WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced toroidal facility

  1. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  2. Thermal and electrical joint test for the helical field coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.L.; Johnson, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Initial feasibility studies of a number of configurations for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) resulted in the selection of a resistive copper continuous-coil torsatron as the optimum device considering the physics program, cost, and schedule. Further conceptual design work was directed toward optimization of this configuration and, if possible, a shorter schedule. It soon became obvious that in order to shorten the schedule, a number of design and fabrication activities should proceed in parallel. This was most critical for the vacuum vessel and the helical field (HF) coils. If the HF coils were wound in place on a completed vacuum vessel, the overall schedule would be significantly (greater than or equal to12 months) longer. The approach of parallel scheduel paths requires that the HF coils be segmented into parts of less than or equal to180 of poloidal angle and that joints be made on a turn-by-turn basis when the segments are installed. It was obvious from the outset that the compact and complex geometry of the joint design presented a special challenge in the areas of reliability, assembly, maintenance, disassembly, and cost. Also, electrical, thermal, and force excursions are significant for these joints. A number of soldered, welded, brazed, electroplated, and bolted joints were evaluated. The evaluations examined fabrication feasibility and complexity, thermal-electrical performance at approximately two-thirds of the steady-state design conditions, and installation and assembly processes. Results of the thermal-electrical tests were analyzed and extrapolated to predict performance at peak design parameters. The final selection was a lap-type joint clamped with insulated bolts that pass through the winding packing. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Fabrication of the helical field coil components for the advanced toroidal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, M.J.; Whitson, J.C.; Banks, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    The fabrication techniques used to manufacture the major components of the helical field (HF) coil segments for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) are described. The major components of an HF coil segment are 14 water-cooled, copper conductors and a T-shaped stainless steel support member (or ''tee''). Twenty-four of these segments were used in the fabrication of two coils for the ATF experiment. The helical shape, accurate position requirements, large size, and potential for high cost required unique approaches to the fabrication of these components. One method of fabrication was to use 44-mm-thick (standard size) plate to form the base and leg of the tee and to join the sections by welding. Because of the tolerance requirements, a thicker plate (70 mm) was used and then contour machined to the final shape. The second approach, conducted in parallel with the first, was to cast the tee as a single piece. The first attempts were to make the casting larger than required, then machine it to final size and shape. The cost of machining either the welded tee or the cast tee was extremely high, so several prototypes were fabricated until a cast tee that required no contour machining was produced. The shape and positional requirements were also the major problems in fabricating the copper conductors, or turns. The approach taken was to make an accurate fixture and position the turns in the fixture, then anneal to remove residual stresses and form the copper turns to the shape of the fixture. The lessons learned in pursuing these fabrication methods are presented. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  4. A Experimental Study of Ion Behavior in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Mickey Ray

    Stellarators represent one of the most promising magnetic confinement concepts for a fusion reactor because of their intrinsic ability to operate at steady state, though legitimate concerns about various aspects of the stellarator concept must be addressed. One of these concerns is the seemingly unfavorable single-particle confinement properties inherent to the stellarator design. Although previous experimental studies of ion confinement in stellarators have indicated that the ions behave classically and are generally well confined, these studies were limited in scope. To complement these experiments and to provide additional information about ion behavior in stellarators, an experimental investigation of ion behavior has been performed on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). Measurements were made of both the thermal- and fast-ion distributions during electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and neutral beam injection (NBI). The purpose of this work was to study thermal- and fast-ion confinement in ATF with particular emphasis placed on constructing a consistent picture of ion confinement based on experimentally measured data. The primary ion diagnostic used in these studies was a two -dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer (NPA). Extensive studies of fast-ion behavior in various operating regimes on ATF were conducted. These studies were performed during NBI and encompass a wide range of plasma densities, ranging from extremely low density ( |{n}_{e} =q 8.0 times 10^ {13} cm^{-3}) . Fokker-Planck simulations of the measured data suggest that the injected ions behave classically and indicate that the injected beam power is not well absorbed at low and intermediate densities because of large charge-exchange and shine-through losses. Further simulations using the PROCTR transport analysis code indicate that this reduced absorption is probably the cause of the thermal collapse observed in intermediate-density NBI discharges. Thermal ion confinement studies were

  5. Advanced Microanalysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Microanalysis Facility fully integrates capabilities for chemical and structural analysis of electronic materials and devices for the U.S. Army and DoD....

  6. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  7. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  8. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  9. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  10. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  11. Advances on the Brazilian toroidal grating monochromator (TGM) beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavasso Filho, R.L. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Box 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil); Homem, M.G.P. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Box 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil); Landers, R. [Instituto de Fisica ' Gleb Wataghin' , Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Box 6165, Campinas, SP 13083-970 (Brazil); Naves de Brito, A. [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Box 6192, Campinas, SP 13084-971 (Brazil)]. E-mail: arnaldo@lnls.br

    2005-06-15

    We report on an important advance for the vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray TGM beamline at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS). This beamline provides photons in the energy range 12-330 eV using three gratings. It is well known that TGMs deliver relatively high flux at these energies but harmonic contamination can be a serious problem. Of special interest for the users is the range between 12 and 21 eV covered by one of the gratings for studies of outer and inner valence ionization processes in gases as well as solids. Here, we report a solution to the harmonic contamination problems based on a noble gas phase filter combined with thin metal foil barriers.

  12. Whistler mode based explanation for the fast reconnection rate measured in the mit versatile toroidal facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2011-12-01

    Despite the widely discussed role of whistler waves in mediating magnetic reconnection (MR), the direct connection between such waves and the MR has not been demonstrated by comparing the characteristic temporal and spatial features of the waves and the MR process. Using the whistler wave dispersion relation, we theoretically predict the experimentally measured rise time (τ(rise)) of a few microseconds for the fast rising MR rate in the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT. The rise time is closely given by the inverse of the frequency bandwidth of the whistler waves generated in the evolving current sheet. The wave frequencies lie much above the ion cyclotron frequency, but they are limited to less than 0.1% of the electron cyclotron frequency in the argon plasma. The maximum normalized MR rate R=0.35 measured experimentally is precisely predicted by the angular dispersion of the whistler waves.

  13. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  14. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, R.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hammett, G.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-12-01

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical E{times}B rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons.

  15. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-06-24

    U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

  16. Status of the cold test facility for the JT-60SA tokamak toroidal field coils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdel Maksoud, Walid, E-mail: walid.abdelmaksoud@cea.fr; Bargueden, Patrick; Bouty, André; Dispau, Gilles; Donati, André; Eppelle, Dominique; Genini, Laurent; Guiho, Patrice; Guihard, Quentin; Joubert, Jean-Michel; Kuster, Olivier; Médioni, Damien; Molinié, Frédéric; Sinanna, Armand; Solenne, Nicolas; Somson, Sébastien; Vieillard, Laurence

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • The 5 K cryogenic loop includes a 500 W refrigerator and a She cold pump. • The coils are energized thanks to a 25.7 kA power supply and HTS current leads. • Temperature margin tests between 5 K and 7.5 K will be made on each coil. • A magnet safety system protects each double pancake of the coil in case of quench. • Instrumentation is monitored on a 1 Hz to 10 kHz fast acquisition system. - Abstract: JT-60SA is a fusion experiment which is jointly constructed by Japan and Europe and which shall contribute to the early realization of fusion energy, by providing support to the operation of ITER, and by addressing key physics issues for ITER and DEMO. In order to achieve these goals, the existing JT-60U experiment will be upgraded to JT-60SA by using superconducting coils. The 18 TF coils of the JT-60SA device will be provided by European industry and tested in a Cold Test Facility (CTF) at CEA Saclay. The coils will be tested at the nominal current of 25.7 kA and will be cooled with supercritical helium between 5 K and 7.5 K to check the temperature margin against a quench. The main objective of these tests is to check the TF coils performance and hence mitigate the fabrication risks. The most important components of the facility are: a 11.5 m × 6.5 m large cryostat in which the TF coils will be thermally insulated by vacuum; a 500 W helium refrigerator and a valve box to cool the coils down to 5 K and circulate 24 g/s of supercritical helium through the winding pack and through the casing; a power supply and HTS current leads to energize the coil; the control and instrumentation equipment (sensors, PLC's, supervision system, fast data acquisition system, etc.) and the Magnet Safety System (MSS) that protects the coils in case of quench. The paper will give an overview of the design of this large facility and the status of its realization.

  17. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  18. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  19. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  20. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsakanov, V.M., E-mail: tsakanov@asls.candle.am [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Amatuni, G.A.; Amirkhanyan, Z.G.; Aslyan, L.V.; Avagyan, V.Sh.; Danielyan, V.A.; Davtyan, H.D.; Dekhtiarov, V.S.; Gevorgyan, K.L.; Ghazaryan, N.G.; Grigoryan, B.A.; Grigoryan, A.H.; Hakobyan, L.S. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Haroutiunian, S.G. [Yerevan State University, 0025 Yerevan (Armenia); Ivanyan, M.I.; Khachatryan, V.G.; Laziev, E.M. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); Manukyan, P.S. [State Engineering University of Armenia, 0009 Yerevan (Armenia); Margaryan, I.N.; Markosyan, T.M. [CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute, 0040 Yerevan (Armenia); and others

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  1. An advanced irradiation facilities and its usage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A carrier type gamma irradiator is an advanced device currently installed in Qingdao Irradiation Center (QIC) and has been put into operation for nine years in Qingdao, China. It utilizes Co-60 as the radiation source; the initial Co-60 loading is 1.48×1016Bq (0.4 million Curies). Rubber, natural and synthetic polymers, heat-shrinkable films and tubes, disposable medical supplies, some foods and drugs have been irradiated for test in the past. Especially a great success achieved on the radiation of compound food for young shrimp. The practice demonstrates that the bacteria in the compound food can be destroyed by the irradiation at optimum dosage between 5 000-6 000 Gy.

  2. Sensing with toroidal metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manoj; Srivastava, Yogesh Kumar; Manjappa, Manukumara; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-03-01

    Localized electromagnetic excitation in the form of toroidal dipoles has recently been observed in metamaterial systems. The origin of the toroidal dipole lies in the currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Thus, the exotic toroidal excitations play an important role in determining the optical properties of a system. Toroidal dipoles also contribute towards enabling high quality factor subwavelength resonances in metamaterial systems which could be an excellent platform for probing the light matter interaction. Here, we demonstrate sensing with toroidal resonance in a two-dimensional terahertz metamaterial in which a pair of mirrored asymmetric Fano resonators possesses anti-aligned magnetic moments at an electromagnetic resonance that gives rise to a toroidal dipole. Our proof of concept demonstration opens up an avenue to explore the interaction of matter with toroidal multipoles that could have strong applications in the sensing of dielectrics and biomolecules.

  3. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  4. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  5. Facility level thermal systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Fraser, Mark; Climent, Tània

    2012-09-01

    The management and control of the local aero-thermal environment is critical for success of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). In addition to minimizing disturbances to local seeing, the facility thermal systems must meet stringent energy efficiency requirements to minimize impact on the surrounding environment and meet federal requirements along with operational budgetary constraints. This paper describes the major facility thermal equipment and systems to be implemented along with associated energy management features. The systems presented include the central plant, the climate control systems for the computer room and coudé laboratory, the carousel cooling system which actively controls the surface temperature of the rotating telescope enclosure, and the systems used for active and passive ventilation of the telescope chamber.

  6. Samus Toroid Installation Fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1990-06-27

    The SAMUS (Small Angle Muon System) toroids have been designed and fabricated in the USSR and delivered to D0 ready for installation into the D0 detector. These toroids will be installed into the aperture of the EF's (End Toroids). The aperture in the EF's is 72-inch vertically and 66-inch horizontally. The Samus toroid is 70-inch vertically by 64-inch horizontally by 66-inch long and weighs approximately 38 tons. The Samus toroid has a 20-inch by 20-inch aperture in the center and it is through this aperture that the lift fixture must fit. The toroid must be 'threaded' through the EF aperture. Further, the Samus toroid coils are wound about the vertical portion of the aperture and thus limit the area where a lift fixture can make contact and not damage the coils. The fixture is designed to lift along a surface adjacent to the coils, but with clearance to the coil and with contact to the upper steel block of the toroid. The lift and installation will be done with the 50 ton crane at DO. The fixture was tested by lifting the Samus Toroid 2-inch off the floor and holding the weight for 10 minutes. Deflection was as predicted by the design calculations. Enclosed are sketches of the fixture and it relation to both Toroids (Samus and EF), along with hand calculations and an Finite Element Analysis. The PEA work was done by Kay Weber of the Accelerator Engineering Department.

  7. Design of demonstration facility for advanced spent fuel conditioning process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, W. M.; Koo, J. H.; Jeo, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Lee, E. P.; Baek, S. R.; Lee, K. I.; You, K. S.; Park, S. W. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process(ACP) was proposed and developed for effective management of the PWR spent fuel. The detail plan was established for demonstration and verification of the ACP, and an existing hot cell will be modified as {alpha}-{gamma} type hot cell. In this study, the process mechanical flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell, and the detail design of hot cell including the auxiliary facility and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell system. And then, this results will be utilized for hot cell refurbishment and license.

  8. Conceptual design study advanced concepts test (ACT) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.

    1978-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) Project is part of program for developing improved power plant dry cooling systems in which ammonia is used as a heat transfer fluid between the power plant and the heat rejection tower. The test facility will be designed to condense 60,000 lb/hr of exhaust steam from the No. 1 turbine in the Kern Power Plant at Bakersfield, CA, transport the heat of condensation from the condenser to the cooling tower by an ammonia phase-change heat transport system, and dissipate this heat to the environs by a dry/wet deluge tower. The design and construction of the test facility will be the responsibility of the Electric Power Research Institute. The DOE, UCC/Linde, and the Pacific Northwest Laboratories will be involved in other phases of the project. The planned test facilities, its structures, mechanical and electrical equipment, control systems, codes and standards, decommissioning requirements, safety and environmental aspects, and energy impact are described. Six appendices of related information are included. (LCL)

  9. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  10. Toroidal optical activity

    CERN Document Server

    Raybould, T A; Papasimakis, N; Kuprov, I; Youngs, I; Chen, W T; Tsai, D P; Zheludev, N I

    2015-01-01

    Optical activity is ubiquitous across natural and artificial media and is conventionally understood in terms of scattering from electric and magnetic moments. Here we demonstrate experimentally and confirm numerically a type of optical activity that cannot be attributed to electric and magnetic multipoles. We show that our observations can only be accounted for by the inclusion of the toroidal dipole moment, the first term of the recently established peculiar family of toroidal multipoles.

  11. Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bonnema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities (AEDG-SHC was recently completed. It is the sixth document in a series of guides designed to achieve 30% savings over the minimum code requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999. The guide [1] is available for print purchase or as a free download from http://www.ashrae.org/aedg and provides user-friendly assistance and recommendations for the building design, construction, and owner communities to achieve energy savings. Included in the guide are prescriptive recommendations for quality assurance and commissioning; design of the building envelope; fenestration; lighting systems (including electric lighting and daylighting; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC systems; building automation and controls; outside air (OA treatment; and service water heating (SWH. The guide educates, provides practical recommendations for exceeding code minimums, and provides leadership to help design teams and owners produce higher efficiency commercial buildings.

  12. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  14. Narrow zone heating by a new radiation focusing technique - Toroidal ellipsoid furnace. [for zone leveling and crystal growth in advanced multicomponent semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, M. C.; Holland, L. R.

    1978-01-01

    The paper describes the design of a toroidal ellipsoid furnace for narrow zone heating of materials in sealed transparent ampoules. The heater is a toroid flattened to an elliptical cross section like a partially inflated inner tube resting on a horizontal surface. The foci of the ellipsoid are two concentric rings. The outer focus is occupied by a heater wire, and the inner focus is arranged to fall on the surface of the cylindrical ingot within its transparent capsule. One advantage of the new furnace is that the wire heater closely approximates the ideal shape, lying along an extended line focus, as opposed to the elusive point source of the Costello furnace. Also, the ingot is heated uniformly around its circumference.

  15. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  16. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans‐Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp‐Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM‐CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM‐CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM‐CFs, German Bio‐Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM‐CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463–479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  17. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  20. Concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The acceleration of beams of unstable nuclei has opened up new research frontiers. Experiments at existing accelerators, and particularly at the first generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, have demonstrated convincingly that unique information becomes accessible. Critical cross sections for astrophysical processes that were impossible to obtain previously, qualitatively new and unexpected nuclear structure effects in nuclei far from stability, completely new approaches to studies of nuclear decays, reactions and structure, all have triggered much excitement for this new dimension in nuclear research. To explore this new dimension, an extension of present technical capabilities and facilities is needed. This need and its scientific basis were discussed in various workshops and symposia and in the Isospin Laboratory (ISL) White Paper. A report by the European community was published recently on prospects of radioactive beam facilities in Europe, and some next-generation projects for such facilities are starting in both Europe and Japan.

  1. On the dynamic toroidal multipoles

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan; Rockstuhl, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    Toroidal multipoles are attracting research attention, particularly in the field of metamaterials. They are often understood as a multipolar family in its own right. The dynamic toroidal multipoles emerge from the separation of one of the two transverse multipoles into two parts, referred to as electric and toroidal. Here, we establish that the dynamic toroidal multipolar components of an electric current distribution cannot be determined by measuring the radiation from the source or its coupling to external electromagnetic waves. We analytically show how the split into electric and toroidal parts causes the appearance of non-radiative components in each of the two parts, which cancel when summed back together. The toroidal multipoles do not have an independent meaning with respect to their interaction with the radiation field. Their formal meaning is clear, however. They are the higher order terms of an expansion of the multipolar coefficients of electric parity with respect to the electromagnetic size of th...

  2. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2012-01-01

    endanger neighbouring populated areas. Second, facilities where high-risk chemicals are present could present opportunities for theft. The concern is that relatively small amounts of highly toxic chemicals could be taken to another location selected for higher impact. The Directive on European Critical......The European Commission has launched a study on the applicability of existing chemical industry safety provisions to enhancing security of chemical facilities covering the situation in 18 EU Member States. This paper reports some preliminary analytical findings regarding the extent to which...... exist at the mitigation level. At the strategic policy level, synergies are obvious. The security of chemical facilities is important. First, facilities with large inventories of toxic materials could be attractive targets for terrorists. The concern is sabotage causing an intentional release that could...

  3. Recent progress on the National Ignition Facility advanced radiographic capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Heebner, J.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.

    2016-01-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a megajoule (million-joule)-class laser and experimental facility built for Stockpile Stewardship and High Energy Density (HED) science research [1]. Up to several times a day, 192 laser pulses from NIF's 192 laser beamlines converge on a millimeter-scale target located at the center of the facility's 10-meter diameter target chamber. The carefully synchronized pulses, typically a few nanoseconds (billionths of a second) in duration and co-times to better than 20 picoseconds (trillionths of a second), a deliver a combined energy of up to 1.8 megajoules and a peak power of 500 terawatts (trillion watts). Furthermore, this drives temperatures inside the target to tens of millions of degrees and pressures to many billion times greater than Earth's atmosphere.

  4. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  5. Advanced materials analysis facility at CSIRO HIAF laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R. [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics Div.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.

    1993-12-31

    The HIAF facility at North Ryde, based on a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been operating for several years. Initially three ion sources were in operation:- conventional duoplasmatrons for proton and helium beams and a sputter ion source for heavy ions. An electrostatic focusing system was designed and built in-house for providing microbeams. The research emphasis has been largely on microbeam PIXE with particular reference to the mining industry. An AMS system was added in 1990 which prevented the inclusion of the charge exchange canal required for helium beams. The facility has been operated by CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining. At the beginning of 1992, the lon Beam Technology Group of CSIRO Division of Applied Physics was relocated at Lindfield and became a major user of the HIAF facility. Because the research activities of this group involved Rutherford Backscattering and Channeling, it was necessary to add a helium ion source and a new high vacuum beam line incorporating a precision goniometer. These facilities became operational in the second quarter of 1992. Currently a PIXE system is being added to the chamber containing the goniometer, making the accelerator an extremely versatile one for a wide range of IBA techniques. 3 refs.

  6. Advanced Process Monitoring Techniques for Safeguarding Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peper, Shane M.

    2010-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-grade nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. For large throughput nuclear facilities, it is difficult to satisfy the IAEA safeguards accountancy goal for detection of abrupt diversion. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non destructive assay (NDA) process monitoring techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide an additional measure to nuclear material accountancy which would potentially result in a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for safeguards verification at such facilities. By monitoring process control measurements (e.g. flowrates, temperatures, or concentrations of reagents, products or wastes), abnormal plant operations can be detected. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including both the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor and a spectroscopy-based monitoring system, to potentially reduce the time and resource burden associated with current techniques. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major cold flowsheet chemicals using UV-Vis, Near IR and Raman spectroscopy. This paper will provide an overview of our methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technologies.

  7. On the Toroidal Leibniz Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong LIU; Lei LIN

    2008-01-01

    Toroidal Leibniz algebras are the universal central extensions of the iterated loop algebras gOC[t±11 ,...,t±v1] in the category of Leibniz algebras. In this paper, some properties and representations of toroidal Leibniz algebras are studied. Some general theories of central extensions of Leibniz algebras are also obtained.

  8. Multi-Purpose Thermal Hydraulic Loop: Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) Facility for Support of Advanced Reactor Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O' Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; SuJong Yoon

    2001-11-01

    Effective and robust high temperature heat transfer systems are fundamental to the successful deployment of advanced reactors for both power generation and non-electric applications. Plant designs often include an intermediate heat transfer loop (IHTL) with heat exchangers at either end to deliver thermal energy to the application while providing isolation of the primary reactor system. In order to address technical feasibility concerns and challenges a new high-temperature multi-fluid, multi-loop test facilityAdvanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test facility” (ARTIST) is under development at the Idaho National Laboratory. The facility will include three flow loops: high-temperature helium, molten salt, and steam/water. Details of some of the design aspects and challenges of this facility, which is currently in the conceptual design phase, are discussed

  9. JAEA key facilities for global advanced fuel cycle R and D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nomura, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Ryuichi [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Labos, JAEA, 4-33 Tokai-mura, Ibaraki, 319-1194 (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    Advanced fuel cycle will be realized with the mid and long term R and D during the long-term transition period from LWR cycle to advanced reactor fuel cycle. Most of JAEA facilities have been utilized to establish the current LWR and FBR (Fast Breeder Reactor) fuel cycle by implementing evolutionary R and D. An assessment of today's state experimental facilities concerning the following research issues: reprocessing, Mox fuel fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examination, waste management and nuclear data measurement, is made. The revolutionary R and D requests new issues to be studied: the TRU multi-recycling, minor actinide recycling, the assessment of proliferation resistance and the assessment of cost reduction. To implement the revolutionary R and D for advanced fuel cycle, however, these facilities should be refurbished to install new machines and process equipment to provide more flexible testing parameters.

  10. Gantry optimization of the Shanghai Advanced Proton Therapy facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 杜涵文; 薛; 潘家珍; 杜月斐; 龙亚文

    2015-01-01

    A proton therapy system is a large medical device to treat tumors. Its gantry is of large structure and high precision. A new half-gantry was designed in the Shanghai Advanced Proton Therapy (SAPT) project. In this paper, the weight of gantry in design is reduced significantly by size and structure optimizations, to improve its cost-effectiveness, while guaranteeing the functions and precision. The processes of physics optimization, empirical design optimization, topological optimization and size optimization, together with factors of consid-eration, are described. The gantry weight is reduced by 30%, with the same precision.

  11. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Shornikov, A.

    2016-01-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  12. Advanced ion beam calorimetry for the test facility ELISE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocentini, R.; Bonomo, F.; Pimazzoni, A.; Fantz, U.; Franzen, P.; Fröschle, M.; Heinemann, B.; Pasqualotto, R.; Riedl, R.; Ruf, B.; Wünderlich, D.

    2015-04-01

    The negative ion source test facility ELISE (Extraction from a Large Ion Source Experiment) is in operation since beginning of 2013 at the Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik (IPP) in Garching bei München. The large radio frequency driven ion source of ELISE is about 1×1 m2 in size (1/2 the ITER source) and can produce a plasma for up to 1 h. Negative ions can be extracted and accelerated by an ITER-like extraction system made of 3 grids with an area of 0.1 m2, for 10 s every 3 minutes. A total accelerating voltage of up to 60 kV is available, i.e. a maximum ion beam power of about 1.2 MW can be produced. ELISE is equipped with several beam diagnostic tools for the evaluation of the beam characteristics. In order to evaluate the beam properties with a high level of detail, a sophisticated diagnostic calorimeter has been installed in the test facility at the end of 2013, starting operation in January 2014. The diagnostic calorimeter is split into 4 copper plates with separate water calorimetry for each of the plates. Each calorimeter plate is made of 15×15 copper blocks, which act as many separate inertial calorimeters and are attached to a copper plate with an embedded cooling circuit. The block geometry and the connection with the cooling plate are optimized to accurately measure the time-averaged power of the 10 s ion beam. The surface of the blocks is covered with a black coating that allows infrared (IR) thermography which provides a 2D profile of the beam power density. In order to calibrate the IR thermography, 48 thermocouples are installed in as many blocks, arranged in two vertical and two horizontal rows. The paper describes the beam calorimetry in ELISE, including the methods used for the IR thermography, the water calorimetry and the analytical methods for beam profile evaluation. It is shown how the maximum beam inhomogeneity amounts to 13% in average. The beam divergence derived by IR thermography ranges between 1° and 4° and correlates

  13. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  14. Next generation toroidal devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshikawa, Shoichi [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1998-10-01

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one`s view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  15. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  16. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  17. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  18. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  19. Prandtl number of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka (National Inst. for Fusion Science, Nagoya (Japan)); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi; Azumi, Masafumi

    1993-12-01

    Theory of the L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas is developed. The Prandtl number, the ratio between the ion viscosity and the thermal conductivity is obtained for the anomalous transport process which is caused by the self-sustained turbulence in the toroidal plasma. It is found that the Prandtl number is of order unity both for the ballooning mode turbulence in tokamaks and for the interchange mode turbulence in helical system. The influence on the anomalous transport and fluctuation level is evaluated. Hartmann number and magnetic Prandtl number are also discussed. (author).

  20. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick...... and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  1. Advanced reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities: safety and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R N; Nutt, W M; Laidler, J J

    2011-01-01

    The safety and environmental impacts of new technology and fuel cycle approaches being considered in current U.S. nuclear research programs are contrasted to conventional technology options in this paper. Two advanced reactor technologies, the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), are being developed. In general, the new reactor technologies exploit inherent features for enhanced safety performance. A key distinction of advanced fuel cycles is spent fuel recycle facilities and new waste forms. In this paper, the performance of existing fuel cycle facilities and applicable regulatory limits are reviewed. Technology options to improve recycle efficiency, restrict emissions, and/or improve safety are identified. For a closed fuel cycle, potential benefits in waste management are significant, and key waste form technology alternatives are described.

  2. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  3. Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

  4. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  5. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  6. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick and placem...

  7. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samain, A.; Nguyen, F.

    1997-01-01

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author). 36 refs.

  8. ATLAS End Cap toroid in upstanding position

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    End Cap toroid The ATLAS End Cap toroid weights 240-ton and is 12-m diameter high. The parts of this vacuum vessel had to be integrated and tested so that End Cap Toroid has no leaks. After that it could be cooled down to 80 K.

  9. Extremely high Q-factor toroidal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that, owing to the unique topology of the toroidal dipolar mode, its electric/magnetic field can be spatially confined within subwavelength, externally accessible regions of the metamolecules, which makes the toroidal planar metamaterials a viable platform for high Q-factor resonators due to interfering toroidal and other dipolar modes in metamolecules.

  10. Design and verification of shielding for the advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, I J; Kook, D H; Kwon, K C; Lee, E P; Choung, W M; You, G S

    2008-05-01

    An Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility (ACPF) has recently been constructed by a modification of previously unused cells. ACPF is a hot cell with two rooms located in the basement of the Irradiated Materials Experiment Facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. This is for demonstrating the advanced spent fuel conditioning process being proposed in Korea, which is an electrolytic reduction process of spent oxide fuels into a metallic form. The ACPF was designed with a more than 90 cm thick high density concrete shield wall to handle 1.38 PBq (37,430 Ci) of radioactive materials with dose rates lower than 10 muSv h in the operational areas (7,000 zone) and 150 muSv h in the service areas (8,000 zone). In Monte Carlo calculations with a design basis source inventory, the results for the bounding wall showed a maximum of 3 muSv h dose rate at an exterior surface of the ACPF for gamma radiation and 0.76 muSv h for neutrons. All the bounding structures of the ACPF were investigated to check on the shielding performance of the facility to ensure the radiation safety of the facility. A test was performed with a 2.96 TBq (80 Ci) 60Co source unit and the test results were compared with the calculation results. A few failure points were discovered and carefully fixed to meet the design criteria. After fixing the problems, the failure points were rechecked and the safety of the shielding structures was confirmed. In conclusion, it was confirmed that all the investigated parts of the ACPF passed the shielding safety limits by using this program and the ACPF is ready to fulfill its tasks for the advanced spent fuel conditioning process.

  11. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum.

  12. Critical need for MFE: the Alcator DX advanced divertor test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Wolf, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-10-01

    Three critical challenges must be met before a steady-state, power-producing fusion reactor can be realized: how to (1) safely handle extreme plasma exhaust power, (2) completely suppress material erosion at divertor targets and (3) do this while maintaining a burning plasma core. Advanced divertors such as ``Super X'' and ``X-point target'' may allow a fully detached, low temperature plasma to be produced in the divertor while maintaining a hot boundary layer around a clean plasma core - a potential game-changer for magnetic fusion. No facility currently exists to test these ideas at the required parallel heat flux densities. Alcator DX will be a national facility, employing the high magnetic field technology of Alcator combined with high-power ICRH and LHCD to test advanced divertor concepts at FNSF/DEMO power exhaust densities and plasma pressures. Its extended vacuum vessel contains divertor cassettes with poloidal field coils for conventional, snowflake, super-X and X-point target geometries. Divertor and core plasma performance will be explored in regimes inaccessible in conventional devices. Reactor relevant ICRF and LH drivers will be developed, utilizing high-field side launch platforms for low PMI. Alcator DX will inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of next-step fusion facilities.

  13. Design and Simulation of Toroidal Twister Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Huifang; LIN Xizhen; ZENG Qinqin

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is a new kind of structural pressure vessels, which not only has high structure efficiency of compound materials pressure vessel, good security and so on, but also has special shape and the property of utilizing toroidal space, and the prospect of the application of toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is extremely broad. By introducing parameters establishment of toroidal vessel and elaborating the principle of filament winding for toroidal vessel, the design model of filament winding machine for toroidal vessel has been introduced, and the design model has been dynamically simulated by the software of ADAMS, which will give more referrence for the design of real toroidal vessel twister.

  14. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  15. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility. [For decommissioned stainless steel equipment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, J. L.; Younger, A. F.

    1980-06-02

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests.

  16. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  17. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  18. Armor Possibilities and Radiographic Blur Reduction for The Advanced Hydrotest Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, M

    2001-09-01

    Currently at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) a composite firing vessel is under development for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) to study high explosives. This vessel requires a shrapnel mitigating layer to protect the vessel during experiments. The primary purpose of this layer is to protect the vessel, yet the material must be transparent to proton radiographs. Presented here are methods available to collect data needed before selection, along with a comparison tool developed to aid in choosing a material that offers the best of ballistic protection while allowing for clear radiographs.

  19. First Results of an Experiment on Advanced Collimator Materials at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Donzé, M; Francon, P; Garlasché, M; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Peroni, L; Scapin, M; Calderon, M; Charitonidis, N

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment (HRMT-14) has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility on six different materials of interest for Beam Intercepting Devices (collimators, targets, dumps). Both traditional materials (Mo, W and Cu alloys) as well as advanced metal/diamond and metal/graphite composites were tested under extreme conditions as to pressure, density and temperature, leading to the development of highly dynamic phenomena as shock-waves, spallation, explosions. Experimental data were acquired, mostly in real time, relying on extensive integrated instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature and vacuum sensors) and on remote acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The experiment was a success under all points of view in spite of the technological challenges and harsh environment. First measurements are in good agreement with results of complex simulations, confirming the effectiveness of the acquisition system and the reliability of advanced numerical...

  20. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  1. Concept design of the cassette toroidal mover

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekinen, H., E-mail: harri.makinen@vtt.fi [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Jaervenpaeae, J. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Valkama, P.; Vaeyrynen, J.; Amjad, F. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Siuko, M. [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O. Box 1300, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland); Mattila, J. [Tampere University of Technology, Korkeakoulunkatu 6, 33720 Tampere (Finland); Semeraro, L.; Esque, S. [Fusion for Energy, Torres Diagonal Litoral B3, Josep Pla 2, 08019 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    A full scale physical development and test facility, Divertor Test Platform 2 (DTP2), has been established in Finland for the purpose of demonstrating and developing the remote handling (RH) equipment designs for ITER using prototypes and virtual models. The major objective of the DTP2 environment is to verify and develop ITER divertor RH devices and operations. In practice this means various test trials and measurements of performance characteristics. This paper describes the design process of the Cassette Toroidal Mover (CTM). The main purpose of this design task was the development of the CTM concept. The goal of the design process was to achieve compatibility between CTM and the latest ITER divertor design. The design process was based on using a variety of tools, i.e. Catia V5, Delmia, Ansys, Mathcad and project management tools. Applicable European Standards were applied to the concept design. CTM is the cassette transporter, which carries divertor cassettes on the toroidal rails inside the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV) during the divertor maintenance. The operation environment differs from a common industrial environment. Radiation level is 100 Gy/h. The temperature during RH operations can be 50 {sup o}C. Clearances are less than 20 mm and the loads carried weigh 9000 kg. These conditions require special solutions during the product development process. The design process consisted of defining and developing of the CTM operational sequence. This sequence includes the procedure of how the CTM - with it is onboard manipulator - prepares for and handles the divertor cassettes during RH operations. RH operations are essential part when defining CTM functions. High reliability is required in order to carry out RH tasks successfully. The recoverability of CTM is also an important design criteria. This paper describes the design process and the structure of the CTM concept.

  2. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  3. Miniature anastigmatic spectrometer design with a concave toroidal mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianing; Chen, He; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan

    2016-03-01

    An advanced optical design for a low-cost and astigmatism-corrected spectrometer with a high resolution is presented. The theory and method of astigmatism correction are determined with the use of a concave toroidal mirror. The performances of a modified spectrometer and a traditional spectrometer are compared, and the analysis is verified. Experimentally, the limiting resolution of our spectrometer is 0.1 nm full width at half-maximum, as measured for 579.1 nm.

  4. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  5. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  6. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  7. Quench Induced Pressure Rise in the Cooling Pipes of the Atlas Barrel Toroid Model

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Broggi, F; Junker, S

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of a Barrel Toroid, two End-Cap Toroids and a Solenoid. Eight individual racetrack coils will be assembled to form the Barrel Toroid with overall dimensions of 26 m length and 20 m diameter. In order to verify the design concept a 9 m long short version of a single Barrel Toroid coil was built. A test program was conducted at the CERN cryogenic test facility which included the evaluation of the pressure rise in the helium cooling channels during quenches of the coil. A specific experimental set-up with cold pressure transducers and capillaries was installed for online measurement of the pressure signals. In addition a computer model was used to simulate these events. The data obtained are presented.

  8. GMP facilities for manufacturing of advanced therapy medicinal products for clinical trials: an overview for clinical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Evren; Blomberg, Pontus

    2010-12-01

    To be able to produce advanced therapy medicinal products, compliance with regulatory standards while maintaining flexibility is mandatory. For this purpose, careful planning is vital in the design or upgrade of a facility. Similarly, extensive foresight is elemental to anticipate upcoming needs and requirements. Failing this may lead to the facility's in-ability to meet the demands. In this chapter we aimed to outline the current issues with regards to the European Union Directives (EUD) and the proposal for Advanced Therapies, which are of importance to cellular and gene therapy facilities in Europe. This chapter is an attempt to elucidate what the minimum requirements for GMP facilities for cell and gene therapy products are and what is considered necessary to comply with the regulations in Europe.

