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Sample records for advanced toroidal facility torsatron

  1. Runaway studies in the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed torsatrons and heliotrons are susceptible to runaway electron formation and confinement resulting from the inherent good containment in the vacuum fields and the high loop voltages during the initiation and termination of the helical and vertical fields (''field ramping''). Because runaway electrons can cause an unacceptable level of hard X rays near the machine, a runaway suppression system was designed and included in the initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The main component of the system is a rotating paddle that is normally left in the vacuum chamber during the field ramps. This device proved to be very effective in reducing the runaway population. Measurements of hard X rays from ATF have shown that the runaways are produced primarily during the field ramping but that usually a small steady-state runaway component is also present during the ''flat-top'' portion of the fields. The paddle is the main source of the hard X rays (thick-target bremsstrahlung), although other objects in the vacuum chamber also serve as targets for the runaways at various times. The maximum X-ray energy found by pulse height analysis is /approximately/12--15 MeV; the mean energy appears to be a few mega-electron-volts. A noticeable forward peaking of the bremsstrahlung from the paddle is evident. The limiters do not appear to be major sources of bremsstrahlung. 17 refs., 14 figs

  2. Construction and initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) torsatron was designed on a physics basis for access to the second stability regime and on an engineering basis for independent fabrication of high-accuracy components. The actual construction, assembly, and initial operation of ATF are compared with the characteristics expected during the design of ATF. 31 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  3. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility]-2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies for a low-aspect-ratio, large next-generation stellarator, ATF-II, with high-current-density, high-field, stable NbTi/Cu helical windings are described. The design parameters are an average plasma radius of 0.52 m, a major radius of 2 m, and a field on axis of 4-5 T, with 10 to 15 MW of heating power. Such a device would be comparable in scope to other next-generation stellarators but would have roughly the same aspect ratio as the tokamaks without, however, the need for current drive to sustain steady-state operation. A number of low-aspect-ratio physics issues need to be addressed in the design of ATF-II, primarily compromises between high-beta capability and good confinement properties. A six-field-period Compact Torsatron is chosen as a reference design for ATF-II, and its main features and performance predictions are discussed. An integrated (beta capability and confinement) optimization approach and optimization of superconducting windings are also discussed. 36 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Stabilisation of ballooning modes in torsatrons with an externally applied toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.A. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale, Lausanne (Switzerland). Centre de Recherche en Physique des Plasma (CRPP)

    1996-09-01

    It has been found that ideal ballooning modes can impose very restrictive volume average {beta} limits in torsatrons much below the typical values close to 5% that are required to be economically realisable as reactor systems and it has been shown that externally applied toroidal currents that are peaked can destabilise the Mercier criterion in this type of configuration. We will show here that if the applied currents are hollow, they can stabilise the ballooning modes without triggering Mercier instabilities and as a result raise the limiting {beta}* from 2% to 5%. (author) 3 figs., 10 refs.

  5. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  6. A Experimental Study of Ion Behavior in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Mickey Ray

    Stellarators represent one of the most promising magnetic confinement concepts for a fusion reactor because of their intrinsic ability to operate at steady state, though legitimate concerns about various aspects of the stellarator concept must be addressed. One of these concerns is the seemingly unfavorable single-particle confinement properties inherent to the stellarator design. Although previous experimental studies of ion confinement in stellarators have indicated that the ions behave classically and are generally well confined, these studies were limited in scope. To complement these experiments and to provide additional information about ion behavior in stellarators, an experimental investigation of ion behavior has been performed on the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). Measurements were made of both the thermal- and fast-ion distributions during electron cyclotron heating (ECH) and neutral beam injection (NBI). The purpose of this work was to study thermal- and fast-ion confinement in ATF with particular emphasis placed on constructing a consistent picture of ion confinement based on experimentally measured data. The primary ion diagnostic used in these studies was a two -dimensional scanning neutral particle analyzer (NPA). Extensive studies of fast-ion behavior in various operating regimes on ATF were conducted. These studies were performed during NBI and encompass a wide range of plasma densities, ranging from extremely low density ( |{n}_{e} =q 8.0 times 10^ {13} cm^{-3}) . Fokker-Planck simulations of the measured data suggest that the injected ions behave classically and indicate that the injected beam power is not well absorbed at low and intermediate densities because of large charge-exchange and shine-through losses. Further simulations using the PROCTR transport analysis code indicate that this reduced absorption is probably the cause of the thermal collapse observed in intermediate-density NBI discharges. Thermal ion confinement studies were

  7. Ripple transport in helical-axis advanced stellarators - a comparison with classical stellarator/torsatrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the neoclassical transport rates due to particles trapped in the helical ripples of a stellarator's magnetic field are carried out, based on solutions of the bounce-averaged kinetic equation. These calculations employ a model for the magnetic field strength, B, which is an accurate approximation to the actual B for a wide variety of stellarator-type devices, among which are Helical-Axis Advanced Stellarators (Helias) as well as conventional stellarators and torsatrons. Comparisons are carried out in which it is shown that the Helias concept leads to significant reductions in neoclassical transport rates throughout the entire long-mean-free-path regime, with the reduction being particularly dramatic in the ν-1 regime. These findings are confirmed by numerical simulations. Further, it is shown that the behavior of deeply trapped particles in Helias can be fundamentally different from that in classical stellarator/torsatrons; as a consequence, the beneficial effects of a radial electric field on the transport make themselves felt at lower collision frequency than is usual. (orig.)

  8. Divertor for a torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The divertor for a torsatron comprising a toroidal vacuum chamber embracing the toroidal chamber of torsatron trap and communicating with it through the gaps between helical conductors of the system for creation of the trap magnetic field is described. The divertor comprises also a collector realized in a form of plates crossing magnetic field force lines. With the purpose of decreasing the plasma contamination level the collector plates realized curvilinear and embrace conductors at full their length and have the curvature less than that of the magnetic field force lines in the plate mounting point. The invention permits to decrease the plasma contamination by decreasing the particles flux formed as a result of collector plates errosion and accordingly increase plasma temperature in the trap

  9. MHD stability of torsatrons using the average method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of torsatrons is studied using the average method, or stellarator expansion. Attention is focused upon the Advanced Toroidal Fusion Device (ATF), an l = 2, 12 field period, moderate aspect ratio configuration which, through a combination of shear and toroidally induced magnetic well, is stable to ideal modes. Using the vertical field (VF) coil system of ATF it is possible to enhance this stability by shaping the plasma to control the rotational transform. The VF coils are also useful tools for exploring the stability boundaries of ATF. By shifting the plasma inward along the major radius, the magnetic well can be removed, leading to three types of long wavelength instabilities: (1) A free boundary ''edge mode'' occurs when the rotational transform at the plasma edge is just less than unity. This mode is stabilized by the placement of a conducting wall at 1.5 times the plasma radius. (2) A free boundary global kink mode is observed at high β. When either β is lowered or a conducting wall is placed at the plasma boundary, the global mode is suppressed, and (3) an interchange mode is observed instead. For this interchange mode, calculations of the second, third, etc., most unstable modes are used to understand the nature of the degeneracy breaking induced by toroidal effects. Thus, the ATF configuration is well chosen for the study of torsatron stability limits

  10. Compact Torsatron configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high Β should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite Β. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  11. Torsatron equilibrium and stability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium and stability results are presented for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device. The results of three-dimensional equilibrium calculations and free boundary average method calculations are shown to be in good agreement with previous fixed boundary average method results. These favorable comparisons serve as a valuable validation of the simple and computationally efficient fixed boundary average method. Stability calculations for the free boundary average method equilibria are also in good agreement with fixed boundary calculations, showing instability only when the plasma is shifted inward with an applied vertical field

  12. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  13. Observation of parallel viscosity in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damping of the toroidal velocity owing to parallel viscosity is observed in the plasma with a tangential neutral beam injection in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron device. Toroidal velocity profile is dominated by the perpendicular viscosity when magnetic field modulation is weak near axis. However, the parallel viscosity is found to be dominant when the modulation is strong enough and to increase in proportion to the square of the modulation of magnetic field. The absolute values of the viscosity agree with the neoclassical prediction within a factor of three. (author)

  14. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  15. Studies on magnetic surface structures and basic magnetic field properties in 'Ultimate' configurations of the L=1, m=13 torsatron and the 'Vint-20' torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is concerned with numerical investigations of various magnetic configurations of a single-pole toroidal L=1, m=13 'ultimate' torsatron having a low aspect ratio Ah=4.345 and the modulation factors (-0.23) ≤ α ≤ 0.71 (K=1, β=0) of the helix law -mφ=Θ-αK SinΘ-βK sin2Θ. The extremums of the basic properties of closed magnetic surfaces as functions of the coefficient α in the neighborhood of α ∼ 0.4, as well as the structures of the edge magnetic field (substructures of virtual current) and the separatrix have been first determined for the L=1, m=13 'ultimate' torsatron and the 'Vint-20' torsatron. Unusual positions of the separatrix X-points in the cross sections for 1/4- and 3/4-magnetic field periods have been identified. The formula that takes into account the modulation factor α of the helix law was first derived to determine the average vertical magnetic field on the geometrical axis of the torus.

  16. Advances in the Fabrication of Toroidal Field Coil Prototypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, A.; Cucchiaro, A.; Frosi, R.; Ramogida, G.; Boert, F.; Wobker, H. G.; Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Coppi, B.

    2006-10-01

    The Bitter-type Toroidal Field Coils (TFC) adopted for Ignitor consist of plates that are cooled down to 30 K by Helium gas. Copper OFHC has been selected for these plates, allowing for an Electron Beam (EB) welding solution of the cooling channels. Kabel Metal set up the welding parameters and qualified the process to achieve full joint penetration with acceptable metallurgical structure. The qualification covers both the welding of the cooling channels and the inlet/outlet tube made on two full size samples. A metallographic examination and vacuum and pressure tests have been preformed to validate the basic suitability of the EB welding process. *Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  17. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  18. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  19. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac

  20. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  1. Wisconsin Torsatron/Stellarator Program, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of the Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory during the present contract period has concentrated on several main areas. The confinement in IMS is being investigated under the conditions of an applied vertical magnetic field and with the insertion of a localized limiter. Excellent agreement between a simplified stochastic heating theory and the measured electron cyclotron breakdown and heating phases of the Proto-Cleo torsatron have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary currents and the ability to drive currents using Alfven waves are continuing on the Proto-Cleo stellarator. Theoretical efforts have concentrated on modelling the experimental devices, including 1-D transport modelling, particle-in-cell simulation and divertor field line following codes

  2. Wisconsin torsatron/stellarator program, FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposal documents recent activities within the University of Wisconsin-Madison Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory and presents plans for future research activities for a three year period. Research efforts have focused on fundamental stellarator physics issues through experimental investigations on the Interchangeable Module Stellarator (IMS) and the Proto-Cleo Stellarator. Theoretical activities and studies of new configurations are being undertaken to support and broaden the experimental program. Experimental research at the Torsatron Stellarator Laboratory has been primarily concerned with effects induced through electron-cyclotron resonant frequency plasma production and heating in the IMS device. Plasma electric fields have been shown to play a major role in particle transport and confinement in IMS. ECRF heating at 6 kG has produced electron tail populations in agreement with Monte-Carlo models. Electric and magnetic fields have been shown to alter the particle flows to the IMS modular divertors. 48 refs

  3. Design of the Compact Auburn Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design and optimization procedure for the Compact Auburn Torsatron. Included in this is a description of the Cary-Hanson Optimization technique. In this paper the properties of the magnetic fields are presented and a description of the machine and the construction procedure. The experimental setup for the surface mapping is described and conclusions are presented. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  4. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  5. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  6. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  7. Whistler mode based explanation for the fast reconnection rate measured in the mit versatile toroidal facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nagendra

    2011-12-01

    Despite the widely discussed role of whistler waves in mediating magnetic reconnection (MR), the direct connection between such waves and the MR has not been demonstrated by comparing the characteristic temporal and spatial features of the waves and the MR process. Using the whistler wave dispersion relation, we theoretically predict the experimentally measured rise time (τ(rise)) of a few microseconds for the fast rising MR rate in the Versatile Toroidal Facility at MIT. The rise time is closely given by the inverse of the frequency bandwidth of the whistler waves generated in the evolving current sheet. The wave frequencies lie much above the ion cyclotron frequency, but they are limited to less than 0.1% of the electron cyclotron frequency in the argon plasma. The maximum normalized MR rate R=0.35 measured experimentally is precisely predicted by the angular dispersion of the whistler waves.

  8. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waltz, R.E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kerbel, G.D.; Milovich, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hammett, G.W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-12-01

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical E{times}B rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons.

  9. Perspectives on low-aspect-ratio torsatron/heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of the low-aspect-ratio torsatron/heliotron configuration is discussed from the point of view of plasma confinement. Recent numerical results on the configuration study and the experimental data base are reviewed. (author)

  10. [Wisconsin Torsatron/Stellarator Program: FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory Program during the present period has concentrated on experimental investigations into ECR-produced plasmas in the IMS device. Significant progress has been made in understanding the role of convection in maintaining the hollow plasma density profiles under a wide range of operating conditions. Divertor studies have continued to show good agreement with predictions derived from simple field-line models and the ability to effect particle flows through biasing of divertor plates. Preliminary fluctuation studies showed a dependence of the amplitudes of the fluctuations and profile shapes as a function of the magnetic topology of the device. Theoretical support of the experimental program has provided models to help interpret the experimental results. New initiatives have begun in reduced-Q operation of the Proto-Cleo Stellarator, and in ion-Bernstein wave heating in IMS

  11. Experimental studies of radio frequency waves and confinement in the Auburn Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Auburn University Torsatron Group has been very active during the past year. The design of the new Compact Auburn Torsatron (CAT) was completed and construction is underway. Plasma experiments on the existing Auburn Torsatron in the areas of ICH and plasma microwave emission have also been carried out. Personnel from the Auburn Torsatron Group have also been involved in collaborative research with other research institutions, particularly the ATF Group at ORNL. Another significant development has been the Auburn Torsatron laboratory renovation project. Auburn University committed $75,000 to a laboratory upgrade in the Nuclear Science Center, the building which houses the Torsatron laboratory. The main result of this renovation is a doubling of the floor space in the Auburn Torsatron laboratory. This renovation work started on August 1, 1989 and is scheduled for completion on October 30, 1989

  12. Proto-CIRCUS Tilted-Coil Tokamak-Torsatron Hybrid: Design and Construction

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, A W; Hammond, K C; Kornbluth, Y; Spong, D A; Sweeney, R; Volpe, F A

    2014-01-01

    We present the field-line modeling, design and construction of a prototype circular-coil tokamak-torsatron hybrid called Proto-CIRCUS. The device has a major radius R = 16 cm and minor radius a < 5 cm. The six "toroidal field" coils are planar as in a tokamak, but they are tilted. This, combined with induced or driven plasma current, is expected to generate rotational transform, as seen in field-line tracing and equilibrium calculations. The device is expected to operate at lower plasma current than a tokamak of comparable size and magnetic field, which might have interesting implications for disruptions and steady-state operation. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced than in an equivalent tokamak in which the coils are not tilted. The tilted coils are interlocked, resulting in a relatively low aspect ratio, and can be moved, both radially and in tilt angle, between discharges. This capability will be exploited for detailed comparisons between calculations and field-line mapping me...

  13. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-06-24

    U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

  14. TOREX-4: a torsatron proof of principle experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOREX-4 is a torsatron Proof of Principle experiment designed to simultaneously achieve ntau approx. = to 5 x 1013, n approx. = to 5 x 1014/cm3, and T greater than or equal to 1 keV. TOREX-4 is capable of operating without externally driven currents; sufficient neutral beam power to reach betas of 2 to 5% is provided. The unique 4(+2) constant pitch angle winding configuration allows the reliable design of large systems with far greater experimental flexibility than can be achieved in conventional stellarators of comparable size. This will allow investigation of the basic physics questions of the torsatron configuration over a wide range of plasma properties and field configurations without sacrifice of the Proof of Principle goals

  15. Radial electric field in JET advanced tokamak scenarios with toroidal field ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated campaign has been run on JET to study the effect of toroidal field (TF) ripple on plasma performance. Radial electric field measurements from experiments on a series of plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) and different levels of ripple amplitude are presented. They have been calculated from charge exchange measurements of impurity ion temperature, density and rotation velocity profiles, using the force balance equation. The ion temperature and the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocities are compared in plasmas with both reversed and optimized magnetic shear profiles. Poloidal rotation velocity (vθ) in the ITB region is measured to be of the order of a few tens of km s-1, significantly larger than the neoclassical predictions. Increasing levels of the TF ripple are found to decrease the ion temperature gradient in the ITB region, a measure for the quality of the ITB, and the maximum value of vθ is reduced. The poloidal rotation term dominates in the calculations of the total radial electric field (Er), with the largest gradient in Er measured in the radial region coinciding with the ITB.

  16. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  17. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles

  18. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  19. Advanced toroidal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At high collisionality the neoclassical theory of transport in tokamaks predicts that the electron confinement time τe will exceed the ion confinement time τi by a factor roughly equal to the square root of the mass ratio mi/me. If the energy confinement time τE is calculated from the normalized particle confinement time τ through division by an emperical factor of three times the magnetic field strength B, then the theoretical confinement time of the ions exceeds experimental measurements by a factor of as much as three. The prediction that the electron confinement time will be two orders of magnitude larger is referred to as anomalous electron transport. We assert that the anomaly can be explained by imposing a strict requirement of quasineutrality to determine the electric potential instead of allowing it to be found from conservation of momentum. Numerical evidence for this contention is provided by performing Monte Carlo calculations based on a fast new computer code called TRAN

  20. Advanced toroidal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: equilibrium and transport; including turbulent transport; stability; wave propagation; statistical data analysis; computational algorithms and computer simulations; and general plasma science

  1. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  2. The ORNL Advanced Toroidal Facility: Physics insight leads to efficient computer-aided construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for accurate measurement of complex parts that contain no reference points is described. The technique is applied to the production of accurate castings, to their machining, and to their installation. Accuracies of /approximately/ 2 mil can be achieved over distances of 7 ft. 3 figs

  3. Transport modeling of ECH and neutral-beam-heated plasmas in the advanced toroidal facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.; Horton, L.D.; Crume, E.C.; Harris, J.H.; Isler, R.C.; Wilgen, J.B.; Wing, W.R.

    1989-01-01

    Results of time-dependent transport modeling of the ATF plasmas are compared with a typical ungettered, neutral-beam-heated discharge. A summary of ATF machine parameters is given by Murakami. The model is adjusted to give agreement between measured diagnostics signals and the corresponding values inferred from the model plasma. With this agreement, the main features of the discharge are reproduced including the radiation-induced temperature collapse. 7 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Advanced facilities for radiochemistry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaflets in this folder describe the latest addition to Harwell's active handling capability. This is a high level alpha, beta, gamma facility designed specifically for undertaking chemical research and development work. It is based on using high integrity containment boxes which are housed in concrete shielded enclosures. The active boxes can be removed and transferred remotely to a support area where they, and any associated equipment, can be decontaminated and serviced whilst a new fully commissioned box can be readily brought into service. The facility fulfills the principle of ALARA and is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a wide range of active handling requirements. It is supported by a suite of medium active handling cells, radiochemical laboratories and, as necessary, facilities of other scientific and engineering disciplines. The leaflets are: report on conceptual aspects; Techsheet 'Remote handling facility - Salient information'; Techsheet 'Project capabilities'; and 4 sheets of diagrams showing details of the facility. (U.K.)

  5. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  6. On vacuum field properties of the URAGAN-2M Torsatron standard configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum field properties of the URAGAN-2M Torsatron are investigated. In the 'Standard Case', within a certain range of field parameters, the size of the observed magnetic islands at τ = 2/3 can be reduced considerably. Some characteristic quantities for stellarator vacuum fields are reported. (orig.)

  7. An advanced irradiation facilities and its usage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A carrier type gamma irradiator is an advanced device currently installed in Qingdao Irradiation Center (QIC) and has been put into operation for nine years in Qingdao, China. It utilizes Co-60 as the radiation source; the initial Co-60 loading is 1.48×1016Bq (0.4 million Curies). Rubber, natural and synthetic polymers, heat-shrinkable films and tubes, disposable medical supplies, some foods and drugs have been irradiated for test in the past. Especially a great success achieved on the radiation of compound food for young shrimp. The practice demonstrates that the bacteria in the compound food can be destroyed by the irradiation at optimum dosage between 5 000-6 000 Gy.

  8. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  9. Review of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) materials irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the workshop was to document as accurately as possible the present and future needs for neutron irradiation capacity and facilities as related to the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) which will be the next generation steady-state research reactor. The report provides the findings and recommendations of the working group. After introductory and background information is presented, the discussion includes the status of the ANS design, in particular in-core materials irradiation facilities design and important experimental parameters. The summary of workshop discussions describes a survey of irradiation-effects research community and opportunities for ex-core irradiation facilities. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  10. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility(ACPF) and hotcell system technologies were developed in this program for demonstrating safely and effectively the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process(ACP) on a lab-scale. With the analysis of work flow and characteristics of the process, ACP was successively demonstrated on a lab-scale experiments and the performance of process was evaluated. The hotcell system was comprehensively evaluated with those results and the design data for the engineering-scale demonstration was derived to propose the direction for the future research and development. The main items performed in this project were as follows. - The reconstruction of ACPF hotcell and demonstration of the ACP - The design and operation technologies for α-γ type nuclear hot cell facility - The overall evaluation of the performance, safety and operation ability of the hotcell system - The acquisition of the government licences for construction and operation and the IAEA licence for using nuclear materials The results of safety analysis and environmental effects assessment and performance data for ACPF had been used for acquiring the government licence for facility operation. The valuable experiences on pyroprocess facility design and operation knowledges would be applied to new Mock-up Facility being scheduled to be a previous stage facility of Integrated Pyroprocess Facility

  11. Axisymmetric Toroidal Equilibrium with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    石秉仁

    2002-01-01

    Problem of the axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium with pure sheared toroidal flow is involved. For standard tokamak equilibrium, general approximate solutions are analytically pursued for arbitrary current profile and non-circular cross-section. Equilibrium properties including the flow-induced density asymmetry are analyzed.

  12. Toroidal circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  14. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  15. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility: advancing nuclear technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a Users Week, internships, faculty student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In addition, the ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  16. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  17. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m2, basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc

  18. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. W.; Park, J. S.; Kwon, S.J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, I. J.; Yu, C. H

    2003-09-01

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m{sup 2}, basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc.

  19. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  20. Facility level thermal systems for the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, LeEllen; Murga, Gaizka; Fraser, Mark; Climent, Tània

    2012-09-01

    The management and control of the local aero-thermal environment is critical for success of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST). In addition to minimizing disturbances to local seeing, the facility thermal systems must meet stringent energy efficiency requirements to minimize impact on the surrounding environment and meet federal requirements along with operational budgetary constraints. This paper describes the major facility thermal equipment and systems to be implemented along with associated energy management features. The systems presented include the central plant, the climate control systems for the computer room and coudé laboratory, the carousel cooling system which actively controls the surface temperature of the rotating telescope enclosure, and the systems used for active and passive ventilation of the telescope chamber.

  1. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  2. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  3. Experimental equipment for an advanced ISOL facility[Isotope Separation On-Line Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baktash, C.; Lee, I.Y.; Rehm, K.E.

    1999-03-01

    This report summarizes the proceedings and recommendations of the Workshop on the Experimental Equipment for an Advanced ISOL Facility which was held at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on July 22--25, 1998. The purpose of this workshop was to discuss the performance requirements, manpower and cost estimates, as well as a schedule of the experimental equipment needed to fully exploit the new physics which can be studied at an advanced ISOL facility. An overview of the new physics opportunities that would be provided by such a facility has been presented in the White Paper that was issued following the Columbus Meeting. The reactions and experimental techniques discussed in the Columbus White Paper served as a guideline for the formulation of the detector needs at the Berkeley Workshop. As outlined a new ISOL facility with intense, high-quality beams of radioactive nuclei would provide exciting new research opportunities in the areas of: the nature of nucleonic matter; the origin of the elements; and tests of the Standard Model. After an introductory section, the following equipment is discussed: gamma-ray detectors; recoil separators; magnetic spectrographs; particle detectors; targets; and apparatus using non-accelerated beams.

  4. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  5. Induced toroid structures and toroid polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency-dependent toroid dipole polarizability γ(ω) of a (nonrelativistic, spinless) hydrogen-like atom in its ground state is calculated analytically in terms of two Gauss hypergeometric functions. The static result reads simply γ(ω=0)=(23/60)α2Z-4a05 (α - fine structure constant, Z - nucleus charge number, a0 - Bohr radius). Comparing the present evaluations for H-like atoms with previous ones for pions, one sees that the role of the induced toroid moments (as against that of the usual electric ones) increases considerably when passing from atomic to particle physics

  6. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  7. Axisymmetric Toroidal Equilibrium with Sheared Toroidal Flows

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    Since the early 1960' s, the developments of the tokamak research make plasma flows a reality in many devices where neutral beam injections were used as heating in general and refueling in particular. Compared to the static axi-symmetric toroidal equilibrium that

  8. Conceptual design study advanced concepts test (ACT) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.

    1978-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) Project is part of program for developing improved power plant dry cooling systems in which ammonia is used as a heat transfer fluid between the power plant and the heat rejection tower. The test facility will be designed to condense 60,000 lb/hr of exhaust steam from the No. 1 turbine in the Kern Power Plant at Bakersfield, CA, transport the heat of condensation from the condenser to the cooling tower by an ammonia phase-change heat transport system, and dissipate this heat to the environs by a dry/wet deluge tower. The design and construction of the test facility will be the responsibility of the Electric Power Research Institute. The DOE, UCC/Linde, and the Pacific Northwest Laboratories will be involved in other phases of the project. The planned test facilities, its structures, mechanical and electrical equipment, control systems, codes and standards, decommissioning requirements, safety and environmental aspects, and energy impact are described. Six appendices of related information are included. (LCL)

  9. Invisibility cloaks for toroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-04-13

    The material properties of toroidal invisibility cloaks are derived based on the coordinate transformation method. The permittivity and permeability tensors for toroidal cloaks are substantially different from those for spherical cloaks, but quite similar to those for 2D cylindrical cloaks because a singularity is involved at the inner boundary in both the cases. The cloaking effect is confirmed by the electric field distribution in the vicinity of toroidal cloaks simulated from the generalized discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. This study extends the concept of electromagnetic cloaking of arbitrarily-shaped objects to a complex geometry. PMID:19365485

  10. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  11. Radiation Monitoring System in Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process is under development for effective management of spent fuel by converting UO2 into U-metal. For demonstration of this process, α-γ type new hot cell was built in the IMEF basement . To secure against radiation hazard, this facility needs radiation monitoring system which will observe the entire operating area before the hot cell and service area at back of it. This system consists of 7 parts; Area Monitor for γ-ray, Room Air Monitor for particulate and iodine in both area, Hot cell Monitor for hot cell inside high radiation and rear door interlock, Duct Monitor for particulate of outlet ventilation, Iodine Monitor for iodine of outlet duct, CCTV for watching workers and material movement, Server for management of whole monitoring system. After installation and test of this, radiation monitoring system will be expected to assist the successful ACP demonstration

  12. Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Bonnema

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities (AEDG-SHC was recently completed. It is the sixth document in a series of guides designed to achieve 30% savings over the minimum code requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999. The guide [1] is available for print purchase or as a free download from http://www.ashrae.org/aedg and provides user-friendly assistance and recommendations for the building design, construction, and owner communities to achieve energy savings. Included in the guide are prescriptive recommendations for quality assurance and commissioning; design of the building envelope; fenestration; lighting systems (including electric lighting and daylighting; heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC systems; building automation and controls; outside air (OA treatment; and service water heating (SWH. The guide educates, provides practical recommendations for exceeding code minimums, and provides leadership to help design teams and owners produce higher efficiency commercial buildings.

  13. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  14. Advanced neutron diagnostics for the Nova laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on recent work addressing advanced neutron diagnostics to be implemented on the Nova laser facility. The goals of these instruments are to measure the following properties of laser fusion targets: compressed fuel areal-density (Rho-R), time-duration, and spatial extent of the neutron emission. The authors will discuss the use of a noval time-of-flight system, radiochemical techniques, and the use of plastic track detectors to measure the compressed Rho-R. The authors will present the design of two proposed instruments to measure the burn time; one uses a sandwich of thin layers of plastic scintillator and uranium coupled to a streak camera while the other design makes use of a neutron sensitive transmission line. Finally, the authors will discuss methods capable of obtaining neutron images of the compressed pellet core

  15. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the X-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft X-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15th ergs/sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  16. Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Delivery Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, has notified NASA that it will be unable to deliver the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, FL, on June 1, 1998, as required by contract, because it has experienced delays in assembly and testing of the facility. TRW is NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. NASA and contractor officials met at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, this week to discuss the issue. While no new delivery date was agreed upon, the agency has directed TRW to develop a plan of action that would show how the contractor can minimize impact to the June 1 delivery. Although a delay in delivery could delay the launch, currently scheduled for August 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-93 mission, and could result in additional program costs, the exact impact is not yet known. "The delay in delivery of the observatory is unfortunate," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center observatory projects office manager in Huntsville, AL. "However, our first priority is to launch a world-class observatory which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements. We will work closely with TRW to ensure that happens." The delay is primarily due to TRW's difficulty in configuring and programming its Integrated Spacecraft Automated Test System to test the observatory before it is delivered to NASA. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is expected to play a vital role in answering fundamental questions about the universe, including its age and size, and will probe the nature and amounts of so-called "dark matter," providing unique insight into one of nature's great puzzles. The observatory also will allow scientists to see and measure the details of hot gas clouds in clusters of galaxies; observe X-rays generated when stars are torn apart by the incredibly strong gravity around massive black holes in the centers of galaxies; and provide images that will help understand how exploding stars

  17. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  18. Experimental studies of radio frequency waves and confinement in the Auburn Torsatron. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first year of operation of the Auburn Torsatron has resulted in the majority of the basic operating systems becoming operational or nearly operational. The diagnostic systems now include two microwave interferometers, a monochrometer, several probes and photodiodes. The plasma is produced by any of three sources: electron cyclotron heating with a cw power of 1 kW, low frequency rf heating with power soon to come up to 10 kW cw, and a pulsed washer-stack gun. The magnetic field studies have mapped the field surfaces and several corrections have been made to center the plasma. The ion-cyclotron source and antenna are nearly ready for experiments to begin

  19. Towards an advanced hadron facility at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Henry A.

    1988-11-01

    In the 1987 AHF Workshop, it was pointed out that activation of the accelerator is a serious problem. At this workshop, it was suggested that a new type of slow extraction system is needed to reduce the activation. We report on the response to this need. The Los Alamos plan is reviewed including as elements the long lead-time R&D in preparation for a 1993 construction start, a menu of accelerator designs, improved losses at injection and extraction time, active participation in the development of PSR, an accelerated hardware R&D program, and close collaboration with TRIUMF. We review progress on magnets and power supplies, on ceramic vacuum chambers, and on ferrite-tuned rf systems. We report on the plan for a joint TRIUMF-Los Alamos main-ring cavity to be tested in PSR in 1989. The problem of beam losses is discussed in detail and a recommendation for a design procedure for the injection system is made. This recommendation includes taking account of single Coulomb scattering, a painting scheme for minimizing foil hits, and a collimator and dump system for containing the expected spills. The slow extraction problem is reviewed and progress on an improved design is discussed. The problem of designing the accelerators for minimum operation and maintenance cost is briefly discussed. The question of the specifications for an advanced hadron facility is raised and it is suggested that the Los Alamos Proposal of a dual energy machine—1.6 GeV and 60 GeV—is a better match to the needs of the science program than the single-energy proposals made elsewhere. It is suggested that design changes need be made in all of the world's hadron facility proposals to prepare for high-intensity operation.

  20. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  1. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

    2009-05-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  2. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  3. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  4. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  5. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans‐Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp‐Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM‐CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM‐CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM‐CFs, German Bio‐Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM‐CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463–479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  6. Drift in toroidal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  7. Solve: a non linear least-squares code and its application to the optimal placement of torsatron vertical field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational method was developed which alleviates the need for lengthy parametric scans as part of a design process. The method makes use of a least squares algorithm to find the optimal value of a parameter vector. Optimal is defined in terms of a utility function prescribed by the user. The placement of the vertical field coils of a torsatron is such a non linear problem

  8. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  9. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  10. Elongated toroid fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for achieving ignition of a plasma with ohmic heating is described comprising: means for defining a toroidal plasma chamber,a and confining gas therein, and means including electrically conductive coils for generating plasma within the chamber and for confining and shaping such plasma substantially into and filling a predetermined single region of the chamber without an axisymmetric internal separatix and ohmically heating the confined plasma to ignition. The predetermined region is toroidal with a major axis defining an axial direction parallel thereto and a transaxial direction perpendicular to the axis and having an axial cross section with an elongation, k, greater than 4, where k is the ratio of the maximum axial dimension of the cross section to the maximum transaxial dimension of the cross section

  11. Concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The acceleration of beams of unstable nuclei has opened up new research frontiers. Experiments at existing accelerators, and particularly at the first generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, have demonstrated convincingly that unique information becomes accessible. Critical cross sections for astrophysical processes that were impossible to obtain previously, qualitatively new and unexpected nuclear structure effects in nuclei far from stability, completely new approaches to studies of nuclear decays, reactions and structure, all have triggered much excitement for this new dimension in nuclear research. To explore this new dimension, an extension of present technical capabilities and facilities is needed. This need and its scientific basis were discussed in various workshops and symposia and in the Isospin Laboratory (ISL) White Paper. A report by the European community was published recently on prospects of radioactive beam facilities in Europe, and some next-generation projects for such facilities are starting in both Europe and Japan.

