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Sample records for advanced toroidal facility torsatron

  1. Runaway studies in the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulsed torsatrons and heliotrons are susceptible to runaway electron formation and confinement resulting from the inherent good containment in the vacuum fields and the high loop voltages during the initiation and termination of the helical and vertical fields (''field ramping''). Because runaway electrons can cause an unacceptable level of hard X rays near the machine, a runaway suppression system was designed and included in the initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). The main component of the system is a rotating paddle that is normally left in the vacuum chamber during the field ramps. This device proved to be very effective in reducing the runaway population. Measurements of hard X rays from ATF have shown that the runaways are produced primarily during the field ramping but that usually a small steady-state runaway component is also present during the ''flat-top'' portion of the fields. The paddle is the main source of the hard X rays (thick-target bremsstrahlung), although other objects in the vacuum chamber also serve as targets for the runaways at various times. The maximum X-ray energy found by pulse height analysis is /approximately/12--15 MeV; the mean energy appears to be a few mega-electron-volts. A noticeable forward peaking of the bremsstrahlung from the paddle is evident. The limiters do not appear to be major sources of bremsstrahlung. 17 refs., 14 figs

  2. Construction and initial operation of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) torsatron was designed on a physics basis for access to the second stability regime and on an engineering basis for independent fabrication of high-accuracy components. The actual construction, assembly, and initial operation of ATF are compared with the characteristics expected during the design of ATF. 31 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  3. Design description of the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a large torsatron being designed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to replace the Impurity Study Experiment (ISX-B) tokamak. ATF will have a major radius of 2.1 m and an average plasma minor radius of 0.3 m. Major components of the device include the coil sets, structure, and vacuum vessel. The coil sets are designed for broad operating envelopes, including the capability to drive up to 100 kA of plasma current, to produce helical axis configurations, and to operate continuously at one-half the baseline currents. The ATF structure consists of a 40-mm-thick stainless steel toroidal shell encasing the helical coil set. The shell is constructed from 24 identical upper and lower segments, with 12 pairs of intermediate panels to provide access to the helical field (HF) coil joints. The lower portion of the shell also serves as an assembly fixture for the HF coil set. The vacuum vessel is a highly contoured 6-mm-thick stainless steel shell closely fitting the bore and sidewalls of the HF coil winding to provide maximum volume for the plasma. Forty-eight large ports allow good access for diagnostics and neutral beam injection

  4. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] data management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data management for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF), a stellarator located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), is provided by DMG, a locally developed, VAX-based software system. DMG is a data storage and retrieval software system that provides the user interface to ATF raw and analyzed data. Data are described in terms of data models and data types and are organized as signals into files, which are internally documented. The system was designed with user accessibility, software maintainability, and extensibility as primary goals. Extensibility features include compatibility with ATF as it moves from pulsed to steady-state operation and capability for use of the DMG system with experiments other than ATF. DMG is implemented as a run-time library of routines available as a shareable image. General-purpose and specialized data acquisition and analysis applications have been developed using the DMG system. This paper describes the DMG system and the interfaces to it. 4 refs., 2 figs

  5. Advanced toroidal facility vaccuum vessel stress analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex geometry of the Advance Toroidal Facility (ATF) vacuum vessel required special analysis techniques in investigating the structural behavior of the design. The response of a large-scale finite element model was found for transportation and operational loading. Several computer codes and systems, including the National Magnetic Fusion Energy Computer Center Cray machines, were implemented in accomplishing these analyses. The work combined complex methods that taxed the limits of both the codes and the computer systems involved. Using MSC/NASTRAN cyclic-symmetry solutions permitted using only 1/12 of the vessel geometry to mathematically analyze the entire vessel. This allowed the greater detail and accuracy demanded by the complex geometry of the vessel. Critical buckling-pressure analyses were performed with the same model. The development, results, and problems encountered in performing these analyses are described. 5 refs., 3 figs

  6. ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility]-2 studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies for a low-aspect-ratio, large next-generation stellarator, ATF-II, with high-current-density, high-field, stable NbTi/Cu helical windings are described. The design parameters are an average plasma radius of 0.52 m, a major radius of 2 m, and a field on axis of 4-5 T, with 10 to 15 MW of heating power. Such a device would be comparable in scope to other next-generation stellarators but would have roughly the same aspect ratio as the tokamaks without, however, the need for current drive to sustain steady-state operation. A number of low-aspect-ratio physics issues need to be addressed in the design of ATF-II, primarily compromises between high-beta capability and good confinement properties. A six-field-period Compact Torsatron is chosen as a reference design for ATF-II, and its main features and performance predictions are discussed. An integrated (beta capability and confinement) optimization approach and optimization of superconducting windings are also discussed. 36 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Initial high-power testing of the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] ECH [electron cyclotron heating] system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a moderate aspect ratio torsatron that will utilize 53.2 GHz 200 kW Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) to produce nearly current-free target plasmas suitable for subsequent heating by strong neutral beam injection. The initial configuration of the ECH system from the gyrotron to ATF consists of an optical arc detector, three bellows, a waveguide mode analyzer, two TiO2 mode absorbers, two 900 miter bends, two waveguide pumpouts, an insulating break, a gate valve, and miscellaneous straight waveguide sections feeding a launcher radiating in the TE02 mode. Later, a focusing Vlasov launcher will be added to beam the ECH power to the saddle point in ATF magnetic geometry for optimum power deposition. The ECH system has several unique features; namely, the entire ECH system is evacuated, the ECH system is broadband, forward power is monitored by a newly developed waveguide mode analyzer, phase correcting miter bends will be employed, and the ECH system will be capable of operating short pulse to cw. Initial high-power tests show that the overall system efficiency is 87%. The waveguide mode analyzer shows that the gyrotron mode output consists of 13% TE01, 82.6% TE02, 2.5% TE03, and 1.9% TE04. 4 refs

  8. Helical coil alignment in the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is comprised of several major structural and magnetic coil systems tightly fitted around a thin helically contoured vacuum vessel. A critical parameter for successful operation of this device is the precise alignment of the various coil systems, with particular emphasis on the exact positioning of the helical field (HF) coils. This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion

  9. Fabrication and installation of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) has been completed and installed in the facility. The vessel fabrication has involved many unique methods to correct unanticipated problems. The primary fabrication concern has been to correct for dimensional inconsistency so that the vessel would fit into the closely nested helical coil set. The vessel has been installed and the remainder of the facility components are being assembled

  10. Transition of toroidal Alfven eigenmode to global Alfven eigenmode in CHS heliotron/torsatron plasmas heated by neutral beam injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A transition of a core localized type toroidal Alfven eigenmode with n 1 toroidal mode number to two n = 1 global Alfven eignemodes was observed in NBI-heated plasmas in the Compact Helical System (CHS) heliotron/torsatron. This transition phenomenon is interpreted based on the temporal evolution of the rotational transform near the plasma center caused by the increased in the beam-driven current. (author)

  11. SAMS: The synchronization and monitoring system for ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] data acquisition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SAMS performs much of the synchronization of the distributed data acquisition system for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF). SAMS is responsible for propagating shot information and managing te data system directories and logical names. This paper describes how SAMS communicates with other processes, both within the VAX cluster that supports most of the ATF data acquisition and on VAXes that are connected to the cluster via DECnet. 3 refs

  12. Toroid magnet test facility

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Because of its exceptional size, it was not feasible to assemble and test the Barrel Toroid - made of eight coils - as an integrated toroid on the surface, prior to its final installation underground in LHC interaction point 1. It was therefore decided to test these eight coils individually in a dedicated test facility.

  13. Highlights from the assembly of the helical field coils for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The helical field (HF) coils in the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device consist of a set of 24 identical segments connected to form a continuous pair of helical coils wrapped around a toroidal vacuum vessel. Each segment weighs approximately 1364 kg (3000 lb) and is composed of 14 water-cooled copper plate conductors bolted to a cast stainless steel structural support member with a T-shape cross section (known as the structural tee). The segment components are electrically insulated with Kapton adhesive tape, G-10, Tefzel, and rubber to withstand 2.5 kV. As a final insulator and structural support, the entire segment is vacuum impregnated with epoxy. This paper offers a brief overview of the processes used to assemble the component parts into a completed segment, including identification of items that required special attention. 4 figs

  14. Design and fabrication of the vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vacuum vessel for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) is a heavily contoured and very complex formed vessel that is specifically designed to allow for maximum plasma volume in a pure stellarator arrangement. The design of the facility incorporates an internal vessel that is closely fitted to the two helical field coils following the winding law theta = 1/6phi. Metallic seals have been incorporated throughout the system to minimize impurities. The vessel has been fabricated utilizing a comprehensive set of tooling fixtures specifically designed for the task of forming 6-mm stainless steel plate to the complex shape. Computer programs were used to develop a series of ribs that essentially form an internal mold of the vessel. Plates were press-formed with multiple compound curves, fitted to the fixture, and joined with full-penetration welds. 7 refs., 8 figs

  15. A mode-transforming polarization-rotatable launcher for the ATF [Advanced Toroidal Facility] fusion experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) fusion energy experiment at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) requires high-power microwaves for startup and plasma heating. Power from a gyrotron oscillator tube at 53.2 GHz will be used to ionize and heat the plasma by the electron cyclotron heating (ECH) process. The confining magnetic field of the device is either 0.95 or 1.9T. The gyrotron tube generates 200 kW in the TE02 mode, which is transported in an overmoded 6.35-cm-diam circular waveguide to the ATF vacuum vessel. The launcher consists of a mode-converting Vlasov section, which converts the nonpolarized TE02 wave into a linearly polarized narrow beam. The beam reflects off a tiled spherical reflector grating and is focused at the center of the plasma. The polarization can be rotated to optimize the absorption efficiency by rotating the grating in the spherical reflector. Overall system efficiency is kept high by making the twist reflector large enough to catch the Vlasov converter sidelobe power, which is partially due to mode conversion in the waveguide system. The launcher design and laboratory measurements are discussed. 3 refs., 3 figs

  16. PEGASUS Toroidal Experimental Facility*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewicki, B.; Pegasus Group

    1998-11-01

    P EGASUS began operations in June 98 and will study the characteristics of Extremely Low-Aspect Ratio Tokamak (ELART) plasmas. The 2.0m diameter, thin-walled (6.35 mm) vacuum vessel is a continuous stainless steel shell with generous port access. Initial pump down base pressure was 5 × 10-8 torr. The high stress ohmic solenoid is powered by a 15 kV, 4.5 MJ capacitor bank and will be impedance-matched through a 10:1 step-down transformer to extend the pulse length. Operating at peak fields of 13 - 20 T, the solenoid can achieve a flux swing of up to 190mV-s over 60 ms. The toroidal field of 0.1 T on axis is powered by a 3 MVA AC/DC converter capable of 3.5 kA at 600 VDC. The equilibrium and shaping field magnets are powered by 2.2 F of commutated capacitor banks plus a 0.5 MVA programmable switching supply. Modest waveform control is available to compensate for the resistive vacuum vessel and aid in plasma shaping for elongated and diverted plasmas. Operational diagnostics include internal magnetic pickup loops, high resolution and fast framing cameras, and impurity monitoring systems. * *Supported by U.S. DoE grant No. DE-FG02-96ER54375

  17. Ripple transport in helical-axis advanced stellarators - a comparison with classical stellarator/torsatrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calculations of the neoclassical transport rates due to particles trapped in the helical ripples of a stellarator's magnetic field are carried out, based on solutions of the bounce-averaged kinetic equation. These calculations employ a model for the magnetic field strength, B, which is an accurate approximation to the actual B for a wide variety of stellarator-type devices, among which are Helical-Axis Advanced Stellarators (Helias) as well as conventional stellarators and torsatrons. Comparisons are carried out in which it is shown that the Helias concept leads to significant reductions in neoclassical transport rates throughout the entire long-mean-free-path regime, with the reduction being particularly dramatic in the ν-1 regime. These findings are confirmed by numerical simulations. Further, it is shown that the behavior of deeply trapped particles in Helias can be fundamentally different from that in classical stellarator/torsatrons; as a consequence, the beneficial effects of a radial electric field on the transport make themselves felt at lower collision frequency than is usual. (orig.)

  18. Divertor for a torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The divertor for a torsatron comprising a toroidal vacuum chamber embracing the toroidal chamber of torsatron trap and communicating with it through the gaps between helical conductors of the system for creation of the trap magnetic field is described. The divertor comprises also a collector realized in a form of plates crossing magnetic field force lines. With the purpose of decreasing the plasma contamination level the collector plates realized curvilinear and embrace conductors at full their length and have the curvature less than that of the magnetic field force lines in the plate mounting point. The invention permits to decrease the plasma contamination by decreasing the particles flux formed as a result of collector plates errosion and accordingly increase plasma temperature in the trap

  19. MHD stability of torsatrons using the average method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The stability of torsatrons is studied using the average method, or stellarator expansion. Attention is focused upon the Advanced Toroidal Fusion Device (ATF), an l = 2, 12 field period, moderate aspect ratio configuration which, through a combination of shear and toroidally induced magnetic well, is stable to ideal modes. Using the vertical field (VF) coil system of ATF it is possible to enhance this stability by shaping the plasma to control the rotational transform. The VF coils are also useful tools for exploring the stability boundaries of ATF. By shifting the plasma inward along the major radius, the magnetic well can be removed, leading to three types of long wavelength instabilities: (1) A free boundary ''edge mode'' occurs when the rotational transform at the plasma edge is just less than unity. This mode is stabilized by the placement of a conducting wall at 1.5 times the plasma radius. (2) A free boundary global kink mode is observed at high β. When either β is lowered or a conducting wall is placed at the plasma boundary, the global mode is suppressed, and (3) an interchange mode is observed instead. For this interchange mode, calculations of the second, third, etc., most unstable modes are used to understand the nature of the degeneracy breaking induced by toroidal effects. Thus, the ATF configuration is well chosen for the study of torsatron stability limits

  20. Microprocessor based hardware-software complex for investigating the magnetic surfaces of torsatron URAGAN-2M

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the microprocessor hardware and software complex designed to control the fluorescent rod scanning in the poloidal cross section of vacuum toroidal chamber in order to study the structure of magnetic surfaces in the torsatron 'URAGAN-2M'.

  1. Compact Torsatron configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio stellarator configurations can be realized by using torsatron winding. Plasmas with aspect ratios in the range of 3.5 to 5 can be confined by these Compact Torsatron configurations. Stable operation at high Β should be possible in these devices, if a vertical field coil system is adequately designed to avoid breaking of the magnetic surfaces at finite Β. 17 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab

  2. Torsatron equilibrium and stability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Equilibrium and stability results are presented for the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) device. The results of three-dimensional equilibrium calculations and free boundary average method calculations are shown to be in good agreement with previous fixed boundary average method results. These favorable comparisons serve as a valuable validation of the simple and computationally efficient fixed boundary average method. Stability calculations for the free boundary average method equilibria are also in good agreement with fixed boundary calculations, showing instability only when the plasma is shifted inward with an applied vertical field

  3. Compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R0 = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R0 ≅ 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs

  4. Observation of parallel viscosity in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damping of the toroidal velocity owing to parallel viscosity is observed in the plasma with a tangential neutral beam injection in the CHS Heliotron/Torsatron device. Toroidal velocity profile is dominated by the perpendicular viscosity when magnetic field modulation is weak near axis. However, the parallel viscosity is found to be dominant when the modulation is strong enough and to increase in proportion to the square of the modulation of magnetic field. The absolute values of the viscosity agree with the neoclassical prediction within a factor of three. (author)

  5. High-mode-number ballooning modes in a heliotron/torsatron system: 1, Local magnetic shear

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the local magnetic shear, a quantity associated with high-mode-number ballooning mode stability, are considered in heliotron/torsatron devices that have a large Shafranov shift. The local magnetic shear is shown to vanish even in the stellarator-like region in which the global magnetic shear is positive. The reason for this is that the degree of the local compression of the poloidal magnetic field on the outer side of the torus, which maintains the toroidal force balance, is reduced in the stellarator-like region of global magnetic shear because the global rotational transform in heliotron/torsatron systems is a radially increasing function. This vanishing of the local magnetic shear is a universal property in heliotron/torsatron systems with a large Shafranov shift since it results from toroidal force balance in the stellarator-like global shear regime that is inherent to such systems

  6. Recent advances in the stability theory of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the most persistent instabilities of a magnetically confined plasma have short wavelength perpendicular to the magnetic field but long wavelength parallel to it. Such instabilities are difficult to treat in a toroidal system because the simple eikonal representation of short wavelength oscillations. X(r) = Y(r) esup(iS(r)/γ) with γ << 1 proves to be incompatible with the other requirements of toroidal periodicity and long parallel wavelength (which would require BETA.ΔS = O). A new method of representing perturbations in a torus will be outlined. By using this, the two-dimensional stability problem posed by an axisymmetric toroidal equilibrium can be reduced to that of solving a one-dimensional eigenvalue equation. This technique essentially completes the linear stability theory of magnetohydrodynamic modes in a toroidal plasma, and is also applicable to the investigation of micro-instabilities that are described by the Vlasov-Maxwell equations. (author)

  7. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  8. 35 years since the start up and the first plasma of the stellarator-torsatron Saturn. Main results for one decade of operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the long history of development of the stellarator conception, there were the steps which strongly influenced the further movement. This happened when instead of the figure-of-eight was suggested the system with helical currents flowing in opposite directions in every neighbor helical coil with total number of coils 4 (l=2) or 6 (l=3). The next important step - transmission from bi-directional to the uni-directional system of helical currents, i.e., transmission from a stellarator conception to a torsatron conception (in Japan this conception is named heliotron). The principal difference and at the same time the significant benefits of torsatron configuration in comparison with the classical stellarator configuration is the possibility to have a natural (intrinsic) divertor. Thus, the torsatron/heliotron conception, with magnetic configuration produced without toroidal coils can be the base for the development of a fusion reactor. Let us note the most important milestones in the origin and evolution of the torsatron idea, following [1]. 1) In 1961 V.F.Aleksin (KIPT) has showed that in a system composed of a direct solenoid and several helical conductors with a unidirectional current, magnetic surfaces (MS) can exist. 2) Later C.Gourdon and collaborators suggested independently a toroidal trap with unidirectional helical current called as a torsatron (e.g., [2]). Soon after C.Gourdon, P.Hubert, D.Marty suggested the shape of coils which allows to have closed magnetic surfaces with only helical winding (so called ultimate torsatron [3]; C.Gourdon and others disclosed that the torsatron configuration can have an intrinsic spatial divertor [4], and considered the scheme of torsatron-reactor [4]. 3) Due to efforts of Japanese scientists (K.Uo et al.) an earlier heliotron conception has come to this direction too (named Helical heliotron) [5,6]. 4) A great contribution into improving the torsatron design was made by researchers of different countries. Because of

  9. Ohmically heated toroidal experiment (OHTE) mobile ignition test reactor facility concept study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the use of an existing nuclear test complex at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) for the assembly, testing, and remote maintenance of the ohmically heated toroidal experiment (OHTE) compact reactor. The portable reactor concept is described and its application to OHTE testing and maintenance requirements is developed. Pertinent INEL facilities are described and several test system configurations that apply to these facilities are developed and evaluated

  10. Advances in the Fabrication of Toroidal Field Coil Prototypes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzuto, A.; Cucchiaro, A.; Frosi, R.; Ramogida, G.; Boert, F.; Wobker, H. G.; Bianchi, A.; Parodi, B.; Coppi, B.