  9. Advanced depreciation cost analysis for a commercial pyroprocess facility in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Ko, Won Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Sae Rom; Gao, Ruxing [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang Hon; Bang, Sung Sig [Dept. of Business and Technology Management, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to present a rational depreciation method for a pyroprocess cost calculation. Toward this end, the so-called advanced decelerated depreciation method (ADDM) was developed that complements the limitations of the existing depreciation methods such as the straight-line method and fixed percentage of declining-balance method. ADDM was used to show the trend of the direct material cost and direct labor cost compared to the straight-line or fixed percentage of the declining-balance methods that are often used today. As a result, it was demonstrated that the depreciation cost of the ADDM, which assumed a pyroprocess facility's life period to be 40 years with a deceleration rate of 5%, takes up 4.14% and 27.74% of the pyroprocess unit cost ($781/kg heavy metal) in the 1st and final years, respectively. In other words, it was found that the ADDM can cost the pyroprocess facility's capital investment rationally every year. Finally, ADDM's validity was verified by confirming that the sum of the depreciation cost by year, and the sum of the purchasing cost of the building and equipment, are the same.

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogden, Dan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  11. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  12. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  13. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  14. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Leon, Francisco [New York Univ. (NYU), Brooklyn, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    2014-08-01

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of single-phase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014. The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  15. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  16. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    X-ray footprinting (XF) is an important structural biology tool used to determine macromolecular conformations and dynamics of both nucleic acids and proteins in solution on a wide range of timescales. With the impending shut-down of the National Synchrotron Light Source, it is ever more important that this tool continues to be developed at other synchrotron facilities to accommodate XF users. Toward this end, a collaborative XF program has been initiated at the Advanced Light Source using the white-light bending-magnet beamlines 5.3.1 and 3.2.1. Accessibility of the microsecond time regime for protein footprinting is demonstrated at beamline 5.3.1 using the high flux density provided by a focusing mirror in combination with a micro-capillary flow cell. It is further reported that, by saturating samples with nitrous oxide, the radiolytic labeling efficiency is increased and the imprints of bound versus bulk water can be distinguished. These results both demonstrate the suitability of the Advanced Light Source as a second home for the XF experiment, and pave the way for obtaining high-quality structural data on complex protein samples and dynamics information on the microsecond timescale. PMID:24971962

  17. A lifesaving model: teaching advanced procedures on shelter animals in a tertiary care facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindel, Miranda E; MacPhail, Catriona M; Hackett, Timothy B; Egger, Erick L; Palmer, Ross H; Mama, Khursheed R; Lee, David E; Wilkerson, Nicole; Lappin, Michael R

    2008-01-01

    It is estimated that there are over 5 million homeless animals in the United States. While the veterinary profession continues to evolve in advanced specialty disciplines, animal shelters in every community lack resources for basic care. Concurrently, veterinary students, interns, and residents have less opportunity for practical primary and secondary veterinary care experiences in tertiary-care institutions that focus on specialty training. The two main goals of this project were (1) to provide practical medical and animal-welfare experiences to veterinary students, interns, and residents, under faculty supervision, and (2) to care for animals with medical problems beyond a typical shelter's technical capabilities and budget. Over a two-year period, 22 animals from one humane society were treated at Colorado State University Veterinary Medical Center. Initial funding for medical expenses was provided by PetSmart Charities. All 22 animals were successfully treated and subsequently adopted. The results suggest that collaboration between a tertiary-care facility and a humane shelter can be used successfully to teach advanced procedures and to save homeless animals. The project demonstrated that linking a veterinary teaching hospital's resources to a humane shelter's needs did not financially affect either institution. It is hoped that such a program might be used as a model and be perpetuated in other communities.

  18. Status of advanced biofuels demonstration facilities in 2012. A report to IEA Bioenergy task 39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacovsky, Dina; Ludwiczek, Nikolaus; Ognissanto, Monica; Woergetter, Manfred

    2013-03-18

    the previous edition of this report (2010), advanced biofuels technologies have developed significantly. Hydrotreatment as pursued by e.g. Neste Oil has been commercialized and currently accounts for app. 2,4% of biofuels production worldwide. Fermentation of lignocellulosic raw material to ethanol has also seen a strong development and several large scale facilities are just coming online in Europe and North America. As for thermochemical processes, the development is recently focusing on the production of mixed alcohols rather than BtL-Diesel. Economic reasons are driving this development, and concepts like the integration into existing industries and the production of several products instead of biofuel only (biorefinery concept) receive more attention lately. But, as expected, some of the projects for advanced biofuel production have failed. As a result, companies are now more careful in making announcements of advanced biofuels projects, and several large-scale projects have been postponed recently, some even though public funding would have been granted. Nevertheless, the production capacity for biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstock has tripled since 2010 and currently accounts for some 140 000 tons per year. Hydrotreating capacity for biofuels has multiplied and stands at about 2 190 000 tons per year.

  19. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  20. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-08-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  1. Image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Miller-Kamm, Victoria; Orth, Charles; Roberts, Randy; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2016-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short-pulse kilo-Joule laser pulses with controllable delays that generate X-rays to provide backlighting for high-density internal confinement fusion (ICF) capsule targets. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. ARC is designed to employ up to eight backlighters with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution, to record the dynamics and produce an X-ray "motion picture" of the compression and ignition of cryogenic deuterium-tritium targets. ARC will generate tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of ICF shots. Additionally, ARC supports a variety of other high energy density experiments including fast ignition studies on NIF. The automated alignment image analysis algorithms use digital camera sensor images to direct ARC beams onto the tens-of-microns scale metal wires. This paper describes the ARC automatic alignment sequence throughout the laser chain from pulse initiation to target with an emphasis on the image processing algorithms that generate the crucial alignment positions for ARC. The image processing descriptions and flow diagrams detail the alignment control loops throughout the ARC laser chain beginning in the ARC high-contrast front end (HCAFE), on into the ARC main laser area, and ending in the ARC target area.

  2. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  3. Toroidal horizons in binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It has been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology. However, such a phase has never been seen in numerical simulations. Instead, in all previous simulations, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We find a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon, thus reconciling the numerical work with theoretical expectations. The demonstration requires extremely high numerical precision, which is made possible by a new event horizon code described in a companion paper. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  4. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, Andy; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We present a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  5. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  6. Toroidal eigenmodes in all-dielectric metamolecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasolamprou, Anna C.; Tsilipakos, Odysseas; Kafesaki, Maria; Soukoulis, Costas M.; Economou, Eleftherios N.

    2016-11-01

    We present a thorough investigation of the electromagnetic resonant modes supported by systems of polaritonic rods placed at the vertices of canonical polygons. The study is conducted with rigorous finite-element eigenvalue simulations. To provide physical insight, the simulations are complemented with coupled mode theory (the analog of LCAO in molecular and solid state physics) and a lumped wire model capturing the coupling-caused reorganizations of the currents in each rod. The systems of rods, which form all-dielectric cyclic metamolecules, are found to support the unconventional toroidal dipole mode, consisting of the magnetic dipole mode in each rod. Besides the toroidal modes, the spectrally adjacent collective modes are identified. The evolution of all resonant frequencies with rod separation is examined. They are found to oscillate about the single-rod magnetic dipole resonance, a feature attributed to the leaky nature of the constituent modes. Importantly, we observe that ensembles of an odd number of rods produce larger frequency separation between the toroidal mode and its neighbor than the ones with an even number of rods. This increased spectral isolation, along with the low quality factor exhibited by the toroidal mode, favors the coupling of the commonly silent toroidal dipole to the outside world, rendering the proposed structure a prime candidate for controlling the observation of toroidal excitations and their interaction with the usually present electric dipole.

  7. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Chance, M.S.

    1985-11-01

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  9. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  10. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  11. Optical force on toroidal nanostructures: toroidal dipole versus renormalized electric dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xu-Lin; Lin, Zhifang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    We study the optical forces acting on toroidal nanostructures. A great enhancement of optical force is unambiguously identified as originating from the toroidal dipole resonance based on the source-representation, where the distribution of the induced charges and currents is characterized by the three families of electric, magnetic, and toroidal multipoles. On the other hand, the resonant optical force can also be completely attributed to an electric dipole resonance in the alternative field-representation, where the electromagnetic fields in the source-free region are expressed by two sets of electric and magnetic multipole fields based on symmetry. The confusion is resolved by conceptually introducing the irreducible electric dipole, toroidal dipole, and renormalized electric dipole. We demonstrate that the optical force is a powerful tool to identify toroidal response even when its scattering intensity is dwarfed by the conventional electric and magnetic multipoles.

  12. Design of Stopper of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The PGNAA facility consists of the filtered collimated neutron beam, the shielding of the whole facility, the control system, the detecting equipment and the data acquisition and analysis system. The neutron beam is filtered by a mono-crystalline bismuth filter,

  13. ANURIB – Advanced National facility for Unstable and Rare Ion Beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Bandyopadhyay; V Naik; S Dechoudhury; M Mondal; A Chakrabarti

    2015-09-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India. In this scheme, Rare Ion Beams (RIBs) will be produced using light ion beams (, ) from the = 130 cyclotron, the RIB of interest will be separated from the other reaction products and accelerated up to about 2 MeV/u using a number of linear accelerators. Recently, a few RIBs have been produced and accelerated using this facility. As an extention of this effort, another RIB facility – ANURIB will be developed in a new campus as a green-field project. ANURIB will have two driver accelerators – a superconducting electron LINAC to produce n-rich RIBs using photofission route and a 50 MeV proton cyclotron for producing p-rich RIBs. In this paper, the status of the RIB facility in the present campus and future plans with the ANURIB facility will be discussed.

  14. Advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic test loop facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; Hardy, J.H.; King, J.F.; McFee, M.T.; Montgomery, B.H.; Pawel, R.E.; Power, B.H.; Shourbaji, A.A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Wood, R.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is a facility for experiments constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ANSR is both cooled and moderated by heavy water and uses uranium silicide fuel. The core is composed of two coaxial fuel-element annuli, each of different diameter. There are 684 parallel aluminum-clad fuel plates (252 in the inner-lower core and 432 in the outer-upper core) arranged in an involute geometry that effectively creates an array of thin rectangular flow channels. Both the fuel plates and the coolant channels are 1.27 mm thick, with a span of 87 mm (lower core), 70 mm (upper core), and 507-mm heated length. The coolant flows vertically upwards at a mass flux of 27 Mg/m{sup 2}s (inlet velocity of 25 m/s) with an inlet temperature of 45{degrees}C and inlet pressure of 3.2 MPa. The average and peak heat fluxes are approximately 6 and 12 MW/m{sup 2}, respectively. The availability of experimental data for both flow excursion (FE) and true critical heat flux (CHF) at the conditions applicable to the ANSR is very limited. The THTL was designed and built to simulate a full-length coolant subchannel of the core, allowing experimental determination of thermal limits under the expected ANSR thermal-hydraulic conditions. For these experimental studies, the involute-shaped fuel plates of the ANSR core with the narrow 1.27-mm flow gap are represented by a narrow rectangular channel. Tests in the THTL will provide both single- and two-phase thermal-hydraulic information. The specific phenomena that are to be examined are (1) single-phase heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors, (2) the point of incipient boiling, (3) nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficients, (4) two-phase pressure-drop characteristics in the nucleate boiling regime, (5) flow instability limits, and (6) CHF limits.

  15. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  16. Ferroic nature of magnetic toroidal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Anne S; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    Electric dipoles and ferroelectricity violate spatial inversion symmetry, and magnetic dipoles and ferromagnetism break time-inversion symmetry. Breaking both symmetries favours magnetoelectric charge-spin coupling effects of enormous interest, such as multiferroics, skyrmions, polar superconductors, topological insulators or dynamic phenomena such as electromagnons. Extending the rationale, a novel type of ferroic order violating space- and time-inversion symmetry with a single order parameter should exist. This existence is fundamental and the inherent magnetoelectric coupling is technologically interesting. A uniform alignment of magnetic vortices, called ferrotoroidicity, was proposed to represent this state. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic vortex pattern identified in LiCoPO4 exhibits the indispensable hallmark of such a ferroic state, namely hysteretic poling of ferrotoroidic domains in the conjugate toroidal field, along with a distinction of toroidal from non-toroidal poling effects. This consolidates ferrotoroidicity as fourth form of ferroic order.

  17. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2013-01-01

    We study a strongly adsorbed flexible polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In this generalized Thomson problem, the patterns of the adsorbed chain are analyzed in the space of the toroidal coordinates and in terms of the orientation of each chain segment. Various patterns are found, including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori, and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry is quantitatively characterized by introducing an order parameter, an integral of the torsion. The uniform packing, which breaks the mirror symmetry the least, has the lowest value of the order parameter. In addition, it is found that the electrostatic energy of confined chains on tori conforms to a power law regardless of the screening effect in some typical cases studied. Furthermore, we study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations in the large screening limit or at large thermal fluctuation; some features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed.

  18. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  19. Some properties of toroidal isodynamic magnetostatic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA, CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR no 7158, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We establish some general properties of a 3D isodynamic magnetostatic equilibrium admitting a family of nested toroidal flux surfaces. In particular, we use the virial theorem to prove a simple relation between the total pressure (magnetic + thermal) and the magnetic pressure on each flux surface, and we derive some useful consequences of the latter. We also show the constancy on each rational surface of two integrals along magnetic lines. As a simple application of our results, we show the nonexistence of an equilibrium with vanishing toroidal current, and of an equilibrium with closed lines.

  20. Quench modeling of the ATLAS superconducting toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Gavrilin, A V; ten Kate, H H J

    2001-01-01

    Details of the normal zone propagation and the temperature distribution in the coils of ATLAS toroids under quench are presented. A tailor-made mathematical model and corresponding computer code enable obtainment of computational results for the propagation process over the coils in transverse (turn-to-turn) and longitudinal directions. The slow electromagnetic diffusion into the pure aluminum stabilizer of the toroid's conductor, as well as the essentially transient heat transfer through inter-turn insulation, is appropriately included in the model. The effect of nonuniform distribution of the magnetic field and the thermal links to the coil casing on the temperature gradients within the coils is analyzed in full. (5 refs).

  1. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  2. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  3. Observation of Central Toroidal Rotation Induced by ICRF on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiayun; Wang, Fudi; Zhang, Xinjun; Lyu, Bo; Chen, Jun; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Yu, Yi; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian

    2016-02-01

    Core plasma rotation of both L-mode and H-mode discharges with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating (MH) scheme was measured with a tangential X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Co-current central impurity toroidal rotation change was observed in ICRF-heated L- and H-mode plasmas. Rotation increment as high as 30 km/s was generated at ∼1.7 MW ICRF power. Scaling results showed similar trend as the Rice scaling but with significant scattering, especially in L-mode plasmas. We varied the plasma current, toroidal field and magnetic configuration individually to study their effect on L-mode plasma rotation, while keeping the other major plasma parameters and heating unchanged during the scanning. It was found that larger plasma current could induce plasma rotation more efficiently. A scan of the toroidal magnetic field indicated that the largest rotation was obtained for on-axis ICRF heating. A comparison between lower-single-null (LSN) and double-null (DN) configurations showed that LSN discharges rendered a larger rotation change for the same power input and plasma parameters. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB112004 and 2015GB103002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175208, 11305212, 11375235, 11405212 and 11261140328), the Innovative Program of Development Foundation of Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology (2014FXCX003) and Brain Korea 21 Program for Leading Universities & Students (BK21 PLUS)

  4. Tearing Mode Stability with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ryan; Coppi, Bruno

    2016-10-01

    Toroidal plasma flow induced by neutral beam heating has been found to increase the stability of tearing modes in tokamak plasmas. The need to extrapolate current (experimentally-based) knowledge of tearing mode onset to future machines, requiresa better understanding of the essential physics. We consider the physics of flow near the rational surfaces. For realistic flow profiles, the velocity shear near the rational surface can be treated as a perturbation, and is found to amplify the dominant stabilizing effect of magnetic curvature. This effect can be seen using a cylindrical model if large-aspect-ratio corrections to the magnetic curvature are incorporated. On the other hand, the physical effects of toroidal rotation are completely absent in a cylinder, and require a fully-toroidal calculation to study. The toroidal rotation near the rational surface is found to couple to a geometrical parameter which vanishes for up-down symmetric profiles. Physically, the dominant effects of rotation arise from a Coriolis force, leading to flow directional dependence. This work is supported by the US DOE.

  5. Toroidal surfaces compared with spherocylindrical surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malacara-Doblado, Daniel; Malacara-Hernandez, Daniel; Garcia-Marquez, Jorge L.

    1995-08-01

    Toroidal and sphero-cylindrical optical surfaces are two different kinds of surfaces (Menchaca and Malacara, 1986), but they are almost identical in the vicinity of the optical axis. The separation between these two surfaces increases when the distance to the optical axis increases. In this work the separation between these two surfaces outside of the central region is analytically studied.

  6. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  7. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  8. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  9. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  10. Toroidal Automorphic Forms for Function Fields

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorscheid, O.

    2008-01-01

    The definition of a toroidal automorphic form is due to Don Zagier, who showed in a paper in 1979 that the vanishing of certain integrals of Eisenstein series over tori in GL(2) is related to the vanishing of the Riemann zeta function at the weight of the Eisenstein series; and thus a relation betwe

  11. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artun, M.; Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.

    1995-04-01

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit k{sub {tau}}{rho}{sub bi} {much_lt} 1, where {rho}{sub bi} is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented.

  12. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  13. A real-time simulation facility for advanced digital guidance and control system research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, W. H.; Downing, D. R.; Ostroff, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time simulation facility built at NASA's Langley Research Center to support digital guidance and control research and development activities is examined. The unit has recently been used to develop autoland systems for VTOL. The paper describes the autoland experiment and the flight environment, the simulation facility hardware and software, and presents typical simulation data to illustrate the type of data analysis carried out during software development. Finally, flight data for a later version of the autoland system are presented to demonstrate the simulation's capability to predict overall system behavior.

  14. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1990-04-01

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended.

  15. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  16. Experimental research subject and renovation of chemical processing facility (CPF) for advanced fast reactor fuel reprocessing technology development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Tomozo; Shinozaki, Tadahiro; Nomura, Kazunori; Koma, Yoshikazu; Miyachi, Shigehiko; Ichige, Yoshiaki; Kobayashi, Tsuguyuki; Nemoto, Shin-ichi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai Works, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-12-01

    In order to enhance economical efficiency, environmental impact and nuclear nonproliferation resistance, the Advanced Reprocessing Technology, such as simplification and optimization of process, and applicability evaluation of the innovative technology that was not adopted up to now, has been developed for the reprocessing of the irradiated fuel taken out from a fast reactor. Renovation of the hot cell interior equipments, establishment and updating of glove boxes, installation of various analytical equipments, etc. in the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was done to utilize the CPF more positivity which is the center of the experimental field, where actual fuel can be used, for research and development towards establishment of the Advanced Reprocessing Technology development. The hot trials using the irradiated fuel pins of the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' for studies on improved aqueous reprocessing technology, MA separation technology, dry process technology, etc. are scheduled to be carried out with these new equipments. (author)

  17. Development of inherent technologies for advanced PWR core - A study on the current status and the construction feasibility of critical facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik; Yang, Hyun Seok [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea); Kim, Chang Hyo; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the appropriateness of constructing critical facilities in our country and to decide a course of constructing them if necessary by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. We investigated the status and the utilization of foreign critical facilities through literature survey and personal visitation. In our judgement, critical facilities are necessary for developing the advanced reactors and fuels which are being studied as parts of the Nuclear R and D Program by MOST. Considering the construction cost and the current state of domestic economy, however, it is unjustifiable to build three different types of critical facilities (the light water, the heavy water, and the fast critical facility). It appears to be reasonable to build a light water critical, considering the construction cost, degree of utilization, and other constraints. (author). 89 refs., 134 figs., 64 tabs.

  18. VEHIL: test facility for fault management testing of advanced driver assistance systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gietelink, O.J.; Ploeg, J.; Schutter, B. de; Verhaegen, M.A.H.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents the latest developments of the VEHIL facility, which aims to make the development process of intelligent vehicles safer, cheaper and more manageable. The main feature of VEHIL is that a complete intelligent vehicle can be tested in a hardware-in-the-loop simulation environment. T

  19. Advanced Education Facilities for Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Lungeanu, Marian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the project- and problem-based learning method is achieved at Aalborg University. Two new laboratories called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) and Green Power Laboratory (GPL) have been developed. A common feature is that these facilities are using entirely Simulink...

  20. Toroidal dipole excitations in metamolecules formed by interacting plasmonic nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Derek W; Ruostekoski, Janne; Fedotov, Vassili A; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    We show how the elusive toroidal dipole moment appears as a radiative excitation eigenmode in a metamolecule resonator that is formed by pairs of plasmonic nanorods. We analyze one such nanorod configuration - a toroidal metamolecule. We find that the radiative interactions in the toroidal metamolecule can be qualitatively represented by a theoretical model based on an electric point dipole arrangement. Both a finite-size rod model and the point dipole approximation demonstrate how the toroidal dipole moment is subradiant and difficult to excite by incident light. By means of breaking the geometric symmetry of the metamolecule, the toroidal mode can be excited by linearly polarized light and we provide simple optimization protocols for maximizing the toroidal dipole mode excitation. This opens up possibilities for simplified control and driving of metamaterial arrays consisting of toroidal dipole unit-cell resonators.

  1. Advances in the archiving and distribution facilities at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Robert J.; Postman, Marc; Pollizzi, Joseph; Richon, J.

    1998-07-01

    The Hubble Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute contains over 4.3 TB of data, primarily for the Hubble Space Telescope, but also from complementary space- based and ground-based facilities. We are in the process of upgrading and generalizing many of the HDA's component system, developing tools to provide more integrated access to the HDA holdings, and working with other major data providing organizations to implement global data location services for astronomy and other space science disciplines. This paper describes the key elements of our archiving and data distribution systems, including a planned transition to DVD media, data compression, data segregation, on-the-fly calibration, an engineering data warehouse, and distributed search and retrieval facilities.

  2. Tagged photon facility at Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore: Possible scenarios

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Pant

    2006-05-01

    Photoproduction of in nuclear medium with the ELSA facility at Bonn is discussed in the context of medium modification of hadronic properties. Utilization of Indus-2 at CAT, Indore for producing tagged bremsstrahlung photons and laser backscattered photons has been explored with a comparison between the two techniques for producing tagged high energy photons for the first time in the country with emphasis on the ADSS programme to have a precise information of (; ) reactions.

  3. Recent advances and results from the solid radiochemistry nuclear diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharibyan, N.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Moody, K. J.; Grant, P. M.; Despotopulos, J. D.; Faye, S. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The solid debris collection capability at the National Ignition Facility has been expanded to include a third line-of-sight assembly. The solid radiochemistry nuclear diagnostic measurement of the ratio of gold isotopes is dependent on the efficient collection of neutron-activated hohlraum debris by passive metal disks. The collection of target debris at this new location is more reliable in comparison to the historic locations, and it appears to be independent of collector surface ablation.

  4. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  5. Modeling the rapid de-swelling of toroidal hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolov, Svetoslav; Chang, Ya-Wen; Alexeev, Alexander; Fernandez de Las Nieves, Alberto

    2015-03-01

    The utilization of synthetic hydrogel networks as 3-D cell culture platforms has allowed researchers to more effectively study how epigenetic factors affect cell growth and physiology. As a whole, this has emphasized the biomechanical role of scaffold structures and led to a number of advances in tissue engineering. Our current research focuses on modeling temperature activated shape transformations of toroidal poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) pNIPAM gels. We use dissipative particle dynamics (DPD) to simulate the steady (slow heating rates) and unsteady (fast heating rates) de-swelling behavior of these thermo-sensitive gels. Our simulations show that for slow heating rates the aspect ratio of the tori remains constant during de-swelling. For rapid heating rates we observe buckling instabilities. Our simulations agree with the experimental observations. Financial support by NSF CAREER Award DMR-1255288 is gratefully acknowledged.

  6. Solar concentrator with a toroidal relay module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jhe-Syuan; Liang, Chao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    III-V multijunction solar cells require solar concentrators with a high concentration ratio to reduce per watt cost and to increase solar energy transforming efficiency. This paper discusses a novel solar concentrator design that features a high concentration ratio, high transfer efficiency, thin profile design, and a high solar acceptance angle. The optical design of the concentrator utilizes a toroidal relay module, which includes both the off-axis relay lens and field lens design in a single concentric toroidal lens shape. The optical design concept of the concentrator is discussed and the simulation results are shown. The given exemplary design has an aspect ratio of 0.24, a high averaged optical concentration ratio 1230×, a maximum efficiency of 76.8%, and the solar acceptance angle of ±0.9°.

  7. Reynolds stress of localized toroidal modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Y.Z. [International Center for Theoretical Studies, Trieste (Italy); Mahajan, S.M. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies

    1995-02-01

    An investigation of the 2D toroidal eigenmode problem reveals the possibility of a new consistent 2D structure, the dissipative BM-II mode. In contrast to the conventional ballooning mode, the new mode is poloidally localized at {pi}/2 (or -{pi}/2), and possesses significant radial asymmetry. The radial asymmetry, in turn, allows the dissipative BM-II to generate considerably larger Reynolds stress as compared to the standard slab drift type modes. It is also shown that a wide class of localized dissipative toroidal modes are likely to be of the dissipative BM-II nature, suggesting that at the tokamak edge, the fluctuation generated Reynolds stress (a possible source of poloidal flow) can be significant.

  8. Physics of collapses in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Yagi, Masatoshi

    1998-12-31

    Theoretical model for the collapse events in toroidal helical plasmas with magnetic hill is presented. There exists a turbulent-turbulent transition at a critical pressure gradient, leading to a sudden increase of the anomalous transport. When the magnetic shear is low, the nonlinear excitation of the global mode is possible. This model explains an abrupt growth of the perturbations, i.e., the trigger phenomena. Achievable limit of the plasma beta value is discussed. (author)

  9. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  10. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  11. Advanced Motor Control Test Facility for NASA GRC Flywheel Energy Storage System Technology Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Hofmann, Heath; Mackin, Michael; Santiago, Walter; Jansen, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the flywheel test facility developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center with particular emphasis on the motor drive components and control. A four-pole permanent magnet synchronous machine, suspended on magnetic bearings, is controlled with a field orientation algorithm. A discussion of the estimation of the rotor position and speed from a "once around signal" is given. The elimination of small dc currents by using a concurrent stationary frame current regulator is discussed and demonstrated. Initial experimental results are presented showing the successful operation and control of the unit at speeds up to 20,000 rpm.

  12. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  13. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Masahiro, E-mail: hino@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki [Center for Experimental Studies, KMI, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 203-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Tasaki, Seiji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS.

  14. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  15. Design of a lunar propellant processing facility. NASA/USRA advanced program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batra, Rajesh; Bell, Jason; Campbell, J. Matt; Cash, Tom; Collins, John; Dailey, Brian; France, Angelique; Gareau, Will; Gleckler, Mark; Hamilton, Charles

    1993-01-01

    Mankind's exploration of space will eventually lead to the establishment of a permanent human presence on the Moon. Essential to the economic viability of such an undertaking will be prudent utilization of indigenous lunar resources. The design of a lunar propellant processing system is presented. The system elements include facilities for ore processing, ice transportation, water splitting, propellant storage, personnel and materials transportation, human habitation, power generation, and communications. The design scenario postulates that ice is present in the lunar polar regions, and that an initial lunar outpost was established. Mining, ore processing, and water transportation operations are located in the polar regions. Water processing and propellant storage facilities are positioned near the equator. A general description of design operations is outlined below. Regolith containing the ice is mined from permanently-shaded polar craters. Water is separated from the ore using a microwave processing technique, and refrozen into projectiles for launch to the equatorial site via railgun. A mass-catching device retrieves the ice. This ice is processed using fractional distillation to remove impurities, and the purified liquid water is fed to an electrolytic cell that splits the water into vaporous hydrogen and oxygen. The hydrogen and oxygen are condensed and stored separately in a tank farm. Electric power for all operations is supplied by SP-100 nuclear reactors. Transportation of materials and personnel is accomplished primarily using chemical rockets. Modular living habitats are used which provide flexibility for the placement and number of personnel. A communications system consisting of lunar surface terminals, a lunar relay satellite, and terrestrial surface stations provides capabilities for continuous Moon-Moon and Moon-Earth transmissions of voice, picture, and data.

  16. Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

  17. Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama. Technical progress report, Run 243 with Illinois 6 coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    This report presents the operating results for Run 243 at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction R and D Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. This run was made in an Integrated Two-Stage Liquefaction (ITSL) mode using Illinois 6 coal from the Burning Star mine. The primary objective was to demonstrate the effect of a dissolver on the ITSL product slate, especially on the net C/sub 1/-C/sub 5/ gas production and hydrogen consumption. Run 243 began on 3 February 1983 and continued through 28 June 1983. During this period, 349.8 tons of coal was fed in 2947 hours of operation. Thirteen special product workup material balances were defined, and the results are presented herein. 29 figures, 19 tables.

  18. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  19. First qualification of ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductor jacketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Kazuya, E-mail: hamada.kazuya@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Isono, Takaaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Kawano, Katsumi; Oshikiri, Masayuki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Nakajima, Hideo; Okuno, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Matsuda, Hidemitsu; Yano, Yoshitaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co. Ltd (Japan); Devred, Arnauld; Bessette, Denis [ITER Organization (France)

    2011-10-15

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility to procure 25% of the ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) in the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA started to produce strand, cables and jacket sections and to construct a conductor manufacturing (jacketing) facility in 2008. Following preparation in December 2009 of the jacketing facility, the dummy cable, the jacket sections and fabrication procedures, such as welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling, JAEA manufactured a 760 m long Cu dummy conductor for process qualification. Into the 760 m long Cu dummy conductor jacketing, JAEA successfully inserted the cable with a maximum force of 32 kN. The outer diameter of the cross section of the spooled conductor was 43.7 {+-} 0.15 mm, which complies with the ITER target requirement of 43.7 {+-} 0.3 mm. Following qualification of all manufacturing processes, JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils.

  20. An overview on research developments of toroidal continuously variable transmissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As environmental protection agencies enact new regulations for automotive fuel economy and emission, the toroidal continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) keep on contribute to the advent of system technologies for better fuel consumption of automobiles with internal combustion engines (ICE). Toroidal CVTs use infinitely adjustable drive ratios instead of stepped gears to achieve optimal performance. Toroidal CVTs are one of the earliest patents to the automotive world but their torque capacities and reliability have limitations in the past. New developments and implementations in the control strategies, and several key technologies have led to development of more robust toroidal CVTs, which enables more extensive automotive application of toroidal CTVs. This paper concerns with the current development, upcoming and progress set in the context of the past development and the traditional problems associated with toroidal CVTs.

  1. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  2. Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode in toroidally rotating tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Haijun, E-mail: hjren@ustc.edu.cn [CAS Key Laboratory of Geospace Environment, The Collaborative Innovation Center for Advanced Fusion Energy and Plasma Science, and Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Cao, Jintao [Bejing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics and CAS Key Laboratory of Soft Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2015-06-15

    Geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using modified gyro-kinetic (MGK) equation applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a rotating axisymmetric plasma. Dispersion relation of GAM in the presence of arbitrary toroidal Mach number is analytically derived. The effects of toroidal rotation on the GAM frequency and damping rate do not depend on the orientation of equilibrium flow. It is shown that the toroidal Mach number M increases the GAM frequency and dramatically decreases the Landau damping rate.

  3. Development of the advanced PHWR technology -Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Jung Yung; Lee, Sung Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The principal contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule and to develop the instrumented capsule in HANARO for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1997, the detail design, safety analysis, and procurement of main equipment for fuel test loop have been performed and also the piping in gallery and the support for IPS piping in reactor pool have been installed in 1994 as the second year of the first phase in implementing this project. In the area of non-instrumented capsule for material irradiation test, the fabrication of capsule has been completed, so the manufacturing process has been accomplished by the preparation of QA procedure manual, machining and assembling, test and inspection. In the area of instrumented capsule technology development, mock-ups of capsule and supporting system have been designed and fabricated for the development of the in-pile test technology. It has been confirmed that the capsule and supporting system are compatible with the HANARO operating conditions and structural requirements. Capsule supporting system has been installed in the HANARO. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and review of HANARO interface have been performed respectively. 36 figs, 18 tabs, 21 refs. (Author).

  4. Recent advances in automatic alignment system for the National Iginition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Kalantar, D; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V

    2010-12-08

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 50 minutes. The system automatically commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics based upon images acquired from high-resolution digital cameras viewing beams at various locations. Forty-five control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze these images of the beams and references, and automaticallys teer the beams toward the target. This paper discusses the upgrades to the NIF automatic alignment system to handle new alignment needs and evolving requirements as related to various types of experiments performed. As NIF becomes a continuously-operated system and more experiments are performed, performance monitoring is increasingly important for maintenance and commissioning work. Data, collected during operations, is analyzed for tuning of the laser and targeting maintenance work. handling evolving alignment and maintenance needs is expected for the planned 30-year operational life of NIF.

  5. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  6. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  7. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  8. Permanent magnetic toroidal drive with half stator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhong Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A permanent magnetic toroidal drive with a half stator is proposed that avoids noise and mechanical vibrations. The effects of the system parameters on the output torque of the drive were investigated. A model machine was designed and produced. The output torque and speed fluctuation of the drive system were measured, and the calculated and measured output torque were compared. The tests demonstrated that the drive system could operate continuously without noise, and the system achieved a given speed ratio. The drive system had high load-carrying ability and a maximum output torque of 0.15 N m when certain parameter values were used.

  9. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  10. In-situ resource utilization in the design of advanced lunar facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    Resource utilization will play an important role in the establishment and support of a permanently manned lunar base. At the University of Houston - College of Architecture and the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture, a study team recently investigated the potential use of lunar in-situ materials in the design of lunar facilities. The team identified seven potential lunar construction materials; concrete, sulfur concrete, cast basalt, sintered basalt, glass, fiberglass, and metals. Analysis and evaluation of these materials with respect to their physical properties, processes, energy requirements, resource efficiency, and overall advantages and disadvantages lead to the selection of basalt materials as the more likely construction material for initial use on a lunar base. Basalt materials can be formed out of in-situ lunar regolith, with minor material beneficiation, by a simple process of heating and controlled cooling. The team then conceptualized a construction system that combines lunar regolith sintering and casting to make pressurized structures out of lunar resources. The design uses a machine that simultaneously excavates and sinters the lunar regolith to create a cylindrical hole, which is then enclosed with cast basalt slabs, allowing the volume to be pressurized for use as a living or work environment. Cylinder depths of up to 4 to 6 m in the lunar mare or 10 to 12 m in the lunar highlands are possible. Advantages of this construction system include maximum resource utilization, relatively large habitable volumes, interior flexibility, and minimal construction equipment needs. Conclusions of this study indicate that there is significant potential for the use of basalt, a lunar resource derived construction material, as a low cost alternative to Earth-based materials. It remains to be determined when in lunar base phasing this construction method should be implemented.

  11. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Seong Nam; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Sung Hak; Kim, Dong Nam; Hwang, Sang Ho [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals.

  12. [Academic cell therapy facilities are challenged by European regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannon, Christian; Sabatier, Florence; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Calmels, Boris; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Guy; Lemarie, Claude; Mahalatchimy, Aurélie

    2014-05-01

    Regulation (EC) n° 1394/2007 from the European Parliament and the Council describes a new category of health products termed « Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products » (ATMPs). ATMPs derive from cell engineering, tissue engineering or genetic manipulations, and can in some instances be combined with medical devices. ATMPs are distributed and administered to patients, after biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies have obtained a marketing authorization that is granted by the European Commission on the basis of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) assessment. Seven years after the publication of the regulation, few of these therapies have received a marketing authorization, and even fewer have met commercial success, suggesting that a number of medical and economic issues still need to be sorted out in order to achieve sustainability in this field. The coexistence of three sets of rules for three categories of health products that are biologically and medically related - ATMPs, ATMPs produced under the hospital exemption rule, and cell therapy products (CTPs) (a specific legal category in France) that have long been used in hematopoietic cell transplantation - constitutes a complex regulatory framework. This situation raises significant issues for historical as well as emerging operators in this moving field that are discussed thereafter.

