. Some of the objectives for the designed airfoils concern the aerodynamic behavior (high efficiency and lift, high tangential coefficient, insensitivity to rough conditions, etc.), others concern the geometry (good for structural design

  3. Axial Turbine Aerodynamic Design of Small Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Joung Seok; Lee, Wu Sang; Ryu, Je Wook [Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-15

    This study describes the aerodynamic design procedure for the axial turbines of a small heavy-duty gas turbine engine being developed by Docosan Heavy Industries. The design procedure mainly consists of three parts: namely, flow path design, airfoil design, and 3a performance calculation. To design the optimized flow path, through flow calculations as well as the loss estimation are widely used to evaluate the effect of geometric variables, for example, shape of meridional plane, mean radius, blades axial gap, and had angle. During the airfoil design procedure, the optimum number of blades is calculated by empirical correlations based on the in/outlet flow angles, and then 2a airfoil planar sections are designed carefully, followed by 2a B2 NS calculations. The designed planar sections are stacked along the span wise direction, leading to a 3a surfaced airfoil shape. To consider the 3a effect on turbine performance, 3a multistage Euler calculation, single row, and multistage NS calculations are performed.

  4. Axial Turbine Aerodynamic Design of Small Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study describes the aerodynamic design procedure for the axial turbines of a small heavy-duty gas turbine engine being developed by Docosan Heavy Industries. The design procedure mainly consists of three parts: namely, flow path design, airfoil design, and 3a performance calculation. To design the optimized flow path, through flow calculations as well as the loss estimation are widely used to evaluate the effect of geometric variables, for example, shape of meridional plane, mean radius, blades axial gap, and had angle. During the airfoil design procedure, the optimum number of blades is calculated by empirical correlations based on the in/outlet flow angles, and then 2a airfoil planar sections are designed carefully, followed by 2a B2 NS calculations. The designed planar sections are stacked along the span wise direction, leading to a 3a surfaced airfoil shape. To consider the 3a effect on turbine performance, 3a multistage Euler calculation, single row, and multistage NS calculations are performed

  5. Design and experimental evaluation of a high temperature radial turbine with a moveable sidewall nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogo, Casimir; Roelke, Richard J.

    1987-01-01

    The uncooled, 2.27 kg/sec mass flow radial turbine designed to operate at 1477 K in the gas generator of an advanced, variable-capacity 683 kW turboshaft engine was configured with a cooled, movable sidewall nozzle capable of changing the stage flow capacity from 50 to 100 percent of maximum. Overall performance test data were obtained in a turbine test rig that duplicated engine Reynolds numbers; attention is given to the changing of flow capacity by moving the hub or shroud sidewall, vane sidewall leakage, vaneless space sidewall geometry, and nozzle-cooling injection. Data are presented in the form of turbine flow, efficiency, work parameter, and performance mappings.

  6. Design and manufacture of turbine runner blades using CAD/CAM technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strohmer, F.; Winkler, S.

    1986-05-01

    Advances in hydraulic and mechanical design and manufacture of hydraulic turbines have occured over the last years. The turbines have reached a high level of performance. This is especially a result of a proper design and accurate manufacture of the turbine runner due to the application of the computer aided design and computer aided manufacturing systems combined with new computerized analysis techniques. The various steps of the modular numerical system - hydraulic computation, interactive blade design, fluid flow analysis, stress analysis and CNC-manufacture of the model blade - are shown on the example of a runner blade for axial turbines. For optimizing the manufacturing of the prototype blade the CAD/CAM-technology is applied. The data flow from the model blade, measured on an electronic coordinate measurement machine, via the CAD/CAM-system, which represents the blade surface in a mathematical form and calculates the tool paths, to the five axis CNC-milling machine is demonstrated. Through the application of the CAD/CAM-technology to hydraulic blades the time frame for designing and manufacturing has been reduced while improving quality and accuracy of the blades.

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy`s advanced turbine systems program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Layne, A.W. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Federal Energy Technology Center; Layne, P.W. [Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) are poised to capture the majority of new electric power generation capacity well into the next century. US Department of Energy (DOE) programs supporting the development of ATS technology will enable gas turbine manufacturers to provide ATS systems to the commercial marketplace at the turn of the next century. A progress report on the ATS Program will he presented in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and system configurations meeting the goals of the program will be discussed. Progress has been made in the are as of materials, heat transfer, aerodynamics, and combustion. Applied research conducted by universities, industry, and Government has resulted in advanced designs and power cycle configurations to develop an ATS which operates on natural gas, coal, and biomass fuels. Details on the ATS Program research, development, and technology validation and readiness activities will be presented. The future direction of the program and relationship to other Government programs will be discussed in this paper.

  8. Gas Turbine Engine Inlet Wall Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florea, Razvan Virgil (Inventor); Matalanis, Claude G. (Inventor); Stucky, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an inlet duct formed to have a shape with a first ellipse in one half and a second ellipse in a second half. The second half has an upstream most end which is smaller than the first ellipse. The inlet duct has a surface defining the second ellipse which curves away from the first ellipse, such that the second ellipse is larger at an intermediate location. The second ellipse is even larger at a downstream end of the inlet duct leading into a fan.

  9. The application of advanced rotor (performance) methods for design calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bussel, G.J.W. van [Delft Univ. of Technology, Inst. for Wind Energy, Delft (Netherlands)

    1997-08-01

    The calculation of loads and performance of wind turbine rotors has been a topic for research over the last century. The principles for the calculation of loads on rotor blades with a given specific geometry, as well as the development of optimal shaped rotor blades have been published in the decades that significant aircraft development took place. Nowadays advanced computer codes are used for specific problems regarding modern aircraft, and application to wind turbine rotors has also been performed occasionally. The engineers designing rotor blades for wind turbines still use methods based upon global principles developed in the beginning of the century. The question what to expect in terms of the type of methods to be applied in a design environment for the near future is addressed here. (EG) 14 refs.

  10. Optimal Design of VLH Axial Hydro-Turbine using Regression Analysis and Multi-Objective Function (GA Optimization Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weerapon Nuantong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This research study was aimed to develop a new concept design of a very low head (VLH turbine using advanced optimization methodologies. A potentially local site was chosen for the turbine and based on its local conditions, such as the water head level of <2 meters and the flow rate of <5 m3/s. The study focused on the optimization of the turbine blade and guide vane profiles, because of their major impacts on the efficiency of the VLH axial flow turbine. The fluid flow simulation was firstly conducted for the axial turbine, followed by applying the regression analysis concept to develop a turbine mathematical model where the leading- and trailing-edge angles of the guide vanes and the turbine blades were related to the efficiency, total head and flow rate. The genetic algorithms (GA with multi-objective function was also used to locate the optimal blade angles. Thereafter, the refined design was re-simulated. Following this procedure the turbine efficiency was improved from 82.59% to 83.96% at a flow rate of 4.2 m3/s and total head of 2 meters.

  11. Advanced LP turbine installation at 1300 MW nuclear power station Unterweser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on Preussen Elektra AG's Unterweser power plant. The steam turbine-generator features a disk-type LP turbine rotor design developed in the late 1960's to early 1970's. This rotor design has been installed in 19 nuclear power plants. The 47 rotors in these plants have been in operation for an average of almost 10 years. The design of the 1970 vintage nuclear LP turbine rotors was based on extensive experience gained with disk-type rotors of fossil turbines built in the 1950's. When EPRI reported about corrosion cracking in nuclear LP turbines, a program was initiated by Siemens/KWU as original steam turbine supplier to ultrasonically inspect all their disk-type rotors in nuclear power plats. Indications on one rotor disk in the Unterweser plant was found. This single event was the only one found out of 310 disks inspected in nuclear power plants

  12. Preliminary Design Optimization For A Supersonic Turbine For Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papila, Nilay; Shyy, Wei; Griffin, Lisa; Huber, Frank; Tran, Ken; McConnaughey, Helen (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    In this study, we present a method for optimizing, at the preliminary design level, a supersonic turbine for rocket propulsion system application. Single-, two- and three-stage turbines are considered with the number of design variables increasing from 6 to 11 then to 15, in accordance with the number of stages. Due to its global nature and flexibility in handling different types of information, the response surface methodology (RSM) is applied in the present study. A major goal of the present Optimization effort is to balance the desire of maximizing aerodynamic performance and minimizing weight. To ascertain required predictive capability of the RSM, a two-level domain refinement approach has been adopted. The accuracy of the predicted optimal design points based on this strategy is shown to he satisfactory. Our investigation indicates that the efficiency rises quickly from single stage to 2 stages but that the increase is much less pronounced with 3 stages. A 1-stage turbine performs poorly under the engine balance boundary condition. A portion of fluid kinetic energy is lost at the turbine discharge of the 1-stage design due to high stage pressure ratio and high-energy content, mostly hydrogen, of the working fluid. Regarding the optimization technique, issues related to the design of experiments (DOE) has also been investigated. It is demonstrated that the criteria for selecting the data base exhibit significant impact on the efficiency and effectiveness of the construction of the response surface.

  13. Design considerations: gas turbines for electric power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas turbine represents one of the most sophisticated designs from the standpoint of time dependent deformation behavior. The large size of the equipment, which limits the amount of full scale testing, together with the demanding performance requirements and high level of reliability desired places a high degree of emphasis on the high temperature deformation design process. As an example of the various design considerations used in this equipment, a brief overview of the turbine will be given, highlighting the materials, stress, temperatures, and load history experienced by the major components. Particular attention will then be focused on the vane segment design considerations. This component is not only structurally complicated, but experiences steep temperature gradients imposed by internal cooling and large temperature transients during cyclic duty operation which have to be addressed in the design procedure. Based on this discussion the limitations of the current design procedures will be highlighted and the areas requiring additional research inputs will be discussed

  14. Design of large Francis turbine using optimal methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, E.; Bornard, L.; Tomas, L.; Liu, J.; Couston, M.

    2012-11-01

    Among a high number of Francis turbine references all over the world, covering the whole market range of heads, Alstom has especially been involved in the development and equipment of the largest power plants in the world : Three Gorges (China -32×767 MW - 61 to 113 m), Itaipu (Brazil- 20x750 MW - 98.7m to 127m) and Xiangjiaba (China - 8x812 MW - 82.5m to 113.6m - in erection). Many new projects are under study to equip new power plants with Francis turbines in order to answer an increasing demand of renewable energy. In this context, Alstom Hydro is carrying out many developments to answer those needs, especially for jumbo units such the planned 1GW type units in China. The turbine design for such units requires specific care by using the state of the art in computation methods and the latest technologies in model testing as well as the maximum feedback from operation of Jumbo plants already in operation. We present in this paper how a large Francis turbine can be designed using specific design methods, including the global and local optimization methods. The design of the spiral case, the tandem cascade profiles, the runner and the draft tube are designed with optimization loops involving a blade design tool, an automatic meshing software and a Navier-Stokes solver, piloted by a genetic algorithm. These automated optimization methods, presented in different papers over the last decade, are nowadays widely used, thanks to the growing computation capacity of the HPC clusters: the intensive use of such optimization methods at the turbine design stage allows to reach very high level of performances, while the hydraulic flow characteristics are carefully studied over the whole water passage to avoid any unexpected hydraulic phenomena.

  15. Industrial advanced turbine systems: Development and demonstration. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The US DOE has initiated a program for advanced turbine systems (ATS) that will serve industrial power generation markets. The ATS will provide ultra-high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness. The ATS will foster (1) early market penetration that enhances the global competitiveness of US industry, (2) public health benefits resulting from reduced exhaust gas emissions of target pollutants, (3) reduced cost of power used in the energy-intensive industrial marketplace and (4) the retention and expansion of the skilled US technology base required for the design, development and maintenance of state-of-the-art advanced turbine products. The Industrial ATS Development and Demonstration program is a multi-phased effort. Solar Turbines Incorporated (Solar) has participated in Phases 1 and 2 of the program. On September 14, 1995 Solar was awarded a Cooperative Agreement for Phases 3 and 4 of the program. Phase 3 of the work is separated into two subphases: Phase 3A entails Component Design and Development Phase 3B will involve Integrated Subsystem Testing. Phase 4 will cover Host Site Testing. Forecasts call for completion of the program within budget as originally estimated. Scheduled completion is forecasted to be approximately 3 years late to original plan. This delay has been intentionally planned in order to better match program tasks to the anticipated availability of DOE funds. To ensure the timely realization of DOE/Solar program goals, the development schedule for the smaller system (Mercury 50) and enabling technologies has been maintained, and commissioning of the field test unit is scheduled for May of 2000. As of the end of the reporting period work on the program is 22.80% complete based upon milestones completed. This measurement is considered quite conservative as numerous drawings on the Mercury 50 are near release. Variance information is provided in Section 4.0-Program Management.

  16. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, ceramic component developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneyck, M. O.; Macbeth, J. W.; Sweeting, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    The ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company while performing as a principal subcontractor to the Garrett Auxiliary Power Division for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project (NASA Contract DEN3-167) is summarized. The report covers the period October 1979 through July 1987, and includes information concerning ceramic technology work categorized as common and unique. The former pertains to ceramic development applicable to two parallel AGT projects established by NASA contracts DEN3-168 (AGT100) and DEN3-167 (AGT101), whereas the unique work solely pertains to Garrett directed activity under the latter contract. The AGT101 Technology Development Project is sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA-Lewis. Standard Oil directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and nondestructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This permitted engine testing to proceed without program slippage.

  17. Advanced wind turbine near-term product development. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-01-01

    In 1990 the US Department of Energy initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine (AWT) Program to assist the growth of a viable wind energy industry in the US. This program, which has been managed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has been divided into three phases: (1) conceptual design studies, (2) near-term product development, and (3) next-generation product development. The goals of the second phase were to bring into production wind turbines which would meet the cost goal of $0.05 kWh at a site with a mean (Rayleigh) windspeed of 5.8 m/s (13 mph) and a vertical wind shear exponent of 0.14. These machines were to allow a US-based industry to compete domestically with other sources of energy and to provide internationally competitive products. Information is given in the report on design values of peak loads and of fatigue spectra and the results of the design process are summarized in a table. Measured response is compared with the results from mathematical modeling using the ADAMS code and is discussed. Detailed information is presented on the estimated costs of maintenance and on spare parts requirements. A failure modes and effects analysis was carried out and resulted in approximately 50 design changes including the identification of ten previously unidentified failure modes. The performance results of both prototypes are examined and adjusted for air density and for correlation between the anemometer site and the turbine location. The anticipated energy production at the reference site specified by NREL is used to calculate the final cost of energy using the formulas indicated in the Statement of Work. The value obtained is $0.0514/kWh in January 1994 dollars. 71 figs., 30 tabs.

  18. Fatigue design of hydraulic turbine runners

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huth, Hans-Joerg

    2005-07-01

    Turbine runners experience start-stop cycles and vibration cycles. Cracks initiated from service or manufacturing defects and propagated by start-stop cycles become critical when the stress intensity range due to vibrational loading exceeds the threshold for fatigue crack growth. In Francis turbine runners, semi-elliptical surface cracks tend to propagate from the quarter-circular transition of the welded T-joint transition between the blade and the band or crown. Assuming a crack to grow under a constant stress amplitude equal to that at the most highly loaded location at the welded joint between the blade and the band or crown of a Francis turbine runner yields a conservative estimate of the life of the runner. A more accurate prediction of fatigue life is obtained by considering the growth of a crack in the real, inhomogeneous stress field. For an idealised T-joint under pure bending, the stress field has been determined by means of plane strain finite element analysis. Finite element models of the entire Francis runner are built with respect to the calculation of fluid dynamic properties. Since in these models geometry transitions are modelled as a sharp notch, both a finite and a zero transition radius have been modelled, and the influence of the mesh size on the maximum stress has been investigated. For relatively small cracks, it is shown that the structural component geometry does not remarkably influence the stress intensity factor values, provided that the stress field in the vicinity of the crack is approximately the same. Therefore, in order to simplify the stress intensity factor retrieval and to generate a solution of extended applicability, a cracked finite-thickness plate is examined instead of the actual T-joint geometry. The stress intensity factors along the front of a semi-elliptical surface crack in such a plate are determined by means of an analysis using finite quarter-point wedge elements for different elementary loading conditions that can

  19. Thermoplastic Composite Wind Turbine Blades: An Integrated Design Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joncas, S.

    2010-01-01

    This thesis proposes a new structural design concept for future large wind turbine blades based on fully recyclable thermoplastic composites (TPC). With respect to material properties, cost and processing, reactively processed anionic polyamide-6 (APA-6) has been identified as the most promising the

  20. Design of Shrouded Airborne Wind Turbine & CFD Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbreen, Faiqa; Faiqa Anbreen Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The focus is to design a shrouded airborne wind turbine, capable to generate 70 kW to propel a leisure boat. The idea of designing an airborne turbine is to take the advantage of different velocity layers in the atmosphere. The blades have been designed using NREL S826 airfoil, which has coefficient of lift CL of 1.4 at angle of attack, 6°. The value selected for CP is 0.8. The rotor diameter is 7.4 m. The balloon (shroud) has converging-diverging nozzle design, to increase the mass flow rate through the rotor. The ratio of inlet area to throat area, Ai/At is 1.31 and exit area to throat area, Ae/At is1.15. The Solidworks model has been analyzed numerically using CFD. The software used is StarCCM +. The Unsteady Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes Simulation (URANS) K- ɛ model has been selected, to study the physical properties of the flow, with emphasis on the performance of the turbine. Stress analysis has been done using Nastran. From the simulations, the torque generated by the turbine is approximately 800N-m and angular velocity is 21 rad/s.

  1. Powering the Future: A Wind Turbine Design Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pries, Caitlin Hicks; Hughes, Julie

    2011-01-01

    Nothing brings out the best in eighth-grade physical science students quite like an engineering challenge. The wind turbine design challenge described in this article has proved to be a favorite among students with its focus on teamwork and creativity and its (almost) sneaky reinforcement of numerous physics concepts. For this activity, pairs of…

  2. OFF-DESIGN PERFORMANCE OF RADIAL INFLOW TURBINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserbauer, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    This program calculates off design performance of radial inflow turbines. The program uses a one dimensional solution of flow conditions through the turbine along the main streamline. The loss model accounts for stator, rotor, incidence, and exit losses. Program features include consideration of stator and rotor trailing edge blockage and computation of performance to limiting load. Stator loss (loss in kinetic energy across the stator) is proportional to the average kinetic energy in the blade row and is represented in the program by an equation which includes a stator loss coefficient determined from design point performance and then assumed to be constant for the off design calculations. Minimum incidence loss does not occur at zero incidence angle with respect to the rotor blade, but at some optimum flow angle. At high pressure ratios the level of rotor inlet velocity seemed to have an excessive influence on the loss. Using the component of velocity in the direction of the optimum flow angle gave better correlations with experimental results. Overall turbine geometry and design point values of efficiency, pressure ratio, and mass flow are needed as input information. The output includes performance and velocity diagram parameters for any number of given speeds over a range of turbine pressure ratio. The program has been implemented on the IBM 7094 and operates in batch mode.

  3. Impact design methods for ceramic components in gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1991-01-01

    Methods currently under development to design ceramic turbine components with improved impact resistance are presented. Two different modes of impact damage are identified and characterized, i.e., structural damage and local damage. The entire computation is incorporated into the EPIC computer code. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating instrumented plate impact and particle impact tests.

  4. Serration Design Methodology for Wind Turbine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, J.; Singh, A.; Madsen, J.; Arce León, C.

    2016-09-01

    Trailing edge serrations are today an established method to reduce the aeroacoustic noise from wind turbine blades. In this paper, a brief introduction to the aerodynamic and acoustic design procedure used at LM Wind Power is given. Early field tests on serrations, retrofitted to the turbine blades, gave preliminary indication of their noise reduction potential. However, a multitude of challenges stand in the way of any proof of concept and a viable commercial product. LM undertook a methodical test and validation procedure to understand the impact of design parameters on serration performance, and quantify the uncertainties associated with the proposed designs. Aerodynamic and acoustic validation tests were carried out in number of wind tunnel facilities. Models were written to predict the aerodynamic, acoustic and structural performance of the serrations. LM serration designs have evolved over the period of time to address constraints imposed by aero performance, structural reliability, manufacturing and installation. The latest LM serration offering was tested in the field on three different wind turbines. A consistent noise reduction in excess of 1.5 dB was achieved in the field for all three turbines.

  5. Conceptual design of helium gas turbine for MHTGR-GT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conceptual designs of the direct-cycle helium gas turbine for a practical unit (450 MWt) and an experimental unit (1200kWt) of MHTGR were conducted and the results as shown below were obtained. The power conversion vessel for this practical unit can further be downsized to an outside diameter of 7.4m and a height of 22m as compared with the conventional design examples. Comparison of the conceptual designs of helium gas turbines using single-shaft type employing the axial-flow compressor and twin-shaft type employing the centrifugal compressor shows that the former provides advantages in terms of structure and control designs whereas the latter offers a higher efficiency. In order to determine which of them should be selected, a further study to investigate various aspects of safety features and startup characteristics will be needed. Either of the two types can provide a cycle efficiency of 46 to 48%. The third mode natural frequencies of the twin-shart type's low-pressure rotational shaft and the single shaft type are below the designed rotational speed, but their vibrational controls are made available using the magnetic bearing system. Elevation of the natural frequency for the twin-shaft type would be possible by altering the arrangements of its shafting configuration. As compared with the earlier conceptual designs, the overall systems configuration can be made simpler and more compact; five stages of turbines for the single-shaft type and seven stages of turbines for the twin-shaft type employing one shaft for the low-pressure compressor and the power turbine and; 26 stages of compressors for the axial-flow type with the single shaft system and five stages of compressors for the centrifugal type with the twin-shaft system. 9 refs, 12 figs, 4 tabs

  6. Design of a New Foundation for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ibsen, Lars Bo; Brincker, Rune

    2004-01-01

    as compared to a traditional pile foundation, it is much easier to install and it can easily be removed when the wind turbine is taken down. However, the new design is suffering from uncertainties in the accumulated fatigue in the both the steel structure and the surrounding earth material. Therefore an on......The gravitation platform and the monopile have in the previous major offshore wind turbine projects been dominating. A four-year research and development project has proven the bucket foundation to be feasible in suitable soil condition in water depth from near shore to app. 40 meters. A prototype...

  7. Modeling of uncertainties for wind turbine blade design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, John Dalsgaard; Toft, Henrik Stensgaard

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbine blades are designed by a combination of tests and numerical calculations using finite element models of the blade. The blades are typically composite structures with laminates of glass-fiber and/or carbon-fibers glued together by a matrix material. This paper presents a framework...... basis in the JCSS framework for modelling material properties, Bayesian statistical methods allowing prior / expert knowledge to be accounted for and the Maximum Likelihood Method. The stochastic framework is illustrated using simulated tests which represent examples relevant for wind turbine blades....

  8. Structural Analysis and Design of the Composite Wind Turbine Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wen-Hsiang; Young, Wen-Bin

    2012-06-01

    The wind turbine blade sustains various kinds of loadings during the operation and parking state. Due to the increasing size of the wind turbine blade, it is important to arrange the composite materials in a sufficient way to reach the optimal utilization of the material strength. Most of the composite blades are made of glass fibers composites while carbon fibers are also employed in recent years. Composite materials have the advantages of high specific strength and stress. This study develops a GUI interface to construct the blade model for the stress analysis using ANSYS. With the aid of visualization interface, the geometric model of the blade can be constructed by only a few data inputs. Based on the numerical stress analysis of the turbine blade, a simple iterative method was proposed to design the structure of the composite blade.

  9. Integration of rocket turbine design and analysis through computer graphics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Wayne; Boynton, Jim

    1988-01-01

    An interactive approach with engineering computer graphics is used to integrate the design and analysis processes of a rocket engine turbine into a progressive and iterative design procedure. The processes are interconnected through pre- and postprocessors. The graphics are used to generate the blade profiles, their stacking, finite element generation, and analysis presentation through color graphics. Steps of the design process discussed include pitch-line design, axisymmetric hub-to-tip meridional design, and quasi-three-dimensional analysis. The viscous two- and three-dimensional analysis codes are executed after acceptable designs are achieved and estimates of initial losses are confirmed.

  10. Design Tool for Direct Drive Wind Turbine Generators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leban, Krisztina Monika

    and suggestions for potential improvement were listed. The design is obtained analytically at first; then visualised in 3D CAD (Computer Assisted Design) and evaluated in FEM. An analytical optimisation (Particle Swarm –PSO and Genetic Algorithms -GA) patch is available for improving the design. The tool...... is destined for engineers that are involved in the design of wind turbine systems. The visualisation of the design in work is important for the overall assessment of the machine concept. The tool provides facilities for reporting on a shaped design: list of geometrical and electromagnetic quantities, pictures...

  11. Hydropower R&D: Recent advances in turbine passage technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cada, Glenn F. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Rinehart, Ben N. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab. (INEEL)

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the recent and planned R&D activities across the U.S. related to survival of fish entrained in hydroelectric turbines. In this report, we have considered studies that are intended to develop new information that can be used to mitigate turbine-passage mortality. This review focuses on the effects on fish of physical or operational modifications to turbines, comparisons to survival in other downstream passage routes (e.g., bypass systems and spillways), and applications of new modeling, experimental, and technological approaches to develop a greater understanding of the stresses associated with turbine passage. In addition, the emphasis is on biological studies, as opposed to the engineering studies (e.g., turbine index testing) that are often carried out in support of fish passage mitigation efforts.

  12. Modal Parameter Identification of New Design of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.

    2013-01-01

    Vertical axis wind turbines have lower power efficiency than the horizontal axis wind turbines. However vertical axis wind turbines are proven to be economical and noise free on smaller scale. A new design of three bladed vertical axis wind turbine by using two airfoils in construction of each bl...... Abaqus cae software. The study is limited to evaluate lowest fundamental modal frequencies and mode shapes of proposed wind turbine....