  12. The advanced containment experiments (ACE) radioiodine test facility experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) program are reported. This study consisted of four intermediate-scale experiments that investigated the effects of radiation, pH, surfaces and initial iodine speciation on iodine behaviour. The tests revealed that, in high radiation fields, the long-term volatility of iodine is independent of the initial iodine speciation (CsI, I2, CH3I). This is presumably because radiolytic reactions inter-convert aqueous iodine species; I- was the predominant aqueous iodine species after an absorbed dose of about 30-40 kGy. Tests at pH 9 and 5.5 demonstrated that iodine volatility increased significantly with decreasing pH. In addition, this study demonstrated that containment surfaces can play an important role in determining iodine volatility, gas and aqueous phase iodine speciation, and surface adsorption. In summary: The ACE/RTF experiments have demonstrated the importance of several factors on iodine behaviour within containment under reactor accident conditions. One of the most important factors was radiation. Without radiation, the volatility of iodine was dependent on the initial speciation of iodine, presumably because inter-conversion of iodine species by non-radiolytic reactions is relatively slow. In contrast, in the presence of radiation, the long-term volatility of iodine was independent of initial speciation. This is attributed to aqueous phase radiolytic reactions that result in rapid inter-conversion of iodine species. Iodine volatility was shown to increase significantly with decreasing pH. However, changing the pH from acidic to alkaline conditions did not result in rapid decreases in iodine volatility. This may have been due to desorption of volatile iodine species from surfaces, in the case of stainless steel, and the influence of organics in the epoxy tests. Surfaces were shown to influence iodine volatility and speciation. Higher gas phase iodine concentrations were

  13. Shafranov shift in low-aspect-ratio heliotron/torsatron CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MHD equilibrium properties of neutral-beam-heated plasmas have been experimentally investigated in the Compact Helical System (CHS), a low-aspect-ratio (Ap ∼ 5) heliotron/torsatron. This configuration is characterized by a strong breaking of helical symmetry. The radial profiles measured by various diagnostics have shown significant Shafranov shift due to plasma pressure. The deviation of the magnetic axis from its vacuum position has reached 50% of the minor radius. When the three-dimensional equilibrium code VMEC is used to reconstruct the equilibrium from the experimental data, the result is in good agreement with the experimentally observed Shafranov shift as well as the diamagnetic pressure in plasmas with ≤ 1.2% and β0 ≤ 3.3%. This β value corresponds to half of the conventional equilibrium β limit defined by the Shafranov shift reaching a value of half the minor radius. Although tangential neutral beam injection has caused pressure anisotropies p parallel/p perpendicular ≤ 3, the description of the equilibrium assuming isotropic pressure is consistent with the experiment. (author)

  14. Recent progress on the National Ignition Facility advanced radiographic capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegner, P.; Bowers, M.; Chen, H.; Heebner, J.; Hermann, M.; Kalantar, D.; Martinez, D.

    2016-01-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a megajoule (million-joule)-class laser and experimental facility built for Stockpile Stewardship and High Energy Density (HED) science research [1]. Up to several times a day, 192 laser pulses from NIF's 192 laser beamlines converge on a millimeter-scale target located at the center of the facility's 10-meter diameter target chamber. The carefully synchronized pulses, typically a few nanoseconds (billionths of a second) in duration and co-times to better than 20 picoseconds (trillionths of a second), a deliver a combined energy of up to 1.8 megajoules and a peak power of 500 terawatts (trillion watts). Furthermore, this drives temperatures inside the target to tens of millions of degrees and pressures to many billion times greater than Earth's atmosphere.

  15. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 22-27, 1988, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, and accelerator hardware. The parallel sessions were particularly lively with discussions of all facets of kaon factory design. The workshop provided an opportunity for communication among the staff involved in hadron facility planning from all the study groups presently active. The recommendations of the workshop include: the need to use h=1 RF in the compressor ring; the need to minimize foil hits in painting schemes for all rings; the need to consider single Coulomb scattering in injection beam los calculations; the need to study the effect of field inhomogeneity in the magnets on slow extraction for the 2.2 Tesla main ring of AHF; and agreement in principle with the design proposed for a joint Los Alamos/TRIUMF prototype main ring RF cavity

  16. Advanced materials analysis facility at CSIRO HIAF laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R. [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics Div.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.

    1993-12-31

    The HIAF facility at North Ryde, based on a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been operating for several years. Initially three ion sources were in operation:- conventional duoplasmatrons for proton and helium beams and a sputter ion source for heavy ions. An electrostatic focusing system was designed and built in-house for providing microbeams. The research emphasis has been largely on microbeam PIXE with particular reference to the mining industry. An AMS system was added in 1990 which prevented the inclusion of the charge exchange canal required for helium beams. The facility has been operated by CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining. At the beginning of 1992, the lon Beam Technology Group of CSIRO Division of Applied Physics was relocated at Lindfield and became a major user of the HIAF facility. Because the research activities of this group involved Rutherford Backscattering and Channeling, it was necessary to add a helium ion source and a new high vacuum beam line incorporating a precision goniometer. These facilities became operational in the second quarter of 1992. Currently a PIXE system is being added to the chamber containing the goniometer, making the accelerator an extremely versatile one for a wide range of IBA techniques. 3 refs.

  17. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  18. Advanced Process Monitoring Techniques for Safeguarding Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orton, Christopher R.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Peper, Shane M.

    2010-11-30

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has established international safeguards standards for fissionable material at spent fuel reprocessing plants to ensure that significant quantities of weapons-grade nuclear material are not diverted from these facilities. For large throughput nuclear facilities, it is difficult to satisfy the IAEA safeguards accountancy goal for detection of abrupt diversion. Currently, methods to verify material control and accountancy (MC&A) at these facilities require time-consuming and resource-intensive destructive assay (DA). Leveraging new on-line non destructive assay (NDA) process monitoring techniques in conjunction with the traditional and highly precise DA methods may provide an additional measure to nuclear material accountancy which would potentially result in a more timely, cost-effective and resource efficient means for safeguards verification at such facilities. By monitoring process control measurements (e.g. flowrates, temperatures, or concentrations of reagents, products or wastes), abnormal plant operations can be detected. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing on-line NDA process monitoring technologies, including both the Multi-Isotope Process (MIP) Monitor and a spectroscopy-based monitoring system, to potentially reduce the time and resource burden associated with current techniques. The MIP Monitor uses gamma spectroscopy and multivariate analysis to identify off-normal conditions in process streams. The spectroscopic monitor continuously measures chemical compositions of the process streams including actinide metal ions (U, Pu, Np), selected fission products, and major cold flowsheet chemicals using UV-Vis, Near IR and Raman spectroscopy. This paper will provide an overview of our methods and report our on-going efforts to develop and demonstrate the technologies.

  19. On the Toroidal Leibniz Algebras

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong LIU; Lei LIN

    2008-01-01

    Toroidal Leibniz algebras are the universal central extensions of the iterated loop algebras gOC[t±11 ,...,t±v1] in the category of Leibniz algebras. In this paper, some properties and representations of toroidal Leibniz algebras are studied. Some general theories of central extensions of Leibniz algebras are also obtained.

  20. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2012-01-01

    existing provisions that have been put into existence to advance safety objectives due to synergy effects could be expected advance security objectives as well. The paper provides a conceptual definition of safety and security and presents a framework of their essential components. Key differences...... are presented. A safety framework is examined with the intent to identify security elements potentially covered. Vice versa, a security framework is examined with the intent to identify safety elements potentially covered. It is concluded that synergies are largely absent at the preventive level. Synergies...

  1. Gantry optimization of the Shanghai Advanced Proton Therapy facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴军; 杜涵文; 薛; 潘家珍; 杜月斐; 龙亚文

    2015-01-01

    A proton therapy system is a large medical device to treat tumors. Its gantry is of large structure and high precision. A new half-gantry was designed in the Shanghai Advanced Proton Therapy (SAPT) project. In this paper, the weight of gantry in design is reduced significantly by size and structure optimizations, to improve its cost-effectiveness, while guaranteeing the functions and precision. The processes of physics optimization, empirical design optimization, topological optimization and size optimization, together with factors of consid-eration, are described. The gantry weight is reduced by 30%, with the same precision.

  2. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  3. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  4. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques

  5. Selected publications related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, 1987--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contain papers on work related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source. The general topics of these papers are: insertion devices; front ends; high heat load x-ray optics; novel optics and techniques; and radiation safety, interlocks, and personnel safety

  6. Toroidal Multipole Confinement Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confinement of plasma is studied in the General Atomic toroidal octopole machine. The magnetic field is produced by four current carrying rings supported inside a contoured conductor. The rings are energized by a transformer core linking the machine. The major radius of the machine is 63.5 cm with an aspect ratio of 5. The magnetic field on the minor axis is zero and increases to 3500 G at the wall between the rings. After crowbarring, the field decays in 6 msec to its half value. The MHD stability calculation has been carried out and the stability is assured up to the plasma pressure of 1016 eV cm-3. Hydrogen plasmas from either a coaxial gun or a pinch gun with ion energies of 50 to 200 eV and with densities of 1014 cm-3 are successfully injected through a port located at the outer conductor wall. After the injection, plasma spreads azimuthally, filling the machine. Electric probes, magnetic probes, and calorimetric probes have been used extensively. Optical spectrometers and particle detectors are also used. The initial plasma density of 1013 cm-'3 decays with a time constant of 700 μsec. The electron temperature decays more quickly in about 100 μsec. No electric or magnetic fluctuations have been observed on any of the probes. Since no provision is made to avoid the plasma loss to the ring supports which penetrate the plasma region, the decay of ion temperature may be attributed to the support loss. (author)

  7. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  8. Characteristics of the three-half-turn-antenna-driven RF discharge in the Uragan-3M torsatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor’eva, L. I.; Chechkin, V. V., E-mail: chechkin@ipp.kharkov.ua; Moiseenko, V. E.; Grekov, D. L.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Lozin, A. V.; Tarasov, I. K.; Kulaga, A. Ye.; Zamanov, N. V.; Tretiak, K. K.; Kozulya, M. M.; Beletskii, A. A.; Kasilov, A. A.; Mironov, Yu. K.; Romanov, V. S.; Voitsenya, V. S. [National Science Center Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Institute of Plasma Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-12-15

    In the ℓ = 3 Uragan-3M torsatron hydrogen plasma is produced by RF fields in the Alfvén range of frequencies (ω ≤ ω{sub ci}). The initial (target) plasma with the line-averaged density of units 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} is produced by a frame antenna with a broad spectrum of generated parallel wavenumbers. After this, to heat the plasma and bring its density to ∼10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}, another, shorter wavelength three-half-turn antenna with large transverse currents is used. The behavior of the density, electron temperature, and loss of the plasma supported by the three-half-turn antenna is studied depending on the RF power fed to the antenna and initial values of the density and electron temperature supplied by the frame antenna.

  9. Determination of 2-dimensional temperature and density profiles of a plasma in the Auburn torsatron via computer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early studies of the magnetic surfaces of the Auburn Torsatron indicated the presence of an X-point in the magnetic surfaces. Both theoretical calculations and experimental verification were performed in these studies. The plasma density distribution is believed to be determined by these magnetic surfaces. The 2-dimensional relative plasma density and electron temperature profiles over a cross-section of the plasma will verify that the X-point does have an influence on the distribution of the plasma. An electric double probe is used to measure the electron temperature and relative density at pre-defined points inside the plasma. The probe is on a moveable platform which is motor driven and positioned by a computer

  10. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  11. Study on process basic requirements of experimental facility of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel management process, which was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. Hot cell facilities of α-γ type and inert atmosphere are required essentially for safe hot test and verification of this process. In this study, design basic data are established, and these data include process flow, process condition and yields, mass and radioactivity balance of radionuclides, process safety considerations, etc. And also, these data will be utilized for basic and detail design of hot cell facility, secured conservative safety and effective operability

  12. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  13. Analytical solutions for Tokamak equilibria with reversed toroidal current

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Caroline G. L.; Roberto, M.; Braga, F. L. [Departamento de Fisica, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, Sao Paulo 12228-900 (Brazil); Caldas, I. L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-08-15

    In tokamaks, an advanced plasma confinement regime has been investigated with a central hollow electric current with negative density which gives rise to non-nested magnetic surfaces. We present analytical solutions for the magnetohydrodynamic equilibria of this regime in terms of non-orthogonal toroidal polar coordinates. These solutions are obtained for large aspect ratio tokamaks and they are valid for any kind of reversed hollow current density profiles. The zero order solution of the poloidal magnetic flux function describes nested toroidal magnetic surfaces with a magnetic axis displaced due to the toroidal geometry. The first order correction introduces a poloidal field asymmetry and, consequently, magnetic islands arise around the zero order surface with null poloidal magnetic flux gradient. An analytic expression for the magnetic island width is deduced in terms of the equilibrium parameters. We give examples of the equilibrium plasma profiles and islands obtained for a class of current density profile.

  14. Design options for the advanced x-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), for which NASA and industry are currently conducting Definition and Preliminary Design studies, will provide a major advance in performance and observing opportunities beyond its predecessor space missions in X-ray astronomy, including Uhuru, Einstein and Rosat. The performance advances come from larger, higher quality mirrors with longer focal length that will extend the useful energy range and provide improved image resolution. Corresponding improvements will be made in observatory aspect determination and pointing stability. Increased observing opportunities come from facility-class operation of the observatory, including on-orbit maintenance and repair to provide potentially unlimited mission lifetime and on-orbit installation of new scientific instruments to take advantage of future advances in sensor technology. A summary of characteristics contrasting AXAF with the Einstein mission will be presented. Developing a design concept for AXAF that takes advantage of recent advances in technology and Shuttle-era capability for operations and servicing in space is a challenging process, requiring evaluation of a number of interesting, diverse design options for the X-ray telescope, science instrument accommodation and the host spacecraft

  15. Heavy ion toroidal collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on HIPAC at Maxwell Laboratories have shown that almost all of the confined electrons are trapped and do not go around the torus. A toroidal electric field produces a negligible toroidal electron current. An ion accelerator where electrons are magnetically contained and their space charge contains ions is considered. A toroidal electric field of suitable magnitude can be applied so that it accelerates all of the ions but does not accelerate most of the electrons. This is possible if the magnetic moment of electrons μsub(e) > μsub(i)/Z, where μsub(i) is the ion magnetic moment and Z is the charge of the ion. Ions would be contained by the electron space-charge electric field E, for energies up to ZeER/2 approximately 100 GeV where Z = 60, E = 107 V/cm and the major radius of the torus is R = 3.3 metres. (author)

  16. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  17. Advanced reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities: safety and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R N; Nutt, W M; Laidler, J J

    2011-01-01

    The safety and environmental impacts of new technology and fuel cycle approaches being considered in current U.S. nuclear research programs are contrasted to conventional technology options in this paper. Two advanced reactor technologies, the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), are being developed. In general, the new reactor technologies exploit inherent features for enhanced safety performance. A key distinction of advanced fuel cycles is spent fuel recycle facilities and new waste forms. In this paper, the performance of existing fuel cycle facilities and applicable regulatory limits are reviewed. Technology options to improve recycle efficiency, restrict emissions, and/or improve safety are identified. For a closed fuel cycle, potential benefits in waste management are significant, and key waste form technology alternatives are described. PMID:21399407

  18. Advanced reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities: safety and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R N; Nutt, W M; Laidler, J J

    2011-01-01

    The safety and environmental impacts of new technology and fuel cycle approaches being considered in current U.S. nuclear research programs are contrasted to conventional technology options in this paper. Two advanced reactor technologies, the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), are being developed. In general, the new reactor technologies exploit inherent features for enhanced safety performance. A key distinction of advanced fuel cycles is spent fuel recycle facilities and new waste forms. In this paper, the performance of existing fuel cycle facilities and applicable regulatory limits are reviewed. Technology options to improve recycle efficiency, restrict emissions, and/or improve safety are identified. For a closed fuel cycle, potential benefits in waste management are significant, and key waste form technology alternatives are described.

  19. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick...... and placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  20. Trace component analysis of process hydrogen streams at the Wilsonville Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronfenbrenner, J.C.

    1983-09-01

    This report summarizes subcontracted work done by the Radian Corporation to analyze trace components in process hydrogen streams at the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The data will be used to help define whether the gas streams to be treated in the hydrogen processing unit in the SRC-I Demonstration Plant will require further treatment to remove trace contaminants that could be explosive under certain conditions. 2 references.

  1. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  2. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  3. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  4. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2012-01-01

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of t...

  5. ATLAS End Cap toroid in upstanding position

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    End Cap toroid The ATLAS End Cap toroid weights 240-ton and is 12-m diameter high. The parts of this vacuum vessel had to be integrated and tested so that End Cap Toroid has no leaks. After that it could be cooled down to 80 K.

  6. Extremely high Q-factor toroidal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that, owing to the unique topology of the toroidal dipolar mode, its electric/magnetic field can be spatially confined within subwavelength, externally accessible regions of the metamolecules, which makes the toroidal planar metamaterials a viable platform for high Q-factor resonators due to interfering toroidal and other dipolar modes in metamolecules.

  7. Technology of toroidal plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After research into many different magnetic confinement systems, there is now general agreement that the most favorable ones for future fusion reactors are all based on toroidal geometry, as distinct from having open ends like mirror machines. For this reason plasma physics research, even when not aimed directly at the fusion problems, has in recent years increasingly concentrated on toroidal systems. One reason is that by using their good confinement properties the experimenter has available a range of high temperature plasma parameters in quasisteady (or even steady) state conditions not otherwise available on Earth. Despite the wide variety of both geometrical possibilities and sizes, ranging from table-top experiments with plasmas a few centimetres across to near reactor scale ones like JET with plasmas several metres across, toroidal systems have many common features, both in their physical principles and of experimental design: the purpose of this paper is to highlight those common features, using some specific examples for illustration, and emphasizing some of the more practical aspects. It will also try to point out important differences between two of the main classes of toroidal systems

  8. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  9. Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodsi, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

  10. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum. PMID:23215195

  11. Critical need for MFE: the Alcator DX advanced divertor test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Wolf, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-10-01

    Three critical challenges must be met before a steady-state, power-producing fusion reactor can be realized: how to (1) safely handle extreme plasma exhaust power, (2) completely suppress material erosion at divertor targets and (3) do this while maintaining a burning plasma core. Advanced divertors such as ``Super X'' and ``X-point target'' may allow a fully detached, low temperature plasma to be produced in the divertor while maintaining a hot boundary layer around a clean plasma core - a potential game-changer for magnetic fusion. No facility currently exists to test these ideas at the required parallel heat flux densities. Alcator DX will be a national facility, employing the high magnetic field technology of Alcator combined with high-power ICRH and LHCD to test advanced divertor concepts at FNSF/DEMO power exhaust densities and plasma pressures. Its extended vacuum vessel contains divertor cassettes with poloidal field coils for conventional, snowflake, super-X and X-point target geometries. Divertor and core plasma performance will be explored in regimes inaccessible in conventional devices. Reactor relevant ICRF and LH drivers will be developed, utilizing high-field side launch platforms for low PMI. Alcator DX will inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of next-step fusion facilities.

  12. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  13. Design and Simulation of Toroidal Twister Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Huifang; LIN Xizhen; ZENG Qinqin

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is a new kind of structural pressure vessels, which not only has high structure efficiency of compound materials pressure vessel, good security and so on, but also has special shape and the property of utilizing toroidal space, and the prospect of the application of toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is extremely broad. By introducing parameters establishment of toroidal vessel and elaborating the principle of filament winding for toroidal vessel, the design model of filament winding machine for toroidal vessel has been introduced, and the design model has been dynamically simulated by the software of ADAMS, which will give more referrence for the design of real toroidal vessel twister.

  14. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  15. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830

  16. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests

  17. Fluid interaction with spinning toroidal tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fester, D. A.; Anderson, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate propellant behavior in spinning torroidal tanks that could be used in a retropropulsion system of an advanced outer-planet Pioneer orbiter. Information on propellant slosh and settling and on ullage orientation and stability was obtained. The effects of axial acceleration, spin rate, spin-rate change, and spacecraft wobble, both singly and in combination, were evaluated using a one-eighth scale transparent tank in one-g and low-g environments. Liquid loadings ranged from 5% to 96% full. The impact of a surface tension acquisition device was assessed by comparison with bare-tank results. The testing simulated the behavior of the fluorine/hydrazine and nitrogen textroxide/monomethylhydrazine propellants. Results are presented that indicate that no major fluid behavior problems would be encountered with any of the four propellants in the toroidal tanks of a spin-stabilized orbiter spacecraft.

  18. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved

  19. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  20. Armor Possibilities and Radiographic Blur Reduction for The Advanced Hydrotest Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hackett, M

    2001-09-01

    Currently at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) a composite firing vessel is under development for the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) to study high explosives. This vessel requires a shrapnel mitigating layer to protect the vessel during experiments. The primary purpose of this layer is to protect the vessel, yet the material must be transparent to proton radiographs. Presented here are methods available to collect data needed before selection, along with a comparison tool developed to aid in choosing a material that offers the best of ballistic protection while allowing for clear radiographs.

  1. First Results of an Experiment on Advanced Collimator Materials at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Donze, M; Francon, P; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Calderon Cueva, M; Charitonidis, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment (HRMT-14) has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility on six different materials of interest for Beam Intercepting Devices (collimators, targets, dumps). Both traditional materials (Mo, W and Cu alloys) as well as advanced metal/diamond and metal/graphite composites were tested under extreme conditions as to pressure, density and temperature, leading to the development of highly dynamic phenomena as shock-waves, spallation, explosions. Experimental data were acquired, mostly in real time, relying on extensive integrated instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature and vacuum sensors) and on remote acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The experiment was a success under all points of view in spite of the technological challenges and harsh environment. First measurements are in good agreement with results of complex simulations, confirming the effectiveness of the acquisition system and the reliability of advanced numerical...

  2. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  3. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 180 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  4. Transporting the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The first coil for the ATLAS toroid magnet is transported from its assembly hall at the CERN Meyrin site to the storage hall above the ATLAS cavern. This involves driving the massive transportation vehicle first through the Meyrin site and then across a main road only metres from the France-Swiss border. Eight magnets in total will be transported in this way before being lowered into the experimental cavern where they will be mounted in a huge ring surrounding the detector.

  5. Design of multichord Hα detector arrays for the U-3M torsatron and identification of rotating plasma perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreval, M. B.; Shapoval, A. M.; Ozherelyev, F. I.; Makhov, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    An Hα camera has been designed and installed in the U-3M torsatron for spatially and temporally resolved measurements. This device provides fast measurements of the emission brightness profile in the noisy environment of the radio frequency (RF) heated plasma. Unusual topology of diagnostics and the data acquisition system are applied. All the system components, including digitizers, are assembled in a single unit. It allows the suppression of a low-frequency electromagnetic interference by eliminating the ground loops. And the suppression of RF noises is achieved by eliminating the signal interface cables and digital interface cables in the design. The Wi-Fi interface is used to prevent a ground loop in the data transfer stage. The achieved sensitivity of our diagnostics is high enough for measuring the Hα emission from the low-density (ne ≈ (1-2)ṡ1010 cm-3) plasma with a temporal resolution of about 20 μs in the noisy environment. Different types of Hα emission fluctuations within the frequency range of 1-5 kHz and poloidal mode numbers m = 0 and m = 5 have been observed in U-3M. A simple technique of the line-of-sight data analysis, based on the U-3M magnetic surface asymmetry, is proposed and used for the spatial localization of the rotating mode and for the determination of mode numbers and its poloidal rotation direction using a single Hα array.

  6. Testing of a pulsed He supersonic beam for plasma edge diagnostic in the TJ-IU torsatron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabarés, F. L.; Tafalla, D.; Herrero, V.; Tanarro, I.

    1997-02-01

    A new, compact atomic beam source based on the supersonic expansion of He has been developed for application as a plasma edge diagnostic. The beam is produced from a pulsed valve with a duration between 0.2 to 2 ms and a nominal repetition rate 10 and a divergence of ± 1° have been achieved at stagnation pressures below 2 bar. The diagnostic has been tested in ECRH plasmas on the TJ-IU torsatron, representing the first application of a supersonic beam to plasma characterization, to our knowledge. Operational conditions which minimized the total amount of He injected into the plasma were chosen. Non-perturbative injection conditions in the low density plasmas could be obtained at local He densities of ⋍ 1 × 10 11 cm -3 and a beam diameter < 1 cm. Due to the relatively low electron density of the ECRH plasmas, and to the good penetration characteristics of the supersonic He beam, the diagnostic could be used up to fairly low values of the normalized plasma minor radius, {r}/{a} (a = 12 cm) . Details of the optimization of the atomic beam diagnostics and typical results for steady state conditions in the TJ-IU plasmas are presented.

  7. Testing of a pulsed He supersonic beam for plasma edge diagnostic in the TJ-IU torsatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tabares, F.L. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Tafalla, D. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Herrero, V. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Tanarro, I. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    1997-02-01

    A new, compact atomic beam source based on the supersonic expansion of He has been developed for application as a plasma edge diagnostic. The beam is produced from a pulsed valve with a duration between 0.2 to 2 ms and a nominal repetition rate <500 Hz. A terminal speed ratio >10 and a divergence of {+-}1 have been achieved at stagnation pressures below 2 bar. The diagnostic has been tested in ECRH plasmas on the TJ-IU torsatron, representing the first application of a supersonic beam to plasma characterization, to our knowledge. Operational conditions which minimized the total amount of He injected into the plasma were chosen. Non-perturbative injection conditions in the low density plasmas could be obtained at local He densities of {approx_equal}1 x 10{sup 11} cm{sup -3} and a beam diameter <1 cm. Due to the relatively low electron density of the ECRH plasmas, and to the good penetration characteristics of the supersonic He beam, the diagnostic could be used up to fairly low values of the normalized plasma minor radius, r/a (a=12 cm). Details of the optimization of the atomic beam diagnostics and typical results for steady state conditions in the TJ-IU plasmas are presented. (orig.).

  8. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  9. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  10. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  11. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  12. Installation of a Thomson scattering diagnostic on the Compact Toroidal Hybrid Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traverso, P. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Ennis, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Cianciosa, M. R.

    2015-11-01

    A Thomson scattering system is being commissioned for the non-axisymmetric plasmas of the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five-field period current-carrying torsatron. The initial system takes a single point measurement on the magnetic axis and will be used to assess options for an expansion to a multi-point system to enable better 3D equilibrium reconstructions using the V3FIT code. A single point measurement will reduce the uncertainty in the reconstructed peak pressure by an order of magnitude for both current-carrying plasmas and future gyrotron-heated stellarator plasmas. The beam, generated by a frequency doubled Continuum 2 J, Nd:YaG laser, is passed vertically through an entrance Brewster window and a two-aperture optical baffle system to minimize stray light. The beam line is designed to propagate ~ 8 m to the mid-plane of the CTH device with the beam diameter < 3 mm inside the plasma volume. An Andor iStar DH740-18U-C3 image intensified CCD camera is used in conjunction with a Holospec f/1.8 spectrograph to collect the red-shifted scattered light from 532-580 nm. A single point system will initially measure plasmas with core electron temperatures of 100 to 200 eV and densities of 5 ×1018 to 5 ×1019 m-3. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  13. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  14. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  15. Toroidal AC transformer for beam intensity measurements in CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of a pulsed beam of charged particles in the Cooling Storage Ring Project of Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) will be measured with a toroidal current transformer. By comparing and analyzing the properties of kinds of magnetic cores, a strip wound toroidal core is adopted, which is made of a high-permeability alloy and can measure a pulsed beam with frequency range of 0.2 to 2 MHz. The permeability of Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy varying with frequency is measured and the noises in the circuit are analyzed. By adding a low-noise operational amplifier into the circuit, the current down to 1 μA can be detected

  16. Compact toroid development. Resource needs for field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the goals and technical approach for the five years 1985 to 1990 for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the field reversed configuration (FRC). The included material represents the third phase of FRC program planning. The first was reported in DOE/ER-0160: Compact Toroid Development, Status and Technical Needs, February 1983. The second was reported in DOE/ER-0197: Compact Toroid Development, Activity Plans for Field Reversed Configurations, June 1984. This planning identifies the facilities and resources needed to achieve the goals set forth in the first two phases. The information in this document is based on technical recommendations provided by the FRC community

  17. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  18. Pellet injection and toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of a technical committee meeting on pellet injection and toroidal confinement, held in Gut Ising, Federal Republic of Germany, 24-26 October, 1988, are given in this report. Most of the major fusion experiments are using pellet injectors; these were reported at this meeting. Studies of confinement, which is favorably affected, impurity transport, radiative energy losses, and affects on the ion temperature gradient instability were given. Studies of pellet ablation and effects on plasma profiles were presented. Finally, several papers described present and proposed injection guns. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. The Scrounge-atron a phased approach to the Advanced Hydrotest Facility utilizing proton radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, O J; Chargin, A K; Dekin, W D; Hartouni, E P; Hockman, J N; Ladran, A S; Libkind, M A; Moore, T L; Pastrnak, J W; Pico, R E; Souza, R J; Stoner, J M; Wilson, J H; Ruggiero, G; Ohnuma, S; Luccio, A U; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy has initiated its Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSMP) to provide a single, integrated technical program for maintaining the continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing. Consistent with the SSMP, the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) has been conceived to provide improved radiographic imaging with multiple axes and multiple time frames. The AHF would be used to better understand the evolution of nuclear weapon primary implosion shape under normal and accident scenarios. There are three fundamental technologies currently under consideration for use on the AHF. These include linear induction acceleration, inductive-adder pulsed-power technology (both technologies using high current electron beams to produce an intense X-ray beam) and high-energy proton accelerators to produce a proton beam. The Scrounge-atron (a proton synchrotron) was conceived to be a relatively low cost demonstration of the viability of t...

  20. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  1. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  2. GMP facilities for manufacturing of advanced therapy medicinal products for clinical trials: an overview for clinical researchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alici, Evren; Blomberg, Pontus

    2010-12-01

    To be able to produce advanced therapy medicinal products, compliance with regulatory standards while maintaining flexibility is mandatory. For this purpose, careful planning is vital in the design or upgrade of a facility. Similarly, extensive foresight is elemental to anticipate upcoming needs and requirements. Failing this may lead to the facility's in-ability to meet the demands. In this chapter we aimed to outline the current issues with regards to the European Union Directives (EUD) and the proposal for Advanced Therapies, which are of importance to cellular and gene therapy facilities in Europe. This chapter is an attempt to elucidate what the minimum requirements for GMP facilities for cell and gene therapy products are and what is considered necessary to comply with the regulations in Europe.

  3. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques

  4. Modelling activities of experimental facilities related to advanced reactors. Considerations on 1D/3D issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of art of modelling activities related to integral experimental facilities of advanced passive reactors show to date important open items. The main advantage of using 1D plant codes is the capability of simulating the full interaction between components traditionally correctly modelled (condensers, heat exchangers, pipes and vessels) and other components for which codes are not 100% suitable (pools and containments). Polytechnical University of Catalonia (UPC) and Polytechnical University of Valencia (UPV) cooperated with other European research organizations in the 'Technology Enhancement for Passive Safety Systems' (TEPSS) project, within the European Fourth Framework Programme. It was a task of both Universities to supply analytical support of PANDA tests. The paper deals with the 1D/3D discussion in the framework of modelling activities related to integral passive facilities like PANDA. It starts choosing reference tests among those corresponding to our participation in TEPSS project. The discrepancies observed in a 1D simulation of the selected tests will be shown and analyzed. An evaluation of how the 3D version can lead to a better agreement with data will be included. Disadvantages of 3D codes will be shown too. Combining the use of different codes, and considering analyst criteria, will make possible to establish suitable recommendations from both engineering and scientific point of view. (author)

  5. Advanced depreciation cost analysis for a commercial pyroprocess facility in Korea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Ki; Ko, Won Il [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Youn, Sae Rom; Gao, Ruxing [University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Yang Hon; Bang, Sung Sig [Dept. of Business and Technology Management, University of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to present a rational depreciation method for a pyroprocess cost calculation. Toward this end, the so-called advanced decelerated depreciation method (ADDM) was developed that complements the limitations of the existing depreciation methods such as the straight-line method and fixed percentage of declining-balance method. ADDM was used to show the trend of the direct material cost and direct labor cost compared to the straight-line or fixed percentage of the declining-balance methods that are often used today. As a result, it was demonstrated that the depreciation cost of the ADDM, which assumed a pyroprocess facility's life period to be 40 years with a deceleration rate of 5%, takes up 4.14% and 27.74% of the pyroprocess unit cost ($781/kg heavy metal) in the 1st and final years, respectively. In other words, it was found that the ADDM can cost the pyroprocess facility's capital investment rationally every year. Finally, ADDM's validity was verified by confirming that the sum of the depreciation cost by year, and the sum of the purchasing cost of the building and equipment, are the same.