  13. Advanced nutrient root feeding system for conveyer-type cylindrical plant growth facilities developed for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.; Krivobok, Anna; Krivobok, Nikolay

    A new brand of cylindrical conveyer-type space plant growth facilities (PGF) has been created to improve of cosmonauts’ diet in the microgravity conditions. Up to date several ground prototypes of the space PGF have been made and tested: “Phytocycle”, “Vitacycle”, “Phytocycle-LED”, “Phytoconveyer”; now the space PGF “Vitacycle-T” for the Russian segment of the ISS is under developing. In the PGFs the ion-exchange salt-saturated fibrous artificial soil (AS) is used as a root medium. We have proposed the system for enrichment of irrigation water by nutrients to decrease of the AS store required for PGF working during the long space mission. The system includes root modules filled in fibrous ion-exchange AS, the enrichment column with crumble salt-saturation ion-exchange resin and the cassette with slow releasing fertilizer (SRF). Both substrates (ion-exchange resin and SRF) are necessary because of the SRF contains mostly N, P and K but another three essential elements S, Ca, Mg are provided by the ion-exchange resin. In the system water goes throw the enrichment column with ion-exchange resin fertilizing by the nutrients and comes into the mixer cell fertilize equipped with the electrical conductivity sensor. When the signal of the conductivity sensor is coming to the controller it turns on the pump directed the water flow throw the cassette with SRF until the electric conductivity of the solution in the mixer cell will reach the setpoint. The nutrient root feeding system was tested during 88 days when Chinese cabbage grew in PGF “Phytocycle-LED”. The crop has been continuously illuminated by red and blue LEDs in the PPF ratio 7 to 1; an integral PPF level has been (240 ± 10) µmol/(m2×s). There was no renewal of the used fibrous AS during the experiment. The PGF total electric power consumption was of 0,45 kW. The average fresh biomass productivity of the PGF during steady state working mode was equal 135×g/day per m2 of the illuminated

  14. A Novel superconducting toroidal field magnet concept using advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J.

    1992-03-01

    The plasma physics database indicates that two distinct approaches to tokamak design may lead to commercial fusion reactors: low Aspect ratio, high plasma current, relatively low magnetic field devices, and high Aspect ratio, high field devices. The former requires significant enhancements in plasma performance, while the latter depends primarily upon technology development. The key technology for the commercialization of the high-field approach is large, high magnetic field superconducting magnets. In this paper, the physics motivation for the high field approach and key superconducting magnet (SCM) development issues are reviewed. Improved SCM performance may be obtained from improved materials and/or improved engineering. Superconducting materials ranging from NbTi to high- T c oxides are reviewed, demonstrating the broad range of potential superconducting materials. Structural material options are discussed, including cryogenic steel alloys and fiber-reinforced composite materials. Again, the breadth of options is highlighted. The potential for improved magnet engineering is quantified in terms of the Virial Theorem Limit, and two examples of approaches to highly optimized magnet configurations are discussed. The force-reduced concept, which is a finite application of the force-free solutions to Ampere's Law, appear promising for large SCMs but may be limited by the electromagnetics of a fusion plasma. The Solid Superconducting Cylinder (SSC) concept is proposed. This concept combines the unique properties of high- T c superconductors within a low- T c SCM to obtain (1) significant reductions in the structural material volume, (2) a decoupling of the tri-axial (compressive and tensile) stress state, and (3) a demountable TF magnet system. The advantages of this approach are quantified in terms of a 24 T commercial reactor TF magnet system. Significant reductions in the mechanical stress and the TF radial build are demonstrated.

  15. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  16. Formation of a compact toroid for enhanced efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mozgovoy, A. G. [P.N. Lebedev Physical Institute, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Romadanov, I. V.; Ryzhkov, S. V., E-mail: ryzhkov@power.bmstu.ru [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Moscow 105005 (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-15

    We report here our results on the formation of a plasma configuration with the generic name of compact toroid (CT). A method of compact toroid formation to confine, heat and compress a plasma is investigated. Formation of a compact torus using an additional toroidal magnetic field helps to increase the plasma current to a maintainable level of the original magnetic field. We design the Compact Toroid Challenge (CTC) experiment in order to improve the magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a compact toroid. The level of the magnetic field immersed in the plasma about 70% of the primary field is achieved. The CTC device and scheme of high level capturing of magnetic flux are presented.

  17. Shear-dependant toroidal vortex flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khorasani, Nariman Ashrafi; Haghighi, Habib Karimi [Payame Noor University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-01-15

    Pseudoplastic circular Couette flow in annulus is investigated. The flow viscosity is dependent on the shear rate, which directly affects the conservation equations that are solved in the present study by the spectral method in the present study. The pseudoplastic model adopted here is shown to be a suitable representative of nonlinear fluids. Unlike the previous studies, where only the square of shear rate term in the viscosity expression was considered to ease the numerical manipulations, in the present study takes the term containing the quadratic power into account. The curved streamlines of the circular Couette flow can cause a centrifugal instability leading to toroidal vortices, known as Taylor vortices. It is further found that the critical Taylor number becomes lower as the pseudoplastic effect increases. Comparison with existing measurements on pseudoplastic circular Couette flow results in good agreement.

  18. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  19. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  20. Damping of toroidal ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    The temporal evolution of linear toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes is studied based on a kinetic integral equation including an initial condition. It is shown how to evaluate the analytic continuation of the integral kernel as a function of a complex-valued frequency, which is useful for analytical and numerical calculations of the asymptotic damping behavior of the ITG mode. In the presence of the toroidal {nabla}B-curvature drift, the temporal dependence of the density and potential perturbations consists of normal modes and a continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from poles and from an integral along a branch cut, respectively, of the Laplace-transformed potential function of the complex-valued frequency. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with frequencies and growth rates determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode, which has a ballooning structure, shows a power law decay {proportional_to} t{sup -2} in the asymptotic limit, where t is the time variable. Therefore, the continuum mode dominantly describes the long-time asymptotic behavior of the density and potential perturbations for the stable system where all normal modes have negative growth rates. By performing proper analytic continuation for the homogeneous version of the kinetic integral equation, dependences of the normal modes` growth rate, real frequency, and eigenfunction on {eta}{sub i} (the ratio of the ion temperature gradient to the density gradient), k{sub {theta}} (the poloidal wavenumber), s (the magnetic shear parameter), and {theta}{sub k} (the ballooning angle corresponding to the minimum radial wavenumber) are numerically obtained for both stable and unstable cases. (author)

  1. Petascale Parallelization of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, Stephane; Adams, Mark; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) is a global, three-dimensional particle-in-cell application developed to study microturbulence in tokamak fusion devices. The global capability of GTC is unique, allowing researchers to systematically analyze important dynamics such as turbulence spreading. In this work we examine a new radial domain decomposition approach to allow scalability onto the latest generation of petascale systems. Extensive performance evaluation is conducted on three high performance computing systems: the IBM BG/P, the Cray XT4, and an Intel Xeon Cluster. Overall results show that the radial decomposition approach dramatically increases scalability, while reducing the memory footprint - allowing for fusion device simulations at an unprecedented scale. After a decade where high-end computing (HEC) was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to processor frequencies, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. In this work, we examine a new parallelization scheme for the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) [?] micro-turbulence fusion application. Extensive scalability results and analysis are presented on three HEC systems: the IBM BlueGene/P (BG/P) at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cray XT4 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and an Intel Xeon cluster at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall results indicate that the new radial decomposition approach successfully attains unprecedented scalability to 131,072 BG/P cores by overcoming the memory limitations of the previous approach. The new version is well suited to utilize emerging petascale resources to access new regimes of physical phenomena.

  2. Active toroidal field ripple compensation and MHD feedback control coils in FAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramogida, G., E-mail: giuseppe.ramogida@enea.it [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Calabrò, G.; Cocilovo, V.; Crescenzi, F.; Crisanti, F.; Cucchiaro, A. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Di Gironimo, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Fresa, R. [Università della Basilicata, Via Nazario Sauro 85, I-85100 Potenza (Italy); Fusco, V. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Martin, P. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127, Padova (Italy); Mastrostefano, S. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – DIEI Università di Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Mozzillo, R. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Nuzzolese, F. [Università della Basilicata, Via Nazario Sauro 85, I-85100 Potenza (Italy); Renno, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – Università di Napoli Federico II, Via Claudio 21, I-80125 Napoli (Italy); Rita, C. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy); Villone, F. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA, CREATE – DIEI Università di Cassino, Via Di Biasio 43, I-03043 Cassino, FR (Italy); Vlad, G. [Associazione Euratom-ENEA sulla Fusione, ENEA – C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, I-00044 Frascati, RM (Italy)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: ► Active Ripple Compensating System (ARCS) consists of 18 off-centre poloidal coils between plasma and Toroidal Field Coils. ► The current in ARCS, adjustable and opposite to that in TFC, reduces the toroidal ripple below 0.2% at any toroidal fields. ► Feedback Active Control System (FACS) consists of two arrays of 9 in-vessel saddle coils fed by an MHD feedback controller. ► FACS allows robust feedback stabilization of low toroidal number MHD modes enabling plasma operations at low safety factor. ► ARCS and FACS are included in the whole FAST model and first engineering assessments show their feasibility and capability. -- Abstract: The Fusion Advanced Study Torus (FAST) has been proposed as a high magnetic field, compact size tokamak providing a flexible integrated environment to study physics and technology issues in ITER and DEMO relevant conditions. FAST has a quite large natural toroidal field ripple (around 1.5%) due to its compactness and to the number of access ports: this ripple must be lowered to an acceptable level to allow safe operations and a good confinement quality. An Active Ripple Compensating System (ARCS) has been designed, based on a set of poloidal coils placed between the plasma chamber and the Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs). These ARCS coils will be fed with adjustable currents, opposite in direction respect to the TFC currents, and will allow lowering the ripple up to zero and beyond. The CAD model of FAST including the ARCS coils has been completed and preliminary electromagnetic and thermal analyses have been carried out. Moreover, a Feedback Active Control System (FACS) composed of two arrays of in-vessel saddle coils has been designed to allow safe high plasma current, low safety factor operation and to mitigate possibly large ELMs effects in FAST. These FACS coils will be fed by a feedback system to control MHD modes: a first engineering assessment of the current requirements has been carried out.

  3. Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC) for toroidal confinement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Kolemen, Egemen; Lazerson, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Because of intrinsic anisotropy of high temperature plasma with respect to magnetic field, use of proper coordinates is of high priority for both theory and numerical methods. While in axisymmetric case, the poloidal flux function Y(r,z)=const determines proper flux coordinates, in 3-D, such a function does not exist. The destruction of nested magnetic surfaces even by small 3-D perturbations leads to a sudden change of topology of magnetic field. As a result, the coordinate systems can no longer be based on tracing the magnetic field lines resulting in difficulties for theory and 3-D numerical simulations. The RMC coordinates a,θ,ζ presented here (introduced in 1998 but not really used) are nested toroidal coordinates, which are best aligned with an ergodic confinement fields. In particular, in RMC the vector potential of the magnetic field has an irreducible form A = φ00(a)∇θ +[Y00(a) +ψ^*(a,θ,ζ)]∇ζ , where 3-D function ψ^* contains only resonant Fourier harmonics of angle coordinates. RMC can be generated and advanced using a fast (Newton) algorithm not involving the field line tracing.

  4. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  5. Greenhouse gas accounting of the proposed landfill extension and advanced incineration facility for municipal solid waste management in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woon, K.S.; Lo, Irene M.C., E-mail: cemclo@ust.hk

    2013-08-01

    The burgeoning of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal issue and climate change have drawn massive attention from people. On the one hand, Hong Kong is facing a controversial debate over the implementation of proposed landfill extension (LFE) and advanced incineration facility (AIF) to curb the MSW disposal issue. On the other hand, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government is taking concerted efforts to reduce the carbon intensity in this region. This paper discusses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from four proposed waste disposal scenarios, covering the proposed LFE and AIF within a defined system boundary. On the basis of the data collected, assumptions made, and system boundary defined in this study, the results indicate that AIF releases less GHG emissions than LFE. The GHG emissions from LFE are highly contributed by the landfill methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions but offset by biogenic carbon storage, while the GHG emissions from AIF are mostly due to the stack discharge system but offset by the energy recovery system. Furthermore, parametric sensitivity analyses show that GHG emissions are strongly dependent on the landfill CH{sub 4} recovery rate, types of electricity displaced by energy recovery systems, and the heating value of MSW, altering the order of preferred waste disposal scenarios. This evaluation provides valuable insights into the applicability of a policy framework for MSW management practices in reducing GHG emissions. Highlights: • AIF is better than LFE with regard to GHG emissions in Hong Kong. • Major individual sub-processes of LFE and AIF for GHG emissions are investigated. • GHG emissions for LFE and AIF are strongly dependent on studied parametric sensitivity analyses. • Findings are valuable for sustainable MSW management and GHG reductions in waste sector.

  6. Gaseous toroid around Saturn. [Saturnian ring system for atomic hydrogen trapping in Titan atmospheric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonough, T. R.

    1974-01-01

    The trapping of Titan's escaping atmosphere in the Saturnian system by a toroidal ring is discussed. The radius of the toroid is comparable to Titan's orbit, or about ten times larger than the visible rings. Theoretical atmospheric models are formulated that consider Saturn's gravitational attraction and magnetospheric properties in forming this toroid and in protecting toroid particles from direct ionization by solar wind particles.

  7. Test facility for advanced electric adjustable frequency drives and generators of typical industrial ratings. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    A test facility has been developed, for electric adjustable-speed motors and variable-speed generators, that is unique in US universities in terms of its range (5 to 300 hp currently with 0.1 to 1,000 hp final capability) and flexibility (standard NEMA frame and novel geometry machines can be accommodated). The basic facility was constructed with funding from the Electric Power Research Institute. The instrumentation obtained under this DOE grant has been integrated into the facility which was completed in Fall 1997. The facility has already provided useful studies for DOE, EPRI, as well as several West Coast industries and electric energy utilities.

  8. Toroidicity Dependence of Tokamak Edge Safety Factor and Shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    In large tokamak device and reactor designs, the relationship between the toroidal current and the edge safety factor is very important because this will determine the eventual device or reactor size according to MHD stability requirements. In many preliminary

  9. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  10. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  11. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    . The DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak......In this paper we study the simple case of the dynamics of a density perturbation localized in the edge region of a medium sized tokamak in a full 3D geometry. The 2D evolution of such a perturbation has been studied in details on the low-field side, where the gradient of the magnetic field always...... point radial inward, see e.g. [1-2]. Here, the initial condition is implemented in two very different 3D numerical codes, ATTEMPT [3], and a new developed code, DIESEL (Disk version of ESEL), and the results are compared and discussed in detail. The ATTEMPT code has been employed to study the blob...

  12. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  13. Ballooning mode spectrum in general toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, R.L.; Glasser, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    A WKB formalism for constructing normal modes of short-wavelength ideal hydromagnetic, pressure-driven instabilities (ballooning modes) in general toroidal magnetic containment devices with sheared magnetic fields is developed. No incompressibility approximation is made. A dispersion relation is obtained from the eigenvalues of a fourth order system of ordinary differential equations to be solved by integrating along a line of force. Higher order calculations are performed to find the amplitude equation and the phase change at a caustic. These conform to typical WKB results. In axisymmetric systems, the ray equations are integrable, and semiclassical quantization leads to a growth rate spectrum consisting of an infinity of discrete eigenvalues, bounded above by an accumulation point. However, each eigenvalue is infinitely degenerate. In the nonaxisymmetric case, the rays are unbounded in a four dimensional phase space, and semiclassical quantization breaks down, leading to broadening of the discrete eigenvalues and accumulation point of the axisymmetric case into continuum bands. Analysis of a model problem indicates that the broadening of the discrete eigenvalues is numerically very small, the dominant effect being broadening of the accumulation point.

  14. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  15. Electric disruption in a hydrogen toroidal plasma; Ruptura eletrica em um plasma toroidal em hidrogenio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberto, M. [UNESP, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia. Dept. de Fisica; Silva, C.A.B. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados; Goes, L.C.S.; Sudano, J.P. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. Tecnologico de Aeronautica

    1990-12-31

    By using a zero-dimensional model the ionizing initial phase of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated. The model consists on describing the plasma time evolution through the density and particle temperature space averaged on the plasma volume. The involved equations are energy and particles balance equations (electrons and ions). The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss is due to ionizing, processes of Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating transformer gives a initial voltage necessary to the breaking 11 refs., 2 figs.

  16. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  17. Real-time volumetric visualization of high-resolution array and toroidal volume search sonar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Robert A.

    1998-09-01

    The Advanced Volume Visualization Display (AVVD) research program is a joint research program between the Fraunhofer Center for Research in Computer Graphics, Inc. and Innovative Research and Development Corp. It is dedicated the application of the human visual system to real-time visualization of high- resolution volumetric sensor data sets. The AVVD program has successfully demonstrated its application to undersea imaging using data from the Naval Undersea Warfare Center -- Division Newport's High Resolution Array (HRA), and from the Naval Surface Warfare Center -- Coastal System Stations's Toroidal Volume Search Sonar (TVSS).

  18. Toroidal momentum pinch velocity due to the coriolis drift effect on small scale instabilities in a toroidal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Strintzi, D

    2007-06-29

    In this Letter, the influence of the "Coriolis drift" on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments.

  19. Advanced technologies for maintenance of electrical systems and equipment at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husler, R.O. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Weir, T.J. (Pentek, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    An enhanced maintenance program is being established to characterize and monitor cables, components, and process response at the Savannah River Site, Defense Waste Processing Facility. This facility was designed and constructed to immobilize the radioactive waste currently stored in underground storage tanks and is expected to begin operation in 1993. The plant is initiating the program to baseline and monitor instrument and control (I C) and electrical equipment, remote process equipment, embedded instrument and control cables, and in-cell jumper cables used in the facility. This program is based on the electronic characterization and diagnostic (ECAD) system which was modified to include process response analysis and to meet rigid Department of Energy equipment requirements. The system consists of computer-automated, state-of-the-art electronics. The data that are gathered are stored in a computerized database for analysis, trending, and troubleshooting. It is anticipated that the data which are gathered and trended will aid in life extension for the facility.

  20. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  1. Profiling compact toroid plasma density on CTIX with laser deflection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brockington, Samuel Joseph Erwin

    A laser deflectometer measures line-integrated plasma density gradient using laser diodes and amplified point detectors. A laser passing through an optically thin plasma is refracted by an amount proportional to the line-integrated electron density gradient. I have designed, installed, and operated a deflection diagnostic for the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment (CTIX), a plasma rail gun which can create compact toroid (CT) plasmas of controllable density and velocity. The diagnostic design and motivation are discussed, as well as three experiments performed with deflectometry. Thus, my thesis consists of the design of the deflectometer diagnostic, a comparison of its accuracy to interferometer density measurements, and finally a survey of compact toroid density profiles in two dimensions conducted with an array of detectors.

  2. Ultra-high-Q toroidal microresonators for cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spillane, S M; Vahala, K J; Goh, K W; Wilcut, E; Kimble, H J

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the suitability of toroidal microcavities for strong-coupling cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). Numerical modeling of the optical modes demonstrate a significant reduction of modal volume with respect to the whispering gallery modes of dielectric spheres, while retaining the high quality factors representative of spherical cavities. The extra degree of freedom of toroid microcavities can be used to achieve improved cavity QED characteristics. Numerical results for atom-cavity coupling strength, critical atom number N_0 and critical photon number n_0 for cesium are calculated and shown to exceed values currently possible using Fabry-Perot cavities. Modeling predicts coupling rates g/(2*pi) exceeding 700 MHz and critical atom numbers approaching 10^{-7} in optimized structures. Furthermore, preliminary experimental measurements of toroidal cavities at a wavelength of 852 nm indicate that quality factors in excess of 100 million can be obtained in a 50 micron principal diameter cavity, which w...

  3. Stellar Dynamo Models with Prominent Surface Toroidal Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-12-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work, it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular, it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low-mass fast-rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying αΩ mechanism.

  4. Stellar dynamo models with prominent surface toroidal fields

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2016-01-01

    Recent spectro-polarimetric observations of solar-type stars have shown the presence of photospheric magnetic fields with a predominant toroidal component. If the external field is assumed to be current-free it is impossible to explain these observations within the framework of standard mean-field dynamo theory. In this work it will be shown that if the coronal field of these stars is assumed to be harmonic, the underlying stellar dynamo mechanism can support photospheric magnetic fields with a prominent toroidal component even in the presence of axisymmetric magnetic topologies. In particular it is argued that the observed increase in the toroidal energy in low mass fast rotating stars can be naturally explained with an underlying $\\alpha\\Omega$ mechanism.

  5. Compact Toroid Propagation in a Magnetized Drift Tube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Robert D.; Baker, Kevin L.; Hwang, David Q.; Evans, Russell W.

    2000-10-01

    Injection of a spheromak-like compact toroid (SCT) plasma into a toroidal plasma confinement device may require the SCT to propagate through a drift tube region occupied by a pre-existing magnetic field. This field is expected to extert a retarding force on the SCT, but may also result in a beneficial compression. The effects of transverse and longitudinal magnetic fields will be measured using the CTIX compact-toroid injector, together with a fast framing camera with an axial view of the formation, coaxial, and drift-tube regions. In the case of longitudinal magnetic field, comparisons will be made with the predictions of two-dimensional numerical simulation. The use of localized magnetic field to reduce plasma bridging of the insulating gap will also be investigated.

  6. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with shearad toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Tasso, H

    2015-01-01

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e. the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  7. Efficiency of Wave-Driven Rigid Body Rotation Toroidal Confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Rax, J -M; Fisch, N J

    2016-01-01

    The compensation of vertical drifts in toroidal magnetic fields through a wave-driven poloidal rotation is compared to compensation through the wave driven toroidal current generation to support the classical magnetic rotational transform. The advantages and drawbacks associated with the sustainment of a radial electric field are compared with those associated with the sustainment of a poloidal magnetic field both in terms of energy content and power dissipation. The energy content of a radial electric field is found to be smaller than the energy content of a poloidal magnetic field for a similar set of orbits. The wave driven radial electric field generation efficiency is similarly shown, at least in the limit of large aspect ratio, to be larger than the efficiency of wave-driven toroidal current generation.

  8. Axion Haloscopes with Toroidal Geometry at CAPP/IBS

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R

    2016-01-01

    The present state of the art axion haloscope employs a cylindrical resonant cavity in a solenoidal field. We, the Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in Korea, are also pursuing halo axion discovery using this cylindrical geometry. However, the presence of end caps of cavities increases challenges as we explore higher frequency regions for the axion at above 2 GHz. To overcome these challenges we exploit a toroidal design of cavity and magnetic field. A toroidal geometry offers several advantages, two of which are a larger volume for a given space and greatly reduced fringe fields which interfere with our preamps, in particular the planned quantum-based devices. We introduce the concept of toroidal axion haloscopes and present ongoing research activities and plans at CAPP/IBS.

  9. Advanced technologies for maintenance of electrical systems and equipment at the Savannah River Site Defense Waste Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Husler, R.O. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Weir, T.J. [Pentek, Inc., Coraopolis, PA (United States)

    1991-12-31

    An enhanced maintenance program is being established to characterize and monitor cables, components, and process response at the Savannah River Site, Defense Waste Processing Facility. This facility was designed and constructed to immobilize the radioactive waste currently stored in underground storage tanks and is expected to begin operation in 1993. The plant is initiating the program to baseline and monitor instrument and control (I&C) and electrical equipment, remote process equipment, embedded instrument and control cables, and in-cell jumper cables used in the facility. This program is based on the electronic characterization and diagnostic (ECAD) system which was modified to include process response analysis and to meet rigid Department of Energy equipment requirements. The system consists of computer-automated, state-of-the-art electronics. The data that are gathered are stored in a computerized database for analysis, trending, and troubleshooting. It is anticipated that the data which are gathered and trended will aid in life extension for the facility.

  10. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The model by Braginskii for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to previous evaluations which contain an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglect the effect of the pitch angle. A radial gyroviscous force is found to survive the limit of constant density and rigid toroidal rotation of the flux surface, and a radial shear viscous force may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile.

  11. Comparative study between toroidal coordinates and the magnetic dipole field

    CERN Document Server

    Chávez-Alarcón, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    There is a similar behaviour between the toroidal coordinates and the dipole magnetic field produced by a circular loop. In this work we evaluate up to what extent the former can be used as a representation of the latter. While the tori in the toroidal coordinates have circular cross sections, those of the circular loop magnetic field are nearly elliptical ovoids, but they are very similar for large aspect ratios.The centres of the latter displace from the axis faster than the former. By making a comparison between tori of similar aspect ratios, we find quantitative criteria to evaluate the accuracy of the approximation.

  12. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...

  13. Toroidal vortices as a solution to the dust migration problem

    CERN Document Server

    Loren-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier letter, we reported that dust settling in protoplanetary discs may lead to a dynamical dust-gas instability that produces global toroidal vortices. In this letter, we investigate the evolution of a dusty protoplanetary disc with two different dust species (1 mm and 50 cm dust grains), under the presence of the instability. We show how toroidal vortices, triggered by the interaction of mm grains with the gas, stop the radial migration of metre-sized dust, potentially offering a natural and efficient solution to the dust migration problem.

  14. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M.

    2000-04-01

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of {nabla}B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  15. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  16. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  17. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  18. Controlling the toroidal excitations in metamaterials for high-Q response

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuancheng; Fu, Quanhong; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of toroidal multipoles in metamaterials was investigated for high-Q response at a subwavelength scale. In this study, we explored the optimization of toroidal excitations in a planar metamaterial comprised of asymmetric split ring resonators (ASRRs). It was found that the scattering power of toroidal dipole can be remarkably strengthened by adjusting the characteristic parameter of ASRRs: asymmetric factor. Interestingly, the improvement in toroidal excitation accompanies increasing of the Q-factor of the toroidal metamaterial, it is shown that both the scattering power of toroidal dipole and the Q-factor were increased near one order by changing the asymmetric factor of ASRRs. The optimization in excitation of toroidal multipoles provide opportunity to further increase the Q-factor of toroidal metamaterial and boost light-matter interactions at the subwavelength scale for potential applications in low-power nonlinear processing and sensitive photonic applications.

  19. Validation of Advanced Computer Codes for VVER Technology: LB-LOCA Transient in PSB-VVER Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Del Nevo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The OECD/NEA PSB-VVER project provided unique and useful experimental data for code validation from PSB-VVER test facility. This facility represents the scaled-down layout of the Russian-designed pressurized water reactor, namely, VVER-1000. Five experiments were executed, dealing with loss of coolant scenarios (small, intermediate, and large break loss of coolant accidents, a primary-to-secondary leak, and a parametric study (natural circulation test aimed at characterizing the VVER system at reduced mass inventory conditions. The comparative analysis, presented in the paper, regards the large break loss of coolant accident experiment. Four participants from three different institutions were involved in the benchmark and applied their own models and set up for four different thermal-hydraulic system codes. The benchmark demonstrated the performances of such codes in predicting phenomena relevant for safety on the basis of fixed criteria.

  20. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  1. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  2. Stability of toroidal magnetic fields in stellar interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Ibañez-Mejia, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    We present 3D MHD simulations of purely toroidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field configurations to study the behavior of the Tayler instability. For the first time the simultaneous action of rotation and magnetic diffusion are taken into account and the effects of a poloidal field on the dynamic evolution of unstable toroidal magnetic fields is included. In the absence of diffusion, fast rotation (rotation rate compared to Alfv\\'en frequency) is able to suppress the instability when the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned and when the radial field strength gradient p 1.5, rapid rotation does not suppress the instability but instead introduces a damping factor to the growth rate in agreement with the analytic predictions. For the mixed poloidal-toroidal fields we find an unstable axisymmetric mode, not predicted analytically, right at the stability threshold for the non-axisymmetric modes; it has been argued that an axisymmetric mode is necessary for the closure of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo loop.

  3. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  4. Approximations for the natural logarithm from solenoid-toroid correspondence

    CERN Document Server

    Semiz, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    It seems reasonable that a toroid can be thought of approximately as a solenoid bent into a circle. The correspondence of the inductances of these two objects gives an approximation for the natural logarithm in terms of the average of two numbers. Different ways of averaging give different approximants. They are expressions simpler than Taylor polynomials, and are meaningful over a wider domain.

  5. Toroidal equilibrium in an iron-core reversed field pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, G.

    1984-04-01

    An analytical theory of toroidal equilibrium in the ZT-40M reversed field pinch is obtained, including effects of iron cores and resistive shell. The iron cores alter the form of the equilibrium condition and cause the equilibrium to be unstable on the shell resistive time scale.

  6. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  7. Theory of the M = 1 Kink Mode in Toroidal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.; Schep, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The energy principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to study the ideal MHD stability of the m = 1 internal kink mode in a toroidal plasma. The equilibrium configurations that are considered allow for a broad region where the safety factor q is close to unity. This region may extend to t

  8. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  9. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the recent studies of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in JET. The ratio of the global energy confinement time to the momentum confinement is found to be close to tau(E)/tau(phi) = 1 except for the low density or low collisionality discharges where the ratio is tau(E...

  10. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  11. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  12. Plasma Processes : Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bhattacharyya; M S Janaki; B Dasgupta

    2000-11-01

    Relaxation of toroidal discharges is described by the principle of minimum energy dissipation together with the constraint of conserved global helicity. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equation is solved in toroidal coordinates for an axisymmetric torus by expressing the solutions in terms of Chandrasekhar-Kendall (C-K) eigenfunctions analytically continued in the complex domain. The C-K eigenfunctions are obtained as hypergeometric functions that are solutions of scalar Helmholtz equation in toroidal coordinates in the large aspect-ratio approximation. Equilibria are constructed by assuming the current to vanish at the edge of plasma. For the = 0; = 0 ( and are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively) relaxed states, the magnetic field, current, (safety factor) and pressure profiles are calculated for a given value of aspect-ratio of the torus and for different values of the eigenvalue 0. The new feature of the present model is that solutions allow for both tokamak as well as RFP-like behaviour with increase in the values of 0, which is related directly to volt-sec in the experiment.

  13. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  14. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Document Server

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  15. Homogeneous Construction of the Toroidal Lie Algebra of Type A1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifeng Lian; Cui Chen; Qinzhu Wen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we consider an analogue of the level two homogeneous construc-tion of the affine Kac-Moody algebra A1(1) by vertex operators.We construct modules for the toroidal Lie algebra and the extended toroidal Lie algebra of type A1.We also prove that the module is completely reducible for the extended toroidal Lie algebra.

  16. The characteristics of the ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity in the KSTAR plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Won Ha; Lee, Hyung Ho; Oh, Seung Tae [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Charge exchange spectroscopy (CES) is one of the important diagnostics on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) to get ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity. We describe the current status and the improvements made over the last two years. The current system upgraded from a Czerny-Turner spectrometer consists of two spectroscopic systems looking at the KSTAR neutral beam which is modulated 5 Hz for special period. One system has a DS spectrometer (f/2.8) lent from NIFS with pitch-controlled double slit fiber bundle with back- illuminated CCD and the other system has Kspectrometer (F/2.0) made by NFRI with intensified CCD. The K-spectrometer has a grating number of 2400 g/mm, focal length of 200 mm. The upgrade of two high throughput spectrometers enables to improve the time resolution from 200 msec to around 10 msec. This article focuses on improved edge spatial interval from increasing of plasma viewing channels to 5 mm and enhanced time resolution from a high throughput spectrometer with back-illuminated CCD. The upgrade has allowed to measure pedestal ion temperature and toroidal rotation velocity profiles in KSTAR H-mode

  17. Toroidal modeling of plasma response to RMP fields in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Wang, N.; Kirk, A.; Koslowski, H. R.; Liang, Y.; Loarte, A.; Ryan, D.; Zhong, F. C.

    2017-04-01

    A systematic numerical study is carried out, computing the resistive plasma response to the resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields for ITER plasmas, utilizing the toroidal code MARS-F (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681). A number of factors are taken into account, including the variation of the plasma scenarios (from 15 MA Q = 10 inductive scenario to the 9 MA Q = 5 steady state scenario), the variation of the toroidal spectrum of the applied fields (n = 1, 2, 3, 4, with n being the toroidal mode number), the amplitude and phase variation of the currents in three rows of the RMP coils as designed for ITER, and finally a special case of mixed toroidal spectrum between the n = 3 and n = 4 RMP fields. Two-dimensional parameter scans, for the edge safety factor and the coil phasing between the upper and lower rows of coils, yield ‘optimal’ curves that maximize a set of figures of merit, that are defined in this work to measure the plasma response. Other two-dimensional scans of the relative coil current phasing among three rows of coils, at fixed coil currents amplitude, reveal a single optimum for each coil configuration with a given n number, for the 15 MA ITER inductive plasma. On the other hand, scanning of the coil current amplitude, at fixed coil phasing, shows either synergy or cancellation effect, for the field contributions between the off-middle rows and the middle row of the RMP coils. Finally, the mixed toroidal spectrum, by combining the n = 3 and the n = 4 RMP field, results in a substantial local reduction of the amplitude of the plasma surface displacement.

  18. Recent Advances in Antenna Measurement Techniques at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports recent antenna measurement projects and research at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at the Technical University of Denmark. High-accuracy measurement projects for the SMOS, SENTINEL-1, and BIOMASS missions of the European Space Agency were driven...... by uncertainty requirements of a few hundredths of dB for the directivity and correspondingly strong requirements for gain and/or phase. Research and development of 1:3 bandwidth range probes, and the near-field to far-field transformation algorithm accounting for the higher-order azimuthal modes...

  19. Advanced accelerator test facility-Final report for the period 9/1/2010 - 8/31/2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-10-27

    This final report summarizes results achieved in the Beam Physics Laboratory at Yale University during the period 9/1/2010 – 8/31//2013, under DoE grant DE-FG02-07 ER 41504. During the period covered by this report, notable progress in technical consolidation of facilities in the Yale Beam Physics Laboratory has occurred; and theory, design, and fabrication for future experiments have been carried out. In the period covered by this grant, 29 scientific publications based on this work and related topics have appeared in the archival literature. Titles, authors, and citations are listed in Section V of this report.

  20. Overview of a test facility designed to guide innovations in the development of advanced thermal insulation materials and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Jessica L.; Boroski, William N.; Hart, Frank R.

    To aid in the development of advanced thermal insulating materials and systems, Lydall, Inc. Manning Nonwovens Division has acquired acalorimeter. The calorimeter is specially-designed to measure the thermal conductivity of high-efficiency insulating materials and multilayer insulation systems under various operating conditions. A description of the apparatus is included. The calorimeter has the capabilities of measuring thermal conductivity in the temperature range of 10K to 300K and under insulating vacuum levels ranging from 10 -2 torr (1.33 Pa) through 10 -8 torr (1.33×10 -6 Pa). The calorimeter has been calibrated over its operating range and measurements have been made on several insulation systems to quantify thermal performance. Details of the calibration process will be presented. Preliminary measurements results demonstrate that the capabilities of this system will enhance the development of advanced thermal insulation materials and systems.

  1. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, M.J.

    1987-01-01

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are the single-cell concept, the low-flow ventilation concept, television viewing, equipment-mounting racks, and force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  2. High Energy Tests of Advanced Materials for Beam Intercepting Devices at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, S; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaeelli, S; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2012-01-01

    Predicting by simulations the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting Collimators and other Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) is a fundamental issue for machine protection: this can be done by resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, these codes require reliable material models that, at the extreme conditions generated by a beam impact, are either imprecise or non-existent. To validate relevant constitutive models or, when unavailable, derive new ones, a comprehensive experimental test foreseeing intense particle beam impacts on six different materials, either already used for present BID or under development for future applications, is being prepared at CERN HiRadMat facility. Tests will be run at medium and high intensity using the SPS proton beam (440 GeV). Material characterization will be carried out mostly in real time relying on embarked instrumentation (strain gauges, microphones, temperature and pressure sensors) and on remote acquisition dev...