    2006-10-01

    The Bitter-type Toroidal Field Coils (TFC) adopted for Ignitor consist of plates that are cooled down to 30 K by Helium gas. Copper OFHC has been selected for these plates, allowing for an Electron Beam (EB) welding solution of the cooling channels. Kabel Metal set up the welding parameters and qualified the process to achieve full joint penetration with acceptable metallurgical structure. The qualification covers both the welding of the cooling channels and the inlet/outlet tube made on two full size samples. A metallographic examination and vacuum and pressure tests have been preformed to validate the basic suitability of the EB welding process. *Sponsored in part by ENEA of Italy and by the U.S. DOE.

  11. Studies on magnetic surface structures and basic magnetic field properties in 'Ultimate' configurations of the L=1, m=13 torsatron and the 'Vint-20' torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is concerned with numerical investigations of various magnetic configurations of a single-pole toroidal L=1, m=13 'ultimate' torsatron having a low aspect ratio Ah=4.345 and the modulation factors (-0.23) ≤ α ≤ 0.71 (K=1, β=0) of the helix law -mφ=Θ-αK SinΘ-βK sin2Θ. The extremums of the basic properties of closed magnetic surfaces as functions of the coefficient α in the neighborhood of α ∼ 0.4, as well as the structures of the edge magnetic field (substructures of virtual current) and the separatrix have been first determined for the L=1, m=13 'ultimate' torsatron and the 'Vint-20' torsatron. Unusual positions of the separatrix X-points in the cross sections for 1/4- and 3/4-magnetic field periods have been identified. The formula that takes into account the modulation factor α of the helix law was first derived to determine the average vertical magnetic field on the geometrical axis of the torus.

  12. Advanced Microscopy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Provides a facility for high-resolution studies of complex biomolecular systems. The goal is an understanding of how to engineer biomolecules for various...

  13. The common cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific requ...

  14. The Common Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel and End-Cap Toroid Magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Delruelle, N; Junker, S; Passardi, Giorgio; Pengo, R; Pirotte, O

    2004-01-01

    The large ATLAS toroidal superconducting magnet made of the Barrel and two End-Caps needs extensive testing at the surface of the individual components prior to their final assembly into the underground cavern of LHC. A cryogenic test facility specifically designed for cooling sequentially the eight coils making the Barrel Toroid (BT) has been fully commissioned and is now ready for final acceptance of these magnets. This facility, originally designed for testing individually the 46 tons BT coils, will be upgraded to allow the acceptance tests of the two End-Caps, each of them having a 160 tons cold mass. The integrated system mainly comprises a 1.2 kW@4.5 K refrigerator, a 10 kW liquid-nitrogen precooler, two cryostats housing liquid helium centrifugal pumps of respectively 80 g/s and 600 g/s nominal flow and specific instrumentation to measure the thermal performances of the magnets. This paper describes the overall facility with particular emphasis to the cryogenic features adopted to match the specific re...

  15. The University of Wisconsin-Madison Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory program, FY 1991--1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document summarizes results obtained during the first eight months of the current three year grant for research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory (TSL) and presents plans for future activity during fiscal years 1992 and 1993. Research efforts have focused on fundamental physics issues associated with toroidal confinement, predominantly through experimental investigations on the Interchangeable Module Stellarator (IMS). The program direction has been guided into studies of fluctuations, potentials and electric fields, plasma currents and flows, and effects of magnetic islands by a desire for increased relevance and impact on the general toroidal confinement program. Theoretical and computational activities are also being undertaken to support the experimental research and to identify interesting new toroidal confinement concepts which could contribute to the understanding of tokamak transport

  16. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac

  17. Advanced fusion concepts: project summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    This report contains descriptions of the activities of all the projects supported by the Advanced Fusion Concepts Branch of the Office of Fusion Energy, US Department of Energy. These descriptions are project summaries of each of the individual projects, and contain the following: title, principle investigators, funding levels, purpose, approach, progress, plans, milestones, graduate students, graduates, other professional staff, and recent publications. Information is given for each of the following programs: (1) reverse-field pinch, (2) compact toroid, (3) alternate fuel/multipoles, (4) stellarator/torsatron, (5) linear magnetic fusion, (6) liners, and (7) Tormac. (MOW)

  18. Advanced Polymer Processing Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenchausen, Ross E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-25

    Some conclusions of this presentation are: (1) Radiation-assisted nanotechnology applications will continue to grow; (2) The APPF will provide a unique focus for radiolytic processing of nanomaterials in support of DOE-DP, other DOE and advanced manufacturing initiatives; (3) {gamma}, X-ray, e-beam and ion beam processing will increasingly be applied for 'green' manufacturing of nanomaterials and nanocomposites; and (4) Biomedical science and engineering may ultimately be the biggest application area for radiation-assisted nanotechnology development.

  19. The CERN Cryogenic Test Facility for the Atlas Barrel Toroid Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    1999-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m2 experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and its ins...

  20. The CERN cryogenic test facility for the ATLAS barrel toroid magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, F; Delruelle, N; Orlic, J P; Passardi, Giorgio; Tischhauser, Johann

    2000-01-01

    The superconducting magnet system of the ATLAS detector will consist of a central solenoid, two end-cap toroidal magnets (ECT) and the barrel toroid magnet (BT) made of eight coils symmetrically placed around the central axis of the detector. The magnets will be tested individually in a 5000 m/sup 2/ experimental area prior to their final installation at an underground cavern of the LHC Collider. For the BT magnets, a dedicated cryogenic test facility has been designed which is currently under the construction and commissioning phase. A liquid nitrogen pre-cooling unit and a 1200 W@4.5K refrigerator will allow flexible operating conditions via a rather complex distribution and transfer line system. Flow of two-phase helium for cooling the coils is provided by centrifugal pumps immersed in a saturated liquid helium bath. The integration of the pumps in an existing cryostat required the adoption of novel mechanical solutions. Tests conducted permitted the validation of the technical design of the cryostat and i...

  1. Helical coil alignment in the advanced toroidal facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a brief overview of the helical coil design concept, detailed descriptions of the method for installation and alignment, and discussions of segment installation and alignment equipment. Alignment is accomplished by optical methods using electronic theodolites connected to a microcomputer to form a coordinate measurement system. The coordinate measurement system is described in detail, along with target selection and fixturing for manipulation of the helical coil segments during installation. In addition, software is described including vendor-supplied software used in the coordinate measurement system and in-house-developed software used to calibrate segment and positioning fixture motion. 2 refs., 8 figs

  2. Wisconsin Torsatron/Stellarator Program, FY 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research of the Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory during the present contract period has concentrated on several main areas. The confinement in IMS is being investigated under the conditions of an applied vertical magnetic field and with the insertion of a localized limiter. Excellent agreement between a simplified stochastic heating theory and the measured electron cyclotron breakdown and heating phases of the Proto-Cleo torsatron have been achieved. Measurements of the secondary currents and the ability to drive currents using Alfven waves are continuing on the Proto-Cleo stellarator. Theoretical efforts have concentrated on modelling the experimental devices, including 1-D transport modelling, particle-in-cell simulation and divertor field line following codes

  3. Wisconsin torsatron/stellarator program, FY 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposal documents recent activities within the University of Wisconsin-Madison Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory and presents plans for future research activities for a three year period. Research efforts have focused on fundamental stellarator physics issues through experimental investigations on the Interchangeable Module Stellarator (IMS) and the Proto-Cleo Stellarator. Theoretical activities and studies of new configurations are being undertaken to support and broaden the experimental program. Experimental research at the Torsatron Stellarator Laboratory has been primarily concerned with effects induced through electron-cyclotron resonant frequency plasma production and heating in the IMS device. Plasma electric fields have been shown to play a major role in particle transport and confinement in IMS. ECRF heating at 6 kG has produced electron tail populations in agreement with Monte-Carlo models. Electric and magnetic fields have been shown to alter the particle flows to the IMS modular divertors. 48 refs

  4. Design of the Compact Auburn Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the design and optimization procedure for the Compact Auburn Torsatron. Included in this is a description of the Cary-Hanson Optimization technique. In this paper the properties of the magnetic fields are presented and a description of the machine and the construction procedure. The experimental setup for the surface mapping is described and conclusions are presented. 10 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab

  5. Advances in the simulation of toroidal gyro Landau fluid model turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gyro-Landau fluid (GLF) model equations for toroidal geometry have been recently applied to the study ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence using the 3D nonlinear ballooning mode representation (BMR). The present paper extends this work by treating some unresolved issues conceming ITG turbulence with adiabatic electrons. Although eddies are highly elongated in the radial direction long time radial correlation lengths are short and comparable to poloidal lengths. Although transport at vanishing shear is not particularly large, transport at reverse global shear, is significantly less. Electrostatic transport at moderate shear is not much effected by inclusion of local shear and average favorable curvature. Transport is suppressed when critical ExB rotational shear is comparable to the maximum linear growth rate with only a weak dependence on magnetic shear. Self consistent turbulent transport of toroidal momentum can result in a transport bifurcation at suffciently large r/(Rq). However the main thrust of the new formulation in the paper deals with advances in the development of finite beta GLF models with trapped electron and BMR numerical methods for treating the fast parallel field motion of the untrapped electrons

  6. Physical mechanism determining the radial electric field and its radial structure in a toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radial structures of plasma rotation and radial electric field are experimentally studied in tokamak, heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices. The perpendicular and parallel viscosities are measured. The parallel viscosity, which is dominant in determining the toroidal velocity in heliotron/torsatron and stellarator devices, is found to be neoclassical. On the other hand, the perpendicular viscosity, which is dominant in dictating the toroidal rotation in tokamaks, is anomalous. Even without external momentum input, both a plasma rotation and a radial electric field exist in tokamaks and heliotrons/torsatrons. The observed profiles of the radial electric field do not agree with the theoretical prediction based on neoclassical transport. This is mainly due to the existence of anomalous perpendicular viscosity. The shear of the radial electric field improves particle and heat transport both in bulk and edge plasma regimes of tokamaks. (author) 95 refs

  7. Proto-CIRCUS tilted-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid: Design and construction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, A.W.; Doumet, M.; Hammond, K.C. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kornbluth, Y. [Yeshiva University, New York, NY 10033 (United States); Spong, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37830 (United States); Sweeney, R. [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Volpe, F.A., E-mail: fvolpe@columbia.edu [Department of Applied Physics and Applied Mathematics, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • A tokamak-like device with tilted toroidal field (TF) coils needs less plasma current than a conventional tokamak. • Rotational transform is partly generated by external coils. Device can be considered a tokamak–torsatron hybrid. • We designed and constructed the first device of this type. • Tilted TF coils are interlinked to each other, which helps to reduce aspect ratio of plasma. • This is a six-coil generalization of CNT stellarator, also at Columbia University, which features two interlinked coils. - Abstract: We present the field-line modeling, design, and construction of a prototype circular-coil tokamak–torsatron hybrid called Proto-CIRCUS. The device has a major radius R = 16 cm and minor radius a < 5 cm. The six “toroidal field” coils are planar as in a tokamak, but they are tilted. This, combined with induced or driven plasma current, is expected to generate rotational transform, as seen in field-line tracing and equilibrium calculations. The device is expected to operate at lower plasma current than a tokamak of comparable size and magnetic field, which might have interesting implications for disruptions and steady-state operation. Additionally, the toroidal magnetic ripple is less pronounced than in an equivalent tokamak in which the coils are not tilted. The tilted coils are interlocked, resulting in a relatively low aspect ratio, and can be moved, both radially and in tilt angle, between discharges. This capability will be exploited for detailed comparisons between calculations and field-line mapping measurements. Such comparisons will reveal whether this relatively simple concept can generate the expected rotational transform.

  8. Kaon: an advanced hadron facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An advanced hadron facility KAON has been proposed to be built in Canada. The report of the Project Definition Study has been presented to both levels of Government (federal and provincial) on May 24, 1990, for action in the near future. A short discussion will be given of the scientific motivation. The physics along the intensity and precision frontier is fully complementary to the physics along the energy frontier. Following, a description will be given of the 100 μA, 30 GeV proton synchrotron proposed. The accelerator will consist of five rings using the present 500 MeV cyclotron as an injector. If the project were funded this year, the accelerators would be completed by 1995 or so, with the experimental program starting a year later

  9. Perspectives on low-aspect-ratio torsatron/heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of the low-aspect-ratio torsatron/heliotron configuration is discussed from the point of view of plasma confinement. Recent numerical results on the configuration study and the experimental data base are reviewed. (author)

  10. [Wisconsin Torsatron/Stellarator Program: FY 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory Program during the present period has concentrated on experimental investigations into ECR-produced plasmas in the IMS device. Significant progress has been made in understanding the role of convection in maintaining the hollow plasma density profiles under a wide range of operating conditions. Divertor studies have continued to show good agreement with predictions derived from simple field-line models and the ability to effect particle flows through biasing of divertor plates. Preliminary fluctuation studies showed a dependence of the amplitudes of the fluctuations and profile shapes as a function of the magnetic topology of the device. Theoretical support of the experimental program has provided models to help interpret the experimental results. New initiatives have begun in reduced-Q operation of the Proto-Cleo Stellarator, and in ion-Bernstein wave heating in IMS

  11. Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Control Test Operation (ACTO) project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), is being developed to enable the latest modern technology, automation, and advanced control methods to be incorporated into nuclear power plants. The facility is proposed as a national multi-user center for advanced control development and testing to be completed in 1991. The facility will support a wide variety of reactor concepts, and will be used by researchers from Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), plus scientists and engineers from industry, other national laboratories, universities, and utilities. ACTO will also include telecommunication facilities for remote users

  12. Experimental studies of radio frequency waves and confinement in the Auburn Torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Auburn University Torsatron Group has been very active during the past year. The design of the new Compact Auburn Torsatron (CAT) was completed and construction is underway. Plasma experiments on the existing Auburn Torsatron in the areas of ICH and plasma microwave emission have also been carried out. Personnel from the Auburn Torsatron Group have also been involved in collaborative research with other research institutions, particularly the ATF Group at ORNL. Another significant development has been the Auburn Torsatron laboratory renovation project. Auburn University committed $75,000 to a laboratory upgrade in the Nuclear Science Center, the building which houses the Torsatron laboratory. The main result of this renovation is a doubling of the floor space in the Auburn Torsatron laboratory. This renovation work started on August 1, 1989 and is scheduled for completion on October 30, 1989

  13. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Reprocessing Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Richard; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-06-24

    U.S. efforts to promote the international expansion of nuclear energy through the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) will result in a dramatic expansion of nuclear fuel cycle facilities in the United States. New demonstration facilities, such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF), the Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), and the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center (CFTC) will use advanced nuclear and chemical process technologies that must incorporate increased proliferation resistance to enhance nuclear safeguards. The ASA-100 Project, “Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities,” commissioned by the NA-243 Office of NNSA, has been tasked with reviewing and developing advanced safeguards approaches for these demonstration facilities. Because one goal of GNEP is developing and sharing proliferation-resistant nuclear technology and services with partner nations, the safeguards approaches considered are consistent with international safeguards as currently implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This first report reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new fuel reprocessing processes to be deployed at the AFCF and CFTC facilities. Similar analyses addressing the ABR and transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication lines at AFCF and CFTC will be presented in subsequent reports.

  14. Radial electric field in JET advanced tokamak scenarios with toroidal field ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dedicated campaign has been run on JET to study the effect of toroidal field (TF) ripple on plasma performance. Radial electric field measurements from experiments on a series of plasmas with internal transport barriers (ITBs) and different levels of ripple amplitude are presented. They have been calculated from charge exchange measurements of impurity ion temperature, density and rotation velocity profiles, using the force balance equation. The ion temperature and the toroidal and poloidal rotation velocities are compared in plasmas with both reversed and optimized magnetic shear profiles. Poloidal rotation velocity (vθ) in the ITB region is measured to be of the order of a few tens of km s-1, significantly larger than the neoclassical predictions. Increasing levels of the TF ripple are found to decrease the ion temperature gradient in the ITB region, a measure for the quality of the ITB, and the maximum value of vθ is reduced. The poloidal rotation term dominates in the calculations of the total radial electric field (Er), with the largest gradient in Er measured in the radial region coinciding with the ITB.

  15. Advancing High Current Startup via Localized Helicity Injection in the PEGASUS Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinson, E. T.; Barr, J. L.; Bongard, M. W.; Burke, M. G.; Fonck, R. J.; Perry, J. M.; Redd, A. J.; Schlossberg, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    Non-solenoidal startup via local helicity injection (LHI) and poloidal field induction is used to produce Ip = 0 . 17 MA tokamak discharges. Impurity contamination has been reduced to negligible levels by use of conical frustum cathode geometry and local scraper limiters. Attainable currents are governed by global limits of helicity and energy balance, and Taylor relaxation. A simple lumped parameter model based on these limits is used to project discharge evolution, and indicates that attaining 1 MA in NSTX-U will require LHI-driven effective loop voltages to dominate contributions from dLp / dt . This regime contrasts with results to date and will be tested at 0.3 MA in PEGASUS with a new integrated multi-injector array. Injector impedance characteristics are consistent with magnetically-limited regimes observed in higher-power foilless diodes. Bursts of MHD are measured on time scales of order ~ 100 μ s, and correlate with rapid equilibrium changes, discrete rises in Ip, redistribution of the toroidal current, ion heating (Ti ~ 1 keV), transient drops in injector voltage, and apparent n = 1 line-tied kink activity at the injector. NIMROD simulations of high-field-side HI discharges in PEGASUS are in qualitative agreement, suggesting Ip buildup results from inward propagating toroidal current loops created by intermittent reconnection of injected current streams. Work supported by US DOE Grant DE-FG02-96ER54375.