  6. Authentication system for the JAERI Fast Critical Facility Advanced Containment and Surveillance System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint effort conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), an authentication system has been installed at the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) facility in Tokai-mura, Japan. The purpose of this authentication system is to provide the IAEA with an independent means of authenticating the operator-provided Advanced Containment and Survellance (AC/S) system already in place at the facility. Authentication Controllers were installed at the AC/S Portal Monkor and Penetration Monitor to collect data and to randomly test sensor functions between IAEA inspections. During each inspection the authentication data is collected with an Inspector's portable computer and printed for comparison to the data recorded by the AC/S system. Installation of the authentication equipment took place in November 1991 and a three-month field test began in December 1991. This paper will describe the authentication system, the operator interface, and the preliminary results of the field tests

  7. Fast Dump of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; Volpini, Giovanni; Dudarev, Alexey; Kate, Herman Ten

    2010-01-01

    The toroidal magnet system of the ATLAS Detector at CERN consists of a Barrel Toroid (BT) and two End Cap Toroids (ECT-A and ECT-C). Each toroid is built up from eight racetrack coils wound with an aluminum stabilized NbTi conductor and indirectly cooled by forced flow liquid helium. The three toroids operate in series at 20.5 kA with a total stored energy of 1.5 GJ. In order to verify the reliability and effectiveness of the quench protection system, series of fast dump tests have been performed first of the single toroids and finally of the entire toroidal magnet system. In this paper a model to simulate the fast dump of the ATLAS toroids in single mode operation and in full system configuration is presented. The model is validated through comparison with measured data extracted from the ramp-and-quench runs. The calculated energy dissipation in the various coils is in very good agreement (within 1-2\\%) with the enthalpy changes estimated from the temperature measurements of the different parts of the cold ...

  8. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  9. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    X-ray footprinting (XF) is an important structural biology tool used to determine macromolecular conformations and dynamics of both nucleic acids and proteins in solution on a wide range of timescales. With the impending shut-down of the National Synchrotron Light Source, it is ever more important that this tool continues to be developed at other synchrotron facilities to accommodate XF users. Toward this end, a collaborative XF program has been initiated at the Advanced Light Source using the white-light bending-magnet beamlines 5.3.1 and 3.2.1. Accessibility of the microsecond time regime for protein footprinting is demonstrated at beamline 5.3.1 using the high flux density provided by a focusing mirror in combination with a micro-capillary flow cell. It is further reported that, by saturating samples with nitrous oxide, the radiolytic labeling efficiency is increased and the imprints of bound versus bulk water can be distinguished. These results both demonstrate the suitability of the Advanced Light Source as a second home for the XF experiment, and pave the way for obtaining high-quality structural data on complex protein samples and dynamics information on the microsecond timescale. PMID:24971962

  11. Toroidal Vortices in Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, D C; Li, S; Montgomery, David; Bates, Jason W.; Li, Shuojun

    1996-01-01

    Resistive steady states in toroidal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), where Ohm's law must be taken into account, differ considerably from ideal ones. Only for special (and probably unphysical) resistivity profiles can the Lorentz force, in the static force-balance equation, be expressed as the gradient of a scalar and thus cancel the gradient of a scalar pressure. In general, the Lorentz force has a curl directed so as to generate toroidal vorticity. Here, we calculate, for a collisional, highly viscous magnetofluid, the flows that are required for an axisymmetric toroidal steady state, assuming uniform scalar resistivity and viscosity. The flows originate from paired toroidal vortices (in what might be called a ``double smoke ring'' configuration), and are thought likely to be ubiquitous in the interior of toroidally driven magnetofluids of this type. The existence of such vortices is conjectured to characterize magnetofluids beyond the high-viscosity limit in which they are readily calculable.

  12. Toroidal effects on drift wave turbulence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBrun, M.J.; Tajima, T.; Gray, M.G.; Furnish, G.; Horton, W.

    1992-09-23

    The universal drift instability and other drift instabilities driven by density and temperature gradients in a toroidal system are investigated in both linear and nonlinear regimes via particle simulation. Runs in toroidal and cylindrical geometry show dramatic differences in plasma behavior, primarily due to the toroidicity-induced coupling of rational surfaces through the poloidal mode number m. In the toroidal system studied, the eigenmodes are seen to possess (i) an elongated, nearly global radial extent (ii) a higher growth rate than in the corresponding cylindrical system, (iii) an eigenfrequency nearly constant with radius, (iv) a global temperature relaxation and enhancement of thermal heat conduction. Most importantly, the measured Xi shows an increase with radius and an absolute value on the order of that observed in experiment. On the basis of our observations, we argue that the increase in Xi with radius observed in experiment is caused by the global nature of heat convection in the presence of toroidicity-induced mode coupling.

  13. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  14. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  15. Status of advanced biofuels demonstration facilities in 2012. A report to IEA Bioenergy task 39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacovsky, Dina; Ludwiczek, Nikolaus; Ognissanto, Monica; Woergetter, Manfred

    2013-03-18

    the previous edition of this report (2010), advanced biofuels technologies have developed significantly. Hydrotreatment as pursued by e.g. Neste Oil has been commercialized and currently accounts for app. 2,4% of biofuels production worldwide. Fermentation of lignocellulosic raw material to ethanol has also seen a strong development and several large scale facilities are just coming online in Europe and North America. As for thermochemical processes, the development is recently focusing on the production of mixed alcohols rather than BtL-Diesel. Economic reasons are driving this development, and concepts like the integration into existing industries and the production of several products instead of biofuel only (biorefinery concept) receive more attention lately. But, as expected, some of the projects for advanced biofuel production have failed. As a result, companies are now more careful in making announcements of advanced biofuels projects, and several large-scale projects have been postponed recently, some even though public funding would have been granted. Nevertheless, the production capacity for biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstock has tripled since 2010 and currently accounts for some 140 000 tons per year. Hydrotreating capacity for biofuels has multiplied and stands at about 2 190 000 tons per year.

  16. An Advanced Reverse Osmosis Technology For Application in Nuclear Desalination Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of adequate supplies of clean, safe water is a growing global problem that has reached crisis proportions in many parts of the world. It is estimated that 1.5 billion people do not have access to adequate supplies of safe water, and that as a result nearly 10,000 people die every day and thousands more suffer from a range of debilitating illnesses due to water related diseases. Included in this total is an estimated 2.2 million child deaths annually. As the world's need for additional sources of fresh water continues to grow, seawater and brackish water desalination are providing an increasingly important contribution to the solution of this problem. Because desalination is an energy intensive process, nuclear desalination provides an economically attractive and environmentally sound alternative to the burning of fossil fuels for desalination. Nevertheless, the enormity of the problem dictates that additional steps must be taken to improve the efficiency of energy utilization and reduce the cost of water production in order to reduce the financial and environmental burden to communities in need. An advanced reverse osmosis (RO) desalination technology has been developed that emphasizes a nontraditional approach to system design and operation, and makes use of a sophisticated design optimization process that can lead to highly optimized design configurations and operating regimes. The technology can be coupled with a nuclear generating station (NGS) to provide an integrated facility for the co-generation of both water and electricity. Waste heat from the NGS allows the use of 'preheated' feedwater into the RO system, improving the efficiency of the RO process and reducing the cost of water production. Because waste heat, rather than process heat, is used the desalination system can be readily coupled to any existing or advanced reactor technology with little or no impact on reactor design and operation and without introducing additional reactor safety

  17. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  18. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-08-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  19. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-07-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  20. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  1. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  2. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, Andy; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We present a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  3. Toroidal horizons in binary black hole mergers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-09-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It has been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology. However, such a phase has never been seen in numerical simulations. Instead, in all previous simulations, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We find a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon, thus reconciling the numerical work with theoretical expectations. The demonstration requires extremely high numerical precision, which is made possible by a new event horizon code described in a companion paper. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  4. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  5. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  6. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  7. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  8. Reconstruction of local emissivity profile from chord-integrated soft x-ray data in heliotron/torsatron plasmas by singular-value decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reconstruction method for a local soft X-ray (SX) emissivity profile based on singular-value decomposition (SVD) was applied to the chord-integrated SX data obtained in the compact helical system (CHS) heliotron/torsatron. The numerical procedure for this method was simplified by introducing the data of equilibrium magnetic surfaces to analyze the experimental data efficiently. The applicability of the Akaide information criterion (AIC) was investigated for the determination of the optimal number of parameters characterizing a local emissivity profile. This method was applied to SX data for sawtoothing plasmas of the CHS. For these CHS data, the optimal number of parameters is determined from the spatial resolution of an SX detector array rather than the AIC. A characteristic feature of the off-axis or annular sawtooth crash was clearly derived with this technique. (author)

  9. Behaviour of the radiation of the suprathermal electrons at the Uragan-3M torsatron after rf heating off from ECE measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microwave radiometry is a well-known diagnostics to obtain the information on temporal evolution and radial profile of the electron temperature at U-3M torsatron plasma experiments. However, under low plasma density with this diagnostics we report on the large production of runaway electrons after RF heating pulse off. We notice a gradually increasing of the radiometer signal at the frequencies that match the second and third harmonics of electron cyclotron emission of the extraordinary mode. This effect could be explained with the existence of the ''runaway'' electrons in U-3M discharge. A phenomenological description of this process is presented, where the time evolution of the ECE radiation signal is compared to the electron density evolution

  10. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  11. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  12. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  13. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  14. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  15. Optical force on toroidal nanostructures: toroidal dipole versus renormalized electric dipole

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xu-Lin; Lin, Zhifang; Sun, Hong-Bo; Chan, C T

    2015-01-01

    We study the optical forces acting on toroidal nanostructures. A great enhancement of optical force is unambiguously identified as originating from the toroidal dipole resonance based on the source-representation, where the distribution of the induced charges and currents is characterized by the three families of electric, magnetic, and toroidal multipoles. On the other hand, the resonant optical force can also be completely attributed to an electric dipole resonance in the alternative field-representation, where the electromagnetic fields in the source-free region are expressed by two sets of electric and magnetic multipole fields based on symmetry. The confusion is resolved by conceptually introducing the irreducible electric dipole, toroidal dipole, and renormalized electric dipole. We demonstrate that the optical force is a powerful tool to identify toroidal response even when its scattering intensity is dwarfed by the conventional electric and magnetic multipoles.

  16. Development of safeguards technology for lab-scale advanced fuel cycle facility at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been developing the DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel in CANDU) fuel cycle and ACP (Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) technology for the purpose of spent fuel management. A safeguards system has been applied to R and D process for fabricating DUPIC fuel directly with PWR spent fuel material. Safeguards issues to be resolved were identified in the areas such as international cooperation on handling foreign origin nuclear material, technology development of operator's measurement system of bulk handling process of spent fuel material, and built-in C/S system for independent verification of material flow. All those safeguards issues have been finally resolved. The lab-scale DUPIC facility (DFDF) safeguards system was successfully established under the international cooperation program. The ACP has been under development at KAERI since 1997 to tackle the problem of the accumulation of the spent fuel. The concept is to convert the spent oxide fuel into a metallic form in a high temperature molten salt in order to reduce the heat power, volume, and radioactivity of the spent fuel. The main objective of the ACP is to treat the PWR spent fuel for a long-term storage and eventual disposal in a proliferation resistant and cost effective way. Moreover, the electrolytic reduction method of the ACP can contribute to the innovative nuclear energy system as a key technology for the preparation of the metallic fuel. Since the inactive tests of the ACP have been successfully implemented to confirm the validity of the electrolytic reduction technology, a lab-scale hot test will be undertaken in the ACP facility (ACPF) to validate the concept. Based on the results of a safeguards implementation at DFDF hot cell, the reference safeguards design conditions are established for the ACPF. Basically, the nuclear material accounting will be performed by ASNC (ACP Safeguards Neutron Counter), which is the same concept as the

  17. Design of Stopper of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The PGNAA facility consists of the filtered collimated neutron beam, the shielding of the whole facility, the control system, the detecting equipment and the data acquisition and analysis system. The neutron beam is filtered by a mono-crystalline bismuth filter,

  18. ANURIB – Advanced National facility for Unstable and Rare Ion Beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Bandyopadhyay; V Naik; S Dechoudhury; M Mondal; A Chakrabarti

    2015-09-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India. In this scheme, Rare Ion Beams (RIBs) will be produced using light ion beams (, ) from the = 130 cyclotron, the RIB of interest will be separated from the other reaction products and accelerated up to about 2 MeV/u using a number of linear accelerators. Recently, a few RIBs have been produced and accelerated using this facility. As an extention of this effort, another RIB facility – ANURIB will be developed in a new campus as a green-field project. ANURIB will have two driver accelerators – a superconducting electron LINAC to produce n-rich RIBs using photofission route and a 50 MeV proton cyclotron for producing p-rich RIBs. In this paper, the status of the RIB facility in the present campus and future plans with the ANURIB facility will be discussed.

  19. Advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic test loop facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; Hardy, J.H.; King, J.F.; McFee, M.T.; Montgomery, B.H.; Pawel, R.E.; Power, B.H.; Shourbaji, A.A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Wood, R.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is a facility for experiments constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ANSR is both cooled and moderated by heavy water and uses uranium silicide fuel. The core is composed of two coaxial fuel-element annuli, each of different diameter. There are 684 parallel aluminum-clad fuel plates (252 in the inner-lower core and 432 in the outer-upper core) arranged in an involute geometry that effectively creates an array of thin rectangular flow channels. Both the fuel plates and the coolant channels are 1.27 mm thick, with a span of 87 mm (lower core), 70 mm (upper core), and 507-mm heated length. The coolant flows vertically upwards at a mass flux of 27 Mg/m{sup 2}s (inlet velocity of 25 m/s) with an inlet temperature of 45{degrees}C and inlet pressure of 3.2 MPa. The average and peak heat fluxes are approximately 6 and 12 MW/m{sup 2}, respectively. The availability of experimental data for both flow excursion (FE) and true critical heat flux (CHF) at the conditions applicable to the ANSR is very limited. The THTL was designed and built to simulate a full-length coolant subchannel of the core, allowing experimental determination of thermal limits under the expected ANSR thermal-hydraulic conditions. For these experimental studies, the involute-shaped fuel plates of the ANSR core with the narrow 1.27-mm flow gap are represented by a narrow rectangular channel. Tests in the THTL will provide both single- and two-phase thermal-hydraulic information. The specific phenomena that are to be examined are (1) single-phase heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors, (2) the point of incipient boiling, (3) nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficients, (4) two-phase pressure-drop characteristics in the nucleate boiling regime, (5) flow instability limits, and (6) CHF limits.

  20. ORNL Levitated Toroidal Multipole Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying confinement of gun-injected and microwave-produced plasmas in a levitated toroidal quadrupole in which internal hoop supports are not present to limit plasma confinement. Electromagnetic levitation is made possible by reducing the 60 Hz skin depth in the copper walls with liquid nitrogen cooling. The cooling also increases the magnetic field lifetime so that an e-folding time of 17 ms was measured after crowbarring. Computations indicate that in a properly designed, larger device, an e-folding time of 100 ms can be reached. Washer-gun hydrogen plasmas and Bostick-type lithium gun plasmas were injected into the levitated quadrupole with typical parameters: B ≥ 3 kG, Te ≈ 3 eV, ni ≈ 109 cm-3, and 1 i i ≈ 1010 cm-3, Te ≈ 30 eV, and τ/τBohm ≈ 30. Density fluctuations (Δn/n) in the region of good field curvature were less than 0.05 and in the region of bad curvature 0.10-0.25. With the removal of the magnetic well (by removing the inner hoop), τ/τBohm and ni each dropped a factor of 4 and Δn/n became greater than 0.25. Recent experiments using 200 W at λ = 3 cm have produced plasmas with higher densities (n > 1011 cm-3 assuming Te ≈ 100 eV), higher temperatures (Te ≈ 100 eV) and longer lifetimes (τ ≈ 80 μs ≈ 40 τBohm) than in the λ = 12 cm experiments. Detailed probe measurements of density and temperature are consistent with models for plasma behaviour based on computed magnetic field plots. Probe data show clear evidence of the changes in heating zones during the variation of the sinusoidal magnetic field and a large obstacle intercepting all flux lines effectively prevents the formation of the plasma. We are also studying a levitated helical hexapole, whose advantages over the quadrupole are a better ratio of connection length to radius of bad curvature and more confinement volume. (author)

  1. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  2. A Classification Scheme For Toroidal Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, J; Berger, Jorge; Avron, Joseph E.

    1995-01-01

    We construct a class of periodic tilings of the plane, which corresponds to toroidal arrangements of trivalent atoms, with pentagonal, hexagonal and heptagonal rings. Each tiling is characterized by a set of four integers and determines a toroidal molecule. The tiling rules are motivated by geometric considerations and the tiling patterns are rich enough to describe a wide class of toroidal carbon molecules, with a broad range of shapes and numbers of atoms. The molecular dimensions are simply related to the integers that determine the tiling. The configurational energy and the delocalisation energy of several molecules obtained in this way were computed for Tersoff and H\\"uckel models. The results indicate that many of these molecules are not strained, and may be expected to be stable. We studied the influence of size on the H\\"{u}ckel spectrum: it bears both similarities and differences as compared with the case of tubules.

  3. Ferroic nature of magnetic toroidal order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Anne S; Meier, Dennis; Fiebig, Manfred

    2014-09-05

    Electric dipoles and ferroelectricity violate spatial inversion symmetry, and magnetic dipoles and ferromagnetism break time-inversion symmetry. Breaking both symmetries favours magnetoelectric charge-spin coupling effects of enormous interest, such as multiferroics, skyrmions, polar superconductors, topological insulators or dynamic phenomena such as electromagnons. Extending the rationale, a novel type of ferroic order violating space- and time-inversion symmetry with a single order parameter should exist. This existence is fundamental and the inherent magnetoelectric coupling is technologically interesting. A uniform alignment of magnetic vortices, called ferrotoroidicity, was proposed to represent this state. Here we demonstrate that the magnetic vortex pattern identified in LiCoPO4 exhibits the indispensable hallmark of such a ferroic state, namely hysteretic poling of ferrotoroidic domains in the conjugate toroidal field, along with a distinction of toroidal from non-toroidal poling effects. This consolidates ferrotoroidicity as fourth form of ferroic order.

  4. Packing of charged chains on toroidal geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhenwei; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera

    2013-01-01

    We study a strongly adsorbed flexible polyelectrolyte chain on tori. In this generalized Thomson problem, the patterns of the adsorbed chain are analyzed in the space of the toroidal coordinates and in terms of the orientation of each chain segment. Various patterns are found, including double spirals, disclination-like structures, Janus tori, and uniform wrappings, arising from the long-range electrostatic interaction and the toroidal geometry. Their broken mirror symmetry is quantitatively characterized by introducing an order parameter, an integral of the torsion. The uniform packing, which breaks the mirror symmetry the least, has the lowest value of the order parameter. In addition, it is found that the electrostatic energy of confined chains on tori conforms to a power law regardless of the screening effect in some typical cases studied. Furthermore, we study random walks on tori that generate chain configurations in the large screening limit or at large thermal fluctuation; some features associated with the toroidal geometry are discussed.

  5. Partnering with Industry to Advance Biofuels, NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2010-10-01

    Fact sheet describing NREL's Integrated Biorefinery Research Facility and its availability to biofuels' industry partners who want to operate, test, and develop biorefining technology and equipment.

  6. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  7. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  8. Anomalous transport equations in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced transport equations for a toroidal plasma with fluctuations are derived. These equations include the effects of both anomalous and standard neoclassical transport, and allow clarification of the structure of convective fluxes caused by electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations. Special attention is paid to the combined effects of fluctuations and toroidicity on the transport. The formulation retains the effects of a magnetic field inhomogeneity on the anomalous transport. It is shown that phase space diffusion caused by the gradient in the equilibrium magnetic field appears as a pinch flux in the real space

  9. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  10. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. ...

  11. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  12. Some properties of toroidal isodynamic magnetostatic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA, CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR no 7158, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We establish some general properties of a 3D isodynamic magnetostatic equilibrium admitting a family of nested toroidal flux surfaces. In particular, we use the virial theorem to prove a simple relation between the total pressure (magnetic + thermal) and the magnetic pressure on each flux surface, and we derive some useful consequences of the latter. We also show the constancy on each rational surface of two integrals along magnetic lines. As a simple application of our results, we show the nonexistence of an equilibrium with vanishing toroidal current, and of an equilibrium with closed lines.

  13. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (first of two) included papers on architecture, beam diagnostics, compressors, and linacs. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended

  14. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  15. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    Radiolytic labeling is established as a collaborative program at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Results indicate that white-light bend-magnet beamlines at the ALS produce flux densities high enough to allow microsecond exposures yielding sufficient modification to conduct footprinting experiments, representing a significant advance for the footprinting experiment.

  16. Electromagnetic toroidal excitations in matter and free space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papasimakis, N; Fedotov, V A; Savinov, V; Raybould, T A; Zheludev, N I

    2016-03-01

    The toroidal dipole is a localized electromagnetic excitation, distinct from the magnetic and electric dipoles. While the electric dipole can be understood as a pair of opposite charges and the magnetic dipole as a current loop, the toroidal dipole corresponds to currents flowing on the surface of a torus. Toroidal dipoles provide physically significant contributions to the basic characteristics of matter including absorption, dispersion and optical activity. Toroidal excitations also exist in free space as spatially and temporally localized electromagnetic pulses propagating at the speed of light and interacting with matter. We review recent experimental observations of resonant toroidal dipole excitations in metamaterials and the discovery of anapoles, non-radiating charge-current configurations involving toroidal dipoles. While certain fundamental and practical aspects of toroidal electrodynamics remain open for the moment, we envision that exploitation of toroidal excitations can have important implications for the fields of photonics, sensing, energy and information. PMID:26906961

  17. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  18. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  19. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  20. Chiral Anomaly in Toroidal Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, K.

    2001-01-01

    It is pointed out that the chiral anomaly in 1+1 dimensions should be observed in toroidal carbon nanotubes on a planar geometry with varying magnetic field. We show that the chiral anomaly is closely connected with the persistent current in a one-dimensional metallic ring.

  1. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  2. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  3. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1990-04-01

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended.

  4. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  5. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended

  6. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  7. Advanced Education Facilities for Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Lungeanu, Marian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the project- and problem-based learning method is achieved at Aalborg University. Two new laboratories called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) and Green Power Laboratory (GPL) have been developed. A common feature is that these facilities are using entirely Simulink...

  8. Development of inherent technologies for advanced PWR core - A study on the current status and the construction feasibility of critical facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Won Sik; Yang, Hyun Seok [Chosun University, Kwangju (Korea); Kim, Chang Hyo; Shim, Hyung Jin [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the appropriateness of constructing critical facilities in our country and to decide a course of constructing them if necessary by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. We investigated the status and the utilization of foreign critical facilities through literature survey and personal visitation. In our judgement, critical facilities are necessary for developing the advanced reactors and fuels which are being studied as parts of the Nuclear R and D Program by MOST. Considering the construction cost and the current state of domestic economy, however, it is unjustifiable to build three different types of critical facilities (the light water, the heavy water, and the fast critical facility). It appears to be reasonable to build a light water critical, considering the construction cost, degree of utilization, and other constraints. (author). 89 refs., 134 figs., 64 tabs.

  9. Development of compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls has been investigated. The compact toroids injection can fuel particles directly into the core of the plasma and modify the plasma profiles at the desired locations. The acceleration tests of the compact toroids have been conducted at Himeji Institute of Technology. The tests showed that the hydrogen compact toroid was accelerated up to 80km/s and the plasma density of the compact toroid was compressed to 1.2 x 1021m-3. (orig.)

  10. Design concepts and advanced manipulator development for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division, Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. The application of advanced manipulation is viewed as an essential part of a series of design directions whose sum describes a somewhat unique blend of old and new technology. A design direction based upon the Teletec concept is explained and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems is feasible through advanced technology. 14 refs., 14 figs

  11. Advances in the archiving and distribution facilities at the Space Telescope Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanisch, Robert J.; Postman, Marc; Pollizzi, Joseph; Richon, J.

    1998-07-01

    The Hubble Data Archive at the Space Telescope Science Institute contains over 4.3 TB of data, primarily for the Hubble Space Telescope, but also from complementary space- based and ground-based facilities. We are in the process of upgrading and generalizing many of the HDA's component system, developing tools to provide more integrated access to the HDA holdings, and working with other major data providing organizations to implement global data location services for astronomy and other space science disciplines. This paper describes the key elements of our archiving and data distribution systems, including a planned transition to DVD media, data compression, data segregation, on-the-fly calibration, an engineering data warehouse, and distributed search and retrieval facilities.

  12. Human Engineering Operations and Habitability Assessment: A Process for Advanced Life Support Ground Facility Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Arch, M.; Elfezouaty, Eileen Schultz; Novak, Jennifer Blume; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Design and Human Engineering (HE) processes strive to ensure that the human-machine interface is designed for optimal performance throughout the system life cycle. Each component can be tested and assessed independently to assure optimal performance, but it is not until full integration that the system and the inherent interactions between the system components can be assessed as a whole. HE processes (which are defining/app lying requirements for human interaction with missions/systems) are included in space flight activities, but also need to be included in ground activities and specifically, ground facility testbeds such as Bio-Plex. A unique aspect of the Bio-Plex Facility is the integral issue of Habitability which includes qualities of the environment that allow humans to work and live. HE is a process by which Habitability and system performance can be assessed.

  13. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  14. Advances in inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory-temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  15. Tagged photon facility at Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore: Possible scenarios

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Pant

    2006-05-01

    Photoproduction of in nuclear medium with the ELSA facility at Bonn is discussed in the context of medium modification of hadronic properties. Utilization of Indus-2 at CAT, Indore for producing tagged bremsstrahlung photons and laser backscattered photons has been explored with a comparison between the two techniques for producing tagged high energy photons for the first time in the country with emphasis on the ADSS programme to have a precise information of (; ) reactions.

  16. Drive-train dynamics technology - State-of-the-art and design of a test facility for advanced development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badgley, R. H.; Fleming, D. P.; Smalley, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A program for the development and verification of drive-train dynamic technology is described along with its basis and the results expected from it. A central feature of this program is a drive-train test facility designed for the testing and development of advanced drive-train components, including shaft systems, dampers, and couplings. Previous efforts in designing flexible dynamic drive-train systems are reviewed, and the present state of the art is briefly summarized. The design of the test facility is discussed with major attention given to the formulation of the test-rig concept, dynamic scaling of model shafts, and the specification of design parameters. Specific efforts envisioned for the test facility are briefly noted, including evaluations of supercritical test shafts, stability thresholds for various sources and types of instabilities that can exist in shaft systems, effects of structural flexibility on the dynamic performance of dampers, and methods for vibration control in two-level and three-level flexible shaft systems.

  17. Toroidal dipole excitations in metamolecules formed by interacting plasmonic nanorods

    CERN Document Server

    Watson, Derek W; Ruostekoski, Janne; Fedotov, Vassili A; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2015-01-01

    We show how the elusive toroidal dipole moment appears as a radiative excitation eigenmode in a metamolecule resonator that is formed by pairs of plasmonic nanorods. We analyze one such nanorod configuration - a toroidal metamolecule. We find that the radiative interactions in the toroidal metamolecule can be qualitatively represented by a theoretical model based on an electric point dipole arrangement. Both a finite-size rod model and the point dipole approximation demonstrate how the toroidal dipole moment is subradiant and difficult to excite by incident light. By means of breaking the geometric symmetry of the metamolecule, the toroidal mode can be excited by linearly polarized light and we provide simple optimization protocols for maximizing the toroidal dipole mode excitation. This opens up possibilities for simplified control and driving of metamaterial arrays consisting of toroidal dipole unit-cell resonators.

  18. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  19. An advanced safeguards approach for a model 200t/a reprocessing facility, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an advanced safeguards approach which has been developed for a model 200 t/a reprocessing plant, using near-real-time materials accountancy in the process MBA, and borrowing advanced ideas from TASTEX, the IWG-RPS, or the authors own invention for the spent fuel storage and plutonium nitrate storage MBAs. In the spent fuel storage MBA primary reliance is placed on 100% inspector observation and verification of all spent fuel receipts, and on surveillance measures to ensure that the inspector is aware of all receipts or other activities in the spent fuel cask receiving bay. The advanced safeguards approach gives more detailed consideration to the mechanical or chop-leach cell than most conventional approaches. Safeguards in the process MBA are based on n.r.t. accountancy. The n.r.t. accountancy model used assumes weekly in-process physical inventories of solution in some five buffer storage tanks. The safeguards approach suggested for the plutonium nitrate storage MBA is not significantly different from conventional approaches. The use of sequential statistical techniques for the analysis of n.r.t. accountancy data requires a significantly different philosophical approach to anomalies and anomaly resolution. This report summarizes anomaly resolution procedures, at least through the earlier stages, and describes a summary estimate of inspection effort likely to be needed to implement the advanced safeguards approach. (author)

  20. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  1. Solar concentrator with a toroidal relay module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jhe-Syuan; Liang, Chao-Wen

    2015-10-01

    III-V multijunction solar cells require solar concentrators with a high concentration ratio to reduce per watt cost and to increase solar energy transforming efficiency. This paper discusses a novel solar concentrator design that features a high concentration ratio, high transfer efficiency, thin profile design, and a high solar acceptance angle. The optical design of the concentrator utilizes a toroidal relay module, which includes both the off-axis relay lens and field lens design in a single concentric toroidal lens shape. The optical design concept of the concentrator is discussed and the simulation results are shown. The given exemplary design has an aspect ratio of 0.24, a high averaged optical concentration ratio 1230×, a maximum efficiency of 76.8%, and the solar acceptance angle of ±0.9°.

  2. Advanced Motor Control Test Facility for NASA GRC Flywheel Energy Storage System Technology Development Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, Barbara H.; Kascak, Peter E.; Hofmann, Heath; Mackin, Michael; Santiago, Walter; Jansen, Ralph

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the flywheel test facility developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center with particular emphasis on the motor drive components and control. A four-pole permanent magnet synchronous machine, suspended on magnetic bearings, is controlled with a field orientation algorithm. A discussion of the estimation of the rotor position and speed from a "once around signal" is given. The elimination of small dc currents by using a concurrent stationary frame current regulator is discussed and demonstrated. Initial experimental results are presented showing the successful operation and control of the unit at speeds up to 20,000 rpm.

  3. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lazaridis, Themis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or ...

  4. Kinetic Damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.Y. Fu; H.L. Berk; A. Pletzer

    2005-05-03

    The damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in JET plasmas is investigated by using a reduced kinetic model. Typically no significant damping is found to occur near the center of the plasma due to mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. In contrast, continuum damping from resonance near the plasma edge may be significant, and when it is, it gives rise to damping rates that are compatible with the experimental observations.

  5. Toroidal geometry subroutines for MORSE-CG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equations, coding, and procedures that are required to include a torus in the Combinatorial Geometry subroutines of the MORSE-CG code are described. The derivation and solutions of the quartic equation that describes a torus along with additional subroutines and the modifications to existing subroutines required to carry out the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in toroidal geometry are presented. The input requirements and a sample problem are included

  6. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  7. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  8. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  9. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube

  10. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  11. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Masahiro; Oda, Tatsuro; Kitaguchi, Masaaki; Yamada, Norifumi L.; Tasaki, Seiji; Kawabata, Yuji

    2015-10-01

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS

  12. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Masahiro, E-mail: hino@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki [Center for Experimental Studies, KMI, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 203-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Tasaki, Seiji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS.

  13. Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

  14. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Savinov, V; Zheludev, N I

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving toroidal multipoles have been predicted to produce vector potential in the absence of electromagnetic fields. Existence of the toroidal response in metamaterials was recently demonstrated and is now a growing field of research. However, no direct analytical link has yet been established between the transmission and reflection of macroscopic electromagnetic media and toroidal dipole excitations. To address this essential gap in electromagnetic theory we have developed an analytical approach linking microscopic and macrosc...

  15. An overview on research developments of toroidal continuously variable transmissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As environmental protection agencies enact new regulations for automotive fuel economy and emission, the toroidal continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) keep on contribute to the advent of system technologies for better fuel consumption of automobiles with internal combustion engines (ICE). Toroidal CVTs use infinitely adjustable drive ratios instead of stepped gears to achieve optimal performance. Toroidal CVTs are one of the earliest patents to the automotive world but their torque capacities and reliability have limitations in the past. New developments and implementations in the control strategies, and several key technologies have led to development of more robust toroidal CVTs, which enables more extensive automotive application of toroidal CTVs. This paper concerns with the current development, upcoming and progress set in the context of the past development and the traditional problems associated with toroidal CVTs.

  16. Toroid cavity/coil NMR multi-detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Meadows, Alexander D.; Gregar, Joseph S.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2007-09-18

    An analytical device for rapid, non-invasive nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of multiple samples using a single spectrometer is provided. A modified toroid cavity/coil detector (TCD), and methods for conducting the simultaneous acquisition of NMR data for multiple samples including a protocol for testing NMR multi-detectors are provided. One embodiment includes a plurality of LC resonant circuits including spatially separated toroid coil inductors, each toroid coil inductor enveloping its corresponding sample volume, and tuned to resonate at a predefined frequency using a variable capacitor. The toroid coil is formed into a loop, where both ends of the toroid coil are brought into coincidence. Another embodiment includes multiple micro Helmholtz coils arranged on a circular perimeter concentric with a central conductor of the toroid cavity.