  3. The CHEASE code for toroidal MHD equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luetjens, H. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Centre de Physique Theorique; Bondeson, A. [Chalmers Univ. of Technology, Goeteborg (Sweden). Inst. for Electromagnetic Field Theory and Plasma Physics; Sauter, O. [ITER-San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1996-03-01

    CHEASE solves the Grad-Shafranov equation for the MHD equilibrium of a Tokamak-like plasma with pressure and current profiles specified by analytic forms or sets of data points. Equilibria marginally stable to ballooning modes or with a prescribed fraction of bootstrap current can be computed. The code provides a mapping to magnetic flux coordinates, suitable for MHD stability calculations or global wave propagation studies. The code computes equilibrium quantities for the stability codes ERATO, MARS, PEST, NOVA-W and XTOR and for the global wave propagation codes LION and PENN. The two-dimensional MHD equilibrium (Grad-Shafranov) equation is solved in variational form. The discretization uses bicubic Hermite finite elements with continuous first order derivates for the poloidal flux function {Psi}. The nonlinearity of the problem is handled by Picard iteration. The mapping to flux coordinates is carried out with a method which conserves the accuracy of the cubic finite elements. The code uses routines from the CRAY libsci.a program library. However, all these routines are included in the CHEASE package itself. If CHEASE computes equilibrium quantities for MARS with fast Fourier transforms, the NAG library is required. CHEASE is written in standard FORTRAN-77, except for the use of the input facility NAMELIST. CHEASE uses variable names with up to 8 characters, and therefore violates the ANSI standard. CHEASE transfers plot quantities through an external disk file to a plot program named PCHEASE using the UNIRAS or the NCAR plot package. (author) figs., tabs., 34 refs.

  4. Observation of Fano resonance and classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in toroidal metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Song; Yang, Helin [College of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Cong, Lonqing; Singh, Ranjan [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    Toroidal multipoles have recently been explored in various scientific communities, ranging from atomic and molecular physics, electrodynamics, and solid-state physics to biology. Here we experimentally and numerically demonstrate a three-dimensional toroidal metamaterial where two different toroidal dipoles along orthogonal directions have been observed. The chosen toroidal metamaterial also simultaneously supports Fano resonance and the classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena in the transmission spectra that originate from the electric-toroidal dipole and electric-magnetic dipole destructive interference. The intriguing properties of the toroidal resonances may open up avenues for applications in toroidal moments generator, sensing and slow-light devices. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Multipurpose monochromator for the Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center Collaborative Access Team beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source x-ray facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, M.; Beno, M. A.; Knapp, G. S.; Jennings, G.; Cowan, P. L.; Montano, P. A.

    1995-02-01

    The Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) will construct x-ray beamlines at two sectors of the Advanced Photon Source facility. In most of the beamlines the first optical element will be a monochromator, so that a standard design for this critical component is advantageous. The monochromator is a double-crystal, fixed exit scheme with a constant offset designed for ultrahigh vacuum windowless operation. In this design, the crystals are mounted on a turntable with the first crystal at the center of rotation. Mechanical linkages are used to correctly position the second crystal and maintain a constant offset. The main drive for the rotary motion is provided by a vacuum compatible Huber goniometer isolated from the main vacuum chamber. The design of the monochromator is such that it can accommodate water, gallium, or liquid-nitrogen cooling for the crystal optics.

  6. An Applied Study of Implementation of the Advanced Decommissioning Costing Methodology for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik, Sweden with special emphasis to the application of the Omega code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The presented study is focused on an analysis of decommissioning costs for the Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (FA) facility in Studsvik prepared by SVAFO and a proposal of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology application. Therefore, this applied study concentrates particularly in the following areas: 1. Analysis of FA facility cost estimates prepared by SVAFO including description of FA facility in Studsvik, summarised input data, applied cost estimates methodology and summarised results from SVAFO study. 2. Discussion of results of the SVAFO analysis, proposals for enhanced cost estimating methodology and upgraded structure of inputs/outputs for decommissioning study for FA facility. 3. Review of costing methodologies with the special emphasis on the advanced costing methodology and cost calculation code OMEGA. 4. Discussion on implementation of the advanced costing methodology for FA facility in Studsvik together with: - identification of areas of implementation; - analyses of local decommissioning infrastructure; - adaptation of the data for the calculation database; - inventory database; and - implementation of the style of work with the computer code OMEGA.

  7. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ˜1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  8. Development of Multi-pulse Compact Toroid Injector System for C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Morehouse, M.; Roche, T.; Gota, H.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Putvinski, S.; Cordero, M.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The C-2U experiment aims at sustaining a dynamically formed field reversed configuration (FRC) for 5 + ms via injection of 10 +MW of neutral beams. One of the systems currently used to refuel the C-2U plasma is a single pulse compact toroid injector (CTI). The CTI is a magnetized co-axial plasma gun, which generates a spheromak-like plasma that is injected into the core of the advanced beam-driven FRC of C-2U. In order to refuel the recent long-lived plasmas in C-2U, a multi-pulse CTI system, whose modular design allows for expandable burst numbers, is being designed. Details of the pulsed power systems used to energize the single pulse and the upgraded multi-pulse CTI will be discussed. Results of injector performance carried out on a dedicated test stand as well as some refueling data on C-2U will also be presented.

  9. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Oliver K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Betz, Michael; Caspers, Fritz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Semertzidis, Yannis [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sikivie, Pierre [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zioutas, Konstantin [Patras Univ. (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  10. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert W.

    2011-12-01

    The model by Braginskii [1] (Braginskii, S. I. 1965 Transport processes in plasma. In: Review of Plasma Physics, Vol. 1 (ed. M.A. Leontovich). New York, NY: Consultants Bureau, pp. 205-311) for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to a previous evaluation, which contains an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglects the effect of the pitch angle. Parallel viscosity contributes a radial shear viscous force, which may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile. An evaluation is performed of this radial viscous force for a tokamak near equilibrium, which indicates qualitative agreement between theory and measurement for impure plasma discharges with strong toroidal flow.

  11. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, Sanae-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, Louis [EURATOM-IPP Association, Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2001-11-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator. (author)

  12. Modelling of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Itoh, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics; Giannone, L. [Max Planck Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-IPP Association, Garching (Germany)

    2000-03-01

    The physics of density limit phenomena in toroidal helical plasmas based on an analytic point model of toroidal plasmas is discussed. The combined mechanism of the transport and radiation loss of energy is analyzed, and the achievable density is derived. A scaling law of the density limit is discussed. The dependence of the critical density on the heating power, magnetic field, plasma size and safety factor in the case of L-mode energy confinement is explained. The dynamic evolution of the plasma energy and radiation loss is discussed. Assuming a simple model of density evolution, of a sudden loss of density if the temperature becomes lower than critical value, then a limit cycle oscillation is shown to occur. A condition that divides the limit cycle oscillation and the complete radiation collapse is discussed. This model seems to explain the density limit oscillation that has been observed on the W7-AS stellarator. (author)

  13. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  14. Initial value problem of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuroda, T.; Sugama, H.; Kanno, R.; Okamoto, M. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Horton, W.

    1998-06-01

    The initial value problem of the toroidal ion temperature gradient mode is studied based on the Laplace transform of the ion gyrokinetic equation and the electron Boltzmann relation with the charge neutrality condition. Due to the toroidal magnetic drift, the Laplace-transformed density and potential perturbations have a branch cut as well as poles on the complex-frequency plane. The inverse Laplace transform shows that the temporal evolution of the density and potential perturbations consists of the normal modes and the continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from the poles and the branch cut, respectively. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with the eigenfrequencies determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode shows power-law decay oscillation. For the stable case, the long-time asymptotic behavior of the potential and density perturbations is dominated by the continuum mode which decays slower than the normal modes. (author)

  15. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; R Singh; D Bora

    2009-12-01

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively. The experimental investigation of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that saturated slab equilibrium is obtained. Low-frequency (LF) coherent fluctuations ( < ci) are observed and identified as flute modes. Here ci represents ion cyclotron frequency. Our results indicate that these modes get reduced with ion mass. The frequency of the fluctuating mode decreases with increase in the ion mass. Further, an attempt has been made to discuss the theory of flute modes to understand the relevance of some of our experimental observations.

  16. Precession of Toroidally Passing Particles in Tokamaks and Spherical Tori

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; R.B.White; Yu.V. Yakovenko

    2003-01-30

    The toroidal precession of the well-circulating particles and particles that are passing toroidally but trapped poloidally is studied. Expressions for the precession frequency, which are convenient for practical use, are obtained and analyzed. It is found that the key parameters that determine the magnitude and the direction of the precession velocity are the plasma elongation, the magnitudes and profiles of the safety factor and beta defined as the ratio of the local plasma pressure to the magnetic field pressure at the magnetic axis. An important role of the ''paramagnetic'' precession in highly elongated plasmas is revealed. The analysis carried out is based on the obtained expressions for the equilibrium magnetic field strength and the field line curvature.

  17. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  18. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  19. Facile synthesis of ultrathin manganese dioxide nanosheets arrays on nickel foam as advanced binder-free supercapacitor electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ming

    2015-03-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Ultrathin MnO2 nanosheets arrays on Ni foam have been fabricated by a facile hydrothermal approach and further investigated as the binder-free electrode for high-performance supercapacitors. This unique well-designed binder-free electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance (595.2 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1), good rate capability (64.1% retention), and excellent cycling stability (89% capacitance retention after 3000 cycles). Moreover, an asymmetric supercapacitor is constructed using the as-prepared MnO2 nanosheets arrays as the positive electrode and activated microwave exfoliated graphite oxide (MEGO) as the negative electrode. The optimized asymmetric supercapacitor displays excellent electrochemical performance with an energy density of 25.8 Wh kg-1 and a maximum power density of 223.2 kW kg-1. These impressive performances suggest that the MnO2 nanosheet array is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  20. Design and advancement status of the Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility (BEaTriX)

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Salmaso, B; Arcangeli, L; Bianucci, G; Ferrari, C; Ghigo, M; Pareschi, G; Rossi, M; Tagliaferri, G; Valsecchi, G; Vecchi, G; Zappettini, A

    2016-01-01

    The BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility) project is an X-ray apparatus under construction at INAF/OAB to generate a broad (200 x 60 mm2), uniform and low-divergent X-ray beam within a small lab (6 x 15 m2). BEaTriX will consist of an X-ray source in the focus a grazing incidence paraboloidal mirror to obtain a parallel beam, followed by a crystal monochromation system and by an asymmetrically-cut diffracting crystal to perform the beam expansion to the desired size. Once completed, BEaTriX will be used to directly perform the quality control of focusing modules of large X-ray optics such as those for the ATHENA X-ray observatory, based on either Silicon Pore Optics (baseline) or Slumped Glass Optics (alternative), and will thereby enable a direct quality control of angular resolution and effective area on a number of mirror modules in a short time, in full X-ray illumination and without being affected by the finite distance of the X-ray source. However, since the individual mirror modules for ATHENA...

  1. Facile construction of 3D graphene/MoS2 composites as advanced electrode materials for supercapacitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tianhua; Li, Zhangpeng; Liu, Xiaohong; Ma, Limin; Wang, Jinqing; Yang, Shengrong

    2016-11-01

    Flower-like molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) microstructures are synthesized based on three-dimensional graphene (3DG) skeleton via a simple and facile one-step hydrothermal method, aiming at constructing series of novel composite electrode materials of 3DG/MoS2 with high electrochemical performances for supercapacitors. The electrochemical properties of the samples are evaluated by cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge/discharge tests. Specifically, the optimal 3DG/MoS2 composite exhibits remarkable performances with a high specific capacitance of 410 F g-1 at a current density of 1 A g-1 and an excellent cycling stability with ca. 80.3% capacitance retention after 10,000 continuous charge-discharge cycles at a high current density of 2 A g-1, making it adaptive for high-performance supercapacitors. The enhanced electrochemical performances can be ascribed to the combination of 3DG and flower-like MoS2, which provides excellent charge transfer network and electrolyte diffusion channels while effectively prevents the collapse, aggregation and morphology change of active materials during charge-discharge process. The results demonstrate that 3DG/MoS2 composite is one of the attractive electrode materials for supercapacitors.

  2. Radial Eigenmodes for a Toroidal Waveguide with Rectangular Cross Section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rui Li

    2012-07-01

    In applying mode expansion to solve the CSR impedance for a section of toroidal vacuum chamber with rectangular cross section, we identify the eigenvalue problem for the radial eigenmodes which is different from that for cylindrical structures. In this paper, we present the general expressions of the radial eigenmodes, and discuss the properties of the eigenvalues on the basis of the Sturm-Liouville theory.

  3. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  4. Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission Systems: Terminology and Present Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of continuously variable transmission systems in many different areas such as aerospace, robotics, machinery and automotive industries as an alternative to conventional speed changers with constant ratio becomes widely.Especially in the automotive industry, these systems have been used increasingly, since they enable that internal combustion engines in vehicles run at optimal speeds, and consequently provide considerable fuel savings and therefore lower emission values and also they provide powerful acceleration and quiet working. CVT systems have several constructive variants such as belted, chained, balled, toroidal etc. In this paper, toroidal CVT systems based on elastohydrodynamic principles are concerned with, and fundamental works of last two decades in this field are reviewed. However, the relevant terminology and dynamics along with the control of these systems are briefly treated for better understanding of the literature mentioned. Attention is drawn to the lack of some significant issues in present research works, and potential future works are pointed out. This paper, to the authors’ knowledge, will be the first review on toroidal CVT systems in Turkish literature

  5. The Geometry on Smooth Toroidal Compactifications of Siegel varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Shing-Tung

    2012-01-01

    This is a part of our joint program. The purpose of this paper is to study smooth toroidal compactifications of Siegel varieties and their applications, we also try to understand the K\\"ahler-Einstein metrics on Siegel varieties through the compactifications. Let $A_{g,\\Gamma}:=H_g/\\Gamma$ be a Siegel variety, where $H_g$ is the genus-$g$ Siegel space and $\\Gamma$ is an arithmetic subgroup in $\\Aut(H_g)$. There are four aspects of this paper : 1.There is a correspondence between the category of degenerations of Abelian varieties and the category of limits of weight one Hodge structures. We show that any cusp of Siegel space $\\frak{H}_g$ can be identified with the set of certain weight one polarized mixed Hodge structures. 2.In general, the boundary of a smooth toroidal compactification $\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}$ of $A_{g,\\Gamma}$ has self-intersections.For most geometric applications, we would like to have a nice toroidal compactification such that the added infinity boundary $D_\\infty =\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}-A_{g,\\Gam...

  6. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, Donald A., E-mail: spongda@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  7. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S., E-mail: gunsu@postech.ac.kr; Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. K. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  8. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rista, P. E. C.; Shull, J.; Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen & helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper.

  9. Test Results of a 1.2 kg/s Centrifugal Liquid Helium Pump for the ATLAS Superconducting Toroid Magnet System

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The toroid superconducting magnet of ATLAS-LHC experiment at CERN will be indirectly cooled by means of forced flow of liquid helium at about 4.5 K. A centrifugal pump will be used, providing a mass flow of 1.2 kg/s and a differential pressure of 40 kPa (ca. 400 mbar) at about 4300 rpm. Two pumps are foreseen, one for redundancy, in order to feed in parallel the cooling circuits of the Barrel and the two End-Caps toroid magnets. The paper describes the tests carried out at CERN to measure the characteristic curves, i.e. the head versus the mass flow at different rotational speeds, as well as the pump total efficiency. The pump is of the "fullemission" type, i.e. with curved blades and it is equipped with an exchangeable inducer. A dedicated pump test facility has been constructed at CERN, which includes a Coriolis-type liquid helium mass flow meter. This facility is connected to the helium refrigerator used for the tests at CERN of the racetrack magnets of the Barrel and of the End-Cap toroids.

  10. High Energy Solid State Laser Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — A suite of laboratories with advanced spectroscopic and laser equipment, this facility develops materials and techniques for advanced solid state high energy lasers....

  11. Toroidal cell and battery. [storage battery for high amp-hour load applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagle, W. J. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A toroidal storage battery designed to handle relatively high amp-hour loads is described. The cell includes a wound core disposed within a pair of toroidal channel shaped electrodes spaced apart by nylon insulator. The shape of the case electrodes of this toroidal cell allows a first planar doughnut shaped surface and the inner cylindrical case wall to be used as a first electrode and a second planar doughnut shaped surface and the outer cylindrical case wall to be used as a second electrode. Connectors may be used to stack two or more toroidal cells together by connecting substantially the entire surface area of the first electrode of a first cell to substantially the entire surface area of the second electrode of a second cell. The central cavity of each toroidal cell may be used as a conduit for pumping a fluid through the toroidal cell to thereby cool the cell.

  12. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staszczak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland; Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  13. The comparative analysis of the different mechanisms of toroidal rotation in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabot, R. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Parail, V. [Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1994-07-01

    The toroidal plasma rotation appears as one the possible mechanism for suppression of plasma turbulence. Several mechanisms are believed to contribute to the toroidal plasma rotation. The results of numerical simulation of the toroidal rotation on JET are presented, where are taken into consideration the following effects: the neoclassical viscosity due to banana and ripple trapped particles, the anomalous viscosity due to plasma turbulence, the momentum input by NBI (neutron beam injection) and ion momentum loss near the separatrix due to prompt ion losses. The NBI appeared to be the principal source of toroidal plasma rotation. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) enables engineers to develop manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient...

  15. D{sup -} energy spectrum in toroidal quantum ring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez, C A; Gutierrez, W; Garcia, L F [Universidad Industrial de Santander, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Marin, J H, E-mail: jhmarin@unal.edu.c [Universidad Nacional-Colombia, Medellin-Colombia, AA3840 (Colombia)

    2009-05-01

    The structure of energy spectrum of the negative donor centre in a toroidal-shaped quantum ring with two different morphologies of the cross-section is analyzed. By using the adiabatic procedure we have deduced a one-dimensional wave equation with periodic conditions which describes the low-lying energy levels related to the electrons rotation around the symmetry axis. Our results are in good agreement with those previously obtained as the size of the ring cross-section tends to zero.

  16. Experimental observation of crystalline particle flows in toroidal dust clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilms, Jochen, E-mail: wilms@physik.uni-kiel.de; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Reichstein, Torben [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); DME, Kiel University of Applied Sciences, Grenzstr. 3, D-24147 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-06-15

    The dust flow in a toroidal dust trap is studied experimentally. The flow is driven by the Hall component of the ion drag force in a magnetized plasma. Dust density waves are found in a torus with a large minor radius a, which allows for several wavelength, 2a>5λ, in the (mostly) radial direction of the ion flow. Beyond an intermediate state with radial sloshing oscillations, a crystalline dust flow with suppressed wave activity could be realized for 2a<2λ. The particles arrange themselves in distinct layers with hexagonal-like local order. Smooth transitions between states with different numbers of layers are found in the inhomogeneous flow.

  17. Simulation of dust streaming in toroidal traps: Stationary flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reichstein, Torben; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universitaet, D-24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2011-08-15

    Molecular-dynamic simulations were performed to study dust motion in a toroidal trap under the influence of the ion drag force driven by a Hall motion of the ions in E x B direction, gravity, inter-particle forces, and friction with the neutral gas. This article is focused on the inhomogeneous stationary streaming motion. Depending on the strength of friction, the spontaneous formation of a stationary shock or a spatial bifurcation into a fast flow and a slow vortex flow is observed. In the quiescent streaming region, the particle flow features a shell structure which undergoes a structural phase transition along the flow direction.

  18. Stationary motion of a self gravitating toroidal incompressible liquid layer

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Giorgio; Oliva, Waldyr M

    2012-01-01

    We consider an incompressible fluid contained in a toroidal stratum which is only subjected to Newtonian self-attraction. Under the assumption of infinitesimal tickness of the stratum we show the existence of stationary motions during which the stratum is approximatly a round torus (with radii r, R and R>>r) that rotates around its axis and at the same time rolls on itself. Therefore each particle of the stratum describes an helix-like trajectory around the circumference of radius R that connects the centers of the cross sections of the torus.

  19. Total and paired domination numbers of toroidal meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fu-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a graph without isolated vertices. The total domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices that can dominate all vertices in $G$, and the paired domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices in a dominating set whose induced subgraph contains a perfect matching. This paper determines the total domination number and the paired domination number of the toroidal meshes, i.e., the Cartesian product of two cycles $C_n$ and $C_m$ for any $n\\ge 3$ and $m\\in\\{3,4\\}$, and gives some upper bounds for $n, m\\ge 5$.

  20. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  1. Position indicating split toroid for the RACE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, B. [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, University of Texas, 10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)]. E-mail: bhurst@mail.utexas.edu; Folkman, K. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Aspects of the recent reactor accelerator coupled experiments (RACE) carried out at University of Texas Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory will be discussed. In particular, a compact instrument that allowed a continuous non-invasive means of determining the relative electron beam position was developed. The operation of the instrument is similar to an inductive current pick up toroid except that the core is sectioned radially, which allows spatial information to be derived from the induced voltages. Results of initial tests, both in beam and with a pulser, will be presented along with plans to optimize future designs.

  2. Toroidal equilibrium with low frequency wave driven currents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehst, D.A.

    1984-12-01

    In the absence of an emf the parallel current, j/sub parallel/, in a steady state tokamak will consist of a neoclassical portion plus a wave-driven contribution. Using the drift kinetic equation, the quasilinear (wave-driven) current is computed for high phase speed waves in a torus, and this is combined with the neoclassical term to obtain the general expression for the flux surface average . For a given pressure profile this technique fully determines the MHD equilibrium, permitting the study of a new class of toroidal equilibria.

  3. Resistive demountable toroidal-field coils for tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jassby, D.L.; Jacobsen, R.A.; Kalnavarns, J.; Masson, L.S.; Sekot, J.P.

    1981-07-01

    Readily demountable TF (toroidal-field) coils allow complete access to the internal components of a tokamak reactor for maintenance of replacement. The requirement of readily demountable joints dictates the use of water-cooled resistive coils, which have a host of decisive advantages over superconducting coils. Previous papers have shown that resistive TF coils for tokamak reactors can operate in the steady state with acceptable power dissipation (typically, 175 to 300 MW). This paper summarizes results of parametric studies of size optimization of rectangular TF coils and of a finite-element stress analysis, and examines several candidate methods of implementing demountable joints for rectangular coils constructed of plate segments.

  4. Preliminary Feasibility, Design, and Hazard Analysis of a Boiling Water Test Loop Within the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Douglas M. Gerstner

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). A Boiling Water Test Loop (BWTL) is being designed for one of the irradiation test positions within the. The objective of the new loop will be to simulate boiling water reactor (BWR) conditions to support clad corrosion and related reactor material testing. Further it will accommodate power ramping tests of candidate high burn-up fuels and fuel pins/rods for the commercial BWR utilities. The BWTL will be much like the pressurized water loops already in service in 5 of the 9 “flux traps” (region of enhanced neutron flux) in the ATR. The loop coolant will be isolated from the primary coolant system so that the loop’s temperature, pressure, flow rate, and water chemistry can be independently controlled. This paper presents the proposed general design of the in-core and auxiliary BWTL systems; the preliminary results of the neutronics and thermal hydraulics analyses; and the preliminary hazard analysis for safe normal and transient BWTL and ATR operation.

  5. Analysis of the confluence of three patterns using the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) images for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Bliss, Erlan; Roberts, Randy; Rushford, Michael; Wilhelmsen, Karl; Zobrist, Thomas

    2014-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight highdensity internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Employing up to eight backlighters, ARC can produce an X-ray "motion picture" to diagnose the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-ofpicosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. The function of the Centering and Pointing System (CAPS) in ARC is to provide superimposed near-field and far-field images on a common optical path. The Images are then analyzed to extract beam centering and pointing data for the control system. The images contain the confluence of pointing, centering, and reference patterns. The patterns may have uneven illumination, particularly when the laser is misaligned. In addition, the simultaneous appearance of three reference patterns may be co-incidental, possibly masking one or more of the patterns. Image analysis algorithms have been developed to determine the centering and pointing position of ARC from these images. In the paper we describe the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the centers of these patterns. Results are provided, illustrating how well the process meets system requirements.

  6. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}˜ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}˜ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (-100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  7. Inversion of the Abel equation for toroidal density distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper I present three new results of astronomical interest concerning the theory of Abel inversion. 1) I show that in the case of a spatial emissivity that is constant on toroidal surfaces and projected along the symmetry axis perpendicular to the torus' equatorial plane, it is possible to invert the projection integral. From the surface (i.e. projected) brightness profile one then formally recovers the original spatial distribution as a function of the toroidal radius. 2) By applying the above-described inversion formula, I show that if the projected profile is described by a truncated off-center gaussian, the functional form of the related spatial emissivity is very simple and - most important - nowhere negative for any value of the gaussian parameters, a property which is not guaranteed - in general - by Abel inversion. 3) Finally, I show how a generic multimodal centrally symmetric brightness distribution can be deprojected using a sum of truncated off-center gaussians, recovering the spatial emis...

  8. Last End Cap Toroid installation : The Pharaonic enterprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaud Foussat

    After the successful and impressive transport feat from Building 191 to Point 1 was carried out by the Friderici crew on 28th June, the second and last Toroid End Cap, ECT-C, was transferred into the surface building, SX1, on 2nd July. The ECT-C was installed in the ATLAS cavern on the C-side on 12th July. As the person responsible for the project, in my opinion, one of the crucial points of this project was to design all the tooling and installation sequences taking into account the building infrastructure dimensional constraints. View of the ECT installation tooling and preparation for the ECT-C descent into the ATLAS 80m-shaft by the ATLAS magnet group and DBS teams. The movement of the 240-ton magnet and 12-m diameter toroid end-cap was achieved in collaboration with SCALES, a subcontractor company, using a hydraulic gantry able to lower the ECT inside the shaft by 5m below the floor level . This allowed the DBS team to attach the end-cap with the 2 x 140 tons overhead crane and lower it onto the c...

  9. Baryonic torii: Toroidal baryons in a generalized Skyrme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2015-02-01

    We study a Skyrme-type model with a potential term motivated by Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), which we call the BEC Skyrme model. We consider two flavors of the model: the first is the Skyrme model, and the second has a sixth-order derivative term instead of the Skyrme term, both with the added BEC-motivated potential. The model contains toroidally shaped Skyrmions, and they are characterized by two integers P and Q , representing the winding numbers of two complex scalar fields along the toroidal and poloidal cycles of the torus, respectively. The baryon number is B =P Q . We find stable Skyrmion solutions for P =1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 with Q =1 , while for P =6 and Q =1 , it is only metastable. We further find that configurations with higher Q >1 are all unstable and split into Q configurations with Q =1 . Finally we discover a phase transition, possibly of first order, in the mass parameter of the potential under study.

  10. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  11. Instability of toroidal magnetic field in jets and plerions

    CERN Document Server

    Begelman, M C

    1997-01-01

    Jets and pulsar-fed supernova remnants (plerions) tend to develop highly organized toroidal magnetic field. Such a field structure could explain the polarization properties of some jets, and contribute to their lateral confinement. A toroidal field geometry is also central to models for the Crab Nebula - the archetypal plerion - and leads to the deduction that the Crab pulsar's wind must have a weak magnetic field. Yet this `Z-pinch' field configuration is well known to be locally unstable, even when the magnetic field is weak and/or boundary conditions slow or suppress global modes. Thus, the magnetic field structures imputed to the interiors of jets and plerions are unlikely to persist. To demonstrate this, I present a local analysis of Z-pinch instabilities for relativistic fluids in the ideal MHD limit. Kink instabilities dominate, destroying the concentric field structure and probably driving the system toward a more chaotic state in which the mean field strength is independent of radius (and in which re...

  12. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  13. Investigation of toroidal acceleration and potential acceleration forces in EAST and J-TEXT plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudi; Pan, Xiayun; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guangming; Wang, Yuming; Han, Xiang; Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhongyong; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth; Rice, John; Morita, Shigeru; Li, Yadong; Zhuang, Ge; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian; Shi, Yuejiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to produce intrinsic rotation, bulk plasmas must be collectively accelerated by the net force exerted on them, which results from both driving and damping forces. So, to study the possible mechanisms of intrinsic rotation generation, it is only needed to understand characteristics of driving and damping terms because the toroidal driving and damping forces induce net acceleration which generates intrinsic rotation. Experiments were performed on EAST and J-TEXT for ohmic plasmas with net counter- and co-current toroidal acceleration generated by density ramping up and ramping down. Additionally on EAST, net co-current toroidal acceleration was also formed by LHCD or ICRF. For the current experimental results, toroidal acceleration was between - 50 km/s^2 in counter-current direction and 70 km/s^2 in co-current direction. According to toroidal momentum equation, toroidal electric field (E\\-(\\g(f))), electron-ion toroidal friction, and toroidal viscous force etc. may play roles in the evolution of toroi...

  14. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Axisymmetric Plasmas with Non-Circular Cross Sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Bing-Ren; LI Ji-Quan; DONG Jia-Qi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The geodesic acoustic mode in general toroidally axisymmetric plasmas such as Tokamak and spherical torus is studied in detail. The mode structure is found and the dispersion equation is derived and solved for arbitrary toroidally axi-symmetric plasmas. Besides the finite aspect ratio, effects of elongation and triangularity on this mode are clarified.

  15. Mark I 1/5-scale boiling water reactor pressure suppression experiment facility report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altes, R.G.; Pitts, J.H.; Ingraham, R.F.; Collins, E.K.; McCauley, E.W.

    1977-10-11

    An accurate Mark I /sup 1///sub 5/-scale, boiling water reactor (BWR), pressure suppression facility was designed and constructed at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in 11 months. Twenty-seven air tests using the facility are described. Cost was minimized by utilizing equipment borrowed from other LLL programs. The total value of borrowed equipment exceeded the program's budget of $2,020,000. Substantial flexibility in the facility was used to permit independent variation in the drywell pressure-time history, initial pressure in the drywell and toroidal wetwells, initial toroidal wetwell water level and downcomer length, vent line flow resistance, and vent line flow asymmetry. The two- and three-dimensional sectors of the toroidal wetwell provided significant data.

  16. Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility scoping study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stacey, W.M. Jr.; Abdou, M.A.; Bolta, C.C.

    1976-03-01

    A scoping study for a Tokamak Engineering Technology Facility (TETF) is presented. The TETF is a tokamak with R = 3 m and I/sub p/ = 1.4 MA based on the counterstreaming-ion torus mode of operation. The primary purpose of TETF is to demonstrate fusion technologies for the Experimental Power Reactor (EPR), but it will also serve as an engineering and radiation test facility. TETF has several technological systems (e.g., superconducting toroidal-field coil, tritium fuel cycle, impurity control, first wall) that are prototypical of EPR.

  17. The Experiment of Modulated Toroidal Current on HT-7 and HT-6M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Experiments of Modulated Toroidal Current were done on the HT-6M tokamakand HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The toroidal current was modulated by programming theOhmic heating field. Modulation of the plasma current has been used successfully to suppressMHD activity in discharges near the density limit where large MHD m = 2 tearing modes weresuppressed by sufficiently large plasma current oscillations. The improved Ohmic confinementphase was observed during modulating toroidal current (MTC) on the Hefei Tokamak-6M (HT-6M) and Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). A toroidal frequency-modulated current,induced by a modulated loop voltage, was added on the plasma equilibrium current. The ratio ofA.C. amplitude of plasma current to the main plasma current △Ip/Ip is about 12% ~ 30%. Thedifferent formats of the frequency-modulated toroidal current were compared.

  18. Modulating toroidal flow stabilization of edge localized modes with plasma density

    CERN Document Server

    Cheng, Shikui; Banerjee, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Recent EAST experiments have demonstrated mitigation and suppression of edge localized modes (ELMs) with toroidal rotation flow in higher collisionality regime, suggesting potential roles of plasma density. In this work, the effects of plasma density on the toroidal flow stabilization of the high-$n$ edge localized modes have been extensively studied in linear calculations for a circular-shaped limiter H-mode tokamak, using the extended MHD code NIMROD. In the single MHD model, toroidal flow has a weak stabilizing effects on the high-$n$ modes. Such a stabilization, however, can be significantly enhanced with the increase in plasma density. Furthermore, our calculations show that the enhanced stabilization of high-$n$ modes from toroidal flow with higher edge plasma density persists in the 2-fluid MHD model. These findings may explain the ELM mitigation and suppression by toroidal rotation in higher collisionality regime due to the enhancement of plasma density obtained in recent EAST experiments.

  19. Toroidally Asymmetric Distributions of Hydrocarbon (CD) Emission and Chemical Sputtering Sources in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Groth, M; Brooks, N H; Fenstermacher, M E; Lasnier, C J; McLean, A G; Watkins, J G

    2006-05-16

    Measurements in DIII-D show that the carbon chemical sputtering sources along the inner divertor and center post are toroidally periodic and highest at the upstream tile edge. Imaging with a tangentially viewing camera and visible spectroscopy were used to monitor the emission from molecular hydrocarbons (CH/CD) at 430.8 nm and deuterium neutrals in attached and partially detached divertors of low-confinement mode plasmas. In contrast to the toroidally periodic CD distribution, emission from deuterium neutrals was observed to be toroidally symmetric along the inner strike zone. The toroidal distribution of the measured tile surface temperature in the inner divertor correlates with that of the CD emission, suggesting larger parallel particle and heat fluxes to the upstream tile edge, either due to toroidal tile gaps or height steps between adjacent tiles.

  20. Toroidal high-spin isomers in light nuclei with N not equal to Z

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The combined considerations of both the bulk liquid-drop-type behavior and the quantized aligned rotation with cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach revealed previously that even-even, N=Z, toroidal high-spin isomeric states have general occurrences for light nuclei with A between 28 and 52. We find that in this mass region there are in addition N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers when the single-particle shells for neutrons and protons occur at the same cranked frequency $\\hbar \\omega$. Examples of N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers, $^{36}_{16}$S$_{20}$($I$=74$\\hbar$) and $^{40}_{18}$Ar$_{22}$($I$=80,102$\\hbar$), are located and examined. The systematic properties of these N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers fall into the same regular (muti-particle)-(muti-hole) patterns as other N=Z toroidal high-spin isomers.

  1. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  2. Optimization of confinement in a toroidal plasma subject to strong radial electric fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The toroidal ring of plasma contained in the NASA Lewis Bumpy Torus facility may be biased to positive or negative potentials approaching 50 kV by applying dc voltages of the respective polarity to 12 or fewer midplane electrode rings. The radial electric fields, which are responsible for raising the ions to high energies by E x B/B-squared drift, then point out of or into the plasma. A preliminary report is given on the identification and optimization of independent variables which affect the ion density and confinement time in the Bumpy Torus plasma. The independent variables include the polarity, position, and number of the midplane electrode rings, the method of gas injection, and the polarity and strength of a weak vertical magnetic field. Some characteristic data taken under conditions where most of the independent variables were optimized are presented. The highest value of the electron number density on the plasma axis is 3.2 trillion per cu cm, the highest ion heating efficiency is 47%, and the longest particle containment time is 2.0 msec.

  3. Thermal-Hydraulic Issues in the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) Test and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanino, R.; Bagnasco, M.; Fillunger, H.; Heller, R.; Savoldi Richard, L.; Suesser, M.; Zahn, G.

    2004-06-01

    The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) was tested in the Toska facility of Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe during 2001 (standalone) and 2002 (in the background magnetic field of the LCT coil). The TFMC is a racetrack coil wound in five double pancakes on stainless steel radial plates using Nb3Sn dual-channel cable-in-conduit conductor (CICC) with a thin circular SS jacket. The coil was cooled by supercritical helium in forced convection at nominal 4.5 K and 0.5 MPa. Instrumentation, all outside the coil, included voltage taps, pressure and temperature sensors, as well as flow meters. Additionally, differential pressure drop measurement was available on the two pancakes DP1.1 and DP1.2, equipped with heaters. Two major thermal-hydraulic issues in the TFMC tests will be addressed here: 1) the pressure drop along heated pancakes and the comparison with friction factor correlations; 2) the quench initiation and propagation. Other thermal-hydraulic issues like heat generation and exchange in joints, radial plates, coil case, or the effects of the resistive heaters on the helium dynamics, have been already addressed elsewhere.

  4. Advanced Simulation Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Simulation Center consists of 10 individual facilities which provide missile and submunition hardware-in-the-loop simulation capabilities. The following...