  16. Advanced Power Conversion Efficiency in Inventive Plasma for Hybrid Toroidal Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hançerlioğullari, Aybaba; Cini, Mesut; Güdal, Murat

    2013-08-01

    Apex hybrid reactor has a good potential to utilize uranium and thorium fuels in the future. This toroidal reactor is a type of system that facilitates the occurrence of the nuclear fusion and fission events together. The most important feature of hybrid reactor is that the first wall surrounding the plasma is liquid. The advantages of utilizing a liquid wall are high power density capacity good power transformation productivity, the magnitude of the reactor's operational duration, low failure percentage, short maintenance time and the inclusion of the system's simple technology and material. The analysis has been made using the MCNP Monte Carlo code and ENDF/B-V-VI nuclear data. Around the fusion chamber, molten salts Flibe (LI2BeF4), lead-lithium (PbLi), Li-Sn, thin-lityum (Li20Sn80) have used as cooling materials. APEX reactor has modeled in the torus form by adding nuclear materials of low significance in the specified percentages between 0 and 12 % to the molten salts. In this study, the neutronic performance of the APEX fusion reactor using various molten salts has been investigated. The nuclear parameters of Apex reactor has been searched for Flibe (LI2BeF4) and Li-Sn, for blanket layers. In case of usage of the Flibe (LI2BeF4), PbLi, and thin-lityum (Li20Sn80) salt solutions at APEX toroidal reactors, fissile material production per source neutron, tritium production speed, total fission rate, energy reproduction factor has been calculated, the results obtained for both salt solutions are compared.

  17. TOREX-4: a torsatron proof of principle experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    TOREX-4 is a torsatron Proof of Principle experiment designed to simultaneously achieve ntau approx. = to 5 x 1013, n approx. = to 5 x 1014/cm3, and T greater than or equal to 1 keV. TOREX-4 is capable of operating without externally driven currents; sufficient neutral beam power to reach betas of 2 to 5% is provided. The unique 4(+2) constant pitch angle winding configuration allows the reliable design of large systems with far greater experimental flexibility than can be achieved in conventional stellarators of comparable size. This will allow investigation of the basic physics questions of the torsatron configuration over a wide range of plasma properties and field configurations without sacrifice of the Proof of Principle goals

  18. ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC). Test and analysis summary report (testing handbook) chapter 3 TOSKA FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the frame of a contract between the ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) Director and the European Home Team Director was concluded the extension of the TOSKA facility of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe as test bed for the ITER toroidal field model coil (TFMC), one of the 7 large research and development projects of the ITER EDA (Engineering Design Activity). The report describes the work and development, which were performed together with industry to extend the existing components and add new components. In this frame a new 2 kW refrigerator was added to the TOSKA facility including the cold lines to the Helium dewar in the TOSKA experimental area. The measuring and control system as well as data acquisition was renewed according to the state-of-the-art. Two power supplies (30 kA, 50 kA) were switched in parallel across an Al bus bar system and combined with an 80 kA dump circuit. For the test of the TFMC in the background field of the EURATOM LCT coil a new 20 kA power supply was taken into operation with the existing 20 kA discharge circuit. Two forced flow cooled 80 kA current leads for the TFMC were developed. The total lifting capacity for loads in the TOSKA building was increased by an ordered new 80 t crane with a suitable cross head (125 t lifting capacity +5 t net mass) to 130 t for assembling and installation of the test arrangement. Numerous pre-tests and development and adaptation work was required to make the components suitable for application. The 1.8 K test of the EURATOM LCT coil and the test of the W 7-X prototype coil count to these tests as overall pre-tests. (orig.)

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  20. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  1. Alpha-particle losses in compact torsatron reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loss of alpha particles in compact torsatron reactors is studied. For 6, 9, and 12 field period reactors, the direct loss is a relatively weak function of radius and energy and varies from ≅33% for M = 6 to ≅18% for M = 12. Loss of alpha particles through scattering into the loss region is calculated using the Fokker-Plank equation for fast ions and found to contribute an additional alpha-particle energy loss of ≅15%. The consequences of these relatively large losses for torsatron reactor design are discussed. The relationship between the direct particle losses and the magnetic field structure is also studied. Orbit losses from a variety of stellarator configurations are calculated and a figure-of-merit that characterizes the orbit confinement of a magnetic configuration is deduced from these calculations. This figure-of-merit is used to show how the direct losses might be reduced at low aspect-ratio. Effects of finite beta on the direct particle losses are also addressed, and are shown to significantly increase the direct losses in some configurations. 15 refs., 8 figs

  2. Compact toroid theory issues and approaches: a panel report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the six years since the initiation of the compact toroid program by the Office of Fusion Energy, remarkable scientific advances have occurred on both field-reversed configurations (FRC) and spheromaks. This progress has been stimulated by a diverse experimental program with facilities at six laboratories, and by a small but nevertheless broad theoretical research effort encompassing more than a dozen institutions. The close coupling between theoretical and experimental programs has contributed immeasurably to this progress. This document offers guidance for future compact toroid theory by identifying and discussing the key physics issues. In most cases promising approaches to these issues are offered

  3. Toroidal Nematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto

    We will discuss how nematic liquid crystals organize inside toroidal droplets. When the director is parallel to the bounding surface, we find spontaneous reflection symmetry breaking, which we attribute to the role played by saddle-splay contributions to the Frank free energy. When the director is perpendicular to the bounding surface, we find that the structure is reminiscent of the escape radial configuration seen in cylinders, but with a central doubly-twisted organization, which we attribute to the geometry of the torus. We will end by presenting recent experiments with active nematics on the toroidal surface. In this case, topology and activity both affect the structure and dynamics of the material.

  4. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  5. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howe, H.C.

    1990-08-01

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles.

  6. Physics models in the toroidal transport code PROCTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The physics models that are contained in the toroidal transport code PROCTR are described in detail. Time- and space-dependent models are included for the plasma hydrogenic-ion, helium, and impurity densities, the electron and ion temperatures, the toroidal rotation velocity, and the toroidal current profile. Time- and depth-dependent models for the trapped and mobile hydrogenic particle concentrations in the wall and a time-dependent point model for the number of particles in the limiter are also included. Time-dependent models for neutral particle transport, neutral beam deposition and thermalization, fusion heating, impurity radiation, pellet injection, and the radial electric potential are included and recalculated periodically as the time-dependent models evolve. The plasma solution is obtained either in simple flux coordinates, where the radial shift of each elliptical, toroidal flux surface is included to maintain an approximate pressure equilibrium, or in general three-dimensional torsatron coordinates represented by series of helical harmonics. The detailed coupling of the plasma, scrape-off layer, limiter, and wall models through the neutral transport model makes PROCTR especially suited for modeling of recycling and particle control in toroidal plasmas. The model may also be used in a steady-state profile analysis mode for studying energy and particle balances starting with measured plasma profiles

  7. Advanced toroidal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At high collisionality the neoclassical theory of transport in tokamaks predicts that the electron confinement time τe will exceed the ion confinement time τi by a factor roughly equal to the square root of the mass ratio mi/me. If the energy confinement time τE is calculated from the normalized particle confinement time τ through division by an emperical factor of three times the magnetic field strength B, then the theoretical confinement time of the ions exceeds experimental measurements by a factor of as much as three. The prediction that the electron confinement time will be two orders of magnitude larger is referred to as anomalous electron transport. We assert that the anomaly can be explained by imposing a strict requirement of quasineutrality to determine the electric potential instead of allowing it to be found from conservation of momentum. Numerical evidence for this contention is provided by performing Monte Carlo calculations based on a fast new computer code called TRAN

  8. Advanced toroidal theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report briefly discusses the following topics: equilibrium and transport; including turbulent transport; stability; wave propagation; statistical data analysis; computational algorithms and computer simulations; and general plasma science

  9. Wall conditioning VHF discharges at Uragan-2M torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text of publication follows. The studies of the RF discharges for wall conditioning have been performed at Uragan-2M torsatron (stellarator). The purpose of the RF discharge wall conditioning is the removal of species adsorbed by the wall, so that they may be pumped out of the vacuum chamber. This can be done by ion or atom impact owing to the momentum transfer or chemical interaction. In the magnetically confined plasma, the outflow of ions is not intensive and their flux to the wall of the vacuum vessel is not uniformly distributed. In such conditions, the wall conditioning with chemically active neutral atoms and molecules is advantageous. Such neutrals are produced intensively in partially ionized plasma when the degree of ionization is low. A scenario for wall conditioning is studied for the discharges in hydrogen. In this scenario the cleaning agents are hydrogen atoms resulting from the dissociation of the hydrogen molecules. If the electron temperature in the discharge is less than the ionization threshold, i.e. 4-10 eV, the dissociation rate is higher than the ionization one, and one electron produces a number of neutral atoms during its lifetime. Continuous VHF discharges in Uragan-2M torsatron are sustained by 2.5 kW oscillator with frequency 150 MHz. For wall conditioning a special small size antenna is designed. It could be fed by both generators. The discharge parameters are measured in wide range of confining magnetic field and pressures. The dependence on launched power is also investigated. Evolution of the impurities in the discharge signified by the optical measurements, the residual gas composition and partial pressures measured with the mass-spectrometer indicate the wall conditioning. Their development is analyzed during days of operation. The studies made indicate that the VHF type discharge could be used at high magnetic fields. This feature is useful for steady-state superconducting machines. (authors)

  10. The ORNL Advanced Toroidal Facility: Physics insight leads to efficient computer-aided construction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for accurate measurement of complex parts that contain no reference points is described. The technique is applied to the production of accurate castings, to their machining, and to their installation. Accuracies of /approximately/ 2 mil can be achieved over distances of 7 ft. 3 figs

  11. Advanced facilities for radiochemistry at Harwell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The leaflets in this folder describe the latest addition to Harwell's active handling capability. This is a high level alpha, beta, gamma facility designed specifically for undertaking chemical research and development work. It is based on using high integrity containment boxes which are housed in concrete shielded enclosures. The active boxes can be removed and transferred remotely to a support area where they, and any associated equipment, can be decontaminated and serviced whilst a new fully commissioned box can be readily brought into service. The facility fulfills the principle of ALARA and is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a wide range of active handling requirements. It is supported by a suite of medium active handling cells, radiochemical laboratories and, as necessary, facilities of other scientific and engineering disciplines. The leaflets are: report on conceptual aspects; Techsheet 'Remote handling facility - Salient information'; Techsheet 'Project capabilities'; and 4 sheets of diagrams showing details of the facility. (U.K.)

  12. Advanced Materials Growth and Processing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This most extensive of U.S. Army materials growth and processing facilities houses seven dedicated, state-of-the-art, molecular beam epitaxy and three metal organic...

  13. Advanced sipping facilities for fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sipping facilities for BWR type plants and PWR type plants of the Russian type WWER-440 are equipped with a bell instead of caps, which is used above the opened reactor, moved by the fuel handling machine, and covers up to eight fuel elements in the core during inspection. In all sipping facilities, the complete inspection sequence is controlled by a desk switchboard near the fuel element storage pool or the reactor well. Siemens' sipping facilities are used in all Siemens-built nuclear power plants and in many others by different manufacturers. Part of them has been in operation already for more than 20 years with a high degree of reliability. Inspection safety is more than 99.5%. (orig./DG)

  14. Geometrical effects of the magnetic field on the neoclassical flow, current and rotation in general toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to clarify geometrical effects of the magnetic field on neoclassical theory, the neoclassical parallel particle flow, heat flux, current and plasma rotation of a multispecies plasma in general toroidal systems are examined in several collisionality regimes. The quantitative and qualitative differences between axisymmetric (tokamaks) and non-axisymmetric toroidal systems (stellarator, heliotron/torsatron) appear mainly through a geometrical factor which prescribes the parallel flow due to the gradients of the density, temperature, and electrostatic potential. In axisymmetric toroidal systems the geometrical factor reduces to the same expression in all collisionality regimes due to axisymmetry. By contrast, in non-axisymmetric toroidal systems, it changes drastically depending on the magnetic fieled structure and the collisionality regime. Thus, the poloidal flow has the radial electric field dependence. When the geometrical factor is very small, the ion parallel flow almost vanishes and the ion rotation consists of the diamagnetic and E vector x B vector flows (perpendicular flows). (author)

  15. Implementation of Rogowski coil and Taylor discharge for ionospheric plasma chamber experiments in the Versatile Toroidal Facility (VTF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The VTF is a large torus used to simulate ionospheric plasmas. Currently, plasmas can be generated by electron emission from four LaB6 cathodes, spaced around the bottom of the chamber, by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with microwaves injected radially into the chamber from a 3 kilowatt magnetron, and by a Taylor discharge apparatus. Electron beams travel in a helical path till they reach a collector plate at the top of the chamber, and produce plasma currents from 500 to 1,500 amps. Recently, a Rogowski coil has been calibrated to quantitatively measure current in the plasma. A 4.2 meter coil of approximately 5,500 turns encircles the torus vertically. As a changing current goes through the coil, a changing magnetic field is produced perpendicular to each of the coil's turns. Each turn produces a small voltage, and the sum of all the voltages from all the turns in the coil is proportional to the change in plasma current. The voltage signal is integrated and the result is the plasma current circulating toroidally inside the chamber. Good results measuring electron beam plasma current have been obtained and will be reported on. Continuing work will include measuring alternating current from the Taylor discharge plasma and is hoped to give insight as to how to increase plasma density using the Taylor discharge device

  16. An advanced irradiation facilities and its usage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A carrier type gamma irradiator is an advanced device currently installed in Qingdao Irradiation Center (QIC) and has been put into operation for nine years in Qingdao, China. It utilizes Co-60 as the radiation source; the initial Co-60 loading is 1.48×1016Bq (0.4 million Curies). Rubber, natural and synthetic polymers, heat-shrinkable films and tubes, disposable medical supplies, some foods and drugs have been irradiated for test in the past. Especially a great success achieved on the radiation of compound food for young shrimp. The practice demonstrates that the bacteria in the compound food can be destroyed by the irradiation at optimum dosage between 5 000-6 000 Gy.

  17. AREAL test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsakanov, V. M.; Amatuni, G. A.; Amirkhanyan, Z. G.; Aslyan, L. V.; Avagyan, V. Sh.; Danielyan, V. A.; Davtyan, H. D.; Dekhtiarov, V. S.; Gevorgyan, K. L.; Ghazaryan, N. G.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Hakobyan, L. S.; Haroutiunian, S. G.; Ivanyan, M. I.; Khachatryan, V. G.; Laziev, E. M.; Manukyan, P. S.; Margaryan, I. N.; Markosyan, T. M.; Martirosyan, N. V.; Mehrabyan, Sh. A.; Mkrtchyan, T. H.; Muradyan, L. Kh.; Nikogosyan, G. H.; Petrosyan, V. H.; Sahakyan, V. V.; Sargsyan, A. A.; Simonyan, A. S.; Toneyan, H. A.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Vardanyan, T. L.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Yeremyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.; Zanyan, G. S.

    2016-09-01

    Advanced Research Electron Accelerator Laboratory (AREAL) is a 50 MeV electron linear accelerator project with a laser driven RF gun being constructed at the CANDLE Synchrotron Research Institute. In addition to applications in life and materials sciences, the project aims as a test facility for advanced accelerator and radiation source concepts. In this paper, the AREAL RF photoinjector performance, the facility design considerations and its highlights in the fields of free electron laser, the study of new high frequency accelerating structures, the beam microbunching and wakefield acceleration concepts are presented.

  18. The design and fabrication of a toroidally continuous cryocondensation pump for the DIII-D Advanced Divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cryocondensation pump will be installed in the baffle chamber of the DIII-D tokamak in the spring of 1992. The design is complete and fabrication of this pump is in progress. The purpose of the pump is to study plasma density control by pumping the divertor. The pump is toroidally continuous, approximately 10 m long, in the lower outer corner of the vacuum vessel interior. It consists of a 1 m2 liquid helium cooled surface surrounded by a liquid nitrogen cooled shield to limit the heat load on the helium cooled surface. The stainless steel liquid nitrogen shell has a copper coating on it to enhance thermal conductivity, but the coating is broken to keep the toroidal electrical resistance high. The liquid nitrogen cooled surface is surrounded by a radiation/particle shield to prevent energetic particles from impacting and releasing condensed water molecules. The whole pump is supported off the water cooled vacuum vessel wall. Key design considerations were: how to accommodate the temperature differences between the various components, developing low heat leak paths for the various supports, and maintaining electrical insulation in a low pressure environment in the presence of induced voltage spikes. A single point ground for the system was used to limit disruption induced currents and the resulting electro-mechanical forces on the pump. A testing program was used to develop coating techniques to enhance heat transfer and emissivity of the various surfaces. Fabrication tests were done to determine the best method of attaching the liquid nitrogen flow tubes to their shield surfaces. A prototype sector of the pump was built to verify fabrication and assembly techniques

  19. Review of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) materials irradiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the workshop was to document as accurately as possible the present and future needs for neutron irradiation capacity and facilities as related to the design of the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) which will be the next generation steady-state research reactor. The report provides the findings and recommendations of the working group. After introductory and background information is presented, the discussion includes the status of the ANS design, in particular in-core materials irradiation facilities design and important experimental parameters. The summary of workshop discussions describes a survey of irradiation-effects research community and opportunities for ex-core irradiation facilities. 20 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  20. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process Facility(ACPF) and hotcell system technologies were developed in this program for demonstrating safely and effectively the Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process(ACP) on a lab-scale. With the analysis of work flow and characteristics of the process, ACP was successively demonstrated on a lab-scale experiments and the performance of process was evaluated. The hotcell system was comprehensively evaluated with those results and the design data for the engineering-scale demonstration was derived to propose the direction for the future research and development. The main items performed in this project were as follows. - The reconstruction of ACPF hotcell and demonstration of the ACP - The design and operation technologies for α-γ type nuclear hot cell facility - The overall evaluation of the performance, safety and operation ability of the hotcell system - The acquisition of the government licences for construction and operation and the IAEA licence for using nuclear materials The results of safety analysis and environmental effects assessment and performance data for ACPF had been used for acquiring the government licence for facility operation. The valuable experiences on pyroprocess facility design and operation knowledges would be applied to new Mock-up Facility being scheduled to be a previous stage facility of Integrated Pyroprocess Facility

  1. On vacuum field properties of the URAGAN-2M Torsatron standard configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vacuum field properties of the URAGAN-2M Torsatron are investigated. In the 'Standard Case', within a certain range of field parameters, the size of the observed magnetic islands at τ = 2/3 can be reduced considerably. Some characteristic quantities for stellarator vacuum fields are reported. (orig.)