  13. Summary of tower designs for large horizontal axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederick, G. R.; Savino, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    Towers for large horizontal axis wind turbines, machines with a rotor axis height above 30 meters and rated at more than 500 kW, have varied in configuration, materials of construction, type of construction, height, and stiffness. For example, the U.S. large HAWTs have utilized steel truss type towers and free-standing steel cylindrical towers. In Europe, the trend has been to use only free-standing and guyed cylindrical towers, but both steel and reinforced concrete have been used as materials of construction. These variations in materials of construction and type of construction reflect different engineering approaches to the design of cost effective towers for large HAWTs. Tower designs are the NASA/DOE Mod-5B presently being fabricated. Design goals and requirements that influence tower configuration, height and materials are discussed. In particular, experiences with United States large wind turbine towers are elucidated. Finally, current trends in tower designs for large HAWTs are highlighted.

  14. Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Martin Otto Laver

    Aerodynamics of Wind Turbines is the established essential text for the fundamental solutions to efficient wind turbine design. Now in its second edition, it has been entirely updated and substantially extended to reflect advances in technology, research into rotor aerodynamics and the structural...... response of the wind turbine structure. Topics covered include increasing mass flow through the turbine, performance at low and high wind speeds, assessment of the extreme conditions under which the turbine will perform and the theory for calculating the lifetime of the turbine. The classical Blade Element...... Momentum method is also covered, as are eigenmodes and the dynamic behavior of a turbine. The new material includes a description of the effects of the dynamics and how this can be modeled in an aeroelastic code, which is widely used in the design and verification of modern wind turbines. Further...

  15. Simulation platform to model, optimize and design wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iov, F.; Hansen, A.D.; Soerensen, P.; Blaabjerg, F.

    2004-03-01

    This report is a general overview of the results obtained in the project 'Electrical Design and Control. Simulation Platform to Model, Optimize and Design Wind Turbines'. The motivation for this research project is the ever-increasing wind energy penetration into the power network. Therefore, the project has the main goal to create a model database in different simulation tools for a system optimization of the wind turbine systems. Using this model database a simultaneous optimization of the aerodynamic, mechanical, electrical and control systems over the whole range of wind speeds and grid characteristics can be achieved. The report is structured in six chapters. First, the background of this project and the main goals as well as the structure of the simulation platform is given. The main topologies for wind turbines, which have been taken into account during the project, are briefly presented. Then, the considered simulation tools namely: HAWC, DIgSILENT, Saber and Matlab/Simulink have been used in this simulation platform are described. The focus here is on the modelling and simulation time scale aspects. The abilities of these tools are complementary and they can together cover all the modelling aspects of the wind turbines e.g. mechanical loads, power quality, switching, control and grid faults. However, other simulation packages e.g PSCAD/EMTDC can easily be added in the simulation platform. New models and new control algorithms for wind turbine systems have been developed and tested in these tools. All these models are collected in dedicated libraries in Matlab/Simulink as well as in Saber. Some simulation results from the considered tools are presented for MW wind turbines. These simulation results focuses on fixed-speed and variable speed/pitch wind turbines. A good agreement with the real behaviour of these systems is obtained for each simulation tool. These models can easily be extended to model different kinds of wind turbines or large wind

  16. Effects of increasing tip velocity on wind turbine rotor design.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Resor, Brian Ray; Maniaci, David Charles; Berg, Jonathan Charles; Richards, Phillip William

    2014-05-01

    A reduction in cost of energy from wind is anticipated when maximum allowable tip velocity is allowed to increase. Rotor torque decreases as tip velocity increases and rotor size and power rating are held constant. Reduction in rotor torque yields a lighter weight gearbox, a decrease in the turbine cost, and an increase in the capacity for the turbine to deliver cost competitive electricity. The high speed rotor incurs costs attributable to rotor aero-acoustics and system loads. The increased loads of high speed rotors drive the sizing and cost of other components in the system. Rotor, drivetrain, and tower designs at 80 m/s maximum tip velocity and 100 m/s maximum tip velocity are created to quantify these effects. Component costs, annualized energy production, and cost of energy are computed for each design to quantify the change in overall cost of energy resulting from the increase in turbine tip velocity. High fidelity physics based models rather than cost and scaling models are used to perform the work. Results provide a quantitative assessment of anticipated costs and benefits for high speed rotors. Finally, important lessons regarding full system optimization of wind turbines are documented.

  17. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Composite Turbine Vane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert J.; Parikh, Ankur H.; Nagpal, VInod K.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to develop design concepts for a cooled ceramic vane to be used in the first stage of the High Pressure Turbine(HPT). To insure that the design concepts were relevant to the gas turbine industry needs, Honeywell International Inc. was subcontracted to provide technical guidance for this work. The work performed under this contract can be divided into three broad categories. The first was an analysis of the cycle benefits arising from the higher temperature capability of Ceramic Matrix Composite(CMC) compared with conventional metallic vane materials. The second category was a series of structural analyses for variations in the internal configuration of first stage vane for the High Pressure Turbine(HPT) of a CF6 class commercial airline engine. The third category was analysis for a radial cooled turbine vanes for use in turboshaft engine applications. The size, shape and internal configuration of the turboshaft engine vanes were selected to investigate a cooling concept appropriate to small CMC vanes.

  18. Design improvements to the ESI-80 wind turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, T.; Kleeman, A.; Manwell, J.; McGowan, J. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes two investigations related to improvements to an ESI-80 wind turbine. One of them involved modeling the tip flaps during braking. The other was a study of the turbine behavior with various delta-3 angles. These topics are of interest since the turbine is a two-bladed, teetered, free-yaw machine with tip flaps and an adjustable delta-3 angle. Tip flaps are used for slowing the turbine during shutdown and as an emergency system to insure that the rotor does not go into an overspeed condition in the event of failure of other parts of the system. Upon deployment, the tip flaps are exposed to a number of varying forces including aerodynamic, damper, spring, centripetal, and gravitational forces and forces at the hinged connection to the blades. For maximum braking the angle of tip flap deployment needs to be as large as possible without striking the blades in overspeed conditions and when covered with ice. To investigate tip flap design tradeoffs, a dynamic model of the tip flaps on the modified ESI-80 turbine was developed. Results include a determination of the effect of the addition of weight to the flap, overspeed conditions, and changes in damping coefficient. Changes in the delta-3 angle can be used to couple pitching and flapping motions, affecting both teeter and yaw behavior. These effects have been investigated using a modified version of YawDyn. The effects of changes in the delta-3 angle on the teeter and yaw behavior of the modified ESI-80 wind turbine were investigated. Results show that increased teeter excursions in steady high winds can be reduced by increasing the delta-3 angle. Increasing the delta-3 angle may also increase yaw motion in low wind speeds. Results suggest that the optimum delta-3 angle for improved performance may be substantially greater than the presently used angle of zero degrees. 8 refs., 16 figs.

  19. Advanced Load Alleviation for Wind Turbines using Adaptive Trailing Edge Flaps: Sensoring and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Peter Bjørn

    The purpose of wind turbines and their predecessors the windmill, is to convert the energy in the wind to usable energy forms. Whereas windmills of the past focused on the conversion of wind power to torque for grinding, pumping and winching, modern wind turbines convert the wind energy...... into electric power. They do so through incorporation of generators, which convert mechanical torque into electricity. Wind turbines are designed to keep the overall cost per produced Kilo Watt hour as low as possible. One way of improving the performance and lifetime of the wind turbine is through active flow...

  20. Advanced Combustor Liner Cooling Technology for Gas Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aspi R. Wadia

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper briefly reviews some of the work on advanced liner cooling techniques - specificially laminated porous wall cooling, angled-multihole (effusion cooling and composite metal matrix liner cooling. The concept definition, heat transfer design procedure and design problems including key materials and fabrication considerations associated with each basic concept will be reviewed. Published rig and engine experience of aircraft engine manufacturers and research organizations will be cited. Some logical extensions of the current liner cooling schemes are suggested for future applications.

  1. Reliability-Based Design of Wind Turbine Foundations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Firouzianbandpey, Sarah

    green energy technology in breaking the fossil fuel dependency. The costs of foundations for offshore wind turbines typically amount to 20–30% of the total wind turbine budget. Thus, an optimized design of these foundations will improve the cost effectiveness by matching a suitable target reliability...... level. The overall aim of the present PhD thesis is to facilitate a low-cost foundation design for future offshore wind farms by focusing on the geotechnical site assessment. First, a number of well-established techniques for soil classification based on cone penetration test (CPT) data have been...... seismic CPTs were performed in sand and clay in order to estimate the small-strain shear modulus of the soil as a key parameter in analysis and design of foundations, and the soil type of the region was estimated based on this value. Furthermore, the shear moduli obtained from the seismic tests were...

  2. Design and Analysis of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine Rotor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arvind Singh Rathore

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an optimization model for rotor design of 750 kW horizontal axis wind turbine. The wind turbine blade is a very important part of the rotor. In this work a blade of length 21.0 m is taken and airfoil for the blade is S809. The airfoil taken is same from root to tip. The model refers to a design method based on TypeApproval Provision Scheme TAPS-2000. All the loads caused by wind and inertia on the blades are transferred to the hub. The stress and deflection were calculated on blades and hub by Finite element analysis method. Result obtained from ANSYS is compared with the existing design.

  3. Optimization design of spar cap layup for wind turbine blade

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    Based on the aerodynamic shape and structural form of the blade are fixed,a mathematical model of optimization design for wind turbine blade is established.The model is pursued with respect to minimum the blade mass to reduce the cost of wind turbine production.The material layup numbers of the spar cap are chosen as the design variables;while the demands of strength,stiffness and stability of the blade are employed as the constraint conditions.The optimization design for a 1.5 MW wind turbine blade is carried out by combing above objective and constraint conditions at the action of ultimate flapwise loads with the finite element software ANSYS.Compared with the original design,the optimization design result achieves a reduction of 7.2% of the blade mass,the stress and strain distribution of the blade is more reasonable,and there is no occurrence of resonance,therefore its effectiveness is verified.

  4. Design of wind turbine airfoils based on maximum power coefficient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2010-01-01

    noise prediction model, the previously developed integrated design technique is further developed. The new code takes into account different airfoil requirements according to their local positions on a blade, such as sensitivity to leading edge roughness, design lift at off-design condition, stall......Based on the blade element momentum (BEM) theory, the power coefficient of a wind turbine can be expressed in function of local tip speed ratio and lift-drag ratio. By taking the power coefficient in a predefined range of angle of attack as the final design objective and combining with an airfoil...

  5. Aerodynamic Optimum Design of Transonic Turbine Cascades Using Genetic Algorithms

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1997-01-01

    This paper presents an aerodynamic optimum design method for transonic turbine cascades based on the Genetic Algorithms coupled to the inviscid flow Euler Solver and the boundary-layer calculation.The Genetic Algorithms control the evolution of a population of cascades towards an optimum design.The fitness value of each string is evaluated using the flow solver.The design procedure has been developed and the behavior of the genetic algorithms has been tested.The objective functions of the design examples are the minimum mean-square deviation between the aimed pressure and computed pressure and the minimum amount of user expertise.

  6. On a method for simulation-based wind turbine blade design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongsma, Sietse Harmen

    2014-01-01

    Wind turbines are an important means for the production of renewable energy. Wind conditions vary from one site to another and the design of a horizontal axis wind turbine depends on these local wind conditions. One of the important aspects of the design of a wind turbine concerns the aerodynamic sh

  7. Low Cost Gas Turbine Off-Design Prediction Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinjako, Jeremy

    This thesis seeks to further explore off-design point operation of gas turbines and to examine the capabilities of GasTurb 12 as a tool for off-design analysis. It is a continuation of previous thesis work which initially explored the capabilities of GasTurb 12. The research is conducted in order to: 1) validate GasTurb 12 and, 2) predict off-design performance of the Garrett GTCP85-98D located at the Arizona State University Tempe campus. GasTurb 12 is validated as an off-design point tool by using the program to predict performance of an LM2500+ marine gas turbine. Haglind and Elmegaard (2009) published a paper detailing a second off-design point method and it includes the manufacturer's off-design point data for the LM2500+. GasTurb 12 is used to predict off-design point performance of the LM2500+ and compared to the manufacturer's data. The GasTurb 12 predictions show good correlation. Garrett has published specification data for the GTCP85-98D. This specification data is analyzed to determine the design point and to comment on off-design trends. Arizona State University GTCP85-98D off-design experimental data is evaluated. Trends presented in the data are commented on and explained. The trends match the expected behavior demonstrated in the specification data for the same gas turbine system. It was originally intended that a model of the GTCP85-98D be constructed in GasTurb 12 and used to predict off-design performance. The prediction would be compared to collected experimental data. This is not possible because the free version of GasTurb 12 used in this research does not have a module to model a single spool turboshaft. This module needs to be purchased for this analysis.

  8. Independent Blade Pitch Controller Design for a Three-Bladed Turbine Using Disturbance Accommodating Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na; Wright, Alan D.; Johnson, Kathryn E.

    2016-08-01

    Two independent pitch controllers (IPCs) based on the disturbance accommodating control (DAC) algorithm are designed for the three-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine to regulate rotor speed and to mitigate blade root flapwise bending loads in above-rated wind speed. One of the DAC-based IPCs is designed based on a transformed symmetrical-asymmetrical (TSA) turbine model, with wind disturbances being modeled as a collective horizontal component and an asymmetrical linear shear component. Another DAC-based IPC is designed based on a multiblade coordinate (MBC) transformed turbine model, with a horizontal component and a vertical shear component being modeled as step waveform disturbance. Both of the DAC-based IPCs are found via a regulation equation solved by Kronecker product. Actuator dynamics are considered in the design processes to compensate for actuator phase delay. The simulation study shows the effectiveness of the proposed DAC-based IPCs compared to a proportional-integral (PI) collective pitch controller (CPC). Improvement on rotor speed regulation and once-per-revolution and twice-per-revolution load reductions has been observed in the proposed IPC designs.

  9. Independent Blade Pitch Controller Design for a Three-Bladed Turbine Using Disturbance Accommodating Control: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Na; Wright, Alan D.; Johnson, Kathryn E.

    2016-07-29

    Two independent pitch controllers (IPCs) based on the disturbance accommodating control (DAC) algorithm are designed for the three-bladed Controls Advanced Research Turbine to regulate rotor speed and to mitigate blade root flapwise bending loads in above-rated wind speed. One of the DAC-based IPCs is designed based on a transformed symmetrical-asymmetrical (TSA) turbine model, with wind disturbances being modeled as a collective horizontal component and an asymmetrical linear shear component. Another DAC-based IPC is designed based on a multiblade coordinate (MBC) transformed turbine model, with a horizontal component and a vertical shear component being modeled as step waveform disturbance. Both of the DAC-based IPCs are found via a regulation equation solved by Kronecker product. Actuator dynamics are considered in the design processes to compensate for actuator phase delay. The simulation study shows the effectiveness of the proposed DAC-based IPCs compared to a proportional-integral (PI) collective pitch controller (CPC). Improvement on rotor speed regulation and once-per-revolution and twice-per-revolution load reductions has been observed in the proposed IPC designs.

  10. Using partial safety factors in wind turbine design and testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musial, W.D. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the relationship between wind turbine design and testing in terms of the certification process. An overview of the current status of international certification is given along with a description of limit-state design basics. Wind turbine rotor blades are used to illustrate the principles discussed. These concepts are related to both International Electrotechnical Commission and Germanischer Lloyd design standards, and are covered using schematic representations of statistical load and material strength distributions. Wherever possible, interpretations of the partial safety factors are given with descriptions of their intended meaning. Under some circumstances, the authors` interpretations may be subjective. Next, the test-load factors are described in concept and then related to the design factors. Using technical arguments, it is shown that some of the design factors for both load and materials must be used in the test loading, but some should not be used. In addition, some test factors not used in the design may be necessary for an accurate test of the design. The results show that if the design assumptions do not clearly state the effects and uncertainties that are covered by the design`s partial safety factors, outside parties such as test labs or certification agencies could impose their own meaning on these factors.

  11. Computational method for the design of wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitale, A.J. [Instituto Argentino de Oceanografia, Camino La Carrindanga Km. 7.5, CC 804, B8000FWB Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Facultad Regional Bahia Blanca, GESE, 11 de Abril 461, B8000LMI Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Nacional del Sur, Dpto. de Ing. Electrica y de Computadoras, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Rossi, A.P. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional Facultad Regional Bahia Blanca, GESE, 11 de Abril 461, B8000LMI Bahia Blanca (Argentina); Universidad Nacional del Sur, Dpto. de Ing. Electrica y de Computadoras, Av. Alem 1253, 8000 Bahia Blanca (Argentina)

    2008-07-15

    Zeus Disenador was developed to design low-power, horizontal-axis wind turbine blades, by means of an iterative algorithm. With this software, it is possible to obtain the optimum blade shape for a wind turbine to satisfy energy requirements of an electric system with optimum rotor efficiency. The number of blades, the airfoil curves and the average wind velocity can be specified by the user. The user can also request particular edge conditions for the width of the blades and for the pitch angle. Results are provided in different windows. Two- and three-dimensional graphics show the aspect of the resultant blade. Numerical results are displayed for blade length, blade surface, pitch angle variation along the blade span, rotor angular speed, rotor efficiency and rotor output power. Software verifications were made by comparing rotor power and rotor efficiency for different designs. Results were similar to those provided by commercial wind generator manufacturers. (author)

  12. The Design and Analysis of Helium Turbine Expander Impeller with a Given All-Over-Controlled Vortex Distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To make the large-scale helium cryogenic system of fusion device EAST (experimental advanced super-conducting tokamak) run stably, as the core part, the helium turbine expander must meet the requirement of refrigeration capacity. However, previous designs were based on one dimension flow to determine the average fluid parameters and geometric parameters of impeller cross-sections, so that it could not describe real physical processes in the internal flow of the turbine expander. Therefore, based on the inverse proposition of streamline curvature method in the context of quasi-three-dimensional flows, the all-over-controlled vortex concept was adopted to design the impeller under specified condition. The wrap angle of the impeller blade and the whole flow distribution on the meridian plane were obtained; meanwhile the performance of the designed impeller was analyzed. Thus a new design method is proposed here for the inverse proposition of the helium turbine expander impeller

  13. The Design and Analysis of Helium Turbine Expander Impeller with a Given All-Over-Controlled Vortex Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaodong; Fu, Bao; Zhuang, Ming

    2014-03-01

    To make the large-scale helium cryogenic system of fusion device EAST (experimental advanced super-conducting tokamak) run stably, as the core part, the helium turbine expander must meet the requirement of refrigeration capacity. However, previous designs were based on one dimension flow to determine the average fluid parameters and geometric parameters of impeller cross-sections, so that it could not describe real physical processes in the internal flow of the turbine expander. Therefore, based on the inverse proposition of streamline curvature method in the context of quasi-three-dimensional flows, the all-over-controlled vortex concept was adopted to design the impeller under specified condition. The wrap angle of the impeller blade and the whole flow distribution on the meridian plane were obtained; meanwhile the performance of the designed impeller was analyzed. Thus a new design method is proposed here for the inverse proposition of the helium turbine expander impeller.

  14. Aerodynamic design study on HTGR helium gas turbines. Investigation on the effect of design conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance prediction codes for an axial turbine and an axial compressor were prepared based on the loss models of Craig, Cox and Wilson and of Koch, Smith and Wilson respectively. Using those codes, preliminary design of 3600 rpm single-shaft HTGR helium gas turbines were carried out. Influences of changing system mass flow rate and pressure on turbine and compressor design and performance were surveyed. Possible conditions of these parameters were found in which 3600 rpm single-shaft gas turbines could be properly designed. Feasibility of magnetic bearings and rotor dynamic design, which were not taken into account in this investigation, should be considered in future studies. A small power, high pressure HTGR gas turbine is difficult to design in a single-shaft configuration. As an alternative plan, a preliminary design of a 2-shaft gas turbine with an electrical output of 100 MWe and an inlet pressure of 6 MPa was carried out. High practicability and performance were expected. Probably, in this particular case, magnetic bearings now on the market can be used. (author). 65 refs

  15. Surrogate Assisted Design Optimization of an Air Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Rameez Badhurshah; Abdus Samad

    2014-01-01

    Surrogates are cheaper to evaluate and assist in designing systems with lesser time. On the other hand, the surrogates are problem dependent and they need evaluation for each problem to find a suitable surrogate. The Kriging variants such as ordinary, universal, and blind along with commonly used response surface approximation (RSA) model were used in the present problem, to optimize the performance of an air impulse turbine used for ocean wave energy harvesting by CFD analysis. A three-level...

  16. Innovative Design of Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad

    2013-01-01

    , it is well known that the VAWT is advantages over a HAWT in terms of a cost and the simplicity (Paraschivoiu 2002). In this PhD project a simple blade design is incorporated by using the two-element airofoil technology for a three straight-bladed VAWT. The design considerations of a two airfoil are given......, and its aerodynamic characteristics are obtained by an experimental method. A new design is called D2퐴 − 푉퐴푊푇 and a test ring is made to validate the numerical results. A double multiple stream tube method (DMSTM) and blade element method (BEM) are used to determine the numerical performance of a proposed...

  17. Life prediction of advanced materials for gas turbine application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamrik, S.Y.; Ray, A.; Koss, D.A. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Most of the studies on the low cycle fatigue life prediction have been reported under isothermal conditions where the deformation of the material is strain dependent. In the development of gas turbines, components such as blades and vanes are exposed to temperature variations in addition to strain cycling. As a result, the deformation process becomes temperature and strain dependent. Therefore, the life of the component becomes sensitive to temperature-strain cycling which produces a process known as {open_quotes}thermomechanical fatigue, or TMF{close_quotes}. The TMF fatigue failure phenomenon has been modeled using conventional fatigue life prediction methods, which are not sufficiently accurate to quantitatively establish an allowable design procedure. To add to the complexity of TMF life prediction, blade and vane substrates are normally coated with aluminide, overlay or thermal barrier type coatings (TBC) where the durability of the component is dominated by the coating/substrate constitutive response and by the fatigue behavior of the coating. A number of issues arise from TMF depending on the type of temperature/strain phase cycle: (1) time-dependent inelastic behavior can significantly affect the stress response. For example, creep relaxation during a tensile or compressive loading at elevated temperatures leads to a progressive increase in the mean stress level under cyclic loading. (2) the mismatch in elastic and thermal expansion properties between the coating and the substrate can lead to significant deviations in the coating stress levels due to changes in the elastic modulii. (3) the {open_quotes}dry{close_quotes} corrosion resistance coatings applied to the substrate may act as primary crack initiation sites. Crack initiation in the coating is a function of the coating composition, its mechanical properties, creep relaxation behavior, thermal strain range and the strain/temperature phase relationship.

  18. Design analysis of vertical wind turbine with airfoil variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maulana, Muhammad Ilham; Qaedy, T. Masykur Al; Nawawi, Muhammad

    2016-03-01

    With an ever increasing electrical energy crisis occurring in the Banda Aceh City, it will be important to investigate alternative methods of generating power in ways different than fossil fuels. In fact, one of the biggest sources of energy in Aceh is wind energy. It can be harnessed not only by big corporations but also by individuals using Vertical Axis Wind Turbines (VAWT). This paper presents a three-dimensional CFD analysis of the influence of airfoil design on performance of a Darrieus-type vertical-axis wind turbine (VAWT). The main objective of this paper is to develop an airfoil design for NACA 63-series vertical axis wind turbine, for average wind velocity 2,5 m/s. To utilize both lift and drag force, some of designs of airfoil are analyzed using a commercial computational fluid dynamics solver such us Fluent. Simulation is performed for this airfoil at different angles of attach rearranging from -12°, -8°, -4°, 0°, 4°, 8°, and 12°. The analysis showed that the significant enhancement in value of lift coefficient for airfoil NACA 63-series is occurred for NACA 63-412.

  19. Design Optimization of a Variable-Speed Power Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, Eric S.; Jones, Scott M.; Gray, Justin S.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Rotary Wing Project is investigating technologies that will enable the development of revolutionary civil tilt rotor aircraft. Previous studies have shown that for large tilt rotor aircraft to be viable, the rotor speeds need to be slowed significantly during the cruise portion of the flight. This requirement to slow the rotors during cruise presents an interesting challenge to the propulsion system designer as efficient engine performance must be achieved at two drastically different operating conditions. One potential solution to this challenge is to use a transmission with multiple gear ratios and shift to the appropriate ratio during flight. This solution will require a large transmission that is likely to be maintenance intensive and will require a complex shifting procedure to maintain power to the rotors at all times. An alternative solution is to use a fixed gear ratio transmission and require the power turbine to operate efficiently over the entire speed range. This concept is referred to as a variable-speed power-turbine (VSPT) and is the focus of the current study. This paper explores the design of a variable speed power turbine for civil tilt rotor applications using design optimization techniques applied to NASA's new meanline tool, the Object-Oriented Turbomachinery Analysis Code (OTAC).

  20. Processing of Advanced Cast Alloys for A-USC Steam Turbine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Hawk, Jeffery A.; Cowen, Christopher J.; Maziasz, Philip J.

    2012-02-01

    The high-temperature components within conventional supercritical coal-fired power plants are manufactured from ferritic/martensitic steels. To reduce greenhouse-gas emissions, the efficiency of pulverized coal steam power plants must be increased to as high a temperature and pressure as feasible. The proposed steam temperature in the DOE/NETL Advanced Ultra Supercritical power plant is high enough (760°C) that ferritic/martensitic steels will not work for the majority of high-temperature components in the turbine or for pipes and tubes in the boiler due to temperature limitations of this class of materials. Thus, Ni-based superalloys are being considered for many of these components. Off-the-shelf forged nickel alloys have shown good promise at these temperatures, but further improvements can be made through experimentation within the nominal chemistry range as well as through thermomechanical processing and subsequent heat treatment. However, cast nickel-based superalloys, which possess high strength, creep resistance, and weldability, are typically not available, particularly those with good ductility and toughness that are weldable in thick sections. To address those issues related to thick casting for turbine casings, for example, cast analogs of selected wrought nickel-based superalloys such as alloy 263, Haynes 282, and Nimonic 105 have been produced. Alloy design criteria, melt processing experiences, and heat treatment are discussed with respect to the as-processed and heat-treated microstructures and selected mechanical properties. The discussion concludes with the prospects for full-scale development of a thick section casting for a steam turbine valve chest or rotor casing.