  5. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratory The Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  6. Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Manufacturing Laboratory at the University of Maryland provides the state of the art facilities for realizing next generation products and educating the...

  7. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemon, R.E. (comp.)

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations (FRC's that contain purely poloidal field).

  8. Toroidal bubbles with circulation in ideal hydrodynamics: A variational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, V.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, unsteady flows with circulation Gamma around a distorted toroidal bubble are considered. A general variational principle that determines the evolution of the bubble shape is formulated. For a two-dimensional (2D) cavity with a constant area A, exact...... pseudodifferential equations of motion are derived, based on variables that determine a conformal mapping of the unit circle exterior into the region occupied by the fluid. A closed expression for the Hamiltonian of the 2D system in terms of canonical variables is obtained. Stability of a stationary drifting 2D...... hollow vortex is demonstrated, when the gravity is small, gA(3/2)/Gamma(2)flows a simplified Lagrangian is suggested, inasmuch as the bubble shape is well described by the center line R(xi,t) and by an approximately circular cross section...

  9. Analysis of recurrent patterns in toroidal magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Allen R; Chen, Guoning; Tricoche, Xavier; Pugmire, David; Kruger, Scott; Breslau, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In the development of magnetic confinement fusion which will potentially be a future source for low cost power, physicists must be able to analyze the magnetic field that confines the burning plasma. While the magnetic field can be described as a vector field, traditional techniques for analyzing the field's topology cannot be used because of its Hamiltonian nature. In this paper we describe a technique developed as a collaboration between physicists and computer scientists that determines the topology of a toroidal magnetic field using fieldlines with near minimal lengths. More specifically, we analyze the Poincaré map of the sampled fieldlines in a Poincaré section including identifying critical points and other topological features of interest to physicists. The technique has been deployed into an interactive parallel visualization tool which physicists are using to gain new insight into simulations of magnetically confined burning plasmas.

  10. On the interaction of turbulence and flows in toroidal plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stroth, U; Manz, P; Ramisch, M [Institut fuer Plasmaforschung, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-02-15

    In toroidally confined plasmas, background E x B flows, microturbulence and zonal flows constitute a tightly coupled dynamic system and the description of confinement transitions needs a self-consistent treatment of these players. The background radial electric field, linked to neoclassical ambipolar transport, has an impact on the interaction between zonal flows and turbulence by tilting and anisotropization of turbulent eddies. Zonal-flow drive is shown to be non-local in wavenumber space and is described as a straining-out process instead as a local inverse cascade. The straining-out process is also discussed as an option to explain turbulence suppression in sheared flows and could be the cause of predator-prey oscillations in the turbulence zonal-flow system.

  11. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  12. Toroid Joining Gun. [thermoplastic welding system using induction heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, J. D.; Fox, R. L.; Swaim, R J.

    1985-01-01

    The Toroid Joining Gun is a low cost, self-contained, portable low powered (100-400 watts) thermoplastic welding system developed at Langley Research Center for joining plastic and composite parts using an induction heating technique. The device developed for use in the fabrication of large space sructures (LSST Program) can be used in any atmosphere or in a vacuum. Components can be joined in situ, whether on earth or on a space platform. The expanded application of this welding gun is in the joining of thermoplastic composites, thermosetting composites, metals, and combinations of these materials. Its low-power requirements, light weight, rapid response, low cost, portability, and effective joining make it a candidate for solving many varied and unique bonding tasks.

  13. Gasdynamic characteristics of toroidal shock and detonation wave converging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG; Honghui; JIANG; Zonglin

    2005-01-01

    The modified CCW relation is applied to analyzing the shock, detonation wave converging and the role of chemical reactions in the process. Results indicate that the shock wave is strengthened faster than the detonation wave in the converging at the same initial Mach number. Euler equations implemented with a detailed chemical reaction model are solved to simulate toroidal shock and detonation wave converging. Gasdynamic characteristics of the converging are investigated, including wave interaction patterns, observable discrepancies and physical phenomena behind them. By comparing wave diffractions, converging processes and pressure evolutions in the focusing area, the different effects of chemical reactions on diffracting and converging processes are discussed and the analytic conclusion is demonstrated through the observation of numerical simulations.

  14. Differentially rotating magnetised neutron stars: production of toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Thampan, A V

    2004-01-01

    We initiate numerical studies of differentially rotating magnetised (proto) neutron stars by studying - through construction from first principles - the coupling between an assumed differential rotation and an impressed magnetic field. For a perfect incompressible, homogeneous, non-dissipative fluid sphere immersed in an ambient plasma, we solve the (coupled) azimuthal components of the Navier-Stokes equation and the Maxwell induction equation. The assumed time--independent poloidal field lines get dragged by the rotating fluid and produce toroidal magnetic fields. Surface magnetic fields take away energy redistributing the angular momentum to produce rigid rotation along poloidal field lines. Due to absence of viscous dissipation, sustained torsional oscillations are set up within the star. However, the perpetual oscillations of neighbouring `closed' field lines get increasingly out of phase with time, leading to structure build up as in Liu & Shapiro (2004) implying the importance of taking into account...

  15. Stability of the toroidal magnetic field in stellar radiation zones

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for various processes in stellar interior like mixing, circulation and angular momentum transport. The stability properties of a star containing a prominent toroidal field in a radiation zone is investigated by means of a linear stability analysis in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. The growth rate of the instability is explicitly calculated and the effects of stable stratification and heat transport are discussed in detail. It is argued that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones although the stable stratification can significantly decrease the growth rate of instability

  16. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  17. Density Measurement of Compact Toroid with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufman-Wollitzer, Lauren; Endrizzi, Doug; Brookhart, Matt; Flanagan, Ken; Forest, Cary

    2016-10-01

    Utilizing a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) built by Tri Alpha Energy, a dense compact toroid (CT) is created and injected at high speed into the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory (WiPAL) vessel. A modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer from the Line-Tied Reconnection Experiment (LTRX) provides an absolute measurement of electron density. The interferometer is located such that the beam intersects the plasma across the diameter of the MCPG drift region before the CT enters the vessel. This placement ensures that the measurement is taken before the CT expand. Results presented will be used to further analyze characteristics of the CT. Funding provided by DoE, NSF, and WISE Summer Research.

  18. Global Theory to Understand Toroidal Drift Waves in Steep Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf., Xie and Xiao, Phys. Plasmas, 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters `quantum number' $l$ and ballooning angle $\\vartheta_k$, (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, $>50\\%$, and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structu...

  19. Heterotic free fermionic and symmetric toroidal orbifold models

    CERN Document Server

    Athanasopoulos, P; Nibbelink, S Groot; Mehta, V M

    2016-01-01

    Free fermionic models and symmetric heterotic toroidal orbifolds both constitute exact backgrounds that can be used effectively for phenomenological explorations within string theory. Even though it is widely believed that for Z2xZ2 orbifolds the two descriptions should be equivalent, a detailed dictionary between both formulations is still lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap: We give a detailed account of how the input data of both descriptions can be related to each other. In particular, we show that the generalized GSO phases of the free fermionic model correspond to generalized torsion phases used in orbifold model building. We illustrate our translation methods by providing free fermionic realizations for all Z2xZ2 orbifold geometries in six dimensions.

  20. Manufacturing aspects of the ATLAS barrel toroid double pancakes

    CERN Document Server

    Drago, G; Gagliardi, P; Laurenti, A; Marabotto, R; Penco, R

    2002-01-01

    In 1999 INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) ordered to ANSALDO the manufacturing of 16 double pancakes for the ATLAS BARREL TOROID. In July 2001 four Double Pancakes have already been completed and shipped to the integration site. In this paper the main aspects of the manufacturing of the largest superconducting coils ever built (5*25 m) are described. The main phases of the manufacturing procedure are reviewed starting from the conductor preparation to the VPI impregnation, including references to the materials used as well as to the relevant customer's requirements. In particular the special winding form and the winding technique are treated. For each phase the most critical aspects and the relevant solutions are pointed out. Particular details about the technical solutions adopted for the impregnation and curing of the Double Pancake, which could not be performed inside an autoclave due to the huge dimension of the coil itself, are reported. Finally the methods used for the dimensional and electri...

  1. Cleaning procedure for improved photothermal background of toroidal optical microresonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horak, Erik H.; Knapper, Kassandra A.; Heylman, Kevin D.; Goldsmith, Randall H.

    2016-09-01

    High Q-factors and small mode volumes have made toroidal optical microresonators exquisite sensors to small shifts in the effective refractive index of the WGM modes. Eliminating contaminants and improving quality factors is key for many different sensing techniques, and is particularly important for photothermal imaging as contaminants add photothermal background obscuring objects of interest. Several different cleaning procedures including wet- and dry-chemical procedures are tested for their effect on Q-factors and photothermal background. RCA cleaning was shown to be successful in contrast to previously described acid cleaning procedures, most likely due to the different surface reactivity of the acid reagents used. UV-ozone cleaning was shown to be vastly superior to O2 plasma cleaning procedures, significantly reducing the photothermal background of the resonator.

  2. The Kirchhoff Index of Toroidal Meshes and Variant Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Bao Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The resistance distance is a novel distance function on electrical network theory proposed by Klein and Randić. The Kirchhoff index Kf(G is the sum of resistance distances between all pairs of vertices in G. In this paper, we established the relationships between the toroidal meshes network Tm×n and its variant networks in terms of the Kirchhoff index via spectral graph theory. Moreover, the explicit formulae for the Kirchhoff indexes of L(Tm×n, S(Tm×n, T(Tm×n, and C(Tm×n were proposed, respectively. Finally, the asymptotic behavior of Kirchhoff indexes in those networks is obtained by utilizing the applications of analysis approach.

  3. Ion temperature and toroidal rotation in JET's low torque plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Giroud, C.; Reyes Cortes, S.; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure developed as the best method to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of the ion temperature Ti and the toroidal velocity vϕ from Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) data from intrinsic rotation experiments at the Joint European Torus with the carbon wall. The low impurity content observed in such plasmas, resulting in low active CXRS signal, alongside low Doppler shifts makes the determination of Ti and vϕ particularly difficult. The beam modulation method will be discussed along with the measures taken to increase photon statistics and minimise errors from the absolute calibration and magneto-hydro-dynamics effects that may impact the CXRS passive emission.

  4. Effects of magnetic islands on bootstrap current in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, G.; Lin, Z.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of magnetic islands on electron bootstrap current in toroidal plasmas are studied using gyrokinetic simulations. The magnetic islands cause little changes of the bootstrap current level in the banana regime because of trapped electron effects. In the plateau regime, the bootstrap current is completely suppressed at the island centers due to the destruction of trapped electron orbits by collisions and the flattening of pressure profiles by the islands. In the collisional regime, small but finite bootstrap current can exist inside the islands because of the pressure gradients created by large collisional transport across the islands. Finally, simulation results show that the bootstrap current level increases near the island separatrix due to steeper local density gradients.

  5. The angular momentum transport by unstable toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, G; Spada, F; Tereshin, I

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate with a nonlinear MHD code that angular momentum can be transported due to the magnetic instability of toroidal fields under the influence of differential rotation, and that the resulting effective viscosity may be high enough to explain the almost rigid-body rotation observed in radiative stellar cores. The fields are assumed strong enough and the density stratification weak enough that the influence of the 'negative' buoyancy in the radiative zones can be neglected. Only permanent current-free fields and only those combinations of rotation rates and magnetic field amplitudes which provide maximal numerical values of the viscosity are considered. We find that the dimensionless ratio of the turbulent over molecular viscosity, \

  6. Parametric design studies of toroidal magnetic energy storage units

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, J. Stephen

    Superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) units have a number of advantages as storage devices. Electrical current is the input, output and stored medium, allowing for completely solid-state energy conversion. The magnets themselves have no moving parts. The round trip efficiency is higher than those for batteries, compressed air or pumped hydro. Output power can be very high, allowing complete discharge of the unit within a few seconds. Finally, the unit can be designed for a very large number of cycles, limited basically by fatigue in the structural components. A small systems code was written to produce and evaluate self-consistent designs for toroidal superconducting energy storage units. The units can use either low temperature or high temperature superconductors. The coils have D shape where the conductor and its stabilizer/structure is loaded only in tension and the centering forces are borne by a bucking cylinder. The coils are convectively cooled from a cryogenic reservoir in the bore of the coils. The coils are suspended in a cylindrical metal shell which protects the magnet during rail, automotive or shipboard use. It is important to note that the storage unit does not rely on its surroundings for structural support, other than normal gravity and inertial loads. Designs are presented for toroidal energy storage units produced by the systems code. A wide range of several parameters have been considered, resulting in units storing from 1 MJ to 72 GJ. Maximum fields range from 5 T to 20 T. The masses and volumes of the coils, bucking cylinder, coolant, insulation and outer shell are calculated. For unattended use, the allowable operating time using only the boiloff of the cryogenic fluid for refrigeration is calculated. For larger units, the coils were divided into modules suitable for normal truck or rail transport.

  7. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-12-31

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, ``cold,`` process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility`s metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  8. Steady state toroidal magnetic field at earth's core-mantle boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Eugene H.; Pearce, Steven J.

    1991-01-01

    Measurements of the dc electrical potential near the top of earth's mantle have been extrapolated into the deep mantle in order to estimate the strength of the toroidal magnetic field component at the core-mantle interface. Recent measurements have been interpreted as indicating that at the core-mantle interface, the magnetic toroidal and poloidal field components are approximately equal in magnitude. A motivation for such measurements is to obtain an estimate of the strength of the toroidal magnetic field in the core, a quantity important to our understanding of the geomagnetic field's dynamo generation. Through the use of several simple and idealized calculation, this paper discusses the theoretical relationship between the amplitude of the toroidal magnetic field at the core-mantle boundary and the actual amplitude within the core. Even with a very low inferred value of the toroidal field amplitude at the core-mantle boundary, (a few gauss), the toroidal field amplitude within the core could be consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic dynamo dominated by nonuniform rotation and having a strong toroidal magnetic field.

  9. A Pre-ionization System to Limit Neutral Gas in a Compact Toroid Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allfrey, Ian; Roche, Thomas; Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Garate, Eusebio; Gota, Hiroshi; Asai, Tomohiko; the TAE Team

    2016-10-01

    Fusion plasmas require long lifetimes and high temperatures, both of which are limited by particle loss, among other factors. Therefore, refueling a long-lived advanced beam-driven field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma in C-2U is necessary, and injecting a supersonic compact toroid (CT) is an effective means of introducing particles into the FRC core. However, neutral gas that trails the CT into the target chamber cools the FRC. Pre-ionization (PI) system assists the break down between electrodes of the CT injector (CTI), so the amount of introduced gas can be lowered by up to a factor of two, effectively increasing the ionization fraction; thus, reducing the amount of neutral gas in the system. Additionally, the PI decreases the delay in CTI breakdown so a highly reproducible operation is achievable. The PI system consists of a fast, high voltage, pulse discharge circuit coupled to a Teflon insulated semi-rigid coaxial cable inserted into the CTI. System details and experimental data will be presented, in addition to issues such as the introduction of impurities and pre-ionizer lifetime.

  10. Conservation laws for collisional and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugama, H.; Nunami, M.; Nakata, M.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2017-02-01

    A novel gyrokinetic formulation is presented by including collisional effects into the Lagrangian variational principle to yield the governing equations for background and turbulent electromagnetic fields and gyrocenter distribution functions, which can simultaneously describe classical, neoclassical, and turbulent transport processes in toroidal plasmas with large toroidal flows on the order of the ion thermal velocity. Noether's theorem modified for collisional systems and the collision operator given in terms of Poisson brackets are applied to derivation of the particle, energy, and toroidal momentum balance equations in the conservative forms, which are desirable properties for long-time global transport simulation.

  11. Low Collisionality Neoclassical Toroidal Viscosity in Tokamaks and Quasi-symmetric Stellarators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, A. J.; Hegna, C. C.; Callen, J. D.

    2008-11-01

    Non-resonant magnetic perturbations can affect plasma rotation in toroidally confined plasmas through their modification to |B|. Variations along a field line induce nonambipolar radial transport and produce a global neoclassical toroidal viscous force [NTV]. In this work, previously calculated radial particle fluxes for the low-collisionality ``ν'' and ``1/ν'' regimes [1] are unified into a single particle flux (or toroidal viscous force). Provided pitch-angle scattering dominates over collisional energy exchange, the energy component of phase space can be decoupled into independent regions (E >Ec. for ν regime, E Callen, Phys. Fluids 19, 667 (1976).

  12. Theoretical studies of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light-mass region

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We review our theoretical knowledge of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light mass region in 28$\\le$$A$$\\le$52 obtained previously in cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations. We report additional toroidal high-spin isomers in $^{56}$Ni with $I$=114$\\hbar$ and 140$\\hbar$, which follow the same (multi-particle)--(multi-hole) systematics as other toroidal high-spin isomers. We examine the production of these exotic nuclei by fusion of various projectiles on $^{20}$Ne or $^{28}$Si as an active target in time-projection-chamber (TCP) experiments.

  13. EMC3-EIRENE modeling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lore, J.D., E-mail: lorejd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reinke, M.L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); LaBombard, B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Churchill, R.M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feng, Y. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ∼50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modeling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  14. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  15. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  16. Recent JET experiments on Alfven eigenmodes with intermediate toroidal mode numbers: measurements and modelling of n=3 toroidal Alfven eigenmodes with the TAEFL code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testa, D. [CRPP, Switzerland; Spong, Donald A [ORNL; Panis, T. [CRPP, Switzerland; Blanchard, P. [CRPP, Switzerland; Fasoli, A. [CRPP, Switzerland

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the results of recent experiments performed on the JET tokamak on Alfven eigenmodes (AEs) with toroidal mode number (n) in the range n = 3-15. The stability properties of these medium-n AEs are investigated experimentally using a new set of compact in-vessel antennas, providing a direct and real-time measurement of the frequency, damping rate and amplitude for each individual toroidal mode number. We report here the quantitative analysis of the measurements of the damping rate for stable n = 3 toroidal AEs as a function of the edge plasma elongation, and the theoretical analysis of these data with the TAEFL code. The TAEFL results are in excellent qualitative agreement with the measurements, reproducing well the experimental scaling of increasing damping rate versus increasing edge elongation, and in many cases are also quantitatively correct, with a difference with respect to the measurements below 30%, particularly for magnetic configurations that have a larger edge magnetic shear.

  17. Hall Equilibria: Solutions with toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields in Neutron Star Crusts

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgouliatos, K N; Lyutikov, M; Reisenegger, A

    2013-01-01

    We present Hall equilibrium solutions for neutron stars crusts containing toroidal and poloidal magnetic field. Some simple cases are solved analytically while more complicated configurations are found numerically through a Gauss-Seidel elliptic partial differential equation solver.

  18. Three Cycles of the Solar Toroidal Magnetic Field and This Peculiar Minimum

    CERN Document Server

    Lo, Leyan; Scherrer, Phil

    2010-01-01

    Thirty-four years of WSO (Wilcox Solar Observatory) and thirteen years of SOHO/MDI (Michelson Doppler Imager on the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) magnetograms have been studied to measure the east-west inclination angle, indicating the toroidal component of the photospheric magnetic field. This analysis reveals that the large-scale toroidal component of the global magnetic field is antisymmetric around the equator and reverses direction in regions associated with flux from one solar cycle compared to the next. The toroidal field revealed the first early signs of cycle 24 at high latitudes, especially in the northern hemisphere, appearing as far back as 2003 in the WSO data and 2004 in MDI. As in previous cycles, the feature moves gradually equatorward. Cycles overlap and the pattern associated with each cycle lasts about 17 years. Even though the polar field at the current solar minimum is significantly lower than the three previous minima, the toroidal field pattern is similar.

  19. Evolution of views on the structure of the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovrizhnykh, L. M., E-mail: lmkov@fpl.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Various methods of determining the ambipolar electric field in toroidal magnetic systems (predominantly, in stellarators) and the evolution of views on this problem are discussed. Paradoxes encountered in solving this problem are analyzed, and ways of resolving them are proposed.

  20. TORQUE CAPACITY AND CONTACT EFFICIENCY OF A HALF TOROIDAL CONTINUOUSLY VARLABLE TRANSMISSIONS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nabil Abdulla Attia; Qin Datong; Shi Wankai; Amir Ibrahim Ali

    2004-01-01

    The automotive industry is seeking new concepts for a continuously variable transmission (CVT) in the driveline. One possible solution for a CVT design is half toroidal traction drive, providing a high torque capacity with quick ratio change. An analytical study on the contact points of the half toroidal CVT has been detailed. The shapes of the contact areas among the input disk, power roller and output disk are considered ellipses. Mathematical equations for estimating the torque capacity, power loss due to spin action, and contact efficiency of the elliptical contacts of the half toroidal CVT are formulated and expressed in the form of integrals which can be readily evaluated by numerical scheme. The contact efficiency calculations of the half toroidal CVT have been developed for the proper spin point locations under the effect of system parameters. Numerical results are presented in graphical forms for considered parameters, which can help the designer to select the proper system parameters to minimize the undesirable spin effects.

  1. Advanced Hydride Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motyka, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metal hydrides have been used at the Savannah River Tritium Facilities since 1984. However, the most extensive application of metal hydride technology at the Savannah River Site is being planned for the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $140 million facility schedules for completion in 1990 and startup in 1991. In the new facility, metal hydride technology will be used to store, separate, isotopically purify, pump, and compress hydrogen isotopes. In support of the Replacement Tritium Facility, a $3.2 million, cold,'' process demonstration facility, the Advanced Hydride Laboratory began operation in November of 1987. The purpose of the Advanced Hydride Laboratory is to demonstrate the Replacement Tritium Facility's metal hydride technology by integrating the various unit operations into an overall process. This paper will describe the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, its role and its impact on the application of metal hydride technology to tritium handling.

  2. Calculation about a modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part I; Calculo sobre una modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak Novillo. Parte I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez A, E.; Melendez L, L.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1991-07-15

    The charged particles that constitute the plasma in the tokamaks are located in magnetic fields that determine its behavior. The poloidal magnetic field of the plasma current and the toroidal magnetic field of the tokamak possess relatively big gradients, which produce drifts on these particles. These drifts are largely the cause of the continuous lost of particles and of energy of the confinement region. In this work the results of numerical calculations of a modification to the 'traditional' toroidal magnetic field that one waits it diminishes the drifts by gradient and improve the confinement properties of the tokamaks. (Author)

  3. Injection of electron beam into a toroidal trap using chaotic orbits near magnetic null.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakashima, C; Yoshida, Z; Himura, H; Fukao, M; Morikawa, J; Saitoh, H

    2002-03-01

    Injection of charged particle beam into a toroidal magnetic trap enables a variety of interesting experiments on non-neutral plasmas. Stationary radial electric field has been produced in a toroidal geometry by injecting electrons continuously. When an electron gun is placed near an X point of magnetic separatrix, the electron beam spreads efficiently through chaotic orbits, and electrons distribute densely in the torus. The current returning back to the gun can be minimized less than 1% of the total emission.

  4. The turbulent diffusion of toroidal magnetic flux as inferred from properties of the sunspot butterfly diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, R. H.; Schüssler, M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. In order to match observed properties of the solar cycle, flux-transport dynamo models require the toroidal magnetic flux to be stored in a region of low magnetic diffusivity, typically located at or below the bottom of the convection zone. Aims: We infer the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field on the basis of empirical data. Methods: We considered the time evolution of mean latitude and width of the activity belts of solar cycles 12-23 and their dependence on cycle strength. We interpreted the decline phase of the cycles as a diffusion process. Results: The activity level of a given cycle begins to decline when the centers of its equatorward propagating activity belts come within their (full) width (at half maximum) from the equator. This happens earlier for stronger cycles because their activity belts are wider. From that moment on, the activity and the belt width decrease in the same manner for all cycles, independent of their maximum activity level. In terms of diffusive cancellation of opposite-polarity toroidal flux across the equator, we infer the turbulent diffusivity experienced by the toroidal field, wherever it is located, to be in the range 150-450 km2 s-1. Strong diffusive latitudinal spreading of the toroidal flux underneath the activity belts can be inhibited by an inflow toward the toroidal field bands in the convection zone with a magnitude of several meters per second. Conclusions: The inferred value of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field agrees, to order of magnitude, with estimates based on mixing-length models for the solar convection zone. This is at variance with the requirement of flux-transport dynamo models. The inflows required to keep the toroidal field bands together before they approach the equator are similar to the inflows toward the activity belts observed with local helioseismology.

  5. Influence of toroidal effects on the stability of the internal kink mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galvao, R.M.O.; Sakanaka, P.H.; Shigueoka, H.

    1978-09-25

    Using the sigma-stability technique, we study the stability of the internal kink mode in toroidal geometry. We show that there are two unstable regions separated by a stable on in a ..beta..-q/sub c/ stability diagram. In one of these regions toroidal effects are stabilizing and in the other they are destabilizing. Discrepant results of previous analytical theories and experimental results are explained.

  6. Tokamak equilibria with strong toroidal current density reversal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, G. O.; Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2013-05-01

    The equilibrium of large magnetic islands in the core of a tokamak under conditions of strong toroidal current density reversal is investigated by a new method. The method uses distinct spectral representations to describe each simply connected region as well as the containing shell geometry. This ideal conducting shell may substitute for the plasma edge region or take a virtual character representing the external equilibrium field effect. The internal equilibrium of the islands is solved within the framework of the variational moment method. Equivalent surface current densities are defined on the boundaries of the islands and on the thin containing shell, giving a straightforward formulation to the interaction between regions. The equilibrium of the island-shell system is determined by matching moments of the Dirichlet boundary conditions. Finally, the macroscopic stability against a class of tilting displacements is examined by means of an energy principle. It is found out that the up-down symmetric islands are stable to this particular perturbation and geometry but the asymmetric system presents a bifurcation in the equilibrium.

  7. Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, Peter; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.

    2016-10-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The system takes a single point measurement at the magnetic axis to both calibrate the two- color soft x-ray Te system and serve as an additional diagnostic for the V3FIT 3D equilibrium reconstruction code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line propagates 8 m to the CTH device mid-plane with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. Thomson scattered light is collected by two adjacent f/2 plano-convex condenser lenses and focused onto a custom fiber bundle. The fiber is then re-bundled and routed to a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 535-565 nm. The system has been designed to measure plasmas with core Te of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. Work supported by USDOE Grant DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  8. LQR Controller for Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission in Reverse Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensler, Michel; Kawabe, Taketoshi; Joe, Shinichiro

    The system considered in this paper is a Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission (TCVT) system for cars. This system is unstable in reverse motion as some mechanical parts have been removed from the original one for cost reduction, and the gear ratio has to be regulated around its nominal value for car reverse motion. The control theory used here is the Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR) associated to a gain-scheduling technique, as the TCVT system is nonlinear according to the car speed. Moreover, as the LQR method requires the entire TCVT state vector and as the only available signal is the gear ratio, a full-order observer is designed. In order to take the other nonlinearities of the system into account, the observer is nonlinear: a diffeomorphism is then used for converting the variables provided by the nonlinear observer into the needed variables. In order to verify the effectiveness and the robustness of the controller against the car speed and the torque shift disturbance phenomenon, several experiments with a test-bed and with an actual vehicle have been performed and showed the efficiency of the proposed controller.

  9. Development of Compact Toroid Injector for C-2 FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Tadafumi; Sekiguchi, Junichi; Asai, Tomohiko; Gota, Hiroshi; Garate, Eusebio; Allfrey, Ian; Valentine, Travis; Smith, Brett; Morehouse, Mark; TAE Team

    2014-10-01

    Collaborative research project with Tri Alpha Energy has been started and we have developed a new compact toroid (CT) injector for the C-2 device, mainly for fueling field-reversed configurations (FRCs). The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun (MCPG), which consists of coaxial cylinder electrodes; a spheromak-like plasma is generated by discharge and pushed out from the gun by Lorentz force. The inner diameter of outer electrode is 83.1 mm and the outer diameter of inner electrode is 54.0 mm. The surface of the inner electrode is coated with tungsten in order to reduce impurities coming out from the electrode. The bias coil is mounted inside of the inner electrode. We have recently conducted test experiments and achieved a supersonic CT translation speed of up to ~100 km/s. Other typical plasma parameters are as follows: electron density ~ 5 × 1021 m-3, electron temperature ~ 40 eV, and the number of particles ~0.5-1.0 × 1019. The CT injector is now planned to be installed on C-2 and the first CT injection experiment will be conducted in the near future. The detailed MCPG design as well as the test experimental results will be presented.

  10. Control of Compact-Toroid Characteristics by External Copper Shell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    A collaborative research project by Tri Alpha Energy and Nihon University has been conducted for several years, which led to the development of a new compact toroid (CT) injector for efficient FRC particle refueling in the C-2U experiment. The CT is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), consisting of coaxial cylindrical electrodes. In CT formation via MCPG, the magnetic helicity content of the generated CT is one of the critical parameters. A bias coil is inserted into the inner electrode to generate a poloidal flux. The resultant bias magnetic field is spread out of MCPG with time due to its low-frequency bias current. To obtain a more effectively distributed bias magnetic field as well as to improve the voltage breakdown between electrodes, the MCPG incorporates a novel ~ 1 mm thick copper shell mounted outside of the outer electrode. This allows for reliable and controlled operation and more robust CT generation. A detailed discussion of the copper shell and experimental test results will be presented.

  11. Validation of Helium Inlet Design for ITER Toroidal Field Coil

    CERN Document Server

    Boyer, C; Hamada, K; Foussat, A; Le Rest, M; Mitchell, N; Decool, P; Savary, F; Sgobba, S; Weiss, K-P

    2014-01-01

    The ITER organization has performed design and its validation tests on a helium inlet structure for the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coil under collaboration with CERN, KIT, and CEA-Cadarache. Detailed structural analysis was performed in order to optimize the weld shape. A fatigue resistant design on the fillet weld between the shell covers and the jacket is an important point on the helium inlet structure. A weld filler material was selected based on tensile test at liquid helium temperature after Nb3Sn reaction heat treatment. To validate the design of the weld joint, fatigue tests at 7 K were performed using heat-treated butt weld samples. A pressure drop measurement of a helium inlet mock-up was performed by using nitrogen gas at room temperature in order to confirm uniform flow distribution and pressure drop characteristic. These tests have validated the helium inlet design. Based on the validation, Japanese and European Union domestic agencies, which have responsibilities of the TF coil procurement, are pr...

  12. Global theory to understand toroidal drift waves in steep gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Hua-sheng; Li, Bo

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from a typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf. H. S. Xie and Y. Xiao, Phys. Plasmas 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters "quantum number" l and ballooning angle ϑk , (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, >50 % , and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structures. With velocity space integral, semi-local theory predicts that the critical jump gradient of the most unstable ion temperature gradient mode from ground state l = 0 to non-ground state l = 1 is LT-1R ˜50 . These features can have important consequences to turbulent transport.

  13. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Use of the overhead travelling crane to hoist the coil up and then tilt it over, the coil frame's metal feet being used as rotational pivots, supporting half the coil's weight. Once it has been turned over, the coil, now with only half the frame, is transported to the heating table using a special lifting gant...

  14. Toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields at Venus. Venus Express observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubinin, E.; Fraenz, M.; Woch, J.; Zhang, T. L.; Wei, Y.; Fedorov, A.; Barabash, S.; Lundin, R.

    2013-10-01

    Magnetic field and plasma measurements carried out onboard Venus Express during solar minimum conditions suggest the existence of two kinds of magnetic field configuration in the Venusian ionosphere. We interpret these as the manifestation of two different types of generation mechanisms for the induced magnetosphere. A different magnetic field topology (toroidal and poloidal) arises if the induced currents are driven either by the solar wind motional electric field or by the Faraday electric field—a conducting ionosphere sees the magnetic field carried by solar wind as a time-varying field. At the dayside, both driving agents produce a similar draping pattern of the magnetic field. However, different magnetic field signatures inherent to both induction mechanisms appear at lower altitudes in the terminator region. The conditions at low solar EUV flux when the ionosphere of Venus becomes magnetized seem to be favorable to distinguish between two different types of the induced fields. We present cases of both types of the magnetic field topology. The cases when the effects of the Faraday induction become well noticeable are especially interesting since they provide us with an example of solar wind interaction with a tiny induced dipole field immersed into the ionosphere. Another interesting case when poloidal magnetic fields are evidently displayed is observed when the IMF vector is almost aligned with the solar wind velocity. In general case, both mechanisms of induction probably complement each other.

  15. Worming Their Way into Shape: Toroidal Formations in Micellar Solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardiel Rivera, Joshua J.; Tonggu, Lige; Dohnalkova, Alice; de la Iglesia, Pablo; Pozzo, Danilo C.; Shen, Amy

    2013-11-01

    We report the formation of nanostructured toroidal micellar bundles (nTMB) from a semidilute wormlike micellar solution, evidenced by both cryogenicelectron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images. Our strategy for creating nTMB involves a two-step protocol consisting of a simple prestraining process followed by flow through a microfluidic device containing an array of microposts, producing strain rates in the wormlike micelles on the order of 105 s^1. In combination with microfluidic confinement, these unusually large strain rates allow for the formation of stable nTMB. Electron microscopy images reveal a variety of nTMB morphologies and provide the size distribution of the nTMB. Small-angle neutron scattering indicates the underlying microstructural transition from wormlike micelles to nTMB. We also show that other flow-induced approaches such as sonication can induce and control the emergence of onion-like and nTMB structures, which may provide a useful tool for nanotemplating.

  16. Behavior of Compact Toroid in the External Magnetic Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumoto, N.; Ioroi, A.; Nagata, M.; Uyama, T.

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated the possibility of refueling and density control of tokamak plasmas by the spheromak-type Compact Toroid (CT) injection in the JFT-2M tokamak in collaboration with JAERI. We demonstrated the CT injection into OH plasmas and observed the core penetration at B_T=0.8 T. The tokamak electron density increased ~0.2× 10^19m-3 at a rate of 2× 10^21m-3/s. We also observed the decrease of the CT velocity by the external magnetic field of the tokamak, which is applied across the CT acceleration region. We have examined the behavior of the CT translated in the external fields B_ext using the magnetic probes and the fast framing camera at Himeji Inst. of tech.. CT plasma in the acceleration region is deformed by the Lorentz force of Jg × B_ext, where Jg is the gun current for CT acceleration. The magnetic field structures of a long CT in the drift region has been revealed to be the mixed relaxed state of m=0 and m=1. Results from CT acceleration and injection in a transverse field will be presented.

  17. Deconfinement in Yang-Mills Theory through Toroidal Compactification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simic, Dusan; Unsal, Mithat; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2011-08-12

    We introduce field theory techniques through which the deconfinement transition of four-dimensional Yang-Mills theory can be moved to a semi-classical domain where it becomes calculable using two-dimensional field theory. We achieve this through a double-trace deformation of toroidally compactified Yang-Mills theory on R{sup 2} x S{sub L}{sup 1} x S{sub {beta}}{sup 1}. At large N, fixed-L, and arbitrary {beta}, the thermodynamics of the deformed theory is equivalent to that of ordinary Yang-Mills theory at leading order in the large N expansion. At fixed-N, small L and a range of {beta}, the deformed theory maps to a two-dimensional theory with electric and magnetic (order and disorder) perturbations, analogs of which appear in planar spin-systems and statistical physics. We show that in this regime the deconfinement transition is driven by the competition between electric and magnetic perturbations in this two-dimensional theory. This appears to support the scenario proposed by Liao and Shuryak regarding the magnetic component of the quark-gluon plasma at RHIC.

  18. Multiple-applications of Accelerated Compact Toroid Injection for MFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, David; Horton, Robert; Evans, Russell; Liu, Fei; Zhu, Ben; Hong, Sean; Buchenauer, Dean

    2010-11-01

    The CTIX experiment has explored the potential applications of launching a fast moving magnetized compact toroid for Magnetic Fusion experiments. These applications include central fueling of a MFE device such as tokamaks, stellarators, etc. At present, the UC Davis CTIX accelerator has achieved densities at mid to upper 10^15 per cc, at speeds reaching over 200 km/sec. In order to meet the parameters of even larger fusion devices, the technology of the accelerator needs to incorporate the latest plasma wall interaction findings. As a result of the next step in CT development, UC Davis will be collaborating with the Fusion Technology group at Sandia National Laboratory in Livermore California. We will be designing new plasmas facing electrodes that can reduce electrode impurities and increase electrode lifetime. In addition to producing high density CTs, we will include the updated conical compression results from our previous installed drift section compressor. In addition of the MFE applications, the ability to enhance the CT density, fields as well as speed can be useful to other fusion areas such as MIF, etc.