  2. Self-sustained turbulence and L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory of the anomalous transport coefficient in toroidal helical systems (such as stellarators, torsatron and Heliotron devices) is developed. The theoretical formalism of self-sustained turbulence is applied to the interchange mode turbulence and ballooning mode turbulence. The nonlinear destabilization of microscopic modes by the current diffusivity is the key for the anomalous transport. A general form of the anomalous transport coefficient in toroidal plasmas is derived. The intrinsic importance of the pressure gradient, collisionless skin depth and Alfven transit time is confirmed. The geometrical factors which characterize the magnetic configurations are also obtained. The theory is extended to study the influence of parallel compressibility. The ion viscosities of the perpendicular and parallel momenta, electron viscosity and energy diffusion coefficient are obtained. The comparison with experimental results is also given. (author)

  3. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    2012-01-01

    The European Commission has launched a study on the applicability of existing chemical industry safety provisions to enhancing security of chemical facilities covering the situation in 18 EU Member States. This paper reports some preliminary analytical findings regarding the extent to which...... Infrastructures (ECI Directive) addresses facility security but does not cover the chemical sector. Chemical facility safety at EU level is addressed by way of the Seveso-II Directive. Preliminary estimates by the chemical industry suggest that perhaps 80% of the existing safety measures under Seveso-II would...... existing provisions that have been put into existence to advance safety objectives due to synergy effects could be expected advance security objectives as well. The paper provides a conceptual definition of safety and security and presents a framework of their essential components. Key differences are...

  4. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  5. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of Wisconsin

  6. Development of Experimental Facilities for Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel management process(ACP), proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. This technology convert spent fuels into pure metal-base uranium with removing the highly heat generating materials(Cs, Sr) efficiently and reducing of the decay heat, volume, and radioactivity from spent fuel by 1/4. In the next phase(2004∼2006), the demonstration of this technology will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For this demonstration, the hot cell facilities of α-γ type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β-γ type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. In this study, the design requirements are established, and the process detail work flow was analysed for the optimum arrangement to ensure effective process operation in hot cell. And also, the basic and detail design of hot cell facility and process, and safety analysis was performed to secure conservative safety of hot cell facility and process

  7. Advances in Radioisotope Handling Facilities and Automation of Radioisotope Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Founded in 1959, the Institute of Isotopes of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences began to produce radioactive isotopes in 1964. Since then, it has become a major Hungarian centre of research, development and production relating to the application of radioisotopes. Since 1993 a part of the former Institute has been operating as the Institute of Isotopes Co., Ltd. The main advances in radioisotope handling facilities and automation of radioisotope production are presented here. (author)

  8. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  9. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility: advancing nuclear technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a Users Week, internships, faculty student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In addition, the ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  10. Investigation of a washer-stack plasma gun on the Auburn torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A pulsed device for producing a highly-ionized plasma in the Auburn Torsatron is described and construction details given. A plasma is formed by discharging a 14 uF capacitor charged to 6 to 12 kV through a titanium washer impregnated with hydrogen. The ions and electrons are injected transversely into the Torsatron confinement field and the plasma is studied with an x-band microwave interferometer and H-alpha spectral-line detectors. The results of initial measurements to determine the optimal performance parameters for the gun, such as discharge voltage and position, are presented. Also, peak electron density and decay time of the guns plasma are given for different machine and souce conditions

  11. Effect of a noncircular shape of the torus on the magnetic surfaces of l=1 torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the numerical calculation results on the magnetic field produced by one helical winding laying on the surface of a noncircular torus. The influence of the chosen poloidal cross-section shape of the torus on the parameters of the closed magnetic surface configuration has been investigated. The calculation results show that the change of a torus with circular cross-section by a torus with noncircular cross-section in the l=1 torsatron under consideration decreases the value of the mirror ratio on the magnetic surfaces by a factor of ∼8. And other parameters of magnetic surfaces were changed no more than by a factor of 1.5 to 2. A feasibility of the simplest torsatron with central stochastic magnetic field line region is discussed

  12. Toroidal circular dichroism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raybould, T. A.; Fedotov, V. A.; Papasimakis, N.; Kuprov, I.; Youngs, I. J.; Chen, W. T.; Tsai, D. P.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2016-07-01

    We demonstrate that the induced toroidal dipole, represented by currents flowing on the surface of a torus, makes a distinct and indispensable contribution to circular dichroism. We show that toroidal circular dichroism supplements the well-known mechanism involving electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions. We illustrate this with rigorous analysis of the experimentally measured polarization-sensitive transmission spectra of an artificial metamaterial, constructed from elements of toroidal symmetry. We argue that toroidal circular dichroism will be found in large biomolecules with elements of toroidal symmetry and should be taken into account in the interpretation of circular dichroism spectra of organics.

  13. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todd R. Allen; Collin J. Knight; Jeff B. Benson; Frances M. Marshall; Mitchell K. Meyer; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    In 2007, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), was designated by the Department of Energy (DOE) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by approved researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide those researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer’s physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, obtained access to additional PIE equipment, taken steps to enable the most advanced post-irradiation analysis possible, and initiated an educational program and digital learning library to help potential users better understand the critical issues in reactor technology and how a test reactor facility could be used to address this critical research. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program invited universities to nominate their capability to become part of a broader user facility. Any university is eligible to self-nominate. Any nomination is then peer reviewed to ensure that the addition of the university facilities adds useful capability to the NSUF. Once added to the NSUF team, the university capability is then integral to the NSUF operations and is available to all users via the proposal process. So far, six universities have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these university capabilities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user’s technical needs. The current NSUF partners are

  14. Waste management planned for the advanced fuel cycle facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program has been proposed to develop and employ advanced technologies to increase the proliferation resistance of spent nuclear fuels, recover and reuse nuclear fuel resources, and reduce the amount of wastes requiring permanent geological disposal. In the initial GNEP fuel cycle concept, spent nuclear fuel is to be reprocessed to separate re-usable transuranic elements and uranium from waste fission products, for fabricating new fuel for fast reactors. The separated wastes would be converted to robust waste forms for disposal. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF) is proposed by DOE for developing and demonstrating spent nuclear fuel recycling technologies and systems. The AFCF will include capabilities for receiving and reprocessing spent fuel and fabricating new nuclear fuel from the reprocessed spent fuel. Reprocessing and fuel fabrication activities will generate a variety of radioactive and mixed waste streams. Some of these waste streams are unique and unprecedented. The GNEP vision challenges traditional U.S. radioactive waste policies and regulations. Product and waste streams have been identified during conceptual design. Waste treatment technologies have been proposed based on the characteristics of the waste streams and the expected requirements for the final waste forms. Results of AFCF operations will advance new technologies that will contribute to safe and economical commercial spent fuel reprocessing facilities needed to meet the GNEP vision. As conceptual design work and research and design continues, the waste management strategies for the AFCF are expected to also evolve. (authors)

  15. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New TRU Fuel Fabrication Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Boyer, Brian; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This second report in a series of three reviews possible safeguards approaches for the new transuranic (TRU) fuel fabrication processes to be deployed at AFCF – specifically, the ceramic TRU (MOX) fuel fabrication line and the metallic (pyroprocessing) line. The most common TRU fuel has been fuel composed of mixed plutonium and uranium dioxide, referred to as “MOX”. However, under the Advanced Fuel Cycle projects custom-made fuels with higher contents of neptunium, americium, and curium may also be produced to evaluate if these “minor actinides” can be effectively burned and transmuted through irradiation in the ABR. A third and final report in this series will evaluate and review the advanced safeguards approach options for the ABR. In reviewing and developing the advanced safeguards approach for the new TRU fuel fabrication processes envisioned for AFCF, the existing international (IAEA) safeguards approach at the Plutonium Fuel Production Facility (PFPF) and the conceptual approach planned for the new J-MOX facility in Japan have been considered as a starting point of reference. The pyro-metallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication process at EBR-II near Idaho Falls also provided insight for safeguarding the additional metallic pyroprocessing fuel fabrication line planned for AFCF.

  16. The upgraded Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pegasus Toroidal Experiment was developed to explore the physics limits of plasma operation as the aspect ratio (A) approaches unity. Initial experiments on the device found that access to high normalized current and toroidal beta was limited by the presence of large-scale tearing modes. Major upgrades have been conducted of the facility to provide the control tools necessary to mitigate these resistive modes. The upgrades include new programmable power supplies, new poloidal field coils and increased, time-variable toroidal field. First ohmic operations with the upgraded system demonstrated position and current ramp-rate control, as well as improvement in ohmic flux consumption from 2.9 MA Wb-1 to 4.2 MA Wb-1. The upgraded experiment will be used to address three areas of physics interest. First, the kink and ballooning stability boundaries at low A and high normalized current will be investigated. Second, clean, high-current plasma sources will be studied as a helicity injection tool. Experiments with two such sources have produced toroidal currents three times greater than predicted by geometric field line following. Finally, the use of electron Bernstein waves to heat and drive current locally will be studied at the 1 MW level; initial modelling indicates that these experiments are feasible at a frequency of 2.45 GHz

  17. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m2, basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc

  18. Construction and engineering report for advanced nuclear fuel development facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, S. W.; Park, J. S.; Kwon, S.J.; Lee, K. W.; Kim, I. J.; Yu, C. H

    2003-09-01

    The design and construction of the fuel technology development facility was aimed to accommodate general nuclear fuel research and development for the HANARO fuel fabrication and advanced fuel researches. 1. Building size and room function 1) Building total area : approx. 3,618m{sup 2}, basement 1st floor, ground 3th floor 2) Room function : basement floor(machine room, electrical room, radioactive waste tank room), 1st floor(research reactor fuel fabrication facility, pyroprocess lab., metal fuel lab., nondestructive lab., pellet processing lab., access control room, sintering lab., etc), 2nd floor(thermal properties measurement lab., pellet characterization lab., powder analysis lab., microstructure analysis lab., etc), 3rd floor(AHU and ACU Room) 2. Special facility equipment 1) Environmental pollution protection equipment : ACU(2sets), 2) Emergency operating system : diesel generator(1set), 3) Nuclear material handle, storage and transport system : overhead crane(3sets), monorail hoist(1set), jib crane(2sets), tank(1set) 4) Air conditioning unit facility : AHU(3sets), packaged air conditioning unit(5sets), 5) Automatic control system and fire protection system : central control equipment(1set), lon device(1set), fire hose cabinet(3sets), fire pump(3sets) etc.

  19. Advanced Measurement Devices for the Microgravity Electromagnetic Levitation Facility EML

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillo, Jurgen; Fritze, Holger; Lohofer, Georg; Schulz, Michal; Stenzel, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on two advanced measurement devices for the microgravity electromagnetic levitation facility (EML), which is currently under construction for the use onboard the "International Space Station (ISS)": the "Sample Coupling Electronics (SCE)" and the "Oxygen Sensing and Control Unit (OSC)". The SCE measures by a contactless, inductive method the electrical resistivity and the diameter of a spherical levitated metallic droplet by evaluating the voltage and electrical current applied to the levitation coil. The necessity of the OSC comes from the insight that properties like surface tension or, eventually, viscosity cannot seriously be determined by the oscillating drop method in the EML facility without knowing the conditions of the surrounding atmosphere. In the following both measurement devices are explained and laboratory test results are presented.

  20. Scientific opportunities with advanced facilities for neutron scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lander, G.H.; Emery, V.J. (eds.)

    1984-01-01

    The present report documents deliberations of a large group of experts in neutron scattering and fundamental physics on the need for new neutron sources of greater intensity and more sophisticated instrumentation than those currently available. An additional aspect of the Workshop was a comparison between steady-state (reactor) and pulsed (spallation) sources. The main conclusions were: (1) the case for a new higher flux neutron source is extremely strong and such a facility will lead to qualitatively new advances in condensed matter science and fundamental physics; (2) to a large extent the future needs of the scientific community could be met with either a 5 x 10/sup 15/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ steady state source or a 10/sup 17/ n cm/sup -2/s/sup -1/ peak flux spallation source; and (3) the findings of this Workshop are consistent with the recommendations of the Major Materials Facilities Committee.

  1. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  2. Conceptual design study advanced concepts test (ACT) facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaloudek, F.R.

    1978-09-01

    The Advanced Concepts Test (ACT) Project is part of program for developing improved power plant dry cooling systems in which ammonia is used as a heat transfer fluid between the power plant and the heat rejection tower. The test facility will be designed to condense 60,000 lb/hr of exhaust steam from the No. 1 turbine in the Kern Power Plant at Bakersfield, CA, transport the heat of condensation from the condenser to the cooling tower by an ammonia phase-change heat transport system, and dissipate this heat to the environs by a dry/wet deluge tower. The design and construction of the test facility will be the responsibility of the Electric Power Research Institute. The DOE, UCC/Linde, and the Pacific Northwest Laboratories will be involved in other phases of the project. The planned test facilities, its structures, mechanical and electrical equipment, control systems, codes and standards, decommissioning requirements, safety and environmental aspects, and energy impact are described. Six appendices of related information are included. (LCL)

  3. Plasma Density Distribution Profile in Toroidal Discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokamak is an electrode less toroidal plasma discharge system whichcontains and heats the plasma by using magnetic field and heating system suchas RF and neutral beams respectively. Using the system, tokamak is expectedto be a most advanced facility in fusion reactor concept. The importantparameters in tokamak are plasma current, plasma discharge voltage,temperature and density, plasma density profile and confinement time.However, the facility belonged to this center (P3TM) is very simple thatmeans a toroidal discharge without confinement magnetic filed and anadditional heating. The preceding result showed that it had been obtainedsome important parameters such as plasma current, discharge current, plasmavoltage and induced poloidal magnetic field. While plasma temperature andplasma density and its profile have not been observed. The one of somediagnostics to be used to determine this parameter is a Langmuir probe.Langmuir probe is an oldest diagnostic tool, simple and quite easy to bemade. The most advantage by using this probe is its ability to measure thecurrent locally. In this experiment, the home made Langmuir probe is atungsten wire with 0.8 mm in diameter enveloped by glass tube and inserted intorus tube. The torus is operated at 1 mbar argon gas pressure and 7.5 kVoperating voltage. The power source is a 330006 Maxwell type capacitor with15 micro farad, and charging system is a 825-100 Hipotronics model which canhold 20 kV of voltage and deliver 100 mA of current. The experiment resultshowed that the relative radial density profile has an exponential relationwith the approaching function is nrel ∝ e-0.54r, r isradial position. (author)

  4. 10 CFR 611.202 - Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program. DOE may issue, under the Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility Award Program, 10 CFR part 611, subpart C, awards for eligible projects. ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Advanced Technology Vehicle Manufacturing Facility...

  5. The Advanced Neutron Source Facility: A new user facility for neutron research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a new reactor-based research facility being planned by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to meet the need for an intense steady state source of neutrons and for associated research space and equipment. The ANS will be open for use by scientists from universities, industry, and other federal laboratories. The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of unprecedented flux; that is, it will produce the most intense continuous beams of neutrons in the world. The goal is to reach a thermal neutron flux for beam experiments of 5 /times/ 1019 to 10 /times/ 1019 neutrons/(m2/center dot/s/sup /minus/1/). By combining the higher source flux with improved experimental facilities, the ANS will surpass current US high flux reactors---the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL and the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory---by a factor of 10 to 20. The safety analysis of the ANS facility will include a complete probabilistic risk assessment (PRA), which will provide a systematic assessment of dependencies among systems at the malfunctions. For the current generation of nuclear power plants that have recently undergone the licensing review process, PRA has been used an an analysis tool after completion of the plant designs. For the ANS Project, the PRA effort has already begun, before the facility conceptual design. This allows safety insights from the PRA to be incorporated into the evolving plant design. 4 refs., 6 figs

  6. Prospects for toroidal fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak has refined understanding of the realities of a deuterium-tritium (D-T) burning magnetic fusion reactor. An ITER-like tokamak reactor using ITER costs and performance would lead to a cost of electricity (COE) of about 130 mills/kWh. Advanced tokamak physics to be tested in the Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX), coupled with moderate components in engineering, technology, and unit costs, should lead to a COE comparable with best existing fission systems around 60 mills/kWh. However, a larger unit size, ∼2000 MW(e), is favored for the fusion system. Alternative toroidal configurations to the conventional tokamak, such as the stellarator, reversed-field pinch, and field-reversed configuration, offer some potential advantage, but are less well developed, and have their own challenges

  7. Advances in shock timing experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Moody, J. D.; Sater, J.; Parham, T.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Ross, J. S.; LePape, S.; Ralph, J. E.; Hohenberger, M.; Dewald, E. L.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Kroll, J. J.; Yoxall, B. E.; Hamza, A. V.; Boehly, T. R.; Nikroo, A.; Landen, O. L.; Edwards, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Recent advances in shock timing experiments and analysis techniques now enable shock measurements to be performed in cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) ice layered capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Previous measurements of shock timing in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions were performed in surrogate targets, where the solid DT ice shell and central DT gas were replaced with a continuous liquid deuterium (D2) fill. These previous experiments pose two surrogacy issues: a material surrogacy due to the difference of species (D2 vs. DT) and densities of the materials used and a geometric surrogacy due to presence of an additional interface (ice/gas) previously absent in the liquid-filled targets. This report presents experimental data and a new analysis method for validating the assumptions underlying this surrogate technique.