  17. The Unmanned Research Airplane Facility at the Cyprus Institute: Advanced Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Manfred A.; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They provide an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. Building on an earlier project (Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project; APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute (APAESO is co-financed by the European Development Fund and the Republic of Cyprus through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation), we have built up an Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The Cyprus Institute (CyI-URAF). The basic components of this facility comprise four CRUISERS airplanes (ET-Air, Slovakia) as UAS platforms, a substantial range of scientific instruments to be flown on these platforms, a mobile Ground Control Station and a well-equipped workshop and calibration laboratory. The APAESO platforms are suitable to carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the (Eastern) Mediterranean (and elsewhere). They enable 3D measurements for determining physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations and atmospheric dynamics as well as 2D investigations into land management practices, vegetation and agricultural mapping, contaminant detection and the monitoring and assessment of hydrological parameters and processes of a given region at high spatial resolution. We will report on some of the essential modifications of the platforms and some of the instrumentation that were instrumental in preparing the research airplanes for a variety of collaborative research projects with. The first scientific mission involved the employment of a DOAS-system (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) in cooperation with

  18. Development of the advanced PHWR technology -Design, fabrication and installation of irradiation facilities-

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yong Sung; Lee, Jung Yung; Lee, Sung Hoh [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-07-01

    The principal contents of this project are to design, fabricate and install the steady-state fuel test loop and non-instrumented capsule and to develop the instrumented capsule in HANARO for nuclear technology development. This project will be completed in 1997, the detail design, safety analysis, and procurement of main equipment for fuel test loop have been performed and also the piping in gallery and the support for IPS piping in reactor pool have been installed in 1994 as the second year of the first phase in implementing this project. In the area of non-instrumented capsule for material irradiation test, the fabrication of capsule has been completed, so the manufacturing process has been accomplished by the preparation of QA procedure manual, machining and assembling, test and inspection. In the area of instrumented capsule technology development, mock-ups of capsule and supporting system have been designed and fabricated for the development of the in-pile test technology. It has been confirmed that the capsule and supporting system are compatible with the HANARO operating conditions and structural requirements. Capsule supporting system has been installed in the HANARO. As besides, as these irradiation facilities will be installed in HANARO, review of safety concern, discussion with KINS for licensing and review of HANARO interface have been performed respectively. 36 figs, 18 tabs, 21 refs. (Author).

  19. The Budapest research reactor as an advanced research facility for the early 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Budapest Research Reactor, Hungary's first nuclear facility was originally put into operation in 1959. The reactor serves for: basic and applied research, technological and commercial applications, education and training. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research. This unique research possibility is used by a broad user community of Europe. Eight instruments for neutron scattering, radiography and activation analyses are already used, others (e.g. time of flight spectrometer, neutron reflectometer) are being installed. The majority of these instruments will get a much improved utilization when the cold neutron source is put into operation. In 1999 the Budapest Research Reactor was operated for 3129 full power hours in 14 periods. The normal operation period took 234 hours (starting Monday noon and finishing Thursday morning). The entire production for the year 1999 was 1302 MW days. This is a slightly reduced value, due to the installation of the cold neutron source. For the year 2000 a somewhat longer operation is foreseen (near to 4000 hours), as the cold neutron source will be operational. The operation of the reactor is foreseen at least up to the end of the first decade of the 21st century. (author)

  20. Recent advances in automatic alignment system for the National Iginition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Kalantar, D; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V

    2010-12-08

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 50 minutes. The system automatically commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics based upon images acquired from high-resolution digital cameras viewing beams at various locations. Forty-five control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze these images of the beams and references, and automaticallys teer the beams toward the target. This paper discusses the upgrades to the NIF automatic alignment system to handle new alignment needs and evolving requirements as related to various types of experiments performed. As NIF becomes a continuously-operated system and more experiments are performed, performance monitoring is increasingly important for maintenance and commissioning work. Data, collected during operations, is analyzed for tuning of the laser and targeting maintenance work. handling evolving alignment and maintenance needs is expected for the planned 30-year operational life of NIF.

  1. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    OpenAIRE

    Savinov, V.; Fedotov, V. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving...

  2. In-situ resource utilization in the design of advanced lunar facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    Resource utilization will play an important role in the establishment and support of a permanently manned lunar base. At the University of Houston - College of Architecture and the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture, a study team recently investigated the potential use of lunar in-situ materials in the design of lunar facilities. The team identified seven potential lunar construction materials; concrete, sulfur concrete, cast basalt, sintered basalt, glass, fiberglass, and metals. Analysis and evaluation of these materials with respect to their physical properties, processes, energy requirements, resource efficiency, and overall advantages and disadvantages lead to the selection of basalt materials as the more likely construction material for initial use on a lunar base. Basalt materials can be formed out of in-situ lunar regolith, with minor material beneficiation, by a simple process of heating and controlled cooling. The team then conceptualized a construction system that combines lunar regolith sintering and casting to make pressurized structures out of lunar resources. The design uses a machine that simultaneously excavates and sinters the lunar regolith to create a cylindrical hole, which is then enclosed with cast basalt slabs, allowing the volume to be pressurized for use as a living or work environment. Cylinder depths of up to 4 to 6 m in the lunar mare or 10 to 12 m in the lunar highlands are possible. Advantages of this construction system include maximum resource utilization, relatively large habitable volumes, interior flexibility, and minimal construction equipment needs. Conclusions of this study indicate that there is significant potential for the use of basalt, a lunar resource derived construction material, as a low cost alternative to Earth-based materials. It remains to be determined when in lunar base phasing this construction method should be implemented.

  3. [Academic cell therapy facilities are challenged by European regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannon, Christian; Sabatier, Florence; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Calmels, Boris; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Guy; Lemarie, Claude; Mahalatchimy, Aurélie

    2014-05-01

    Regulation (EC) n° 1394/2007 from the European Parliament and the Council describes a new category of health products termed « Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products » (ATMPs). ATMPs derive from cell engineering, tissue engineering or genetic manipulations, and can in some instances be combined with medical devices. ATMPs are distributed and administered to patients, after biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies have obtained a marketing authorization that is granted by the European Commission on the basis of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) assessment. Seven years after the publication of the regulation, few of these therapies have received a marketing authorization, and even fewer have met commercial success, suggesting that a number of medical and economic issues still need to be sorted out in order to achieve sustainability in this field. The coexistence of three sets of rules for three categories of health products that are biologically and medically related - ATMPs, ATMPs produced under the hospital exemption rule, and cell therapy products (CTPs) (a specific legal category in France) that have long been used in hematopoietic cell transplantation - constitutes a complex regulatory framework. This situation raises significant issues for historical as well as emerging operators in this moving field that are discussed thereafter.

  4. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available

  5. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Seong Nam; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Sung Hak; Kim, Dong Nam; Hwang, Sang Ho [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals.

  6. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals

  7. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp3 peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm−1) and that negligible amounts of the sp2 band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films

  8. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  9. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus. PMID:27357246

  10. Plasma current resonance in asymmetric toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Catto, Peter J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The well-known singularity in the magnetic differential equation for plasma current in an asymmetric toroidal confinement system is resolved by including in the pressure tensor corrections stemming from finite Larmor radius. The result provides an estimate of the amplitude of spikes in the parallel current that occur on rational magnetic surfaces. Resolution of the singularity is shown to depend on both the ambipolarity condition—the requirement of zero surface-averaged radial current—and the form of the magnetic differential equation near the rational surface.

  11. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  12. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  13. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N D; Evrard, R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs-Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  14. Polar interface phonons in ionic toroidal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, N. D.; Evrard, R.; Stroscio, Michael A.

    2016-09-01

    We use the dielectric continuum model to obtain the polar (Fuchs–Kliewer like) interface vibration modes of toroids made of ionic materials either embedded in a different material or in vacuum, with applications to nanotoroids specially in mind. We report the frequencies of these modes and describe the electric potential they produce. We establish the quantum-mechanical Hamiltonian appropriate for their interaction with electric charges. This Hamiltonian can be used to describe the effect of this interaction on different types of charged particles either inside or outside the torus.

  15. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  16. Pulsar Wind Nebulae with Thick Toroidal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroida...

  17. Advanced nutrient root feeding system for conveyer-type cylindrical plant growth facilities developed for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.; Krivobok, Anna; Krivobok, Nikolay

    A new brand of cylindrical conveyer-type space plant growth facilities (PGF) has been created to improve of cosmonauts’ diet in the microgravity conditions. Up to date several ground prototypes of the space PGF have been made and tested: “Phytocycle”, “Vitacycle”, “Phytocycle-LED”, “Phytoconveyer”; now the space PGF “Vitacycle-T” for the Russian segment of the ISS is under developing. In the PGFs the ion-exchange salt-saturated fibrous artificial soil (AS) is used as a root medium. We have proposed the system for enrichment of irrigation water by nutrients to decrease of the AS store required for PGF working during the long space mission. The system includes root modules filled in fibrous ion-exchange AS, the enrichment column with crumble salt-saturation ion-exchange resin and the cassette with slow releasing fertilizer (SRF). Both substrates (ion-exchange resin and SRF) are necessary because of the SRF contains mostly N, P and K but another three essential elements S, Ca, Mg are provided by the ion-exchange resin. In the system water goes throw the enrichment column with ion-exchange resin fertilizing by the nutrients and comes into the mixer cell fertilize equipped with the electrical conductivity sensor. When the signal of the conductivity sensor is coming to the controller it turns on the pump directed the water flow throw the cassette with SRF until the electric conductivity of the solution in the mixer cell will reach the setpoint. The nutrient root feeding system was tested during 88 days when Chinese cabbage grew in PGF “Phytocycle-LED”. The crop has been continuously illuminated by red and blue LEDs in the PPF ratio 7 to 1; an integral PPF level has been (240 ± 10) µmol/(m2×s). There was no renewal of the used fibrous AS during the experiment. The PGF total electric power consumption was of 0,45 kW. The average fresh biomass productivity of the PGF during steady state working mode was equal 135×g/day per m2 of the illuminated

  18. A Novel superconducting toroidal field magnet concept using advanced materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, J.

    1992-03-01

    The plasma physics database indicates that two distinct approaches to tokamak design may lead to commercial fusion reactors: low Aspect ratio, high plasma current, relatively low magnetic field devices, and high Aspect ratio, high field devices. The former requires significant enhancements in plasma performance, while the latter depends primarily upon technology development. The key technology for the commercialization of the high-field approach is large, high magnetic field superconducting magnets. In this paper, the physics motivation for the high field approach and key superconducting magnet (SCM) development issues are reviewed. Improved SCM performance may be obtained from improved materials and/or improved engineering. Superconducting materials ranging from NbTi to high- T c oxides are reviewed, demonstrating the broad range of potential superconducting materials. Structural material options are discussed, including cryogenic steel alloys and fiber-reinforced composite materials. Again, the breadth of options is highlighted. The potential for improved magnet engineering is quantified in terms of the Virial Theorem Limit, and two examples of approaches to highly optimized magnet configurations are discussed. The force-reduced concept, which is a finite application of the force-free solutions to Ampere's Law, appear promising for large SCMs but may be limited by the electromagnetics of a fusion plasma. The Solid Superconducting Cylinder (SSC) concept is proposed. This concept combines the unique properties of high- T c superconductors within a low- T c SCM to obtain (1) significant reductions in the structural material volume, (2) a decoupling of the tri-axial (compressive and tensile) stress state, and (3) a demountable TF magnet system. The advantages of this approach are quantified in terms of a 24 T commercial reactor TF magnet system. Significant reductions in the mechanical stress and the TF radial build are demonstrated.

  19. Reflectometer end station for synchrotron calibrations of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility flight optics and for spectrometric research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations have been underway to construct and test a facility for grazing incidence reflectance calibrations of flat mirrors at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The purpose is to conduct calibrations on witness flats to the coating process of the flight mirrors for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The x-ray energy range required is 50 eV--12 keV. Three monochromatic beamlines (X8C, X8A, U3A) will provide energy tunability over this entire range. The goal is to calibrate the AXAF flight mirrors with uncertainties approaching 1%. A portable end station with a precision-positioning reflectometer has been developed for this work. We have resolved the vacuum cleanliness requirements to preserve the coating integrity of the flats with the strict grazing-angle certainty requirements placed on the rotational control system of the reflectometer. A precision positioning table permits alignment of the system to the synchrotron beam to within 10 arcsec; the reflectometer's rotational control system can then produce grazing angle accuracy to within less than 2 arcsec, provided that the electron orbit is stable. At 10--12 keV, this degree of angular accuracy is necessary to achieve the calibration accuracy required for AXAF. However the most important energy regions for the synchrotron calibration are in the 2000--3200 eV range, where the M-edge absorption features of the coating element, iridium, appear, and the 300--700 eV range of the Ir N edges. The detail versus energy exhibited in these features cannot be traced adequately without a tunable energy source, which necessitates a synchrotron for this work. We present the mechanical designs, motion control systems, detection and measurement capabilities, and selected procedures for our measurements, as well as reflectance data

  20. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  1. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The ofly potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting torgidal magnets. It is found that the two general classificatigls of protectign methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which aldow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed

  2. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed

  3. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  4. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  5. EMPACT: Electrons Muons Partons with Air Core Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, M.D. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA))

    1990-05-25

    The EMPACT experiment utilizes a broad approach to maximize its discovery potential for new phenomena accessible at the SSC. The high resolution detector has a balances emphasis on, and large acceptance for, electrons, muons, jets, and noninteracting particles, and is capable of utilizing the ultimate luminosity of the SSC. The detector emphasizes excellent calorimetry augmented by TRD tracking, and employs an innovative system of superconducting air core toroids for muon measurements. Significant engineering effort has established the feasibility of a baseline detector concept and has addressed the related issues of support facilities, assembly, and detector integration. The design has been tested against the challenges of predicted phenomena, with the expectation that this will optimize the capacity for observing the unexpected. EMPACT's international collaboration has unprecedented support from major aerospace industries who are providing tools and expertise for project design and integration, which will assure that a detector optimized for performance and cost will be available for the first collisions at the new laboratory.

  6. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  7. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  8. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  9. Epithelial Proliferation on Curved Toroidal Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; Cruz, Ricardo; Fragkopoulos, Alexandros; Marquez, Samantha; Garcia, Andres; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    Cellular environment influences a multitude of cellular functions by providing chemical and physical signals that modulate cell behavior, dynamics, development, and eventually survival. In strongly interacting epithelial cells, cells coordinate their behavior to respond to mechanical constraints in 2D. Local differences in tissue tension has also been shown to impact cell reproduction within an epithelial-cell sheet. Much less is known about how cells respond to out-of-plane curvatures. Here, we describe the proliferation of MDCK on toroidal hydrogel substrates, which unlike spheres or planes, have regions of both positive and negative Gaussian curvature. Additionally, the range of curvatures can be controlled by varying the size and aspect ratio of the torus, allowing us to quantify the relation between substrate curvature and cell proliferation.

  10. Damping of toroidal ion temperature gradient modes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugama, H. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    The temporal evolution of linear toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes is studied based on a kinetic integral equation including an initial condition. It is shown how to evaluate the analytic continuation of the integral kernel as a function of a complex-valued frequency, which is useful for analytical and numerical calculations of the asymptotic damping behavior of the ITG mode. In the presence of the toroidal {nabla}B-curvature drift, the temporal dependence of the density and potential perturbations consists of normal modes and a continuum mode, which correspond to contributions from poles and from an integral along a branch cut, respectively, of the Laplace-transformed potential function of the complex-valued frequency. The normal modes have exponential time dependence with frequencies and growth rates determined by the dispersion relation while the continuum mode, which has a ballooning structure, shows a power law decay {proportional_to} t{sup -2} in the asymptotic limit, where t is the time variable. Therefore, the continuum mode dominantly describes the long-time asymptotic behavior of the density and potential perturbations for the stable system where all normal modes have negative growth rates. By performing proper analytic continuation for the homogeneous version of the kinetic integral equation, dependences of the normal modes` growth rate, real frequency, and eigenfunction on {eta}{sub i} (the ratio of the ion temperature gradient to the density gradient), k{sub {theta}} (the poloidal wavenumber), s (the magnetic shear parameter), and {theta}{sub k} (the ballooning angle corresponding to the minimum radial wavenumber) are numerically obtained for both stable and unstable cases. (author)

  11. Reference Magnetic Coordinates (RMC) for toroidal confinement systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Leonid; Kolemen, Egemen; Lazerson, Samuel

    2012-03-01

    Because of intrinsic anisotropy of high temperature plasma with respect to magnetic field, use of proper coordinates is of high priority for both theory and numerical methods. While in axisymmetric case, the poloidal flux function Y(r,z)=const determines proper flux coordinates, in 3-D, such a function does not exist. The destruction of nested magnetic surfaces even by small 3-D perturbations leads to a sudden change of topology of magnetic field. As a result, the coordinate systems can no longer be based on tracing the magnetic field lines resulting in difficulties for theory and 3-D numerical simulations. The RMC coordinates a,θ,ζ presented here (introduced in 1998 but not really used) are nested toroidal coordinates, which are best aligned with an ergodic confinement fields. In particular, in RMC the vector potential of the magnetic field has an irreducible form A = φ00(a)∇θ +[Y00(a) +ψ^*(a,θ,ζ)]∇ζ , where 3-D function ψ^* contains only resonant Fourier harmonics of angle coordinates. RMC can be generated and advanced using a fast (Newton) algorithm not involving the field line tracing.

  12. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.; Mendicino, R.; Benkechkache, M. A.

    2015-02-01

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC.

  13. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  14. Advancing Long Tail Data Capture and Access Through Trusted, Community-Driven Data Services at the IEDA Data Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehnert, K. A.; Carbotte, S. M.; Ferrini, V.; Hsu, L.; Arko, R. A.; Walker, J. D.; O'hara, S. H.

    2012-12-01

    Substantial volumes of data in the Earth Sciences are collected in small- to medium-size projects by individual investigators or small research teams, known as the 'Long Tail' of science. Traditionally, these data have largely stayed 'in the dark', i.e. they have not been properly archived, and have therefore been inaccessible and underutilized. The primary reason has been the lack of appropriate infrastructure, from adequate repositories to resources and support for investigators to properly manage their data, to community standards and best practices. Lack of credit for data management and for the data themselves has contributed to the reluctance of investigators to share their data. IEDA (Integrated Earth Data Applications), a NSF-funded data facility for solid earth geoscience data, has developed a comprehensive suite of data services that are designed to address the concerns and needs of investigators. IEDA's data publication service registers datasets with DOI and ensures their proper citation and attribution. IEDA is working with publishers on advanced linkages between datasets in the IEDA repository and scientific online articles to facilitate access to the data, enhance their visibility, and augment their use and citation. IEDA's investigator support ranges from individual support for data management to tools, tutorials, and virtual or face-to-face workshops that guide and assist investigators with data management planning, data submission, and data documentation. A critical aspect of IEDA's concept has been the disciplinary expertise within the team and its strong liaison with the science community, as well as a community-based governance. These have been fundamental to gain the trust and support of the community that have lead to significantly improved data preservation and access in the communities served by IEDA.

  15. Greenhouse gas accounting of the proposed landfill extension and advanced incineration facility for municipal solid waste management in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burgeoning of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal issue and climate change have drawn massive attention from people. On the one hand, Hong Kong is facing a controversial debate over the implementation of proposed landfill extension (LFE) and advanced incineration facility (AIF) to curb the MSW disposal issue. On the other hand, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government is taking concerted efforts to reduce the carbon intensity in this region. This paper discusses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from four proposed waste disposal scenarios, covering the proposed LFE and AIF within a defined system boundary. On the basis of the data collected, assumptions made, and system boundary defined in this study, the results indicate that AIF releases less GHG emissions than LFE. The GHG emissions from LFE are highly contributed by the landfill methane (CH4) emissions but offset by biogenic carbon storage, while the GHG emissions from AIF are mostly due to the stack discharge system but offset by the energy recovery system. Furthermore, parametric sensitivity analyses show that GHG emissions are strongly dependent on the landfill CH4 recovery rate, types of electricity displaced by energy recovery systems, and the heating value of MSW, altering the order of preferred waste disposal scenarios. This evaluation provides valuable insights into the applicability of a policy framework for MSW management practices in reducing GHG emissions. Highlights: • AIF is better than LFE with regard to GHG emissions in Hong Kong. • Major individual sub-processes of LFE and AIF for GHG emissions are investigated. • GHG emissions for LFE and AIF are strongly dependent on studied parametric sensitivity analyses. • Findings are valuable for sustainable MSW management and GHG reductions in waste sector

  16. Greenhouse gas accounting of the proposed landfill extension and advanced incineration facility for municipal solid waste management in Hong Kong

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woon, K.S.; Lo, Irene M.C., E-mail: cemclo@ust.hk

    2013-08-01

    The burgeoning of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal issue and climate change have drawn massive attention from people. On the one hand, Hong Kong is facing a controversial debate over the implementation of proposed landfill extension (LFE) and advanced incineration facility (AIF) to curb the MSW disposal issue. On the other hand, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government is taking concerted efforts to reduce the carbon intensity in this region. This paper discusses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from four proposed waste disposal scenarios, covering the proposed LFE and AIF within a defined system boundary. On the basis of the data collected, assumptions made, and system boundary defined in this study, the results indicate that AIF releases less GHG emissions than LFE. The GHG emissions from LFE are highly contributed by the landfill methane (CH{sub 4}) emissions but offset by biogenic carbon storage, while the GHG emissions from AIF are mostly due to the stack discharge system but offset by the energy recovery system. Furthermore, parametric sensitivity analyses show that GHG emissions are strongly dependent on the landfill CH{sub 4} recovery rate, types of electricity displaced by energy recovery systems, and the heating value of MSW, altering the order of preferred waste disposal scenarios. This evaluation provides valuable insights into the applicability of a policy framework for MSW management practices in reducing GHG emissions. Highlights: • AIF is better than LFE with regard to GHG emissions in Hong Kong. • Major individual sub-processes of LFE and AIF for GHG emissions are investigated. • GHG emissions for LFE and AIF are strongly dependent on studied parametric sensitivity analyses. • Findings are valuable for sustainable MSW management and GHG reductions in waste sector.

  17. Toroidal Spiral Strings in Higher-dimensional Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2010-01-01

    We report on our progress in research of separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings with a symmetric configuration in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a Hopf loop string which is a special class of the toroidal spirals, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  18. Toroidal dipole resonances in the relativistic random phase approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, D; Ring, P

    2002-01-01

    The isoscalar toroidal dipole strength distributions in spherical nuclei are calculated in the framework of a fully consistent relativistic random phase approximation, based on effective mean-field Lagrangians with nonlinear meson self-interaction terms. It is suggested that the recently observed "low-lying component of the isoscalar dipole mode" might in fact correspond to the toroidal giant dipole resonance. Although predicted by several theoretical models, the existence of toroidal resonances has not yet been confirmed in experiment. In the present analysis the vortex dynamics of these states is displayed by the corresponding velocity fields.

  19. Kinetic effect of toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, W., E-mail: wfguo@ipp.ac.cn; Ye, L.; Zhou, D.; Xiao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, S. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Kinetic effects of the toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode are theoretically investigated. It is found that when the toroidal rotation increases, the damping rate increases in the weak rotation regime due to the rotation enhancement of wave-particle interaction, and it decreases in the strong rotation regime due to the reduction of the number of resonant particles. Theoretical results are consistent with the behaviors of the geodesic acoustic mode recently observed in DIII-D and ASDEX-Upgrade. The kinetic damping effect of the rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode may shed light on the regulation of turbulence through the controlling the toroidal rotation.

  20. Performance of a Folded-Strip Toroidally Wound Induction Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Jack, Alan G.; Atkinson, Glynn J.;

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the measured experimental results from a four-pole toroidally wound induction machine, where the stator is constructed as a pre-wound foldable strip. It shows that if the machine is axially restricted in length, the toroidally wound induction machine can have substantially...... shorter stator end-windings than conventionally wound induction machines, and hence that a toroidally wound induction machine can have lower losses and a higher efficiency. The paper also presents the employed construction method, which emphasizes manufacturability, and highlights the advantages...

  1. Laser-induced production of large carbon-based toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the production of large carbon-based toroids (CBTs) from fullerenes. The process involves two-step laser irradiation of a mixed fullerene target (76% C60, 22% C70). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly identifies toroidal-shaped structures as well as Q-shaped constructs. The typical diameters of the CBTs are ∼0.2-0.3 μm with tubular diameters of ∼50-100 nm, but toroids as wide as 0.5 μm are observed making them nanostructures on the verge of being microstructures

  2. Development of a Code for the Long Term Radiological Safety Assessment of Radioactive Wastes from Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of evaluating annual individual doses from a potential repository disposing of radioactive wastes from the operation of the prospective advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Korea, the new safety assessment code based on the Goldsim has been developed. It was designed to compare the environmental impacts from many fuel cycle options such as direct disposal, wet and dry recycling. The code based on the compartment theory can be applied to assess both normal and what if scenarios

  3. Computer programs for capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes for laser fusion and other advanced technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three FORTRAN programs, CAPITAL, VENTURE, and INDEXER, have been developed to automate computations used in assessing the economic viability of proposed or conceptual laser fusion and other advanced-technology facilities, as well as conventional projects. The types of calculations performed by these programs are, respectively, capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes. The codes permit these three topics to be addressed with considerable sophistication commensurate with user requirements and available data

  4. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  5. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  6. Toroidicity Dependence of Tokamak Edge Safety Factor and Shear

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHIBingren

    2002-01-01

    In large tokamak device and reactor designs, the relationship between the toroidal current and the edge safety factor is very important because this will determine the eventual device or reactor size according to MHD stability requirements. In many preliminary

  7. Effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion is examined by treating the wave propagation in an inhomogeneous medium as an eigenvalue problem for ω2(m,n),m,n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers. Since the frequency regime near ω2 = ω/sub LH/2 is an accumulation point for the eigenvalue spectrum, the degenerate perturbation technique must be applied. The toroidal eigenmodes are constructed by a zeroth order superposition of monochromatic solutions with different poloidal dependence m, thus they generically exhibit a wide spectrum in k/sub parallel/ for given fixed ω2 even for small inverse aspect ratio epsilon. In case that the average is in the neighborhood of k/sub min/, the minimum wave number for accessibility of the mode conversion regime, it is expected that excitation of toroidal modes rather than geometric optics will determine the wave coupling to the plasma

  8. Numerical solution of quasilinear kinetic diffusion equations in toroidal plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Höök, Lars Josef

    2013-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the realization of a working fusion power plant is an increased detailed understanding of kinetic phenomena in toroidal plasmas. The tokamak is a toroidal, magnetically confined plasma device and is currently the main line towards a power plant. The spatial and temporal scales in a tokamak plasma are extreme and the only tractable path for quantitative studies is to rely on computer simulations. Present day simulation codes can resolve only some of these scales....

  9. Relation of E1 pygmy and toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Nesterenko, V O; Reinhard, P -G; Kvasil, J

    2014-01-01

    A possible relation of the low-lying E1 (pygmy resonance) and toroidal strengths is analyzed by using Skyrme-RPA results for the strength functions, transition densities and current fields in $^{208}$Pb. It is shown that the irrotational pygmy motion can appear as a local manifestation of the collective vortical toroidal dipole resonance (TDR) at the nuclear surface. The RPA results are compared to unperturbed (1ph) ones.

  10. Low-aspect-ratio toroidal equilibria of electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroidal electron clouds with a low aspect ratio (as small as 1.3) and lasting for thousands of poloidal rotation periods have been formed in the laboratory. Characteristic toroidal effects like a large inward shift of the minor axis of equipotential contours, elliptical and triangular deformations, etc., have been observed experimentally for the first time. The results of new analytic and numerical investigations of low-aspect-ratio electron cloud equilibria, which reproduce many of the observed features, are also presented

  11. Confinement and heating of high beta plasma with emphasis on compact toroids. Compact toroid research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two older projects associated with very high energy density plasmas, specifically the High Density Field Reversed Configuration and the Liner Plasma Compression Experiment, have been completed. Attention has been turned to compact toroid experiments of more conventional density, and three experiments have been initiated. These include the Coaxial Slow Source Experiment, the Variable Length FRC Experiment, and Variable Angle CthetaP Experiment. In each case, the project was begun in order to provide basic plasma physics information on specific unresolved issues of progammatic importance to the national CT Program

  12. Experimental study of high beta toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole have produced a wide range of stable high β plasmas with β significantly above single fluid MHD theory predictions. A stable β approx. 8% plasma, twice the fluid limit, is obtained with 5 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/ and tau/sub β/ approx. = 6000 tau/sub Alfven/ = 600 μsec. The enhanced stability is explained with a kinetic treatment that includes the effect of finite ion gyroradius which couples the ballooning mode to an ion drift wave. In a more collisional, large gyroradius (2 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/) regime, a stable β approx. 35% plasma is obtained with a decay time of 1000 Alfven times. Measurement of the equilibrium magnetic field in this regime indicates that the diamagnetic current density is five times smaller than predicted by ideal MHD, probably due to ion gyroviscosity. Particle transport is anomalous and ranges from agreement with the classical diffusion rate at the highest beta, lowest field plasma (B/sub P/ = 200 G), to thirteen times the classical rate in a β=11%, high field plasma (B/sub P/ = 860 G) where the level of enhancement increase with magnetic field. Fluctuations in density, electrostatic potential, and magnetic field have been studied in plasmas with β from 0.1% to 40%

  13. Toroidal bubble entrapment under an impacting drop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoraval, Marie-Jean; Thoroddsen, Sigurdur T.; Takehara, Kohsei; Etoh, Takeharu Goji

    2012-11-01

    We use ultra-high-speed imaging and numerical simulations (GERRIS, http://gfs.sf.net) to observe and analyze the formation of up to 14 air tori when a water drop impacts on a thin liquid film of water or other miscible liquids. They form during the early contact between the drop and the pool by the vertical oscillations of the ejecta sheet. They then break in micro-bubble rings by the Rayleigh instability. Their formation is associated with the shedding of an axisymmetric vortex street into the liquid from the free surface. These vorticity structures and their dynamics are made apparent by the dynamics of the micro-bubbles, added seed particles and the difference of refractive index for different liquids in the drop and the pool. More robust entrapments are observed for a thin film of ethanol or methanol. We show that while the non-spherical drop shape is not responsible for the toroidal bubble entrapments, the number of rings is increasing for more oblate drops. Individual bubble entrapments are also observed from azimuthal destabilizations of the neck between the drop and the pool.

  14. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  15. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  16. Pseudo-Anosov flows in toroidal manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Barbot, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We first prove rigidity results for pseudo-Anosov flows in prototypes of toroidal 3-manifolds: we show that a pseudo-Anosov in a Seifert fibered manifold is up to finite covers topologically conjugate to a geodesic flow. We also show that a pseudo-Anosov flow in a solv manifold is topologically conjugate to a suspension Anosov flow. Then we analyse immersed and embedded incompressible tori in optimal position with respect to a pseudo-Anosov flow. We also study the interaction of a pseudo-Anosov flow with possible Seifert fibered pieces in the torus decomposition: if the fiber is associated to a periodic orbit of the flow, we produce a standard form for the flow in the piece using Birkhoff annuli. Finally we introduce several new classes of examples, some of which are generalized pseudo-Anosov flows which have one prong singularities. The examples show that the results above in Seifert fibered and solvable manifolds do not apply to one prong pseudo-Anosov flows. In addition we also construct a large new class ...

  17. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  18. ''Turbulent Equipartition'' Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mode-independent part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density (Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)) which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nmi U#parallel# R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  19. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    In this paper we study the simple case of the dynamics of a density perturbation localized in the edge region of a medium sized tokamak in a full 3D geometry. The 2D evolution of such a perturbation has been studied in details on the low-field side, where the gradient of the magnetic field always...... dynamics in a full 3D tokamak geometry including the edge and SOL region as well. Previous studies with the ATTEMPT code proved that density blobs appear for typical parameters in the TEXTOR tokamak. The code has been prepared for flux driven simulations with detailed control of the blob initial state....... The DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak...

  20. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  1. Spontaneous toroidal flow generation due to negative effective momentum diffusivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Ben F.

    2015-02-01

    Spontaneous structure formation, and in particular, zonal flows, is observed in a broad range of natural and engineered systems, often arising dynamically as the saturated state of a linear instability. Flows in tokamaks are known to self-organise on small scales, but large scale toroidal flows also arise even when externally applied torques are zero. This has previously been interpreted as the result of small externally imposed breaking of a symmetry. However, we show that for large enough field line pitch, a robust spontaneous symmetry breaking occurs, leading to the generation of strong toroidal flow structures; parameters are typical of Spherical Tokamak discharges with reversed shear profiles. The short wavelength dynamics are qualitatively similar to the growth of poloidal flow structures, and toroidal flow gradients nonlinearly saturate at levels where the shearing rate is comparable to linear growth rate. On long wavelengths, we measure Prandtl numbers of around zero for these systems, in conjunction with the formation of structured toroidal flows, and we show that this is consistent with a model of momentum transport where fluxes act to reinforce small flow gradients: the effective momentum diffusivity is negative. Toroidal flow structures are largely unaffected by collisional damping, so this may allow toroidal bulk flows of order the ion thermal velocity to be maintained with zero momentum input. This phenomenon also provides a mechanism for the generation of localised meso-scale structures like transport barriers.

  2. Toroidal momentum pinch velocity due to the coriolis drift effect on small scale instabilities in a toroidal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, A G; Angioni, C; Strintzi, D

    2007-06-29

    In this Letter, the influence of the "Coriolis drift" on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments.