  19. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhunia, Uttam; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-01

    A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium-titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  20. Electron cyclotron heating and current drive in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kritz, A.H.

    1991-11-01

    The Principal Investigator has continued to work on problems associated both with the deposition and with the emission of electron cyclotron power in toroidal plasmas. We have investigated the use of electron cyclotron resonance heating for bringing compact tokamaks (BPX) to ignition-like parameters. This requires that we continue to refine the modeling capability of the TORCH code linked with the BALDUR 1 {1/2} D transport code. Using this computational tool, we have examined the dependence of ignition on heating and transport employing both theoretical (multi-mode) and empirically based transport models. The work on current drive focused on the suppression of tearing modes near the q = 2 surface and sawteeth near the q = 1 surface. Electron cyclotron current drive in CIT near the q =2 surface was evaluated for a launch scenario where electron cyclotron power was launched near the equatorial plane. The work on suppression of sawteeth has been oriented toward understanding the suppression that has been observed in a number of tokamaks, in particular, in the WT-3 tokamak in Kyoto. To evaluate the changes in current profile (shear) near the q =1 surface, simulations have been carried out using the linked BALDUR-TORCH code. We consider effects on shear resulting both from wave-induced current as well as from changes in conductivity associated with changes in local temperature. Abstracts and a paper relating to this work is included in Appendix A.

  1. Advanced Instrumentation, Information and Control (II&C) Research and Development Facility Buildout and Project Execution of LWRS II&C Pilot Projects 1 and 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronald Farris; Johanna Oxstrand; Gregory Weatherby

    2011-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring research, development, and deployment on light water reactor sustainability (LWRS), in which the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is working closely with nuclear utilities to develop technologies and solutions to help ensure the safe operational life extension of current reactors. As technologies are introduced that change the operation of the plant, the LWRS pilot projects can help identify their best-advanced uses and help demonstrate the safety of these technologies. In early testing of operator performance given these emerging technologies will ensure the safety and usability of systems prior to large-scale deployment and costly verification and validation at the plant. The aim of these collaborations, demonstrations, and approaches are intended to lessen the inertia that sustains the current status quo of today's II&C systems technology, and to motivate transformational change and a shift in strategy to a long-term approach to II&C modernization that is more sustainable. Research being conducted under Pilot Project 1 regards understanding the conditions and behaviors that can be modified, either through process improvements and/or technology deployment, to improve the overall safety and efficiency of outage control at nuclear facilities. The key component of the research in this pilot project is accessing the delivery of information that will allow researchers to simulate the control room, outage control center (OCC) information, and plant status data. The simulation also allows researchers to identify areas of opportunity where plant operating status and outage activities can be analyzed to increase overall plant efficiency. For Pilot Project 3 the desire is to demonstrate the ability of technology deployment and the subsequent impact on maximizing the 'Collective Situational Awareness' of the various stakeholders in a commercial nuclear power plant. Specifically, the desire is to show positive

  2. First End Cap Toroid knocking on the door of SX1

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman Ten Kate

    On Tuesday May 29, the first Toroid End Cap for the A-side was transported from its test station next to B180 to the front of the ATLAS surface building SX1. The 240-ton and 12-m high toroid end-cap moved on a special trailer at walking speed, got over various slopes and survived the difficult turn left in front of the entrance at gate B. The toroid had to wait for almost two months to commence its journey to its destination as the cryogenic test down to 80K was already successfully completed by early April. In the next days, the toroid will slide into the SX1 building, turn around its axes by 90 degrees and then gently slide over the first shaft and land on top of the A-side shaft on Wednesday. There, it will descend by 5 m into the shaft using special lifting tooling before it can be connected to the 2x140 tons overhead cranes which will let the toroid go further down to the cavern. End Cap Toroid A on the trailer on its way to the cavern at Point 1. Crossing the main road near entrance A while t...

  3. Inductive Eigenmodes of a resistive toroidal surface in vacuum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Surdo, C. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Frascati, Rome (Italy). Dipt. Innovazione

    1999-07-01

    In this paper it has been studied the Electro-Magnetic (EM) Eigenmodes, sufficiently slow as to legitimate the pre-Maxwell approximation of Maxwell's system (or inductive Eigenmodes), of a given smooth, toroidal-un knotted, electrically resistive surface {tau} with given smooth (surface) resistivity 0 < {rho}{sub d}egree < {infinity}, and lying in the (empty) R{sup 3}. Within the above limitations (to be made more precise), the geometry of {tau} is arbitrary. With the eigenvalue associated with the generic Eigenmode being defined as the opposite of its logarithmic time-derivative, one expects that the resulting spectrum be discrete and strictly positive. It shall be interested into the degenerate case where {tau} be cut (i.e. electrically broken) along one or more of its irreducible cycles. This case will be analyzed autonomously, rather than as a limit (for {rho}{sub d}egree {yields} {infinity} along the cuts) of the regular case. Without cuts, the Eigenproblem under consideration is nothing but the two-dimensional (2-dim) generalization of the classical case of a smooth, unknotted, electrically conductive, simple coil in infinite vacuum. Its analysis hinges on the classical potential theory, and turns out to be a special application of the linear, integrodifferential (elliptic) equation theory on a compact, multiply connected, 2-dim manifold. The attention and approach will be confined to strong (or classical) solutions, both in {tau} and C {tau} = R{sup 3} / {tau}. This study is divided in two parts: a General Part (Sects 1 divided 4) is devoted to the case of generic {tau} and {rho}{sub d}egree (within the convenient smoothness requirements), whereas a Special Part (Sects 5 divided 7) deals with the (more or less formal) discussion of a couple of particular cases ({tau} {identical_to} a canonical torus), both of which with uniform {rho}{sub d}egree. Some propaedeutical/supplementary information is provided in a number of Appendices. [Italian] Il presente

  4. Transport bifurcation induced by sheared toroidal flow in tokamak plasmasa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highcock, E. G.; Barnes, M.; Parra, F. I.; Schekochihin, A. A.; Roach, C. M.; Cowley, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear than one of finite magnetic shear, because in the former case the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence. In the zero-magnetic-shear regime, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the existence of modes, driven by the ion temperature gradient and the parallel velocity gradient, which grow transiently. Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gradients. A parametric model is constructed which accurately describes the combined effect of the temperature gradient and the flow gradient over a wide range of their values. Using this parametric model, it is shown that in the reduced-transport state, heat is transported almost neoclassically, while momentum transport is dominated by subcritical parallel-velocity-gradient-driven turbulence. It is further shown that for any given input of torque, there is an optimum input of heat which maximises the temperature gradient. The parametric model describes both the behaviour of the subcritical turbulence (which cannot be modelled by the quasi-linear methods used in current transport codes) and the complicated effect of the flow shear on the transport stiffness. It may prove useful for transport modelling of tokamaks with sheared flows.

  5. First-principles approach to investigate toroidal property of magnetoelectric multiferroic GaFeO{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nie, Yung-mau, E-mail: ymnie@ncnu.edu.tw [Department of Applied Materials and Optoelectronic Engineering, National Chi Nan University (NCNU), Nantou County 54561, Taiwan (China)

    2016-01-14

    A first-principles approach incorporating the concept of toroidal moments as a measure of the spin vortex is proposed and applied to simulate the toroidization of magnetoelectric multiferroic GaFeO{sub 3}. The nature of space-inversion and time-reversal violations of ferrotoroidics is reproduced in the simulated magnetic structure of GaFeO{sub 3}. For undoped GaFeO{sub 3}, a toroidal moment of −22.38 μ{sub B} Å per unit cell was obtained, which is the best theoretical estimate till date. Guided by the spin vortex free-energy minimization perturbed by an externally applied field, it was discovered that the minority spin markedly biases the whole toroidization. In summary, this approach not only calculates the toroidal moment but provides a way to understand the toroidal nature of magnetoelectric multiferroics.

  6. Validation of improved Multi-Mode model for density, temperature and toroidal rotation profiles using PTRANSP simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, L.; Bateman, G.; Kritz, A. H.; Pankin, A. Y.; Rafiq, T.; McCune, D. C.; Budny, R. V.

    2010-11-01

    Advances in the Multi-Mode model include an improved Weiland model for the ITG and TEM modes [1] and a new model for the drift resistive inertial ballooning modes (DRIBM) [2]. Advances in the PTRANSP code include an improved algorithm for the particle density evolution. Validation studies are carried out for the improved Multi-Mode model using PTRANSP simulations. In order to allow tight coupling with stiff transport models, all of the transport equations for main ion and impurity density profiles as well as electron temperature, ion temperature and toroidal angular rotation profiles are advanced simultaneously by the PTRANSP solver. The Plasma State connects the new solver to the rest of PTRANSP. The solver uses several techniques to control numerical stability. Simulation results for density, temperature and rotation frequency profiles are compared with experimental data for L-mode and H-mode discharges. [4pt] [1] J.Weiland et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 965933; F.D. Halpern et al., Phys. Plasmas 15 (2008) 065033 [2] T. Rafiq et al., to appear in Phys. Plasmas (2010)

  7. Development of toroid-type HTS DC reactor series for HVDC system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kwangmin, E-mail: kwangmin81@gmail.com [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Go, Byeong-Soo; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Sung-kyu; Kim, Seokho [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sangjin [Uiduk University, Gyeongju 780-713 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Yunsang [Vector Fields Korea Inc., Pohang 790-834 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun [Changwon National University, 55306 Sarim-dong, Changwon 641-773 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • The authors developed the 400 mH, 400 A class toroid-type HTS DC reactor system. • The target temperature, inductance and operating current are under 20 K at magnet, 400 mH and 400 A, respectively. All target performances of the HTS DC reactor were achieved. • The HTS DC reactor was conducted through the interconnection operation with a LCC type HVDC system. • Now, the authors are studying the 400 mH, 1500 A class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase HTS DC reactor. - Abstract: This paper describes design specifications and performance of a toroid-type high-temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The first phase operation targets of the HTS DC reactor were 400 mH and 400 A. The authors have developed a real HTS DC reactor system during the last three years. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. The total system has been successfully developed and tested in connection with LCC type HVDC system. Now, the authors are studying a 400 mH, kA class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase research. The 1500 A class DC reactor system was designed using layered 13 mm GdBCO 2G HTS wire. The expected operating temperature is under 30 K. These fundamental data obtained through both works will usefully be applied to design a real toroid-type HTS DC reactor for grid application.

  8. 2015 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  9. Turbine and Structural Seals Team Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Seals Team Facilities conceive, develop, and test advanced turbine seal concepts to increase efficiency and durability of turbine engines. Current projects include...

  10. 2014 Annual Report - Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, James R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Papka, Michael E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Cerny, Beth A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Coffey, Richard M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility provides supercomputing capabilities to the scientific and engineering community to advance fundamental discovery and understanding in a broad range of disciplines.

  11. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  12. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to 6...

  13. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  14. Preliminary experimental results using the thermal-hydraulic integral test facility (VISTA) for the pilot plant of the system integrated modular advanced reactor, SMART-P

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Ki Yong; Pak, Hyun Sik; Cho, Seok; Pak, Choon Kyung; Lee, Sung Jae; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Moon Ki [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-07-01

    Preliminary experimental tests were carried out using the thermal-hydraulic integral test facility, VISTA (Experimental Verification by Integral Simulation of Transients and Accidents), which has been constructed to simulate the SMART-P. The VISTA facility is an integral test facility including the primary and secondary systems as well as safety-related Passive Residual heat removal (PRHR) systems. Its scaled ratio with respect to the SMART-P is 1/1 in height and 1/96 in volume and heater power. So far, several steady states and transient tests have been carried out to verify the overall thermal hydraulic primary and secondary characteristics in a range of 10% to 100% power operation. As results of preliminary results, the steady state conditions were found to coincide with the expected design values of the SMART-P. But the major thermal hydraulic parameters are greatly affected by the initial water level and the nitrogen pressure in the reactor upper annular cavity. In the PRHR transient tests, the steam inlet temperature of the PRHR system is found to drop suddenly from a superheated condition to a saturated condition at the end period of PRHR operation.

  15. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  16. Development of toroid-type HTS DC reactor series for HVDC system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwangmin; Go, Byeong-Soo; Park, Hea-chul; Kim, Sung-kyu; Kim, Seokho; Lee, Sangjin; Oh, Yunsang; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun

    2015-11-01

    This paper describes design specifications and performance of a toroid-type high-temperature superconducting (HTS) DC reactor. The first phase operation targets of the HTS DC reactor were 400 mH and 400 A. The authors have developed a real HTS DC reactor system during the last three years. The HTS DC reactor was designed using 2G GdBCO HTS wires. The HTS coils of the toroid-type DC reactor magnet were made in the form of a D-shape. The electromagnetic performance of the toroid-type HTS DC reactor magnet was analyzed using the finite element method program. A conduction cooling method was adopted for reactor magnet cooling. The total system has been successfully developed and tested in connection with LCC type HVDC system. Now, the authors are studying a 400 mH, kA class toroid-type HTS DC reactor for the next phase research. The 1500 A class DC reactor system was designed using layered 13 mm GdBCO 2G HTS wire. The expected operating temperature is under 30 K. These fundamental data obtained through both works will usefully be applied to design a real toroid-type HTS DC reactor for grid application.

  17. Quantum field theory on toroidal topology: Algebraic structure and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, F. C.; Malbouisson, A. P. C.; Malbouisson, J. M. C.; Santana, A. E.

    2014-05-01

    The development of quantum theory on a torus has a long history, and can be traced back to the 1920s, with the attempts by Nordström, Kaluza and Klein to define a fourth spatial dimension with a finite size, being curved in the form of a torus, such that Einstein and Maxwell equations would be unified. Many developments were carried out considering cosmological problems in association with particle physics, leading to methods that are useful for areas of physics, in which size effects play an important role. This interest in finite size effect systems has been increasing rapidly over the last decades, due principally to experimental improvements. In this review, the foundations of compactified quantum field theory on a torus are presented in a unified way, in order to consider applications in particle and condensed matter physics. The theory on a torus ΓDd=(S1)d×RD-d is developed from a Lie-group representation and c*c*-algebra formalisms. As a first application, the quantum field theory at finite temperature, in its real- and imaginary-time versions, is addressed by focusing on its topological structure, the torus Γ41. The toroidal quantum-field theory provides the basis for a consistent approach of spontaneous symmetry breaking driven by both temperature and spatial boundaries. Then the superconductivity in films, wires and grains are analyzed, leading to some results that are comparable with experiments. The Casimir effect is studied taking the electromagnetic and Dirac fields on a torus. In this case, the method of analysis is based on a generalized Bogoliubov transformation, that separates the Green function into two parts: one is associated with the empty space-time, while the other describes the impact of compactification. This provides a natural procedure for calculating the renormalized energy-momentum tensor. Self interacting four-fermion systems, described by the Gross-Neveu and Nambu-Jona-Lasinio models, are considered. Then finite size effects on

  18. Finite beta and compressibility effects on stability of resistive modes in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leboeuf, J.-N.G. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kurita, Gen-ichi

    1998-03-01

    Linear resistive stability results obtained from the toroidal magnetohydrodynamic codes FAR developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in United States of America and AEOLUS developed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute are compared for carefully constructed benchmark profiles and parameters. These are unstable to a tearing mode with toroidal mode number n=1. The eigenvalues and eigenfunctions calculated with both codes are in close agreement and show that the effect of compressibility is weak for these modes. The effect of finite plasma beta is considered, and the eigenvalues calculated by the FAR and AEOLUS codes also show good agreement. It is shown that the finite beta has a stabilizing effect on the toroidal tearing mode, but that the compressibility also has little effect on finite beta tearing modes. (author)

  19. Current transformers with nanocrystalline alloy toroidal core: analytical, computational and experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedito Antonio Luciano

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper are presented theoretical analysis and experimental results concerning the performance of toroidal cores used in current transformers. For most problems concerning transformers design, analytical methods are useful, but numerical methods provide a better understanding of the transformers electromagnetic behaviour. Numerical field solutions may be used to determine the electrical equivalent circuit parameters of toroidal core current transformers. Since the exciting current of current transformers alters the ratio and phase angle of primary and secondary currents, it is made as small as possible though the use of high permeability and low loss magnetic material in the construction of the core. According to experimental results presented in this work, in comparison with others soft magnetic materials, nanocrystalline alloys appear as the best material to be used in toroidal core for current transformers.

  20. Observations of toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmodes in a reversed field pinch plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnoli, G.; Bergsâker, H.; Tennfors, E.; Zonca, F.; Martines, E.; Serianni, G.; Spolaore, M.; Vianello, N.; Cecconello, M.; Antoni, V.; Cavazzana, R.; Malmberg, J.-A.

    2005-04-01

    High frequency peaks in the spectra of magnetic field signals have been detected at the edge of Extrap-T2R [P. R. Brunsell, H. Bergsåker, M. Cecconello, J. R. Drake, R. M. Gravestijn, A. Hedqvist, and J.-A. Malmberg, Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion, 43, 1457 (2001)]. The measured fluctuation is found to be mainly polarized along the toroidal direction, with high toroidal periodicity n and Alfvénic scaling (f∝B/√mini ). Calculations for a reversed field pinch plasma predict the existence of an edge resonant, high frequency, high-n number toroidicity-induced Alfvén eigenmode with the observed frequency scaling. In addition, gas puffing experiments show that edge density fluctuations are responsible for the rapid changes of mode frequency. Finally a coupling with the electron drift turbulence is proposed as drive mechanism for the eigenmode.

  1. Optimization of Shielded PCB Air-Core Toroids for High-Efficiency DC-DC Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Orlandi, S; Buso, S; Michelis, S; Fuentes, C A; Kayal, M; Faccio, F; Spiazzi, G

    2011-01-01

    The paper describes the design of optimized printed circuit board (PCB) air-core toroids for high-frequency dc-dc converters with strict requirements in terms of volume and noise. The effect of several design parameters on the overall inductor volume, on dc and ac winding resistance, and on the radiated noise will be investigated. PCB toroids are compared to standard air-core solenoids and other state-of-the-art air-core toroids both theoretically and experimentally: at first, using ANSOFT Maxwell and ANSOFT Q3D simulation tools, and subsequently, with laboratory measurements (irradiated noise, efficiency, and frequency response) on several prototypes. These very flexible and rather easy to manufacture inductors appear very attractive for compact high-frequency dc-dc converters where high efficiency, low volume, and low noise are of primary concern.

  2. A Generic Minimal Discrete Model for Toroidal Moments and Its Experimental Realization

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, Hong; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Tianshu; Zhang, Z Q; Chan, C T; Han, Dezhuan

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that a closed loop of magnetic dipoles can give rise to the rather elusive toroidal moment. However, artificial structures required to generate the necessary magnetic moments are typically optically large, complex to make and easily compromised by the kinetic inductance at high frequencies. Instead of using magnetic dipoles, we propose a minimal model based on just three aligned discrete electric dipoles in which the occurrence of resonant toroidal modes is guaranteed by symmetry. The advantage of this model is its simplicity and the same model supports toroidal moments from the microwave regime up to optical frequencies as exemplified by a three-antenna array and a system consisting of three nano-sized plasmonic particles. Both the microwave and high-frequency configurations exhibit non-radiating "anapoles". Experiments in the microwave regime confirm the theoretical predictions.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamic calculations with a nonmonotonic q profile and equilibrium, sheared toroidal flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Held, E.D. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Center for Plasma Theory and Computation; Leboeuf, J.N.; Carreras, B.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Fusion Energy Div.

    1998-07-01

    The linear and nonlinear stability of a nonmonotonic q profile is examined using a reduced set of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equations with an equilibrium, sheared toroidal flow. The reversed shear profile is shown to be unstable to a rich variety of resistive MHD modes including pressure-driven instabilities and tearing instabilities possessing a tearing/interchange character at low Lundquist number, S, and taking on a double/triple tearing structure at high S. Linear calculations show that the destabilizing effect of toroidal velocity shear on tearing modes is enhanced at finite pressure seen previously for tearing modes at high S. Nonlinear calculations show the generation of a large, m = 1, n = 0, Reynolds-stress-driven poloidal flow in the absence of significant flow damping. Calculations in which the poloidal flow was heavily damped show that sub-Alfvenic, sheared toroidal flows have a minimal effect on weakly-coupled, localized instabilities.

  4. Instability of Non-uniform Toroidal Magnetic Fields in Accretion Disks

    CERN Document Server

    Hirabayashi, Kota

    2016-01-01

    A new type of instability that is expected to drive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence from a purely toroidal magnetic field in an accretion disk is presented. It is already known that in a differentially rotating system, the uniform toroidal magnetic field is unstable due to a magnetorotational instability (MRI) under a non-axisymmetric and vertical perturbation, while it is stable under a purely vertical perturbation. Contrary to the previous study, this paper proposes an unstable mode completely confined to the equatorial plane, driven by the expansive nature of the magnetic pressure gradient force under a non-uniform toroidal field. The basic nature of this growing eigenmode, to which we give a name "magneto-gradient driven instability", is studied using linear analysis, and the corresponding nonlinear evolution is then investigated using two-dimensional ideal MHD simulations. Although a single localized magnetic field channel alone cannot provide sufficient Maxwell stress to contribute significantly to...

  5. A toroidal vortex field as an origin of the narrow mass spectrum of neutron stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontorovich, V. M.

    2016-03-01

    The evolution and collapse of a gaseous, self-gravitating sphere in the presence of an internal massive toroidal vortex analogous to the vortex created by the toroidal magnetic field of the Sun is considered. When thermal pressure is taken into account, for sufficiently high masses, the instability is preserved even for a polytropic index γ neutrons differs appreciably. In the ultrarelativistic limit, an interval of stablemasses arises in a neutron gas, between a minimum mass that depends on the circulation velocity in the vortex and the critical mass for the formation of a black hole. This suggests toroidal vortex fields as a possible physical origin for the observed narrow spectrum of neutron-star masses.

  6. Bifurcation to 3D Helical Magnetic Equilibrium in an Axisymmetric Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W. F.; Auriemma, F.; Chapman, B. E.; Ding, W. X.; Zanca, P.; Brower, D. L.; Innocente, P.; Lin, L.; Lorenzini, R.; Martines, E.; Momo, B.; Sarff, J. S.; Terranova, D.

    2011-12-01

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established.

  7. Nondiffusive toroidal-momentum-transport in the JFT-2M tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Katsumi; Itoh, Kimitaka [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae; Matsuda, Toshiaki

    1998-12-01

    A nondiffusive term in the toroidal-momentum-transport equation is evaluated by the analysis of the transport of toroidal rotation in the transient phase, where the direction of neutral beam injection is changed from parallel to the plasma current to antiparallel. The ratio of nondiffusive viscosity coefficient to diffusive viscosity coefficient is evaluated to be 0.1 to 0.3, which increases as the plasma current is decreased. Nondiffusive momentum transport is found to be in proportion to {nabla}T{sub i}. (author)

  8. Bifurcation to 3D helical magnetic equilibrium in an axisymmetric toroidal device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergerson, W F; Auriemma, F; Chapman, B E; Ding, W X; Zanca, P; Brower, D L; Innocente, P; Lin, L; Lorenzini, R; Martines, E; Momo, B; Sarff, J S; Terranova, D

    2011-12-16

    We report the first direct measurement of the internal magnetic field structure associated with a 3D helical equilibrium generated spontaneously in the core of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma containment device. Magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium bifurcation occurs in a reversed-field pinch when the innermost resonant magnetic perturbation grows to a large amplitude, reaching up to 8% of the mean field strength. Magnetic topology evolution is determined by measuring the Faraday effect, revealing that, as the perturbation grows, toroidal symmetry is broken and a helical equilibrium is established.

  9. Entropy of quantum field in toroidal black hole without brick wall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Bo-Bo

    2008-01-01

    In this paper the entropy of a toroidal black hole due to a scalar field is investigated by using the DLM scheme.The entropy is renormalized to the standard Bekenstein-Hawking formula with a one-loop correction arising from the higher curvature terms of the gravitational action. For the scalar field,the renormalized Newton constant and two renormalized coupling constants in the toroidal black hole are the same as those in the Reissner-Nordstrom black hole except for other one.

  10. Design and Comparison of a 1 MW / 5s HTS SMES with Toroidal and Solenoidal Geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Morandi, Antonio; Gholizad, Babak; Grilli, Francesco; Sirois, Frédéric; Zermeño, Víctor M R

    2015-01-01

    The design of a HTS SMES coil with solenoidal and toroidal geometry is carried out based on a commercially available 2G HTS conductor. A SMES system of practical interest (1 MW / 5 s) is considered. The comparison between ideal toroidal and solenoidal geometry is first discussed and the criteria used for choosing the geometrical parameters of the coils' bore are explained. The design of the real coil is then carried out and the final amount of conductor needed is compared. A preliminary comparison of the two coils in terms of AC loss during one charge discharge cycle is also discussed.

  11. On the possibility of controlling the hydrophilic/hydrophobic characteristics of toroid Mo138 nanocluster polyoxometalates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzhegorzhevskii, K. V.; Adamova, L. V.; Eremina, E. V.; Ostroushko, A. A.

    2017-03-01

    The possibility of changing the hydrophilic (polar) surfaces of toroid nanocluster polyoxomolibdates to hydrophobic (nonpolar) surfaces via the modification of Mo138 nanoclusters by surfactant molecules (dodecylpyridinium chloride) as a result of the interaction between these compounds in solutions is demonstrated. Benzene and methanol are used as molecular probes (indicators of the condition of nanocluster surfaces). Comparative characteristics of the equilibrium sorption of benzene and methanol vapors on the initial and modified surfaces of the solid polyoxometalate, and data on the sorption of organic molecules on the surfaces of Rhodamine B-modified nanoclusters of the toroid (Mo138) and keplerate (Mo132) types are obtained.

  12. Evaluation of a relativistic electron ring system as a plasma target for buildup of compact-toroid configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Condit, W.C.

    1980-06-26

    A review of the idea of using plasma-loaded electron rings as buildup targets for future compact-toroid machines is presented. Present experiments at Cornell University and Nagoya University are analyzed, and the need for auxiliary heating to reach interesting temperatures is described. Consideration of the effect of two-stream instability, toroidal field, and plasma containment are discussed.

  13. Toroidal-Core Microinductors Biased by Permanent Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieneweg, Udo; Blaes, Brent

    2003-01-01

    The designs of microscopic toroidal-core inductors in integrated circuits of DC-to-DC voltage converters would be modified, according to a proposal, by filling the gaps in the cores with permanent magnets that would apply bias fluxes (see figure). The magnitudes and polarities of the bias fluxes would be tailored to counteract the DC fluxes generated by the DC components of the currents in the inductor windings, such that it would be possible to either reduce the sizes of the cores or increase the AC components of the currents in the cores without incurring adverse effects. Reducing the sizes of the cores could save significant amounts of space on integrated circuits because relative to other integrated-circuit components, microinductors occupy large areas - of the order of a square millimeter each. An important consideration in the design of such an inductor is preventing magnetic saturation of the core at current levels up to the maximum anticipated operating current. The requirement to prevent saturation, as well as other requirements and constraints upon the design of the core are expressed by several equations based on the traditional magnetic-circuit approximation. The equations involve the core and gap dimensions and the magnetic-property parameters of the core and magnet materials. The equations show that, other things remaining equal, as the maximum current is increased, one must increase the size of the core to prevent the flux density from rising to the saturation level. By using a permanent bias flux to oppose the flux generated by the DC component of the current, one would reduce the net DC component of flux in the core, making it possible to reduce the core size needed to prevent the total flux density (sum of DC and AC components) from rising to the saturation level. Alternatively, one could take advantage of the reduction of the net DC component of flux by increasing the allowable AC component of flux and the corresponding AC component of current

  14. Facile synthesis of N-rich carbon quantum dots by spontaneous polymerization and incision of solvents as efficient bioimaging probes and advanced electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Zhouyue; Xu, Shengjie; Wan, Jiaxun; Wu, Peiyi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread commercial application prospects, not only as bioimaging probes but also as promising electrocatalysts for the metal-free ORR.In this study, uniform nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CDs) were synthesized through a one-step solvothermal process of cyclic and nitrogen-rich solvents, such as N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) and dimethyl-imidazolidinone (DMEU), under mild conditions. The products exhibited strong light blue fluorescence, good cell permeability and low cytotoxicity. Moreover, after a facile post-thermal treatment, it developed a lotus seedpod surface-like structure of seed-like N-CDs decorating on the surface of carbon layers with a high proportion of quaternary nitrogen moieties that exhibited excellent electrocatalytic activity and long-term durability towards the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). The peak potential was -160 mV, which was comparable to or even lower than commercial Pt/C catalysts. Therefore, this study provides an alternative facile approach to the synthesis of versatile carbon quantum dots (CDs) with widespread

  15. Advanced Chemistry Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description/History: Chemistry laboratoryThe Advanced Chemistry Laboratory (ACL) is a unique facility designed for working with the most super toxic compounds known...

  16. Advanced Missile Signature Center

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Missile Signature Center (AMSC) is a national facility supporting the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) and other DoD programs and customers with analysis,...

  17. Component Test Facility (Comtest) Phase 1 Engineering For 760°C (1400°F) Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC) Steam Generator Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Paul [Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group, Inc., Barberton, OH (United States)

    2016-05-13

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760°C (1400°F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  18. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  19. Neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity with effects of finite banana width for finite aspect ratio tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaing, K. C.; Sabbagh, S. A.

    2016-07-01

    Theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity has been developed to model transport phenomena, especially, toroidal plasma rotation for tokamaks with broken symmetry. Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the results of the numerical codes in the large aspect ratio limit. The theory has since been extended to include effects of finite aspect ratio and finite plasma β. Here, β is the ratio of the plasma thermal pressure to the magnetic field pressure. However, there are cases where the radial wavelength of the self-consistent perturbed magnetic field strength B on the perturbed magnetic surface is comparable to the width of the trapped particles, i.e., bananas. To accommodate those cases, the theory for neoclassical toroidal plasma viscosity is further extended here to include the effects of the finite banana width. The extended theory is developed using the orbit averaged drift kinetic equation in the low collisionality regimes. The results of the theory can now be used to model plasma transport, including toroidal plasma rotation, in real finite aspect ratio, and finite plasma β tokamaks with the radial wavelength of the perturbed symmetry breaking magnetic field strength comparable to or longer than the banana width.

  20. Optimizing dc-resistance of a foil wounded toroidal inductor combining matlab and comsol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    An optimization routine is presented to optimize the shape of a foil winding of a toroid inductor in terms of the DC resistance. MATLAB was used to define the geometry of the foil winding and COMSOL was used to import the geometry and create a 3D finite element model. The initial parameters...

  1. The effect of toroidal plasma rotation on low-frequency reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes in tokamaks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of toroidal plasma rotation on the existence of reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes (RSAEs) near their minimum frequency is investigated analytically. An existence condition is derived showing that a radially decreasing kinetic energy density is unfavourable for the existence of RSAEs. Th

  2. Investigation of a Hybrid Winding Concept for Toroidal Inductors using 3D Finite Element Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Mønster, Jakob Døllner;

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates a hybrid winding concept for a toroidal inductor by simulating the winding resistance as a function of frequency. The problem of predicting the resistance of a non-uniform and complex winding shape is solved using 3D Finite Element Modeling. A prototype is built and tested...

  3. Performance assessment and optimization of the ITER toroidal field coil joints

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rolando, G.; Foussat, A.; Knaster, J.; Illiin, Y.; Nijhuis, A.

    2013-01-01

    The ITER toroidal field (TF) system features eighteen coils that will provide the magnetic field necessary to confine the plasma. Each winding pack is composed of seven double pancakes (DP) connected through praying hands joints. Shaking hands joints are used to interface the terminals of the conduc

  4. Internal Field of Homogeneously Magnetized Toroid Sensor for Proton Free Precession Magnetometer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Primdahl, Fritz; Merayo, José M.G.; Brauer, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The shift of the NMR spectral line frequency in a proton free precession absolute scalar magnetometer using the omni-directional toroid container for a proton-rich liquid depends on the magnetic susceptibility of the liquid and on the direction of the external field relative to the axis of the to......The shift of the NMR spectral line frequency in a proton free precession absolute scalar magnetometer using the omni-directional toroid container for a proton-rich liquid depends on the magnetic susceptibility of the liquid and on the direction of the external field relative to the axis...... of the toroid. The theoretical shift is estimated for water by computing the additional magnetic field from the magnetization of the liquid and comparing it to the theoretical field in a spherical container. Along the axis the estimated average shift is -0.08 nT and perpendicular to the axis the shift is +0.......08 nT relative to that of a spherical sensor. The field inhomogeneity introduced by the toroid shape amounts to 0.32 nT over the volume of the sensor and is not expected to significantly affect the signal decay time, when considering the typical water line width of about 2.5 InT....

  5. Generation of rotational flows in toroidally confined visco-resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2015-11-01

    We investigate by numerical simulation the generation of rotational flows in a toroid confining a conducting magnetofluid. A current is driven by the application of externally supported electric and magnetic fields. We show how the properties and intensity of the rotations are regulated by dimensionless numbers (Lundquist and viscous Lundquist) that contain the resistivity and viscosity of the magnetofluid. At the magnetohydrodynamic level (uniform mass density and incompressible magnetofluids), rotational flows appear in toroidal, driven MHD. The evolution of these flows with the transport coefficients, geometry, and safety factor are described. Two different toroidal geometries are considered, one with an up-down symmetric and the other with an asymmetric cross section. We show that there exists a fundamental difference between both studied cases: the volume-averaged angular momentum is zero for the symmetric case, while for the asymmetric cross section a finite volume-averaged angular momentum appears. We observe a breaking in the up-down symmetry of the flow and a toroidal preferred direction emerges.

  6. A toroidal trap for the cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms using a rf-dressed quadrupole trap

    CERN Document Server

    Chakraborty, A; Ram, S P; Tiwari, S K; Rawat, H S

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the trapping of cold $^{87}Rb$ atoms in a toroidal geometry using a rf-dressed quadrupole magnetic trap formed by superposing a strong radio frequency (rf) field on a quadrupole trap. This rf-dressed quadrupole trap has minimum of the potential away from the quadrupole trap centre on a circular path which facilitates the trapping in the toroidal geometry. In the experiments, the laser cooled atoms were first trapped in the quadrupole trap, then cooled evaporatively using a weak rf-field, and finally trapped in the rf-dressed quadrupole trap. The radius of the toroid could be varied by varying the frequency of the dressing rf-field. It has also been demonstrated that a single rf source and an antenna can be used for the rf-evaporative cooling as well as for rf-dressing of atoms. The atoms trapped in the toroidal trap may have applications in realization of an atom gyroscope as well as in studying the quantum gases in low dimensions.

  7. Toroidal rotation braking with n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Y; Liang, Y; Koslowski, H R;

    2010-01-01

    A strong toroidal rotation braking has been observed in plasmas with application of an n = 1 magnetic perturbation field on the JET tokamak. Calculation results from the momentum transport analysis show that the torque induced by the n = 1 perturbation field has a global profile. The maximal valu...

  8. A Study on Main Breaker for Quench Protection of HT-7U Toroidal Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许留伟; 刘小宁

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a quench protection project of HT-7U toroidal superconducting tokamak through a forced commutation analysis of DC circuit breaker (DCCB) paralleling fuse.Based on the requirement of quench protection, main parameters are selected. Experimental results demonstrate the validity of this proposed project.

  9. A study on Main Breaker for Quench Protection of HT—7U Toroidal Superconducting Tokammak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许留伟; 刘小宁

    2002-01-01

    This paper proposes a quench protection project of HT-7U toroidal superconducting tokamak through a forced commutation analysis of DC circuit breaker(DCCB) paralleling fuse.Based on the requirement of quench protection.Amin parameters are selected.Experimental results demonstrate the validity of this proposed project.