  8. Radiation Monitoring System in Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced spent fuel Conditioning Process is under development for effective management of spent fuel by converting UO2 into U-metal. For demonstration of this process, α-γ type new hot cell was built in the IMEF basement . To secure against radiation hazard, this facility needs radiation monitoring system which will observe the entire operating area before the hot cell and service area at back of it. This system consists of 7 parts; Area Monitor for γ-ray, Room Air Monitor for particulate and iodine in both area, Hot cell Monitor for hot cell inside high radiation and rear door interlock, Duct Monitor for particulate of outlet ventilation, Iodine Monitor for iodine of outlet duct, CCTV for watching workers and material movement, Server for management of whole monitoring system. After installation and test of this, radiation monitoring system will be expected to assist the successful ACP demonstration

  9. Advanced neutron diagnostics for the Nova laser facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report on recent work addressing advanced neutron diagnostics to be implemented on the Nova laser facility. The goals of these instruments are to measure the following properties of laser fusion targets: compressed fuel areal-density (Rho-R), time-duration, and spatial extent of the neutron emission. The authors will discuss the use of a noval time-of-flight system, radiochemical techniques, and the use of plastic track detectors to measure the compressed Rho-R. The authors will present the design of two proposed instruments to measure the burn time; one uses a sandwich of thin layers of plastic scintillator and uranium coupled to a streak camera while the other design makes use of a neutron sensitive transmission line. Finally, the authors will discuss methods capable of obtaining neutron images of the compressed pellet core

  10. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility high resolution camera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Stephen S.; Chappell, Jon H.

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the X-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft X-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15th ergs/sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  11. Induced toroid structures and toroid polarizabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency-dependent toroid dipole polarizability γ(ω) of a (nonrelativistic, spinless) hydrogen-like atom in its ground state is calculated analytically in terms of two Gauss hypergeometric functions. The static result reads simply γ(ω=0)=(23/60)α2Z-4a05 (α - fine structure constant, Z - nucleus charge number, a0 - Bohr radius). Comparing the present evaluations for H-like atoms with previous ones for pions, one sees that the role of the induced toroid moments (as against that of the usual electric ones) increases considerably when passing from atomic to particle physics

  12. A toroidal magnet option

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of using, for the ALICE forward muon spectrometer, a superconducting toroidal magnet has been considered in place of the SC dipole. The study has been restricted to the acceptance calculations and to the tracking simulations of the toroidal magnet but without technical investigations. The estimated performances are found maladjusted to the physics requirements of the heavy ion runs. (author)

  13. New Toroid shielding design

    CERN Multimedia

    Hedberg V

    On the 15th of June 2001 the EB approved a new conceptual design for the toroid shield. In the old design, shown in the left part of the figure above, the moderator part of the shielding (JTV) was situated both in the warm and cold areas of the forward toroid. It consisted both of rings of polyethylene and hundreds of blocks of polyethylene (or an epoxy resin) inside the toroid vacuum vessel. In the new design, shown to the right in the figure above, only the rings remain inside the toroid. To compensate for the loss of moderator in the toroid, the copper plug (JTT) has been reduced in radius so that a layer of borated polyethylene can be placed around it (see figure below). The new design gives significant cost-savings and is easier to produce in the tight time schedule of the forward toroid. Since the amount of copper is reduced the weight that has to be carried by the toroid is also reduced. Outgassing into the toroid vacuum was a potential problem in the old design and this is now avoided. The main ...

  14. Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility Delivery Delayed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-12-01

    TRW Space and Electronics Group, Redondo Beach, CA, has notified NASA that it will be unable to deliver the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, FL, on June 1, 1998, as required by contract, because it has experienced delays in assembly and testing of the facility. TRW is NASA's prime contractor for the observatory. NASA and contractor officials met at NASA Headquarters in Washington, DC, this week to discuss the issue. While no new delivery date was agreed upon, the agency has directed TRW to develop a plan of action that would show how the contractor can minimize impact to the June 1 delivery. Although a delay in delivery could delay the launch, currently scheduled for August 1998 aboard Space Shuttle Columbia's STS-93 mission, and could result in additional program costs, the exact impact is not yet known. "The delay in delivery of the observatory is unfortunate," said Fred Wojtalik, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center observatory projects office manager in Huntsville, AL. "However, our first priority is to launch a world-class observatory which has been thoroughly tested and meets all requirements. We will work closely with TRW to ensure that happens." The delay is primarily due to TRW's difficulty in configuring and programming its Integrated Spacecraft Automated Test System to test the observatory before it is delivered to NASA. The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility is expected to play a vital role in answering fundamental questions about the universe, including its age and size, and will probe the nature and amounts of so-called "dark matter," providing unique insight into one of nature's great puzzles. The observatory also will allow scientists to see and measure the details of hot gas clouds in clusters of galaxies; observe X-rays generated when stars are torn apart by the incredibly strong gravity around massive black holes in the centers of galaxies; and provide images that will help understand how exploding stars

  15. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  16. Towards an advanced hadron facility at Los Alamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiessen, Henry A.

    1988-11-01

    In the 1987 AHF Workshop, it was pointed out that activation of the accelerator is a serious problem. At this workshop, it was suggested that a new type of slow extraction system is needed to reduce the activation. We report on the response to this need. The Los Alamos plan is reviewed including as elements the long lead-time R&D in preparation for a 1993 construction start, a menu of accelerator designs, improved losses at injection and extraction time, active participation in the development of PSR, an accelerated hardware R&D program, and close collaboration with TRIUMF. We review progress on magnets and power supplies, on ceramic vacuum chambers, and on ferrite-tuned rf systems. We report on the plan for a joint TRIUMF-Los Alamos main-ring cavity to be tested in PSR in 1989. The problem of beam losses is discussed in detail and a recommendation for a design procedure for the injection system is made. This recommendation includes taking account of single Coulomb scattering, a painting scheme for minimizing foil hits, and a collimator and dump system for containing the expected spills. The slow extraction problem is reviewed and progress on an improved design is discussed. The problem of designing the accelerators for minimum operation and maintenance cost is briefly discussed. The question of the specifications for an advanced hadron facility is raised and it is suggested that the Los Alamos Proposal of a dual energy machine—1.6 GeV and 60 GeV—is a better match to the needs of the science program than the single-energy proposals made elsewhere. It is suggested that design changes need be made in all of the world's hadron facility proposals to prepare for high-intensity operation.

  17. Towards an advanced hadron facility at Los Alamos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 1987 workshop, it was pointed out that activation of the accelerator is a serious problem. At this workshop, it was suggested that a new type of slow extraction system is needed to reduce the activation. We report on the response to this need. The Los Alamos plan is reviewed including as elements the long lead-time R and D in preparation for a 1993 construction start, a menu of accelerator designs, improved losses at injection and extraction time, active participation in the development of PSR, and accelerated hardware R and D program, and close collaboration with TRIUMF. We review progress on magnets and power supplies, on ceramic vacuum chambers, and on ferrite-turned rf systems. We report on the plan for a joint TRIUMF-Los Alamos main-ring cavity to be tested in PSR in 1989. The problem of beam losses is discussed in detail and a recommendation for a design procedure for the injection system is made. This recommendation includes taking account of single Coulomb scattering, a painting scheme for minimizing foil hits, and a collimator and dump system for containing the expected spills. The slow extraction problem is reviewed and progress on an improved design is discussed. The problem of designing the accelerators for minimum operation and maintenance cost is briefly discussed. The question of the specifications for an advanced hadron facility is raised and it is suggested that the Los Alamos Proposal of a dual energy machine - 1.6 GeV and 60 GeV - is a better match to the needs of the science program than the single-energy proposals made elsewhere. It is suggested that design changes need be made in all of the world's hadron facility proposals to prepare for high-intensity operation

  18. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  19. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  20. Invisibility cloaks for toroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yu; Kattawar, George W; Yang, Ping

    2009-04-13

    The material properties of toroidal invisibility cloaks are derived based on the coordinate transformation method. The permittivity and permeability tensors for toroidal cloaks are substantially different from those for spherical cloaks, but quite similar to those for 2D cylindrical cloaks because a singularity is involved at the inner boundary in both the cases. The cloaking effect is confirmed by the electric field distribution in the vicinity of toroidal cloaks simulated from the generalized discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. This study extends the concept of electromagnetic cloaking of arbitrarily-shaped objects to a complex geometry. PMID:19365485

  1. Torsatron/stellarator research at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details experimental activities of the University of Wisconsin-Madison Torsatron/Stellarator Laboratory during the period 1978 through 1983. Experiments on the Proto-Cleo Stellarator have demonstrated the effectiveness of ion-cyclotron resonance heating with ion temperatures increased to 150 eV. Tangential injection of gun-produced plasmas showed a reduction in convective cell structures with an increase in confinement time of a factor of two. Pfirsch-Schluter currents were measured to be in excellent agreement with neoclassical predictions. Studies on the Proto-Cleo Torsatron identified the presence of drift waves and rippling modes and identified a runaway instability under certain operating conditions. Heat pulse propagation measurement were used to obtain transport coefficients. Electron-cyclotron resonance heating was observed with good agreement to a stochastic heating model related to local field gradients. During this period, the Interchangeable Module Stellarator (IMS) was designed and fabricated. IMS is the first modular stellarator to be built based upon the modular coil concept of Rehker and Wobig. Details of the design and construction are presented. Initial operation of IMS demonstrated well formed vacuum magnetic surfaces with no evidence of significant isolation. Experience gained in the design of IMS was utilized in a modular stellarator reactor study. UWTOR-M, to demonstrate the feasibility of stellarator reactors based upon this concept

  2. Advanced light microscopy core facilities: Balancing service, science and career.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando-May, Elisa; Hartmann, Hella; Reymann, Jürgen; Ansari, Nariman; Utz, Nadine; Fried, Hans-Ulrich; Kukat, Christian; Peychl, Jan; Liebig, Christian; Terjung, Stefan; Laketa, Vibor; Sporbert, Anje; Weidtkamp-Peters, Stefanie; Schauss, Astrid; Zuschratter, Werner; Avilov, Sergiy

    2016-06-01

    Core Facilities (CF) for advanced light microscopy (ALM) have become indispensable support units for research in the life sciences. Their organizational structure and technical characteristics are quite diverse, although the tasks they pursue and the services they offer are similar. Therefore, throughout Europe, scientists from ALM-CFs are forming networks to promote interactions and discuss best practice models. Here, we present recommendations for ALM-CF operations elaborated by the workgroups of the German network of ALM-CFs, German Bio-Imaging (GerBI). We address technical aspects of CF planning and instrument maintainance, give advice on the organization and management of an ALM-CF, propose a scheme for the training of CF users, and provide an overview of current resources for image processing and analysis. Further, we elaborate on the new challenges and opportunities for professional development and careers created by CFs. While some information specifically refers to the German academic system, most of the content of this article is of general interest for CFs in the life sciences. Microsc. Res. Tech. 79:463-479, 2016. © 2016 THE AUTHORS MICROSCOPY RESEARCH AND TECHNIQUE PUBLISHED BY WILEY PERIODICALS, INC. PMID:27040755

  3. An Advanced Hadron Facility: Prospects and applicability to antiproton production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Advanced Hadron Facility is designed to address physics problems within and beyond the Standard Model. High fluxes of secondary beams are needed for the requisite precision tests and searches for very rare decay modes of mesons and baryons. Such high fluxes at useful secondary energies are readily obtained from high intensity, intermediate energy proton beams, which are also well suited to antiproton production. If the AHF primary proton beam were merely dumped into a beam stop, it would produce on the order of 1019 to 1020 antiprotons per operating year. Current collection techniques are not likely to be capable of absorbing more than one part in 103 of this production. Thus, an AHF provides both the immediate possibility of collecting quantities of antiprotons substantially beyond those available from the LEF discussed at this meeting, and for significant increases in the available antiproton supply upon the development (at an AHF) of more efficient collection methods. The prospects are presently good for the completion of an AHF in the late 1990's

  4. Advanced neutron source corrosion test-loop facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reference core for the advanced neutron source (ANS) will have a configuration similar to the present High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: simply, an array of aluminum-alloy-clad fuel plates immersed in rapidly flowing water. The high thermal conductivity of the aluminum combined with the high heat transfer coefficient governing heat flow from the plate to the water keep the fuel inside the plates at an acceptable temperature. Unfortunately, the exposed of aluminum under these conditions leads to the formation of a thin layer of oxide (boehmite) that separates the fuel plates from the coolant water. The boehmite film has very poor thermal conductivity, and the heat flux that must cross this film can cause excessive heating of the fuel during the lifetime of the core. A test loop has been built to determine experimentally the rate of corrosion product formation on the aluminum cladding at the higher heat fluxes. Preliminary experiments have been completed that illustrate the capabilities of the loop system and the general behavior of an aluminum specimen exposed to large heat fluxes and coolant velocities. This same facility will be used for thermal-hydraulic testing; however, modifications will be necessary because of higher heat fluxes, temperatures, and pressures. Currently, the design is for light water testing; heavy water tests will be conducted in the future, which will require additional modifications

  5. An Advanced Tokamak Fusion Nuclear Science Facility (FNSF-AT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, V. S.; Garofalo, A. M.; Stambaugh, R. D.

    2010-11-01

    A Fusion Development Facility (FDF) is a candidate for FNSF-AT. It is a compact steady-state machine of moderate gain that uses AT physics to provide the neutron fluence required for fusion nuclear science development. FDF is conceived as a double-null plasma with high elongation and triangularity, predicted to allow good confinement of high plasma pressure. Steady-state is achieved with high bootstrap current and radio frequency current drive. Neutral beam injection and 3D non-resonant magnetic field can provide edge plasma rotation for stabilization of MHD and access to Quiescent H-mode. The estimated power exhaust is somewhat lower than that of ITER because of higher core radiation and stronger tilting of the divertor plates. FDF is capable of further developing all elements of AT physics, qualifying them for an advanced performance DEMO. The latest concept has accounted for realistic neutron shielding and divertor implementation. Self-consistent evolution of the transport profiles and equilibrium will quantify the stability and confinement required to meet the FNS mission.

  6. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  7. ICRF plasma production and heating in the URAGAN-3M torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of experimental and theoretical studies of Alfven wave production and heating of plasma in the frequency range below the ion cyclotron frequency (ω0 ci) are presented. Several types of antenna have been studied for plasma RF production and heating in the URAGAN-3M torsatron (R = 100 cm, apl ≤ 12.5 cm, B ≤ 1.3 T): A frame type antenna (FTA) conventionally used for plasma RF production and heating with the best operational properties at low and moderate plasma densities (n-bare ≤ 5 x 1012 cm-3); compact three-half-turn antenna (THTA) proposed for plasma heating and density ramp up (up to 3 x 1013 cm-3) after the low density target plasma (n-bare ≥ 4 x 1011 cm-3) had been produced by FTA; recently proposed antenna of combined type (''crankshaft''), which has the best properties of both above mentioned antennae in the whole range of densities. The excitation of the electromagnetic fields in URAGAN-3M plasmas by FTA, THTA and crankshaft antenna has been studied numerically using 1-D wave code. To study the dynamics of RF plasma production in the URAGAN-3M torsatron the 0-dimensional code have been used. The results of calculations showed better performance of crankshaft antenna compared with FTA and THTA in the whole range of plasma densities. When using the THTA at the scenario with FTA as a target plasma source, the experiments performed showed the possibility of dense plasma production (n-bare > 2 x 1013 cm-3) and heating, which had not been obtained earlier in the URAGAN-3M torsatron. The shifted towards the plasma core power deposition profile of THTA resulted in modification of plasma density profile and improvement in plasma confinement. The preliminary experiments with crankshaft antenna on plasma production showed that this antenna can produce the dense (up to 1013 cm-3) plasma in the URAGAN-3M without any additional source of target plasma and it can be used for subsequent Alfven heating. (author)

  8. Evaluation of dynamic target options for dual axis radiography hydrotest facility II (DARHT II) and advanced hydrotest facility (AHF) programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Initial results indicate that electron beams hitting targets used to generate x-rays during multipulse operation in advanced radiography facilities will generate plasma plumes which will disturb the electron beam during subsequent pulses. This, in turn, degrades the x-ray spot quality generated by the subsequent pulses. If this concern is substantiated, new facilities such as the Dual Axia Radiography Hydrotest Facility (DARHT II) and the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) will need a provision for mitigating this effect. one such provision involves moving the target with sufficient velocity that any plasmas formed are carried adequately far from the electron beam that they do not disturb it. They report the various approaches which have been considered and present data showing the maximum target rates which can be achieved with each approach

  9. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility 2010 Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mary Catherine Thelen; Todd R. Allen

    2011-05-01

    This is the 2010 ATR National Scientific User Facility Annual Report. This report provides an overview of the program for 2010, along with individual project reports from each of the university principal investigators. The report also describes the capabilities offered to university researchers here at INL and at the ATR NSUF partner facilities.

  10. Approximations to toroidal harmonics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroidal harmonics P/sub n-1/2/1(cosh μ) and Q/sub n-1/2/1(cosh μ) are useful in solutions to Maxwell's equations in toroidal coordinates. In order to speed their computation, a set of approximations has been developed that is valid over the range 0 -10. The simple method used to determine the approximations is described. Relative error curves are also presented, obtained by comparing approximations to the more accurate values computed by direct summation of the hypergeometric series

  11. Drift in toroidal configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelidis, E. A.

    1990-12-01

    This paper considers possible mechanisms involved in amplifying the drift velocity of plasma particles, under conditions of toroidal geometry. It is shown that particles constrained to move on an axisymmetric circular spheroidal surface, develop a sinusoidal motion with a characteristic frequency which depends on the energy of the particles, the value of the isoflux surface, and the value of the general momentum. It is also shown that the incorporation of the effects of toroidal geometry in the Lorentz equation produces a nonambipolar charge-dependent particle flux amplified by a factor 2(q/epsilon) squared.