  1. Turbine Design and Analysis for the J-2X Engine Turbopumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcu, Bogdan; Tran, Ken; Dorney, Daniel J.; Schmauch, Preston

    2008-01-01

    Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center are developing the advanced upper stage J-2X engine based on the legacy design of the J-2/J-2S family of engines which powered the Apollo missions. The cryogenic propellant turbopumps have been denoted as Mark72-F and Mark72-0 for the fuel and oxidizer side, respectively. Special attention is focused on preserving the essential flight-proven design features while adapting the design to the new turbopump configuration. Advanced 3-D CFD analysis has been employed to verify turbine aero performance at current flow regime boundary conditions and to mitigate risks associated with stresses. A limited amount of redesign and overall configuration modifications allow for a robust design with performance level matching or exceeding requirement.

  2. Cost analysis of advanced turbine blade manufacturing processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, C. F.; Blake, D. E.; Stelson, T. S.

    1977-01-01

    A rigorous analysis was conducted to estimate relative manufacturing costs for high technology gas turbine blades prepared by three candidate materials process systems. The manufacturing costs for the same turbine blade configuration of directionally solidified eutectic alloy, an oxide dispersion strengthened superalloy, and a fiber reinforced superalloy were compared on a relative basis to the costs of the same blade currently in production utilizing the directional solidification process. An analytical process cost model was developed to quantitatively perform the cost comparisons. The impact of individual process yield factors on costs was also assessed as well as effects of process parameters, raw materials, labor rates and consumable items.

  3. CMC Technology Advancements for Gas Turbine Engine Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grady, Joseph E.

    2013-01-01

    CMC research at NASA Glenn is focused on aircraft propulsion applications. The objective is to enable reduced engine emissions and fuel consumption for more environmentally friendly aircraft. Engine system studies show that incorporation of ceramic composites into turbine engines will enable significant reductions in emissions and fuel burn due to increased engine efficiency resulting from reduced cooling requirements for hot section components. This presentation will describe recent progress and challenges in developing fiber and matrix constituents for 2700 F CMC turbine applications. In addition, ongoing research in the development of durable environmental barrier coatings, ceramic joining integration technologies and life prediction methods for CMC engine components will be reviewed.

  4. Advanced Wind Turbine Program Next Generation Turbine Development Project: June 17, 1997--April 30, 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GE Wind Energy, LLC

    2006-05-01

    This document reports the technical results of the Next Generation Turbine Development Project conducted by GE Wind Energy LLC. This project is jointly funded by GE and the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory.The goal of this project is for DOE to assist the U.S. wind industry in exploring new concepts and applications of cutting-edge technology in pursuit of the specific objective of developing a wind turbine that can generate electricity at a levelized cost of energy of $0.025/kWh at sites with an average wind speed of 15 mph (at 10 m height).

  5. Design geometry and design/off-design performance computer codes for compressors and turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1995-01-01

    This report summarizes some NASA Lewis (i.e., government owned) computer codes capable of being used for airbreathing propulsion system studies to determine the design geometry and to predict the design/off-design performance of compressors and turbines. These are not CFD codes; velocity-diagram energy and continuity computations are performed fore and aft of the blade rows using meanline, spanline, or streamline analyses. Losses are provided by empirical methods. Both axial-flow and radial-flow configurations are included.

  6. Design studies for twist-coupled wind turbine blades.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valencia, Ulyses (Wichita State University, Wichita, KS); Locke, James (Wichita State University, Wichita, KS)

    2004-06-01

    This study presents results obtained for four hybrid designs of the Northern Power Systems (NPS) 9.2-meter prototype version of the ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade. The ERS-100 wind turbine rotor blade was designed and developed by TPI composites. The baseline design uses e-glass unidirectional fibers in combination with {+-}45-degree and random mat layers for the skin and spar cap. This project involves developing structural finite element models of the baseline design and carbon hybrid designs with and without twist-bend coupling. All designs were evaluated for a unit load condition and two extreme wind conditions. The unit load condition was used to evaluate the static deflection, twist and twist-coupling parameter. Maximum deflections and strains were determined for the extreme wind conditions. Linear and nonlinear buckling loads were determined for a tip load condition. The results indicate that carbon fibers can be used to produce twist-coupled designs with comparable deflections, strains and buckling loads to the e-glass baseline.

  7. Parametric study of turbine NGV blade lean and vortex design

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Shaowen; David G. MacManus; Luo Jianqiao

    2016-01-01

    The effects of blade lean and vortex design on the aerodynamics of a turbine entry nozzle guide vane (NGV) are considered using computational fluid dynamics. The aim of the work is to address some of the uncertainties which have arisen from previous studies where conflicting results have been reported for the effect on the NGV. The configuration was initially based on the energy efficient engine turbine which also served as the validation case for the computational method. A total of 17 NGV configurations were evaluated to study the effects of lean and vortex design on row efficiency and secondary kinetic energy. The distribution of mass flow ratio is introduced as an additional factor in the assessment of blade lean effects. The results show that in the turbine entry NGV, the secondary flow strength is not a dominant factor that determines NGV losses and therefore the changes of loading distribution due to blade lean and the associated loss mecha-nisms should be regarded as a key factor. Radial mass flow redistribution under different NGV lean and twist is demonstrated as an addition key factor influencing row efficiency.

  8. Parametric study of turbine NGV blade lean and vortex design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Shaowen

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The effects of blade lean and vortex design on the aerodynamics of a turbine entry nozzle guide vane (NGV are considered using computational fluid dynamics. The aim of the work is to address some of the uncertainties which have arisen from previous studies where conflicting results have been reported for the effect on the NGV. The configuration was initially based on the energy efficient engine turbine which also served as the validation case for the computational method. A total of 17 NGV configurations were evaluated to study the effects of lean and vortex design on row efficiency and secondary kinetic energy. The distribution of mass flow ratio is introduced as an additional factor in the assessment of blade lean effects. The results show that in the turbine entry NGV, the secondary flow strength is not a dominant factor that determines NGV losses and therefore the changes of loading distribution due to blade lean and the associated loss mechanisms should be regarded as a key factor. Radial mass flow redistribution under different NGV lean and twist is demonstrated as an addition key factor influencing row efficiency.

  9. Elektrisk Design og Styring. Simulation Platform to Model, Optimize and Design Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iov, Florin; Hansen, A. D.; Soerensen, P.;

    This report is a general overview of the results obtained in the project ?Electrical Design and Control. Simulation Platform to Model, Optimize and Design Wind Turbines?. The report is structured in six chapters. First, the background of this project and the main goals as well as the structure...... of the simulation platform is given. The main topologies for wind turbines, which have been taken into account during the project, are briefly presented. Then, the considered simulation tools namely: HAWC, DIgSILENT, Saber and Matlab/Simulink have been used in this simulation platform are described. The focus here...... is on the modelling and simulation time scale aspects. The abilities of these tools are complementary and they can together cover all the modelling aspects of the wind turbines e.g. mechanical loads, power quality, switching, control and grid faults. New models and new control algorithms for wind turbine systems have...

  10. Preliminary design of 600 MWt HTGR-gas turbine plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Yasushi; Miyamoto, Yoshiaki; Shiozawa, Shusaku [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Research Establishment

    1999-07-01

    In JAERI a feasibility study of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor - Gas Turbine (HTGR-GT) system has been carried out since January, 1997 as an assigned work by the Science and Technology Agency. This paper describes a result of a preliminary design for a direct cycle plant of 600 MWt carried out in 1997 fiscal year within the framework of this feasibility study. A reactor inlet gas temperature of 460degC, a reactor outlet gas temperature of 850degC and a helium gas pressure of 6 MPa were selected. A power density of 6 MW/m{sup 3} and the maximum burnup of 10{sup 5} MWD/ton were achieved. A single-shaft horizontal turbomachine of 3600 rpm was selected and placed in a turbine vessel. A net thermal efficiency of 45.7% is expected to be achieved. (author)

  11. Conventional and novel control designs for direct driven PMSG wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shuhui; Haskew, Timothy A.; Xu, Ling [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Alabama, 317 Houser Hall, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States)

    2010-03-15

    With the advance of power electronic technology, direct driven permanent magnet synchronous generators (PMSG) have increasingly drawn interests to wind turbine manufactures. This paper studies and compares conventional and a novel control designs for a direct driven PMSG wind turbine. The paper presents transient and steady-state models of a PMSG system in a d-q reference frame. Then, general PMSG characteristics are investigated in the rotor-flux-oriented frame. A shortage of conventional control mechanisms is studied analytically and through computer simulation. A novel direct-current based d-q vector control technique is proposed by integrating fuzzy, adaptive and traditional PID control technologies in an optimal control configuration. Comparison study demonstrates that the proposed control approach, having superior performance in various aspects, is effective not only in achieving desired PMSG control objectives but also in improving the optimal performance of the overall system. (author)

  12. Integrated airfoil and blade design method for large wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    and a free-stream Mach number of 0.25 near the tip. Results show that the new airfoils achieve a high power coefficient in a wide range of angles of attack (AOA) and are extremely insensitive to surface roughness. Finally, a full blade analysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and blade element......This paper presents an integrated method for designing airfoil families of large wind turbine blades. For a given rotor diameter and a tip speed ratio, optimal airfoils are designed based on the local speed ratios. To achieve a high power performance at low cost, the airfoils are designed...... with the objectives of high Cp and small chord length. When the airfoils are obtained, the optimum flow angle and rotor solidity are calculated which forms the basic input to the blade design. The new airfoils are designed based on a previous in-house designed airfoil family which was optimized at a Reynolds number...

  13. Design Method of Guide Vane for Wells Turbine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Masami SUZUKI

    2006-01-01

    Guide vanes are installed in the Wells turbine in order to improve its efficiency, self-rotating characteristics and off design performance with stall. This work attempts to explain the role of these guide vanes on the basis of momentum theory. It is shown that the upstream vanes are more effective in enhancing efficiency than the downstream ones. A design method for guide vanes is suggested based on experimental data and potential theory.Experimental studies carried out by the author confirm the theory proposed.

  14. Partial Safety Factors for Fatigue Design of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    In the present paper calibration of partial safety factors for fatigue design of wind turbine blades is considered. The stochastic models for the physical uncertainties on the material properties are based on constant amplitude fatigue tests and the uncertainty on Miners rule for linear damage...... accumulation is determined from variable amplitude fatigue tests with the Wisper and Wisperx spectra. The statistical uncertainty for the assessment of the fatigue loads is also investigated. The partial safety factors are calibrated for design load case 1.2 in IEC 61400-1. The fatigue loads are determined...

  15. DK-iteration robust control design of a wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaei, Mahmood; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2011-01-01

    The problem of robust control of a wind turbine is considered in this paper. A controller is designed based on a 2 degrees of freedom linearized model. An extended Kalman filter is used to estimate effective wind speed and the estimated wind speed is used to find the operating point of the wind...... include these uncertainties as parametric uncertainties in the model and design a robust controller using DK-iteration method. The controller is applied on a full complexity simulation model and simulations are performed for wind speed step changes....

  16. Design and Analysis of Gas Turbine Blade by Potential Flow Approach

    OpenAIRE

    V. Vijaya Kumar,; R. Lalitha Narayana

    2014-01-01

    The design features of the turbine segment of the gas turbine have been taken from the “preliminary design of a power turbine for maximization of an existing turbojet engine”. It was observed that in the above design, after the rotor blades being designed they were analyzed only for the mechanical stresses. As the temperature has a significant effect on the overall stress in the rotor blades, a detailed study is carried out on the temperature effects to have a clear understand...

  17. Advanced combustion technologies for gas turbine power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandsburger, U.; Desu, S.B. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Roe, L.A.

    1995-10-01

    During the second half of fiscal year 1995 progress was made in all three funded subject areas of the project as well as in a new area. Work in the area of mixing and combustion management through flow actuation was transferred into an enclosed facility. Jet mixing in a ducted co-flow was examined. The same jets were also subjected to a strong acoustic field established in the duct. Excitation of the jet with static spatial modes was shown to be effective even in the presence of co-flow and the acoustic field. Only when a wall is placed at the jet exit plane did the acoustic field dominate the jet dispersion (as expected due to reflective boundary conditions and the jet shear layer receptivity). This case is, however, not the most relevant to gas turbine combustors since it precludes co-flow. In the area of combustor testing, the design, fabrication, and assembly of a modular combustor test rig for project has been completed at the University of Arkansas. In the area of high temperature piezoceramic actuator materials development, Sr{sub 2}(Nb{sub x}Ta{sub 1-x}){sub 2}O{sub 7} powders have been synthesized, and bulk samples and thick films sintered. These materials have a curie temperature of about 1400{degrees}C compared with 300{degrees}C for the commercially available PZT. While at room temperature the new materials show a piezoelectric constant (d{sub 33}) which is a factor of 100 lower than PZT, at high temperatures they can exhibit significant action. A new area of non-linear, neural-net based, controllers for mixing and combustion control has been added during the second contract year. This work is not funded by the contract. Significant progress was made in this area. Neural nets with up to 15 neurons in the hidden layer were trained with experimental data and also with data generated using linear stability theory. System ID was performed successfully. The network was then used to predict the behavior of jets excited at other modes not used for the training.

  18. Advanced industrial gas turbine technology readiness demonstration program. Phase II. Final report: compressor rig fabrication assembly and test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitzer, J. K.; Smith, J. D.

    1981-03-01

    The results of a component technology demonstration program to fabricate, assemble and test an advanced axial/centrifugal compressor are presented. This work was conducted to demonstrate the utilization of advanced aircraft gas turbine cooling and high pressure compressor technology to improve the performance and reliability of future industrial gas turbines. Specific objectives of the compressor component testing were to demonstrate 18:1 pressure ratio on a single spool at 90% polytropic efficiency with 80% fewer airfoils as compared to current industrial gas turbine compressors. The compressor design configuration utilizes low aspect ratio/highly-loaded axial compressor blading combined with a centrifugal backend stage to achieve the 18:1 design pressure ratio in only 7 stages and 281 axial compressor airfoils. Initial testing of the compressor test rig was conducted with a vaneless centrifugal stage diffuser to allow documentation of the axial compressor performance. Peak design speed axial compressor performance demonstrated was 91.8% polytropic efficiency at 6.5:1 pressure ratio. Subsequent documentation of the combined axial/centrifugal performance with a centrifugal stage pipe diffuser resulted in the demonstration of 91.5% polytropic efficiency and 14% stall margin at the 18:1 overall compressor design pressure ratio. The demonstrated performance not only exceeded the contract performance goals, but also represents the highest known demonstrated compressor performance in this pressure ratio and flow class. The performance demonstrated is particularly significant in that it was accomplished at airfoil loading levels approximately 15% higher than that of current production engine compressor designs. The test results provide conclusive verification of the advanced low aspect ratio axial compressor and centrifugal stage technologies utilized.

  19. A row-by-row off-design performance calculation method for turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schobeiri, T.; Abouelkheir, M.

    1991-01-01

    The turbine component of a gas turbine engine is frequently subjected to extreme operation conditions associated with significant changes in mass flow, turbine inlet temperature, pressure and rotational speed. These off-design operation conditions significantly affect the flow deflection within the turbine stage, which consists of individual stator and rotor rows. As a result, the stage parameters representing the velocity diagram will change and affect the efficiency and performance of the stage and, thus, the turbine. A row-by-row calculation method is presented for predicting the performance behavior of turbines under extreme off-design conditions. The method is applied to a multistage turbine for which the off-design performance is calculated and compared with the measurement.

  20. Advanced turbine cooling, heat transfer, and aerodynamic studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Je-Chin Han; Schobeiri, M.T. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The contractual work is in three parts: Part I - Effect of rotation on enhanced cooling passage heat transfer, Part II - Effect on Thermal Barrier Coating (TBC) spallation on surface heat transfer, and Part III - Effect of surface roughness and trailing edge ejection on turbine efficiency under unsteady flow conditions. Each section of this paper has been divided into three parts to individually accommodate each part. Part III is further divided into Parts IIIa and IIIb.

  1. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  2. Advanced 3D inverse method for designing turbomachine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States)

    1995-10-01

    To meet the goal of 60% plant-cycle efficiency or better set in the ATS Program for baseload utility scale power generation, several critical technologies need to be developed. One such need is the improvement of component efficiencies. This work addresses the issue of improving the performance of turbo-machine components in gas turbines through the development of an advanced three-dimensional and viscous blade design system. This technology is needed to replace some elements in current design systems that are based on outdated technology.

  3. Design And Analysis Of Savonius Wind Turbine Blades

    OpenAIRE

    Kshitija. M. Deshmukh,; Deepak .V. Mishra

    2015-01-01

    There are two kinds of wind turbines according to the axis of rotation to the ground, horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT) and vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT). VAWTs include both a drag type configuration like Savonius wind turbine and a lift-type configuration like Darrieus wind turbine. Savonius wind rotor has many advantages such as low starting speeds and no need for external torque for its starting. Moreover it is cheaper in construction and has low maintenance. It is inde...

  4. Advanced Low NOx Combustors for Aircraft Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P. B.; White, D. J.; Shekleton, J. R.; Butze, H. F.

    1976-01-01

    A test rig program was conducted with the objective of evaluating and minimizing the exhaust emissions, in particular NOx, of two advanced aircraft combustor concepts at a simulated high-altitude cruise condition. The two pre-mixed, lean-reaction designs are known as the Jet Induced Circulation (JIC) combustor and the Vortex Air Blast (VAB) combustor and were rig tested in the form of reverse flow can combustors in the 0.13 ni (5.0 in. ) size range. Various configuration modifications were applied to the JIC and VAB combustor designs in an effort to reduce the emissions levels. The VAB combustor demonstrated a NOx level of 1.11 gm NO2/kg fuel with essentially 100 percent combustion efficiency at the simulated cruise combustor condition of 507 kPa (5 atm), 833 K (1500 R), inlet pressure and temperature respectively, and 1778 K (3200 R) outlet temperature on Jet-Al fuel. These configuration screening tests were carried out on essentially reaction zones only, in order to simplify the construction and modification of the combustors and to uncouple any possible effects on the emissions produced by the dilution flow. Tests were also conducted however at typical engine idle conditions on both combustors equipped with dilution ports in order to better define the problem areas involved in the operation of such concepts over a complete engine operational envelope. Versions of variable-geometry, JIC and VAB annular combustors are proposed.

  5. Design Preliminaries for Direct Drive under Water Wind Turbine Generator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leban, Krisztina Monika; Ritchie, Ewen; Argeseanu, Alin

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the preliminary design process of a 20 MW electric generator. The application calls for an offshore, vertical axis, direct drive wind turbine. Arguments for selecting the type of electric machine for the application are presented and discussed. Comparison criteria for deciding...... on a type of machine are listed. Additional constraints emerging from the direct drive, vertical axis concepts are considered. General rules and a preliminary algorithm are discussed for the machine selected to be most suitable for the imposed conditions....

  6. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  7. Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle Reliability, Availability & Maintainability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leonard Angello

    2005-09-30

    Power generators are concerned with the maintenance costs associated with the advanced turbines that they are purchasing. Since these machines do not have fully established Operation and Maintenance (O&M) track records, power generators face financial risk due to uncertain future maintenance costs. This risk is of particular concern, as the electricity industry transitions to a competitive business environment in which unexpected O&M costs cannot be passed through to consumers. These concerns have accelerated the need for intelligent software-based diagnostic systems that can monitor the health of a combustion turbine in real time and provide valuable information on the machine's performance to its owner/operators. EPRI, Impact Technologies, Boyce Engineering, and Progress Energy have teamed to develop a suite of intelligent software tools integrated with a diagnostic monitoring platform that, in real time, interpret data to assess the 'total health' of combustion turbines. The 'Combustion Turbine Health Management System' (CTHMS) will consist of a series of 'Dynamic Link Library' (DLL) programs residing on a diagnostic monitoring platform that accepts turbine health data from existing monitoring instrumentation. CTHMS interprets sensor and instrument outputs, correlates them to a machine's condition, provide interpretative analyses, project servicing intervals, and estimate remaining component life. In addition, the CTHMS enables real-time anomaly detection and diagnostics of performance and mechanical faults, enabling power producers to more accurately predict critical component remaining useful life and turbine degradation.

  8. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown.

  9. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercialization demonstration. Quarterly report, October 1--December 31, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue.

  10. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, January 1--March 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 1Q97.

  11. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing and pre-commercial demonstration. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and the US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which will be sited and operated in Phase 4. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 2Q97.

  12. Optimization of wind turbine rotors - using advanced aerodynamic and aeroelastic models and numerical optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doessing, M.

    2011-05-15

    During the last decades the annual energy produced by wind turbines has increased dramatically and wind turbines are now available in the 5MW range. Turbines in this range are constantly being developed and it is also being investigated whether turbines as large as 10-20MW are feasible. The design of very large machines introduces new problems in the practical design, and optimization tools are necessary. These must combine the dynamic effects of both aerodynamics and structure in an integrated optimization environment. This is referred to as aeroelastic optimization. The Risoe DTU optimization software HAWTOPT has been used in this project. The quasi-steady aerodynamic module have been improved with a corrected blade element momentum method. A structure module has also been developed which lays out the blade structural properties. This is done in a simplified way allowing fast conceptual design studies and with focus on the overall properties relevant for the aeroelastic properties. Aeroelastic simulations in the time domain were carried out using the aeroelastic code HAWC2. With these modules coupled to HAWTOPT, optimizations have been made. In parallel with the developments of the mentioned numerical modules, focus has been on analysis and a fundamental understanding of the key parameters in wind turbine design. This has resulted in insight and an effective design methodology is presented. Using the optimization environment a 5MW wind turbine rotor has been optimized for reduced fatigue loads due to apwise bending moments. Among other things this has indicated that airfoils for wind turbine blades should have a high lift coefficient. The design methodology proved to be stable and a help in the otherwise challenging task of numerical aeroelastic optimization. (Author)

  13. Gas-turbine critical research and advanced technology support project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, J. S.; Lowell, C. E.; Niedzwiecki, R. W.; Nainiger, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The technical progress made during the first 15 months of a planned 40-month project to provide a critical-technology data base for utility gas-turbine systems capable of burning coal-derived fuels is summarized. Tasks were included in the following areas: (1) combustion, to study the combustion of coal-derived fuels and conversion of fuel-bound nitrogen to NOx; (2) materials, to understand and prevent hot corrosion; and (3) system studies, to integrate and guide the other technologies. Significant progress was made.

  14. SMART wind turbine rotor. Design and field test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berg, Jonathan Charles; Resor, Brian Ray; Paquette, Joshua A.; White, Jonathan Randall

    2014-01-01

    The Wind Energy Technologies department at Sandia National Laboratories has developed and field tested a wind turbine rotor with integrated trailing-edge flaps designed for active control of rotor aerodynamics. The SMART Rotor project was funded by the Wind and Water Power Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and was conducted to demonstrate active rotor control and evaluate simulation tools available for active control research. This report documents the design, fabrication, and testing of the SMART Rotor. This report begins with an overview of active control research at Sandia and the objectives of this project. The SMART blade, based on the DOE / SNL 9-meter CX-100 blade design, is then documented including all modifications necessary to integrate the trailing edge flaps, sensors incorporated into the system, and the fabrication processes that were utilized. Finally the test site and test campaign are described.

  15. Design Of Rotor Blade For Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Using Double Aerofoil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Ratkovich, Nicolas Rios; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning;

    . In this current work two aerofoils are used to design a rotor blade for a vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency on the rotor. Double aerofoil blade design consists of a main aerofoil and a slat aerofoil. The parameters related to position and orientation of the slat aerofoil with respect......Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention compared to horizontal wind turbines due to their suitability in urban use because they generate less noise, have bird free turbines and lower cost. There is few vertical axis wind turbines design with good power curve....... However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology in practice for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double aerofoil elements mainly used in aeroplane wing design...

  16. Low-order aeroelastic models of wind turbines for controller design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Ivan Bergquist

    Wind turbine controllers are used to optimize the performance of wind turbines such as to reduce power variations and fatigue and extreme loads on wind turbine components. Accurate tuning and design of modern controllers must be done using low-order models that accurately captures the aeroelastic...... by modal truncation by using the aeroelastic mode shapes of a fully flexible wind turbine. To capture the effect of shed vorticity and dynamic stall, a relatively large number of aerodynamically dominated modes are required, due to the assumption of independent annular flow tubes in the Blade Element...... response of the wind turbine. The purpose of this thesis is to investigate the necessary model complexity required in aeroelastic models used for controller design and to analyze and propose methods to design low-order aeroelastic wind turbine models that are suited for model-based control design...

  17. Advanced load alleviation for wind turbines using adaptive trailing edge flaps: Sensoring and control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, Peter Bjoern

    2010-02-15

    The purpose of wind turbines and their predecessors the windmill, is to convert the energy in the wind to usable energy forms. Whereas windmills of the past focused on the conversion of wind power to torque for grinding, pumping and winching, modern wind turbines convert the wind energy into electric power. They do so through incorporation of generators, which convert mechanical torque into electricity. Wind turbines are designed to keep the overall cost per produced Kilo Watt hour as low as possible. One way of improving the performance and lifetime of the wind turbine is through active flow control. Active control is often considered costly but if the lifespan of the components can be increased it could be justifiable. This thesis covers various aspects of 'smart control' such as control theory, sensoring, optimization, experiments and numerical modeling. (author)

  18. An integrated approach for optimal design of micro gas turbine combustors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuligno, Luca; Micheli, Diego; Poloni, Carlo

    2009-06-01

    The present work presents an approach for the optimized design of small gas turbine combustors, that integrates a 0-D code, CFD analyses and an advanced game theory multi-objective optimization algorithm. The output of the 0-D code is a baseline design of the combustor, given the required fuel characteristics, the basic geometry (tubular or annular) and the combustion concept (i.e. lean premixed primary zone or diffusive processes). For the optimization of the baseline design a simplified parametric CAD/mesher model is then defined and submitted to a CFD code. Free parameters of the optimization process are position and size of the liner hole arrays, their total area and the shape of the exit duct, while different objectives are the minimization of NOx emissions, pressure losses and combustor exit Pattern Factor. A 3D simulation of the optimized geometry completes the design procedure. As a first demonstrative example, the integrated design process was applied to a tubular combustion chamber with a lean premixed primary zone for a recuperative methane-fuelled small gas turbine of the 100 kW class.