  3. Advancing automation of power distribution facilities and the cost reduction measures. Activities o technology development for advanced automation systems; Susumu haiden setsubi no jidoka, cost teigen taisaku. Jidoka system no kodoka eno gijutsu kaihatsu no torikumi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayami, M.; Matsui, Y. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Electric power companies in Japan are making efforts to reduce the cost by improving the operation rate of existing facilities through the employment of advanced automation systems in the sector of distribution. This paper introduces the systems of Hitachi. A 22 kV-line automation system using high-speed photo-transmission line is adopted for the maintenance of widely extended distribution facilities. This system includes a 22 kV/240-415 V transformer and a 22 kV/105-210 V transformer. To supervise and control these transformers and switches, and to recover the accidents, this system consists of a computer system, a remote host station, and remote end terminals. Based on the information of distribution facilities of substations, end terminals and a host station, monitor/control of these facilities and recovery of accidents are conducted using computers. A system plan supporting system is also introduced, which aims at improvements of facility utilization factor, operation efficiency, and distribution operation efficiency. 5 figs.

  4. Development of ITER toroidal field insert. International collaboration with Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Solenoid (CS) model coil programme was performed since 1992 as one of the projects in the Engineering Design Activity (EDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER). The CS model coil programme involves a plan to develop the Toroidal Field (TF) insert to demonstrate the conductor performance of ITER TF coils under a magnetic flux density of 13T. The TF insert was fabricated by Russia and tested by Japan under the framework of the ITER-EDA. The TF insert developed a single-layer solenoid with nine turns. It is wound with a cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor which consists of 1,152 Nb3Sn strands, a thin titanium jacket and a central channel. The outer diameter, height and weight of the TF insert are 1.56 m, 3.2 m and 3.1 ton, respectively. Fabrication of the TF insert was completed in May 2001 at the D.V.Efremov Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Apparatus (Efremov institute) in St. Petersburg, Russia. The TF insert was then transported to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Installation of the TF insert to CS model coil test facility was completed in August, 2001. Experiments including the cooldown and warmup processes, were completed in November 2001. The TF insert was charged to 13T with 46 kA without any instability under a back up magnetic field from the CS model coil. This report introduces an overview of the fabrication, installation and experiments for the TF insert conducted under collaboration between Japan and Russia. (author)

  5. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  6. Optical toroidal dipolar response by an asymmetric double-bar metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Zheng-Gao; Rho, Junsuk; Li, Jia-Qi; Lu, Changgui; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, X; 10.1063/1.4757613

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that the toroidal dipolar response can be realized in the optical regime by designing a feasible nanostructured metamaterial, comprising asymmetric double-bar magnetic resonators assembled into a toroid-like configuration. It is confirmed numerically that an optical toroidal dipolar moment dominates over other moments. This response is characterized by a strong confinement of an E-field component at the toroid center, oriented perpendicular to the H-vortex plane. The resonance-enhanced optical toroidal response can provide an experimental avenue for various interesting optical phenomena associated with the elusive toroidal moment.

  7. Axion Haloscopes with Toroidal Geometry at CAPP/IBS

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R

    2016-01-01

    The present state of the art axion haloscope employs a cylindrical resonant cavity in a solenoidal field. We, the Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in Korea, are also pursuing halo axion discovery using this cylindrical geometry. However, the presence of end caps of cavities increases challenges as we explore higher frequency regions for the axion at above 2 GHz. To overcome these challenges we exploit a toroidal design of cavity and magnetic field. A toroidal geometry offers several advantages, two of which are a larger volume for a given space and greatly reduced fringe fields which interfere with our preamps, in particular the planned quantum-based devices. We introduce the concept of toroidal axion haloscopes and present ongoing research activities and plans at CAPP/IBS.

  8. Toroidal and poloidal momentum transport studies in JET

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Andrew, Y.; Crombe, K.;

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the recent studies of toroidal and poloidal momentum transport in JET. The ratio of the global energy confinement time to the momentum confinement is found to be close to tau(E)/tau(phi) = 1 except for the low density or low collisionality discharges where the ratio is tau...... of toroidal velocity using the Weiland model and GLF23 also confirm that the ratio chi(phi)/chi(i) approximate to 0.4 reproduces the core toroidal velocity profiles well and similar accuracy with the ion temperature profiles. Concerning poloidal velocities on JET, the experimental measurements show...... is the turbulence driven flow through the Reynolds stress. Both CUTIE and TRB turbulence codes show the existence of an anomalous poloidal velocity, being significantly larger than the neo-classical values. And similarly to experiments, the poloidal velocity profiles peak in the vicinity of the ITB and seem...

  9. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  10. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B; Kozak, S; Kozak, J; Wojtasiewicz, G; Majka, M [Electrotechnical Institute in Warsaw (Poland); Janowski, T, E-mail: t.janowski@pollub.p [Lublin University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-06-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  11. Toroidal drift waves with an equilibrium velocity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the effect of a radially sheared poloidal velocity field on the toroidal drift wave which is well known to escape magnetic shear damping through toroidal coupling between different poloidal harmonics centered on individual rational surfaces. He endeavored to model the velocity profile according to that observed at the plasma edge during H-mode shots. The resultant wave formed by the interference of different poloidal harmonics now sees an antiwell created by the H-mode type velocity profile in the radial direction (in contrast to a well formed by the diamagnetic frequency in the absence of velocity fields). The wave, therefore, convects energy outward and hence undergoes damping. Outgoing wave boundary condition then introduces a negative imaginary contribution to the global eigenvalue -- once again confirming the stabilizing role of H-mode type velocity profiles. On the other hand, L-mode type velocity profiles have destabilizing action on toroidal drift waves

  12. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with sheared toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap, E-mail: kouirouki@astro.auth.gr [Technological Education Institute of Serres, 62124 Serres (Greece); Throumoulopoulos, G. N., E-mail: gthroum@uoi.gr [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Tasso, H., E-mail: het@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e., the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions, these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  13. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    by comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified...

  14. Experiments with a fully toroidal Extrap Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Extrap plasma confinement scheme, a Z-pinch is produced along the null of an octupole field generated by currents in external conductors. In the paper, studies of the discharge startup process in a fully toroidal configuration are described. Startup involves first breaking down a toroidal discharge and then driving up the current in order to reach the pinch parameter regime. Current densities of 2x106 A·m-2 have been achieved. The estimated plasma density is 6x1020m-3, and the temperature is about 4 eV. These parameters correspond to pinch conditions. (author)

  15. Toroidal Spiral Strings in Higher-dimensional Spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    We report on our progress in research of separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings with a symmetric configuration in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a Hopf loop string which is a special class of the toroidal spirals, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black ho...

  16. Comparative study between toroidal coordinates and the magnetic dipole field

    CERN Document Server

    Chávez-Alarcón, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    There is a similar behaviour between the toroidal coordinates and the dipole magnetic field produced by a circular loop. In this work we evaluate up to what extent the former can be used as a representation of the latter. While the tori in the toroidal coordinates have circular cross sections, those of the circular loop magnetic field are nearly elliptical ovoids, but they are very similar for large aspect ratios.The centres of the latter displace from the axis faster than the former. By making a comparison between tori of similar aspect ratios, we find quantitative criteria to evaluate the accuracy of the approximation.

  17. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  18. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The model by Braginskii for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to previous evaluations which contain an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglect the effect of the pitch angle. A radial gyroviscous force is found to survive the limit of constant density and rigid toroidal rotation of the flux surface, and a radial shear viscous force may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile.

  19. The Linear Evolution of Tearing Mode in Toroidal Geometry*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任慎明; 俞国扬

    2001-01-01

    A set of linearly-reduced MHD equations in toroidal geometry has been solved numerically in flux coordinate with toroidal coupling. In the case of q > 1 on the magnetic axis.where q is the safety factor, the result shows that an unstable 2/1 tearing mode destabilizes both 1/1 and 3/1 modes. The 1/1 and 3/1 modes contribute local perturbations on the resonant surface of q = 2. And the 2/1 mode also contributes a local perturbation on the resonant surface of q = 3.``

  20. Toroidal vortices as a solution to the dust migration problem

    CERN Document Server

    Loren-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier letter, we reported that dust settling in protoplanetary discs may lead to a dynamical dust-gas instability that produces global toroidal vortices. In this letter, we investigate the evolution of a dusty protoplanetary disc with two different dust species (1 mm and 50 cm dust grains), under the presence of the instability. We show how toroidal vortices, triggered by the interaction of mm grains with the gas, stop the radial migration of metre-sized dust, potentially offering a natural and efficient solution to the dust migration problem.

  1. Polygonal silica toroidal microcavity for controlled optical coupling

    CERN Document Server

    Kato, Takumi; Tanabe, Takasumi

    2012-01-01

    We fabricated polygonal silica toroidal microcavities to achieve stable mechanical coupling with an evanescent coupler such as a tapered fiber. The polygonal cavity was fabricated by using a combination of isotropic etching, anisotropic etching and laser reflow. It offers both high and low coupling efficiencies with the cavity mode even when the coupler is in contact with the cavity, which offers the possibility of taking the device outside the laboratory. A numerical simulation showed that an octagonal silica toroidal microcavity had an optical quality factor of 8.8\\times10^6.

  2. Field calculation of D0 toroids and comparison with measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, R.; Ostiguy, F.; Brzezniak, J.

    1992-06-01

    The magnetic structure of the D0 detector is described in an earlier report. The two-dimensional code POISSON was used for the initial design of the magnetic structures and the magnetic properties of the D0 toroids. During the construction, the two-dimensional code ANSYS was used to perform more detailed calculations. Full three-dimensional analysis was also performed using the code TOSCA. These new results are reported here and compared with measurements. In this study the magnetic flux in all toroids, CF, EF, and SAMUS is set in the same direction.

  3. Upgrades to Power Systems and Magnetic Field Coils in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Bradisse, M. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Swager, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    A set of facility upgrades for Pegasus is currently underway to improve the control and performance of the power systems and the magnetic field coils, with the aim of increased helicity-driven current drive for non-inductive startup. The plasma current achieved through helicity injection goes as √ITF Iinj , the toroidal field rod current and injector bias current, respectively. To increase this quantity, the toroidal field power system will be upgraded. Eight new high-current IGBT bridges will replace the 6 bridges currently in place, bringing ITF from 288 kA-turns to 600 kA-turns. Iinj is increased via a new 14 kA, 2.2 kV, single-quadrant IGCT switching power supply. The main poloidal field coil system is expanded to provide faster vertical field penetration of the vessel wall, thereby providing more flexible control of plasma position during startup and current growth. The L/R time for these coils is reduced by ˜40%. New divertor coils are being installed to provide more shaping flexibility and separatrix-limited operations. Overall power supply control will be improved and simplified by deployment of digital feedback controllers using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to replace PWM analog feedback controllers. FPGAs will provide faster control frequencies, improved fault-handling capability, and streamlined recording of power system operations.

  4. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  5. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Shear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)). The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  6. Summary of US-Japan Exchange 2004 New Directions and Physics for Compact Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Intrator, T; Nagata, M; Hoffman, A; Guo, H; Steinhauer, L; Ryutov, D; Miller, R; Okada, S

    2005-08-15

    This exchange workshop was an open meeting coordinated by the P-24 Plasma Physics Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. We brought together scientists from institutions in the US and Japan who are researching the various and complementary types of Compact Toroids (CT). Many concepts, including both experimental and theoretical investigations, are represented. The range spans Field Reversed Configuration (FRC), spheromak, Reversed Field Pinch (RFP), spherical tokamaks, linear devices dedicated to fundamental physics studies, and hybrid transitions that bridge multiple configurations. The participants represent facilities on which significant experiments are now underway: FRC Injection experiment (FIX), Translation Confinement experiment (TCS), Nihon-University Compact Torus Experiment (NUCTE), HITSI (Helicity Injection experiment, Steady Inductive Helicity Injection (HIT-SIHI)), Field Reversed Configuration experiment-Liner (FRX-L), TS-3/4, Sustained Spheromak Experiment (SSPX), Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX), HIST, Caltech Spheromak, or in the design process such as MRX-FRC (PPPL), Pulsed High Density experiment (PHD at UW). Several new directions and results in compact toroid (CT) research have recently emerged, including neutral-beam injection, rotating magnetic fields, flux build up from Ohmic boost coils, electrostatic helicity injection techniques, CT injection into other large devices, and high density configurations for applications to magnetized target fusion and translational compression of CT's. CT experimental programs in both the US and Japan have also shown substantial progress in the control and sustainment of CT's. Both in theory and experiment, there is increased emphasis on 3D dynamics, which is also related to astrophysical and space physics issues. 3D data visualization is now frequently used for experimental data display. There was much discussion of the effects of weak toroidal fields in FRC's and possible implications

  7. Controlling the toroidal excitations in metamaterials for high-Q response

    CERN Document Server

    Fan, Yuancheng; Fu, Quanhong; Wei, Zeyong; Li, Hongqiang

    2016-01-01

    The excitation of toroidal multipoles in metamaterials was investigated for high-Q response at a subwavelength scale. In this study, we explored the optimization of toroidal excitations in a planar metamaterial comprised of asymmetric split ring resonators (ASRRs). It was found that the scattering power of toroidal dipole can be remarkably strengthened by adjusting the characteristic parameter of ASRRs: asymmetric factor. Interestingly, the improvement in toroidal excitation accompanies increasing of the Q-factor of the toroidal metamaterial, it is shown that both the scattering power of toroidal dipole and the Q-factor were increased near one order by changing the asymmetric factor of ASRRs. The optimization in excitation of toroidal multipoles provide opportunity to further increase the Q-factor of toroidal metamaterial and boost light-matter interactions at the subwavelength scale for potential applications in low-power nonlinear processing and sensitive photonic applications.

  8. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sovinec, Carl [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-09-07

    The study entitled, "Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems," (TDTFS) applied analytical theory and numerical computation to investigate topics of importance to confining plasma, the fourth state of matter, with magnetic fields. A central focus of the work is how non-thermal components of the ion particle distribution affect the "sawtooth" collective oscillation in the core of the tokamak magnetic configuration. Previous experimental and analytical research had shown and described how the oscillation frequency decreases and amplitude increases, leading to "monster" or "giant" sawteeth, when the non-thermal component is increased by injecting particle beams or by exciting ions with imposed electromagnetic waves. The TDTFS study applied numerical computation to self-consistently simulate the interaction between macroscopic collective plasma dynamics and the non-thermal particles. The modeling used the NIMROD code [Sovinec, Glasser, Gianakon, et al., J. Comput. Phys. 195, 355 (2004)] with the energetic component represented by simulation particles [Kim, Parker, Sovinec, and the NIMROD Team, Comput. Phys. Commun. 164, 448 (2004)]. The computations found decreasing growth rates for the instability that drives the oscillations, but they were ultimately limited from achieving experimentally relevant parameters due to computational practicalities. Nonetheless, this effort provided valuable lessons for integrated simulation of macroscopic plasma dynamics. It also motivated an investigation of the applicability of fluid-based modeling to the ion temperature gradient instability, leading to the journal publication [Schnack, Cheng, Barnes, and Parker, Phys. Plasmas 20, 062106 (2013)]. Apart from the tokamak-specific topics, the TDTFS study also addressed topics in the basic physics of magnetized plasma and in the dynamics of the reversed-field pinch (RFP) configuration. The basic physics work contributed to a study of two-fluid effects on interchange dynamics, where

  9. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  10. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  11. Validation of Advanced Computer Codes for VVER Technology: LB-LOCA Transient in PSB-VVER Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Del Nevo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The OECD/NEA PSB-VVER project provided unique and useful experimental data for code validation from PSB-VVER test facility. This facility represents the scaled-down layout of the Russian-designed pressurized water reactor, namely, VVER-1000. Five experiments were executed, dealing with loss of coolant scenarios (small, intermediate, and large break loss of coolant accidents, a primary-to-secondary leak, and a parametric study (natural circulation test aimed at characterizing the VVER system at reduced mass inventory conditions. The comparative analysis, presented in the paper, regards the large break loss of coolant accident experiment. Four participants from three different institutions were involved in the benchmark and applied their own models and set up for four different thermal-hydraulic system codes. The benchmark demonstrated the performances of such codes in predicting phenomena relevant for safety on the basis of fixed criteria.

  12. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  13. Homogeneous Construction of the Toroidal Lie Algebra of Type A1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Haifeng Lian; Cui Chen; Qinzhu Wen

    2007-01-01

    In this paper,we consider an analogue of the level two homogeneous construc-tion of the affine Kac-Moody algebra A1(1) by vertex operators.We construct modules for the toroidal Lie algebra and the extended toroidal Lie algebra of type A1.We also prove that the module is completely reducible for the extended toroidal Lie algebra.

  14. Induced synthesis of toroid-like lead sulfide nanocomposites in ethanol solution through a protein templating route

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroid-like PbS nanocrystals have been prepared in zein ethanol solution based on self-assembly template of protein molecules. From transmission electron microscopy observation, the obtained samples were monodispersed with an average size of about 47 nm. The chemical composition and crystal structure of nanocomposites were determined by X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum measurements. The interaction between PbS and zein was investigated through Fourier transform infrared, photoluminescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and thermogravimetric analysis. The PbS nanocrystals could react with nitrogen and oxygen atoms of zein molecules through coordination and electrostatic force. The CD spectra results suggested that PbS nanocrystals induced the conformational transition of protein from α-helix to β-sheet and then self-assembled into ring or toroid nanostructure. The quenching of zein fluorescence induced by PbS nanocrystals also showed the change in the chemical microenvironments of the fluorescent amino acid residues in the protein structure. The key step of this facile, biomimetic route was the formation of self-assembly nanostructure of zein, which could regulate the nucleation and growth of toroid-like PbS nanocrystals

  15. Simulation and experimental research of x-ray toroidally bent crystal imaging with laser-produced plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xinyi, Wang; Shali, Xiao; jian, Lu; Yufen, Wu; Jun, Shi; Jiayu, Qian; Shenye, Liu; Minxi, Wei; Bolun, Chen

    2016-04-01

    Based on the Bragg law and imaging principle of bent crystal, the imaging properties of the monochromic backlighting system with a toroidally bent crystal were studied via ray-tracing simulations and experiments. Comparison experiments with both toroidally and spherically bent crystals using a Cr line as the backlighter were performed, showing that using toroidally bent crystal, a 2D image with the same magnifications in meridional and sagittal directions can be obtained with higher spatial resolution. Experiments with laser-produced plasmas using Mica crystal were carried out on the Shenguang II laser facility. Five laser beams were focused onto a Ti planar target producing a line at 4.75 keV as the backlighter and an image of a metal grid with size of 200 μm  ×  200 μm was recorded with an x-ray image plate. A spatial resolution of 40 μm was demonstrated with a magnification of 3 due to the restriction of the target chamber size. 10 μm spatial resolution might be possible if the detector can be located outside the chamber to enlarge the magnification.

  16. Induced synthesis of toroid-like lead sulfide nanocomposites in ethanol solution through a protein templating route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Li, E-mail: lizhangpds@126.com; Qin, Dezhi [Pingdingshan University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China); Yang, Guangrui [North China University of Water Conservancy and Electric Power, Institute of Environmental and Municipal Engineering (China); Du, Xian; Zhang, Qiuxia; Li, Feng [Pingdingshan University, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering (China)

    2015-09-15

    The toroid-like PbS nanocrystals have been prepared in zein ethanol solution based on self-assembly template of protein molecules. From transmission electron microscopy observation, the obtained samples were monodispersed with an average size of about 47 nm. The chemical composition and crystal structure of nanocomposites were determined by X-ray diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectrum measurements. The interaction between PbS and zein was investigated through Fourier transform infrared, photoluminescence, circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and thermogravimetric analysis. The PbS nanocrystals could react with nitrogen and oxygen atoms of zein molecules through coordination and electrostatic force. The CD spectra results suggested that PbS nanocrystals induced the conformational transition of protein from α-helix to β-sheet and then self-assembled into ring or toroid nanostructure. The quenching of zein fluorescence induced by PbS nanocrystals also showed the change in the chemical microenvironments of the fluorescent amino acid residues in the protein structure. The key step of this facile, biomimetic route was the formation of self-assembly nanostructure of zein, which could regulate the nucleation and growth of toroid-like PbS nanocrystals.

  17. Compact-Toroid development: status and technical needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and strategy for the technical development of a class of magnetic confinement configurations collectively identified as Compact Toroids. This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and range of output power

  18. Toroidal, compression, and vortical dipole strengths in 124Sn

    CERN Document Server

    Kvasil, J; Repko, A; Kleinig, W; Reinhard, P -G; Iudice, N Lo

    2012-01-01

    The toroidal, compression and vortical dipole strength functions in semi-magic $^{124}$Sn (and partly in doubly-magic $^{100,132}$Sn) are analyzed within the random-phase-approximation method with the SkT6, SkI3, SLy6, SV-bas, and SkM* Skyrme forces. The isoscalar (T=0), isovector (T=1), and electromagnetic ('elm') channels are considered. Both convection $j_c$ and magnetization $j_m$ nuclear currents are taken into account. The calculations basically confirm the previous results obtained for $^{208}$Pb with the force SLy6. In particular, it is shown that the vortical and toroidal strengths are dominated by $j_c$ in T=0 channel and by $j_m$ in T=1 and 'elm' channels. The compression strength is always determined by $j_c$. It is also shown that the 'elm' strength (relevant for (e,e') reaction) is very similar to T=1 one. The toroidal mode resides in the region of the pygmy resonance. So, perhaps, this region embraces both irrotational (pygmy) and vortical (toroidal) flows.

  19. Plasma Processes : Minimum dissipative relaxed states in toroidal plasmas

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Bhattacharyya; M S Janaki; B Dasgupta

    2000-11-01

    Relaxation of toroidal discharges is described by the principle of minimum energy dissipation together with the constraint of conserved global helicity. The resulting Euler-Lagrange equation is solved in toroidal coordinates for an axisymmetric torus by expressing the solutions in terms of Chandrasekhar-Kendall (C-K) eigenfunctions analytically continued in the complex domain. The C-K eigenfunctions are obtained as hypergeometric functions that are solutions of scalar Helmholtz equation in toroidal coordinates in the large aspect-ratio approximation. Equilibria are constructed by assuming the current to vanish at the edge of plasma. For the = 0; = 0 ( and are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers respectively) relaxed states, the magnetic field, current, (safety factor) and pressure profiles are calculated for a given value of aspect-ratio of the torus and for different values of the eigenvalue 0. The new feature of the present model is that solutions allow for both tokamak as well as RFP-like behaviour with increase in the values of 0, which is related directly to volt-sec in the experiment.

  20. Evidence of Inward Toroidal Momentum Convection in the JET Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tala, T.; Zastrow, K.-D.; Ferreira, J.;

    2009-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out on the Joint European Torus tokamak to determine the diffusive and convective momentum transport. Torque, injected by neutral beams, was modulated to create a periodic perturbation in the toroidal rotation velocity. Novel transport analysis shows the magnitude an...

  1. First ATLAS Barrel Toroid coil casing arrives at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The first of eight 25-metre long coil casings for the ATLAS experiment's barrel toroid magnet system arrived at CERN on Saturday 2 March by road from Heidelberg. This structure will be part of the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever made.   The first coil casing for the toroidal magnets of Atlas arrives at Building 180. This is the start of an enormous three-dimensional jigsaw puzzle. Each of the eight sets of double pancake coils will be housed inside aluminium coil casings, which in turn will be held inside a stainless steel vacuum vessel. A huge construction, the casing that arrived at CERN measures 25 metres in length and 5 metres in width. It weighs 20 tones. And this is just the beginning of the toroid jigsaw: by early April a batch of four double pancake coils, which altogether weighs 65 tones, will arrive from Ansaldo in Italy. The first vacuum vessel will also be arriving from Felguera in Spain this month. It will take about two years for all these 25 m long structures of casings, coils a...

  2. Stability of toroidal magnetic fields in stellar interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Ibañez-Mejia, Juan C

    2015-01-01

    We present 3D MHD simulations of purely toroidal and mixed poloidal-toroidal magnetic field configurations to study the behavior of the Tayler instability. For the first time the simultaneous action of rotation and magnetic diffusion are taken into account and the effects of a poloidal field on the dynamic evolution of unstable toroidal magnetic fields is included. In the absence of diffusion, fast rotation (rotation rate compared to Alfv\\'en frequency) is able to suppress the instability when the rotation and magnetic axes are aligned and when the radial field strength gradient p 1.5, rapid rotation does not suppress the instability but instead introduces a damping factor to the growth rate in agreement with the analytic predictions. For the mixed poloidal-toroidal fields we find an unstable axisymmetric mode, not predicted analytically, right at the stability threshold for the non-axisymmetric modes; it has been argued that an axisymmetric mode is necessary for the closure of the Tayler-Spruit dynamo loop.

  3. Flat-band assembly for toroidal transformer cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1973-01-01

    Toroidal transformer cores are often banded together by means of strap. Spot welds secure strap. Proper tension is obtained by use of special fixture in conjunction with winding of wire which is placed temporarily on core; winding is excited by dc current to hold core halves together magnetically during alignment.

  4. An Overview of Plasma Confinement in Toroidal Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Dini, Fatemeh; Baghdadi, Reza; Amrollahi, Reza; Khorasani, Sina

    2009-01-01

    This overview presents a tutorial introduction to the theory of magnetic plasma confinement in toroidal confinement systems with particular emphasis on axisymmetric equilibrium geometries, and tokamaks. The discussion covers three important aspects of plasma physics: Equilibrium, Stability, and Transport. The section on equilibrium will go through an introduction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, curvilinear system of coordinates, flux coordinates, extensions to axisymmetric equilibrium, Grad-Sh...

  5. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 metres long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-metre diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horisontal robust platform. Images from Camera 1

  6. ATLAS-Lowering the first Barrel Toroid coil

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Audiovisual Unit

    2004-01-01

    Cranes lowered the first of ATLAS's eight Barrel Toroid coils into the cavern. The part is 25 meters long and the cranes had to hold the 100 tonne coil at a sharp angle while it passed through the 18-meter diameter vertical shaft into the cavern. Then they laid the magnet to a horizontal robust platform. Images from Camera 2

  7. Theoretical studies of non inductive current drive in compact toroids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Farengo, R; Lifschitz, AF; Caputi, KI; Arista, NR; Clemente, RA

    2002-01-01

    Three non inductive current drive methods that can be applied to compact toroids axe studied. The use of neutral beams to drive current in field reversed configurations and spheromaks is studied using a Monte Carlo code that includes a complete ionization package and follows the exact particle orbit

  8. The Superconducting Toroid for the New International AXion Observatory (IAXO)

    CERN Document Server

    Shilon, I; Silva, H; Wagner, U; Kate, H H J ten

    2013-01-01

    IAXO, the new International AXion Observatory, will feature the most ambitious detector for solar axions to date. Axions are hypothetical particles which were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. This detector aims at achieving a sensitivity to the coupling between axions and photons of one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions to detectable X-ray photons. Inspired by the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a large superconducting toroid is being designed. The toroid comprises eight, one meter wide and twenty one meters long racetrack coils. The assembled toroid is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length and its mass is about 250 tons. The useful field in the bores is 2.5 T while the peak magnetic field in the windings is 5....

  9. Preparing an ATLAS toroid magnet end-cap for lowering

    CERN Multimedia

    Claudia Marcelloni

    2007-01-01

    One of the two 13-m high toroid magnet end-caps for the ATLAS experiment being transported from the construction hall to the experimental area. The end-cap will be lowered into the ATLAS cavern and attached to an end of the detector.

  10. Theory of the M = 1 Kink Mode in Toroidal Plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Blank, H. J.; Schep, T. J.

    1991-01-01

    The energy principle of ideal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) is used to study the ideal MHD stability of the m = 1 internal kink mode in a toroidal plasma. The equilibrium configurations that are considered allow for a broad region where the safety factor q is close to unity. This region may extend to t

  11. Barrel Toroid fully charged to nominal field, and it works!

    CERN Multimedia

    Herman ten Kate

    After a few weeks of testing up to intermediate currents, finally, on Thursday evening November 9, the current in the Barrel Toroid was pushed up to its nominal value of 20500 A and even 500 A beyond this value to prove that we have some margin. It went surprisingly well. Of course, the 8 coils forming the toroid were already tested individually at the surface but still, some surprise may have come from those parts added to the toroid in the cavern for the first time like the 8 cryoring sections linking the coils as well as the valve box at the bottom in sector 13 regulating the helium flow or the current lead cryostat on the top in sector 5. No training quenches, nothing to worry about, and the test was concluded with a fast dump triggered at 00:40 in the very early morning of November 10. (left) The toroid current during the evening and night of November 9. (right) The test crew oscillated between fear and hope while looking at the control panels as the current approached 21kA. Big relief was in the...

  12. A toroidal inductor integrated in a standard CMOS process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandi, Luca; Andreani, Pietro; Temporiti, Enrico;

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a toroidal inductor integrated in a standard 0.13 um CMOS process. Finite-elements preliminary simulations are provided to prove the validity of the concept. In order to extract fundamental parameters by means of direct calculations, two different and well-known approaches...

  13. Plasma Heating and Losses in Toroidal Multipole Fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armentrout, C. J.; Barter, J. D.; Breun, R. A.; Cavallo, A. J.; Drake, J. R.; Etzweiler,; Greenwood, J. R.

    1974-09-01

    The heating and loss of plasmas have been studied in three pulsed, toroidal multipole devices: a large levitated octupole, a small supported octupole and a very .small supported quadrupole. Plasmas are produced by gun injection and heated by electron and ion cyclotron resonance heating and ohmic heating. Electron cyclotron heating rates have been measured over a wide range of parameters, and the results are in quantitative agreement with stochastic heating theory. Electron cyclotron resonance heating produces ions with energies larger than predicted by theory. With the addition of a toroidal field, ohmic heating gives densities as high as 10{sup 13}cm{sup -3} in the toroidal quadrupole and 10{sup 12}cm{sup -3} in the small octupole. Plasma losses for n=5 x 10{sup 9}cm{sup -3} plasmas are inferred from Langmuir probe and Fabry-Perot interferometer measurements, and measured with special striped collectors on the wall and rings. The loss to a levitated ring is measured using a modulated light beam telemeter. The confinement is better than Bohm but considerably worse than classical. Low frequency convective cells which are fixed in space are observed. These cells around the ring are diminished when a weak toroidal field is added, and loss collectors show a vastly reduced flux to the rings. Analysis of the spatial density profile shows features of B-independent diffusion. The confinement is sensitive to some kinds of dc field errors, but surprisingly insensitive to perturbations of the ac confining field.

  14. Recent Advances in Antenna Measurement Techniques at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.;

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports recent antenna measurement projects and research at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at the Technical University of Denmark. High-accuracy measurement projects for the SMOS, SENTINEL-1, and BIOMASS missions of the European Space Agency were driven...... by uncertainty requirements of a few hundredths of dB for the directivity and correspondingly strong requirements for gain and/or phase. Research and development of 1:3 bandwidth range probes, and the near-field to far-field transformation algorithm accounting for the higher-order azimuthal modes...

  15. Remote replacement of TF [toroidal field] and PF [poloidal field] coils for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of deuterium-tritium fuel in the Compact Ignition Tokamak will require applying remote handling technology for ex-vessel maintenance and replacement of machine components. Highly activated and contaminated components of the fusion devices auxiliary systems, such as diagnostics and RF heating, must be replaced using remotely operated maintenance equipment in the test cell. In-vessel remote maintenance included replacement of divertor and first wall hardware, faraday shields, and for an in-vessel inspection system. Provision for remote replacement of a vacuum vessel sector, toroidal field coil or poloidal field ring coil was not included in the project baseline. As a result of recent coil failures experienced at a number of facilities, the CIT project decided to reconsider the question of remote recovery from a coil failure and, in January of 1990, initiated a coil replacement study. This study focused on the technical requirements and impact on fusion machine design associated with remote recovery from any coil failure

  16. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are the single-cell concept, the low-flow ventilation concept, television viewing, equipment-mounting racks, and force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. 14 refs., 3 figs

  17. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are (1) the single-cell concept, (2) the low-flow ventilation concept, (3) television viewing, (4) equipment-mounting racks, and (5) force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. (author)

  18. Application of life-cycle information for advancement in safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Application of safety information to advanced safety management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk management is major concern to nuclear energy reprocessing plants to improve plant and process reliability and ensure their safety. This is because we are required to predict potential risks before any accident or disaster occurs. The advancement of safety design and safety systems technologies showed large amount of useful safety-related knowledge that can be of great importance to plant operation to reduce operation risks and ensure safety. This research proposes safety knowledge modeling framework on the basis of ontology technologies to systematically construct plant knowledge model, which includes plant structure, operation, and the associated behaviors. In such plant knowledge model safety related information is defined and linked to the different elements of plant knowledge model. Ontology editor is employed to define the basic concepts and their inter-relations, which are used to capture and construct plant safety knowledge. In order to provide detailed safety knowledgebase, HAZOP results are analyzed and structured so that safety-related knowledge are identified and structured within the plant knowledgebase. The target safety knowledgebase includes: failures, deviations, causes, consequences, and fault propagation as mapped to plant knowledge. The proposed ontology-based safety framework is applied on case study nuclear plant to structure failures, causes, consequences, and fault propagation, which are used to support plant operation. (author)

  19. High Energy Tests of Advanced Materials for Beam Intercepting Devices at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, S; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaeelli, S; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2012-01-01

    Predicting by simulations the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting Collimators and other Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) is a fundamental issue for machine protection: this can be done by resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, these codes require reliable material models that, at the extreme conditions generated by a beam impact, are either imprecise or non-existent. To validate relevant constitutive models or, when unavailable, derive new ones, a comprehensive experimental test foreseeing intense particle beam impacts on six different materials, either already used for present BID or under development for future applications, is being prepared at CERN HiRadMat facility. Tests will be run at medium and high intensity using the SPS proton beam (440 GeV). Material characterization will be carried out mostly in real time relying on embarked instrumentation (strain gauges, microphones, temperature and pressure sensors) and on remote acquisition dev...