  12. Permutation entropy analysis of density fluctuations in the torsatron TJ-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to explore the nature of density fluctuations in the edge of magnetically confined fusion plasmas, the technique of permutation entropy and statistical complexity is used. The location of fluctuations on the entropy versus complexity plane classifies the dynamical behaviour of the system. The behaviour can be differentiated between stochastic and chaotic. The latter is supposed to be connected to a specific temporal form of intermittent density events, i.e. blobs, in the scrape-off layer (SOL). In this contribution, density fluctuations measured with a Langmuir probe in the torsatron TJ-K are analyzed with respect to the dynamical nature. Radial scans are performed across the separatrix to distinguish the dynamics in the inner edge and the SOL. Comparisons with well known test systems indeed point to a qualitative change in the dynamics across the separatrix. In the region of maximum density gradient, the fluctuations are characterized by minimum entropy. The results will be discussed on separated scales.

  13. Determination of the electronic temperature in the torsatron TJ-I Upgrade by the two filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, F.; Ochando, M.

    1994-07-01

    A Te monitor for the TJ-IU torsatron, based on the two-filters method, has been designed. It will consist of two surface-barrier silicon detectors looking at the same plasma region through berylium filters of different thickness. Plasma electron temperature is deduced from the ratio of the soft-x-ray fluxes transmitted through the two filters. The flexibility in magnetic configuration of TJ-IU plasmas has been taken into account in the mechanical design of this diagnostic. It will be attached to an upper 1 port of the vacuum vessel and the whole system will be movable both, to change the spatial resolution when needed and to enable the scan of the full plasma cross-section to obtain the radial profile of electron temperature in a shot-to-shot basis. (Author) 7 refs.

  14. Determination of the electronic temperature in the torsatron TJ-I Upgrade by the two filters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Te monitor for the TJ-IU torsatron, based on the two-filters method, has been designed. It will consist of two surface-barrier silicon detectors looking at the same plasma region through berilium filters of different thickness. Plasma electron temperature is deduced from the ratio of the soft-x-ray fluxes transmitted through the two filters. The flexibility in magnetic configuration of TJ-IU plasmas has been taken into account in the mechanical design of this diagnostic. It will be attached to an upper port of the vacuum vessel and the whole system will be movable both, to change the spatial resolution when needed and to enable the scan of the full plasma cross-section to obtain the radial profile of electron temperature in a shot-to-shot basis. (Author)

  15. Experimental studies of radio frequency waves and confinement in the Auburn Torsatron. Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first year of operation of the Auburn Torsatron has resulted in the majority of the basic operating systems becoming operational or nearly operational. The diagnostic systems now include two microwave interferometers, a monochrometer, several probes and photodiodes. The plasma is produced by any of three sources: electron cyclotron heating with a cw power of 1 kW, low frequency rf heating with power soon to come up to 10 kW cw, and a pulsed washer-stack gun. The magnetic field studies have mapped the field surfaces and several corrections have been made to center the plasma. The ion-cyclotron source and antenna are nearly ready for experiments to begin

  16. Concept for an advanced exotic beam facility based on ATLAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehm, K.E.; Ahmad, I.; Back, B.B. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The acceleration of beams of unstable nuclei has opened up new research frontiers. Experiments at existing accelerators, and particularly at the first generation of radioactive ion beam facilities, have demonstrated convincingly that unique information becomes accessible. Critical cross sections for astrophysical processes that were impossible to obtain previously, qualitatively new and unexpected nuclear structure effects in nuclei far from stability, completely new approaches to studies of nuclear decays, reactions and structure, all have triggered much excitement for this new dimension in nuclear research. To explore this new dimension, an extension of present technical capabilities and facilities is needed. This need and its scientific basis were discussed in various workshops and symposia and in the Isospin Laboratory (ISL) White Paper. A report by the European community was published recently on prospects of radioactive beam facilities in Europe, and some next-generation projects for such facilities are starting in both Europe and Japan.

  17. The advanced containment experiments (ACE) radioiodine test facility experimental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of the Advanced Containment Experiments (ACE) Radioiodine Test Facility (RTF) program are reported. This study consisted of four intermediate-scale experiments that investigated the effects of radiation, pH, surfaces and initial iodine speciation on iodine behaviour. The tests revealed that, in high radiation fields, the long-term volatility of iodine is independent of the initial iodine speciation (CsI, I2, CH3I). This is presumably because radiolytic reactions inter-convert aqueous iodine species; I- was the predominant aqueous iodine species after an absorbed dose of about 30-40 kGy. Tests at pH 9 and 5.5 demonstrated that iodine volatility increased significantly with decreasing pH. In addition, this study demonstrated that containment surfaces can play an important role in determining iodine volatility, gas and aqueous phase iodine speciation, and surface adsorption. In summary: The ACE/RTF experiments have demonstrated the importance of several factors on iodine behaviour within containment under reactor accident conditions. One of the most important factors was radiation. Without radiation, the volatility of iodine was dependent on the initial speciation of iodine, presumably because inter-conversion of iodine species by non-radiolytic reactions is relatively slow. In contrast, in the presence of radiation, the long-term volatility of iodine was independent of initial speciation. This is attributed to aqueous phase radiolytic reactions that result in rapid inter-conversion of iodine species. Iodine volatility was shown to increase significantly with decreasing pH. However, changing the pH from acidic to alkaline conditions did not result in rapid decreases in iodine volatility. This may have been due to desorption of volatile iodine species from surfaces, in the case of stainless steel, and the influence of organics in the epoxy tests. Surfaces were shown to influence iodine volatility and speciation. Higher gas phase iodine concentrations were

  18. Solve: a non linear least-squares code and its application to the optimal placement of torsatron vertical field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational method was developed which alleviates the need for lengthy parametric scans as part of a design process. The method makes use of a least squares algorithm to find the optimal value of a parameter vector. Optimal is defined in terms of a utility function prescribed by the user. The placement of the vertical field coils of a torsatron is such a non linear problem

  19. Do provisions to advance chemical facility safety also advance chemical facility security? An analysis of possible synergies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hedlund, Frank Huess

    The European Commission has launched a study on the applicability of existing chemical industry safety provisions to enhancing security of chemical facilities covering the situation in 18 EU Member States. This paper reports some preliminary analytical findings regarding the extent to which...... exist at the mitigation level. At the strategic policy level, synergies are obvious. The security of chemical facilities is important. First, facilities with large inventories of toxic materials could be attractive targets for terrorists. The concern is sabotage causing an intentional release that could...

  20. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 22-27, 1988, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. The program included papers on facility plans, beam dynamics, and accelerator hardware. The parallel sessions were particularly lively with discussions of all facets of kaon factory design. The workshop provided an opportunity for communication among the staff involved in hadron facility planning from all the study groups presently active. The recommendations of the workshop include: the need to use h=1 RF in the compressor ring; the need to minimize foil hits in painting schemes for all rings; the need to consider single Coulomb scattering in injection beam los calculations; the need to study the effect of field inhomogeneity in the magnets on slow extraction for the 2.2 Tesla main ring of AHF; and agreement in principle with the design proposed for a joint Los Alamos/TRIUMF prototype main ring RF cavity

  1. Advances in the Electrical , Control Systems, General Analysis of the Coils Design in the Mexican Tokamak Experimental Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Fusion Research Group of the Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (UANL, Spanish acronyms) presents its advances into the electrical, control systems and its coils design developed toward the Tokamak Experimental Facility [1]. This Research and Development Project (R+D) was approved from the Mexican Education Ministry (UANL-EXB-156). The present electrical and control systems studies are mainly oriented to establish our Magnetic Confinement Facility into our University Campus, with a D-shaped tokamak design with the next main characteristics: major radius R = 41 cm, minor radius a = 18.5 cm, aspect ratio A = 2.2162, safety factor q = 1.9552, plasma current Ip = 277 kA , toroidal field Bt = 1.3 T, electronic plasma density ne = 2 — 3 x 1013 cm-3. The present study at this time is an effective electrical engineering proposal to our University involving studies over the electrical power quality provided by Federal Electricity Commission. We define our parameters in voltage, current, frequency, to implement the correct strategies of electrical supplies in order to protect our facility. The analysis was performed measuring in the five domestic circuits of the University Campus: phase imbalances (current and voltage), harmonic distortion total and individual (voltages and currents of 1 — 50), transient capture, presentation of the power factor, registration of electrical interruptions and reclosing, measuring and recording quality power systems, crest factors (voltage and current), accurate RMS measurements of voltage and current, presentation of phasor diagrams. Our tokamak design contains a proposal coils arrangement capable for generate 1.6 T, with a coil current range (10,000 — 30, 000 A), short circuit times from 0.3 s to 1 s. The entirely systems uses Cu like first analysis material. The coils are designed with 3D CAD modeling and after, we apply finite element analysis through the software COMSOL Multiphysics. Our numerical calculus programs

  2. Advanced materials analysis facility at CSIRO HIAF laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kenny, M.J.; Wielunski, L.S.; Baxter, G.R. [CSIRO, Lindfield, NSW (Australia). Applied Physics Div.; Sie, S.H.; Suter, G.F. [CSIRO, North Ryde, NSW (Australia). Exploration and Mining Div.

    1993-12-31

    The HIAF facility at North Ryde, based on a 3 MV Tandetron accelerator has been operating for several years. Initially three ion sources were in operation:- conventional duoplasmatrons for proton and helium beams and a sputter ion source for heavy ions. An electrostatic focusing system was designed and built in-house for providing microbeams. The research emphasis has been largely on microbeam PIXE with particular reference to the mining industry. An AMS system was added in 1990 which prevented the inclusion of the charge exchange canal required for helium beams. The facility has been operated by CSIRO Division of Exploration and Mining. At the beginning of 1992, the lon Beam Technology Group of CSIRO Division of Applied Physics was relocated at Lindfield and became a major user of the HIAF facility. Because the research activities of this group involved Rutherford Backscattering and Channeling, it was necessary to add a helium ion source and a new high vacuum beam line incorporating a precision goniometer. These facilities became operational in the second quarter of 1992. Currently a PIXE system is being added to the chamber containing the goniometer, making the accelerator an extremely versatile one for a wide range of IBA techniques. 3 refs.

  3. Recent utility efforts to develop advanced gasification biomass power generation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides a status report on recent utility efforts to evaluate cost-effective opportunities for developing advanced gasification biomass power generation facilities and, in some cases, to actually begin developing the facilities. An overview is provided of national estimates of the potential for producing electricity from various biomass feedstocks. Major manufacturers of advanced gasification biomass power generation technologies are described. Major biomass power generation projects underway by utilities in the US are described. Significant issues affecting further commercialization of biomass gasification facilities are discussed and strategies for addressing the barriers are suggested

  4. Development of Demonstration Facility Design Technology for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main objective of this R and D is to develop the PRIDE (PyRoprocess Integrated inactive DEmonstration) facility for engineering-scale inactive test using fresh uranium, and to establish the design requirements of the ESPF (Engineering Scale Pyroprocess Facility) for active demonstration of the pyroprocess. Pyroprocess technology, which is applicable to GEN-IV systems as one of the fuel cycle options, is a solution of the spent fuel accumulation problems. PRIDE Facility, pyroprocess mock-up facility, is the first facility that is operated in inert atmosphere in the country. By using the facility, the functional requirements and validity of pyroprocess technology and facility related to the advanced fuel cycle can be verified with a low cost. Then, PRIDE will contribute to evaluate the technology viability, proliferation resistance and possibility of commercialization of the pyroprocess technology. The PRIDE evaluation data, such as performance evaluation data of equipment and operation experiences, will be directly utilized for the design of ESPF

  5. Elongated toroid fusion device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A device for achieving ignition of a plasma with ohmic heating is described comprising: means for defining a toroidal plasma chamber,a and confining gas therein, and means including electrically conductive coils for generating plasma within the chamber and for confining and shaping such plasma substantially into and filling a predetermined single region of the chamber without an axisymmetric internal separatix and ohmically heating the confined plasma to ignition. The predetermined region is toroidal with a major axis defining an axial direction parallel thereto and a transaxial direction perpendicular to the axis and having an axial cross section with an elongation, k, greater than 4, where k is the ratio of the maximum axial dimension of the cross section to the maximum transaxial dimension of the cross section

  6. Tokamak with liquid metal toroidal field coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro; Schaffer, Michael J.

    1981-01-01

    Tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. Electric current is passed through the liquid metal over a conductive path linking the toroidal space to produce a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  7. JAEA key facilities for global advanced fuel cycle R and D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced fuel cycle will be realized with the mid and long term R and D during the long-term transition period from LWR cycle to advanced reactor fuel cycle. Most of JAEA facilities have been utilized to establish the current LWR and FBR (Fast Breeder Reactor) fuel cycle by implementing evolutionary R and D. An assessment of today's state experimental facilities concerning the following research issues: reprocessing, Mox fuel fabrication, irradiation and post-irradiation examination, waste management and nuclear data measurement, is made. The revolutionary R and D requests new issues to be studied: the TRU multi-recycling, minor actinide recycling, the assessment of proliferation resistance and the assessment of cost reduction. To implement the revolutionary R and D for advanced fuel cycle, however, these facilities should be refurbished to install new machines and process equipment to provide more flexible testing parameters

  8. J-PARC designated as the 'specific advanced neutron beam facility'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two years ago, the Japanese Government applied in 'Law for the Promotion of Public Utilization of the Specific Advanced Large Research Facilities' to J-PARC for its secure operation regardless of owner's financial conditions. Under this Law, the Comprehensive Research Organization for Science and Society (CROSS) has been awarded the 'Registered Institution for Facilities Use Promotion' to conduct users program for the public beam lines at the Japanese Spallation Neutron Source. (author)

  9. Effects of nonclassical ion losses on radial electric field in CHS torsatron/heliotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A selfconsistent analysis is discussed to determine the radial electric field and loss cone boundary in torsatron/heliotron plasmas under the influence of nonclassical ion losses. Effects of the loss cone loss, charge exchange loss of fast ions with neutrals, and the bipolar part of anomalous loss are taken into account. Analysis is applied to the NBI heated plasma in the CHS device. Comparison is made between theoretical results and experimental observations. The increased ion particle losses by the orbit loss and charge exchange loss with neutrals make the radial electric field more negative than the value of purely neoclassical calculation. The partition of the injection energy among the shine through, direct orbit loss , charge exchange loss and bulk heating is estimated by using the self-consistent electric field profile. The power loss of fast ions caused by the orbit loss or charge exchange process is by a factor of several tens to hundred greater than the reduction of the energy loss of bulk ions through the enhancement of radial electric field. Comparison with W7-A experiment is made, and the differences are discussed. (author)

  10. First results of multichord soft x-ray detection array on the U-3m torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A miniature pinhole camera array for spatially and temporally resolved measurements of soft X-ray plasma emission has been recently installed on the U-3M. The diagnostics has been tested in different types of the U-3M discharge. In low density frame antenna discharges with so-called ''H-like'' transition a fast SXR emission profile modification is observed. A phase shift of the SXR perturbation induced by the transition as well as different shapes of the perturbation is observed in different channels. The transition can be associated with MHD instability. Different shapes of the SXR emission profile has been observed in different discharge conditions. The SXR array is en excellent tool for study different types of the MHD activity. Different types of the low frequency MHD activity have been observed in the U-3M torsatron. The recently installed SXR diagnostics opens opportunity of detailed studies of the MHD activity together with its driver - the plasma pressure gradient. In the paper we are presented recent experimental results obtained with the use of SXP, without deep analysis these experiments

  11. Shafranov shift in low-aspect-ratio heliotron/torsatron CHS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MHD equilibrium properties of neutral-beam-heated plasmas have been experimentally investigated in the Compact Helical System (CHS), a low-aspect-ratio (Ap ∼ 5) heliotron/torsatron. This configuration is characterized by a strong breaking of helical symmetry. The radial profiles measured by various diagnostics have shown significant Shafranov shift due to plasma pressure. The deviation of the magnetic axis from its vacuum position has reached 50% of the minor radius. When the three-dimensional equilibrium code VMEC is used to reconstruct the equilibrium from the experimental data, the result is in good agreement with the experimentally observed Shafranov shift as well as the diamagnetic pressure in plasmas with ≤ 1.2% and β0 ≤ 3.3%. This β value corresponds to half of the conventional equilibrium β limit defined by the Shafranov shift reaching a value of half the minor radius. Although tangential neutral beam injection has caused pressure anisotropies p parallel/p perpendicular ≤ 3, the description of the equilibrium assuming isotropic pressure is consistent with the experiment. (author)

  12. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development

  13. Advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) for 2-nd generation carbon radiotherapy facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shornikov, A.; Wenander, F.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we analyze how advanced Electron Beam Ion Sources (EBIS) can facilitate the progress of carbon therapy facilities. We will demonstrate that advanced ion sources enable operation of 2-nd generation ion beam therapy (IBT) accelerators. These new accelerator concepts with designs dedicated to IBT provide beams better suited for therapy and, are more cost efficient than contemporary IBT facilities. We will give a sort overview of the existing new IBT concepts and focus on those where ion source technology is the limiting factor. We will analyse whether this limitation can be overcome in the near future thanks to ongoing EBIS development.

  14. Advanced filters for nuclear facilities and filter conditioning for disposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports the advantages of the cylinder shape selected for the filter elements for aerosol and iodine removal from the offgas of nuclear facilities, above all in view of remote and manual operation and transport, conditioning and disposal. In order to test the conditioning of polygonal HEPA filter elements, several filter elements not exposed to radioactivity were crushed remotely and embedded in concrete in a 400 l waste drum. The waste drum was subsequently saw cut in order to verify the quality of concrete embedding. The result of concrete embedding is satisfactory. The design is presented of a filter element capable of accommodating gas flows up to 500 m3/h for wet aerosol removal with a high removal efficiency. Also the design of a filter element for gas flows up to 800 m3/h to be used in iodine removal from offgases with low iodine contents is described. In order to be able to use the cylindrical filter elements developed for remote handling in manual operation too, e.g., for cleaning low level offgases, a manually operated filter housing was developed. It is suited for working pressures up to 10 bar and working temperatures up to 160 degree C. The filter elements are replaced by the usual bagging technique

  15. The status of facilities at China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 60 MW research reactor, so called China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR,) was built in China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), located in the southwest of Beijing and about 37 kilometers away from the central city. CARR is a tank-in-pool inverse neutron trap type reactor using D2O reflector, the designed optimal undisturbed thermal neutron flux is 8×1014 n⋅cm-2⋅s-1. A liquid D2 cold source will be equipped and the installation will be finished at the end of 2015. As a multipurpose research reactor, its main applications include neutron scattering, neutron activation analysis, isotope production, silicon doping, fuel element test, fundamental nuclear physics and so on. On March 13rd, 2012 CARR realized the 72 h stable operation with the full power. And the official operation license is expected to be issued at the beginning of next year. Cooperating with the internal and international users in the first phase ten instruments complete construction and are under commissioning, which are High Resolution Powder Diffractometer, High Intensity Powder Diffractometer, Residual Stress Diffractometer, Texture Diffractometer, Four Circle Diffractometer, Reflectometer, Small Angle Neutron Scattering, two Thermal Triple Axis Spectrometers and Isotope Separator On-Line instrument . In the second phase 7 instruments were approved and are under construction now. Although the operation license was not issued, the reactor was permitted to do the testing run several times and some results were obtained during the instrument commissioning.