  19. An Integrated Approach for Optimal Design of Micro Gas Turbine Combustors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Luca Fuligno; Diego Micheli; Carlo Poloni

    2009-01-01

    The present work presents an approach for the optimized design of small gas turbine combustors, that integrates a 0-D code, CFD analyses and an advanced game theory multi-objective optimization algorithm. The output of the 0-D code is a baseline design of the comhustor, given the required fuel characteristics, the basic geometry (tubular or annular) and the combustion concept (i.e. lean premixed primary zone or diffusive processes). For the optimi-zation of the baseline design a simplified parametric CAD/mesher model is then defined and submitted to a CFD code. Free parameters of the optimization process are position and size of the liner hole arrays, their total area and the shape of the exit duct, while different objectives are the minimization of NO, emissions, pressure losses and comhustor exit Pattern Factor. A 3D simulation of the optimized geometry completes the design procedure. As a first demonstrative example, the integrated design process was applied to a tubular combustion chamber with a lean premixed primary zone for a recuperative methane-fuelled small gas turbine of the 100 kW class.

  20. Materials Selection in Gas Turbine Engine Design and the Role of Low Thermal Expansion Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagow, Benjamin W.

    2016-08-01

    Materials selection criteria in gas turbine engine design are reviewed, and several design challenges are introduced where selection of low coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) materials can help improve engine performance and operability. This is followed by a review of the types of low CTE materials that are suitable for gas turbine engine applications, and discussion of their advantages and disadvantages. The primary limitation of low CTE materials is their maximum use temperature; if higher temperature materials could be developed, this could result in novel turbine system designs for gas turbine engines.

  1. Degradation of TBC Systems in Environments Relevant to Advanced Gas Turbines for IGCC Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gleeson, Brian [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    Air plasma sprayed (APS) thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are used to provide thermal insulation for the hottest components in gas turbines. Zirconia stabilized with 7wt% yttria (7YSZ) is the most common ceramic top coat used for turbine blades. The 7YSZ coating can be degraded from the buildup of fly-ash deposits created in the power-generation process. Fly ash from an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) system can result from coal-based syngas. TBCs are also exposed to harsh gas environments containing CO2, SO2, and steam. Degradation from the combined effects of fly ash and harsh gas atmospheres has the potential to severely limit TBC lifetimes. The main objective of this study was to use lab-scale testing to systematically elucidate the interplay between prototypical deposit chemistries (i.e., ash and its constituents, K2SO4, and FeS) and environmental oxidants (i.e., O2, H2O and CO2) on the degradation behavior of advanced TBC systems. Several mechanisms of early TBC failure were identified, as were the specific fly-ash constituents responsible for degradation. The reactivity of MCrAlY bondcoats used in TBC systems was also investigated. The specific roles of oxide and sulfate components were assessed, together with the complex interplay between gas composition, deposit chemistry and alloy reactivity. Bondcoat composition design strategies to mitigate corrosion were established, particularly with regard to controlling phase constitution and the amount of reactive elements the bondcoat contains in order to achieve optimal corrosion resistance.

  2. Three-dimensional analysis of the Pratt and Whitney alternate design SSME fuel turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirtley, K. R.; Beach, T. A.; Adamczyk, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The three dimensional viscous time-mean flow in the Pratt and Whitney alternate design space shuttle main engine fuel turbine is simulated using the average passage Navier-Stokes equations. The migration of secondary flows generated by upstream blade rows and their effect on the performance of downstream blade rows is studied. The present simulation confirms that the flow in this two stage turbine is highly three dimensional and dominated by the tip leakage flow. The tip leakage vortex generated by the first blade persists through the second blade and adversely affects its performance. The greatest mixing of the inlet total temperature distortion occurs in the second vane and is due to the large leakage vortex generated by the upstream rotor. It is assumed that the predominant spanwise mixing mechanism in this low aspect ratio turbine is the radial transport due to the deterministically unsteady vortical flow generated by upstream blade rows. A by-product of the analysis is accurate pressure and heat loads for all blade rows under the influence of neighboring blade rows. These aero loads are useful for advanced structural analysis of the vanes and blades.

  3. RELIABILITY BASED DESIGN OF FIXED FOUNDATION WIND TURBINES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichols, R.

    2013-10-14

    Recent analysis of offshore wind turbine foundations using both applicable API and IEC standards show that the total load demand from wind and waves is greatest in wave driven storms. Further, analysis of overturning moment loads (OTM) reveal that impact forces exerted by breaking waves are the largest contributor to OTM in big storms at wind speeds above the operating range of 25 m/s. Currently, no codes or standards for offshore wind power generators have been adopted by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) for use on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Current design methods based on allowable stress design (ASD) incorporate the uncertainty in the variation of loads transferred to the foundation and geotechnical capacity of the soil and rock to support the loads is incorporated into a factor of safety. Sources of uncertainty include spatial and temporal variation of engineering properties, reliability of property measurements applicability and sufficiency of sampling and testing methods, modeling errors, and variability of estimated load predictions. In ASD these sources of variability are generally given qualitative rather than quantitative consideration. The IEC 61400‐3 design standard for offshore wind turbines is based on ASD methods. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methods are being increasingly used in the design of structures. Uncertainties such as those listed above can be included quantitatively into the LRFD process. In LRFD load factors and resistance factors are statistically based. This type of analysis recognizes that there is always some probability of failure and enables the probability of failure to be quantified. This paper presents an integrated approach consisting of field observations and numerical simulation to establish the distribution of loads from breaking waves to support the LRFD of fixed offshore foundations.

  4. Proceedings of the Advanced Turbine Systems Annual Program Review meeting. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    Goal of the 8-year program is to develop cleaner, more efficient, and less expensive gas turbine systems for utility and industrial electric power generation, cogeneration, and mechanical drive units. The conference is held annually for energy executives, engineers, scientists, and other interested parties industry, academia, and Government. Advanced turbine systems topics discussed during five technical sessions included policy and strategic issues, program element overviews and technical reviews, related activities, university/industry consortium interactions, and supportive projects. Twenty-one papers presented during the technical sessions are contained in this volume; they are processed separately for the data base.

  5. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which

  6. A discussion on turbine design for safe operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brekke, H.

    2012-11-01

    The paper gives a brief description of the hydraulic design of Francis and Pelton runners. The dynamic behaviour at part load has been a major problem for low head and medium head Francis turbines. The main reason for this has been inter blade separation and unstable swirl flow in the draft tube. A description is given on the hydraulic design of X-BLADE runners to obtain stable operation on the whole range of operation by reducing the cross flow. A classical theoretical analysis is also given on the dynamic hydraulic load on Pelton buckets. Several CFD analyses of this non stationary flow have been presented during the last decade, but the velocity distribution in the jets have not been correct. Experimental research work is presented on the complexity of this problem.

  7. Surrogate Assisted Design Optimization of an Air Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rameez Badhurshah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Surrogates are cheaper to evaluate and assist in designing systems with lesser time. On the other hand, the surrogates are problem dependent and they need evaluation for each problem to find a suitable surrogate. The Kriging variants such as ordinary, universal, and blind along with commonly used response surface approximation (RSA model were used in the present problem, to optimize the performance of an air impulse turbine used for ocean wave energy harvesting by CFD analysis. A three-level full factorial design was employed to find sample points in the design space for two design variables. A Reynolds-averaged Navier Stokes solver was used to evaluate the objective function responses, and these responses along with the design variables were used to construct the Kriging variants and RSA functions. A hybrid genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal point in the design space. It was found that the best optimal design was produced by the universal Kriging while the blind Kriging produced the worst. The present approach is suggested for renewable energy application.

  8. Advanced PWR fuel design concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For nearly 15 years, Combustion Engineering has provided pressurized water reactor fuel with the features most suppliers are now introducing in their advanced fuel designs. Zircaloy grids, removable upper end fittings, large fission gas plenum, high burnup, integral burnable poisons and sophisticated analytical methods are all features of C-E standard fuel which have been well proven by reactor performance. C-E's next generation fuel for pressurized water reactors features 24-month operating cycles, optimal lattice burnable poisons, increased resistance to common industry fuel rod failure mechanisms, and hardware and methodology for operating margin improvements. Application of these various improvements offer continued improvement in fuel cycle economics, plant operation and maintenance. (author)

  9. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.

  10. Morping blade design for vertical axis wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macphee, David; Beyene, Asfaw

    2015-11-01

    Wind turbines operate at peak efficiency at a certain set of operational conditions. Away from these conditions, conversion efficiency drops significantly, requiring pitch and yaw control schemes to mitigate these losses. These efforts are an example of geometric variability, allowing for increased power production but with an unfortunate increase in investment cost to the energy conversion system. In Vertical-Axis Wind Turbines (VAWTs), the concept of pitch control is especially complicated due to a dependence of attack angle on armature azimuth. As a result, VAWT pitch control schemes, both active and passive, are as of yet unfeasible. This study investigates a low-cost, passive pitch control system, in which VAWT blades are constructed of a flexible material, allowing for continuous shape-morphing in response to local aerodynamic loading. This design is analyzed computationally using a finite-volume fluid-structure interaction routine and compared to a geometrically identical rigid rotor. The results indicate that the flexible blade increases conversion efficiency by reducing the severity of vortex shedding, allowing for greater average torque over a complete revolution.

  11. Demonstration of a Basis for Tall Wind Turbine Design, EUDP Project Final Report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Natarajan, Anand; Dimitrov, Nikolay Krasimirov; Madsen, Peter Hauge;

    Wind turbine design using calibrated wind models have been proposed to be used in conjunction with load cases which lead to reduced uncertainties in the design of wind turbines with hub heights above 60m. These recommended wind profiles have been made for shear, wind directional change and turbul...

  12. Design and verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, P.; Bak, C.; Gaunaa, M.;

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents the design and experimental verification of the Risø-B1 airfoil family for MW-size wind turbines with variable speed and pitch control. Seven airfoils were designed with thickness-to-chord ratios between 15% and 53% to cover the entire span of a wind turbine blade. The airfoil...

  13. Potentials for site-specific design of MW sized wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, K.; Fuglsang, P.; Schepers, G.

    2001-01-01

    The potential for site specific design of MW sized wind turbines is quantified by comparing design loads for wind turbines installed at a range of different sites. The sites comprise on-shore normal flat terrain stand-alone conditions and wind farm conditions together with offshore and mountainou...

  14. Computer Aided Design of Kaplan Turbine Piston with\tSolidWorks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Jianu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the steps for 3D computer aided design (CAD of Kaplan turbine piston made in SolidWorks.The present paper is a tutorial for a Kaplan turbine piston 3D geometry, which is dedicaded to the Parts Sketch and Parts Features design and Drawing Geometry and Drawing Annotation.

  15. Application of aeroacoustic models to design of wind turbine rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Madsen, H.A. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1997-12-31

    A design method is presented for wind turbine rotors. The design process is split into overall design of the rotor and detailed design of the blade tip. A numerical optimization tool is used together with a semi-empirical noise prediction code for overall rotor design. The noise prediction code is validated with measurements and good agreement is obtained both on the total noise emission and on the sensitivity to wind speed, tip pitch angle and tip speed. A design study for minimum noise emission for a 300 kW rotor shows that the total sound power level can be reduced by 3 dB(A) without loss in energy production and the energy production can be increased by 2% without increase in the total noise. Detailed CFD calculations are subsequently done to resolve the blade tip flow. The characteristics of the general flow and the tip vortex are found, and the relevant parameters for the aeroacoustic models are derived for a sharp rectangular tip. (au) 16 refs.

  16. Innovative design approaches for large wind turbine blades : final report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2004-05-01

    The goal of the Blade System Design Study (BSDS) was investigation and evaluation of design and manufacturing issues for wind turbine blades in the one to ten megawatt size range. A series of analysis tasks were completed in support of the design effort. We began with a parametric scaling study to assess blade structure using current technology. This was followed by an economic study of the cost to manufacture, transport and install large blades. Subsequently we identified several innovative design approaches that showed potential for overcoming fundamental physical and manufacturing constraints. The final stage of the project was used to develop several preliminary 50m blade designs. The key design impacts identified in this study are: (1) blade cross-sections, (2) alternative materials, (3) IEC design class, and (4) root attachment. The results show that thick blade cross-sections can provide a large reduction in blade weight, while maintaining high aerodynamic performance. Increasing blade thickness for inboard sections is a key method for improving structural efficiency and reducing blade weight. Carbon/glass hybrid blades were found to provide good improvements in blade weight, stiffness, and deflection when used in the main structural elements of the blade. The addition of carbon resulted in modest cost increases and provided significant benefits, particularly with respect to deflection. The change in design loads between IEC classes is quite significant. Optimized blades should be designed for each IEC design class. A significant portion of blade weight is related to the root buildup and metal hardware for typical root attachment designs. The results show that increasing the number of blade fasteners has a positive effect on total weight, because it reduces the required root laminate thickness.

  17. Overview of power converter designs feasible for high voltage transformer-less wind turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sztykiel, Michal

    2011-01-01

    Many leading wind turbine manufacturers are pushing forward in variable-speed wind turbines, often exceeding 5 MW. Therefore, novel designs and concepts for optimal high power wind turbines appeared. One of the most promising concepts is the high voltage (10-35 kV) transformer-less topology. High...... topology along with an overview of most promising candidates for optimal full-scale power converter design. Study is carried with proposed and justified high voltage wind turbine application along with selection of existing and most promising multilevel power converter topologies, which could be...

  18. Advanced Offshore Wind Turbine/Foundation Concept for the Great Lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Afjeh, Abdollah A. [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States); Windpower, Nautica [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States); Marrone, Joseph [OCC COWI, Vancouver (Canada); Wagner, Thomas [Nautica Windpower, Olmsted Falls, OH (United States)

    2013-08-29

    This project investigated a conceptual 2-bladed rotor wind turbine design and assessed its feasibility for installation in the Great Lakes. The levelized cost of energy was used for this purpose. A location in Lake Erie near the coast of Cleveland, Ohio was selected as the application site. The loading environment was defined using wind and wave data collected at a weather station in Lake Erie near Cleveland. In addition, the probability distributions of the annual significant wave height and wind speed were determined. A model of the dependence of the above two quantities was also developed and used in the study of wind turbine system loads. Loads from ice floes and ridges were also included.The NREL 5 MW 3-bladed rotor wind turbine concept was used as the baseline design. The proposed turbine design employs variable pitch blade control with tip-brakes and a teeter mechanism. The rotor diameter, rated power and the tower dimensions were selected to closely match those of the NREL 5 MW wind turbine.A semi-floating gravity base foundation was designed for this project primarily to adapt to regional logistical constraints to transport and install the gravity base foundation. This foundation consists of, from bottom to top, a base plate, a buoyancy chamber, a taper zone, a column (with ice cone), and a service platform. A compound upward-downward ice cone was selected to secure the foundation from moving because of ice impact.The turbine loads analysis was based on International ElectroTechnical Committee (IEC) Standard 61400-1, Class III winds. The NREL software FAST was the primary computational tool used in this study to determine all design load cases. An initial set of studies of the dynamics of wind turbines using Automatic Dynamic Analysis of Mechanical Systems (ADAMS) demonstrated that FAST and ADAMS load predictions were comparable. Because of its relative simplicity and short run times, FAST was selected for this study. For ice load calculations, a method

  19. Technical design and principle test of active magnetic bearings for the turbine compressor of HTR-10GT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi Lei, E-mail: shlinet@tsinghua.edu.cn [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yu Suyuan; Yang Guojun; Shi Zhengang; Xu Yang [Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

    2012-10-15

    The 10 MW high temperature gas-cooled test reactor coupled with gas-turbine circle (HTR-10GT) has been carried out by the Institute of Nuclear and New Energy Technology (INET) of Tsinghua University in China since year 2002. In the power convention unit (PCU) of the HTR-10GT, the contact-free and no-lubricating active magnetic bearings (AMB) are adopted to support the vertical high-speed turbine machine shaft, because of their numerous advantages over the conventional oil mechanical bearings under the special reactor operating conditions. Based on the previous studies and small tests of the AMBs, the final engineering design of the AMBs for the HTR-10GT turbine compressor rotor has been finished recently. This paper firstly introduces the design principle and technical futures of the AMBs. Then the main structure, as well as the key dimensions and parameters of the different AMB components are illustrated in detail. Besides, the rotor dynamic analysis is conducted to provide the mathematic model for the unbalance attenuation with high performance control system design in order to smoothly pass across the first two bending critical speeds before reaching the rated speed of 15,000 rpm. Furthermore, a small AMB flexible test system in compliance with the dynamic similarity principle of the helium turbine compressor rotor of the HTR-10GT, has been set up to validate the advanced control algorithms and accumulate design and operation experiences for the next full scale experiment in the near future.

  20. Advanced turbine systems study system scoping and feasibility study. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-04-01

    United Technologies Research Center, Pratt & Whitney Commercial Engine Business, And Pratt & Whitney Government Engine and Space Propulsion has performed a preliminary analysis of an Advanced Turbine System (ATS) under Contract DE-AC21-92MC29247 with the Morgantown Energy Technology Center. The natural gas-fired reference system identified by the UTC team is the Humid Air Turbine (HAT) Cycle in which the gas turbine exhaust heat and heat rejected from the intercooler is used in a saturator to humidify the high pressure compressor discharge air. This results in a significant increase in flow through the turbine at no increase in compressor power. Using technology based on the PW FT4000, the industrial engine derivative of the PW4000, currently under development by PW, the system would have an output of approximately 209 MW and an efficiency of 55.3%. Through use of advanced cooling and materials technologies similar to those currently in the newest generation military aircraft engines, a growth version of this engine could attain approximately 295 MW output at an efficiency of 61.5%. There is the potential for even higher performance in the future as technology from aerospace R&D programs is adapted to aero-derivative industrial engines.

  1. Advanced biomass power generation: The biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The most promising initial strategy for modernizing bioenergy is the production of electricity or the cogeneration of electricity and heat using advanced gas turbines fired by gasified biomass. The major advances that have been made in coal gasification technology, to marry the gas turbine to coal, are readily adaptable to biomass applications. integrating biomass gasifiers with aeroderivative gas turbines in particular makes it possible to achieve high efficiencies and low unit capital costs at the modest scales required with bioenergy systems. Beyond the turn of the century fuel cells operated on gasified biomass offer the promise of even higher performance levels. For the near term, electricity produced with biomass-integrated gasifier/gas turbine (BIG/GT) power systems not only offers major environmental benefits but also would be competitive with electricity produced from fossil fuels and nuclear energy in a wide range of circumstances. It is reasonable to expect that biomass could be providing 25-35% of total global power generation in the second quarter of the next century, helping make it possible to substantially reduce CO2 emissions from the power sector relative to present levels in that time frame

  2. Blade System Design Studies Volume I: Composite Technologies for Large Wind Turbine Blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GRIFFIN, DAYTON A.; ASHWILL, THOMAS D.

    2002-07-01

    As part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Partnerships for Advanced Component Technologies (WindPACT) program, Global Energy Concepts LLC (GEC) is performing a study concerning innovations in materials, processes and structural configurations for application to wind turbine blades in the multi-megawatt range. The project team for this work includes experts in all areas of wind turbine blade design, analysis, manufacture, and testing. Constraints to cost-effective scaling-up of the current commercial blade designs and manufacturing methods are identified, including self-gravity loads, transportation, and environmental considerations. A trade-off study is performed to evaluate the incremental changes in blade cost, weight, and stiffness for a wide range of composite materials, fabric types, and manufacturing processes. Fiberglass/carbon fiber hybrid blades are identified as having a promising combination of cost, weight, stiffness and fatigue resistance. Vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding, resin film infision, and pre-impregnated materials are identified as having benefits in reduced volatile emissions, higher fiber content, and improved laminate quality relative to the baseline wet lay-up process. Alternative structural designs are identified, including jointed configurations to facilitate transportation. Based on the results to date, recommendations are made for further evaluation and testing under this study to verify the predicted material and structural performance.

  3. Partial Safety Factors for Fatigue Design of Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2010-01-01

    In the present paper calibration of partial safety factors for fatigue design of wind turbine blades is considered. The stochastic models for the physical uncertainties on the material properties are based on constant amplitude fatigue tests and the uncertainty on Miners rule for linear damage...... accumulation is determined from variable amplitude fatigue tests with the Wisper and Wisperx spectra. The statistical uncertainty for the assessment of the fatigue loads is also investigated. The partial safety factors have been calibrated for different variations of the stochastic models in order to determine...... the influence from each of these. In general model uncertainty on the aerodynamics has the largest influence on the partial safety factors followed by the physical uncertainty on the material properties and the model uncertainty on Miners rule. In the paper a framework is presented for determination...

  4. Development of impact design methods for ceramic gas turbine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, J.; Cuccio, J.; Kington, H.

    1990-01-01

    Impact damage prediction methods are being developed to aid in the design of ceramic gas turbine engine components with improved impact resistance. Two impact damage modes were characterized: local, near the impact site, and structural, usually fast fracture away from the impact site. Local damage to Si3N4 impacted by Si3N4 spherical projectiles consists of ring and/or radial cracks around the impact point. In a mechanistic model being developed, impact damage is characterized as microcrack nucleation and propagation. The extent of damage is measured as volume fraction of microcracks. Model capability is demonstrated by simulating late impact tests. Structural failure is caused by tensile stress during impact exceeding material strength. The EPIC3 code was successfully used to predict blade structural failures in different size particle impacts on radial and axial blades.

  5. Design analysis and development of a high temperature actuaror for gas turbine blade tip clearance control

    OpenAIRE

    Coşkun, Mustafa Bulut; Coskun, Mustafa Bulut

    2011-01-01

    During a typical startup cycle industrial gas turbine blades experience rapid radial thermal expansion while bulky shroud structure with larger thermal inertia requires much longer period to reach its operating temperature. Turbine designers have to leave a safe radial distance in order to prevent contact of blades to the surrounding annular casing. However, when thermal steady state in the turbine stage is achieved, shroud and casing grow and excessive amount of blade-shroud clearance remain...

  6. Anisotropic beam model for analysis and design of passive controlled wind turbine blades

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Branner, K.; Blasques, J.P.; Kim, T.; Fedorov, V.A.; Berring, P.; Bitsche, R.D.; Berggreen, C.

    2012-02-15

    The main objective of the project was, through theoretical and experimental research, to develop and validate a fully coupled, general beam element that can be used for advanced and rapid analysis of wind turbine blades. This is fully achieved in the project and the beam element has even been implemented in the aeroelastic code HAWC2. It has also been demonstrated through a parametric study in the project that a promising possibility with the tool is to reduce fatigue loads through structural couplings. More work is needed before these possibilities are fully explored and blades with structural couplings can be put into production. A cross section analysis tool BECAS (BEam Cross section Analysis Software) has been developed and validated in the project. BECAS is able to predict all geometrical and material induced couplings. This tool has obtained great interest from both industry and academia. The developed fully coupled beam element and cross section analysis tool has been validated against both numerical calculations and experimental measurements. Numerical validation has been performed against beam type calculations including Variational Asymptotical Beam Section Analysis (VABS) and detailed shell and solid finite element analyses. Experimental validation included specially designed beams with built-in couplings, a full-scale blade section originally without couplings, which subsequently was modified with extra composite layers in order to obtain measurable couplings. Both static testing and dynamic modal analysis tests have been performed. The results from the project now make it possible to use structural couplings in an intelligent manner for the design of future wind turbine blades. The developed beam element is especially developed for wind turbine blades and can be used for modeling blades with initial curvature (pre-bending), initial twist and taper. Finally, it have been studied what size of structural couplings can be obtained in current and future

  7. Design and aero-acoustic analysis of a counter-rotating wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Vineesh V.

    Wind turbines have become an integral part of the energy business because they are one of the most economical and reliable sources of renewable energy. Conventional wind turbines are capable of capturing less than half of the energy present in the wind. Hence, to make the wind turbines more efficient, it is important to increase their performance. A horizontal axis wind turbine with multiple rotors is one concept that can achieve a higher power conversion rate. Also, a concern for wind energy is the noise generated by wind turbines. Hence, an investigation into the acoustic behavior of a multi-rotor horizontal axis wind turbine is required. In response to the need of a wind turbine design with higher power coefficient, a unique design of a counter-rotating horizontal axis wind turbine (CR-HAWT) is proposed. The Blade Element Momentum (BEM) theory is used to aerodynamically design the blades of the two rotors. Modifications are made to the BEM theory to accommodate the interaction of the two rotors. The tower effect on the noise generation of the downwind rotor is investigated. Predictions are made for the total noise generated by the wind turbine at its design operating conditions. A total power coefficient of 65.2% is predicted for the proposed CR-HAWT design. A low tip speed ratio is chosen to minimize the noise generation. The aeroacoustic analysis of the CR-HAWT shows that the noise generated at its design operating conditions is within an acceptable range. Thus, the CR-HAWT is predicted to be a quiet wind turbine with a high power coefficient, making it highly desirable for small wind turbine applications.

  8. Grid fault and design-basis for wind turbines - Final report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Anca Daniela; Cutululis, Nicolaos Antonio; Markou, Helen;

    This is the final report of a Danish research project “Grid fault and design-basis for wind turbines”. The objective of this project has been to assess and analyze the consequences of the new grid connection requirements for the fatigue and ultimate structural loads of wind turbines....... The fulfillment of the grid connection requirements poses challenges for the design of both the electrical system and the mechanical structure of wind turbines. The development of wind turbine models and novel control strategies to fulfill the TSO’s requirements are of vital importance in this design. Dynamic...... expertise in different specialized design areas for wind turbines. In order to quantify the impact of the grid faults and grid requirements fulfillment on wind turbines structural loads and thus on their lifetime, a rainflow and a statistical analysis for fatigue and ultimate structural loads, respectively...

  9. Measured and predicted rotor performance for the SERI advanced wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tangler, J.; Smith, B.; Kelley, N.; Jager, D.