  20. COMPONENT TEST FACILITY (COMTEST) PHASE 1 ENGINEERING FOR 760C (1400F) ADVANCED ULTRASUPERCRITICAL (A-USC) STEAM GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weitzel, Paul

    2016-01-31

    The Babcock & Wilcox Company (B&W) performed a Pre-Front End Engineering Design (Pre-FEED) of an A-USC steam superheater for a proposed component test program achieving 760C (1400F) steam temperature. This would lead to follow-on work in a Phase 2 and Phase 3 that would involve detail design, manufacturing, construction and operation of the ComTest. Phase 1 results have provided the engineering data necessary for proceeding to the next phase of ComTest. The steam generator superheater would subsequently supply the steam to an A-USC prototype intermediate pressure steam turbine. The ComTest program is important in that it will place functioning A-USC components in operation and in coordinated boiler and turbine service. It is also important to introduce the power plant operation and maintenance personnel to the level of skills required and provide the first background experience with hands-on training. The project will provide a means to exercise the complete supply chain events required in order to practice and perfect the process for A-USC power plant design, supply, manufacture, construction, commissioning, operation and maintenance. Representative participants will then be able to transfer knowledge and recommendations to the industry. ComTest is conceived in the manner of using a separate standalone plant facility that will not jeopardize the host facility or suffer from conflicting requirements in the host plant’s mission that could sacrifice the nickel alloy components and not achieve the testing goals. ComTest will utilize smaller quantities of the expensive materials and reduce the risk in the first operational practice for A-USC technology in the United States. Components at suitable scale in ComTest provide more assurance before putting them into practice in the full size A-USC demonstration plant.

  1. Multipurpose monochromator for the Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center Collaborative Access Team beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source x-ray facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, M.; Beno, M. A.; Knapp, G. S.; Jennings, G.; Cowan, P. L.; Montano, P. A.

    1995-02-01

    The Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) will construct x-ray beamlines at two sectors of the Advanced Photon Source facility. In most of the beamlines the first optical element will be a monochromator, so that a standard design for this critical component is advantageous. The monochromator is a double-crystal, fixed exit scheme with a constant offset designed for ultrahigh vacuum windowless operation. In this design, the crystals are mounted on a turntable with the first crystal at the center of rotation. Mechanical linkages are used to correctly position the second crystal and maintain a constant offset. The main drive for the rotary motion is provided by a vacuum compatible Huber goniometer isolated from the main vacuum chamber. The design of the monochromator is such that it can accommodate water, gallium, or liquid-nitrogen cooling for the crystal optics.

  2. Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation

  3. Observation of Fano resonance and classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency in toroidal metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Song; Yang, Helin [College of Physical Science and Technology, Central China Normal University, Wuhan (China); Cong, Lonqing; Singh, Ranjan [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Centre for Disruptive Photonic Technologies, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore); Gao, Fei [Division of Physics and Applied Physics, School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (Singapore)

    2016-05-15

    Toroidal multipoles have recently been explored in various scientific communities, ranging from atomic and molecular physics, electrodynamics, and solid-state physics to biology. Here we experimentally and numerically demonstrate a three-dimensional toroidal metamaterial where two different toroidal dipoles along orthogonal directions have been observed. The chosen toroidal metamaterial also simultaneously supports Fano resonance and the classical analog of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) phenomena in the transmission spectra that originate from the electric-toroidal dipole and electric-magnetic dipole destructive interference. The intriguing properties of the toroidal resonances may open up avenues for applications in toroidal moments generator, sensing and slow-light devices. (copyright 2016 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Development of Multi-pulse Compact Toroid Injector System for C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allfrey, I.; Garate, E.; Morehouse, M.; Roche, T.; Gota, H.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Putvinski, S.; Cordero, M.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    The C-2U experiment aims at sustaining a dynamically formed field reversed configuration (FRC) for 5 + ms via injection of 10 +MW of neutral beams. One of the systems currently used to refuel the C-2U plasma is a single pulse compact toroid injector (CTI). The CTI is a magnetized co-axial plasma gun, which generates a spheromak-like plasma that is injected into the core of the advanced beam-driven FRC of C-2U. In order to refuel the recent long-lived plasmas in C-2U, a multi-pulse CTI system, whose modular design allows for expandable burst numbers, is being designed. Details of the pulsed power systems used to energize the single pulse and the upgraded multi-pulse CTI will be discussed. Results of injector performance carried out on a dedicated test stand as well as some refueling data on C-2U will also be presented.

  5. Characterization of compact-toroid injection during formation, translation, and field penetration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T.; Roche, T.; Allfrey, I.; Sekiguchi, J.; Asai, T.; Gota, H.; Cordero, M.; Garate, E.; Kinley, J.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; Binderbauer, M.; Tajima, T.

    2016-11-01

    We have developed a compact toroid (CT) injector system for particle refueling of the advanced beam-driven C-2U field-reversed configuration (FRC) plasma. The CT injector is a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG), and the produced CT must cross the perpendicular magnetic field surrounding the FRC for the refueling of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of ˜1 kG is established, which is comparable to the C-2U axial magnetic field in the confinement section, and CTs are fired across it. On the test stand we have been characterizing and studying CT formation, ejection/translation from the MCPG, and penetration into transverse magnetic fields.

  6. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, Oliver K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Physics; Betz, Michael; Caspers, Fritz [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva (Switzerland); Jaeckel, Joerg [Institute for Particle Physics Phenomenology, Durham (United Kingdom); Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Semertzidis, Yannis [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Sikivie, Pierre [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Zioutas, Konstantin [Patras Univ. (Greece)

    2011-10-15

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  7. Prospects for searching axionlike particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal, and wiggler magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Baker, Oliver K; Caspers, Fritz; Jaeckel, Joerg; Lindner, Axel; Ringwald, Andreas; Semertzidis, Yannis; Sikivie, Pierre; Zioutas, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axionlike particles using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle-physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such axionlike-particle dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets which are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already-existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axionlike dark matter particles.

  8. Prospects for searching axion-like particle dark matter with dipole, toroidal and wiggler magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we consider searches for dark matter made of axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) using resonant radio frequency cavities inserted into dipole magnets from particle accelerators, wiggler magnets developed for accelerator based advanced light sources, and toroidal magnets similar to those used in particle physics detectors. We investigate the expected sensitivity of such ALP dark matter detectors and discuss the engineering aspects of building and tuning them. Brief mention is also made of even stronger field magnets that are becoming available due to improvements in magnetic technology. It is concluded that new experiments utilizing already existing magnets could greatly enlarge the mass region in searches for axion-like dark matter particles. (orig.)

  9. The CHEASE code for toroidal MHD equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CHEASE solves the Grad-Shafranov equation for the MHD equilibrium of a Tokamak-like plasma with pressure and current profiles specified by analytic forms or sets of data points. Equilibria marginally stable to ballooning modes or with a prescribed fraction of bootstrap current can be computed. The code provides a mapping to magnetic flux coordinates, suitable for MHD stability calculations or global wave propagation studies. The code computes equilibrium quantities for the stability codes ERATO, MARS, PEST, NOVA-W and XTOR and for the global wave propagation codes LION and PENN. The two-dimensional MHD equilibrium (Grad-Shafranov) equation is solved in variational form. The discretization uses bicubic Hermite finite elements with continuous first order derivates for the poloidal flux function Ψ. The nonlinearity of the problem is handled by Picard iteration. The mapping to flux coordinates is carried out with a method which conserves the accuracy of the cubic finite elements. The code uses routines from the CRAY libsci.a program library. However, all these routines are included in the CHEASE package itself. If CHEASE computes equilibrium quantities for MARS with fast Fourier transforms, the NAG library is required. CHEASE is written in standard FORTRAN-77, except for the use of the input facility NAMELIST. CHEASE uses variable names with up to 8 characters, and therefore violates the ANSI standard. CHEASE transfers plot quantities through an external disk file to a plot program named PCHEASE using the UNIRAS or the NCAR plot package. (author) figs., tabs., 34 refs

  10. SINP MSU accelerator facility and applied research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: SINP accelerator facility includes 120 cm cyclotron, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 3.0 MeV, electrostatic generator with the upper voltage 2.5 MeV, Cocroft -Walton generator with the upper voltage 500 keV, 150 keV accelerator for solid microparticles. A new generation of electron beam accelerators has been developed during the last decade. The SINP accelerator facility will be shortly described in the report. A wide range of basic research in nuclear and atomic physics, physics of ion-beam interactions with condensed matter is currently carried out. SINP activity in the applied research is concentrated in the following areas of materials science: - Materials diagnostics with the Rutherford backscattering techniques (RBS) and channeling of ions (RBS/C). A large number of surface ad-layers and multilayer systems for advanced micro- and nano-electronic technology have been investigated. A selected series of examples will be illustrated. - Concentration depth profiles of hydrogen by the elastic recoils detection techniques (ERD). Primarily, the hydrogen depth profiles in perspective materials for thermonuclear reactors have been investigated. - Lattice site locations of hydrogen by a combination of ERD and channeling techniques. This is a new technique which was successfully applied for investigation of hydrogen and hydrogen-defect complexes in silicon for the smart-cut technology. - Light element diagnostics by RBS and nuclear backscattering techniques (NBS). The technique is illustrated by applications for nitrogen concentration profiling in steels. Nitrogen take-up and release, nitrides precipitate formation will be illustrated. - New medium energy ion scattering (MEIS) facility and applications. Ultra-high vacuum and superior energy resolution electrostatic toroidal analyzer is designed to be applied for characterization of composition and structure of several upper atomic layers of materials

  11. An Applied Study of Implementation of the Advanced Decommissioning Costing Methodology for Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel in Studsvik, Sweden with special emphasis to the application of the Omega code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kristofova, Kristina; Vasko, Marek; Daniska, Vladimir; Ondra, Frantisek; Bezak, Peter [DECOM Slovakia, spol. s.r.o., J. Bottu 2, SK-917 01 Trnava (Slovakia); Lindskog, Staffan [Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2007-01-15

    The presented study is focused on an analysis of decommissioning costs for the Intermediate Storage Facility for Spent Fuel (FA) facility in Studsvik prepared by SVAFO and a proposal of the advanced decommissioning costing methodology application. Therefore, this applied study concentrates particularly in the following areas: 1. Analysis of FA facility cost estimates prepared by SVAFO including description of FA facility in Studsvik, summarised input data, applied cost estimates methodology and summarised results from SVAFO study. 2. Discussion of results of the SVAFO analysis, proposals for enhanced cost estimating methodology and upgraded structure of inputs/outputs for decommissioning study for FA facility. 3. Review of costing methodologies with the special emphasis on the advanced costing methodology and cost calculation code OMEGA. 4. Discussion on implementation of the advanced costing methodology for FA facility in Studsvik together with: - identification of areas of implementation; - analyses of local decommissioning infrastructure; - adaptation of the data for the calculation database; - inventory database; and - implementation of the style of work with the computer code OMEGA.

  12. Facile synthesis of ultrathin manganese dioxide nanosheets arrays on nickel foam as advanced binder-free supercapacitor electrodes

    KAUST Repository

    Huang, Ming

    2015-03-01

    © 2014 Elsevier B.V. Ultrathin MnO2 nanosheets arrays on Ni foam have been fabricated by a facile hydrothermal approach and further investigated as the binder-free electrode for high-performance supercapacitors. This unique well-designed binder-free electrode exhibits a high specific capacitance (595.2 F g-1 at a current density of 0.5 A g-1), good rate capability (64.1% retention), and excellent cycling stability (89% capacitance retention after 3000 cycles). Moreover, an asymmetric supercapacitor is constructed using the as-prepared MnO2 nanosheets arrays as the positive electrode and activated microwave exfoliated graphite oxide (MEGO) as the negative electrode. The optimized asymmetric supercapacitor displays excellent electrochemical performance with an energy density of 25.8 Wh kg-1 and a maximum power density of 223.2 kW kg-1. These impressive performances suggest that the MnO2 nanosheet array is a promising electrode material for supercapacitors.

  13. Design and advancement status of the Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility (BEaTriX)

    CERN Document Server

    Spiga, D; Salmaso, B; Arcangeli, L; Bianucci, G; Ferrari, C; Ghigo, M; Pareschi, G; Rossi, M; Tagliaferri, G; Valsecchi, G; Vecchi, G; Zappettini, A

    2016-01-01

    The BEaTriX (Beam Expander Testing X-ray facility) project is an X-ray apparatus under construction at INAF/OAB to generate a broad (200 x 60 mm2), uniform and low-divergent X-ray beam within a small lab (6 x 15 m2). BEaTriX will consist of an X-ray source in the focus a grazing incidence paraboloidal mirror to obtain a parallel beam, followed by a crystal monochromation system and by an asymmetrically-cut diffracting crystal to perform the beam expansion to the desired size. Once completed, BEaTriX will be used to directly perform the quality control of focusing modules of large X-ray optics such as those for the ATHENA X-ray observatory, based on either Silicon Pore Optics (baseline) or Slumped Glass Optics (alternative), and will thereby enable a direct quality control of angular resolution and effective area on a number of mirror modules in a short time, in full X-ray illumination and without being affected by the finite distance of the X-ray source. However, since the individual mirror modules for ATHENA...

  14. Experimental investigation of transitional flow in a toroidal pipe

    CERN Document Server

    Kühnen, J; Hof, B; Kuhlmann, H

    2015-01-01

    The flow instability and further transition to turbulence in a toroidal pipe (torus) with curvature (tube-to-coiling diameter) 0.049 is investigated experimentally. The flow inside the toroidal pipe is driven by a steel sphere fitted to the inner pipe diameter. The sphere is moved with constant azimuthal velocity from outside the torus by a moving magnet. The experiment is designed to investigate curved pipe flow by optical measurement techniques. Using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry, laser Doppler velocimetry and pressure drop measurements, the flow is measured for Reynolds numbers ranging from 1000 to 15000. Time- and space-resolved velocity fields are obtained and analysed. The steady axisymmetric basic flow is strongly influenced by centrifugal effects. On an increase of the Reynolds number we find a sequence of bifurcations. For Re=4075 a supercritical bifurcation to an oscillatory flow is found in which waves travel in the streamwise direction with a phase velocity slightly faster than the mean...

  15. Stabilization of ballooning modes with sheared toroidal rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new code demonstrates the stabilization of MHD ballooning modes by sheared toroidal rotation. A shifted-circle model is used to elucidate the physics, and numerically reconstructed equilibria are used to analyze DIII-D discharges. In the ballooning representation, the modes shift periodically along the field line to the next point of unfavorable curvature. The shift frequency (dΩ/dq, where Ω is the angular toroidal velocity and q is the safety factor) is proportional to the rotation shear and inversely proportional to the magnetic shear. Stability improves with increasing shift frequency and, in the shifted circle model, direct stable access to the second stability regime occurs when this frequency is a fraction of the Alfven frequency, ωA = VA/qR. Shear stabilization is also demonstrated for an equilibrium reconstruction of a DIII-D VH-mode. (author). 9 refs, 3 figs

  16. Cooling of Neutron Stars with Strong Toroidal Magnetic Fields

    CERN Document Server

    Page, D; Küker, M; Page, Dany; Geppert, Ulrich; Kueker, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    We present models of temperature distribution in the crust of a neutron star in the presence of a strong toroidal component superposed to the poloidal component of the magnetic field. The presence of such a toroidal field hinders heat flow toward the surface in a large part of the crust. As a result, the neutron star surface presents two warm regions surrounded by extended cold regions and has a thermal luminosity much lower than in the case the magnetic field is purely poloidal. We apply these models to calculate the thermal evolution of such neutron stars and show that the lowered photon luminosity naturally extends their life-time as detectable thermal X-ray sources.

  17. Low-frequency fluctuations in a pure toroidal magnetized plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; R Singh; D Bora

    2009-12-01

    A magnetized, low- plasma in pure toroidal configuration is formed and extensively studied with ion mass as control parameter. Xenon, krypton and argon plasmas are formed at a fixed toroidal magnetic field of 0.024 T, with a peak density of ∼ 1011 cm-3, ∼ 4 × 1010 cm-3 and ∼ 2 × 1010 cm−3 respectively. The experimental investigation of time-averaged plasma parameter reveals that their profiles remain insensitive to ion mass and suggests that saturated slab equilibrium is obtained. Low-frequency (LF) coherent fluctuations ( < ci) are observed and identified as flute modes. Here ci represents ion cyclotron frequency. Our results indicate that these modes get reduced with ion mass. The frequency of the fluctuating mode decreases with increase in the ion mass. Further, an attempt has been made to discuss the theory of flute modes to understand the relevance of some of our experimental observations.

  18. An Overview of Plasma Confinement in Toroidal Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dini, Fatemeh; Amrollahi, Reza; Khorasani, Sina

    2009-01-01

    This overview presents a tutorial introduction to the theory of magnetic plasma confinement in toroidal confinement systems with particular emphasis on axisymmetric equilibrium geometries, and tokamaks. The discussion covers three important aspects of plasma physics: Equilibrium, Stability, and Transport. The section on equilibrium will go through an introduction to ideal magnetohydrodynamics, curvilinear system of coordinates, flux coordinates, extensions to axisymmetric equilibrium, Grad-Shafranov Equation (GSE), Green's function formalism, as well as analytical and numerical solutions to GSE. The section on stability will address topics including Lyapunov Stability in nonlinear systems, energy principle, modal analysis, and simplifications for axisymmetric machines. The final section will consider transport in toroidal systems. We present the flux-surface-averaged system of equations describing classical and non-classical transport phenomena. Applications to the small-sized high-aspect-ratio Damavand tokam...

  19. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Robert W.

    2011-12-01

    The model by Braginskii [1] (Braginskii, S. I. 1965 Transport processes in plasma. In: Review of Plasma Physics, Vol. 1 (ed. M.A. Leontovich). New York, NY: Consultants Bureau, pp. 205-311) for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to a previous evaluation, which contains an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglects the effect of the pitch angle. Parallel viscosity contributes a radial shear viscous force, which may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile. An evaluation is performed of this radial viscous force for a tokamak near equilibrium, which indicates qualitative agreement between theory and measurement for impure plasma discharges with strong toroidal flow.

  20. Nonlinear particle simulation of ion cyclotron waves in toroidal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuley, A., E-mail: akuley@uci.edu; Lin, Z. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, CA-92697 (United States); Bao, J. [Fusion Simulation Center, Peking University, Beijing (China); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California Irvine, CA-92697 (United States); Wei, X. S.; Xiao, Y. [Institute of Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2015-12-10

    Global particle simulation model has been developed in this work to provide a first-principles tool for studying the nonlinear interactions of radio frequency (RF) waves with plasmas in tokamak. In this model, ions are considered as fully kinetic particles using the Vlasov equation and electrons are treated as guiding centers using the drift kinetic equation with realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. Boris push scheme for the ion motion has been developed in the toroidal geometry using magnetic coordinates and successfully verified for the ion cyclotron and ion Bernstein waves in global gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC). The nonlinear simulation capability is applied to study the parametric decay instability of a pump wave into an ion Bernstein wave side band and a low frequency ion cyclotron quasi mode.

  1. ATLAS barrel toroid integration and test area in building 180

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two 'double-pancake' windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. The barrel toroid is being assembled in building 180 on the Meyrin site. In the first phase of assembly, the coils are packed into their aluminium-alloy casing. These photos show the double-pancake coils from ANSALDO and the coil casings from ALSTOM. In the foreground is the tooling from COSMI used to turn over the coil casings during this first phase. In the right background is the yellow lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia which will transport the coil casings to a heating table for prestressing. Two test benches with magnetic mirror are also visible.

  2. Counterformal contacts of full toroidal continuously variable transmission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ATTIA Nabil Abdulla; QIN Da-tong

    2005-01-01

    The point and the line contacts of a toroidal continuously variable transmission (CVT) are studied. The contact shapes between the roller and input and output disks are formulated by using the classical Hertz contact theory. Based on the formulated equations, different system factors affecting the maximum Hertz stress in the elliptical and strip contacts of the full toroidal CVT are explored, which include the properties of the contacting material (Young's modulus), operating condition (pushing load) and geometrical parameters (aspect cavity ratio, aspect roller ratio). The comparative results reveal the relations between the maximum Hertz stress and the speed ratio in the form of graphs. These graphs give useful information for designer to know the maximum Hertz stress during operation in such systems.

  3. Quasars a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    CERN Document Server

    Spivey, R J

    2000-01-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars whose internal nuclear reactions proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. These events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Due to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiat...

  4. MINERVA: Ideal MHD stability code for toroidally rotating tokamak plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aiba, N.; Tokuda, S.; Furukawa, M.; Snyder, P. B.; Chu, M. S.

    2009-08-01

    A new linear MHD stability code MINERVA is developed for investigating a toroidal rotation effect on the stability of ideal MHD modes in tokamak plasmas. This code solves the Frieman-Rotenberg equation as not only the generalized eigenvalue problem but also the initial value problem. The parallel computing method used in this code realizes the stability analysis of both long and short wavelength MHD modes in short time. The results of some benchmarking tests show the validity of this MINERVA code. The numerical study with MINERVA about the toroidal rotation effect on the edge MHD stability shows that the rotation shear destabilizes the intermediate wavelength modes but stabilizes the short wavelength edge localized MHD modes, though the rotation frequency destabilizes both the long and the short wavelength MHD modes.

  5. Path Integral Quantization for a Toroidal Phase Space

    OpenAIRE

    Bodmann, Bernhard G.; Klauder, John R.

    1999-01-01

    A Wiener-regularized path integral is presented as an alternative way to formulate Berezin-Toeplitz quantization on a toroidal phase space. Essential to the result is that this quantization prescription for the torus can be constructed as an induced representation from anti-Wick quantization on its covering space, the plane. When this construction is expressed in the form of a Wiener-regularized path integral, symmetrization prescriptions for the propagator emerge similar to earlier path-inte...

  6. Self-Sustained Magnetic Braiding in Toroidal Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh, K; Fukuyama, A.; Itoh, S.-I.; Yagi, M.; Azumi, M.

    1994-01-01

    Theory for the magnetic braiding in toroidal plasmas, which is caused by microscopic pressure-gradient-driven turbulence, is developed. When the pressure gradient exceeds a threshold, the self-sustaining of the magnetic braiding and enhanced anomalous transport occur. The balance between the nonlinear destabilization and nonlinear stabilization, which determines the stationary turbulence, is solved analytically for the case of interchange mode. The enhanced thermal conductivity and magneti...

  7. Toroidal field coil system for STARFIRE, a preliminary assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An important element of STARFIRE is the 12-coil superconducting toroidal field coil system which is required to generate 5.6 tesla at the 7.0 m plasma axis, with a peak-to-peak field ripple of 1% (maximum). Internal spatial requirements dictate a clear bore about 15 1/2 m high x 10 m wide, resulting in a total stored energy of 67 GJ

  8. Suomi-NPP Mission On-Orbit Experience with Toroid Ball Bearing Retainers Under Unidirectional and Reversing Motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruegman, Otto; Thakore, Kamal; Loewenthal, Stu; Cymerman, John

    2016-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) instrument scan system on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) spacecraft has experienced several randomly occurring increased torque 'events' since its on-orbit activation in November 2011. Based on a review of on-orbit telemetry data and data gathered from scan mechanism bearing life testing on the ground, the conclusion was drawn that some degradation of Teflon toroid ball retainers was occurring in the instrument Scan Drive Mechanism. A life extension program was developed and executed on-orbit with very good results to date. The life extension program consisted of reversing the mechanism for a limited number of consecutive scans every day.

  9. Toroidal mode number estimation of the edge-localized modes using the KSTAR 3-D electron cyclotron emission imaging system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Yun, G. S., E-mail: gunsu@postech.ac.kr; Lee, J. E.; Kim, M.; Choi, M. J.; Lee, W. [Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Park, H. K. [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan 689-798 (Korea, Republic of); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Sabbagh, S. A.; Park, Y. S. [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Lee, S. G.; Bak, J. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    A new and more accurate technique is presented for determining the toroidal mode number n of edge-localized modes (ELMs) using two independent electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems in the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. The technique involves the measurement of the poloidal spacing between adjacent ELM filaments, and of the pitch angle α{sub *} of filaments at the plasma outboard midplane. Equilibrium reconstruction verifies that α{sub *} is nearly constant and thus well-defined at the midplane edge. Estimates of n obtained using two ECEI systems agree well with n measured by the conventional technique employing an array of Mirnov coils.

  10. Diagnosing Implosion Performance at the National Ignition Facility by Means of Advanced Neutron-Spectrometry and Neutron-Imaging Techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Proper assembly of capsule mass, as manifested through the evolution of fuel areal density, is essential for achieving hot-spot ignition planned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Experimental information about areal density and areal-density asymmetries, hot-spot ion temperature (Ti) and yield (Yn) are therefore critical for understanding the assembly of the fuel. To obtain this information, a suite of neutron Time-of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been commissioned and extensively used on the NIF for measurements of the neutron spectrum in the energy range from 1.5 to 20 MeV. This range covers all essential details of the neutron spectrum, allowing for the determination of areal density, Yn, and Ti. The spectrometers are fielded at different locations around the implosion for directional measurements of the neutron spectrum, also allowing for determination of areal-density asymmetries and possible kinetic effects. The data obtained from these diagnostics have been essential to the progress of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), indicating that the implosion performance, characterized by the Experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx), has improved about two orders of magnitude since the first cryogenic shot taken in September 2010. Areal-density values greater than 1 g/cm2 are now readily achieved. By combining the areal-density data with information about the spatial extent of the high-density region obtained from Neutron Imaging System (NIS), it has been demonstrated that densities above 500 g/cc and pressure-time (Pτ) products in excess of 10 atm s have been achieved, which are according to HYDRA simulations about a factor of three from ignition conditions. (author)

  11. Neoclassical offset toroidal velocity and auxiliary ion heating in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzaro, E.

    2016-05-01

    In conditions of ideal axisymmetry, for a magnetized plasma in a generic bounded domain, necessarily toroidal, the uniform absorption of external energy (e.g., RF or any isotropic auxiliary heating) cannot give rise to net forces or torques. Experimental evidence on contemporary tokamaks shows that the near central absorption of RF heating power (ICH and ECH) and current drive in presence of MHD activity drives a bulk plasma rotation in the co- I p direction, opposite to the initial one. Also the appearance of classical or neoclassical tearing modes provides a nonlinear magnetic braking that tends to clamp the rotation profile at the q-rational surfaces. The physical origin of the torque associated with P RF absorption could be due the effects of asymmetry in the equilibrium configuration or in power deposition, but here we point out also an effect of the response of the so-called neoclassical offset velocity to the power dependent heat flow increment. The neoclassical toroidal viscosity due to internal magnetic kink or tearing modes tends to relax the plasma rotation to this asymptotic speed, which in absence of auxiliary heating is of the order of the ion diamagnetic velocity. It can be shown by kinetic and fluid calculations, that the absorption of auxiliary power by ions modifies this offset proportionally to the injected power thereby forcing the plasma rotation in a direction opposite to the initial, to large values. The problem is discussed in the frame of the theoretical models of neoclassical toroidal viscosity.

  12. Toroidal Continuously Variable Transmission Systems: Terminology and Present Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet YILDIZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of continuously variable transmission systems in many different areas such as aerospace, robotics, machinery and automotive industries as an alternative to conventional speed changers with constant ratio becomes widely.Especially in the automotive industry, these systems have been used increasingly, since they enable that internal combustion engines in vehicles run at optimal speeds, and consequently provide considerable fuel savings and therefore lower emission values and also they provide powerful acceleration and quiet working. CVT systems have several constructive variants such as belted, chained, balled, toroidal etc. In this paper, toroidal CVT systems based on elastohydrodynamic principles are concerned with, and fundamental works of last two decades in this field are reviewed. However, the relevant terminology and dynamics along with the control of these systems are briefly treated for better understanding of the literature mentioned. Attention is drawn to the lack of some significant issues in present research works, and potential future works are pointed out. This paper, to the authors’ knowledge, will be the first review on toroidal CVT systems in Turkish literature

  13. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breakinga)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Donald A.

    2015-05-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  14. The Geometry on Smooth Toroidal Compactifications of Siegel varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Yau, Shing-Tung

    2012-01-01

    This is a part of our joint program. The purpose of this paper is to study smooth toroidal compactifications of Siegel varieties and their applications, we also try to understand the K\\"ahler-Einstein metrics on Siegel varieties through the compactifications. Let $A_{g,\\Gamma}:=H_g/\\Gamma$ be a Siegel variety, where $H_g$ is the genus-$g$ Siegel space and $\\Gamma$ is an arithmetic subgroup in $\\Aut(H_g)$. There are four aspects of this paper : 1.There is a correspondence between the category of degenerations of Abelian varieties and the category of limits of weight one Hodge structures. We show that any cusp of Siegel space $\\frak{H}_g$ can be identified with the set of certain weight one polarized mixed Hodge structures. 2.In general, the boundary of a smooth toroidal compactification $\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}$ of $A_{g,\\Gamma}$ has self-intersections.For most geometric applications, we would like to have a nice toroidal compactification such that the added infinity boundary $D_\\infty =\\bar{A}_{g,\\Gamma}-A_{g,\\Gam...

  15. 3D toroidal physics: Testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spong, Donald A., E-mail: spongda@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6169 (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to provide the plasma control needed for a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D edge localized mode suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. This motivates the development of physics models that are applicable across the full range of 3D devices. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with the requirements of future fusion reactors.

  16. Expansions of non-symmetric toroidal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzner, Harold

    2016-06-01

    Expansions of non-symmetric toroidal ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibria with nested flux surfaces are carried out for two cases. The first expansion is in a topological torus in three dimensions, in which physical quantities are periodic of period 2 π in y and z. Data is given on the flux surface x = 0. Despite the possibility of magnetic resonances the power series expansion can be carried to all orders in a parameter which measures the flux between x = 0 and the surface in question. Resonances are resolved by appropriate addition resonant fields, as by Weitzner, [Phys. Plasmas 21, 022515 (2014)]. The second expansion is about a circular magnetic axis in a true torus. It is also assumed that the cross section of a flux surface at constant toroidal angle is approximately circular. The expansion is in an analogous flux coordinate, and despite potential resonance singularities, may be carried to all orders. Non-analytic behavior occurs near the magnetic axis. Physical quantities have a finite number of derivatives there. The results, even though no convergence proofs are given, support the possibility of smooth, well-behaved non-symmetric toroidal equilibria.

  17. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  18. AFRL Advanced Electric Lasers Branch - Construction and Upgrade of a 50-watt Facility-Class Sodium Guidestar Pump Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronder, T.; Miller, H.; Stohs, J.; Lu, C.; Baker, J.; Lucero, A.

    The development of a reliable and effective laser source for pumping mesospheric sodium to generate an artificial guidestar has been well documented. From the early achievements with 589nm high-power dye lasers at the Keck and Lick observatories to the ground-breaking 50W CW FASOR (Frequency Addition Source of Optical Radiation) Guidestar at the Air Forces Starfire Optical Range (SOR), there has been intense interest in this technology from both the academic and military communities. Beginning in the fall of 2008, the Air Force Research Laboratorys Advanced Electric Lasers Branch began a project to build, test, verify and deliver an upgraded version of the SOR FASOR for use at the AF Maui Optical Station (AMOS) in the summer of 2010. This FASOR will be similar in design to the existing SOR device and produce 50W of diffraction limited, linearly polarized narrow linewidth 589nm light by combining the output of two injection-locked Nd:YAG ring lasers (operating at 1064nm and 1319nm) using resonant sum-frequency generation in a lithium triborate crystal (LBO). The upgraded features will include modularized sub-components, embedded control electronics, and a simplified cooling system. The first portion of this upgrade project is to reconstruct the current SOR FASOR components and include improved methods of regulating the gain modules of the two injection lasers. In parallel with this effort, the technical plans for the modularization and re-packaging of the FASOR will be finalized and coordinated with the staff at Maui. This presentation will summarize the result of these efforts to date and provide updates on the AMOS FASOR status. Additionally, plans for "next-generation" FASOR upgrades for both SOR and AMOS will also be discussed.

  19. Toroidal modeling of interaction between resistive wall mode and plasma flow

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yueqiang

    2013-01-01

    The non-linear interplay between the resistive wall mode (RWM) and the toroidal plasma flow is numerically investigated in a full toroidal geometry, by simultaneously solving the initial value problems for the n=1 RWM and the n=0 toroidal force balance equation. Here n is the toroidal mode number. The neoclassical toroidal viscous torque is identified as the major momentum sink that brakes the toroidal plasma flow during the non-linear evolution of the RWM. This holds for a mode that is initially either unstable or stable. For an initially stable RWM, the braking of the flow, and hence the eventual growth of the mode, depends critically on the initial perturbation amplitude.