  16. High-Level Functional and Operational Requirements for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes the principal functional and operational requirements for the proposed Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF is intended to be the world's foremost facility for nuclear fuel cycle research, technology development, and demonstration. The facility will also support the near-term mission to develop and demonstrate technology in support of fuel cycle needs identified by industry, and the long-term mission to retain and retain U.S. leadership in fuel cycle operations. The AFCF is essential to demonstrate a more proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and make long-term improvements in fuel cycle effectiveness, performance and economy

  17. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design

  18. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  19. Self-sustained turbulence and L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theory of the L-mode confinement in toroidal plasmas is developed. The quantitative effect of the anomalous transport, which is caused by microscopic fluctuations, on the pressure-gradient- driven modes is analyzed. The ExB nonlinearity is renormalized in a form of the transport coefficient such as the thermal diffusivity, the ion viscosity and the current diffusivity. The destabilization by the current-diffusivity and the stabilization by the thermal transport and ion viscosity are analyzed. By use of the mean-field approximations, the nonlinear dispersion relation is solved. Growth rate and stability condition are expressed in terms of the renormalized transport coefficients. The transport coefficients in the steady state are obtained by the marginal stability condition for the least stable mode. This method is applied to the microscopic ballooning mode for the toroidal plasma with the magnetic well (such as tokamak). The comparison with experimental observations are made. A good agreement is found in a various aspects of the L-mode plasmas; The typical wavenumber and level of the fluctuations for the self-sustained turbulence is also obtained. The analysis is also made for the plasma with magnetic hill and shear (such as torsatron/Heliotron devices). This method is applied to the interchange modes. Formula of the anomalous transport is obtained. Also investigated is the case of the magnetic well and low magnetic shear (conventional stellarator). The roles of the pressure gradient and the collisionless skin depth in determining the anomalous transport are found to be generic in toroidal plasmas. The difference in the magnetic configuration affects the transport coefficient. These formula explain major experimental observations. (J.P.N.)

  20. Selected publications related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source, 1987--1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contain papers on work related to the experimental facilities of the Advanced Photon Source. The general topics of these papers are: insertion devices; front ends; high heat load x-ray optics; novel optics and techniques; and radiation safety, interlocks, and personnel safety

  1. Filling the gaps in SCWR materials research: advanced nuclear corrosion research facilities in Hamilton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research efforts on materials selection and development in support of the design of supercritical water-cooled reactors (SCWRs) have produced a considerable amount of data on corrosion, creep and other related properties. Summaries of the data on corrosion [1] and stress corrosion cracking [2] have recently been produced. As research on the SCWR advances, gaps and limitations in the published data are being identified. In terms of corrosion properties, these gaps can be seen in several areas, including: 1) the test environment, 2) the physical and chemical severity of the tests conducted as compared with likely reactor service/operating conditions, and 3) the test methods used. While some of these gaps can be filled readily using existing facilities, others require the availability of advanced test facilities for specific tests and assessments. In this paper, highlights of the new materials research facilities jointly established in Hamilton by CANMET Materials Technology Laboratory and McMaster University are presented. (author)

  2. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process

  3. Basic requirements for a preliminary conceptual design of the Korea advanced pyroprocess facility (KAPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ho Hee; Ko, Won Il; Chang, Hong Lae; Song, Dae Yong; Kwon, Eun Ha; Lee, Jung Won [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-12-15

    Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing technologies for pyroprocessing for spent PWR fuels. This study is part of a long term R and D program in Korea to develop an advanced recycle system that has the potential to meet and exceed the proliferation resistance, waste minimization, resource minimization, safety and economic goals of approved Korean Government energy policy, as well as the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) program. To support this R and D program, KAERI requires that an independent estimate be made of the conceptual design and cost for construction and operation of a 'Korea Advanced Pyroprocessing Facility', This document describes the basic requirements for preliminary conceptual design of the Korea Advanced Pyroprocess Facility (KAPF). The presented requirements will be modified to be more effective and feasible on an engineering basis during the subsequent design process.

  4. Heating of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The limitations of ohmic heating in achieving the thermonuclear ignition of a low-β toroidal plasma can be overcome by using several heating methods. Such methods are: fast neutral beam injection (possibly combined with an adiabatic compression or any other means) and HF heating, the most interesting schemes being based on plasma resonances. The basic physical phenomena in each method are briefly explained and results obtained are given. A new heating scheme using an outer frequency of a few kHz is described, that makes it possible to locate the exciting coils outside the vacuum vessel (some of these coils can be that producing the vertical magnetic field for the plasma equilibrium)

  5. Radiation and physical protection challenges at advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The purpose of this study is to examine challenges and opportunities for radiation protection in advanced nuclear reactors and fuel facilities proposed under the Generation IV (GEN IV) initiative which is examining and pursuing the exploration and development of advanced nuclear science and technology; and the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), which seeks to develop worldwide consensus on enabling expanded use of economical, carbon-free nuclear energy to meet growing energy demand. The International Energy Agency projects nuclear power to increase at a rate of 1.3 to 1.5 percent a year over the next 20 years, depending on economic growth. Much of this growth will be in Asia, which, as a whole, currently has plans for 40 new nuclear power plants. Given this increase in demand for new nuclear power facilities, ranging from light water reactors to advanced fuel processing and fabrication facilities, it is necessary for radiation protection and physical protection technologies to keep pace to ensure both worker and public health. This paper is based on a review of current initiatives and the proposed reactors and facilities, primarily the nuclear fuel cycle facilities proposed under the GEN IV and GNEP initiatives. Drawing on the Technology Road map developed under GEN IV, this work examines the potential radiation detection and protection challenges and issues at advanced reactors, including thermal neutron spectrum systems, fast neutron spectrum systems and nuclear fuel recycle facilities. The thermal neutron systems look to improve the efficiency of production of hydrogen or electricity, while the fast neutron systems aim to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel. While there are components of these advanced systems that can draw on the current and well-developed radiation protection practices, there will inevitably be opportunities to improve the overall quality of radiation

  6. The microwave system for ECRH experiments on TJ-1U torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For ECRH experiments on the TJ-1U torsatron a microwave system based on a Russian gyrotron was designed. This system delivers to plasma microwave power pulses of a maximum of 350 KW during 43 msecs at 28 GHz with 0.02% duty cycle. The main parts of this system are as follows: a high-voltage power supply, a gyrotron module and a quasi-optical transmission line. The power supply configuration is based on a high voltage power tetrode EBV 50/100 that provides the following functions: regulation, overcurrent limitation and fast switching. Pulses of a maximum of 50 A at 70 KV with a 0.1% accuracy of stabilized voltage during pulse can be obtained. The maximum time to switch the power supply off, in case of breakdown, is less than 20 microsecs. The gyrotron module is comprised of superconductive coils for resonant magnetic field generation and a Russian gyrotron. This kind of gyrotrons has a high flexibility in power control since it is possible to change the output power from 100 KW to 350 KW without deep cuts in regime. The gyrotron forms a Gaussian-like beam with linear polarization and a purity of 90% permitting to handle the output power in a quasi-optical transmission form. The quasi-optical line carrying microwave power from the gyrotron into the TJ-1U consists of four cylindrical copper-covered mirrors and features a transmission coefficient of more then 0.9. Radiative losses occur mainly at the gyrotron output and into the side lobes of the radiation pattern whereas ohmic losses into the copper mirrors are negligible. A Gaussian beam diameter of 4.3 cm (-10 dB power level) results at the TJ-1U window. (orig.)

  7. Project of an advanced ISOL facility for exotic beams at LNL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of the European program to define a second generation Radioactive Ion Beam facility, LNL are proposing the construction in the next five-seven years of a specialized national facility for RIB originated by fission fragments produced by secondary neutrons. It consists on a two-accelerator ISOL-type facility to provide intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams of highest quality, in the range of masses between 80 and 160. The conceptual design is based on a high intensity 50 MeV (100 kW) proton linac as driver and on the availability of the heavy-ion accelerator ALPI as post accelerator. The estimated neutron yield is 2x1014 n/s at 0 deg., high enough to satisfy the demand for an advanced RIB facility. An intense R and D program on different items is actually in progress in collaboration with other Laboratories and University groups and is moving in a European context

  8. Construction Report of Hot Cell Facility for Demonstration of Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. The hot cell facilities for demonstration of ACP(ACPF) was consisted of α-γ type heavy concrete hot cell, the auxiliary equipment for hot cell operation, and process equipment. A existing β-γ type hot cell, located in IMEF, was refurbished to minimize construction expenditures for utilization as ACPF. The detail design of hot cell facilities and process was completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. And also, the construction of ACPF and installation of process equipment were completed, and government license for hot cell operation was acquired. In this report, the construction outline and the detail information of hot cell facilities and process equipment s are summarized to utilize for operation and maintenance of hot cell facility and process

  9. Design Report of Hot Cell Facilities for Demonstration of Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. The hot test will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For the hot test, the hot cell facilities of α-γ type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β-γ type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. The detail design of hot cell facilities and process were completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. This results were utilized for refurbishment of IMEF future hot cell and installation of process equipments, and manufacturing and procurement of hot cell auxiliary equipments. The safety analysis report were submitted to KINS through MOST for license acquisition, the government issued license for construction and operation. And, the hot test for demonstration of the ACP is performing in this hot cell facilities. In this report, the detail design and safety analysis data are summarized to utilize for operation of hot cell facility and process

  10. Study on process basic requirements of experimental facility of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel management process, which was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel, is under research and development. Hot cell facilities of α-γ type and inert atmosphere are required essentially for safe hot test and verification of this process. In this study, design basic data are established, and these data include process flow, process condition and yields, mass and radioactivity balance of radionuclides, process safety considerations, etc. And also, these data will be utilized for basic and detail design of hot cell facility, secured conservative safety and effective operability

  11. Technology developments for ACIGA high power test facility for advanced interferometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barriga, P [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia); Barton, M [California Institute of Technology, LIGO Project, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Blair, D G [School of Physics, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA 6009 (Australia)] [and others

    2005-05-21

    The High Optical Power Test Facility for Advanced Interferometry has been built by the Australian Consortium for Interferometric Gravitational Astronomy north of Perth in Western Australia. An 80 m suspended cavity has been prepared in collaboration with LIGO, where a set of experiments to test suspension control and thermal compensation will soon take place. Future experiments will investigate radiation pressure instabilities and optical spring effects in a high power optical cavity with {approx}200 kW circulating power. The facility combines research and development undertaken by all consortium members, whose latest results are presented.

  12. National facility for advanced computational science: A sustainable path to scientific discovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, Horst; Kramer, William; Saphir, William; Shalf, John; Bailey, David; Oliker, Leonid; Banda, Michael; McCurdy, C. William; Hules, John; Canning, Andrew; Day, Marc; Colella, Philip; Serafini, David; Wehner, Michael; Nugent, Peter

    2004-04-02

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) proposes to create a National Facility for Advanced Computational Science (NFACS) and to establish a new partnership between the American computer industry and a national consortium of laboratories, universities, and computing facilities. NFACS will provide leadership-class scientific computing capability to scientists and engineers nationwide, independent of their institutional affiliation or source of funding. This partnership will bring into existence a new class of computational capability in the United States that is optimal for science and will create a sustainable path towards petaflops performance.

  13. Design options for the advanced x-ray astrophysics facility (AXAF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF), for which NASA and industry are currently conducting Definition and Preliminary Design studies, will provide a major advance in performance and observing opportunities beyond its predecessor space missions in X-ray astronomy, including Uhuru, Einstein and Rosat. The performance advances come from larger, higher quality mirrors with longer focal length that will extend the useful energy range and provide improved image resolution. Corresponding improvements will be made in observatory aspect determination and pointing stability. Increased observing opportunities come from facility-class operation of the observatory, including on-orbit maintenance and repair to provide potentially unlimited mission lifetime and on-orbit installation of new scientific instruments to take advantage of future advances in sensor technology. A summary of characteristics contrasting AXAF with the Einstein mission will be presented. Developing a design concept for AXAF that takes advantage of recent advances in technology and Shuttle-era capability for operations and servicing in space is a challenging process, requiring evaluation of a number of interesting, diverse design options for the X-ray telescope, science instrument accommodation and the host spacecraft

  14. Drift waves in general toroidal geometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model, based on gyro-kinetic ions and fluid electrons, to study drift waves in low-beta [beta = (kinetic pressure)/(magnetic pressure)] stellarator plasmas is presented. The model equations are written in straight-field-line coordinates and are valid for arbitrary, fully three-dimensional configurations with closed, nested magnetic surfaces. An implicit method, coupled with a subcycling technique for the electrons, is used to solve the time-dependent, along-the-field-line equations. Numerical calculations are carried out for a 3-field-period toroidal heliac. The geometrical effects that enter the model equations are calculated and displayed in physical space using advanced visualization techniques

  15. Advanced reactors and associated fuel cycle facilities: safety and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, R N; Nutt, W M; Laidler, J J

    2011-01-01

    The safety and environmental impacts of new technology and fuel cycle approaches being considered in current U.S. nuclear research programs are contrasted to conventional technology options in this paper. Two advanced reactor technologies, the sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) and the very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR), are being developed. In general, the new reactor technologies exploit inherent features for enhanced safety performance. A key distinction of advanced fuel cycles is spent fuel recycle facilities and new waste forms. In this paper, the performance of existing fuel cycle facilities and applicable regulatory limits are reviewed. Technology options to improve recycle efficiency, restrict emissions, and/or improve safety are identified. For a closed fuel cycle, potential benefits in waste management are significant, and key waste form technology alternatives are described. PMID:21399407

  16. Toroidal Multipole Confinement Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confinement of plasma is studied in the General Atomic toroidal octopole machine. The magnetic field is produced by four current carrying rings supported inside a contoured conductor. The rings are energized by a transformer core linking the machine. The major radius of the machine is 63.5 cm with an aspect ratio of 5. The magnetic field on the minor axis is zero and increases to 3500 G at the wall between the rings. After crowbarring, the field decays in 6 msec to its half value. The MHD stability calculation has been carried out and the stability is assured up to the plasma pressure of 1016 eV cm-3. Hydrogen plasmas from either a coaxial gun or a pinch gun with ion energies of 50 to 200 eV and with densities of 1014 cm-3 are successfully injected through a port located at the outer conductor wall. After the injection, plasma spreads azimuthally, filling the machine. Electric probes, magnetic probes, and calorimetric probes have been used extensively. Optical spectrometers and particle detectors are also used. The initial plasma density of 1013 cm-'3 decays with a time constant of 700 μsec. The electron temperature decays more quickly in about 100 μsec. No electric or magnetic fluctuations have been observed on any of the probes. Since no provision is made to avoid the plasma loss to the ring supports which penetrate the plasma region, the decay of ion temperature may be attributed to the support loss. (author)

  17. Next generation toroidal devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general survey of the possible approach for the next generation toroidal devices was made. Either surprisingly or obviously (depending on one's view), the technical constraints along with the scientific considerations lead to a fairly limited set of systems for the most favorable approach for the next generation devices. Specifically if the magnetic field strength of 5 T or above is to be created by superconducting coils, it imposes minimum in the aspect ratio for the tokamak which is slightly higher than contemplated now for ITER design. The similar technical constraints make the minimum linear size of a stellarator large. Scientifically, it is indicated that a tokamak of 1.5 times in the linear dimension should be able to produce economically, especially if a hybrid reactor is allowed. For the next stellarator, it is strongly suggested that some kind of helical axis is necessary both for the (almost) absolute confinement of high energy particles and high stability and equilibrium beta limits. The author still favors a heliac most. Although it may not have been clearly stated in the main text, the stability afforded by the shearless layer may be exploited fully in a stellarator. (author)

  18. Compact toroid formation experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the design and experimental performance of a compact toroid (CT) formation experiment. The device has co-axial electrode diameters of 0.9 m (inner) and 1.25 m (outer), and an electrode length of ∼ 1.2 m, including an expansion/drift section. The CT is formed by a 0.1--0.2 Tesla initial radial magnetic field embedded co-axial puff gas discharge. The gas puff is injected with an array of 60 pulsed solenoid driven fast valves. The formation discharge is driven by a 108 microfarad, 40 to 100 KV, 86 to 540 kilojoule 2 to 5 megamp capacitor discharge with ∼ 20 nanohenry initial total discharge inductance. The hardware includes transmission line connections for a Shiva Star (1300 microfarad, up to 120 KV, 0.4 megajoule) capacitor bank driven acceleration discharge. Experimental measurements include current, voltage; azimuthal, radial and axial magnetic field at numerous location; fast photography, optical spectroscopy; microwave, CO2 laser, and He-Ne laser interferometry. Auxiliary experiments include Penning ionization gauge, pressure probe, and breakdown gas trigger diagnostics of gas injection, and Hall probe measurements of magnetic field injection

  19. Electron cyclotron ray tracing and absorption predictions for Compact Toroidal Hybrid plasmas using TRAVIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, S. F.; Hartwell, G. J.; Maurer, D. A.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Turkin, Y.; Bigelow, T.

    2015-11-01

    Plasmas in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a five field period, l = 2 torsatron (B0 = 0 . 5 T R0 = 0 . 75 m, ap ~ 0 . 2 m) will be heated by second harmonic X-mode electron cyclotron heating with power provided by a 28 GHz gyrotron capable of producing up to 200 kW. Ray-tracing calculations that will guide the selection of the launching position, antenna focal length, and beam-steering characteristics are performed with the TRAVIS code. Non-axisymmetric vacuum and current-carrying CTH equilibria for the ray tracing are modeled with the V3FIT code. The calculated absorption is highest for vertically propagating rays that traverse the region where a saddle of resonant field strength exists. However, the absorption for top-launched waves is more sensitive to variations in the magnetic equilibria than for a radial side launch where the magnetic field profile is tokamak-like. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  20. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  1. Efficiency and cost advantages of an advanced-technology nuclear electrolytic hydrogen-energy production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donakowski, T. D.; Escher, W. J. D.; Gregory, D. P.