    1992-02-01

    Measured and predicted rotor performance for the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) advanced wind turbine blades were compared to assess the accuracy of predictions and to identify the sources of error affecting both predictions and measurements. An awareness of these sources of error contributes to improved prediction and measurement methods that will ultimately benefit future rotor design efforts. Propeller/vane anemometers were found to underestimate the wind speed in turbulent environments such as the San Gorgonio Pass wind farm area. Using sonic or cup anemometers, good agreement was achieved between predicted and measured power output for wind speeds up to 8 m/sec. At higher wind speeds an optimistic predicted power output and the occurrence of peak power at wind speeds lower than measurements resulted from the omission of turbulence and yaw error. In addition, accurate two-dimensional (2-D) airfoil data prior to stall and a post stall airfoil data synthesization method that reflects three-dimensional (3-D) effects were found to be essential for accurate performance prediction.

  10. Physics-Based Design Tools for Lightweight Ceramic Composite Turbine Components with Durable Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Under the Supersonics Project of the NASA Fundamental Aeronautics Program, modeling and experimental efforts are underway to develop generic physics-based tools to better implement lightweight ceramic matrix composites into supersonic engine components and to assure sufficient durability for these components in the engine environment. These activities, which have a crosscutting aspect for other areas of the Fundamental Aero program, are focusing primarily on improving the multi-directional design strength and rupture strength of high-performance SiC/SiC composites by advanced fiber architecture design. This presentation discusses progress in tool development with particular focus on the use of 2.5D-woven architectures and state-of-the-art constituents for a generic un-cooled SiC/SiC low-pressure turbine blade.

  11. Modeling Tool Advances Rotorcraft Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Continuum Dynamics Inc. (CDI), founded in 1979, specializes in advanced engineering services, including fluid dynamic modeling and analysis for aeronautics research. The company has completed a number of SBIR research projects with NASA, including early rotorcraft work done through Langley Research Center, but more recently, out of Ames Research Center. NASA Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) grants on helicopter wake modeling resulted in the Comprehensive Hierarchical Aeromechanics Rotorcraft Model (CHARM), a tool for studying helicopter and tiltrotor unsteady free wake modeling, including distributed and integrated loads, and performance prediction. Application of the software code in a blade redesign program for Carson Helicopters, of Perkasie, Pennsylvania, increased the payload and cruise speeds of its S-61 helicopter. Follow-on development resulted in a $24 million revenue increase for Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation, of Stratford, Connecticut, as part of the company's rotor design efforts. Now under continuous development for more than 25 years, CHARM models the complete aerodynamics and dynamics of rotorcraft in general flight conditions. CHARM has been used to model a broad spectrum of rotorcraft attributes, including performance, blade loading, blade-vortex interaction noise, air flow fields, and hub loads. The highly accurate software is currently in use by all major rotorcraft manufacturers, NASA, the U.S. Army, and the U.S. Navy.

  12. Advanced gas turbine systems research. Quarterly report, January--March, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-04-01

    The Department of Energy is sponsoring a series of studies related to advanced gas turbine systems. Ten universities participated in the first round studies, and an additional 13 studies have been funded this year. The five areas being covered are heat transfer, aerodynamics, materials, combustion, and dynamics. Summaries are given for the 6-month progress on the 1993 subcontract studies and on the planned research for the new subcontract studies.

  13. Design And Analysis Of Savonius Wind Turbine Blades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kshitija. M. Deshmukh,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available There are two kinds of wind turbines according to the axis of rotation to the ground, horizontal axis wind turbines (HAWT and vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT. VAWTs include both a drag type configuration like Savonius wind turbine and a lift-type configuration like Darrieus wind turbine. Savonius wind rotor has many advantages such as low starting speeds and no need for external torque for its starting. Moreover it is cheaper in construction and has low maintenance. It is independent of the wind direction and has a good starting torque at lower wind speeds. The experimental study conducted in this paper aims to investigate the effect of number of blades and other criteria that can affect the performance of the model of Savonius type wind turbine. The experiments used to compare 2, 3, and 4 blades wind turbines to show tip speed ratio, torque and power coefficient related with wind speed. A simulation using ANSYS 13.0 software will show pressure distribution of wind turbine. The results of study showed that number of blades influence the performance of wind turbine. Savonius model with three blades has the best performance at high tip speed ratio.

  14. Grid fault and design-basis for wind turbines. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, A.D.; Cutululis, N.A.; Markou, H.; Soerensen, Poul; Iov, F.

    2010-01-15

    This is the final report of a Danish research project 'Grid fault and design-basis for wind turbines'. The objective of this project has been to assess and analyze the consequences of the new grid connection requirements for the fatigue and ultimate structural loads of wind turbines. The fulfillment of the grid connection requirements poses challenges for the design of both the electrical system and the mechanical structure of wind turbines. The development of wind turbine models and novel control strategies to fulfill the TSO's requirements are of vital importance in this design. Dynamic models and different fault ride-through control strategies have been developed and assessed in this project for three different wind turbine concepts (active stall wind turbine, variable speed doublyfed induction generator wind turbine, variable speed multipole permanent magnet wind turbine). A computer approach for the quantification of the wind turbines structural loads caused by the fault ride-through grid requirement, has been proposed and exemplified for the case of an active stall wind turbine. This approach relies on the combination of knowledge from complimentary simulation tools, which have expertise in different specialized design areas for wind turbines. In order to quantify the impact of the grid faults and grid requirements fulfillment on wind turbines structural loads and thus on their lifetime, a rainflow and a statistical analysis for fatigue and ultimate structural loads, respectively, have been performed and compared for two cases, i.e. one when the turbine is immediately disconnected from the grid when a grid fault occurs and one when the turbine is equipped with a fault ride-through controller and therefore it is able to remain connected to the grid during the grid fault. Different storm control strategies, that enable variable speed wind turbines to produce power at wind speeds higher than 25m/s and up to 50m/s without substantially increasing

  15. Modeling Improvements and Users Manual for Axial-flow Turbine Off-design Computer Code AXOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glassman, Arthur J.

    1994-01-01

    An axial-flow turbine off-design performance computer code used for preliminary studies of gas turbine systems was modified and calibrated based on the experimental performance of large aircraft-type turbines. The flow- and loss-model modifications and calibrations are presented in this report. Comparisons are made between computed performances and experimental data for seven turbines over wide ranges of speed and pressure ratio. This report also serves as the users manual for the revised code, which is named AXOD.

  16. Design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) has been conducted. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR that is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel. International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) takes advantage of international experience and uses the design based on Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) as reference for FOA studies of US DOE, because Japan has conducted R and Ds for the JSFR incorporating thirteen technology enhancements expected to improve safety, enhance economics, and increase reactor reliability. The targets of the ARR are to generate electricity while consuming fuel containing transuranics and to attain cost competitiveness with the similar sized LWRs. INRA proposes 3 evolutions of the ARR; ARR1, a 500 MWe demonstration plant, online in 2025; ARR2, a 1,000 MWe commercial plant, online in 2035; ARR3, a 1,500 MWe full-scale commercial plant, online in 2050. INRA believes the scale-up factor of two is acceptable increase from manufacturing and licensing points of view. Major features of the ARR1 are the following: The reactor core is 70cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is approximately 32%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.6 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh.Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop arrangement and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The ARR1 is co-located with a recycling facility. The overall plant facility arrangement is planned assuming to be constructed and installed in an inland area. The plant consists of a reactor building (including reactor auxiliary facilities and electrical/control systems), a turbine building, and a recycling building. The volume of the reactor building will be approximately 180,000 m3. The capital cost for the ARR1 and the ARR2 are

  17. Reliability-Based Design of Wind Turbine Foundations – Computational Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vahdatirad, Mohammad Javad

    increased cost-effectiveness in wind turbines, and an optimized design must be implemented on the expensive structural components. The traditional wind turbine foundation typically expends 25-30% of the total wind turbine budget; thus it is one of the most costly fabrication components. Therefore......, a reduction in foundation cost, and optimizing foundation structural design is the best solution to cost effectiveness. An optimized wind turbine foundation design should provide a suitable target reliability level. Unfortunately, the reliability level is not identified in most current deterministic design...... on the foundation reliability have already been characterized. Given that usually a conservative result has already been obtained through the current deterministic design methodologies; consequently, a reliability-based design can be suggested to quantify the uncertainties related to the design parameters...

  18. Investigation of Advanced Processed Single-Crystal Turbine Blade Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, B. J.; Biondo, C. M.; DeLuca, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation studied the influence of thermal processing and microstructure on the mechanical properties of the single-crystal, nickel-based superalloys PWA 1482 and PWA 1484. The objective of the program was to develop an improved single-crystal turbine blade alloy that is specifically tailored for use in hydrogen fueled rocket engine turbopumps. High-gradient casting, hot isostatic pressing (HIP), and alternate heat treatment (HT) processing parameters were developed to produce pore-free, eutectic-free microstructures with different (gamma)' precipitate morphologies. Test materials were cast in high thermal gradient solidification (greater than 30 C/cm (137 F/in.)) casting furnaces for reduced dendrite arm spacing, improved chemical homogeneity, and reduced interdendritic pore size. The HIP processing was conducted in 40 cm (15.7 in.) diameter production furnaces using a set of parameters selected from a trial matrix study. Metallography was conducted on test samples taken from each respective trial run to characterize the as-HIP microstructure. Post-HIP alternate HT processes were developed for each of the two alloys. The goal of the alternate HT processing was to fully solution the eutectic gamma/(gamma)' phase islands and to develop a series of modified (gamma)' morphologies for subsequent characterization testing. This was accomplished by slow cooling through the (gamma)' solvus at controlled rates to precipitate volume fractions of large (gamma)'. Post-solution alternate HT parameters were established for each alloy providing additional volume fractions of finer precipitates. Screening tests included tensile, high-cycle fatigue (HCF), smooth and notched low-cycle fatigue (LCF), creep, and fatigue crack growth evaluations performed in air and high pressure (34.5 MPa (5 ksi)) hydrogen at room and elevated temperature. Under the most severe embrittling conditions (HCF and smooth and notched LCF in 34.5 MPa (5 ksi) hydrogen at 20 C (68 F), screening test

  19. Design and Analysis of Jacket Substructures for Offshore Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Wen Chen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on investigating various existing types of offshore jacket substructures along with a proposed twisted-tripod jacket type (modified jacket (MJ-structures. The architectures of the three-leg structure, as well as the patented twisted jacket structure motivated the design of the proposed MJ-structures. The dimensions of the structures were designed iteratively using static stress analysis to ensure that all structures had a similar level of load-carrying capability. The numerical global buckling analyses were performed for all structures after the validation by the scaled-down experiments. The local buckling strength of all compressive members was analyzed using the NORSOK standard. The results showed that the proposed MJ-structures possess excellent structural behavior and few structural nodes and components competitive with the patented twisted jacket structures, while still maintaining the advantages of low material usage similar to the three-leg jacket structures. This study provides alternatives for the initial selection and design of offshore wind turbine substructures for green energy applications.

  20. Design study of 10 kW superconducting generator for wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen;

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a design study of a 10 kW superconducting slow rotating generator suitable for demonstration in a small scale wind turbine, where the drive train only consists of the turbine blades connected directly to the generator. The flux density in the superconducting rotor is chosen as B...

  1. A numerical study of automotive turbocharger mixed flow turbine inlet geometry for off design performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mixed flow turbines represent a potential solution to the increasing requirement for high pressure, low velocity ratio operation in turbocharger applications. While literature exists for the use of these turbines at such operating conditions, there is a lack of detailed design guidance for defining the basic geometry of the turbine, in particular, the cone angle – the angle at which the inlet of the mixed flow turbine is inclined to the axis. This investigates the effect and interaction of such mixed flow turbine design parameters. Computational Fluids Dynamics was initially used to investigate the performance of a modern radial turbine to create a baseline for subsequent mixed flow designs. Existing experimental data was used to validate this model. Using the CFD model, a number of mixed flow turbine designs were investigated. These included studies varying the cone angle and the associated inlet blade angle. The results of this analysis provide insight into the performance of a mixed flow turbine with respect to cone and inlet blade angle

  2. A numerical study of automotive turbocharger mixed flow turbine inlet geometry for off design performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, T.; Spence, S.; Early, J.; Filsinger, D.

    2013-12-01

    Mixed flow turbines represent a potential solution to the increasing requirement for high pressure, low velocity ratio operation in turbocharger applications. While literature exists for the use of these turbines at such operating conditions, there is a lack of detailed design guidance for defining the basic geometry of the turbine, in particular, the cone angle - the angle at which the inlet of the mixed flow turbine is inclined to the axis. This investigates the effect and interaction of such mixed flow turbine design parameters. Computational Fluids Dynamics was initially used to investigate the performance of a modern radial turbine to create a baseline for subsequent mixed flow designs. Existing experimental data was used to validate this model. Using the CFD model, a number of mixed flow turbine designs were investigated. These included studies varying the cone angle and the associated inlet blade angle. The results of this analysis provide insight into the performance of a mixed flow turbine with respect to cone and inlet blade angle.

  3. Chances in wind energy: a probalistic approach to wind turbine fatigue design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldkamp, H.F.

    2006-01-01

    Wind is becoming an ever more important source of renewable energy: installed wind turbine power now stands at 60,000 MW worldwide, providing 0.6% of world electricity demand. Still it is important that the cost of wind energy is brought down further, which means that wind turbines must be designed

  4. Materials for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Steam Turbines Task 4: Cast Superalloy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thangirala, Mani

    2015-09-30

    The Steam Turbine critical stationary structural components are high integrity Large Shell and Valve Casing heavy section Castings, containing high temperature steam under high pressures. Hence to support the development of advanced materials technology for use in an AUSC steam turbine capable of operating with steam conditions of 760°C (1400°F) and 35 Mpa (5000 psia), Casting alloy selection and evaluation of mechanical, metallurgical properties and castability with robust manufacturing methods are mandated. Alloy down select from Phase 1 based on producability criteria and creep rupture properties tested by NETL-Albany and ORNL directed the consortium to investigate cast properties of Haynes 282 and Haynes 263. The goals of Task 4 in Phase 2 are to understand a broader range of mechanical properties, the impact of manufacturing variables on those properties. Scale up the size of heats to production levels to facilitate the understanding of the impact of heat and component weight, on metallurgical and mechanical behavior. GE Power & Water Materials and Processes Engineering for the Phase 2, Task 4.0 Castings work, systematically designed and executed casting material property evaluation, multiple test programs. Starting from 15 lbs. cylinder castings to world’s first 17,000 lbs. poured weight, heavy section large steam turbine partial valve Haynes 282 super alloy casting. This has demonstrated scalability of the material for steam Turbine applications. Activities under Task 4.0, Investigated and characterized various mechanical properties of Cast Haynes 282 and Cast Nimonic 263. The development stages involved were: 1) Small Cast Evaluation: 4 inch diam. Haynes 282 and Nimonic 263 Cylinders. This provided effects of liquidus super heat range and first baseline mechanical data on cast versions of conventional vacuum re-melted and forged Ni based super alloys. 2) Step block castings of 300 lbs. and 600 lbs. Haynes 282 from 2 foundry heats were evaluated which

  5. Full 3-D viscous optimization design of a reversible pump turbine runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bi-directional operation of reversible pump turbines presents a great challenge in terms of runner design. In the present paper, an optimal design system for the pump turbine runner is presented by coupling three-dimensional (3-D) inverse design with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), Design of Experiment (DoE), Response Surface Methodology (RSM) and Multi Objective Genetic Algorithm (MOGA). A pump-turbine runner was designed using the system, with selecting blade loading distributions and blade lean as the input parameters, and the runner efficiency for both pump and turbine mode as optimization objectives. The CFD results show that a high efficiency runner can be designed using the present system

  6. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) powertrain system development for automotive applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-01

    Rotor dynamic instability investigations were conducted. Forward ball bearing hydraulic mount configurations were tested with little effect. Trial assembly of S/N 002 ceramic engine was initiated. Impeller design activities were completed on the straight line element (SLE) blade definition to address near-net-shape powder metal die forging. Performance characteristics of the Baseline Test 2A impeller were closely preserved. The modified blading design has been released for tooling procurement. Developmental testing of the diffusion flame combustor (DFC) for initial use in the S/N 002 2100 F ceramic structures engine was completed. A natural gas slave preheater was designed and fabricated. Preliminary regenerator static seal rig testing showed a significant reduction in leakage and sensitivity to stack height. Ceramic screening tests were completed and two complete sets of ceramic static structures were qualified for engine testing. Efforts on rotor dynamics development to resolve subsynchronous motion were continued.

  7. Optimization Method for Turbine Airfoil Designing Using Genetic Algorithms, CFD and Parallel Computing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An optimization method to design turbine airfoils using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) design shell coupled directly with a viscous CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis code is proposed in this paper. The blade geometry is parameterized and the optimization method is used to search for a blade geometry that will minimize the loss in the turbine cascade passage. The viscous flow prediction code is verified by the experimental data of cascade, which is typical for a gas turbine rotor blade section. A comparative study of the blades designed by the optimization technique and the original one is presented

  8. Design, development and operating experience with wet steam turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper first describes the special characteristics of wet steam units. It then goes on to discuss the principal features of the units manufactured by the author's company, the considerations on which the designs were based, and the development work carried out to validate them. Some of the design features such as the separator/reheater units and the arrangements for water extraction in the high pressure turbine are unconventional. An important characteristic of all nuclear plant is the combination of high capital cost and low fuel cost, and the consequent emphasis placed on high availability. The paper describes some service problems experienced with wet steam plant and how these were overcome with minimum loss of generation. The paper also describes a number of the developments for future wet steam plant which have evolved from these experiences, and from research and development programmes aimed at increasing the efficiency and reliability of both conventional and wet steam units. Blading, rotor construction and separator/reheater units are considered. (author)

  9. Mechanical Design of a Performance Test Rig for the Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, John C.; Xenofos, George D.; Farrow, John L.; Tyler, Tom; Williams, Robert; Sargent, Scott; Moharos, Jozsef

    2004-01-01

    To support development of the Boeing-Rocketdyne RS84 rocket engine, a full-flow, reaction turbine geometry was integrated into the NASA-MSFC turbine air-flow test facility. A mechanical design was generated which minimized the amount of new hardware while incorporating all test and instrumentation requirements. This paper provides details of the mechanical design for this Turbine Air-Flow Task (TAFT) test rig. The mechanical design process utilized for this task included the following basic stages: Conceptual Design. Preliminary Design. Detailed Design. Baseline of Design (including Configuration Control and Drawing Revision). Fabrication. Assembly. During the design process, many lessons were learned that should benefit future test rig design projects. Of primary importance are well-defined requirements early in the design process, a thorough detailed design package, and effective communication with both the customer and the fabrication contractors.

  10. Advances in Learning Design: Special Issue Editorial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tattersall, Colin; Koper, Rob

    2005-01-01

    Please cite as: Colin Tattersall and Rob Koper (2005). Advances in Learning Design: Special Issue Editorial. Journal of Interactive Media in Education (Advances in Learning Design. Special Issue, eds. Colin Tattersall, Rob Koper), 2005/03. ISSN:1365-893X [http://jime.open.ac.uk/2005/03

  11. Study of Flow Patterns in Radial and Back Swept Turbine Rotor under Design and Off-Design Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samip Shah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Paper details the numerical investigation of flow patterns in a conventional radial turbine compared with a back swept design for same application. The blade geometry of a designed turbine from a 25kW micro gas turbine was used as a baseline. A back swept blade was subsequently designed for the rotor, which departed from the conventional radial inlet blade angle to incorporate up to 25° inlet blade angle. A comparative numerical analysis between the two geometries is presented. While operating at lower than optimum velocity ratios (U/C, the 25° back swept blade offers significant increases in efficiency. In turbocharger since the turbine typically experiences lower than optimum velocity ratios, this improvement in the efficiency at off-design condition could significantly improve turbocharger performance. The numerical predictions show off-design performance gains of the order of 4.61% can be achieved, while maintaining design point efficiency.

  12. Design and experimental results for a turbine with jet flap stator and jet flap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettner, J. L.; Blessing, J. O.

    1973-01-01

    The overall performance and detailed stator performance of a negative hub reaction turbine design featuring a moderately low solidity jet flap stator and a jet flap rotor were determined. Testing was conducted over a range of turbine expansion ratios at design speed. At each expansion ratio, the stator jet flow and rotor jet flow ranged up to about 7 and 8 percent, respectively, of the turbine inlet flow. The performance of the jet flap stator/jet flap rotor turbine was compared with that of a turbine which used the same jet flap rotor and a conventional, high solidity plan stator. The effect on performance of increased axial spacing between the jet stator and rotor was also investigated.

  13. Analysis of Wells turbine design parameters by numerical simulation of the OWC performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brito-Melo, A.; Gato, L.M.C.; Sarmento, A.J.N.A. [Technical Univ. of Lisbon, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Lisbon (Portugal)

    2002-09-01

    This paper investigates by numerical simulation the influence of the Wells turbine aerodynamic design on the overall plant performance, as affected by the turbine peak efficiency and the range of flow rates within which the turbine can operate efficiently. The problem of matching the turbine to an oscillating water column (OWC) is illustrated by taking the wave climate and the OWC of the Azores power converter. The study was performed using a time-domain mathematical model based on linear water wave theory and on model experiments in a wave tank. Results are presented of numerical simulations considering several aerodynamic designs of the Wells turbine, with and without guide vanes, and with the use of a bypass pressure-relief valve. (Author)

  14. Design of a wind turbine pitch angle controller for power system stabilisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jauch, Clemens; Islam, S.M.; Sørensen, Poul Ejnar;

    2007-01-01

    The design of a PID pitch angle controller for a fixed speed active-stall wind turbine, using the root locus method is described in this paper. The purpose of this controller is to enable an active-stall wind turbine to perform power system stabilisation. For the purpose of controller design, the...... transfer function of the wind turbine is derived from the wind turbine's step response. The performance of this controller is tested by simulation, where the wind turbine model with its pitch angle controller is connected to a power system model. The power system model employed here is a realistic model of...... controller can effectively contribute to power system stabilisation. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  15. Design and development of gas cooled reactors with closed cycle gas turbines. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technological advances over the past fifteen years in the design of turbomachinery, recuperators and magnetic bearings provide the potential for a quantum improvement in nuclear power generation economics through the use of the HTGR with a closed cycle gas turbine. Enhanced international co-operation among national gas cooled reactor programmes in these common technology areas could facilitate the development of this nuclear power concept thereby achieving safety, environmental and economic benefits with overall reduced development costs. This TCM and Workshop was convened to provide the opportunity to review and examine the status of design activities and technology development in national HTGR programmes with specific emphasis on the closed cycle gas turbine, and to identify pathways which take advantage of the opportunity for international co-operation in the development of this concept. Refs, figs, tabs

  16. Preliminary Axial Flow Turbine Design and Off-Design Performance Analysis Methods for Rotary Wing Aircraft Engines. Part 1; Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-cheng, S.

    2009-01-01

    For the preliminary design and the off-design performance analysis of axial flow turbines, a pair of intermediate level-of-fidelity computer codes, TD2-2 (design; reference 1) and AXOD (off-design; reference 2), are being evaluated for use in turbine design and performance prediction of the modern high performance aircraft engines. TD2-2 employs a streamline curvature method for design, while AXOD approaches the flow analysis with an equal radius-height domain decomposition strategy. Both methods resolve only the flows in the annulus region while modeling the impact introduced by the blade rows. The mathematical formulations and derivations involved in both methods are documented in references 3, 4 for TD2-2) and in reference 5 (for AXOD). The focus of this paper is to discuss the fundamental issues of applicability and compatibility of the two codes as a pair of companion pieces, to perform preliminary design and off-design analysis for modern aircraft engine turbines. Two validation cases for the design and the off-design prediction using TD2-2 and AXOD conducted on two existing high efficiency turbines, developed and tested in the NASA/GE Energy Efficient Engine (GE-E3) Program, the High Pressure Turbine (HPT; two stages, air cooled) and the Low Pressure Turbine (LPT; five stages, un-cooled), are provided in support of the analysis and discussion presented in this paper.

  17. Integrated Approach to Design and Manufacture of Gas Turbine Components Based on Group Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jawaharlal

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with a new method that provides an integrated approach to design and manufacture of gas turbine components by using the group theory and customising standard computer aided design and manufacturing system. With this approach time consuming and iterative design procedure and process planning are automated and become more efficient. Due to the intricate and diverse nature of gas turbine components, grouping them is not easy as in other industries. A possible way of grouping the gas turbine components based on design and manufacturing attributes on a broad basis is presented. A case study of high pressure turbine disc is included with illustrations for design and process planning of this component. The proposed system is implemented on a personal computer and offers an alternate solution to sophisticated and expensive main frame based systems.

  18. Aero-Thermo-Structural Design Optimization of Internally Cooled Turbine Blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulikravich, G. S.; Martin, T. J.; Dennis, B. H.; Lee, E.; Han, Z.-X.

    1999-01-01

    A set of robust and computationally affordable inverse shape design and automatic constrained optimization tools have been developed for the improved performance of internally cooled gas turbine blades. The design methods are applicable to the aerodynamics, heat transfer, and thermoelasticity aspects of the turbine blade. Maximum use of the existing proven disciplinary analysis codes is possible with this design approach. Preliminary computational results demonstrate possibilities to design blades with minimized total pressure loss and maximized aerodynamic loading. At the same time, these blades are capable of sustaining significantly higher inlet hot gas temperatures while requiring remarkably lower coolant mass flow rates. These results suggest that it is possible to design internally cooled turbine blades that will cost less to manufacture, will have longer life span, and will perform as good, if not better than, film cooled turbine blades.

  19. Advanced induction machine model in phase coordinates for wind turbine applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fajardo, L.A.; Iov, F.; Hansen, Anca Daniela;

    2007-01-01

    In this paper an advanced phase coordinates squirrel cage induction machine model with time varying electrical parameters affected by magnetic saturation and rotor deep bar effects, is presented. The model uses standard data sheet for characterization of the electrical parameters, it is developed...... in C-code and interfaced with Matlab/Simulink through an S-Function. The investigation is conducted in the way to study the ride through capability of Squirrel Cage Induction Generators and compares the behavior of the classical DQ0 model, ABC/abc model in phase coordinate with constant parameters...... and the proposed ABC/abc phase coordinate with varying parameters model, in the presence of external faults. The results are promising for protection and control applications of fixed speed active stall controlled wind turbines. This new approach is useful to support control and planning of wind turbines...