  20. Test Results of a 1.2 kg/s Centrifugal Liquid Helium Pump for the ATLAS Superconducting Toroid Magnet System

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Passardi, Giorgio; Pirotte, O; ten Kate, H H J

    2002-01-01

    The toroid superconducting magnet of ATLAS-LHC experiment at CERN will be indirectly cooled by means of forced flow of liquid helium at about 4.5 K. A centrifugal pump will be used, providing a mass flow of 1.2 kg/s and a differential pressure of 40 kPa (ca. 400 mbar) at about 4300 rpm. Two pumps are foreseen, one for redundancy, in order to feed in parallel the cooling circuits of the Barrel and the two End-Caps toroid magnets. The paper describes the tests carried out at CERN to measure the characteristic curves, i.e. the head versus the mass flow at different rotational speeds, as well as the pump total efficiency. The pump is of the "fullemission" type, i.e. with curved blades and it is equipped with an exchangeable inducer. A dedicated pump test facility has been constructed at CERN, which includes a Coriolis-type liquid helium mass flow meter. This facility is connected to the helium refrigerator used for the tests at CERN of the racetrack magnets of the Barrel and of the End-Cap toroids.

  1. Toroidal Spiral Nambu-Goto Strings around Higher-Dimensional Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2009-01-01

    We present solutions of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in five-dimensional spacetimes. In particular, we show that stationary toroidal spirals exist around the five-dimensional Myers-Perry black holes. We also show the existence of innermost stationary toroidal spirals around the five-dimensional black holes like geodesic particles orbiting around four-dimensional black holes.

  2. PARTICLE-HOLE NATURE OF THE LIGHT HIGH-SPIN TOROIDAL ISOMERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Staszczak, A. [Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Poland; Wong, Cheuk-Yin [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Nuclei under non-collective rotation with a large angular momentum above some threshold can assume a toroidal shape. In our previous work, we showed by using cranked Skyrme Hartree Fock approach that even even, N = Z, high-K, toroidal isomeric states may have general occurrences for light nuclei with 28 < A < 52. We present here some additional results and systematics on the particle-hole nature of these high-spin toroidal isomers.

  3. Engineering, Manufacture and Preliminary Testing of the ITER Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rista, P. E. C.; Shull, J.; Sargent, S.

    2015-12-01

    The ITER cryodistribution system provides the supercritical Helium (SHe) forced flow cooling to the magnet system using cold circulators. The cold circulators are located in each of five separate auxiliary cold boxes planned for use in the facility. Barber-Nichols Inc. has been awarded a contract from ITER-India for engineering, manufacture and testing of the Toroidal Field (TF) Magnet Helium Cold Circulator. The cold circulator will be extensively tested at Barber-Nichols’ facility prior to delivery for qualification testing at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency's (JAEA) test facility at Naka, Japan. The TF Cold Circulator integrates features and technical requirements which Barber-Nichols has utilized when supplying helium cold circulators worldwide over a period of 35 years. Features include a vacuum-jacketed hermetically sealed design with a very low helium leak rate, a heat shield for use with both nitrogen & helium cold sources, a broad operating range with a guaranteed isentropic efficiency over 70%, and impeller design features for high efficiency. The cold circulator will be designed to meet MTBM of 17,500 hours and MTBF of 36,000 hours. Vibration and speed monitoring are integrated into a compact package on the rotating assembly with operation and health monitoring in a multi-drop PROFIBUS communication environment using an electrical cabinet with critical features and full local and network PLC interface and control. For the testing in Japan and eventual installation in Europe, the cold circulator must be certified to the Japanese High Pressure Gas Safety Act (JHPGSA) and CE marked in compliance with the European Pressure Equipment Directive (PED) including Essential Safety Requirements (ESR). The test methodology utilized at Barber-Nichols’ facility and the resulting test data, validating the high efficiency of the TF Cold Circulator across a broad operating range, are important features of this paper.

  4. Toroidal maps : Schnyder woods, orthogonal surfaces and straight-line representations

    CERN Document Server

    Gonçalves, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    A Schnyder wood is an orientation and coloring of the edges of a planar map satisfying a simple local property. We propose a generalization of Schnyder woods to toroidal maps with application to graph drawing. We prove the existence of these Schnyder woods for toroidal triangulations. We show that Schnyder woods can be used to embed the universal cover of a toroidal map on an infinite and periodic orthogonal surface. Finally we use this embedding to obtain a straight-line flat torus representation of any toroidal map in a polynomial size grid.

  5. Alpha particle destabilization of the toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high frequency, low mode number toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) are shown to be driven unstable by the circulating and/or trapped α-particles through the wave-particle resonances. Satisfying the resonance condition requires that the α-particle birth speed vα ≥ vA/2|m-nq|, where vA is the Alfven speed, m is the poloidal model number, and n is the toroidal mode number. To destabilize the TAE modes, the inverse Landau damping associated with the α-particle pressure gradient free energy must overcome the velocity space Landau damping due to both the α-particles and the core electrons and ions. The growth rate was studied analytically with a perturbative formula derived from the quadratic dispersion relation, and numerically with the aid of the NOVA-K code. Stability criteria in terms of the α-particle beta βα, α-particle pressure gradient parameter (ω*/ωA) (ω* is the α-particle diamagnetic drift frequency), and (vα/vA) parameters will be presented for TFTR, CIT, and ITER tokamaks. The volume averaged α-particle beta threshold for TAE instability also depends sensitively on the core electron and ion temperature. Typically the volume averaged α-particle beta threshold is in the order of 10-4. Typical growth rates of the n=1 TAE mode can be in the order of 10-2ωA, where ωA=vA/qR. Other types of global Alfven waves are stable in D-T tokamaks due to toroidal coupling effects

  6. Toroidal Imploding Detonation Wave Initiator for Pulse Detonation Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, S. I.; Shepherd, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Imploding toroidal detonation waves were used to initiate detonations in propane–air and ethylene–air mixtures inside of a tube. The imploding wave was generated by an initiator consisting of an array of channels filled with acetylene–oxygen gas and ignited with a single spark. The initiator was designed as a low-drag initiator tube for use with pulse detonation engines. To detonate hydrocarbon–air mixtures, the initiator was overfilled so that some acetylene oxygen spilled into the tube. The...

  7. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication

  8. Fabrication of toroidal composite pressure vessels. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodge, W.G.; Escalona, A.

    1996-11-24

    A method for fabricating composite pressure vessels having toroidal geometry was evaluated. Eight units were fabricated using fibrous graphite material wrapped over a thin-walled aluminum liner. The material was wrapped using a machine designed for wrapping, the graphite material was impregnated with an epoxy resin that was subsequently thermally cured. The units were fabricated using various winding patterns. They were hydrostatically tested to determine their performance. The method of fabrication was demonstrated. However, the improvement in performance to weight ratio over that obtainable by an all metal vessel probably does not justify the extra cost of fabrication.

  9. Hydraulic jumps in inhomogeneous strongly coupled toroidal dust flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piel, Alexander; Wilms, Jochen

    2016-07-01

    The inhomogeneous flow of strongly coupled dust particles in a toroidal particle trap with harmonic radial confinement is analyzed in the incompressible fluid limit. It is shown that the flow can spontaneously generate shock-like events, which are similar to the hydraulic jump in open channel flows. A definition of the Froude number for this model is given and the critical speed is recovered as the group velocity of surface waves. This hydraulic model is compared with molecular-dynamics simulations, which show that a sudden bifurcation of the flow lines and a localized temperature peak appear just at the point where the critical condition for the hydraulic jump is located.

  10. Position indicating split toroid for the RACE experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, B. [Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory, University of Texas, 10100 Burnet Road, Austin, TX 78758 (United States)]. E-mail: bhurst@mail.utexas.edu; Folkman, K. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, ID 83201 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    Aspects of the recent reactor accelerator coupled experiments (RACE) carried out at University of Texas Nuclear Engineering Teaching Laboratory will be discussed. In particular, a compact instrument that allowed a continuous non-invasive means of determining the relative electron beam position was developed. The operation of the instrument is similar to an inductive current pick up toroid except that the core is sectioned radially, which allows spatial information to be derived from the induced voltages. Results of initial tests, both in beam and with a pulser, will be presented along with plans to optimize future designs.

  11. Symbolic derivation of bicycle kinematics with toroidal wheels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Everett X.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bicycle kinematics with toroidal wheels is presented in this paper. Using symbolic mathematic tool Maple, we obtain two holonomic and four nonholonomic constraint equations due to front and rear wheels of a bicycle. We show that the two holonomic constraints cannot be expressed in quartic form for bicycle rear body pitch angle unless the minor (crown radius of the torus are the same for both the front and rear wheels. In addition, we show that all the constraints can be written in differential form, from which a constraint matrix is constructed, according to standard procedure for developing dynamics in robotics.

  12. Application of toroidal multipoles to facilitate tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of calculating the vacuum magnetic flux for plasma equilibrium over a range of aspect ratio A and major radius R is presented. Toroidal multipoles are used to fit the vacuum flux for a set of reference equilibria and the fitted moments are then used to parametrize the flux over the design space in A and R. An example is given in which the equilibrium flux for a D-shaped tokamak plasma is predicted and compared with the actual equilibrium code vacuum flux

  13. Stationary motion of a self gravitating toroidal incompressible liquid layer

    CERN Document Server

    Fusco, Giorgio; Oliva, Waldyr M

    2012-01-01

    We consider an incompressible fluid contained in a toroidal stratum which is only subjected to Newtonian self-attraction. Under the assumption of infinitesimal tickness of the stratum we show the existence of stationary motions during which the stratum is approximatly a round torus (with radii r, R and R>>r) that rotates around its axis and at the same time rolls on itself. Therefore each particle of the stratum describes an helix-like trajectory around the circumference of radius R that connects the centers of the cross sections of the torus.

  14. Total and paired domination numbers of toroidal meshes

    CERN Document Server

    Hu, Fu-Tao

    2011-01-01

    Let $G$ be a graph without isolated vertices. The total domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices that can dominate all vertices in $G$, and the paired domination number of $G$ is the minimum number of vertices in a dominating set whose induced subgraph contains a perfect matching. This paper determines the total domination number and the paired domination number of the toroidal meshes, i.e., the Cartesian product of two cycles $C_n$ and $C_m$ for any $n\\ge 3$ and $m\\in\\{3,4\\}$, and gives some upper bounds for $n, m\\ge 5$.

  15. A Rotating Bose-Einstein Condensation in a Toroidal Trap

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    文渝川; 张鹏鸣; 李师杰

    2011-01-01

    We have studied the ground state configurations of a rotating Bose-Einstein condensation in a toroidal trap as the radius of the central Ganssian potentiaJ expands adiabatically. Firstly, we observe that the vortices are devoured successively into the central hole of the condensate to form a giant vortex as the radius of the trap expands. When all the pre-existing vortices are absorbed, the angular momentum of the system still increase as the radius of the ganssian potential enlarges. When increasing the interaction strength, we find that more singly quantized vortices are squeezed into the condensate, but the giant vortex does not change.

  16. Comments on structural types of toroidal carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Chuang, Chern; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-01

    We clarify the relationships between the eight structural types of toroidal carbon nanotubes (TCNTs), which can be identified as the eight corners of a cube of structural transformation. The four families with Dnh symmetry can be related by rim rotations, and the same is true for those with Dnd symmetries. These two sets are then connected by horizontal shiftings, thereby completing the cube. Moreover, we further point out that there are five more highly symmetric Dnh structural types that can be derived from performing the generalized Stone-Wales transformatoin on certain TCNTs with Dnh structural types.

  17. Meshing analysis of toroidal drive by computer algebra system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Presents the meshing analysis based on the Computer Algebra System to make it easier to deduce complex formulas while the expression of more complicated surface equations are visualized, by which, the contact line, mesh ing bordlines and undercut bordlines of toroidal drive are deduced, and the results obtained are consistent with the re sults discussed in literature[1] , and concludes that the absolute value of the induced normal curvature is usually smaller (less than 0.12, for example), and it increases as parameters ψ2, V and R increase, decreases as parameter r in creases, and hardly varies with W2, and the variation with a, i21 is not definite.

  18. Free-boundary toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eugene Y.; Berk, H. L.; Breizman, B.; Zheng, L. J.

    2011-05-01

    A numerical study is presented for the n = 1 free-boundary toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAE) in tokamaks, which shows that there is considerable sensitivity of n = 1 modes to the position of the conducting wall. An additional branch of the TAE is shown to emerge from the upper continuum as the ratio of conducting wall radius to plasma radius increases. Such phenomena arise in plasma equilibria with both circular and shaped cross sections, where the shaped profile studied here is similar to that found in Alcator C-Mod.

  19. Toroidal modelling of RMP response in ASDEX Upgrade: coil phase scan, q 95 dependence, and toroidal torques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yueqiang; Ryan, D.; Kirk, A.; Li, Li; Suttrop, W.; Dunne, M.; Fischer, R.; Fuchs, J. C.; Kurzan, B.; Piovesan, P.; Willensdorfer, M.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team; the EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-05-01

    The plasma response to the vacuum resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fields, produced by the ELM control coils in ASDEX Upgrade experiments, is computationally modelled using the MARS-F/K codes (Liu et al 2000 Phys. Plasmas 7 3681, Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503). A systematic investigation is carried out, considering various plasma and coil configurations as in the ELM control experiments. The low q plasmas, with {{q}95}˜ 3.8 (q 95 is the safety factor q value at 95% of the equilibrium poloidal flux), responding to low n (n is the toroidal mode number) field perturbations from each single row of the ELM coils, generates a core kink amplification effect. Combining two rows, with different toroidal phasing, thus leads to either cancellation or reinforcement of the core kink response, which in turn determines the poloidal location of the peak plasma surface displacement. The core kink response is typically weak for the n  =  4 coil configuration at low q, and for the n  =  2 configuration but only at high q ({{q}95}˜ 5.5 ). A phase shift of around 60 degrees for low q plasmas, and around 90 degrees for high q plasmas, is found in the coil phasing, between the plasma response field and the vacuum RMP field, that maximizes the edge resonant field component. This leads to an optimal coil phasing of about 100 (-100) degrees for low (high) q plasmas, that maximizes both the edge resonant field component and the plasma surface displacement near the X-point of the separatrix. This optimal phasing closely corresponds to the best ELM mitigation observed in experiments. A strong parallel sound wave damping moderately reduces the core kink response but has minor effect on the edge peeling response. For low q plasmas, modelling shows that both the resonant electromagnetic torque and the neoclassical toroidal viscous (NTV) torque (due to the presence of 3D magnetic field perturbations) contribute to the toroidal flow damping, in particular near the

  20. Dynamic processes in field-reversed-configuration compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture, the dynamic processes involved in field-reversed configuration (FRC) formation, translation, and compression will be reviewed. Though the FRC is related to the field-reversed mirror concept, the formation method used in most experiments is a variant of the field-reversed Θ-pinch. Formation of the FRC eqilibrium occurs rapidly, usually in less than 20 μs. The formation sequence consists of several coupled processes: preionization; radial implosion and compression; magnetic field line closure; axial contraction; equilibrium formation. Recent experiments and theory have led to a significantly improved understanding of these processes; however, the experimental method still relies on a somewhat empirical approach which involves the optimization of initial preionization plasma parameters and symmetry. New improvements in FRC formation methods include the use of lower voltages which extrapolate better to larger devices. The axial translation of compact toroid plasmas offers an attractive engineering convenience in a fusion reactor. FRC translation has been demonstrated in several experiments worldwide, and these plasmas are found to be robust, moving at speeds up to the Alfven velocity over distances of up to 16 m, with no degradation in the confinement. Compact toroids are ideal for magnetic compression. Translated FRCs have been compressed and heated by imploding liners. Upcoming experiments will rely on external flux compression to heat a translater FRC at 1-GW power levels. 39 refs

  1. Incorporation of toroidal boundary conditions into program POISSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique is developed for introduction of a boundary condition applicable to relaxation computations for magnetic problems with axial symmetry and with no sources (currents, or magnetized material) external to the boundary. The procedure as described in this note is restricted to cases in which the (toroidal) boundary will surround completely the region of physical interest but will not encompass the axis of rotational symmetry. The technique accordingly provides the opportunity of economically excluding from the relaxation process regions of no direct concern in the immediate neighborhood of the symmetry axis and hence can have useful application to annular magnetic devices with axial symmetry. The procedure adopted makes use internally of the characteristic form of the vector-potential function, in a source-free region, when expressed in toroidal coordinates. The relevant properties of associated Legendre functions of half-integral degree are summarized in this connection and their introduction into the program POISSON is outlined. Results of some test cases are included, to illustrate the application of this technique for configurations with median-plane symmetry. 8 refs., 9 figs

  2. Inversion of the Abel equation for toroidal density distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Ciotti, L

    1999-01-01

    In this paper I present three new results of astronomical interest concerning the theory of Abel inversion. 1) I show that in the case of a spatial emissivity that is constant on toroidal surfaces and projected along the symmetry axis perpendicular to the torus' equatorial plane, it is possible to invert the projection integral. From the surface (i.e. projected) brightness profile one then formally recovers the original spatial distribution as a function of the toroidal radius. 2) By applying the above-described inversion formula, I show that if the projected profile is described by a truncated off-center gaussian, the functional form of the related spatial emissivity is very simple and - most important - nowhere negative for any value of the gaussian parameters, a property which is not guaranteed - in general - by Abel inversion. 3) Finally, I show how a generic multimodal centrally symmetric brightness distribution can be deprojected using a sum of truncated off-center gaussians, recovering the spatial emis...

  3. Cryogenic Characteristics of the ATLAS Barrel Toroid Superconducting Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Pengo, R; Delruelle, N; Pezzetti, M; Pirotte, O; Passardi, Giorgio; Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H

    2008-01-01

    ATLAS, one of the experiments of the LHC accelerator under commissioning at CERN, is equipped with a large superconducting magnet the Barrel Toroid (BT) that has been tested at nominal current (20500 A). The BT is composed of eight race-track superconducting coils (each one weights about 45 tons) forming the biggest air core toroidal magnet ever built. By means of a large throughput centrifugal pump, a forced flow (about 10 liter/second at 4.5 K) provides the indirect cooling of the coils in parallel. The paper describes the results of the measurements carried out on the complete cryogenic system assembled in the ATLAS cavern situated 100 m below the ground level. The measurements include, among other ones, the static heat loads, i.e., with no or constant current in the magnet, and the dynamic ones, since additional heat losses are produced, during the current ramp-up or slow dump, by eddy currents induced on the coil casing.

  4. Baryonic torii: Toroidal baryons in a generalized Skyrme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudnason, Sven Bjarke; Nitta, Muneto

    2015-02-01

    We study a Skyrme-type model with a potential term motivated by Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs), which we call the BEC Skyrme model. We consider two flavors of the model: the first is the Skyrme model, and the second has a sixth-order derivative term instead of the Skyrme term, both with the added BEC-motivated potential. The model contains toroidally shaped Skyrmions, and they are characterized by two integers P and Q , representing the winding numbers of two complex scalar fields along the toroidal and poloidal cycles of the torus, respectively. The baryon number is B =P Q . We find stable Skyrmion solutions for P =1 ,2 ,3 ,4 ,5 with Q =1 , while for P =6 and Q =1 , it is only metastable. We further find that configurations with higher Q >1 are all unstable and split into Q configurations with Q =1 . Finally we discover a phase transition, possibly of first order, in the mass parameter of the potential under study.

  5. Saturation of single toroidal number Alfvén modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Briguglio, S.

    2016-08-01

    The results of numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the saturation mechanism of a single toroidal number Alfvén mode, driven unstable, in a tokamak plasma, by the resonant interaction with energetic ions. The effects of equilibrium geometry non-uniformities and finite mode radial width on the wave-particle nonlinear dynamics are discussed. Saturation occurs as the fast-ion density flattening produced by the radial flux associated to the resonant particles captured in the potential well of the Alfvén wave extends over the whole region where mode-particle power exchange can take place. The occurrence of two different saturation regimes is shown. In the first regime, dubbed resonance detuning, that region is limited by the resonance radial width (that is, the width of the region where the fast-ion resonance frequency matches the mode frequency). In the second regime, called radial decoupling, the power exchange region is limited by the mode radial width. In the former regime, the mode saturation amplitude scales quadratically with the growth rate; in the latter, it scales linearly. The occurrence of one or the other regime can be predicted on the basis of linear dynamics: in particular, the radial profile of the fast-ion resonance frequency and the mode structure. Here, we discuss how such properties can depend on the considered toroidal number and compare simulation results with the predictions obtained from a simplified nonlinear pendulum model.

  6. Pareto optimal design of sectored toroidal superconducting magnet for SMES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhunia, Uttam, E-mail: ubhunia@vecc.gov.in; Saha, Subimal; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • The optimization approach minimizes both the magnet size and necessary cable length of a sectored toroidal SMES unit. • Design approach is suitable for low temperature superconducting cable suitable for medium size SMES unit. • It investigates coil parameters with respect to practical engineering aspects. - Abstract: A novel multi-objective optimization design approach for sectored toroidal superconducting magnetic energy storage coil has been developed considering the practical engineering constraints. The objectives include the minimization of necessary superconductor length and torus overall size or volume, which determines a significant part of cost towards realization of SMES. The best trade-off between the necessary conductor length for winding and magnet overall size is achieved in the Pareto-optimal solutions, the compact magnet size leads to increase in required superconducting cable length or vice versa The final choice among Pareto optimal configurations can be done in relation to other issues such as AC loss during transient operation, stray magnetic field at outside the coil assembly, and available discharge period, which is not considered in the optimization process. The proposed design approach is adapted for a 4.5 MJ/1 MW SMES system using low temperature niobium–titanium based Rutherford type cable. Furthermore, the validity of the representative Pareto solutions is confirmed by finite-element analysis (FEA) with a reasonably acceptable accuracy.

  7. Last End Cap Toroid installation : The Pharaonic enterprise

    CERN Multimedia

    Arnaud Foussat

    After the successful and impressive transport feat from Building 191 to Point 1 was carried out by the Friderici crew on 28th June, the second and last Toroid End Cap, ECT-C, was transferred into the surface building, SX1, on 2nd July. The ECT-C was installed in the ATLAS cavern on the C-side on 12th July. As the person responsible for the project, in my opinion, one of the crucial points of this project was to design all the tooling and installation sequences taking into account the building infrastructure dimensional constraints. View of the ECT installation tooling and preparation for the ECT-C descent into the ATLAS 80m-shaft by the ATLAS magnet group and DBS teams. The movement of the 240-ton magnet and 12-m diameter toroid end-cap was achieved in collaboration with SCALES, a subcontractor company, using a hydraulic gantry able to lower the ECT inside the shaft by 5m below the floor level . This allowed the DBS team to attach the end-cap with the 2 x 140 tons overhead crane and lower it onto the c...

  8. Design study of toroidal traction CVT for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raynard, A. E.; Kraus, J.; Bell, D. D.

    1980-01-01

    The development, evaluation, and optimization of a preliminary design concept for a continuously variable transmission (CVT) to couple the high-speed output shaft of an energy storage flywheel to the drive train of an electric vehicle is discussed. An existing computer simulation program was modified and used to compare the performance of five CVT design configurations. Based on this analysis, a dual-cavity full-toroidal drive with regenerative gearing is selected for the CVT design configuration. Three areas are identified that will require some technological development: the ratio control system, the traction fluid properities, and evaluation of the traction contact performance. Finally, the suitability of the selected CVT design concept for alternate electric and hybrid vehicle applications and alternate vehicle sizes and maximum output torques is determined. In all cases the toroidal traction drive design concept is applicable to the vehicle system. The regenerative gearing could be eliminated in the electric powered vehicle because of the reduced ratio range requirements. In other cases the CVT with regenerative gearing would meet the design requirements after appropriate adjustments in size and reduction gearing ratio.

  9. Theoretical Analysis of the Electron Spiral Toroid Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambier, Jean-Luc; Micheletti, David A.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This report describes the analysis of the Electron Spiral Toroid (EST) concept being promoted by Electron Power Systems Inc. (EPS). The EST is described as a toroidal plasma structure composed Of ion and electron shells. It is claimed that the EST requires little or no external confinement, despite the extraordinarily large energy densities resulting from the self-generating magnetic fields. The present analysis is based upon documentation made available by EPS, a previous description of the model by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and direct discussions with EPS and MIT. It is found that claims of absolute stability and large energy storage capacities of the EST concept have not been substantiated. Notably, it can be demonstrated that the ion fluid is fundamentally unstable. Although various scenarios for ion confinement were subsequently suggested by EPS and MIT, none were found to be plausible. Although the experimental data does not prove the existence of EST configurations, there is undeniable experimental evidence that some type of plasma structures whose characteristics remain to be determined are observed. However, more realistic theoretical models must first be developed to explain their existence and properties before applications of interest to NASA can he assessed and developed.

  10. Kinetic and electromagnetic transport processes in toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review of transport processes in toroidal devices is presented. Particular attention is given to radial transport of power by the Poynting's vector and kinetic electron flow. This work is primarily focused on the Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) which holds the added complexity of a dynamo process that sustains poloidal current in the edge region, where the toroidal field is reversed. The experimental observation of superthermal unidirectional electrons in the plasma edge of ZT-40M and HBTX1C is noted, and the rapid, nonclassical ion heating in RFPs is taken account of. Radial transport parallel to fluctuating magnetic field lines is deemed a likely candidate for both electromagnetic and kinetic energy transport. Two models are discussed and compared. It is concluded that electromagnetic transport using a local Ohm's law best describes nonclassical ion heating, and the transport of kinetic energy by long mean free path electrons best represents the half-Maxwellian of electrons observed in the edge of several RFPs. A nonlocal Ohm's law is essential for the kinetic electron model. 18 refs

  11. Shear-Alfven dynamics of toroidally confined plasmas. Part A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the stability theory of toroidally confined plasmas are reviewed, with the intention of providing a picture comprehensible to non-specialists. The review considers a class of low-frequency, electromagnetic disturbances that seem especially pertinent to modern high-temperature confinement experiments. It is shown that such disturbances are best unified and understood through consideration of a single, exact fluid moment: the shear-Alfven law. Appropriate versions of this law and its corresponding closure relations are derived - essentially from first principles - and applied in a variety of mostly, but not exclusively, linear contexts. Among the specific topics considered are: flux coordinates (including Hamada coordinates), the Newcomb solubility condition. Shafranov geometry, magnetic island evolution, reduced MHD and its generalizations, drift-kinetic electron response, classical tearing, twisting, and kink instabilities, pressure-modified tearing instability (Δ-critical), collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes, the ballooning representation in general geometry, ideal ballooning instability, Mercier criterion, near-axis expansions, the second stability region, and resistive and kinetic ballooning modes. The fundamental importance of toroidal topology and curvature is stressed

  12. Time-Dependent of Accretion Flow with Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Khesali, Alireza

    2008-01-01

    In the present study time evolution of quasi-spherical polytropic accretion flow with toroidal magnetic field was investigated. The study especially focused the astrophysically important case in which the adiabatic exponent $\\gamma=5/3$. In this scenario, it was assumed that the angular momentum transport is due to viscous turbulence and used $\\alpha$-prescription for kinematic coefficient of viscosity. The equations of accretion flow are solved in a simplified one-dimensional model that neglects the latitudinal dependence of the flow. In order to solve the integrated equations which govern the dynamical behavior of the accretion flow, self-similar solution was used. The solution provides some insight into the dynamics of quasi-spherical accretion flow and avoids many of the strictures of the steady self-similar solution. The effect of the toroidal magnetic field is considered with additional variable $\\beta[=p_{mag}/p_{gas}]$, where $p_{mag}$ and $p_{gas}$ are the magnetic and gas pressure, respectively. The...

  13. Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s Materials Engineering Research Facility (MERF) enables engineers to develop manufacturing processes for producing advanced battery materials in sufficient...

  14. Calculation of modification to the toroidal magnetic field of the Tokamak Novillo. Part II; Calculo de modificacion al campo magnetico toroidal del Tokamak nivillo. Parte II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melendez L, L.; Chavez A, E.; Colunga S, S.; Valencia A, R.; Lopez C, R.; Gaytan G, E

    1992-03-15

    In a cylindrical magnetic topology. the confined plasma experiences 'classic' collisional transport phenomena. When bending the cylinder with the purpose of forming a toro, the magnetic field that before was uniform now it has a radial gradient which produces an unbalance in the magnetic pressure that is exercised on the plasma in the transverse section of the toro. This gives place to transport phenomena call 'neo-classicist'. In this work the structure of the toroidal magnetic field produced by toroidal coils of triangular form, to which are added even of coils of compensation with form of half moon is analyzed. With this type of coils it is looked for to minimize the radial gradient of the toroidal magnetic field. The values and characteristics of B (magnetic field) in perpendicular planes to the toro in different angular positions in the toroidal direction, looking for to cover all the cases of importance are exhibited. (Author)

  15. Investigation of toroidal acceleration and potential acceleration forces in EAST and J-TEXT plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Fudi; Pan, Xiayun; Cheng, Zhifeng; Chen, Jun; Cao, Guangming; Wang, Yuming; Han, Xiang; Li, Hao; Wu, Bin; Chen, Zhongyong; Bitter, Manfred; Hill, Kenneth; Rice, John; Morita, Shigeru; Li, Yadong; Zhuang, Ge; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian; Shi, Yuejiang

    2014-01-01

    In order to produce intrinsic rotation, bulk plasmas must be collectively accelerated by the net force exerted on them, which results from both driving and damping forces. So, to study the possible mechanisms of intrinsic rotation generation, it is only needed to understand characteristics of driving and damping terms because the toroidal driving and damping forces induce net acceleration which generates intrinsic rotation. Experiments were performed on EAST and J-TEXT for ohmic plasmas with net counter- and co-current toroidal acceleration generated by density ramping up and ramping down. Additionally on EAST, net co-current toroidal acceleration was also formed by LHCD or ICRF. For the current experimental results, toroidal acceleration was between - 50 km/s^2 in counter-current direction and 70 km/s^2 in co-current direction. According to toroidal momentum equation, toroidal electric field (E\\-(\\g(f))), electron-ion toroidal friction, and toroidal viscous force etc. may play roles in the evolution of toroi...

  16. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Axisymmetric Plasmas with Non-Circular Cross Sections

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Bing-Ren; LI Ji-Quan; DONG Jia-Qi

    2005-01-01

    @@ The geodesic acoustic mode in general toroidally axisymmetric plasmas such as Tokamak and spherical torus is studied in detail. The mode structure is found and the dispersion equation is derived and solved for arbitrary toroidally axi-symmetric plasmas. Besides the finite aspect ratio, effects of elongation and triangularity on this mode are clarified.

  17. Potential role of the Fast Flux Test Facility and the advanced test reactor in the U.S. tritium production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy is currently engaged in a dual-track strategy to develop an accelerator and a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as potential sources of tritium supply. New analysis of the production capabilities of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site argues for considering its inclusion in the tritium supply,system. The use of the FFTF (alone or together with the Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) as an integral part of,a tritium production system would help (1) ensure supply by 2005, (2) provide additional time to resolve institutional and technical issues associated with the- dual-track strategy, and (3) reduce discounted total life-cycle'costs and near-tenn annual expenditures for accelerator-based systems. The FFRF would also provide a way to get an early start.on dispositioning surplus weapons-usable plutonium as well as provide a source of medical isotopes. Challenges Associated With the Dual-Track Strategy The Department's purchase of either a commercial reactor or reactor irradiation services faces challenging institutional issues associated with converting civilian reactors to defense uses. In addition, while the technical capabilities of the individual components of the accelerator have been proven, the entire system needs to be demonstrated and scaled upward to ensure that the components work together 1548 as a complete production system. These challenges create uncertainty over the ability of the du2a-track strategy to provide an assured tritium supply source by 2005. Because the earliest the accelerator could come on line is 2007, it would have to operate at maximum capacity for the first few years to regenerate the reserves lost through radioactive decay after 2005

  18. Simulation study of toroidal flow generation of minority ions by local ICRF heating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal flow generation of minority ions by the local ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating is investigated in a tokamak plasma by applying the GNET code, which can solve the drift kinetic equation in the 5-D phase space. An asymmetry of velocity distribution function in the parallel direction is found and two types of toroidal averaged flow of minority ions are observed. One is the sheared flow near the RF power absorption region depending on the sign of k∥, and the other is the toroidal flow, which is larger than the previous one, independent of the sign of k∥. It is found that the k∥-sign-independent toroidal flow is generated by the net toroidal motion of energetic tail ions and that the k∥-sign-dependent flow is related to the mechanism proposed by Ohkawa. (author)

  19. The Experiment of Modulated Toroidal Current on HT-7 and HT-6M Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Experiments of Modulated Toroidal Current were done on the HT-6M tokamakand HT-7 superconducting tokamak. The toroidal current was modulated by programming theOhmic heating field. Modulation of the plasma current has been used successfully to suppressMHD activity in discharges near the density limit where large MHD m = 2 tearing modes weresuppressed by sufficiently large plasma current oscillations. The improved Ohmic confinementphase was observed during modulating toroidal current (MTC) on the Hefei Tokamak-6M (HT-6M) and Hefei superconducting Tokamak-7 (HT-7). A toroidal frequency-modulated current,induced by a modulated loop voltage, was added on the plasma equilibrium current. The ratio ofA.C. amplitude of plasma current to the main plasma current △Ip/Ip is about 12% ~ 30%. Thedifferent formats of the frequency-modulated toroidal current were compared.