  10. Manifestation of the cyclo-toroid nuclear moment in anomalous conversion and Lamb shift

    CERN Document Server

    Tkalya, E V

    2005-01-01

    We offer the hypothesis that atomic nuclei, nucleons, and atoms possess a new type of electromagnetic moment, that we call a ``cyclo-toroid moment''. In nuclei, this moment arises when the toroid dipole (anapole) moments are arrayed in the form of a ring, or, equivalently, when the magnetic moments of the nucleons are arranged in the form of rings which, in turn, constitute the surface of a torus. We establish theoretically that the cyclo-toroid moment plays a role in the processes of the atomic shell--nucleus interaction. The existence of this moment would explain known anomalies in the internal conversion coefficients for $M1$ transitions in nuclei. We show also that the static cyclo-toroid nuclear moment interacts locally inside the nucleus with the vortex part of the atomic electron currents and this leads to an energy shift in atomic $s_{1/2}$ states. For the hydrogen atom the value of this shift may be comparable in order of magnitude to the present accuracy of measurements of the Lamb shift for the $1s...

  11. Conceptual Design of a New Large Superconducting Toroid for IAXO, the New International AXion Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    The International AXion Observatory (IAXO) will incorporate a new generation detector for axions, a hypothetical particle, which was postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP problem. The new IAXO experiment is aiming at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current state-of-the-art detector, represented by the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions into x-ray photons. Utilizing the designs of the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroidal magnet is currently being designed at CERN to provide the required magnetic field. The new toroid will be built up from eight, one meter wide and 20 m long, racetrack coils. The toroid is sized about 4 m in diameter and 22 m in length. It is designed to realize a peak magnetic field of 5.4 T with a ...

  12. The Dynamics of an Isolated Plasma Filament at the Edge of a Toroidal Device, Rev. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryutov, D D

    2006-09-28

    The dynamics of an isolated plasma filament (an isolated blob) in the far scrape-off layer (SOL) of a toroidal device is described, with a proper averaging of the geometrical parameters as well as plasma parameters along the filament. The analysis is limited to the magnetohydrodynamic description. The effects of the anchored ends and finite plasma resistivity are also discussed.

  13. Toroidal and poloidal soft x-ray imaging system on the DIII-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, R. T.; Evanko, R.; Haskovec, J.

    1988-08-01

    A toroidal soft x-ray imaging system is being added to the currently installed poloidal soft x-ray system on the DIII-D tokamak. The poloidal array is used to determine the poloidal mode structure and location of internal helical MHD perturbations in the plasma. The new array will add toroidal mode identification capability. The four detector arrays are toroidally spaced in a manner that allows identification of toroidal mode numbers up to 24. Beryllium vacuum windows separate the detectors from the tokamak vacuum and also serve as low-energy filters. The separate detector vacuum chambers can be filled with a gas that changes the low-energy cutoff of the system. By proper selection of the gas and pressure the low-energy cutoff can be chosen over the entire range of the detector sensitivity (500-1200 eV). This capability can be used to produce crude x-ray spectra for the entire imaging system or for gain control.

  14. Toroidal and poloidal soft X-ray imaging system on the D3-D tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snider, R.; Evanko, R.; Haskovec, J.

    1988-02-01

    A toroidal soft X-ray imaging system is being added to the currently installed poloidal soft X-ray system on the D3-D tokamak. The poloidal array is used to determine the poloidal mode structure and location of internal helical MHD perturbations in the plasma. The new array will add toroidal mode identification capability. The four detector arrays are toroidally spaced in a manner which allows identification of toroidal mode numbers of up to 24. Beryllium vacuum windows separate the detectors from the tokamak vacuum and also serve as low energy filters. The separate detector vacuum chambers can be filled with a gas which changes the low energy cutoff of the system. By proper selection of the gas and pressure the low energy cutoff can be chosen over the entire range of the detector sensitivity (500 eV to 1200 eV). This capability can be used to produce crude X-ray spectra for the entire imaging system or for gain control.

  15. On the fundamental mode of the optical resonator with toroidal mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serednyakov, S.S.; Vinokurov, N.A. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    1995-12-31

    The fundamental mode of the optical resonator with the toroidal mirrors is investigated. The losses in such resonator with the on-axis holes are low in compare with the case of spherical mirrors. The use of this type of optical resonator is briefly discussed.

  16. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  17. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  18. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  19. Global stability of plasmas with helical boundary deformation and net toroidal current against n=1,2 external modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardela, A.; Cooper, W.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    In this paper we resume a numerical study of the global stability of plasma with helical boundary deformation and non null net toroidal current. The aim was to see whether external modes with n=1,2 (n toroidal mode number) can be stabilized at values of {beta} inaccessible to the tokamak. L=2,3 configurations with several aspect ratios and different numbers of equilibrium field periods are considered. A large variety of toroidal current densities and different pressure profiles are taken into account. Mercier stability is also investigated. (author) 4 figs., 6 refs.

  20. Overview of Compact Toroidal Hybrid research program progress and plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, David; Ennis, David; Hanson, James; Hartwell, Gregory; Herfindal, Jeffrey; Knowlton, Stephen; Ma, Xingxing; Pandya, Mihir; Roberds, Nicholas; Ross, Kevin; Traverso, Peter

    2016-10-01

    disruptive behavior on the level of applied 3D magnetic shaping; (2) test and advance the V3FIT reconstruction code and NIMROD modeling of CTH; and (3) study the implementation of an island divertor. Progress towards these goals and other developments are summarized. The disruptive density limit exceeds the Greenwald limit as the vacuum transform is increased, but a threshold for avoidance is not observed. Low- q disruptions, with 1.1 behavior has been reproducibly modified with external transform and NIMROD is used to model these observations and reproduces experimental trends. An island divertor design has begun with connection length studies to model energy deposition on divertor plates located in an edge 1/3 island as well as the study of a non-resonant divertor configuration. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  1. Budget estimates: Fiscal year 1994. Volume 2: Construction of facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Construction of Facilities (CoF) appropriation provides contractual services for the repair, rehabilitation, and modification of existing facilities; the construction of new facilities and the acquisition of related collateral equipment; the acquisition or condemnation of real property; environmental compliance and restoration activities; the design of facilities projects; and advanced planning related to future facilities needs. Fiscal year 1994 budget estimates are broken down according to facility location of project and by purpose.

  2. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  3. Thermal energy storage test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ternes, M. P.

    1980-01-01

    The thermal behavior of prototype thermal energy storage units (TES) in both heating and cooling modes is determined. Improved and advanced storage systems are developed and performance standards are proposed. The design and construction of a thermal cycling facility for determining the thermal behavior of full scale TES units is described. The facility has the capability for testing with both liquid and air heat transport, at variable heat input/extraction rates, over a temperature range of 0 to 280 F.

  4. Toroidal current profile control during low confinement mode plasma discharges in DIII-D via first-principles-driven model-based robust control synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Justin E.; Boyer, Mark D.; Shi, Wenyu; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2012-12-01

    In order for ITER to be capable of operating in advanced tokamak operating regimes, characterized by a high fusion gain, good plasma confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability and a non-inductively driven plasma current, for extended periods of time, several challenging plasma control problems still need to be solved. Setting up a suitable toroidal current density profile in the tokamak is key for one possible advanced operating scenario characterized by non-inductive sustainment of the plasma current. At the DIII-D tokamak, the goal is to create the desired current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the plasma discharge and then actively maintain this target profile for the remainder of the discharge. The evolution in time of the toroidal current profile in tokamaks is related to the evolution of the poloidal magnetic flux profile, which is modelled in normalized cylindrical coordinates using a first-principles, nonlinear, dynamic partial differential equation (PDE) referred to as the magnetic diffusion equation. The magnetic diffusion equation is combined with empirical correlations developed from physical observations and experimental data from DIII-D for the electron temperature, the plasma resistivity and the non-inductive current drive to develop a simplified, control-oriented, nonlinear, dynamic PDE model of the poloidal flux profile evolution valid for low confinement mode discharges. In this work, we synthesize a robust feedback controller to reject disturbances and track a desired reference trajectory of the poloidal magnetic flux gradient profile by employing the control-oriented model of the system. A singular value decomposition of the static gain matrix of the plant model is utilized to identify the most relevant control channels and is combined with the dynamic response of system around a given operating trajectory to design the feedback controller. A general framework for real-time feedforward + feedback control of magnetic and

  5. Studies on orange oil methyl ester in diesel engine with hemispherical and toroidal combustion chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthickeyan Viswanathan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An investigation has been made to compare the emission characteristics of 20% orange oil methyl ester and 80% diesel in volumetric basis with Neat diesel in hemispherical combustion chamber and toroidal combustion chamber. Non-edible orange oil is selected and utilized to prepare alternative fuel to be utilized in Diesel engine. The traditional method of transestrification is employed for preparation orange oil methyl ester. The chemical properties of prepared methyl ester were determined using fouriertransform infrared spectroscopy method. Further its fuel properties were found based on American Society for Testing and Materials standards and compared with Neat diesel fuel properties. A compression ignition engine with electrical dynamometer test rig with gas analyzer has been used. It is observed that 1% of NOx and 4% of HC emission reduced in toroidal combustion chamber engine. However, smoke emission is found to be lower in hemispherical combustion chamber engine.

  6. Experimental Phenomena of Improved Ohmic Confinement Induced by Modulated Toroidal Current on the HT-7 Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛剑珊; 罗家融; P.Phillips; 赵君煜; 揭银先; 吴振伟; 胡立群; 李建刚

    2002-01-01

    The phenomena of improved ohmic confinement have been observed during the modulation of the toroidal curranton the Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). In the experiment, the programming ohmic heating field wasmodulated. A toroidal frequency-modulated current induced by modulated loop voltage was added on the plasmaequilibrium current. The ratio of ac amplitude of the plasma current to the main plasma current is about 12-30%.These improved plasma confinement phenomena include the facts that the average electron density and the centralelectron temperature both increase, the Dα radiation from the edge is reduced, the magnetohydrodynamics isobviously suppressed by oscillating plasma current, eand the global energy confinement time increases by 27-45%o.It is found that the faster the modulation is, the more effective the improved ohmic confinement phase.

  7. Temperature distribution in magnetized neutron star crusts. II. The effect of a strong toroidal component

    CERN Document Server

    Geppert, U; Page, D; Page, Dany

    2005-01-01

    We continue the study of the effects of a strong magnetic field on the temperature distribution in the crust of a magnetized neutron star (NS) and its impact on the observable surface temperature. Extending the approach initiated in Geppert et al.(2004), we consider more complex and, hence, more realistic, magnetic field structures but still restrict ourselves to axisymmetric configurations. We put special emphasis on the heat blanketing effect of a toroidal field component. We show that asymmetric temperature distributions can occur and a crustal field consisting of dipolar poloidal and toroidal components will cause one polar spot to be larger than the opposing one. These two warm regions can be separated by an extended cold equatorial belt. We present an internal magnetic field structure which can explain both the X-ray and optical spectra of the isolated NS RXJ 1856-3754. We investigate the effects of the resulting surface temperature profiles on the observable lightcurve which an isolated thermally emitt...

  8. Demonstration of ultra-high-Q small mode volume toroid microcavities on a chip

    CERN Document Server

    Kippenberg, T J; Vahala, K J

    2004-01-01

    Optical microcavities confine light spatially and temporally and find application in a wide range of fundamental and applied studies. In many areas, the microcavity figure of merit is not only determined by photon lifetime (or the equivalent quality-factor, Q), but also by simultaneous achievement of small mode volume V . Here we demonstrate ultra-high Q-factor small mode volume toroid microcavities on-a-chip, which exhibit a Q/V factor of more than $10^{6}(\\lambda/n)^{-3}$. These values are the highest reported to date for any chip-based microcavity. A corresponding Purcell factor in excess of 200 000 and a cavity finesse of $2.8\\times10^{6}$ is achieved, demonstrating that toroid microcavities are promising candidates for studies of the Purcell effect, cavity QED or biochemical sensing

  9. Demonstration of ultra-high-Q small mode volume toroid microcavities on a chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kippenberg, T. J.; Spillane, S. M.; Vahala, K. J.

    2004-12-01

    Optical microcavities confine light spatially and temporally and find application in a wide range of fundamental and applied studies. In many areas, the microcavity figure of merit is not only determined by photon lifetime (or the equivalent quality-factor, Q), but also by simultaneous achievement of small mode volume (V). Here we demonstrate ultra-high Q-factor small mode volume toroid microcavities on-a-chip, which exhibit a Q/V factor of more than 106(λ/n)-3. These values are the highest reported to date for any chip-based microcavity. A corresponding Purcell factor in excess of 200 000 and a cavity finesse of >2.8×106 is achieved, demonstrating that toroid microcavities are promising candidates for studies of the Purcell effect, cavity QED or biochemical sensing.

  10. Physical mechanism determining the radial electric field and its radial structure in a toroidal plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ida, Katsumi; Miura, Yukitoshi; Itoh, Sanae [and others

    1994-10-01

    Radial structures of plasma rotation and radial electric field are experimentally studied in tokamak, heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices. The perpendicular and parallel viscosities are measured. The parallel viscosity, which is dominant in determining the toroidal velocity in heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices, is found to be neoclassical. On the other hand, the perpendicular viscosity, which is dominant in dictating the toroidal rotation in tokamaks, is anomalous. Even without external momentum input, both a plasma rotation and a radial electric field exist in tokamaks and heliotrons/torsatrons. The observed profiles of the radial electric field do not agree with the theoretical prediction based on neoclassical transport. This is mainly due to the existence of anomalous perpendicular viscosity. The shear of the radial electric field improves particle and heat transport both in bulk and edge plasma regimes of tokamaks. (author) 95 refs.

  11. A Toroidal Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) for a Neutrino Factory

    CERN Document Server

    Bross, A; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, F J P; Villanueva, A Cervera; Ghosh, T; Cadenas, J J Gómez; Hernández, P; Martín-Albo, J; Burguet-Castell, J

    2013-01-01

    A neutrino factory has unparalleled physics reach for the discovery and measurement of CP violation in the neutrino sector. A far detector for a neutrino factory must have good charge identification with excellent background rejection and a large mass. An elegant solution is to construct a magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) along the lines of MINOS, where iron plates provide a toroidal magnetic field and scintillator planes provide 3D space points. In this report, the current status of a simulation of a toroidal MIND for a neutrino factory is discussed in light of the recent measurements of large $\\theta_{13}$. The response and performance using the 10 GeV neutrino factory configuration are presented. It is shown that this setup has equivalent $\\delta_{CP}$ reach to a MIND with a dipole field and is sensitive to the discovery of CP violation over 85% of the values of $\\delta_{CP}$.

  12. Modeling and control of plasma rotation for NSTX using neoclassical toroidal viscosity and neutral beam injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goumiri, I. R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Rowley, C. W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Mechanical and Aerospace Dept.; Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics; Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Boyer, M. D. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Andre, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kolemen, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Taira, K. [Florida State Univ, Dept Mech Engn, Tallahassee, FL USA.

    2016-02-19

    A model-based feedback system is presented to control plasma rotation in a magnetically confined toroidal fusion device, to maintain plasma stability for long-pulse operation. This research uses experimental measurements from the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) and is aimed at controlling plasma rotation using two different types of actuation: momentum from injected neutral beams and neoclassical toroidal viscosity generated by three-dimensional applied magnetic fields. Based on the data-driven model obtained, a feedback controller is designed, and predictive simulations using the TRANSP plasma transport code show that the controller is able to attain desired plasma rotation profiles given practical constraints on the actuators and the available measurements of rotation.

  13. Measurement of toroidal vessel eddy current during plasma disruption on J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, L. J.; Yu, K. X.; Zhang, M., E-mail: zhangming@hust.edu.cn; Zhuang, G.; Li, X.; Yuan, T.; Rao, B.; Zhao, Q. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we have employed a thin, printed circuit board eddy current array in order to determine the radial distribution of the azimuthal component of the eddy current density at the surface of a steel plate. The eddy current in the steel plate can be calculated by analytical methods under the simplifying assumptions that the steel plate is infinitely large and the exciting current is of uniform distribution. The measurement on the steel plate shows that this method has high spatial resolution. Then, we extended this methodology to a toroidal geometry with the objective of determining the poloidal distribution of the toroidal component of the eddy current density associated with plasma disruption in a fusion reactor called J-TEXT. The preliminary measured result is consistent with the analysis and calculation results on the J-TEXT vacuum vessel.

  14. MHD equilibrium of toroidal fusion plasma with stationary flows; Rownowaga MHD toroidalnej plazmy termojadrowej z przeplywami

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galkowski, A. [Institute of Atomic Energy, Otwock-Swierk (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Non-linear ideal MHD equilibria in axisymmetric system with flows are examined, both in 1st and 2nd ellipticity regions. Evidence of the bifurcation of solutions is provided and numerical solutions of several problems in a tokamak geometry are given, exhibiting bifurcation phenomena. Relaxation of plasma in the presence of zero-order flows is studied in a realistic toroidal geometry. The field aligned flow allows equilibria with finite pressure gradient but with homogeneous temperature distribution. Numerical calculations have been performed for the 1st and 2nd ellipticity regimes of the extended Grad-Shafranov-Schlueter equation. Numerical technique, alternative to the well-known Grad`s ADM methods has been proposed to deal with slow adiabatic evolution of toroidal plasma with flows. The equilibrium problem with prescribed adiabatic constraints may be solved by simultaneous calculations of flux surface geometry and original profile functions. (author). 178 refs, 37 figs, 5 tabs.

  15. An integral equation-based numerical solver for Taylor states in toroidal geometries

    CERN Document Server

    O'Neil, Michael

    2016-01-01

    We develop an algorithm for the numerical calculation of Taylor states (also known as Beltrami, or force-free fields) in toroidal and toroidal-shell geometries using an analytical framework developed for the solution to the time-harmonic Maxwell equations. The scheme relies on the generalized Debye source representation of Maxwell fields and an integral representation of Beltrami fields which immediately yields a well-conditioned second-kind integral equation. This integral equation has a unique solution whenever the Beltrami parameter $\\lambda$ is not a member of a discrete, countable set of resonances which physically correspond to spontaneous symmetry breaking in the plasma. Several numerical examples relevant to magnetohydrodynamic equilibria calculations are provided. Lastly, our approach easily generalizes to arbitrary geometries, both bounded and unbounded, and of varying genus.

  16. Magnetic field perturbartions in closed-field-line systems with zero toroidal magnetic field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, M; Ryutov, D; Kesner, J

    2003-12-02

    In some plasma confinement systems (e.g., field-reversed configurations and levitated dipoles) the confinement is provided by a closed-field-line poloidal magnetic field. We consider the influence of the magnetic field perturbations on the structure of the magnetic field in such systems and find that the effect of perturbations is quite different from that in the systems with a substantial toroidal field. In particular, even infinitesimal perturbations can, in principle, lead to large radial excursions of the field lines in FRCs and levitated dipoles. Under such circumstances, particle drifts and particle collisions may give rise to significant neoclassical transport. Introduction of a weak regular toroidal magnetic field reduces radial excursions of the field lines and neoclassical transport.

  17. Tracking formulas and strategies for a receiver oriented dual-axis tracking toroidal heliostat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Minghuan; Wang, Zhifeng; Liang, Wenfeng; Zhang, Xiliang; Zang, Chuncheng [Key Laboratory of Solar Thermal Energy and Photovoltaic System of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Electrical Engineering, Beijing 100190 (China); Lu, Zhenwu; Wei, Xiudong [Changchun Institute of Optics, Fine Mechanics and Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), Jilin 130033 (China)

    2010-06-15

    A 4 m x 4 m toroidal heliostat with receiver oriented dual-axis tracking, also called spinning-elevation tracking, was developed as an auxiliary heat source for a hydrogen production system. A series of spinning-elevation tracking formulas have been derived for this heliostat. This included basic tracking formulas, a formula for the elevation angle for heliostat with a mirror-pivot offset, and a more general formula for the biased elevation angle. This paper presents the new tracking formulas in detail and analyzes the accuracy of applying a simplifying approximation. The numerical results show these receiver oriented dual-axis tracking formula approximations are accurate to within 2.5 x 10{sup -6} m in image plane. Some practical tracking strategies are discussed briefly. Solar images from the toroidal heliostat at selected times are also presented. (author)

  18. Experimental study of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmode (TAE) stability at high q(0)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batha, S.H.; Levinton, F.M. [Fusion Physics and Technology, Torrance, CA (United States); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Experiments to destabilize the Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) by energetic alpha particles were performed on the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor using deuterium and tritium fuel. To decrease the alpha particle pressure instability threshold, discharges with an elevated value of q(0) > 1.5 were used. By raising q(0), the radial location of the low toroidal-mode-number TAE gaps moves toward the magnetic axis and into alignment with the region of maximum alpha pressure gradient, thereby (in theory) lowering the value of {beta}{sub {alpha}}(0) required for instability. No TAE activity was observed when the central alpha particle {beta}{sub {alpha}} reached 0.08% in a discharge with fusion power of 2.4 MW. Calculations show that the fusion power is within a factor of 1.5 to 3 of the instability threshold.

  19. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Albert, Christopher G; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant NTV regimes including superbanana plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shea...

  20. Toroidally Resolved Structure of Divertor Heat Flux in RMP H-mode Discharges on DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowski, M. W. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, San Diego; Fenstermacher, M. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Lasnier, C. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Wolf, R. C. [Max-Planck-Institute for Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Association, Greifswald, Germany; Baylor, Larry R [ORNL; Boedo, J.A. [University of California, San Diego; Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics; DeGrassie, J. S. [General Atomics, San Diego; Gohil, P. [General Atomics; Mordijck, S. [University of California, San Diego; Laengner, R. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Leonard, A. W. [General Atomics; Moyer, R.A. [University of California, San Diego; Petrie, T. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; Petty, C C. [General Atomics, San Diego; Pinsker, R. I. [General Atomics, San Diego; Rhodes, T. L. [University of California, Los Angeles; Schaffer, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego; Schmitz, O. [Forschungszentrum Julich, Julich, Germany; Snyder, P. B. [General Atomics; Stoschus, H. [EURATOM / FZ-Juelich, Germany; Osborne, T. H. [General Atomics; Orlov, D. M. [University of California, San Diego & La Jolla; Unterberg, Ezekial A [ORNL; Watkins, J. G. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

    2011-01-01

    As shown on DIII-D edge localized modes (ELMs) can be either completely eliminated or mitigated with resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields. Two infrared cameras, separated 105 degrees toroidally, were used to make simultaneous measurements of ELM heat loads with high frame rates. Without the RMP fields ELMs display a variety of different heat load dynamics and a range of toroidal variability that is characteristic of their 3D structure. Comparing radial averages there is no asymmetry between two toroidal locations. With RMP-mitigated ELMs, the variability in the radially averaged power loads is significantly reduced and toroidal asymmetries in power loads are introduced. In addition to RMP ELM suppression scenarios an RMP scenario with only very small ELMs and very good confinement has been achieved.

  1. High-throughput beamline for attosecond pulses based on toroidal mirrors with microfocusing capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassetto, F; Trabattoni, A; Anumula, S; Sansone, G; Calegari, F; Nisoli, M; Poletto, L

    2014-10-01

    We have developed a novel attosecond beamline designed for attosecond-pump/attosecond probe experiments. Microfocusing of the Extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is obtained by using a coma-compensated optical configuration based on the use of three toroidal mirrors controlled by a genetic algorithm. Trains of attosecond pulses are generated with a measured peak intensity of about 3 × 10(11) W/cm(2).

  2. Particle Simulation Code for the Electron Temperature Gradient Instability in Tokamak Toroidal Plasmas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANGuangde; DONGJiaqi

    2003-01-01

    A numerical simulation code has been established with particle simulation method in order to study the gyro-kinetic equations for the electrostatic electron temperature gradient modes in toroidal plasmas. The flowchart is given as well for the code. The fourth-order adaptive step-size scheme is adopted, that saves computer time and is simple. The calculation code is useful for the research of the electron temperature gradient instability.

  3. Topological symmetry breaking of self-interacting fractional Klein-Gordon field theories on toroidal spacetime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, S C [Faculty of Engineering, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya, 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Teo, L P [Faculty of Information Technology, Multimedia University, Jalan Multimedia, Cyberjaya, 63100, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia)], E-mail: sclim@mmu.edu.my, E-mail: lpteo@mmu.edu.my

    2008-04-11

    Quartic self-interacting fractional Klein-Gordon scalar massive and massless field theories on toroidal spacetime are studied. The effective potential and topologically generated mass are determined using zeta-function regularization technique. Renormalization of these quantities are derived. Conditions for symmetry breaking are obtained analytically. Simulations are carried out to illustrate regions or values of compactified dimensions where symmetry-breaking mechanisms appear.

  4. Zonal Flow Patterns: How Toroidal Coupling Induces Phase Jumps and Shear Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Guo, Z B

    2016-01-01

    A new, frequency modulation mechanism for zonal flow pattern formation is presented. The model predicts the probability distribution function of the flow strength as well as the evolution of the characteristic spatial scale. Magnetic toroidicity-induced global phase dynamics is shown to determine the spatial structure of the flow. A key result is the observation that global phase patterning can lead to zonal flow formation in the absence of turbulence inhomogeneity.

  5. High-throughput beamline for attosecond pulses based on toroidal mirrors with microfocusing capabilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frassetto, F.; Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it [National Research Council, Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, via Trasea 7, 35131 Padova (Italy); Trabattoni, A.; Anumula, S.; Sansone, G. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Calegari, F. [National Research Council, Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Nisoli, M. [Department of Physics, Politecnico di Milano, Piazza L. Da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); National Research Council, Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies, Piazza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2014-10-15

    We have developed a novel attosecond beamline designed for attosecond-pump/attosecond probe experiments. Microfocusing of the Extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) radiation is obtained by using a coma-compensated optical configuration based on the use of three toroidal mirrors controlled by a genetic algorithm. Trains of attosecond pulses are generated with a measured peak intensity of about 3 × 10{sup 11} W/cm{sup 2}.

  6. Stability analysis of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes in TFTR DT experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, G.Y.; Cheng, C.Z.; Budny, R.; Chang, Z.; Darrow, D.S.; Fredrickson, E.; Mazzucato, E.; Nazikian, R.; Zweben, S.

    1995-05-15

    The toroidicity-induced Alfvin eigenmodes (TAE) with radially extended structure are found to be stable in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor Deuterium-Tritium plasmas. A core localized TAE mode is shown to exist near the center of the plasma at small magnetic shear and finite plasma beta, which can be destabilized by energetic alpha particles on TFTR. With additional instability drive from fast minority ions powered by ICRH, both the global and the core localized TAE modes can be readily destabilized.

  7. New picture of the 1/1 internal kink and sawtooth in compressible toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Linda

    2013-10-01

    The m = 1 , n = 1 internal kink mode and the sawtooth crash have been analyzed extensively in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas. Nevertheless, many questions remain. A new analysis, with the aid of numerical simulation, shows that small parameter expansions such as large aspect ratio break down in general for the MHD compressible toroidal 1/1 instability with realistically small growth rates. The perpendicular momentum rate of change ρ ∂v⊥ / ∂ t must be very small compared to the individual terms in - ρ (v . ∇) v |⊥ + J × B |⊥ -∇⊥ p . The lowest order mode still has the standard 1/1 internal kink form, but the v⊥ magnitude and growth rate are determined by the higher order terms. Terms containing B~ϕ , nominally associated with the compressional Alfvén wave are important. One corollary is that reduced MHD (RMHD) fails completely and Sweet-Parker-type reconnection never develops. At a critical nonlinear amplitude, associated with the growth of the higher toroidal harmonics, a fast, explosive crash begins with rapidly accelerating velocity growth that matches observations. Other transverse MHD instabilities experience analogous effects. Work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy.

  8. The turbulent diffusion of toroidal magnetic flux as inferred from properties of the sunspot butterfly diagram

    CERN Document Server

    Cameron, R H

    2016-01-01

    In order to match observed properties of the solar cycle, flux-transport dynamo models require the toroidal magnetic flux to be stored in a region of low magnetic diffusivity, typically located at or below the bottom of the convection zone. We infer the turbulent magnetic diffusivity affecting the toroidal field on the basis of empirical data. We consider the time evolution of mean latitude and width of the activity belts of solar cycles 12--23 and their dependence on cycle strength. We interpret the decline phase of the cycles as a diffusion process. The activity level of a given cycle begins to decline when the centers of its equatorward propagating activity belts come within their width (at half maximum) from the equator. This happens earlier for stronger cycles because their activity belts are wider. From that moment on, the activity and the belt width decrease in the same manner for all cycles, independent of their maximum activity level. In terms of diffusive cancellation of opposite-polarity toroidal f...

  9. Equilibrium poloidal field distributions in reversed-field-pinch toroidal discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D.A.; Mann, L.W.; Schoenberg, K.F.

    1982-04-01

    A comparison between the analytic formulae of Shafranov for equilibrium in axisymmetric toroidal reversed field pinch (RFP) systems and fully toroidal numerical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation is presented as a function of poloidal beta, internal plasma inductance, and aspect ratio. The Shafranov formula for the equilibrium poloidal field distribution is accurate to within 5% for aspect ratios greater than 2, poloidal betas less than 50%, and for plasma current channels that exceed one-third of the minor toroidal radius. The analytic description for the center shift of the innermost flux surface that encloses the plasma current (the Shafranov shift) is accurate to within 15% for aspect ratios greater than 2 and poloidal betas below 50%, provided the shift does not exceed one-tenth of the minor conducting boundary radius. The behavior of the magnetic axis shift as a function of plasma parameters is included. The Shafranov formulae provide a convenient method for describing the equilibrium behavior of an RFP discharge. Examples illustrating the application of the analytic formulae to the Los Alamos ZT-40M RFP experiment are given.

  10. Bifurcation physics of magnetic islands and stochasticity explored by heat pulse propagation studies in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Yoshinuma, M.; Suzuki, Y.; Narushima, Y.; Evans, T. E.; Ohdachi, S.; Tsuchiya, H.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, K.

    2016-09-01

    Bifurcation physics of a magnetic island was investigated using the heat pulse propagation technique produced by the modulation of electron cyclotron heating. There are two types of bifurcation phenomena observed in a large helical device (LHD) and DIII-D. One is a bifurcation of the magnetic topology between nested and stochastic fields. The nested state is characterized by the bi-directional (inward and outward) propagation of the heat pulse with slow propagation speed. The stochastic state is characterized by the fast propagation of the heat pulse with electron temperature flattening. The other bifurcation is between the magnetic island with larger thermal diffusivity and that with smaller thermal diffusivity. The damping of toroidal flow is observed at the O-point of the magnetic island both in helical plasmas and in tokamak plasmas during a mode locking phase with strong flow shears at the boundary of the magnetic island. Associated with the stochastization of the magnetic field, the abrupt damping of toroidal flow is observed in LHD. The toroidal flow shear shows a linear decay, while the ion temperature gradient shows an exponential decay. This observation suggests that this flow damping is due to the change in the non-diffusive term of momentum transport.

  11. The linear tearing instability in three dimensional, toroidal gyro-kinetic simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornsby, W. A., E-mail: william.hornsby@ipp.mpg.de; Migliano, P.; Buchholz, R.; Kroenert, L.; Weikl, A.; Peeters, A. G. [Theoretical Physics V, Department of Physics, Universitaet Bayreuth, Bayreuth D-95447 (Germany); Zarzoso, D.; Poli, E. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Casson, F. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-15

    Linear gyro-kinetic simulations of the classical tearing mode in three-dimensional toroidal geometry were performed using the global gyro-kinetic turbulence code, GKW. The results were benchmarked against a cylindrical ideal MHD and analytical theory calculations. The stability, growth rate, and frequency of the mode were investigated by varying the current profile, collisionality, and the pressure gradients. Both collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes were found with a smooth transition between the two. A residual, finite, rotation frequency of the mode even in the absence of a pressure gradient is observed, which is attributed to toroidal finite Larmor-radius effects. When a pressure gradient is present at low collisionality, the mode rotates at the expected electron diamagnetic frequency. However, the island rotation reverses direction at high collisionality. The growth rate is found to follow a η{sup 1∕7} scaling with collisional resistivity in the semi-collisional regime, closely following the semi-collisional scaling found by Fitzpatrick. The stability of the mode closely follows the stability analysis as performed by Hastie et al. using the same current and safety factor profiles but for cylindrical geometry, however, here a modification due to toroidal coupling and pressure effects is seen.

  12. Twisted toroidal vortex-solitons in inhomogeneous media with repulsive nonlinearity

    CERN Document Server

    Kartashov, Y V; Shnir, Y; Torner, L

    2014-01-01

    Toroidal modes in the form of so-called Hopfions, with two independent winding numbers, a hidden one (twist, s), which characterizes a circular vortex thread embedded into a three-dimensional soliton, and the vorticity around the vertical axis m, appear in many fields, including the field theory, ferromagnetics, and semi- and superconductors. Such topological states are normally generated in multi-component systems, or as trapped quasi-linear modes in toroidal potentials. We uncover that stable solitons with this structure can be created, without any linear potential, in the single-component setting with the strength of repulsive nonlinearity growing fast enough from the center to the periphery, for both steep and smooth modulation profiles. Toroidal modes with s=1 and vorticity m=0,1,2 are produced. They are stable for m1. An approximate analytical solution is obtained for the twisted ring with s=1, m=0. Under the application of an external torque, it rotates like a solid ring. The setting can be implemented...

  13. Three-dimensional neutron source models for toroidal fusion energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaybaugh, R.N. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: slaybaugh@wisc.edu; Wilson, P.P.H. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)], E-mail: wilsonp@engr.wisc.edu; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Marriott, E.P. [Fusion Technology Institute, University of Wisconsin, 1500 Engineering Dr., Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Developments in computer architecture and neutronics code capabilities have enabled high-resolution analysis of complex 3D geometries. Thus, accurately modeling 3D source distributions has become important for nuclear analyses. In this work two methods are described which generate and sample such 3D sources based directly on the plasma parameters of a fusion device and which facilitate the ability to update the neutron source following changes to the plasma physics configuration. The cylindrical mesh method is for toroidally symmetric machines and utilizes data in a standard file format which represents the poloidal magnetic flux on an R-Z grid. The conformal hexahedral mesh method takes plasma physics data generated in an idealized toroidal coordinate system and uses a Jacobian transformation and a functional expansion to generate the source. This work describes each methodology and associated test cases. The cylindrical mesh method was applied to ARIES-RS and the conformal hexahedral mesh method was applied to a uniform torus and ARIES-CS. The results of the test cases indicate that these improved source definitions can have important effects on pertinent engineering parameters, such as neutron wall loading, and should therefore be used for high-resolution nuclear analyses of all toroidal devices.

  14. New Superconducting Toroidal Magnet System for IAXO, the International AXion Observatory

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    Axions are hypothetical particles that were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. The new International AXion Observatory (IAXO) will incorporate the most promising solar axions detector to date, which is designed to enhance the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling by one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current state-of-the-art detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions into X-ray photons. Inspired by the successful realization of the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a very large superconducting toroid is currently designed at CERN to provide the required magnetic field. This toroid will comprise eight, one meter wide and twenty one meter long, racetrack coils. The system is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length. Its peak magnetic field is 5.4 T with a stored e...

  15. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greiner, A.; Moxon, L.; Robinson, A.; Tamura, L.

    2001-04-01

    This is an annual report, detailing activities at the Advanced Light Source for the year 2000. It includes highlights of scientific research by users of the facility as well as information about the development of the facility itself.

  16. Advanced Light Source Activity Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duque, Theresa; Greiner, Annette; Moxon, Elizabeth; Robinson, Arthur; Tamura, Lori (Editors)

    2003-06-12

    This annual report of the Advanced Light Source details science highlights and facility improvements during the year. It also offers information on events sponsored by the facility, technical specifications, and staff and publication information.

  17. DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chyzh, A.; Mitchell, G.; Vieira, D.; Bredeweg, T.; Ullmann, J.; Jandel, M.; Couture, A.; Keksis, A.; Rundberg, R.; Wilhelmy, J.; O'Donnell, J.; Baramsai, B.; Haight, R.; Wouters, J.; Krticka, M.; Parker, W.; Becker, J.; Agvaanlusan, U.