  20. Development of interactive design system, KAIT by computer-analysis for gas turbine blade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuta, Toshio; Yamaji, Seiichi; Tanizawa, Tadashi; Isozaki, Toshiaki; Hamabe, Kenji; Hoshino, Akifumi; Sugimoto, Takao; Miyaji, Hiroshi; Take, Koji; Yoshigane, Masaru

    1987-08-20

    Upon development of various gas turbines, design of the turbine power generating portion provides the dominating influences over the turbine performance and durability. Heretofore, such design has been coped with by the accumulation of the technologies required during the design stage which had been programed individually, but due to the recent increase of development projects which contents have been upgraded, difficulties have arisen in coping with the performance design of blade profile, etc. which requires a time-consuming trial and error approach. Accordingly, Kawasaki Heavy Industries Co. has developed the Kawasaki Interactive Axial Gas Turbine Blade Design System (KAIT) which does the design and development of turbine blades, the most labor and time consuming work in designing a gas turbine, through the computer dialoguing on examination and analysis in each different specific field such as fluid dynamics, thermodynamics, structural mechanics, fatigue and high temperature strength etc.. This article explains the outline of this system. Thanks for this system, a blade with well balanced performance and durability can be designed in a short time. (13 figs, 12 refs)

  1. Comparison between pressurized design and ambient pressure design of hybrid solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S. K.; Kim, T. S.

    Design performances of the hybrid solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)-gas turbine (GT) system have been investigated. A pressurized system and an indirectly heated ambient pressure system were analyzed and their performances were compared. In the baseline layout, the basic performance characteristics of the two system configurations were analyzed, with the cell operation temperature and the pressure ratio as the main design parameters. The pressurized system exhibits a better efficiency owing to not only the higher cell voltage but also more effective utilization of gas turbine, i.e., a larger GT power contribution due to a higher turbine inlet temperature. Independent setting of the turbine inlet temperature was simulated by using the additional fuel supply as well as the air bypass. Increasing the pressure ratio of the gas turbine hardly improves the system efficiency, but the efficiency becomes less sensitive to the turbine inlet temperature. In the ambient pressure system, the available design parameter range is much reduced due to the limit on the recuperator temperature. In particular, design of the ambient pressure hybrid system with a gas turbine of a high pressure ratio does not seem quite feasible because the system efficiency that can be achieved at the possible design conditions is even lower than the efficiency of the SOFC only system.

  2. Design of low noise airfoil with high aerodynamic performance for use on small wind turbines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Taehyung; KIM; Seungmin; LEE; Hogeon; KIM; Soogab; LEE

    2010-01-01

    Wind power is one of the most reliable renewable energy sources and internationally installed capacity is increasing radically every year.Although wind power has been favored by the public in general,the problem with the impact of wind turbine noise on people living in the vicinity of the turbines has been increased.Low noise wind turbine design is becoming more and more important as noise is spreading more adverse effect of wind turbine to public.This paper demonstrates the design of 10 kW class wind turbines,each of three blades,a rotor diameter 6.4 m,a rated rotating speed 200 r/min and a rated wind speed 10 m/s.The optimized airfoil is dedicated for the 75% spanwise position because the dominant source of a wind turbine blade is trailing edge noise from the outer 25% of the blade.Numerical computations are performed for incompressible flow and for Mach number at 0.145 and for Reynolds numbers at 1.02×106 with a lift performance,which is resistant to surface contamination and turbulence intensity.The objectives in the design process are to reduce noise emission,while sustaining high aerodynamic efficiency.Dominant broadband noise sources are predicted by semi-empirical formulas composed of the groundwork by Brooks et al.and Lowson associated with typical wind turbine operation conditions.During the airfoil redesign process,the aerodynamic performance is analyzed to reduce the wind turbine power loss.The results obtained from the design process show that the design method is capable of designing airfoils with reduced noise using a commercial 10 kW class wind turbine blade airfoil as a basis.Therefore,the new optimized airfoil showing 2.9 dB reductions of total sound pressure level(SPL) and higher aerodynamic performance are achieved.

  3. Design of h-Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Teresa; Vega, Carmen; Gallegos, A.; Uzarraga, N. C.; Castro, F.

    2015-05-01

    Numerical simulation is used to predict the performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) H-Darrieus. The rotor consists of three straight blades with shape of aerofoil of the NACA family attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The influence of the solidity is tested to get design tendencies. The mesh has two fluid volumes: one sliding mesh for the rotor where the rotation velocity is established while the other is the environment of the rotor. Bearing in mind the overall flow is characterized by important secondary flows, the turbulence model selected was realizable k-epsilon with non-equilibrium wall functions. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order Muscl scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. During VAWT operation, the performance depends mainly on the relative motion of the rotating blade and has a fundamental period which depends both on the rate of rotation and the number of blades. The transient study is necessary to characterise the hysteresis phenomenon. Hence, more than six revolutions get the periodic behaviour. Instantaneous flows provide insight about wake structure interaction. Time averaged parameters let obtain the characteristic curves of power coefficient.

  4. Design of h-Darrieus vertical axis wind turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is used to predict the performance of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT H-Darrieus. The rotor consists of three straight blades with shape of aerofoil of the NACA family attached to a rotating vertical shaft. The influence of the solidity is tested to get design tendencies. The mesh has two fluid volumes: one sliding mesh for the rotor where the rotation velocity is established while the other is the environment of the rotor. Bearing in mind the overall flow is characterized by important secondary flows, the turbulence model selected was realizable k-epsilon with non-equilibrium wall functions. Conservation equations were solved with a Third-Order Muscl scheme using SIMPLE to couple pressure and velocity. During VAWT operation, the performance depends mainly on the relative motion of the rotating blade and has a fundamental period which depends both on the rate of rotation and the number of blades. The transient study is necessary to characterise the hysteresis phenomenon. Hence, more than six revolutions get the periodic behaviour. Instantaneous flows provide insight about wake structure interaction. Time averaged parameters let obtain the characteristic curves of power coefficient.

  5. Initial design of a stall-controlled wind turbine rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nygaard, T.A. [Inst. for Energiteknikk, Kjeller (Norway)

    1997-08-01

    A model intended for initial design of stall-controlled wind turbine rotors is described. The user specifies relative radial position of an arbitrary number of airfoil sections, referring to a data file containing lift-and drag curves. The data file is on the same format as used in the commercial blade-element code BLADES-/2/, where lift- and drag coefficients are interpolated from tables as function of Reynolds number, relative thickness and angle of attack. The user can set constraints on a selection of the following: Maximum power; Maximum thrust in operation; Maximum root bending moment in operation; Extreme root bending moment, parked rotor; Tip speed; Upper and lower bounds on optimisation variables. The optimisation variables can be selected from: Blade radius; Rotational speed; Chord and twist at an arbitrary number of radial positions. The user can chose linear chord distribution and a hyperbola-like twist distribution to ensure smooth planform and twist, or cubic spline interpolation for one or both. The aerodynamic model is based on classical strip theory with Prandtl tip loss correction, supplemented by empirical data for high induction factors. (EG)

  6. Design and Analysis of Gas Turbine Blade by Potential Flow Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Vijaya Kumar,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The design features of the turbine segment of the gas turbine have been taken from the “preliminary design of a power turbine for maximization of an existing turbojet engine”. It was observed that in the above design, after the rotor blades being designed they were analyzed only for the mechanical stresses. As the temperature has a significant effect on the overall stress in the rotor blades, a detailed study is carried out on the temperature effects to have a clear understanding of the combined mechanical and the thermal stresses. The first stage rotor blade of the gas turbine is analyzed for the mechanical axial and centrifugal forces. Knowing the fluid conditions at exit of the gas turbines, a value of static pressure was assumed at the turbine outlet. From this the corresponding enthalpy drop required in the power turbine is calculated. The peripheral speed of rotor and flows velocities is kept in the reasonable range so to minimize losses. In which the base profiles available and is analyzed later for flow conditions through any of the theoretical flow analysis methods such as “Potential flow Approach”

  7. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  8. Gusts and Shear Within Hurricane Eyewalls Can Exceed Offshore Wind-Turbine Design Standards

    CERN Document Server

    Worsnop, Rochelle P; Bryan, George H; Damiani, Rick; Musial, Walt

    2016-01-01

    Offshore wind energy development is underway in the U.S., with proposed sites located in hurricane-prone regions. Turbine design criteria outlined by the International Electrotechnical Commission do not encompass the extreme wind speeds and directional shifts of hurricanes stronger than a Category 2. We examine the most turbulent portion of a hurricane (the eyewall) using large-eddy simulations with Cloud Model 1 (CM1). Gusts and mean wind speeds near the eyewall exceed the current design threshold of 50 m s-1 mean wind and 70 m s-1 gusts for Class I turbines. Gust factors are greatest at the eye-eyewall interface. Further, shifts in wind direction at wind turbine hub height suggest turbines must rotate into the wind faster than current practice. Although current design standards omit mention of wind direction change across the rotor layer, large values (15-50 deg) suggest that veer should be considered in design standards.

  9. Mixed-flow vertical tubular hydraulic turbine: determination of proper design duty point

    OpenAIRE

    Bergant, Anton; Höfler, Edvard; Širok, Brane

    2015-01-01

    A new vertical single-regulated mixed-flow turbine with conical guide apparatus and without spiral casing is presented in this paper. Runner blades are fixed to the hub and runner band and resemble to the Francis type runner of extremely high specific speed. Due to lack of information and guidelines for the design of a new turbine, a theoretical model was developed in order to determinate the design duty point, i.e. to determine the optimum narrow operation range of the turbine. It is not nec...

  10. Design, Operation and Diagnostics of a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    OpenAIRE

    Colley, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    The need for sustainable energy sources becomes greater each year due to the continued depletion of fossil fuels and the resulting energy crisis. Solutions to this problem are potentially in the form of wind turbines which have been receiving increased support at a micro level. At present a number of wind turbines are being developed that are of cross-flow vertical axis operation which have shown significant increases in performance compared to existing technologies. From an extensive literat...

  11. HydroPak: concept design and analysis of a packaged cross-flow turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarises the findings of a project to complete the conceptual design and economic optimization of a modular standardised crossflow hydro-turbine. Details are given of the work to date, the comparison of HydroPak cost with conventional micro- and mini-hydro power costs, and the economic advantages of taking the ''packaged'' and ''standardised approaches'' to the design process. The market for mini-hydro turbines is discussed

  12. Wind Turbine Design Guideline DG03: Yaw and Pitch Rolling Bearing Life

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harris, T.; Rumbarger, J. H.; Butterfield, C. P.

    2009-12-01

    This report describes the design criteria, calculation methods, and applicable standards recommended for use in performance and life analyses of ball and roller (rolling) bearings for yaw and pitch motion support in wind turbine applications. The formulae presented here for rolling bearing analytical methods and bearing-life ratings are consistent with methods in current use by wind turbine designers and rolling-bearing manufacturers.

  13. Improved design for large wind turbine blades of fibre composites (Phase 4) - Summary report

    OpenAIRE

    Sørensen, Bent F; Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack; Goutianos, Stergios; Branner, Kim; Berring, Peter; Lund, E.; Wedel-Heinen, J.; Garm, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Results are summarised for the project "Improved design for large wind turbine blades (Phase 4)", partially supported by the Danish Energy Agency under the Ministry of Climate and Energy through the EUDP journal no.: 33033-0267. The aim of the project was to develop new and better design methods for wind turbine blades, so that uncertainties associated with damage and defects can be reduced. The topics that are studied include buckling-driven delamination of flat load-carrying laminates, crac...

  14. Design features of the GTD 8000 and GTD 15000 marine gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanov, Viktor I.

    1992-06-01

    An account is given of the design features and performance of the GTD 8000 and GTD 15000 marine gas turbines, whose simple-cycle thermodynamic efficiencyis of the order of 34-35 percent. A development history is presented for the component design improvements through which such performance levels were achieved. Attention is given to the counterflow combustor, bearings, and high pressure compressor/turbine spool rotor joint assembly features. These powerplants are suitable for hydrofoil and hovercraft applications.

  15. HydroPak: concept design and analysis of a packaged cross-flow turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This report summarises the findings of a project to complete the conceptual design and economic optimization of a modular standardised crossflow hydro-turbine. Details are given of the work to date, the comparison of HydroPak cost with conventional micro- and mini-hydro power costs, and the economic advantages of taking the ''packaged'' and ''standardised approaches'' to the design process. The market for mini-hydro turbines is discussed.

  16. Design of full speed 985 MW turbine for Daya Bay nuclear station, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daya Bay will be the first utility-operated nuclear power station in the People's Republic of China. It will be situated some 30 miles north-east of Hong Kong. The station will consist of two power units, each based on pressurized water reactors of 2905 MWth power output supplied by Framatome of France. The two conventional islands complete with their civil, mechanical and electrical designs and plants and comprising two 985 MWe, 3000 rpm steam turbines will be supplied by GEC Turbine Generators of the UK. The turbines are the largest full speed machines ever built in Britain. The steam cycle and plant layout are illustrated. The construction and operation of the turbines and associated valves etc are explained. The turbine control is discussed. (author)

  17. Evaluation of advanced turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. Part 3. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines for operating heads of 1000 to 1500 m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frigo, A.A.; Pistner, C.

    1980-08-01

    This is the final report in a series of three on studies of advanced hydraulic turbomachinery for underground pumped hydroelectric storage. All three reports address Francis-type, reversible pump/turbines. The first report covered single-stage regulated units; the second report covered two-stage regulated units; the present report covers multistage unregulated units. Multistage unregulated pump/turbines offer an economically attractive option for heads of 1000 to 1500 m. The feasibility of developing such machines for capacities up to 500 MW and operating heads up to 1500 m has been evaluated. Preliminary designs have been generated for six multistage pump/turbines. The designs are for nominal capacities of 350 and 500 MW and for operating heads of 1000, 1250, and 1500 m. Mechanical, hydraulic, and economic analyses indicate that these machines will behave according to the criteria used to design them and that they can be built at a reasonable cost with no unsolvable problems. Efficiencies of 85.8% and 88.5% in the generating and pumping modes, respectively, can be expected for the 500-MW, 1500-m unit. Performances of the other five machines are at least comparable, and usually better. Over a 1000 to 1500-m head range, specific $/kW costs of the pump/turbines in mid-1978 US dollars vary from 19.0 to 23.1 for the 500-MW machines, and from 21.0 to 24.1 for the 350-MW machines.

  18. Standard practice for radiographic examination of advanced aero and turbine materials and components

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This practice establishes the minimum requirements for radiographic examination of metallic and nonmetallic materials and components used in designated applications such as gas turbine engines and flight structures. 1.2 The requirements in this practice are intended to control the radiographic process to ensure the quality of radiographic images produced for use in designated applications such as gas turbine engines and flight structures; this practice is not intended to establish acceptance criteria for material or components. When examination is performed in accordance with this practice, engineering drawings, specifications or other applicable documents shall indicate the acceptance criteria. 1.3 All areas of this practice may be open to agreement between the cognizant engineering organization and the supplier, or specific direction from the cognizant engineering organization. 1.4 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the respons...

  19. Advanced thermal barrier coatings for operation in high hydrogen content fueled gas turbines.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sampath, Sanjay [Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States)

    2015-04-02

    The Center for Thermal Spray Research (CTSR) at Stony Brook University in partnership with its industrial Consortium for Thermal Spray Technology is investigating science and technology related to advanced metallic alloy bond coats and ceramic thermal barrier coatings for applications in the hot section of gasified coal-based high hydrogen turbine power systems. In conjunction with our OEM partners (GE and Siemens) and through strategic partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) (materials degradation group and high temperature materials laboratory), a systems approach, considering all components of the TBC (multilayer ceramic top coat, metallic bond coat & superalloy substrate) is being taken during multi-layered coating design, process development and subsequent environmental testing. Recent advances in process science and advanced in situ thermal spray coating property measurement enabled within CTSR has been incorporated for full-field enhancement of coating and process reliability. The development of bond coat processing during this program explored various aspects of processing and microstructure and linked them to performance. The determination of the bond coat material was carried out during the initial stages of the program. Based on tests conducted both at Stony Brook University as well as those carried out at ORNL it was determined that the NiCoCrAlYHfSi (Amdry) bond coats had considerable benefits over NiCoCrAlY bond coats. Since the studies were also conducted at different cycling frequencies, thereby addressing an associated need for performance under different loading conditions, the Amdry bond coat was selected as the material of choice going forward in the program. With initial investigations focused on the fabrication of HVOF bond coats and the performance of TBC under furnace cycle tests , several processing strategies were developed. Two-layered HVOF bond coats were developed to render optimal balance of density and surface roughness

  20. Energy Conversion Alternatives Study (ECAS), General Electric Phase 1. Volume 2: Advanced energy conversion systems. Part 1: Open-cycle gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, D. H.; Corman, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    Ten energy conversion systems are defined and analyzed in terms of efficiency. These include: open-cycle gas turbine recuperative; open-cycle gas turbine; closed-cycle gas turbine; supercritical CO2 cycle; advanced steam cycle; liquid metal topping cycle; open-cycle MHD; closed-cycle inert gas MHD; closed-cycle liquid metal MHD; and fuel cells. Results are presented.

  1. System Integration of the Horizontal-Axis Wind Turbine: The Design of Turbine Blades with an Axial-Flux Permanent Magnet Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Chi-Jeng Bai; Wei-Cheng Wang; Po-Wei Chen; Wen-Tong Chong

    2014-01-01

    In designing a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT) blade, system integration between the blade design and the performance test of the generator is important. This study shows the aerodynamic design of a HAWT blade operating with an axial-flux permanent magnet (AFPM) generator. An experimental platform was built to measure the performance curves of the AFPM generator for the purpose of designing the turbine blade. An in-house simulation code was developed based on the blade element momentum (B...

  2. Identification–Oriented Control Designs with Application to a Wind Turbine Benchmark

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Simani

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Wind turbines are complex dynamic systems forced by stochastic wind disturbances, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. Since their aerodynamics are nonlinear, wind turbine modelling is thus challenging. Therefore, the design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for these complexities, but without being too complex and unwieldy. Therefore, the main contribution of this study consists of providing two examples of robust and viable control designs with application to a wind turbine simulator. Due to the description of the considered process, extensive simulations of this test case and Monte–Carlo analysis are the tools for assessing experimentally the achieved features of the suggested control schemes, in terms of reliability, robustness, and stability, in the presence of modelling and measurement errors. These developed control methods are finally compared with different approaches designed for the same benchmark, in order to evaluate the properties of the considered control techniques.

  3. Optimization design of airfoil profiles based on the noise of wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Jin; Cheng, Jiangtao; Shen, Wenzhong;

    2012-01-01

    Based on design theory of airfoil profiles and airfoil self-noise prediction model, a new method with the target of the airfoil average efficiency-noise ratio of design ranges for angle of attack had been developed for designing wind turbine airfoils. The airfoil design method was optimized for a...

  4. Steam turbines of scientific and industrial joining 'Turboatom' , their features and perfecting ways

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article deals with the specific features of steam turbines for TPPs and NPPs developed by Turboatom Research and Production Association. Design diagrams of advanced turbines, including modified, are considered. Operation experience of turbines and turbine plants is analysed. 9 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab

  5. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-09-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the

  6. The 5 MW DeepWind floating offshore vertical wind turbine concept design - status and perspective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Kragh, Knud Abildgaard;

    2014-01-01

    Floating vertical-axis wind turbines for offshore wind energy present a concept with novelty and potentials for reducing COE. Cost reduction for offshore wind power plants is an industrial challenge, and DeepWind is - as the analysis of the current design shows-believed to be a good candidate...... in achieving this. In the paper the current design status of the 5 MW DeepWind concept is presented. The intended siting for the turbine is off the Norwegian west coast at about 250 m of sea depth. Focus is set on the integrated design highlighting structural benefits of the light rotor, the hydrodynamic...... aspects of the floating hull, and new generator design embracing magnetic bearings. Two important design tools were developed which allow the industry to analyze various VAWT(vertical Axis Wind Turbine) variants for offshore applications: a main design tool “HAWC2” for aeroelastic design of VAWTs...

  7. Aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Xinzi

    This work investigates the aerodynamic design and analysis of small horizontal axis wind turbine blades via the blade element momentum (BEM) based approach and the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based approach. From this research, it is possible to draw a series of detailed guidelines on small wind turbine blade design and analysis. The research also provides a platform for further comprehensive study using these two approaches. The wake induction corrections and stall corrections of the BEM method were examined through a case study of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine. A hybrid stall correction model was proposed to analyse wind turbine power performance. The proposed model shows improvement in power prediction for the validation case, compared with the existing stall correction models. The effects of the key rotor parameters of a small wind turbine as well as the blade chord and twist angle distributions on power performance were investigated through two typical wind turbines, i.e. a fixed-pitch variable-speed (FPVS) wind turbine and a fixed-pitch fixed-speed (FPFS) wind turbine. An engineering blade design and analysis code was developed in MATLAB to accommodate aerodynamic design and analysis of the blades.. The linearisation for radial profiles of blade chord and twist angle for the FPFS wind turbine blade design was discussed. Results show that, the proposed linearisation approach leads to reduced manufacturing cost and higher annual energy production (AEP), with minimal effects on the low wind speed performance. Comparative studies of mesh and turbulence models in 2D and 3D CFD modelling were conducted. The CFD predicted lift and drag coefficients of the airfoil S809 were compared with wind tunnel test data and the 3D CFD modelling method of the NREL/NASA Phase VI wind turbine were validated against measurements. Airfoil aerodynamic characterisation and wind turbine power performance as well as 3D flow details were studied. The detailed flow

  8. Design of wind turbines for non-standard air density

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soraperra, Giusepe

    2005-01-01

    New site typologies characterized by non-standard air density have been recently considered for wind energy exploitation. The work attempts to assess the effect of air density on turbine performance, whether with variable or fixed speed. Since the power density of the sites with non-standard dens......New site typologies characterized by non-standard air density have been recently considered for wind energy exploitation. The work attempts to assess the effect of air density on turbine performance, whether with variable or fixed speed. Since the power density of the sites with non......-standard density is intrinsically different, it is impossible to reach the standard rated power at the standard rated speed. Three scenarios are possible (i) to keep the standard rated speed of the turbine by changing the size of the electric generator; (ii) to change the rated speed of the turbine by adopting...... a different pitch angel setting; (iii) adoption of extendeders to the blades can also help in restraining the standard rated power at the standard rated speed for p less than pst. The power curves for the three turbine configurations, each in three different air density conformations, have been calculated...

  9. Off-Design Performance of a Multi-Stage Supersonic Turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorney, Daniel J.; Griffin, Lisa W.; Huber, Frank; Sondak, Douglas L.

    2003-01-01

    The drive towards high-work turbines has led to designs which can be compact, transonic, supersonic, counter rotating, or use a dense drive gas. These aggressive designs can lead to strong unsteady secondary flows and flow separation. The amplitude and extent of these unsteady flow phenomena can be amplified at off-design operating conditions. Pre-test off-design predictions have been performed for a new two-stage supersonic turbine design that is currently being tested in air. The simulations were performed using a three-dimensional unsteady Navier-Stokes analysis, and the predicted results have been compared with solutions from a validated meanline analysis.

  10. Hydraulic turbines and auxiliary equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo Gaorong [Organization of the United Nations, Beijing (China). International Centre of Small Hydroelectric Power Plants

    1995-07-01

    This document presents a general overview on hydraulic turbines and auxiliary equipment, emphasizing the turbine classification, in accordance with the different types of turbines, standard turbine series in China, turbine selection based on the basic data required for the preliminary design, general hill model curves, chart of turbine series and the arrangement of application for hydraulic turbines, hydraulic turbine testing, and speed regulating device.

  11. Injector Design for Advanced Accelerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henestroza, Enrique; Faltens, A.

    1996-11-01

    Accelerator designs intended to provide acceleration at a much lower cost per Joule than the ILSE or ELISE designs are under study. For these designs, which typically have many beams, an injector of significantly lower cost is needed. A goal, which from our design appears to be achievable, is to reduce the transverse dimension to half that of the 2 MeV, 800 mA ILSE injector(E. Henestroza, ``Injectors for Heavy Ion Fusion", Proc. of the 11th International Wkshp. on Laser Interaction and Related Plasma Phenomena, 1993.) while generating about the same current. A single channel of a lower cost injector includes an 800 kV column, accelerating a 700 mA beam extracted from a potassium source of 4 cm radius by a 120 kV electrode. The beam passes into a superconducting 7 T solenoid of 15 cm aperture and 15 cm length. This high-field solenoid provides the focusing needed for a small beam without increasing the electric field gradient. The injector and its matching section, also designed, fit within a 12 cm radius, which is small enough to allow construction of attractive multi-beam injectors. We will present solutions for the generation and transport of 700 mA potassium beams of up to 1.6 MeV within the same transverse constraint.

  12. Turbine Aeration Design Software for Mitigating Adverse Environmental Impacts Resulting From Conventional Hydropower Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, John S.

    2016-07-12

    conventional hydropower turbine aeration test-bed for computational routines and software tools for improving environmental mitigation technologies for conventional hydropower systems. In achieving this goal, we have partnered with Alstom, a global leader in energy technology development and United States power generation, with additional funding from the Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment (IREE) and the College of Science and Engineering (CSE) at the UMN

  13. Turbine Aeration Design Software for Mitigating Adverse Environmental Impacts Resulting From Conventional Hydropower Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulliver, John S. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Conventional hydropower turbine aeration test-bed for computational routines and software tools for improving environmental mitigation technologies for conventional hydropower systems. In achieving this goal, we have partnered with Alstom, a global leader in energy technology development and United States power generation, with additional funding from the Initiative for Renewable Energy and the Environment (IREE) and the College of Science and Engineering (CSE) at the UMN

  14. Application of biological design criteria and computational fluid dynamics to investigate fish survival in Kaplan turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garrison, Laura A. [Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation, Inc., York, PA (United States); Fisher, Jr., Richard K. [Voith Siemens Hydro Power Generation, Inc., York, PA (United States); Sale, Michael J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Cada, Glenn [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2002-07-01

    One of the contributing factors to fish injury in a turbine environment is shear stress. This paper presents the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to display and quantify areas of elevated shear stress in the Wanapum Kaplan turbine operating at four different flow conditions over its operating range. CFD observations will be compared to field test observations at the same four flow conditions. Methods developed here could be used to facilitate the design of turbines and related water passages with lower risks of fish injury.