  20. Toroidal high-spin isomers in light nuclei with N not equal to Z

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    The combined considerations of both the bulk liquid-drop-type behavior and the quantized aligned rotation with cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock approach revealed previously that even-even, N=Z, toroidal high-spin isomeric states have general occurrences for light nuclei with A between 28 and 52. We find that in this mass region there are in addition N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers when the single-particle shells for neutrons and protons occur at the same cranked frequency $\\hbar \\omega$. Examples of N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers, $^{36}_{16}$S$_{20}$($I$=74$\\hbar$) and $^{40}_{18}$Ar$_{22}$($I$=80,102$\\hbar$), are located and examined. The systematic properties of these N not equal to Z toroidal high-spin isomers fall into the same regular (muti-particle)-(muti-hole) patterns as other N=Z toroidal high-spin isomers.

  1. Matter in the form of toroidal electromagnetic vortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagen, Wilhelm F.

    2015-09-01

    The creation of charged elementary particles from neutral photons is explained as a conversion process of electromagnetic (EM) energy from linear to circular motion at the speed of light into two localized, toroidal shaped vortices of trapped EM energy that resist change of motion, perceptible as particles with inertia and hence mass. The photon can be represented as a superposition of left and right circular polarized transverse electric fields of opposite polarity originating from a common zero potential axis, the optical axis of the photon. If these components are separated by interaction with a strong field (nucleon) they would curl up into two electromagnetic vortices (EMV) due to longitudinal magnetic field components forming toroids. These vortices are perceptible as opposite charged elementary particles e+/- . These spinning toroids generate extended oscillating fields that interact with stationary field oscillations. The velocity-dependent frequency differences cause beat signals equivalent to matter waves, leading to interference. The extended fields entangled with every particle explain wave particle duality issues. Spin and magnetic moment are the natural outcome of these gyrating particles. As the energy and hence mass of the electron increases with acceleration so does its size shrink proportional to its reduced wavelength. The artificial weak and strong nuclear forces can be easily explained as different manifestations of the intermediate EM forces. The unstable neutron consists of a proton surrounded by a contracted and captured electron. The associated radial EM forces represent the weak nuclear force. The deuteron consists of two axially separated protons held together by a centrally captured electron. The axial EM forces represent the strong nuclear force, providing stability for "neutrons" only within nucleons. The same principles were applied to determine the geometries of force-balanced nuclei. The alpha-particle emerges as a very compact

  2. 3D toroidal physics: testing the boundaries of symmetry breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spong, Don

    2014-10-01

    Toroidal symmetry is an important concept for plasma confinement; it allows the existence of nested flux surface MHD equilibria and conserved invariants for particle motion. However, perfect symmetry is unachievable in realistic toroidal plasma devices. For example, tokamaks have toroidal ripple due to discrete field coils, optimized stellarators do not achieve exact quasi-symmetry, the plasma itself continually seeks lower energy states through helical 3D deformations, and reactors will likely have non-uniform distributions of ferritic steel near the plasma. Also, some level of designed-in 3D magnetic field structure is now anticipated for most concepts in order to lead to a stable, steady-state fusion reactor. Such planned 3D field structures can take many forms, ranging from tokamaks with weak 3D ELM-suppression fields to stellarators with more dominant 3D field structures. There is considerable interest in the development of unified physics models for the full range of 3D effects. Ultimately, the questions of how much symmetry breaking can be tolerated and how to optimize its design must be addressed for all fusion concepts. Fortunately, significant progress is underway in theory, computation and plasma diagnostics on many issues such as magnetic surface quality, plasma screening vs. amplification of 3D perturbations, 3D transport, influence on edge pedestal structures, MHD stability effects, modification of fast ion-driven instabilities, prediction of energetic particle heat loads on plasma-facing materials, effects of 3D fields on turbulence, and magnetic coil design. A closely coupled program of simulation, experimental validation, and design optimization is required to determine what forms and amplitudes of 3D shaping and symmetry breaking will be compatible with future fusion reactors. The development of models to address 3D physics and progress in these areas will be described. This work is supported both by the US Department of Energy under Contract DE

  3. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations

  4. Proceedings of the third symposium on the physics and technology of compact toroids in the magnetic fusion energy program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemon, R.E. (comp.)

    1981-03-01

    This document contains papers contributed by the participants of the Third Symposium on Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids in the Magnetic Fusion Energy Program. Subjects include reactor aspects of compact toroids, energetic particle rings, spheromak configurations (a mixture of toroidal and poloidal fields), and field-reversed configurations (FRC's that contain purely poloidal field).

  5. Development of the KfK NET toroidal field coil react and wind conductor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of the Euratom Fusion Technology program an A15 forced flow cooled conductor for the toroidal field (TF) coils of the Next European Torus (NET) was developed at KfK Karlsruhe. The conductor is based on the bronze route of Nb3Sn. It was designed as a react and wind conductor in a sandwich type where the flat Nb3Sn Rutherford cable was enclosed between two Cu stabilizers based on roebeled Cu profiles. A subsize conductor at the scale 1:1.75 was fabricated for developing the industrial fabrication procedure and testing the electrical properties within an acceptable cost frame. For the heat treatment of the Rutherford cable a suitable process was developed. No unexpected degradations were found on samples taken at different fabrication stages and tested in the FBI facility at KfK. In a late stage of development the NET parameters were changed which loaded the conductor with 10 times higher field transients caused by plasmas disruption with respect to the original specifications. A detailed analysis showed that the conductor fulfilled further all specifications except the field transients of the plasma disruption where the conductor will quench. The development of the Nb3Sn conductor in react and wind technique demonstrate that this conductor type is feasible using the common manufacturing techniques of large coils which were already successfully demonstrated in the Large Coil Task and in the KfK-Polo project. (orig.)

  6. Stress Distribution on the Fe Based Amorphous Toroidal Transducer Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Göktepe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of sensors are the transmission of energy from one system to another. In general, an electrical signal is produced by the change of a physical property induced by the applied change of a second parameter. In the case of magnetic transducers either the property or the parameter would have a magnetic context. For example, in magnetoelastic toroidal transducers, the induced changes of a physical property, that is, the variation of permeability caused by the applied external force are used to produce a variation in output signal. The linearity, magnitude, sensitivity, and repeatability of the relationship between the output signal of the transducer and the physical property define the quality of the transducer.

  7. The use of toroidal boundary conditions in the program POISSON

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In circular particle accelerators of moderate size, one cannot entirely neglect the curvature of the structure and of the guide field. In practice, one may wish to restrict the region of analysis to that near the working aperture, while excluding a very substantial area closer to (and including) the axis of rotational symmetry. In this way, a more efficient mesh can be generated for a program such as POISSON. In restricting the solution to the region of interest, there must be concern regarding a suitable termination of the problem at the boundary of the mesh. For these reasons, we have employed toroidal coordinates in constructing the boundary to a relaxation mesh, and in formulating the boundary conditions that then would be imposed at such boundaries. 11 refs., 6 figs

  8. Effect of loss cone on confinement in toroidal helical device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analytical estimation is given on the loss cone in the toroidal helical devices in the presence of the radial electric field and the modulation of the helical ripple. The minimum energy of particles entering the loss cone is calculated. The modulation is not always effective in reducing the loss in the presence of the radial electric field. The plasma loss due to the loss cone is estimated in the collisionless limit. The radial electric field is estimated in the presence of the loss cone. It is found that the transition to the solution with positive radial electric field, which is necessary to achieve the high-ion-temperature mode, becomes difficult. This difficulty is large for the systems with the small helical ripple. (author)

  9. Ion temperature and toroidal rotation in JET's low torque plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, J.; Nave, M. F. F.; Giroud, C.; Reyes Cortes, S.; Bizarro, João P. S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper reports on the procedure developed as the best method to provide an accurate and reliable estimation of the ion temperature Ti and the toroidal velocity vϕ from Charge-eXchange Recombination Spectroscopy (CXRS) data from intrinsic rotation experiments at the Joint European Torus with the carbon wall. The low impurity content observed in such plasmas, resulting in low active CXRS signal, alongside low Doppler shifts makes the determination of Ti and vϕ particularly difficult. The beam modulation method will be discussed along with the measures taken to increase photon statistics and minimise errors from the absolute calibration and magneto-hydro-dynamics effects that may impact the CXRS passive emission.

  10. Geodesic Acoustic Mode in Toroidally Rotating Anisotropic Tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Ren, Haijun

    2015-01-01

    Effects of anisotropy on the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) is analyzed by using gyro-kinetic equations applicable to low-frequency microinstabilities in a toroidally rotating tokamak plasma. Dispersion relation in the presence of arbitrary Mach number $M$, anisotropy strength $\\sigma$, and the temperature ration $\\tau$ is analytically derived. It is shown that when $\\sigma$ is less than $ 3 + 2 \\tau$, the increased electron temperature with fixed ion parallel temperature increases the normalized GAM frequency. When $\\sigma$ is larger than $ 3 + 2 \\tau$, the increasing of electron temperature decreases the GAM frequency. The anisotropy $\\sigma$ always tends to enlarge the GAM frequency. The Landau damping rate is dramatically decreased by the increasing $\\tau$ or $\\sigma$.

  11. Stability of the toroidal magnetic field in stellar radiation zones

    CERN Document Server

    Bonanno, Alfio

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the stability of the magnetic field in radiation zones is of crucial importance for various processes in stellar interior like mixing, circulation and angular momentum transport. The stability properties of a star containing a prominent toroidal field in a radiation zone is investigated by means of a linear stability analysis in the Boussinesq approximation taking into account the effect of thermal conductivity. The growth rate of the instability is explicitly calculated and the effects of stable stratification and heat transport are discussed in detail. It is argued that the stabilizing influence of gravity can never entirely suppress the instability caused by electric currents in radiation zones although the stable stratification can significantly decrease the growth rate of instability

  12. Transport Bifurcation Induced by Sheared Toroidal Flow in Tokamak Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Highcock, E G; Parra, F I; Schekochihin, A A; Roach, C M; Cowley, S C

    2011-01-01

    First-principles numerical simulations are used to describe a transport bifurcation in a differentially rotating tokamak plasma. Such a bifurcation is more probable in a region of zero magnetic shear, where the component of the sheared toroidal flow that is perpendicular to the magnetic field has the strongest suppressing effect on the turbulence, than one of finite magnetic shear. Where the magnetic shear is zero, there are no growing linear eigenmodes at any finite value of flow shear. However, subcritical turbulence can be sustained, owing to the transient growth of modes driven by the ion temperature gradient (ITG) and the parallel velocity gradient (PVG). Nonetheless, in a parameter space containing a wide range of temperature gradients and velocity shears, there is a sizeable window where all turbulence is suppressed. Combined with the relatively low transport of momentum by collisional (neoclassical) mechanisms, this produces the conditions for a bifurcation from low to high temperature and velocity gr...

  13. Heterotic free fermionic and symmetric toroidal orbifold models

    CERN Document Server

    Athanasopoulos, P; Nibbelink, S Groot; Mehta, V M

    2016-01-01

    Free fermionic models and symmetric heterotic toroidal orbifolds both constitute exact backgrounds that can be used effectively for phenomenological explorations within string theory. Even though it is widely believed that for Z2xZ2 orbifolds the two descriptions should be equivalent, a detailed dictionary between both formulations is still lacking. This paper aims to fill this gap: We give a detailed account of how the input data of both descriptions can be related to each other. In particular, we show that the generalized GSO phases of the free fermionic model correspond to generalized torsion phases used in orbifold model building. We illustrate our translation methods by providing free fermionic realizations for all Z2xZ2 orbifold geometries in six dimensions.

  14. Modeling transport in toroidal plasmas: Status and issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope and detail of physics contained in computational models for fluid (density, momentum, energy) transport in toroidal plasmas have steadily increased during the past two decades. There has been considerable success in the development and verification of models for sources and sinks of particles, energy, momentum, and magnetic flux. Transport codes have collectively become very useful tools in interpreting experimental data and in providing guidance for new experiments. However, a more thorough understanding of the fundamental transport processes of magnetically confined plasmas and development of improved computational models are needed to enhance the predictive capabilities of transport codes. It is argued that fluid transport modeling by itself cannot lead to a complete understanding of transport---there must be a very strong collaboration among theory, experiment, and modeling on both the fluid and kinetic levels

  15. Gasdynamic characteristics of toroidal shock and detonation wave converging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Honghui; JIANG Zonglin

    2005-01-01

    The modified CCW relation is applied to analyzing the shock, detonation wave converging and the role of chemical reactions in the process. Results indicate that the shock wave is strengthened faster than the detonation wave in the converging at the same initial Mach number. Euler equations implemented with a detailed chemical reaction model are solved to simulate toroidal shock and detonation wave converging. Gasdynamic characteristics of the converging are investigated, including wave interaction patterns, observable discrepancies and physical phenomena behind them. By comparing wave diffractions, converging processes and pressure evolutions in the focusing area, the different effects of chemical reactions on diffracting and converging processes are discussed and the analytic conclusion is demonstrated through the observation of numerical simulations.

  16. Two novel compact toroidal concepts with Stellarator features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two novel compact toroidal concepts are presented. One is the Stellarator-Spheromak (SSP) and another is the Extreme-Low-Aspect-Ratio Stellarator (ELARS). An SSP device represents a hybrid between a spherical stellarator (SS) and a spheromak. This configuration retains the main advantages of spheromaks ans has a potential for improving the spheromak concept regarding its main problems. The MHD equilibrium in an SSP with very high β of the confined plasma is demonstrated. Another concept, ELARS, represents an extreme limit of the SS approach, and considers devices with stellarator features and aspect ratios A ∼ 1. We have succeeded in finding ELARS configurations with extremely compact, modular, and simple design compatible with significant rotational transform, large plasma volume, and good particle transport characteristics

  17. First assembly phase for the ATLAS toroid coils

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    The ATLAS barrel toroid system consists of eight coils, each of axial length 25.3 m, assembled radially and symmetrically around the beam axis. The coils are of a flat racetrack type with two double-pancake windings made of 20.5 kA aluminium-stabilized niobium-titanium superconductor. In the first phase of assembly, the two 'pancakes' are packed into their vacuum vessel. This is done using bladders filled with resin and glass microbeads under pressure. The resin is heated and, once cooled, holds the pancakes in place. The operation has to be performed on both sides of the coil, which necessitated a special technique to turn the coils over and then transport them to the heating table. Photos 01, 02, 03: Transporting the coil to the heating table using a special lifting gantry manufactured at JINR-Dubna, Russia in preparation for the 'bladderisation' operation.

  18. Analysis of recurrent patterns in toroidal magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Allen R; Chen, Guoning; Tricoche, Xavier; Pugmire, David; Kruger, Scott; Breslau, Joshua

    2010-01-01

    In the development of magnetic confinement fusion which will potentially be a future source for low cost power, physicists must be able to analyze the magnetic field that confines the burning plasma. While the magnetic field can be described as a vector field, traditional techniques for analyzing the field's topology cannot be used because of its Hamiltonian nature. In this paper we describe a technique developed as a collaboration between physicists and computer scientists that determines the topology of a toroidal magnetic field using fieldlines with near minimal lengths. More specifically, we analyze the Poincaré map of the sampled fieldlines in a Poincaré section including identifying critical points and other topological features of interest to physicists. The technique has been deployed into an interactive parallel visualization tool which physicists are using to gain new insight into simulations of magnetically confined burning plasmas.

  19. Compact toroid development: activity plan for field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the description, goals, status, plans, and approach for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the field reversed configuration (FRC). This component of the magnetic fusion development program has been characterized by its potential for physical compactness and a flexible range of output power. The included material represents the second phase of FRC program planning. The first was completed in February 1983, and was reported in DOE/ER-0160; Compact Toroid Development. This planning builds on that previous report and concentrates on the detailed plans for the next several years of the current DOE sponsored program. It has been deliberately restricted to the experimental and theoretical efforts possible within the present scale of effort. A third phase of this planning exercise will examine the subsequent effort and resources needed to achieve near term (1987 to 1990) FRC technical objectives

  20. High-frequency toroidal sensor of superconducting quantum magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The toroidal sensor consists of a superconducting induction loop electrically closed with a superconducting weak junction. The sensor features a cylindrical body. The body is integral and is made of superconducting material. It is provided with tow O-shape cavities in which cylindrical signal and exciting coils are installed. The precise cavity geometry and coil fitting is described on an example and shown in figures. The advantages of the configuration include suppression of spurious signals and improvement of the internal sensor shielding against external electromagnetic fields. The device is used for measuring low intensity magnetic fields, e.g., in the measurement of nuclear magnetic resonance, in particle detection, thermometry, geology, medicine, etc. (E.J.). 5 figs

  1. Global Theory to Understand Toroidal Drift Waves in Steep Gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Xie, Hua-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Toroidal drift waves with unconventional mode structures and non-ground eigenstates, which differ from typical ballooning structure mode, are found to be important recently by large scale global gyrokinetic simulations and especially become dominant at strong gradient edge plasmas [cf., Xie and Xiao, Phys. Plasmas, 22, 090703 (2015)]. The global stability and mode structures of drift wave in this steep edge density and temperature gradients are examined by both direct numerical solutions of a model two-dimensional eigen equation and analytical theory employing WKB-ballooning approach. Theory agrees with numerical solutions quite well. Our results indicate that (i) non-ground eigenstates and unconventional mode structures generally exist and can be roughly described by two parameters `quantum number' $l$ and ballooning angle $\\vartheta_k$, (ii) local model can overestimate the growth rate largely, say, $>50\\%$, and (iii) the narrow steep equilibrium profile leads to twisting (triangle-like) radial mode structu...

  2. Magnetic surfaces of toroidal helical fields in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is proposed to analyse theoretically the disruptive instability that occurs in confined plasmas in tokamaks, through investigation of the influence of resonant helical fields on their equilibrium; With this aim, a superposition of the magnetic field of the plasma in static MHD equilibrium with the field associated with the resonances is considered, taking into account the toroidal geometry of the tokamak. Due to the lack of symmetry, the lines of the total magnetic field resulting from this superposition must form magnetic surfaces only around some regions of the plasma. using the averaging method, functions of approximate magnetic surfaces are obtained (analytically) around the regions of resonances of the plasma (they contain the lines of this total magnetic field). It was verified that these approximate surfaces have structures of magnetic islands. (author)

  3. Toroidal bubbles with circulation in ideal hydrodynamics: A variational approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruban, V.P.; Juul Rasmussen, J.

    2003-01-01

    Incompressible, inviscid, irrotational, unsteady flows with circulation Gamma around a distorted toroidal bubble are considered. A general variational principle that determines the evolution of the bubble shape is formulated. For a two-dimensional (2D) cavity with a constant area A, exact...... pseudodifferential equations of motion are derived, based on variables that determine a conformal mapping of the unit circle exterior into the region occupied by the fluid. A closed expression for the Hamiltonian of the 2D system in terms of canonical variables is obtained. Stability of a stationary drifting 2D...... hollow vortex is demonstrated, when the gravity is small, gA(3/2)/Gamma(2)flows a simplified Lagrangian is suggested, inasmuch as the bubble shape is well described by the center line R(xi,t) and by an approximately circular cross section...

  4. The angular momentum transport by unstable toroidal magnetic fields

    CERN Document Server

    Ruediger, G; Spada, F; Tereshin, I

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate with a nonlinear MHD code that angular momentum can be transported due to the magnetic instability of toroidal fields under the influence of differential rotation, and that the resulting effective viscosity may be high enough to explain the almost rigid-body rotation observed in radiative stellar cores. The fields are assumed strong enough and the density stratification weak enough that the influence of the 'negative' buoyancy in the radiative zones can be neglected. Only permanent current-free fields and only those combinations of rotation rates and magnetic field amplitudes which provide maximal numerical values of the viscosity are considered. We find that the dimensionless ratio of the turbulent over molecular viscosity, \

  5. Evolution of toroidal Alfven eigenmode instability in TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, K.L.; Majeski, R.; Petrov, M. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.] [and others

    1996-07-01

    The nonlinear behavior of the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) driven unstable by energetic ions in TFTR is studied. The evolution of instabilities can take on several scenarios: a single mode or several modes can be driven unstable at the same time, the spectrum can be steady or pulsating and there can be negligible or anomalous loss associated with the instability. This paper presents a comparison between experimental results and recently developed nonlinear theory. The authors find many features observed in experiment are compatible with the consequences of the nonlinear theory. Examples include the structure of the saturated pulse that emerges from the onset of instability of a single mode and the decrease but persistence of TAE signals when the applied rf power is reduced or shut off.

  6. New results from the BATES Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment using the novel technique of scattering a longitudinally polarized electron beam from polarized internal hydrogen/deuterium gas targets was carried out in the South Hall Ring at the MIT-Bates Accelerator Center. The scattered particles were detected by the Bates Large Acceptance Spectrometer Toroid (BLAST) detector. The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio, GEp/GMp at Q2 = 0.1 - 0.65 (GeV/c)2 has been determined from the experiment by measuring the spin-dependent ep elastic scattering asymmetry in the two symmetric sectors of the BLAST simultaneously for the first time. The neutron electric form factor GEn in the same Q2 range has been extracted by measuring the spin-dependent asymmetry from the d-vector(e-vector, e′n) process with a vector polarized deuterium target. These results on the nucleon form factors from the BLAST experiment are presented. (author)

  7. Equilibrium and Stability of Partial Toroidal Plasma Discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equilibrium and stability of partial toroidal flux ropes are studied in detail in the laboratory, motivated by ubiquitous loop structures on the solar surface. The flux ropes studied here are magnetized arc discharges formed in the Magnetic Reconnection Experiment (MRX). It is found that these loops robustly maintain their equilibrium on time scales much longer than the Alfven time over a wide range of plasma current, guide eld strength, and angle between electrodes, even in the absence of a strapping field. Additionally, the external kink stability of these flux ropes is found to be governed by the Kruskal-Shafranov limit for a flux rope with line-tied boundary conditions at both ends (q > 1).

  8. Quasars: a supermassive rotating toroidal black hole interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, R. J.

    2000-08-01

    A supermassive rotating toroidal black hole (TBH) is proposed as the fundamental structure of quasars and other jet-producing active galactic nuclei. Rotating protogalaxies gather matter from the central gaseous region leading to the birth of massive toroidal stars, the internal nuclear reactions of which proceed very rapidly. Once the nuclear fuel is spent, gravitational collapse produces a slender ring-shaped TBH remnant. Transitory electron and neutron degeneracy stabilized collapse phases, although possible, are unlikely owing to the large masses involved thus these events are typically the first supernovae of the host galaxies. Given time, the TBH mass increases through continued accretion by several orders of magnitude, the event horizon swells whilst the central aperture shrinks. The difference in angular velocities between the accreting matter and the TBH induces a magnetic field that is strongest in the region of the central aperture and innermost ergoregion. Owing to the presence of negative energy states when such a gravitational vortex is immersed in an electromagnetic field, circumstances are near ideal for energy extraction via non-thermal radiation including the Penrose process and superradiant scattering. This establishes a self-sustaining mechanism whereby the transport of angular momentum away from the quasar by relativistic bi-directional jets reinforces both the modulating magnetic field and the TBH/accretion disc angular velocity differential. Continued mass-capture by the TBH results in contraction of the central aperture until the TBH topology transitions to being spheroidal, extinguishing quasar behaviour. Similar mechanisms may be operating in microquasars, supernovae and sources of repeating gamma-ray bursts when neutron density or black hole tori arise. Long-term TBH stability seems to require either a negative cosmological constant, a non-stationary space-time resulting from the presence of accreting matter or the intervention of quantum

  9. Confinement studies of ECRH plasmas in a toroidal heliac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SHEILA heliac is a toroidal device of major radius Ro=18.75 cm and mean minor radius a (last closed flux surface) of about 3.1 cm. 24 toroidal field coils displaced 2.5 cm about a poloidal ring coil (radius Ro) form a N=3 period helical axis stellarator. SHEILA has been converted to a flexible heliac by an additional l=1 helical winding about the ring coil. Considerable variation in the magnetic geometry can be obtained by adjusting the current ratio C=Ih/Ir between -0.16 to +0.25, equivalent to the range 0.55≥ι(0)≥1.86, where Ih and Ir are the currents in the helical winding and poloidal ring. The vacuum flux surfaces are generally bean-shaped in cross section, but change considerably with variations in the helical current. The |B| surfaces, however, remain roughly circular, concentric with the poloidal ring coil. Plasma formation by electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) depends critically on the position of the fundamental resonance surface, and also the second harmonic surface at low field strengths, relative to the plasma column and the launching antenna. In this paper we investigate the particle confinement properties of the heliac geometry as the rotational transform is varied using up to 2.5 kW peak 10 ms wide pulses of microwave ECR power at 2.45 GHz. Cool (Te=6-10eV) but highly ionized argon plasmas with very reproducible characteristics are generated by discrete dipole/monopole or helical antennae positioned close to the plasma surface. Depending on the magnetic geometry and field strength the antennae can launch either from the high field side (HFS) or the low field side (LFS) of the fundamental resonance surface. (author) 3 refs., 5 figs

  10. Technological Advancements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Mike

    2010-01-01

    The influx of technology has brought significant improvements to school facilities. Many of those advancements can be found in classrooms, but when students head down the hall to use the washrooms, they are likely to find a host of technological innovations that have improved conditions in that part of the building. This article describes modern…

  11. Solenoid-free toroidal plasma start-up concept utilizing only the outer poloidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Eventual elimination of in-board ohmic heating solenoid is required for the spherical torus (ST) reactors and it is considered to be highly desirable for advanced tokamak reactors. A fundamental challenge for using only the outer poloidal field coils for the start-up purpose is the difficulty of creating a sufficiently high quality field null region while retaining significant poloidal flux needed for subsequent current ramp up. Here, we show through both static and dynamic calculations that a carefully chosen proper set of outer poloidal field coils can indeed offer a promising prospect of creating a good quality 'multi-pole' field null while retaining sufficient poloidal flux, in particular, satisfying the 'Lloyd' criteria for the inductive plasma start-up. For a single turn TF system envisioned for ST-based CTF and power plant, the poloidal magnetic flux stored in the TF inner leg can provide additional significant flux. This concept can be readily extended to future devices for a multi-MA level start-up current due to the relatively simple physics principles and a favorable scaling with device size and toroidal magnetic field. (author)

  12. Operation of a 20 tesla on-axis tokamak toroidal field magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT) has designed, built, and is presently testing a 20 T on-axis, single turn, toroidal field (TF) coil. The Ignition Technology Demonstration (ITD) is a 0.06-scale IGNITEX (Texas Fusion Ignition Experiment) TF-coil experiment. The purpose of the ITD program is to demonstrate the operation of a 20 T, single turn, TF coil powered by homopolar generators (HPGs). This program is funded by the Advanced Technology Program and the Texas Atomic Energy Research Foundation. Scaling of the prototype 20 T TF coil was selected to be 0.06 on the basis of the maximum current capability of CEM-UT's 60 MJ HPG power supply, which has a rating of 9 MA at 100 V in a parallel configuration. Stresses and temperatures reached in the scale TF coil are representative of those that would be experienced in a full-scale IGNITEX TF coil with a 1.5 m major radius and a 5 s flat top current profile. The 60 MJ HPG system consists of six, 20 MJ, drum-type HPGs each capable of 1.5 MA at 100 V. Only 25% of the available system energy is used to drive the single turn TF coil to 20 T

  13. Experience with operation of a large magnet system in the international fusion superconducting magnet test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superconducting toroidal field systems, including coils and ancillaries, are being developed through international collaboration in the Large Coil Task. Focal point is a test facility in Oak Ridge where six coils will be tested in a toroidal array. Shakedown of the facility and preliminary tests of the first three coils (from Japan, Switzerland, and the US) were accomplished in 1984. Useful data were obtained on performance of the helium refrigerator and distribution system, power supplies, control and data acquisition systems and voltages, currents, strains, and acoustic emission in the coils. Performance was generally gratifying except for the helium system, where improvements are being made

  14. Dynamics of Toroidal Spiral Strings around Five-dimensional Black Holes

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2009-01-01

    We examine the separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a `{\\it Hopf loop}\\rq string which is a special class of the toroidal spiral strings, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  15. Dynamics of Toroidal Spiral Strings around Five-dimensional Black Holes

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    We examine the separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a `{\\it Hopf loop}\\rq string which is a special class of the toroidal spiral strings, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral i...

  16. Theoretical studies of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light-mass region

    CERN Document Server

    Staszczak, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    We review our theoretical knowledge of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light mass region in 28$\\le$$A$$\\le$52 obtained previously in cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations. We report additional toroidal high-spin isomers in $^{56}$Ni with $I$=114$\\hbar$ and 140$\\hbar$, which follow the same (multi-particle)--(multi-hole) systematics as other toroidal high-spin isomers. We examine the production of these exotic nuclei by fusion of various projectiles on $^{20}$Ne or $^{28}$Si as an active target in time-projection-chamber (TCP) experiments.

  17. Theoretical studies of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light-mass region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszczak, Andrzej; Wong, Cheuk-Yin

    2016-05-01

    We review our theoretical knowledge of possible toroidal high-spin isomers in the light mass region in 28≤A≤52 obtained previously in cranked Skyrme-Hartree-Fock calculations. We report additional toroidal high-spin isomers in 56Ni with I=114ħ and 140ħ, which follow the same (multi-particle)-(multi-hole) systematics as other toroidal high-spin isomers. We examine the production of these exotic nuclei by fusion of various projectiles on 20Ne or 28Si as an active target in time-projection-chamber (TPC) experiments.

  18. Design and manufacture of a toroidal-type SMES for combination with real-time digital simulator (RTDS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-min; Kim, A.-Rong; Park, Minwon; Yu, In-Keun; Eom, Bum-Yong; Sim, Kidoek; Kim, Seok-Ho; Sohn, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Jong; Bae, Joon-Han; Seong, Ki-Cheol

    2011-06-01

    The authors designed and manufactured a toroidal-type superconducting magnetic energy storage (SMES) system. The toroidal-type SMES was designed using a 3D CAD program. The toroidal-type magnet consists of 30 double pancake coils (DPCs). The single pancake coils (SPCs), which constitute the double pancake coils, are arranged at an angle of 6° from each other, based on the central axis of the toroidal-type magnet. The cooling method used for the toroidal-type SMES is the conduction cooling type. When the cooling method for the toroidal-type SMES was designed, the two-stage Gifford-McMahon (GM) refrigerator was considered. The Bi-2223 HTS wire, which was made by soldering brass on both sides of the superconductor, is used for the magnet winding. Finally, the authors connected the toroidal-type SMES to a real-time digital simulator (RSCAD/RTDS) to simulate voltage sag compensation in a power utility.

  19. EMC3-EIRENE modeling of toroidally-localized divertor gas injection experiments on Alcator C-Mod

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lore, J.D., E-mail: lorejd@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Reinke, M.L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); LaBombard, B. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lipschultz, B. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, University of York, Heslington, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Churchill, R.M. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Pitts, R.A. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); Feng, Y. [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, Greifswald (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    Experiments on Alcator C-Mod with toroidally and poloidally localized divertor nitrogen injection have been modeled using the three-dimensional edge transport code EMC3-EIRENE to elucidate the mechanisms driving measured toroidal asymmetries. In these experiments five toroidally distributed gas injectors in the private flux region were sequentially activated in separate discharges resulting in clear evidence of toroidal asymmetries in radiated power and nitrogen line emission as well as a ∼50% toroidal modulation in electron pressure at the divertor target. The pressure modulation is qualitatively reproduced by the modeling, with the simulation yielding a toroidal asymmetry in the heat flow to the outer strike point. Toroidal variation in impurity line emission is qualitatively matched in the scrape-off layer above the strike point, however kinetic corrections and cross-field drifts are likely required to quantitatively reproduce impurity behavior in the private flux region and electron temperatures and densities directly in front of the target.

  20. Toroidal Discharge in a Varying Longitudinal Magnetic Field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors present results on the behaviour of a current-carrying toroidal plasma column in a strong longitudinal magnetic field whose magnitude is varied (increased) considerably during discharge in order to constrict the plasma column and reduce its interaction with the walls of the discharge chamber. These experiments are a continuation of the work of Ivanov and Razumova and were carried out on Tokamak TM-1, which is similar in its dimensions and main parameters to the Tokamak TM-2. The large radius of its toroidal chamber is R = 40 cm and the small radius a = 10 cm. The discharge current is 9 to 15 kA and lasts 3.2 ms. It is found that the quasi-stationary stabilizing longitudinal magnetic field can vary by 8 kOe over a period of 1 ms at any time during discharge. The total magnetic field reaches 16 kOe. The discharge current, the bypass voltage and the displacement of the current column relative to the centre of the cross-section of the discharge chamber are measured. In addition, a streak photograph is made of the luminescence of the cross-section of the discharge. Measurements are also made of the density with a microwave radio-interferometer on three channels located at various points in the cross-section of the plasma column. Discharge processes are attained in which plasma conductivity, displacement of the current column and density of the charged particles in the constant magnetic field are weakly dependent on the magnitude of the latter, beginning about 8 kOe. In such processes an increase in the magnetic field during discharge leads to a concentration of the current, the velocity of which is estimated by the jump in bypass voltage at the moment when the field begins to increase and by the change in the displacement of the current column. However, no substantial change in the density distribution over the plasma column cross-section is observed, at least when the magnetic field H/H is increasing at rates not in excess of 103 s-1. Possible explanations