    2009-10-01

    DANCE (Detector for Advanced Neutron Capture Experiments) is a 4π array of BaF2 crystals installed at LANSCE, Lujan Center. Neutron capture measurements on ^157Gd and ^89Y nuclei were conducted using this facility. The absolute cross sections of the ^89Y(n,γ) reaction was measured for the first time ever in the neutron energy range of 10 eV -- 10 keV and improvements were made in the 10 -- 300 keV range. The error bars were significantly reduced and number of cross section points was increased since the past ^89Y(n,γ) experiments. The ^157Gd(n,γ) cross section was determined at En = 20 eV -- 300 keV by normalizing the experimental DANCE data to a well known resonance taken from the ENDF/B-VII library. Computer simulations of the ^157Gd(n,γ) cascades and DANCE pulse height function were made using DICEBOX and GEANT4 codes and simulated Esum and Eγ spectra are compared to the experimental DANCE data. Values of spin and photon strength function (PSF) of the ^157Gd(n,γ) resonances are provided in the range of En = 2 -- 300 eV using spin dependence upon a γ-ray multiplicity.

  18. Numerical Simulation of Non-Inductive Startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, John B.

    The dynamics and relaxation of magnetic flux ropes produced during non-inductive startup of the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment are simulated with nonlinear magnetohydrodynamic and two-fluid plasma models. A current filament is produced by a single injector and directed along multiple passes by toroidal and vertical vacuum magnetic field components. Adjacent passes of the current filament merge and reconnect, releasing an axisymmetric current ring from the driven channel. Squashing degree analysis indicates the presence of a quasi-separatrix layer (QSL) during ring formation, but the QSL does not solely correspond to magnetic reconnection. Chaotic scattering is also apparent from the distribution of magnetic field-line lengths. The merging of adjacent passes constitutes coherent dynamo action that affects the toroidally-averaged magnetic-field distribution. The MHD dynamo--primarily from the vertical displacement of the current channel--concentrates symmetric poloidal flux and transfers significant energy to the forming flux-rope ring. Accumulation of poloidal flux over many reconnection events contributes to the development of a poloidal magnetic field null near the central column that redirects the driven current filament, such that its path traces a toroidal surface. After cessation of the simulated current drive, temperature and current profiles broaden and closed flux surfaces form rapidly and encompass a large plasma volume. High toroidal-mode number harmonics of the magnetic energy decay preferentially, leaving a tokamak-like plasma suitable for transition to other forms of current drive. Computations with the two-fluid terms in Ohm's Law produce qualitatively similar plasma evolution to the MHD computations. However, for the computations with the two-fluid plasma model, the ion fluid significantly decouples from the electron fluid, weakening the dynamics during magnetic reconnection. This effect is quantified by comparing global and local plasma parameters in

  19. Toroidal, Counter-Toroidal, and Upwelling Flow in the Mantle Wedge of the Rivera and Cocos Plates: Implications for IOB Geochemistry in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Florian; Vásquez-Serrano, Alberto; Tolson, Gustavo; Negrete-Aranda, Raquel; Contreras, Juan

    2015-12-01

    We carried out analog laboratory modeling at a scale 1:4,000,000 and computer rendering of the flow patterns in a simulated western Middle American subduction zone. The scaled model consists of a transparent tank filled with corn syrup and housing two conveyor belts made of polyethylene strips. One of the strips dips 60° and moves at a velocity of 30 mm/min simulating the Rivera plate. The other one dips 45°, moves at 90 mm/min simulating the subduction of the Cocos plate. Our scaled subduction zone also includes a gap between the simulated slabs analogous to a tear recently observed in shear wave tomography studies. An acrylic plate 3 mm thick floats on the syrup in grazing contact with the polyethylene strips and simulates the overriding North America plate. Our experiments reveal a deep toroidal flow of asthenospheric mantle through the Cocos-Rivera separation. The flow is driven by a pressure gradient associated with the down-dip differential-motion of the slabs. Similarly, low pressure generated by the fast-moving Cocos plate creates a shallow counter-toroidal flow in the uppermost 100 km of the mantle wedge. The flow draws mantle beneath the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the Jalisco block, then plunges into the deep mantle by the descending poloidal cell of the Cocos slab. Moreover, our model suggests a hydraulic jump causes an ~250 km asthenosphere upwelling around the area where intra-arc extensional systems converge in western Mexico. The upwelling eventually merges with the shallow counter-toroidal flow describing a motion in 3D space similar to an Archimedes' screw. Our results indicate the differential motion between subducting slabs drives mixing in the mantle wedge of the Rivera plate and allows the slab to steepen and retreat. Model results are in good agreement with seismic anisotropy studies and the geochemistry of lavas erupted in the Jalisco block. The model can explain the eruption of OIB lavas in the vicinity of the City of

  20. Toroidal, Counter-Toroidal, and Upwelling Flow in the Mantle Wedge of the Rivera and Cocos Plates: Implications for IOB Geochemistry in the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Florian; Vásquez-Serrano, Alberto; Tolson, Gustavo; Negrete-Aranda, Raquel; Contreras, Juan

    2016-10-01

    We carried out analog laboratory modeling at a scale 1:4,000,000 and computer rendering of the flow patterns in a simulated western Middle American subduction zone. The scaled model consists of a transparent tank filled with corn syrup and housing two conveyor belts made of polyethylene strips. One of the strips dips 60° and moves at a velocity of 30 mm/min simulating the Rivera plate. The other one dips 45°, moves at 90 mm/min simulating the subduction of the Cocos plate. Our scaled subduction zone also includes a gap between the simulated slabs analogous to a tear recently observed in shear wave tomography studies. An acrylic plate 3 mm thick floats on the syrup in grazing contact with the polyethylene strips and simulates the overriding North America plate. Our experiments reveal a deep toroidal flow of asthenospheric mantle through the Cocos-Rivera separation. The flow is driven by a pressure gradient associated with the down-dip differential-motion of the slabs. Similarly, low pressure generated by the fast-moving Cocos plate creates a shallow counter-toroidal flow in the uppermost 100 km of the mantle wedge. The flow draws mantle beneath the western Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt to the Jalisco block, then plunges into the deep mantle by the descending poloidal cell of the Cocos slab. Moreover, our model suggests a hydraulic jump causes an ~250 km asthenosphere upwelling around the area where intra-arc extensional systems converge in western Mexico. The upwelling eventually merges with the shallow counter-toroidal flow describing a motion in 3D space similar to an Archimedes' screw. Our results indicate the differential motion between subducting slabs drives mixing in the mantle wedge of the Rivera plate and allows the slab to steepen and retreat. Model results are in good agreement with seismic anisotropy studies and the geochemistry of lavas erupted in the Jalisco block. The model can explain the eruption of OIB lavas in the vicinity of the City of

  1. Enclosed Small and Medium Caliber Firing Experimental Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility conducts completely instrumented terminal ballistics experimental tests with small and medium-caliber tungsten alloy penetrators against advanced armor...

  2. Enforcement and Compliance History Online (ECHO) Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — ECHO provides integrated compliance and enforcement information for about 800,000 regulated facilities nationwide. Its features range from simple to advanced,...

  3. Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Berkeley Lab Laser Accelerator (BELLA) facility (formerly LOASIS) develops advanced accelerators and radiation sources. High gradient (1-100 GV/m) laser-plasma...

  4. New dual gas puff imaging system with up-down symmetry on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zweben, S. J.;

    2012-01-01

    advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The two views are up-down symmetric about the midplane and separated by a toroidal angle of 66.6 degrees. A linear manifold with 16 holes apart by 10 mm is used to form helium gas cloud at the 130x130 mm (radial versus poloidal) objective plane. A fast camera...

  5. An advanced ISOL facility based on ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Nolen, J A; Pardo, R C; Savard, G; Rehm, K E; Schiffer, J P; Henning, W F; Jiang, C L; Ahmad, L; Back, B B; Kaye, R A; Petra, M; Portillo, M; Greene, J; Clifft, B E; Specht, J R; Janssens, R V F; Siemssen, R H; Gómez, I; Reed, C B; Hassanein, A M

    1999-01-01

    The Argonne concept for an accelerator complex for efficiently producing high-quality radioactive beams from an ion source energy up to 6-15 MeV/u is described. The Isotope-Separator-On-Line (ISOL) method is used. A high-power $9 driver accelerator produces radionuclides in a target that is closely coupled to an ion source and mass separator. By using a driver accelerator which can deliver a variety of beams and energies the radionuclide production mechanisms $9 can be chosen to optimize yields for the species of interest. To effectively utilize the high beam power of the driver two-step target /ion source geometries are proposed: (1) Neutron production with intermediate energy deuterons on $9 a primary target to produce neutron- rich fission products in a secondary /sup 238/U target, and (2) Fragmentation of neutron-rich heavy ion beams such as /sup 18/O in a target/catcher geometry. Heavy ion beams with total energies in $9 the 1-10 GeV range are also available for radionuclide production via high-energy sp...

  6. Toroidal Variable-Line-Space Gratings: The Good, the Bad and The Ugly

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Edward A.; Kobayashi, Ken; Cirtain, Jonathan; Gary, Allen; Davis, John; Reader, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Toroidal variable-line-space (VLS) gratings are an important factor in the design of an efficient VUV solar telescope that will measure the CIV (155nm) and MgII (280nm) emissions lines in the Sun's transition region. In 1983 Kita and Harada described spherical VLS gratings but the technology to commercially fabricate these devices is a recent development, especially for toroidal surfaces. This paper will describe why this technology is important in the development of the Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) sounding rocket program (the good), the delays due to the conversion between the TVLS grating design and the optical fabrication (the bad), and finally the optical testing, alignment and tolerancing of the gratings (the ugly). The Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation, SUMI, has been reported in several papers since this program began in 2000. The emphasis of this paper is to describe SUMI's Toroidal Variable-Line-Space (TVLS) gratings. These gratings help SUMI meet its scientific goals which require both high spectral resolution and high optical efficiency for magnetic field measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength band of the solar spectrum (the good). Unfortunately, the technology readiness level of these gratings has made their implementation difficult, especially for a sounding rocket payload (the bad). Therefore, this paper emphasizes the problems and solutions that were developed to use these gratings in SUMI (the ugly). Section 2 contains a short review of the scientific goals of SUMI and why this mission is important in the understanding of the 3D structure of the magnetic field on the Sun. The flight hardware that makes up the SUMI payload is described in Section 3 with emphasis on those components that affect the TVLS gratings. Section 4 emphasizes the alignment, testing and optical modeling that were developed to optimize the performance of these gratings.

  7. Neoclassical toroidal torque generation by auxiliary heating in non-axisymmetric tori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, E.; Nowak, S.; Sauter, O.

    2016-12-01

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g. rf or isotropic alpha heating) clearly cannot give rise to net forces or torques. A rather common experimental observation on contemporary tokamaks is that the near central absorption of auxiliary heating power (often ICH, ECH, and LHCD) and current drive in presence of non axisymmetric magnetic perturbations, including tearing modes, drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co  -  I p direction. Also growing tearing modes provide a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to flatten the rotation profile and clamp it at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P aux absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in deposition or in the equilibrium configuration, but here we consider also the effect of the response of the so called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV), due to error fields, internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by a kinetic calculation, this offset velocity is a function of the absorbed heat and therefore of the injected auxiliary power, thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  8. Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Active Acoustics Lab (AAAL) is a state-of-the-art Undersea Warfare (USW) acoustic data analysis facility capable of both active and passive underwater...

  9. Evaluation of toroidal torque by non-resonant magnetic perturbations in tokamaks for resonant transport regimes using a Hamiltonian approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Christopher G.; Heyn, Martin F.; Kapper, Gernot; Kasilov, Sergei V.; Kernbichler, Winfried; Martitsch, Andreas F.

    2016-08-01

    Toroidal torque generated by neoclassical viscosity caused by external non-resonant, non-axisymmetric perturbations has a significant influence on toroidal plasma rotation in tokamaks. In this article, a derivation for the expressions of toroidal torque and radial transport in resonant regimes is provided within quasilinear theory in canonical action-angle variables. The proposed approach treats all low-collisional quasilinear resonant neoclassical toroidal viscosity regimes including superbanana-plateau and drift-orbit resonances in a unified way and allows for magnetic drift in all regimes. It is valid for perturbations on toroidally symmetric flux surfaces of the unperturbed equilibrium without specific assumptions on geometry or aspect ratio. The resulting expressions are shown to match the existing analytical results in the large aspect ratio limit. Numerical results from the newly developed code NEO-RT are compared to calculations by the quasilinear version of the code NEO-2 at low collisionalities. The importance of the magnetic shear term in the magnetic drift frequency and a significant effect of the magnetic drift on drift-orbit resonances are demonstrated.

  10. SKF TOROIDAL ROLLER BEARING CARB – PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT AND MAINTENANCE COST REDUCTION THROUGH RELIABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiberiu LAURIAN

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The CARB bearing is a single row bearing with long, slightly crowned symmetrical rollers. It combines the self-aligning capability of the spherical roller bearing with the unconstrained axial displacement ability of the cylindrical roller bearing. The optimal combination of both raceway profiles provides a favorable load distribution in the bearing, as well as low frictional running. This paper emphasizes the functioning characteristics of the SKF CARB toroidal roller bearing by means of a multibody dynamics simulation. Different conditions like load direction, races relative position or angular misalignment, are taken into consideration.

  11. A novel synthetic aperture technique for breast tomography with toroidal arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Simonetti, Francesco [IMPERIAL COLLEGE

    2009-01-01

    Ultrasound is commonly used as an adjunct to mammography for diagnostic evaluation of suspicions arising from breast cancer screening. As an alternative to conventional sonography that uses hand-held transducers, toroidal array probes that encircle the breast immersed in a water bath have been investigated for ultrasound tomography. This paper introduces a new method for three-dimensional synthetic aperture diffraction tomography that maximizes the resolution in the scanning direction and provides quantitative reconstructions of the acoustic properties of the object. The method is validated by means of numerical simulations.

  12. Demountable Toroidal Field Magnets for Use in a Compact Modular Fusion Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangiarotti, F. J.; Goh, J.; Takayasu, M.; Bromberg, L.; Minervini, J. V.; Whyte, D.

    2014-05-01

    A concept of demountable toroidal field magnets for a compact fusion reactor is discussed. The magnets generate a magnetic field of 9.2 T on axis, in a 3.3 m major radius tokamak. Subcooled YBCO conductors have a critical current density adequate to provide this large magnetic field, while operating at 20 K reduces thermodynamic cooling cost of the resistive electrical joints. Demountable magnets allow for vertical replacement and maintenance of internal components, potentially reducing cost and time of maintenance when compared to traditional sector maintenance. Preliminary measurements of contact resistance of a demountable YBCO electrical joint between are presented.

  13. Comparative investigation of ELM control based on toroidal modelling of plasma response to RMP fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2016-10-01

    The type-I edge localized mode (ELM), bursting at low frequency and with large amplitude, can channel a substantial amount of the plasma thermal energy into the surrounding plasma-facing components in tokamak devices operating at the high-confinement mode, potentially causing severe material damages. Learning effective ways of controlling this instability is thus an urgent issue in fusion research, in particular in view of the next generation large devices such as ITER and DEMO. Among other means, externally applied, three-dimensional resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields have been experimentally demonstrated to be successful in mitigating or suppressing the type-I ELM, in multiple existing devices. In this work, we shall report results of a comparative study of ELM control using RMPs. Comparison is made between the modelled plasma response to the 3D external fields and the observed change of the ELM behaviour on multiple devices, including MAST, ASDEX Upgrade, EAST, DIII-D, JET, and KSTAR. We show that toroidal modelling of the plasma response, based on linear and quasi-linear magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models, provides essential insights that are useful in interpreting and guiding the ELM control experiments. In particular, linear toroidal modelling results, using the MARS-F code, reveal the crucial role of the edge localized peeling-tearing mode response during ELM mitigation/suppression on all these devices. Such response often leads to strong peaking of the plasma surface displacement near the region of weak equilibrium poloidal field (e.g. the X-point), and this provides an alternative practical criterion for ELM control, as opposed to the vacuum field based Chirikov criteria. Quasi-linear modelling using MARS-Q provides quantitative interpretation of the side effects due to the ELM control coils, on the plasma toroidal momentum and particle confinements. The particular role of the momentum and particle fluxes, associated with the neoclassical toroidal

  14. Nonaxisymmetric Rossby vortex instability with toroidal magnetic fields in structured disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Cong [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Hui [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    We investigate the global nonaxisymmetric Rossby vortex instability (RVI) in a differentially rotating, compressible magnetized accretion disk with radial density structures. Equilibrium magnetic fields are assumed to have only the toroidal component. Using linear theory analysis, we show that the density structure can be unstable to nonaxisymmetric modes. We find that, for the magnetic field profiles we have studied, magnetic fields always provide a stabilizing effect to the unstable RVI modes. We discuss the physical mechanism of this stabilizing effect. The threshold and properties of the unstable modes are also discussed in detail. In addition, we present linear stability results for the global magnetorotational instability when the disk is compressible.

  15. Spectrally Efficient OFDMA Lattice Structure via Toroidal Waveforms on the Time-Frequency Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultan Aldirmaz

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the performance of frequency division multiplexed (FDM signals, where multiple orthogonal Hermite-Gaussian carriers are used to increase the bandwidth efficiency. Multiple Hermite-Gaussian functions are modulated by a data set as a multicarrier modulation scheme in a single time-frequency region constituting toroidal waveform in a rectangular OFDMA system. The proposed work outperforms in the sense of bandwidth efficiency compared to the transmission scheme where only single Gaussian pulses are used as the transmission base. We investigate theoretical and simulation results of the proposed methods.

  16. Toroidal Nuclear Matter Distributions of Superheavy Nuclei from Constrained Skyrme-HFB Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosior, Amelia [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland; Staszczak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland; Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2017-01-01

    Using the Hartree Fock Bogoliubov (HFB) self-consistent mean-field theory with the SkM* Skyrme energy-density functional, we study nuclear structure properties of even even superheavy nuclei (SHN) of Z = 120 isotopes and N = 184 isotones. The shape of the nucleus along the lowest energy curve as a function of the quadrupole moment Q20 makes a sud- den transition from the oblate spheroids (biconcave discs) to the toroidal shapes, in the region of large oblate quadrupole moments.

  17. Conceptual studies of toroidal field magnets for the tokamak experimental power reactor. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buncher, B.R.; Chi, J.W.H.; Fernandez, R.

    1976-10-26

    This report documents the principal results of a Conceptual Design Study for the Superconducting Toroidal Field System for a Tokamak Experimental Power Reactor. Two concepts are described for peak operating fields at the windings of 8 tesla, and 12 tesla, respectively. The design and manufacturing considerations are treated in sufficient detail that cost and schedule estimates could be developed. Major uncertainties in the design are identified and their potential impact discussed, along with recommendations for the necessary research and development programs to minimize these uncertainties. The minimum dimensions of a sub-size test coil for experimental qualification of the full size design are developed and a test program is recommended.

  18. Effects of energetic particles on zonal flow generation by toroidal Alfven eigenmode

    CERN Document Server

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2016-01-01

    Generation of zonal ow (ZF) by energetic particle (EP) driven toroidal Alfven eigenmode (TAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that, nonlinear resonant EP contri- bution dominates over the usual Reynolds and Maxwell stresses due to thermal plasma nonlinear response. ZF can be forced driven in the linear growth stage of TAE, with the growth rate being twice the TAE growth rate. The ZF generation mechanism is shown to be related to polarization induced by resonant EP nonlinearity. The generated ZF has both the usual meso-scale and micro- scale radial structures. Possible consequences of this forced driven ZF on the nonlinear dynamics of TAE are also discussed.

  19. Frequency Spectrum of Fluctuations Near a Rational Surface in a Toroidal Heliac

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zama, Tatsuya; Kitajima, Sumio; Takayama, Masakazu; Takeuchi, Nobunao; Watanabe, Hiroshige

    1993-03-01

    Density and space potential fluctuations have been studied in electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) plasma of a helical axis stellarator TU Heliac using Langmuir probe techniques. These fluctuations are coherent and global, which can be explained by a drift instability model in cylindrical geometry. A particular fluctuation mode vanishes inside a rational surface. The ratio of this mode, n/m, corresponds to the rotational transform \\includegraphics{dummy.eps} of this rational surface, (m, n: poloidal, toroidal fluctuation modes, respectively). This phenomenon near the rational surface can also be explained by a drift instability theory.

  20. Finite-orbit-width effects on the geodesic acoustic mode in the toroidally rotating tokamak plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Haijun

    2016-01-01

    The Landau damping of geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) in a torodial rotating tokamak plasma is analytically investigated by taking into account the finite-orbit-width (FOW) resonance effect to the 3rd order. The analytical result is shown to agree well with the numerical solution. The dependence of the damping rate on the toroidal Mach number $M$ relies on $k_r \\rho_i$. For sufficiently small $k_r \\rho_i$, the damping rate monotonically decreases with $M$. For relatively large $k_r \\rho_i$, the damping rate increases with $M$ until approaching the maximum and then decreases with $M$.

  1. Toroidal silicon polarization analyzer for resonant inelastic x-ray scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Xuan; Casa, Diego; Kim, Jungho; Gog, Thomas; Li, Chengyang; Burns, Clement

    2016-08-01

    Resonant Inelastic X-ray Scattering (RIXS) is a powerful probe for studying electronic excitations in materials. Standard high energy RIXS measurements do not measure the polarization of the scattered x-rays, which is unfortunate since it carries information about the nature and symmetry of the excitations involved in the scattering process. Here we report the fabrication of thin Si-based polarization analyzers with a double-concave toroidal surface, useful for L-edge RIXS studies in heavier atoms such as the 5-d transition metals.

  2. Poloidal flow and toroidal particle ring formation in a sessile drop driven by megahertz order vibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Amgad R; Yeo, Leslie Y; Friend, James R

    2014-09-23

    Poloidal flow is curiously formed in a microliter sessile water drop over 157-225 MHz because of acoustic streaming from three-dimensional standing Lamb waves in a lithium niobate substrate. The flow possesses radial symmetry with downwelling at the center and upwelling around the periphery of the drop. Outside this frequency range, the attenuation occurs over a length scale incompatible with the drop size and the poloidal flow vanishes. Remarkably, shear-induced migration was found to drive toroidal particle ring formation with diameters inversely proportional to the frequency of the acoustic irradiation.

  3. Transport of Parallel Momentum by Toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient Instability near Marginality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E.S. Yoon and T.S. Hahm

    2009-10-20

    The turbulent angular momentum flux carried by ions resonant with toroidal ion temperature gradient(ITG) instability is calculated via quasilinear calculation using the phase-space conserving gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame. The results near ITG marginality indicate that the inward turbulent equipartition (TEP) momentum pinch [Hahm T.S. et al 2007 Phys. Plasmas 14 072302] remains as the most robust part of pinch. In addition, ion temperature gradient driven momentum flux is inward for typical parameters, while density gradient driven momentum flux is outward as in the previous kinetic result in slab geometry [Diamond P.H. et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 012303].

  4. Using a priori knowledge for developing bolometric tomography in toroidal devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sano, Ryuichi; Peterson, Byron J.; Mukai, Kiyofumi; Teranishi, Masaru; Iwama, Naofumi; Kobayashi, Masahiro

    2016-11-01

    In tomographic imaging of magnetically confined toroidal plasmas, a countermeasure against missing observation has been studied in terms of the adoption of prior information based on modelled plasma profiles. The Tikhonov regularization for image reconstruction is extended by the use of the Euclidean distance. A procedure of model fitting is designed in order to adaptively generate the reference image. The new method is tested on a typical example of ill-conditioned tomography, that is, the three-dimensional imaging-bolometer tomography in the large helical device. It has been found that the new method is useful for diminishing artifacts and thus for better recognizing the radiation structure of plasma.

  5. Stabilisation of ballooning modes in torsatrons with an externally applied toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    It has been found that ideal ballooning modes can impose very restrictive volume average {beta} limits in torsatrons much below the typical values close to 5% that are required to be economically realisable as reactor systems and it has been shown that externally applied toroidal currents that are peaked can destabilise the Mercier criterion in this type of configuration. We will show here that if the applied currents are hollow, they can stabilise the ballooning modes without triggering Mercier instabilities and as a result raise the limiting {beta}* from 2% to 5%. (author) 3 figs., 10 refs.

  6. Static envelope patterns in composite resonances generated by level crossing in optical toroidal microcavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmon, Tal; Schwefel, Harald G L; Yang, Lan; Oxborrow, Mark; Stone, A Douglas; Vahala, Kerry J

    2008-03-14

    We study level crossing in the optical whispering-gallery (WG) modes by using toroidal microcavities. Experimentally, we image the stationary envelope patterns of the composite optical modes that arise when WG modes of different wavelengths coincide in frequency. Numerically, we calculate crossings of levels that correspond with the observed degenerate modes, where our method takes into account the not perfectly transverse nature of their field polarizations. In addition, we analyze anticrossing with a large avoidance gap between modes of the same azimuthal number.

  7. External kinks in plasmas with helical boundary deformation and net toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ardelea, A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1997-11-01

    The investigation of the global ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability of plasmas with helical boundary shape and nonvanishing toroidal plasma current constitutes the principal aim of this work. Global external modes with small values of m,n (typically n = 1,2,3 and m = n+1) are studied, where m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively. The first and main part of the work concentrates on fixed boundary equilibria generated by systematically varying parameters such as the type and the magnitude of the boundary deformation, the number of equilibrium field periods N{sub per}, the aspect ratio, the toroidal current density profile, {beta} and the pressure profile. Due to the periodicity of the equilibrium, couplings between Fourier perturbation components with different toroidal mode numbers n occur and lead to the apparition of families of modes. The study of a particular (m,n) mode has to take into account all (m{sub l}, n{sub l}) perturbation components with n{sub 1} belonging to the same family as n. The stability analysis is carried out in the parameter region where the inverse rotational transform (the safety factor in the traditional tokamak notation) q{<=}2.0 and {beta}{<=}2%. A particular property of the configurations investigated is that equilibrium Fourier components (m{sub e}, N{sub per}n{sub e}) which are involved in the couplings between the (m,n) mode studied and the (m{sub k},n{sub k}) perturbation components with m{sub k}>n{sub k}>n that exhibit resonances in the q>1 region are very small. As a consequence, the contributions of the (m,n)x(m{sub k},n{sub k}) couplings to the potential energy are very weak. It is shown that a helical boundary deformation can stabilize the n=1,2,3 external modes; if {delta} is a measure of the plasma boundary deformation, then windows of stability [{delta}{sub min}, {delta}{sub max}] may exist for a large variety of equilibrium parameters. (author) figs., tabs., 44 refs.

  8. Zonal flow driven by energetic particle during magneto-hydro-dynamic burst in a toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, S.; Fujisawa, A.; Shimizu, A.; Nakano, H.; Iguchi, H.; Yoshimura, Y.; Nagaoka, K.; Minami, T.; Isobe, M.; Nishimura, S.; Suzuki, C.; Akiyama, T.; Takahashi, C.; Takeuchi, M.; Ito, T.; Watari, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Itoh, S.-I.; Itoh, K.; Matsuoka, K.; Okamura, S.

    2007-11-01

    The internal structural measurements of electric field and density using twin heavy ion beam probes have been performed to elucidate the nonlinear evolution of the magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) bursty phenomenon driven by the interaction with high-energy particles in a toroidal plasma. The results have given the finest observation of the internal structure of plasma quantities, such as electric field, density and magnetic field distortion, which nonlinearly develop during the MHD phenomenon. In particular, the finding of a new kind of oscillating zonal flow driven by interaction between energetic particles and MHD modes should be emphasized for burning state plasmas.

  9. Controlling Confinement with Induced Toroidal Current in the Flexible Heliac TJ-II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, J. A.; Lopez-Bruna, D.; Lopez-Fraguas, A.; Ascasibar, E.; TJ-II Team

    2002-07-01

    A method to control plasma particle an energy confinement in the TJ-II Heliac devices is reported A small toroidal current is induced in the plasma with the aid of a 0.2 Wb air core transformer. Plasma particle and energy confinement improve (degrade) with negative (positive) plasma current. For typical TJ-II discharges plasma density and temperature broaden considerably when plasma current is sufficiently negative, accounting for a 40% increase in stored energy. The experimental results agree qualitatively with the paradigm of instability growth rate modifications with magnetic shear. (Author) 18 refs.

  10. A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation code for design of position and shape control on tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takase, Haruhiko [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Naka, Ibaraki (Japan). Naka Fusion Research Establishment; Senda, Ikuo

    1999-04-01

    A Toroidally Symmetric Plasma Simulation (TSPS) code has been developed for investigating the position and shape control on tokamak plasmas. The analyses of three-dimensional eddy currents on the conducting components around the plasma and the two-dimensional magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium are taken into account in this code. The code can analyze the plasma position and shape control during the minor disruption in which the deformation of plasma is not negligible. Using the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) parameters, some examples of calculations are shown in this paper. (author)

  11. The attenuation of Love waves and toroidal oscillations of the earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D. D.

    1971-01-01

    An attempt has been made to invert a large set of attenuation data for Love waves and toroidal oscillations in the earth, using a recent method by Backus and Gilbert. The difficulty in finding an acceptable model of internal friction which explains the data, under the assumption that the internal friction is independent of frequency, casts doubt on the validity of this assumption. A frequency-dependent model of internal friction is presented which is in good agreement with the seismic data and with recent experimental measurements of attenuation in rocks.

  12. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  13. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  14. Recent Advancements in Microwave Imaging Plasma Diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H. Park; C.C. Chang; B.H. Deng; C.W. Domier; A.J.H. Donni; K. Kawahata; C. Liang; X.P. Liang; H.J. Lu; N.C. Luhmann, Jr.; A. Mase; H. Matsuura; E. Mazzucato; A. Miura; K. Mizuno; T. Munsat; K. and Y. Nagayama; M.J. van de Pol; J. Wang; Z.G. Xia; W-K. Zhang

    2002-03-26

    Significant advances in microwave and millimeter wave technology over the past decade have enabled the development of a new generation of imaging diagnostics for current and envisioned magnetic fusion devices. Prominent among these are revolutionary microwave electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI), microwave phase imaging interferometers, imaging microwave scattering and microwave imaging reflectometer (MIR) systems for imaging electron temperature and electron density fluctuations (both turbulent and coherent) and profiles (including transport barriers) on toroidal devices such as tokamaks, spherical tori, and stellarators. The diagnostic technology is reviewed, and typical diagnostic systems are analyzed. Representative experimental results obtained with these novel diagnostic systems are also presented.

  15. Oscillations of magnetic stars: II. Axisymmetric toroidal and non-axisymmetric shear Alfven modes in a spherical shell

    CERN Document Server

    Reese, D; Rieutord, M

    2004-01-01

    We carry out numerical and mathematical investigations of shear Alfven waves inside of a spherical shell filled with an incompressible conducting fluid, and bathed in a strong dipolar magnetic field. We focus on axisymmetric toroidal and non-axisymmetric modes, in continuation of a previous work by Rincon & Rieutord (2003). Analytical expressions are obtained for toroidal eigenmodes and their corresponding frequencies at low diffusivities. These oscillations behave like magnetic shear layers, in which the magnetic poles play a key role, and hence become singular when diffusivities vanish. It is also demonstrated that non-axisymmetric modes are split into two categories, namely poloidal or toroidal types, following similar asymptotic behaviours as their axisymmetric counterparts when the diffusivities become arbitrarily small.

  16. On the toroidal current density flowing across a poloidal-magnetic-field null in an axisymmetric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2013-04-01

    The axisymmetry condition and two of Maxwell's equations are used to show that, in general, there are no nested magnetic surfaces around a poloidal-magnetic-field null for a sufficiently small value of the toroidal current density flowing there. Hence, the toroidal current density at the axis of a magnetic configuration with extreme shear reversal cannot continuously approach zero unless nested surfaces are first broken or particular values are assigned to boundary conditions and other plasma parameters. The threshold of the toroidal current-density at which the topology changes is shown to be set by such parameters, and some examples of the predicted topology transition are presented using analytical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation.

  17. On the toroidal current density flowing across a poloidal-magnetic-field null in an axisymmetric plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Paulo; Bizarro, Joao P. S. [Associacao Euratom-IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Universidade Tecnica de Lisboa, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2013-04-15

    The axisymmetry condition and two of Maxwell's equations are used to show that, in general, there are no nested magnetic surfaces around a poloidal-magnetic-field null for a sufficiently small value of the toroidal current density flowing there. Hence, the toroidal current density at the axis of a magnetic configuration with extreme shear reversal cannot continuously approach zero unless nested surfaces are first broken or particular values are assigned to boundary conditions and other plasma parameters. The threshold of the toroidal current-density at which the topology changes is shown to be set by such parameters, and some examples of the predicted topology transition are presented using analytical solutions of the Grad-Shafranov equation.

  18. The optical designing method and the concentrating performance analysis for a toroidal heliostat with spinning-elevation sun tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Minghuan [Himin Solar Energy Group, Dezhou (China); CAS, Inst. of Electrical Engineering, Beijing (China); Lu, Zhenwu [CAS, Changchun Inst. of Optics Fine Mechanics and Physics, Changchun (China). State Key Lab. of Applied Optics; Wang, Zhifeng [Himin Solar Energy Group, Dezhou (China)

    2008-07-01

    A practical optical designing method for and some optical simulation results of a toroidal surface heliostat with the two axis spinning-elevation sun tracking are presented in this paper, which will be used as a concentrator for a hydrogen generation system. As a prototype, this heliostat has a compound toroidal surface, which is composed of the 16 same toroidal mirror facets of 1 meter width and 1 meter height with the focal length 7.4689 meters, and the design concentration power of the heliostat is 6 kilowatts. The sampling ray-tracing method including the solar disk effect is introduced and used to analyze the optical performance of the heliostat. The optical errors of the heliostat and the attenuation of reflected solar irradiance in the air have not been taken into account yet. (orig.)

  19. Generation of microstripe cylindrical and toroidal mirrors by localized laser evaporation of fused silica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wlodarczyk, Krystian L; Thomson, Ian J; Baker, Howard J; Hall, Denis R

    2012-09-10

    We report a new technique for the rapid fabrication of microstripe cylindrical and toroidal mirrors with a high ratio (>10) of the two principal radii of curvature (RoC(1)/RoC(2)), and demonstrate their effectiveness as mode-selecting resonator mirrors for high-power planar waveguide lasers. In this process, the larger radius of curvature (RoC(1)) is determined by the planar or cylindrical shape of the fused silica substrate selected for laser processing, whilst the other (RoC(2)) is produced by controlled CO(2) laser-induced vaporization of the glass. The narrow stripe mirror aperture is achieved by applying a set of partially overlapped laser scans, with the incident laser power, the number of laser scans, and their spacing being used to control the curvature produced by laser evaporation. In this work, a 1 mm diameter laser spot is used to produce grooves of cylindrical/toroidal shape with 240 μm width and 16 mm length. After high reflectance coating, these grooves are found to provide excellent mode selectivity as resonator mirrors for a 150 μm core Yb:YAG planar waveguide laser, producing high brightness output at more than 300 W. The results show clearly that the laser-generated microstripe mirrors can improve the optical performance of high-power planar waveguide lasers when applied in a low-loss mode-selective resonator configuration.

  20. A Simulation Model for the Toroidal Ion Temperature Gradient Instability with Fully Kinetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturdevant, Benjamin; Parker, Scott; Chen, Yang

    2016-10-01

    A simulation model for the toroidal ITG mode in which the ions follow the primitive Lorentz force equations of motion is presented. Such a model can provide an important validation tool or replacement for gyrokinetic ion models in applications where higher order terms may be important. A number of multiple-scale simulation techniques are employed in this work, based on the previous success in slab geometry with an implicit orbit averaged and sub-cycled δf model. For the toroidal geometry model, we have derived a particle integration scheme based on variational principles, which is demonstrated to produce stable and accurate ion trajectories on long time scales. Orbit averaging and sub-cycling will be implemented with the variational integration scheme. The inclusion of equilibrium gradients in the fully kinetic δf formulation is achieved through the use of a guiding center coordinate transformation of the weight equation. Simulation results for the fully kinetic ion model will be presented for the cyclone base case and comparisons will be made with gyrokinetic ion models.