  15. A Global Approach for the Design of a Rim- Driven Marine Turbine Generator for Sail Boat

    OpenAIRE

    Drouen, Laurent; CHARPENTIER, Jean-Frederic; Clenet, Stéphane; SEMAIL, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Development of new ways to provide clean onboard electric energy is a key feature for the sailing boat industry and sail race teams. This is why marine turbines (MT), are considered to provide onboard energy. These turbines can be used to harness kinetic energy of the water flow related to the ship motion. In this paper we propose to study an unconventional design of such a turbine where the electrical generator is located in the periphery of the blades and where the magnetic gap is water fil...

  16. Probabilistic Calibration of Fatigue Design Factors for Offshore Wind Turbine Support Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramirez, José Rangel; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2010-01-01

    for the considered offshore wind turbines in such a way that the specific uncertainties for the fatigue life are accounted in a rational manner. Similar approaches have been used for offshore oil & gas sub-structures, but the required reliability level for offshore wind turbines is generally lower and the fatigue......This paper describes a reliability-based approach to determine fatigue design factors (FDF) for offshore wind turbine support structures made of steel. The FDF values are calibrated to a specific reliability level and linked to a specific inspection and maintenance (I&M) strategy used...

  17. Design study of 10 kW superconducting generator for wind turbine applications

    OpenAIRE

    Abrahamsen, Asger Bech; Mijatovic, Nenad; Seiler, Eugen; Sørensen, Mads Peter; Koch, Martin; Nørgård, Per Bromand; Pedersen, Niels Falsig; Træholt, Chresten; Andersen, Niels Hessel; Østergaard, Jacob

    2009-01-01

    We have performed a design study of a 10 kW superconducting slow rotating generator suitable for demonstration in a small scale wind turbine, where the drive train only consists of the turbine blades connected directly to the generator. The flux density in the superconducting rotor is chosen as B = 1 Tesla to be similar to the performance of permanent magnets and to represent a layout, which can be scaled up in future off-shore wind turbines. The proposed generator is a 8 pole synchronous mac...

  18. Power Control Design for Variable-Speed Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesc Pozo

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers power generation control in variable-speed variable-pitch horizontal-axis wind turbines operating at high wind speeds. A dynamic chattering torque control and a proportional integral (PI pitch control strategy are proposed and validated using the National Renewable Energy Laboratory wind turbine simulator FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence code. Validation results show that the proposed controllers are effective for power regulation and demonstrate high-performances for all other state variables (turbine and generator rotational speeds; and smooth and adequate evolution of the control variables for turbulent wind conditions. To highlight the improvements of the provided method, the proposed controllers are compared to relevant previously published studies.

  19. Design of rotor blade for vertical axis wind turbine using double aerofoil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chougule, P.D.; Ratkovich, N.; Kirkegaard, P.H.; Nielsen, Soeren R.K. [Aalborg Univ.. Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg (Denmark)

    2012-07-01

    Nowadays, small vertical axis wind turbines are receiving more attention compared to horizontal wind turbines due to their suitability in urban use,because they generate less noise, have bird free turbines and lower cost. There are few vertical axis wind turbines design with good power curve. However, the efficiency of power extraction has not been improved. Therefore, an attempt has been made to utilize high lift technology in practice for vertical axis wind turbines in order to improve power efficiency. High lift is obtained by double aerofoil elements mainly used in aeroplane wing design. In this current work, two aerofoils are used to design a rotor blade for a vertical axis wind turbine to improve the power efficiency on the rotor. Double aerofoil blade design consists of a main aerofoil and a slat aerofoil. The parameters related to position and orientation of the slat aerofoil with respect to the main aerofoil defines the high lift. Orientation of slat aerofoil is a parameter of investigation in this paper. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) have been used to obtain the aerodynamic characteristics of double aerofoil. The CFD simulations were carried out using Star CCM+ v7.04 (CD-adapco, UK) software. Aerofoils used in this work are selected from standard aerofoil shapes. (Author)

  20. Dynamic Soil-Structure Interaction issues in designing offshore wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Bhattacharya, S.

    2012-01-01

    Choosing appropriate foundations for supporting offshore wind turbines is one of the uncertainties in the future rounds of offshore wind power development. Offshore wind turbines are dynamically sensitive structures as the global natural frequency of the whole system is very close to the forcing frequencies (due to the environmental loads and the associated frequencies due to the rotor). This particular aspect is important for designing foundations for Round 2 and Round 3 offshore wind farms ...

  1. Hydrodynamics of a Pump-Turbine Operating at Off-Design Conditions in Generating Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Hasmatuchi, Vlad

    2012-01-01

    Modern pump-turbines are subject to frequent switching between the pumping and generating modes with extended operation under off-design conditions. Depending on the specific speed of the pump-turbine, the discharge-speed as well as torque-speed generating mode characteristics at constant guide vanes opening can be "S-Shaped". In such a situation, the machine operation may become strongly unstable at runaway speed and beyond, with a significant increa...

  2. Selection of an industrial natural-gas-fired advanced turbine system - Task 3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holloway, G.M.

    1997-05-01

    TASK OBJECTIVES: Identify a gas-fueled turbine and steam system which will meet the program goals for efficiency - and emissions. TECHNICAL GOALS AND REQUIREMENTS: Goals for the Advanced Turbine System Program (ATS) where outlined in the statement of work for five basic categories: Cycle Efficiency - System heat rate to have a 15% improvement over 1991 vintage systems being offered to the market. Environmental No post-combustion devices while meeting the following parameter targets: (1) Nitrous Oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions to equal 8 parts per million dry (ppmd) with 15% oxygen. (2) Carbon monoxide (CO) and unburned hydrocarbon (UHC) emissions to equal 20 parts per million(ppmd) each. Cost of electricity to be 10 percent less when compared to similar 1991 systems. Fuel Flexibility Have to ability to burn coal or coal derived fuels without extensive redesign. Reliability, Availability, Maintainability Reliability, availability and maintainability must be comparable to modern advanced power generation systems. For all cycle and system studies, analyses were done for the following engine system ambient conditions: Temperature - 59F; Altitude - Sea Level; Humidity - 60%. For the 1991 reference system, GE Aircraft Engines used its LM6OOO engine product offering for comparison of the Industrial System parameters developed under this program.

  3. Hydrodynamic Optimization Method and Design Code for Stall-Regulated Hydrokinetic Turbine Rotors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sale, D.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2009-08-01

    This report describes the adaptation of a wind turbine performance code for use in the development of a general use design code and optimization method for stall-regulated horizontal-axis hydrokinetic turbine rotors. This rotor optimization code couples a modern genetic algorithm and blade-element momentum performance code in a user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) that allows for rapid and intuitive design of optimal stall-regulated rotors. This optimization method calculates the optimal chord, twist, and hydrofoil distributions which maximize the hydrodynamic efficiency and ensure that the rotor produces an ideal power curve and avoids cavitation. Optimizing a rotor for maximum efficiency does not necessarily create a turbine with the lowest cost of energy, but maximizing the efficiency is an excellent criterion to use as a first pass in the design process. To test the capabilities of this optimization method, two conceptual rotors were designed which successfully met the design objectives.

  4. Control design for two-bladed wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Solingen, E.

    2015-01-01

    In the past decades wind energy has evolved into a mature source of sustainable energy such that onshore wind turbines have become cost competitive with other fossil-based energy sources. Onshore wind energy, however, faces social resistance and a lack of available locations. Offshore wind energy,

  5. 5MW Direct Drive Wind Turbine Generator Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaidi, Arsalan; Senn, Lucile; Ortega, Iratxe;

    2012-01-01

    A 5MW direct drive offshore wind turbine generator was studied and simulated using Vector Fields OPERA. This software allows calculation of the flux density, force, torque, and eddy currents in the machine at different rotor positions. Based on the data obtained from the model, initial assumptions...

  6. A critical evaluation of a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes CFD as a tool to design supersonic turbine stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, C.; Kwon, O.; Shoemaker, M.

    1992-01-01

    Three-dimensional flow phenomena in a supersonic turbine blade row were studied numerically to evaluate CFD as a tool to design supersonic turbine stages. The details of the three-dimensional flow structure inside the supersonic turbine blade row and the overall aerodynamic performance at design and off-design conditions are analyzed and the results are compared between the experimental data and the numerical results.

  7. System design and optimization study of axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Yuquan Zhang; Yuan Zheng; Chunxia Yang; Yantao Zhu; Xin Zhang

    2015-12-01

    The axial flow turbine applied in an overtopping wave energy convertor can continuously provide power with high efficiency and reliably. To study the rules between parameters of the turbine and flows, three different types of turbines with complete 3D flow-channel models were designed and optimized. It appears that diameter of the runner, flow rates, number of guide vanes and shape of outflow passage have a considerable impact on the performance of the whole convertor. The turbine with a diameter of 0.8 m, flow rate of 0.5 m3/s, double guide vanes and bent section in outflow passage shows the best comprehensive performance. Moreover, the results of the experiments indicate that the output power can be enhanced by increasing the wave overtopping rate.

  8. Design of a new urban wind turbine airfoil using a pressure-load inverse method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henriques, J.C.C.; Gato, L.M.C. [IDMEC, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Marques da Silva, F. [LNEC - Laboratorio Nacional de Engenharia Civil, Av. Brasil, 101, 1700-066 Lisboa (Portugal); Estanqueiro, A.I. [INETI - Instituto Nacional de Engenharia, Tecnologia e Inovacao Estrada do Paco do Lumiar, 1649-038 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents the design methodology of a new wind turbine airfoil that achieves high performance in urban environment by increasing the maximum lift. For this purpose, an inverse method was applied to obtain a new wind turbine blade section with constant pressure-load along the chord, at the design inlet angle. In comparison with conventional blade section designs, the new airfoil has increased maximum lift, reduced leading edge suction peak and controlled soft-stall behaviour, due to a reduction of the adverse pressure gradient on the suction side. Wind tunnel experimental results confirmed the computational results. (author)

  9. A Study on Structural Design and Analysis of Blade and Tower for Small Wind Turbine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Hyunbum

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper performed aerodynamic, structural design and analysis of the horizontal axis blade of low noise 1kW class small wind turbine system that can be operated at homes and designed to display excellent performances in low wind velocity regions such as Korea. In terms of the material applied, glass/epoxy that is both economical and excellent in its performance was applied. Structural test was conducted to verify whether the actual movement of the blade designed is consistent with the theoretical analysis result. In addition, structural safety review was performed through the structural analysis of a tower for installing the wind turbine system developed.

  10. Design and optimization of HPLWR high pressure Turbine gamma ray shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Shield around HPLWR high pressure turbine optimized by Monte Carlo method. • The occupancy period in the turbine building was considered in the optimization. • Shield thickness is significantly reduced when heavy concretes are used. • Shield thickness for BWRs is sufficient for HPWR if heavy concrete is used. - Abstract: This work proposes the optimum gamma ray shield thickness around the HPLWR high pressure turbine for different occupancy periods in the turbine building. Monte Carlo method was employed in the design process and only radioactive nitrogen-16 was considered as the source of radiation. Five grades of concrete (ordinary, magnetite, heavy magnetite, steel magnetite and barite) were used as shielding materials. The isotope source term in the high pressure turbine was estimated by modeling the HPLWR three pass core in MCNP and tracking the inventory using a simple algorithm. The high pressure turbine was thereafter modeled in MCNP with a concrete shield arrayed in layers around it. The surface flux tally and ICRP74 dose conversion coefficients were employed to estimate the dose profile across the shield. For some shielding materials, exponential functions were fitted on the calculated data to extrapolate dose values beyond the model thickness. The optimum shield thickness was determined by comparing the calculated dose profiles with dose limit proposals in the IAEA standard (NS-G-1.13) on radiation protection considerations during nuclear power plant design. It was observed that with a 120 cm thick heavy concrete shield, the turbine building would be safe for most occupancy periods. However for ordinary concrete the shield would require some extension to guarantee safety. For very long occupancy (more than 10 person hours per week), magnetite shield may also require slight extension. It can therefore be concluded that the shield thickness recommended for BWR turbines (which operate on a direct cycle like HPLWR) could be sufficient

  11. Advanced hardware design for error correcting codes

    CERN Document Server

    Coussy, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This book provides thorough coverage of error correcting techniques. It includes essential basic concepts and the latest advances on key topics in design, implementation, and optimization of hardware/software systems for error correction. The book’s chapters are written by internationally recognized experts in this field. Topics include evolution of error correction techniques, industrial user needs, architectures, and design approaches for the most advanced error correcting codes (Polar Codes, Non-Binary LDPC, Product Codes, etc). This book provides access to recent results, and is suitable for graduate students and researchers of mathematics, computer science, and engineering. • Examines how to optimize the architecture of hardware design for error correcting codes; • Presents error correction codes from theory to optimized architecture for the current and the next generation standards; • Provides coverage of industrial user needs advanced error correcting techniques.

  12. WindPACT Turbine Rotor Design Study: June 2000--June 2002 (Revised)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malcolm, D. J.; Hansen, A. C.

    2006-04-01

    This report presents the results of the turbine rotor study completed by Global Energy Concepts (GEC) as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's WindPACT (Wind Partnership for Advanced Component Technologies) project. The purpose of the WindPACT project is to identify technology improvements that will enable the cost of energy from wind turbines to fall to a target of 3.0 cents/kilowatt-hour in low wind speed sites. The study focused on different rotor configurations and the effect of scale on those rotors.

  13. Design Concepts for Cooled Ceramic Matrix Composite Turbine Vanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Robert

    2014-01-01

    This project demonstrated that higher temperature capabilities of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) can be used to reduce emissions and improve fuel consumption in gas turbine engines. The work involved closely coupling aerothermal and structural analyses for the first-stage vane of a high-pressure turbine (HPT). These vanes are actively cooled, typically using film cooling. Ceramic materials have structural and thermal properties different from conventional metals used for the first-stage HPT vane. This project identified vane configurations that satisfy CMC structural strength and life constraints while maintaining vane aerodynamic efficiency and reducing vane cooling to improve engine performance and reduce emissions. The project examined modifications to vane internal configurations to achieve the desired objectives. Thermal and pressure stresses are equally important, and both were analyzed using an ANSYS® structural analysis. Three-dimensional fluid and heat transfer analyses were used to determine vane aerodynamic performance and heat load distributions.

  14. Design space exploration and performance modelling of advanced turbofan and open-rotor engines

    OpenAIRE

    Giannakakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the current civil engine design practice of increasing overall pressure ratio, turbine entry temperature and bypass ratio, and on the technologies required in order to sustain it. In this context, this thesis contributes towards clarifying the following gray aspects of future civil engine development: the connection between an aircraft application, the engine thermodynamic cycle and the advanced technologies of variable area fan nozzle and fan drive gearb...

  15. Design for manufacturability with advanced lithography

    CERN Document Server

    Yu, Bei

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the most advanced research results on Design for Manufacturability (DFM) with multiple patterning lithography (MPL) and electron beam lithography (EBL).  The authors describe in detail a set of algorithms/methodologies to resolve issues in modern design for manufacturability problems with advanced lithography.  Unlike books that discuss DFM from the product level, or physical manufacturing level, this book describes DFM solutions from a circuit design level, such that most of the critical problems can be formulated and solved through combinatorial algorithms. Enables readers to tackle the challenge of layout decompositions for different patterning techniques; Presents a coherent framework, including standard cell compliance and detailed placement, to enable Triple Patterning Lithography (TPL) friendly design; Includes coverage of the design for manufacturability with E-Beam lithography.

  16. Design Of A Turgo Two-Phase Turbine Runner

    OpenAIRE

    Aaraj, Youssef; Mortada, Sorina; Clodic, Denis; Nemer, Maroun

    2014-01-01

    A two-phase impulse turbine used to replace the classic expansion valve in a refrigeration system needs a nozzle/expander to transform the flow stored enthalpy into kinetic energy, and a runner that comes afterwards to transform the flow kinetic energy into torque. That process transforms the isenthalpic expansion of the refrigerant into, ideally, an isentropic one. Replacing a classic isenthalpic expansion with a nearly isentropic one increases the cycle cooling capacity by 8% up to 20 % for...

  17. Design of support structures for offshore wind turbines

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Tempel, J.

    2006-01-01

    To meet growing energy demands, the Kyoto protocol and the much desired diversification of supply, wind energy has become a mainstream source of energy in the EU. Cost wise it is already competing with gas fired electricity. In the last decade wind moved offshore to accommodate even more wind power. The offshore wind resource is more abundant and of a better quality, resulting in higher electricity output. On the other hand, the cost of installing turbines offshore is higher than onshore. To ...

  18. Tilting pad gas bearing design for micro gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabuurs, M. J. H. W.; Al-Bender, F.; Reynaerts, D.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the results of a dynamic stability investigation of a micro gas turbine supported by two flexible tilting pad bearings. The pad flexibility allows centrifugal and thermal shaft growth of the rotor but can also introduce undesirable rotor instabilities. An eigenvalue analysis on the linearised rotor-bearing dynamics is performed to estimate the required pad stiffness and damping for stability. Results of the eigenvalue analysis are evaluated by fully nonlinear orbit simulations.

  19. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part I: Steady state performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-07-01

    The hybridization of gas turbine technology with high temperature fuel cells represents an ultra-high efficiency, ultra-low emission, fuel flexible power generation platform. The performance of past prototypes has been limited by marginal compatibility of the two primary sub-systems. This paper addresses the challenge of selecting compatible hardware by presenting a simple and robust method for bespoke hybrid system design and off-the-shelf component integration. This is the first application of detailed, spatially resolved, physical models capable of resolving off-design performance to the integration analysis of FC-GT hybrids. Static maps are produced for both turbine and fuel cell sub-systems that readily evaluate the compatibility and hybrid performance. Molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are considered for hybridization with recuperated micro-turbines and larger axial flow gas turbine systems. Current state-of-the-art molten carbonate technology is shown to pair well with present micro-turbine technology in an FC bottoming cycle design achieving 74.4% LHV efficiency. Solid oxide technology demonstrates remarkable potential for integration with larger scale axial turbo-machinery to achieve greater than 75% LHV efficiency. This performance map technique closely matches results from detailed integrated hybrid system analyses, and enables quick determination of performance requirements for balance of plant design and optimization.

  20. Aerodynamic Design and Numerical Analysis of Supersonic Turbine for Turbo Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Chao; Zou, Zhengping; Kong, Qingguo; Cheng, Honggui; Zhang, Weihao

    2016-09-01

    Supersonic turbine is widely used in the turbo pump of modern rocket. A preliminary design method for supersonic turbine has been developed considering the coupling effects of turbine and nozzle. Numerical simulation has been proceeded to validate the feasibility of the design method. As the strong shockwave reflected on the mixing plane, additional numerical simulated error would be produced by the mixing plane model in the steady CFD. So unsteady CFD is employed to investigate the aerodynamic performance of the turbine and flow field in passage. Results showed that the preliminary design method developed in this paper is suitable for designing supersonic turbine. This periodical variation of complex shockwave system influences the development of secondary flow, wake and shock-boundary layer interaction, which obviously affect the secondary loss in vane passage. The periodical variation also influences the strength of reflecting shockwave, which affects the profile loss in vane passage. Besides, high circumferential velocity at vane outlet and short blade lead to high radial pressure gradient, which makes the low kinetic energy fluid moves towards hub region and produces additional loss.

  1. A Virtual Tool for Minimum Cost Design of a Wind Turbine Tower with Ring Stiffeners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Karpat

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Currently, renewable energy resources are becoming more important to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and increase energy efficiency. Researchers have focused on all components of wind turbines to increase reliability and minimize cost. In this paper, a procedure including a cost analysis method and a particle swarm optimization algorithm has been presented to efficiently design low cost steel wind turbine towers. A virtual tool is developed in MATLAB for the cost optimization of wind turbine steel towers with ring stiffeners using a particle swarm optimization algorithm. A wind turbine tower optimization problem in the literature is solved using the developed computer program. In the optimization procedure the optimization results match very well with the optimization results obtained previously. The wall thickness of the shell segments and the dimensions of the ring stiffeners are selected as the design variables, and the limits of the local buckling for the flat ring stiffeners, the local shell buckling limit, the panel ring buckling limit and the limitation of the frequency are considered the design constraints. Numerical examples are presented to understand the impacts of the design variables on the total cost of the wind turbine tower.

  2. Refinements and Tests of an Advanced Controller to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wright, A.D.; Fleming, P.; Van Wingerden, J.W.

    2011-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated 3-D turbulent wind inflow field, with imbedded coherent

  3. Efficient preliminary floating offshore wind turbine design and testing methodologies and application to a concrete spar design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matha, Denis; Sandner, Frank; Molins, Climent; Campos, Alexis; Cheng, Po Wen

    2015-02-28

    The current key challenge in the floating offshore wind turbine industry and research is on designing economic floating systems that can compete with fixed-bottom offshore turbines in terms of levelized cost of energy. The preliminary platform design, as well as early experimental design assessments, are critical elements in the overall design process. In this contribution, a brief review of current floating offshore wind turbine platform pre-design and scaled testing methodologies is provided, with a focus on their ability to accommodate the coupled dynamic behaviour of floating offshore wind systems. The exemplary design and testing methodology for a monolithic concrete spar platform as performed within the European KIC AFOSP project is presented. Results from the experimental tests compared to numerical simulations are presented and analysed and show very good agreement for relevant basic dynamic platform properties. Extreme and fatigue loads and cost analysis of the AFOSP system confirm the viability of the presented design process. In summary, the exemplary application of the reduced design and testing methodology for AFOSP confirms that it represents a viable procedure during pre-design of floating offshore wind turbine platforms. PMID:25583870

  4. Preliminary design of offshore wind turbine support structures: The importance of proper mode shape estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Male, P.

    2013-01-01

    Offshore wind turbines are highly exposed to timevarying loads. For support structures, estimation of the fatigue damage during the lifetime of the structure is an essential design aspect. This already applies for the preliminary design stage. In determining the dynamic amplification in the frequenc

  5. Fatigue Reliability and Calibration of Fatigue Design Factors for Offshore Wind Turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dominguez, Sergio Marquez; Sørensen, John Dalsgaard

    2012-01-01

    Consequences of failure of offshore wind turbines (OWTs) are in general lower than consequences of failure of, e.g., oil & gas platforms. It is reasonable that lower fatigue design factors can be applied for fatigue design of OWTs when compared to other fixed offshore structures. Calibration...

  6. Design of a fibrous composite preform for wind turbine rotor blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jens Zangenberg; Brøndsted, Povl; Kofoed, M.

    2014-01-01

    The present work addresses the different factors and challenges one must cope with in the design process of a composite preform used for the load-carrying main laminate of a wind turbine rotor blade. The design process is split up into different key elements, each of which are presented and...

  7. Design of the new Risoe-A1 airfoil family for wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuglsang, P.; Dahl, K.S. [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmospheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    A new airfoil family for wind turbines was developed by use of a design method using numerical optimization and the flow solver, XFOIL. The results were evaluated with the Navier-Stokes solver EllipSys2D. The airfoil family constitutes 6 airfoils ranging in thickness from 15% to 30%. The airfoils were designed to have a maximum lift coefficient around 1.5 in natural conditions and high lift-drag ratios below maximum lift. Insensitivity to leading edge roughness was obtained by securing that transition from laminar to turbulent flow on the suction side occurred close to the leading edge just before stall. The airfoil family was designed for a 600 kW wind turbine and provides a basis for further enhancing the characteristics of airfoils for wind turbines and to tailor airfoils for specific rotor sizes and power regulation principles. (au) EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  8. Hafnia-Based Nanostructured Thermal Barrier Coatings for Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramana, Chintalapalle; Choudhuri, Ahsan

    2013-01-31

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are critical technologies for future gas turbine engines of advanced coal based power generation systems. TBCs protect engine components and allow further increase in engine temperatures for higher efficiency. In this work, nanostructured HfO{sub 2}-based coatings, namely Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (YSH), Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized HfO{sub 2} (GSH) and Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} (YSZH) were investigated for potential TBC applications in hydrogen turbines. Experimental efforts are aimed at creating a fundamental understanding of these TBC materials. Nanostructured ceramic coatings of YSH, GSH and YSZH were grown by physical vapor deposition methods. The effects of processing parameters and ceramic composition on the microstructural evolution of YSH, GSH and YSZH nanostructured coatings was studied using combined X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Electron microscopy analyses. Efforts were directed to derive a detailed understanding of crystal-structure, morphology, and stability of the coatings. In addition, thermal conductivity as a function of composition in YSH, YSZH and GSH coatings was determined. Laboratory experiments using accelerated test environments were used to investigate the relative importance of various thermo-mechanical and thermo-chemical failure modes of TBCs. Effects of thermal cycling, oxidation and their complex interactions were evaluated using a syngas combustor rig.

  9. Variable Torque Control of Offshore Wind Turbine on Spar Floating Platform Using Advanced RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT has been a challenging research spot because of the high-quality wind power and complex load environment. This paper focuses on the research of variable torque control of offshore wind turbine on Spar floating platform. The control objective in below-rated wind speed region is to optimize the output power by tracking the optimal tip-speed ratio and ideal power curve. Aiming at the external disturbances and nonlinear uncertain dynamic systems of OFWT because of the proximity to load centers and strong wave coupling, this paper proposes an advanced radial basis function (RBF neural network approach for torque control of OFWT system at speeds lower than rated wind speed. The robust RBF neural network weight adaptive rules are acquired based on the Lyapunov stability analysis. The proposed control approach is tested and compared with the NREL baseline controller using the “NREL offshore 5 MW wind turbine” model mounted on a Spar floating platform run on FAST and Matlab/Simulink, operating in the below-rated wind speed condition. The simulation results show a better performance in tracking the optimal output power curve, therefore, completing the maximum wind energy utilization.

  10. Assessment of extreme design loads for modern wind turbines using the probabilistic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, Imad

    assessment through turbine-mounted real-time site assessment technologies, improved components reliability by increased laboratory testing, increased number of prototype test turbines before serial production, larger rotor and tower concepts for both onshore and offshore installations, advanced drive train......There is a large drive to reduce the cost of energy of wind energy generators. Various tracks are being considered such as enhanced O&M strategies through condition monitoring, increased manufacturing efficiency through higher production volumes and increased automation, improved resource...... and drag coefficients showed (a) a tangible reduction in the load partial safety factor for a blade and (b) generally a larger impact on extreme loads during power production compared to stand-still. Therefore, the way forward is for wind turbine manufactures to further update the stochastic model...

  11. On the performance of a high head Francis turbine at design and off-design conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aakti, B.; Amstutz, O.; Casartelli, E.; Romanelli, G.; Mangani, L.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, fully 360 degrees transient and steady-state simulations of a Francis turbine were performed at three operating conditions, namely at part load (PL), best efficiency point (BEP), and high load (HL), using different numerical approaches for the pressure-velocity coupling. The simulation domain includes the spiral casing with stay and guide vanes, the runner and the draft tube. The main target of the investigations is the numerical prediction of the overall performance of the high head Francis turbine model as well as local and integral quantities of the complete machine in different operating conditions. All results were compared with experimental data published by the workshop organization. All CFD simulations were performed at model scale with a new in-house, 3D, unstructured, object-oriented finite volume code within the framework of the open source OpenFOAM library. The novel fully coupled pressure-based solver is designed to solve the incompressible RANS- Equations and is capable of handling multiple references of frame (MRF). The obtained results show that the overall performance is well captured by the simulations. Regarding the local flow distributions within the inlet section of the draft-tube, the axial velocity is better estimated than the circumferential component.

  12. Modeling Creep-Fatigue-Environment Interactions in Steam Turbine Rotor Materials for Advanced Ultra-supercritical Coal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, Chen [General Electric Global Research, Niskayuna, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    The goal of this project is to model creep-fatigue-environment interactions in steam turbine rotor materials for advanced ultra-supercritical (A-USC) coal power Alloy 282 plants, to develop and demonstrate computational algorithms for alloy property predictions, and to determine and model key mechanisms that contribute to the damages caused by creep-fatigue-environment interactions.

  13. Aerodynamic and Performance Behavior of a Three-Stage High Efficiency Turbine at Design and Off-Design Operating Points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Schobeiri

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the aerodynamic and performance behavior of a three-stage high pressure research turbine with 3-D curved blades at its design and off-design operating points. The research turbine configuration incorporates six rows beginning with a stator row. Interstage aerodynamic measurements were performed at three stations, namely downstream of the first rotor row, the second stator row, and the second rotor row. Interstage radial and circumferential traversing presented a detailed flow picture of the middle stage. Performance measurements were carried out within a rotational speed range of 75% to 116% of the design speed. The experimental investigations have been carried out on the recently established multi-stage turbine research facility at the Turbomachinery Performance and Flow Research Laboratory, TPFL, of Texas A&M University.

  14. Experiences with the hydraulic design of the high specific speed Francis turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obrovsky, J.; Zouhar, J.

    2014-03-01

    The high specific speed Francis turbine is still suitable alternative for refurbishment of older hydro power plants with lower heads and worse cavitation conditions. In the paper the design process of such kind of turbine together with the results comparison of homological model tests performed in hydraulic laboratory of ČKD Blansko Engineering is introduced. The turbine runner was designed using the optimization algorithm and considering the high specific speed hydraulic profile. It means that hydraulic profiles of the spiral case, the distributor and the draft tube were used from a Kaplan turbine. The optimization was done as the automatic cycle and was based on a simplex optimization method as well as on a genetic algorithm. The number of blades is shown as the parameter which changes the resulting specific speed of the turbine between ns=425 to 455 together with the cavitation characteristics. Minimizing of cavitation on the blade surface as well as on the inlet edge of the runner blade was taken into account during the design process. The results of CFD analyses as well as the model tests are mentioned in the paper.

  15. Design of PVC Bladed Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine for Low Wind Speed Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicky K Rathod

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The Project is aimed at designing a wind turbine that can be able to build by Laypersons, using readily available material which is feasible & affordable to provide much needed electricity. Since most of the high wind power density regions in the zone of high wind speed are already being tapped by large scale wind turbine and so it required creating a large scope for the development of low wind speed turbines. Our study focuses primarily on designing the blade for tapping power in the regions of low wind power density. The aerodynamic profiles of wind turbine blades have major influence on aerodynamic efficiency of wind turbine. This can be achieved by comparing the effectiveness of a crude blade fashioned from a different Size, Material & standard of PVC drainage pipe which are easily available in market. It can be evaluated by performing experimental analysis, data collection & its evaluation on different type & size of PVC Pipe & preparing an analytical tool for best Design.

  16. Experiences with the hydraulic design of the high specific speed Francis turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high specific speed Francis turbine is still suitable alternative for refurbishment of older hydro power plants with lower heads and worse cavitation conditions. In the paper the design process of such kind of turbine together with the results comparison of homological model tests performed in hydraulic laboratory of ČKD Blansko Engineering is introduced. The turbine runner was designed using the optimization algorithm and considering the high specific speed hydraulic profile. It means that hydraulic profiles of the spiral case, the distributor and the draft tube were used from a Kaplan turbine. The optimization was done as the automatic cycle and was based on a simplex optimization method as well as on a genetic algorithm. The number of blades is shown as the parameter which changes the resulting specific speed of the turbine between ns=425 to 455 together with the cavitation characteristics. Minimizing of cavitation on the blade surface as well as on the inlet edge of the runner blade was taken into account during the design process. The results of CFD analyses as well as the model tests are mentioned in the paper

  17. A novel isolation curtain to reduce turbine ingress heating and an advanced model for honeycomb labyrinth seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Dong Chun

    A combination of 3-D and 2-D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling as well as experimental testing of the labyrinth seal with hexagonal honeycomb cells on the stator wall was performed. For the 3-D and 2-D CFD models, the hexagonal honeycomb structure was modeled using the concept of the baffle (zero-thickness wall) and the simplified 2-D fin, respectively. The 3-D model showed that even a small axial change of the tooth (or honeycomb wall) location, or a small circumferential change of the honeycomb wall location significantly affected the flow patterns and leakage characteristics especially for small tooth tip clearance. Also, the local details of the flow field were investigated. The seven basic procedural steps to develop a 2-D axisymmetric honeycomb labyrinth seal leakage model were shown. Clearly demonstrated for varying test conditions was the 2-D model capability to predict the 3-D honeycomb labyrinth flow that had been measured at different operating conditions from that used in developing the 2-D model. Specifically, the 2-D model showed very close agreement with measurements. In addition, the 2-D model greatly reduced the computer resource requirement needed to obtain a solution of the 3-D honeycomb labyrinth seal leakage. The novel and advanced strategy to reduce the turbine ingress heating, and thus the coolant requirement, by injecting a "coolant isolation curtain" was developed numerically using a 3-D CFD model. The coolant isolation curtain was applied under the nozzle guide vane platform for the forward cavity of a turbine stage. Specifically, the isolation curtain serves to isolate the hot mainstream gas from the turbine outer region. The effect of the geometry change, the outer cavity axial gap clearance, the circumferential location of the injection curtain slot and the injection fluid angle on the ingress heating was investigated. Adding the chamfer to the baseline design gave a similar or higher maximum temperature T*max than did the

  18. 50% Advanced Energy Design Guides: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.; Liu, B.; Wang, W.; Thornton, B.; Williams, J.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents the process, methodology, and assumptions for the development of the 50% Energy Savings Advanced Energy Design Guides (AEDGs), a design guidance document that provides specific recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings above the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 in four building types: (1) Small to medium office buildings, (2) K-12 school buildings, (3) Medium to big box retail buildings, (4) Large hospital buildings.

  19. AGT 101: Ceramic component development: Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Topical report, October 1979-July 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten Eyck, M.O.; MacBeth, J.W.; Sweeting, T.B.

    1987-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company. Standard Oil, acting as a principal subcontractor and supplier of ceramic components, directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and non-destructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This enabled engine testing to proceed without program slippage, and developed the approaches for producing low-cost, production quantity processes. Standard Oil contributed to the acceptance of ceramics as a viable approach for automotive gas turbine engines and to the advancement of this vital ceramic technology. 174 figs., 33 tabs.

  20. Advanced Control Strategy of DFIG Wind Turbines for Power System Fault Ride Through

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lihui; Xu, Zhao; Ostergaard, Jacob;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an advanced control strategy for the rotor and grid side converters of the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine (WT) to enhance the low-voltage ride-through (LVRT) capability according to the grid connection requirement. Within the new control strategy, the...... instantaneous DC-link current of the rotor side converter in order to smooth the DC-link voltage fluctuations during the grid fault. A major difference from other methods is that the proposed control strategy can absorb the additional kinetic energy during the fault conditions, and significantly reduce the...... oscillations in the stator and rotor currents and the DC bus voltage. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy has been demonstrated through various simulation cases. Compared with conventional crowbar protection, the proposed control method can not only improve the LVRT capability of the DFIG WT...

  1. Mechanical Design Optimization Using Advanced Optimization Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Rao, R Venkata

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical design includes an optimization process in which designers always consider objectives such as strength, deflection, weight, wear, corrosion, etc. depending on the requirements. However, design optimization for a complete mechanical assembly leads to a complicated objective function with a large number of design variables. It is a good practice to apply optimization techniques for individual components or intermediate assemblies than a complete assembly. Analytical or numerical methods for calculating the extreme values of a function may perform well in many practical cases, but may fail in more complex design situations. In real design problems, the number of design parameters can be very large and their influence on the value to be optimized (the goal function) can be very complicated, having nonlinear character. In these complex cases, advanced optimization algorithms offer solutions to the problems, because they find a solution near to the global optimum within reasonable time and computational ...

  2. Improved design for large wind turbine blades of fibre composites (Phase 3)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Branner, Kim; Lund, E.;

    methods for wind turbine blades, so that uncertainties associated with damage and defects can be reduced. The following topics with respect to failure modes were covered: Buckling-driven delamination of loadcarrying laminates, cracking along interfaces in material joints, implementation of cohesive laws......An overview is given of the activities of the project "Improved design for large wind turbine blades (Phase 3)", partially supported by the Danish Energy Agency under the Ministry of Climate and Energy through the EFP-grant no. 33031-0078. The project was focussed at the development of new design...

  3. Design and Aero-elastic Simulation of a 5MW Floating Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vita, Luca; Schmidt Paulsen, Uwe; Aagaard Madsen, Helge;

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with the design of a 5MW floating offshore Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). The design is based on a new offshore wind turbine concept (DeepWind concept), consisting of a Darrieus rotor mounted on a spar buoy support structure, which is anchored to the sea bed with mooring lines...... with the rotor, whose stability is achieved by adding ballast at the bottom. The platform is connected to the mooring lines with some rigid arms, which are necessary to absorb the torque transmitted by the rotor. The aero-elastic simulations are carried out with Hawc2, a numerical solver developed at Risø...

  4. Optimisation and evaluation of pre-design models for offshore wind turbines with jacket support structures and their influence on integrated load simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years many advanced load simulation tools, allowing an aero-servo-hydroelastic analyses of an entire offshore wind turbine, have been developed and verified. Nowadays, even an offshore wind turbine with a complex support structure such as a jacket can be analysed. However, the computational effort rises significantly with an increasing level of details. This counts especially for offshore wind turbines with lattice support structures, since those models do naturally have a higher number of nodes and elements than simpler monopile structures. During the design process multiple load simulations are demanded to obtain an optimal solution. In the view of pre-design tasks it is crucial to apply load simulations which keep the simulation quality and the computational effort in balance. The paper will introduce a reference wind turbine model consisting of the REpower5M wind turbine and a jacket support structure with a high level of detail. In total twelve variations of this reference model are derived and presented. Main focus is to simplify the models of the support structure and the foundation. The reference model and the simplified models are simulated with the coupled simulation tool Flex5-Poseidon and analysed regarding frequencies, fatigue loads, and ultimate loads. A model has been found which reaches an adequate increase of simulation speed while holding the results in an acceptable range compared to the reference results

  5. A parametric physics based creep life prediction approach to gas turbine blade conceptual design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marcus Edward Brockbank

    The required useful service lives of gas turbine components and parts are naturally one of the major design constraints limiting the gas turbine design space. For example, the required service life of a turbine blade limits the firing temperature in the combustor, which in turn limits the performance of the gas turbine. For a cooled turbine blade, it also determines the necessary cooling flow, which has a strong impact on the turbine efficiency. In most gas turbine design practices, the life prediction is only emphasized during or after the detailed design has been completed. Limited life prediction efforts have been made in the early design stages, but these efforts capture only a few of the necessary key factors, such as centrifugal stress. Furthermore, the early stage prediction methods are usually hard coded in the gas turbine system design tools and hidden from the system designer's view. The common failure mechanisms affecting the service life, such as creep, fatigue and oxidation, are highly sensitive to the material temperatures and/or stresses. Calculation of these temperatures and stresses requires that the geometry, material properties, and operating conditions be known; information not typically available in early stages of design. Even without awareness of the errors, the resulting inaccuracy in the life prediction may mislead the system designers when examining a design space which is bounded indirectly by the inaccurate required life constraints. Furthermore, because intensive creep lifing analysis is possible only towards the end of the design process, any errors or changes will cost the engine manufacturer significant money; money that could be saved if more comprehensive creep lifing predictions were possible in the early stages of design. A rapid, physics-based life prediction method could address this problem by enabling the system designer to investigate the design space more thoroughly and accurately. Although not meant as a final decision

  6. Advanced Exergy Analysis for Chemically Reacting Systems – Application to a Simple Open Gas-Turbine System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Tsatsaronis

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available

    A conventional exergy analysis has some limitations, which are significantly reduced by an advanced exergy analysis. The latter evaluates: (a the interactions among components of the overall system (splitting the exergy destruction into endogenous and exogenous parts; and, (b the real potential for improving a system component (splitting the exergy destruction into unavoidable and avoidable parts. The main role of an advanced exergy analysis is to provide engineers with additional information useful for improving the design and operation of energy conversion systems. This information cannot be supplied by any other approach. In previous publications, approaches were presented that were appropriate for application to closed thermodynamic cycles, without chemical reactions (e.g., refrigeration cycles. Here a general approach is discussed that could be applied to systems with chemical reactions. Application of this approach to a simple gas-turbine system reveals the potential for improvement and the interactions among the system components.

    • This paper is an updated version of a paper published in the ECOS'08 proceedings. 

  7. Exhibition design: hybrid space of advanced design innovation

    OpenAIRE

    Bollini, L; Borsotti, M

    2014-01-01

    The exhibition design has always been – among other design disciplines – one of the most innovative field of experimentation both for languages and projects improvement. Moreover in the recent years the use of digital technologies, on one hand, and the further more active participation of the public – or, better to say, of the user – on the other hand, are making exhibition design a promising and rising laboratory of advanced innovation. This evolution is shaping itself around the co-particip...

  8. Capability Extension to the Turbine Off-Design Computer Program AXOD With Applications to the Highly Loaded Fan-Drive Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Shu-cheng S.

    2011-01-01

    The axial flow turbine off-design computer program AXOD has been upgraded to include the outlet guide vane (OGV) into its acceptable turbine configurations. The mathematical bases and the techniques used for the code implementation are described and discussed in lengths in this paper. This extended capability is verified and validated with two cases of highly loaded fan-drive turbines, designed and tested in the V/STOL Program of NASA. The first case is a 4 1/2-stage turbine with an average stage loading factor of 4.66, designed by Pratt & Whitney Aircraft. The second case is a 3 1/2-stage turbine with an average loading factor of 4.0, designed in-house by the NASA Lewis Research Center (now the NASA Glenn Research Center). Both cases were experimentally tested in the turbine facility located at the Glenn Research Center. The processes conducted in these studies are described in detail in this paper, and the results in comparison with the experimental data are presented and discussed. The comparisons between the AXOD results and the experimental data are in excellent agreement.

  9. Design and wind tunnel experimentation of a variable blade drag type vertical axis wind turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Samuel; Bahr, Behnam

    2012-04-01

    The primary purpose of this research effort is to propose a novel efficiency boosting design feature in a drag type vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT), explore practicality through design and fabrication, and test the viability of the design through wind tunnel experiments. Using adaptive control surface design and an improved blade shape can be very useful in harnessing the wind's energy in low wind speed areas. The new design is based on a series of smaller blade elements to make any shape, which changes to reduce a negative resistance as it rotates and thus maximizing the useful torque. As such, these blades were designed into a modified Savonius wind turbine with the goal of improving upon the power coefficient produced by a more conventional design. The experiment yielded some positive observations with regard to starting characteristics. Torque and angular velocity data was recorded for both the conventional configuration and the newly built configuration and the torque and power coefficient results were compared.

  10. Hydraulic design and optimization of a modular pump-turbine runner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A modular pumped-storage scheme using elevated water storage towers is investigated. • The pumped-storage scheme also aides in the wastewater treatment process. • A preliminary hydraulic pump-turbine runner design is created based on existing literature. • The preliminary design is optimized using a response surface optimization methodology. • The performance and flow fields between preliminary and optimized designs are compared. - Abstract: A novel modular pumped-storage scheme is investigated that uses elevated water storage towers and cement pools as the upper and lower reservoirs. The scheme serves a second purpose as part of the wastewater treatment process, providing multiple benefits besides energy storage. A small pumped-storage scheme has been shown to be a competitive energy storage solution for micro renewable energy grids; however, pumped-storage schemes have not been implemented on scales smaller than megawatts. Off-the-shelf runner designs are not available for modular pumped-storage schemes, so a custom runner design is sought. A preliminary hydraulic design for a pump-turbine runner is examined and optimized for increased pumping hydraulic efficiency using a response surface optimization methodology. The hydraulic pumping efficiency was found to have improved by 1.06% at the best efficiency point, while turbine hydraulic efficiency decreased by 0.70% at the turbine best efficiency point. The round-trip efficiency for the system was estimated to be about 78%, which is comparable to larger pumped-storage schemes currently in operation

  11. Control system design for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW wind turbine generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Robert S.; Hosp, Theodore J.; Schanzenbach, George P.

    1995-01-01

    This paper provides descriptions of the requirements analysis, hardware development and software development phases of the Control System design for the MOD-5A 7.3 mW Wind Turbine Generator. The system, designed by General Electric Company, Advanced Energy Programs Department, under contract DEN 3-153 with NASA Lewis Research Center and DOE, provides real time regulation of rotor speed by control of both generator torque and rotor torque. A variable speed generator system is used to provide both airgap torque control and reactive power control. The wind rotor is designed with segmented ailerons which are positioned to control blade torque. The central component of the control system, selected early in the design process, is a programmable controller used for sequencing, alarm monitoring, communication, and real time control. Development of requirements for use of aileron controlled blades and a variable speed generator required an analytical simulation that combined drivetrain, tower and blade elastic modes with wind disturbances and control behavior. An orderly two phase plan was used for controller software development. A microcomputer based turbine simulator was used to facilitate hardware and software integration and test.

  12. A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service. Second topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled ``An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems`` [Ref.1.1], identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

  13. A review of potential turbine technology options for improving the off-design performance of direct coal-fired gas turbines in base load service

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.L.

    1988-03-01

    The January, 1988 draft topical report, entitled An Assessment of Off-Design Particle Control Performance on Direct Coal-Fired Gas Turbine Systems'' (Ref.1.1), identified the need to assess potential trade-offs in turbine aerodynamic and thermodynamic design which may offer improvements in the performance, operational and maintenance characteristics of open-cycle, direct coal-fired, combustion gas turbines. In this second of a series of three topical reports, an assessment of the technical options posed by the above trade-offs is presented. The assessment is based on the current status of gas turbine technology. Several industry and university experts were contacted to contribute to the study. Literature sources and theoretical considerations are used only to provide additional background and insight to the technology involved.

  14. Cold-air performance of free power turbine designed for 112-kilowatt automotive gas-turbine engine. 2: Effects of variable stator-vane-chord setting angle on turbine performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclallin, K. L.; Kofskey, M. G.

    1979-01-01

    The cold-air performance of an axial-flow power turbine with a variable stator designed for a 112-kW automotive gas-turbine engine was determined at speeds from 30 to 110 percent of design and at pressure ratios from 1.11 to 2.67. Performance is presented in terms of equivalent mass flow, torque, power, and efficiency for stator-vane-chord setting angles of 26 degs, 30 degs, 35 degs (design), 40 degs, 45 degs, and 50 degs. Turbine braking performance at a nominal stator setting angle of 107 degs is also presented. Turbine efficiency increased with increasing stator setting angle. A 10-point efficiency increase was obtained by opening the stator from the design setting angle of 35 degs to a setting angle of 45 degs.

  15. Improved design for large wind turbine blades of fibre composites (Phase 4) - Summary report

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Toftegaard, Helmuth Langmaack; Goutianos, Stergios;

    Results are summarised for the project "Improved design for large wind turbine blades (Phase 4)", partially supported by the Danish Energy Agency under the Ministry of Climate and Energy through the EUDP journal no.: 33033-0267. The aim of the project was to develop new and better design methods...... for wind turbine blades, so that uncertainties associated with damage and defects can be reduced. The topics that are studied include buckling-driven delamination of flat load-carrying laminates, cracking along interfaces in material joints (fracture mechanical characterisation and modelling), cyclic crack...... growth with large scale bridging and the use of cohesive laws in finite element programmes for simulating wind turbine blade failure. An overview is given of the methods and the major research results of the project. The implementation of the knowledge in the industry is discussed. Finally, some ideas...

  16. A design code to study vertical-axis wind turbine control strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, William A.

    1987-07-01

    A computer code called ASYM is described. The code permits a wind turbine designer to examine the role of low and high wind speed cut-in and cutout control strategies on the production of energy and the consumption of fatigue life by a wind turbine. The primary goal of the code development has been to create a design tool to optimize the energy production and the fatigue life of a wind machine through optimized high wind speed control schemes. The code is also very useful in evaluating start-up algorithms. It works primarily in the time domain and simulates high-frequency random wind of specific statistical characteristics while employing energy and damage density functions to calculate the results. A modified net present value calculation of the annual machine revenues and costs over the calculated life of the wind turbine is used to compare the merits of various control algorithms. Typical results are provided to demonstrate the use of the code.

  17. Active Blade Pitch Control for Straight Bladed Darrieus Vertical Axis Wind Turbine of New Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chougule, Prasad; Nielsen, Søren R.K.; Basu, Biswajit

    2013-01-01

    As Development of small vertical axis wind turbines (VAWT) for urban use is becoming an interesting topic both within industry and academia. However, there are few new designs of vertical axis turbines which are customized for building integration. These are getting importance because they operate...... at low rotational speed producing very less noise during operation, although these are less efficient than Horizontal Axis Wind Turbines (HAWT). The efficiency of a VAWT has been significantly improved by H-Darrieus VAWT design based on double airfoil technology as demonstrated by the authors...... in a previous publication. Further, it is well know that the variation of the blade pitch angle during the rotation improves the power efficiency. A blade pitch variation is implemented by active blade pitch control, which operates as per wind speed and position of the blade with respect to the rotor. A double...

  18. Improved design for large wind turbine blades of fibre composites (Phase 4) - Summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soerensen, B.F.; Toftegaard, H.; Goutanos, S. (Risoe DTU, Materials Research Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); Branner, K.; Berring, P. (Risoe DTU, Wind Energy Div., Roskilde (Denmark)); Lund, E. (Aalborg Univ., Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Aalborg (Denmark)); Wedel-Heinen, J. (Vestas Wind System, Randers (Denmark)); Garm, J.H. (LM Wind Power, Kolding (Denmark))

    2010-06-15

    Results are summarised for the project 'Improved design for large wind turbine blades (Phase 4)', partially supported by the Danish Energy Agency under the Ministry of Climate and Energy through the EUDP journal no.: 33033-0267. The aim of the project was to develop new and better design methods for wind turbine blades, so that uncertainties associated with damage and defects can be reduced. The topics that are studied include buckling-driven delamination of flat load-carrying laminates, cracking along interfaces in material joints (fracture mechanical characterisation and modelling), cyclic crack growth with large scale bridging and the use of cohesive laws in finite element programmes for simulating wind turbine blade failure. An overview is given of the methods and the major research results of the project. The implementation of the knowledge in the industry is discussed. Finally, some ideas for future research activities are considered. (author)

  19. Computer Aided Design of the Link-Fork Head-Piston Assembly of the Kaplan Turbine with Solidworks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camelia Jianu

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the steps for 3D computer aided design (CAD of the link-fork head-piston assembly of the Kaplan turbine made in SolidWorks.The present paper is a tutorial for a Kaplan turbine assembly 3D geometry, which is dedicated to the Assembly design and Drawing Geometry and Drawing Annotation.

  20. Parametric design of a Francis turbine runner by means of a three-dimensional inverse design method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daneshkah, K.; Zangeneh, M.

    2010-08-01

    The present paper describes the parametric design of a Francis turbine runner. The runner geometry is parameterized by means of a 3D inverse design method, while CFD analyses were performed to assess the hydrodymanic and suction performance of different design configurations that were investigated. An initial runner design was first generated and used as baseline for parametric study. The effects of several design parameter, namely stacking condition and blade loading was then investigated in order to determine their effect on the suction performance. The use of blade parameterization using the inverse method lead to a major advantage for design of Francis turbine runners, as the three-dimensional blade shape is describe by parameters that closely related to the flow field namely blade loading and stacking condition that have a direct impact on the hydrodynamics of the flow field. On the basis of this study, an optimum configuration was designed which results in a cavitation free flow in the runner, while maintaining a high level of hydraulic efficiency. The paper highlights design guidelines for application of inverse design method to Francis turbine runners. The design guidelines have a general validity and can be used for similar design applications since they are based on flow field analyses and on hydrodynamic design parameters.