    1977-01-01

    The concept of an advanced-technology (viz., 1985 technology) nuclear-electrolytic water electrolysis facility was assessed for hydrogen production cost and efficiency expectations. The facility integrates (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) operating a binary work cycle, (2) direct-current (d-c) electricity generation via acyclic generators, and (3) high-current-density, high-pressure electrolyzers using a solid polymer electrolyte (SPE). All subsystems are close-coupled and optimally interfaced for hydrogen production alone (i.e., without separate production of electrical power). Pipeline-pressure hydrogen and oxygen are produced at 6900 kPa (1000 psi). We found that this advanced facility would produce hydrogen at costs that were approximately half those associated with contemporary-technology nuclear electrolysis: $5.36 versus $10.86/million Btu, respectively. The nuclear-heat-to-hydrogen-energy conversion efficiency for the advanced system was estimated as 43%, versus 25% for the contemporary system.

  2. Influence of plasma biasing on turbulence in the torsatron TJ-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma confinement can be strongly improved by transport barriers. First in the ASDEX tokamak, spontaneous transitions from a low-confinement (L-mode) into a high-confinement regime (H-mode) have been observed. L-H transitions are accompanied by the formation of a transport barrier at the plasma edge. E x B shear flows have been considered as a candidate for trigger- ing the transport barrier. They are assumed to limit the radial correlation length of turbulent structures and, thus, reduce radial turbulent transport. Besides spontaneous L-H transitions, improved confinement regimes can also be achieved by externally induced electric fields. In the concept of plasma biasing, the plasma potential is locally modified by an inserted electrode. In this contribution, biasing is applied to the low-temperature plasma in the torsatron TJ-K in order to investigate the mechanism of transport reduction due to shear flows. The plasma is throughout accessible for probe diagnostics and the dimensionless parameters are similar to those at the edge of fusion plasmas. Turbulent structures are detected by means of an 8 x 8 Langmuir probe array in order to study the shear decorrelation mechanism. Different biasing schemes were tested to create sufficiently strong shear flows to have an impact on turbulent structures and radial transport. A clear effect was achieved with ring-like electrodes aligned on a flux surface. The plasma conditions and the fluctuations could strongly be influenced. Steepened density gradients and reduced fluctuation and transport levels were obtained when the shear was increased inside the confinement region. The direction of the poloidal propagation of turbulent structures changed from the electron-diamagnetic to the E x B-drift direction when strong radial electric fields were induced. The structures were found to be distorted, but a decrease of the radial correlation length was not observed. Transport reduction can be traced to enhanced stability reflected

  3. Determination of 2-dimensional temperature and density profiles of a plasma in the Auburn torsatron via computer control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Early studies of the magnetic surfaces of the Auburn Torsatron indicated the presence of an X-point in the magnetic surfaces. Both theoretical calculations and experimental verification were performed in these studies. The plasma density distribution is believed to be determined by these magnetic surfaces. The 2-dimensional relative plasma density and electron temperature profiles over a cross-section of the plasma will verify that the X-point does have an influence on the distribution of the plasma. An electric double probe is used to measure the electron temperature and relative density at pre-defined points inside the plasma. The probe is on a moveable platform which is motor driven and positioned by a computer

  4. Characteristics of the three-half-turn-antenna-driven RF discharge in the Uragan-3M torsatron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigor’eva, L. I.; Chechkin, V. V., E-mail: chechkin@ipp.kharkov.ua; Moiseenko, V. E.; Grekov, D. L.; Pavlichenko, R. O.; Lozin, A. V.; Tarasov, I. K.; Kulaga, A. Ye.; Zamanov, N. V.; Tretiak, K. K.; Kozulya, M. M.; Beletskii, A. A.; Kasilov, A. A.; Mironov, Yu. K.; Romanov, V. S.; Voitsenya, V. S. [National Science Center Kharkiv Institute of Physics and Technology, Institute of Plasma Physics (Ukraine)

    2015-12-15

    In the ℓ = 3 Uragan-3M torsatron hydrogen plasma is produced by RF fields in the Alfvén range of frequencies (ω ≤ ω{sub ci}). The initial (target) plasma with the line-averaged density of units 10{sup 12} cm{sup −3} is produced by a frame antenna with a broad spectrum of generated parallel wavenumbers. After this, to heat the plasma and bring its density to ∼10{sup 13} cm{sup –3}, another, shorter wavelength three-half-turn antenna with large transverse currents is used. The behavior of the density, electron temperature, and loss of the plasma supported by the three-half-turn antenna is studied depending on the RF power fed to the antenna and initial values of the density and electron temperature supplied by the frame antenna.

  5. A blueprint for GNEP advanced burner reactor startup fuel fabrication facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → This article discusses use of WG-plutonium as the startup fuel for Advanced Burner Reactor. → The presence of gallium in WG fuel may compromise the fuel integrity. → There is no facility exists to remove gallium from plutonium except at laboratory scale. → This article discusses the processes and issues associated with the gallium removal. → The article provides realistic scenario to all stack-holders involved in designing and operating ABR. - Abstract: The purpose of this article is to identify the requirements and issues associated with design of GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor Fuel Facility. The report was prepared in support of providing data for preparation of a NEPA Environmental Impact Statement in support the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). One of the GNEP objectives was to reduce the inventory of long lived actinide from the light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel. The LWR spent fuel contains Plutonium (Pu)-239 and other transuranics (TRU) such as Americium-241. One of the options is to transmute or burn these actinides in fast neutron spectra as well as generate the electricity. A sodium-cooled Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) concept was proposed to achieve this goal. However, fuel with relatively high TRU content has not been used in the fast reactor. To demonstrate the utilization of TRU fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype of ARR was proposed, which would necessarily be started up using weapons grade (WG) Pu fuel. The WG Pu is distinguished by relatively highest proportions of Pu-239 and lesser amount of other actinides. The WG Pu was assumed to be used as the startup fuel along with TRU fuel in lead test assemblies. Because such fuel is not currently being produced in the US, a new facility (or new capability in an existing facility) was being considered for fabrication of WG Pu fuel for the ABR. It was estimated that the facility will provide the

  6. The Short-Pulse X-ray Facility at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Linda; Evans, Paul

    2013-05-01

    The Short-Pulse X-ray (SPX) Facility will extend time-resolved x-ray scattering and spectroscopy to the picosecond time scale while retaining the powerful characteristics of synchrotron radiation, i.e., user-controlled continuous tunability of energy, polarization, and bandwidth combined with exquisite x-ray energy and pulse-length stability over a wide energy range. Experiments at the SPX facility will produce 1-ps stroboscopic snapshots of molecular rotations, molecular excited-state transient structures, stress/strain wave propagation, magnetic domain wall dynamics, phase transitions, and the coupling between electronic, vibrational, and magnetic degrees of freedom in condensed matter systems. Time-resolved studies of transient dynamics will be possible with simultaneous picosecond time resolution and picometer structural precision for a variety of atomic, molecular, supramolecular, nanoscale, and bulk material systems. Pump-probe experiments using high-average-power, sub-picosecond, high-repetition-rate laser systems will make efficient use of the MHz x-ray rates of the SPX. Five end stations for x-ray scattering, diffraction, spectroscopy, imaging, and microscopy can be developed as part of the Advanced Photon Source Upgrade project. The Advanced Photon Source is an Office of Science User Facility operated for the U.S. Dept of Energy Office of Science by Argonne National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  7. Critical need for MFE: the Alcator DX advanced divertor test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, R.; Labombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Wolf, S.; Bonoli, P.; Fiore, C.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hutchinson, I.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Parker, R.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M.; Rice, J.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, J.; Theiler, C.; Wallace, G.; White, A.; Whyte, D.; Wukitch, S.

    2013-10-01

    Three critical challenges must be met before a steady-state, power-producing fusion reactor can be realized: how to (1) safely handle extreme plasma exhaust power, (2) completely suppress material erosion at divertor targets and (3) do this while maintaining a burning plasma core. Advanced divertors such as ``Super X'' and ``X-point target'' may allow a fully detached, low temperature plasma to be produced in the divertor while maintaining a hot boundary layer around a clean plasma core - a potential game-changer for magnetic fusion. No facility currently exists to test these ideas at the required parallel heat flux densities. Alcator DX will be a national facility, employing the high magnetic field technology of Alcator combined with high-power ICRH and LHCD to test advanced divertor concepts at FNSF/DEMO power exhaust densities and plasma pressures. Its extended vacuum vessel contains divertor cassettes with poloidal field coils for conventional, snowflake, super-X and X-point target geometries. Divertor and core plasma performance will be explored in regimes inaccessible in conventional devices. Reactor relevant ICRF and LH drivers will be developed, utilizing high-field side launch platforms for low PMI. Alcator DX will inform the conceptual development and accelerate the readiness-for-deployment of next-step fusion facilities.

  8. Active toroidal field ripple reduction system in FAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fusion advanced studies torus (FAST) has been proposed as a flexible and cost effective machine that is able to support the development of ITER and DEMO operating scenarios exploiting some innovative technology solutions and to investigate the physics of high-performance plasmas in a dimensionless parameter range close to ITER. The FAST magnet consists of 18 coils, spaced by 20o in the toroidal angle, each made up of 14 copper plates, suitably arranged in order to realise 3 turns in the radial direction, with 89.2 kA per coil (in the H-mode plasma scenario 6.5 MA at 7.5 T). The finite number and toroidal extension of the toroidal field coils (TFCs) cause a periodic variation of the toroidal field from its nominal value called toroidal field ripple (TFR). An active ripple reduction system has been comprehensively investigated, by using proper 3D finite elements models, to provide an efficient and flexible system able to minimize the TFR in the region of interest. An optimization study of position and size of the coils required to reduce to an acceptable level for the operations the maximum ripple on the plasma (well below 0.3%), feeding them with currents sustainable during the whole scenario (∼1/10 of the current flowing in TFCs), is presented in this paper.

  9. The advanced fuel cycle facility (AFCF) role in the global nuclear energy partnership

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP), launched in February, 2006, proposes to introduce used nuclear fuel recycling in the United States with improved proliferation-resistance and a more effective waste management approach. This program is evaluating ways to close the fuel cycle in a manner that builds on recent laboratory breakthroughs in U.S. national laboratories and draws on international and industry partnerships. Central to moving this advanced fuel recycling technology from the laboratory to commercial implementation is a flexible research, development and demonstration facility, called the Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility (AFCF). The AFCF was introduced as one of three projects under GNEP and will provide the U.S. with the capabilities to evaluate technologies that separate used fuel into reusable material and waste in a proliferation-resistant manner. The separations technology demonstration capability is coupled with a remote transmutation fuel fabrication demonstration capability in an integrated manner that demonstrates advanced safeguard technologies. This presentation will discuss the key technical and programmatic features of AFCF and their support of the GNEP objectives. (authors)

  10. Heavy ion toroidal collective accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on HIPAC at Maxwell Laboratories have shown that almost all of the confined electrons are trapped and do not go around the torus. A toroidal electric field produces a negligible toroidal electron current. An ion accelerator where electrons are magnetically contained and their space charge contains ions is considered. A toroidal electric field of suitable magnitude can be applied so that it accelerates all of the ions but does not accelerate most of the electrons. This is possible if the magnetic moment of electrons μsub(e) > μsub(i)/Z, where μsub(i) is the ion magnetic moment and Z is the charge of the ion. Ions would be contained by the electron space-charge electric field E, for energies up to ZeER/2 approximately 100 GeV where Z = 60, E = 107 V/cm and the major radius of the torus is R = 3.3 metres. (author)

  11. RF breakdown by toroidal helicons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S K P Tripathi; D Bora; M Mishra

    2001-04-01

    Bounded whistlers are well-known for their efficient plasma production capabilities in thin cylindrical tubes. In this paper we shall present their radio frequency (RF) breakdown and discharge sustaining capabilities in toroidal systems. Pulsed RF power in the electronmagnetohydrodynamic (EMHD) frequency regime is fed to the neutral background medium. After the breakdown stage, discharge is sustained by toroidal bounded whistlers. In these pulsed experiments the behaviour of the time evolution of the discharge could be studied in four distinct phases of RF breakdown, steady state attainment, decay and afterglow. In the steady state average electron density of ≈ 1012 per cc and average electron temperature of ≈ 20 eV are obtained at 10-3 mbar of argon filling pressure. Experimental results on toroidal mode structure, background effects and time evolution of the electron distribution function will be presented and their implications in understanding the breakdown mechanism are discussed.

  12. DOE ARM Climate Research Facility - Providing Research Quality Data Products for Climate Model Evaluation and Advancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voyles, J.; Mather, J. H.

    2012-12-01

    a third Mobile Facility will be deployed at Oliktok Point, Alaska. The new array of ARM instruments and sites are intended to build upon the existing ARM capabilities to better study the interactions among aerosol, clouds, and precipitation. Data from these instruments are now available and the development of advanced data products is underway.

  13. Advanced Non-Destructive Assay Systems and Special Instrumentation Requirements for Spent Nuclear Fuel Recycling Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    drawings and documentation (iii) Lack of compatibility with modern computers, software, data transfer networks, digital protocols and electrical code standards, (iv) Non-compliance with current and future mandatory standards and regulations for nuclear facilities (v) Design focused on measurement and control points that may be specific to the facility process (vi) Lack of utilization of recent technological advances where better performing, less complex and more cost-effective options are now available. Key radiometric measurement drivers and control points for future recycling facilities have been determined and a review of the adequacy of existing instrumentation has been performed. Areas where recent technology improvements may be more effectively deployed and future technology development may be appropriate are identified. (author)

  14. Progress on Thomson scattering in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel Thomson scattering system has been implemented on the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment where typical densities of 1019 m−3 and electron temperatures of 10 to 500 eV are expected. The system leverages technological advances in high-energy pulsed lasers, volume phase holographic (VPH) diffraction gratings, and gated image intensified (ICCD) cameras to provide a relatively low-maintenance, economical, robust diagnostic system. Scattering is induced by a frequency-doubled, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (2 J at 532 nm, 7 ns FWHM pulse) directed to the plasma over a 7.7 m long beam path, and focused to 80%) and fast-gated ICCDs (gate > 2 ns, Gen III intensifier) with high-throughput (F/1.8), achromatic lensing. A stray light mitigation facility has been implemented, consisting of a multi-aperture optical baffle system and a simple beam dump. Successful stray light reduction has enabled detection of scattered signal, and Rayleigh scattering has been used to provide a relative calibration. Initial temperature measurements have been made and data analysis algorithms are under development

  15. Project of an advanced ISOL facility for exotic beams at LNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tecchio, L.B. E-mail: tecchio@lnl.infn.it; Andrighetto, A.; Cherubini, R.; Colautti, P.; Comunian, M.; Corradi, L.; Dainelli, A.; De Angelis, G.; De Poli, M.; Facco, A.; Fioretto, E.; Fortuna, G.; Jiyu, G.; Ming, R.; Montagnoli, G.; Moschini, G.; Pisent, A.; Poggi, M.; Porcellato, A.M.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Bak, P.; Kot, N.; Logatchev, P.; Shyankov, S.; Brandolini, F.; Signorini, C.; Clauser, T.; Lamanna, G.; Stagno, V.; Variale, V

    2002-04-22

    In the framework of the European program to define a second generation Radioactive Ion Beam facility, LNL are proposing the construction in the next five-seven years of a specialized national facility for RIB originated by fission fragments produced by secondary neutrons. It consists on a two-accelerator ISOL-type facility to provide intense neutron-rich radioactive ion beams of highest quality, in the range of masses between 80 and 160. The conceptual design is based on a high intensity 50 MeV (100 kW) proton linac as driver and on the availability of the heavy-ion accelerator ALPI as post accelerator. The estimated neutron yield is 2x10{sup 14} n/s at 0 deg., high enough to satisfy the demand for an advanced RIB facility. An intense R and D program on different items is actually in progress in collaboration with other Laboratories and University groups and is moving in a European context.

  16. Hydrogeologic investigation of the Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development Facility, Wilsonville, Alabama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, F.G.; Kearl, P.M.; Mumby, M.E.; Rogers, S.

    1996-09-01

    This document describes the geology and hydrogeology at the former Advanced Coal Liquefaction Research and Development (ACLR&D) facility in Wilsonville, Alabama. The work was conducted by personnel from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Grand Junction office (ORNL/GJ) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (PETC). Characterization information was requested by PETC to provide baseline environmental information for use in evaluating needs and in subsequent decision-making for further actions associated with the closeout of facility operations. The hydrogeologic conceptual model presented in this report provides significant insight regarding the potential for contaminant migration from the ACLR&D facility and may be useful during other characterization work in the region. The ACLR&D facility is no longer operational and has been dismantled. The site was characterized in three phases: the first two phases were an environmental assessment study and a sod sampling study (APCO 1991) and the third phase the hydraulic assessment. Currently, a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) remedial investigation (RI) to address the presence of contaminants on the site is underway and will be documented in an RI report. This technical memorandum addresses the hydrogeologic model only.

  17. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830

  18. Materials selection of surface coatings in an advanced size reduction facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A materials selection test program was conducted to characterize optimum interior surface coatings for an advanced size reduction facility. The equipment to be processed by this facility consists of stainless steel apparatus (e.g., glove boxes, piping, and tanks) used for the chemical recovery of plutonium. Test results showed that a primary requirement for a satisfactory coating is ease of decontamination. A closely related concern is the resistance of paint films to nitric acid - plutonium environments. A vinyl copolymer base paint was the only coating, of eight paints tested, with properties that permitted satisfactory decontamination of plutonium and also performed equal to or better than the other paints in the chemical resistance, radiation stability, and impact tests

  19. Hybrid winding concept for toroids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, Henrik; Andersen, Thomas; Knott, Arnold;

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid winding concept for toroids using the traces in a printed circuit board to make connection to bended copper foil cutouts. In a final product a number of strips with a certain thickness would be held by a former and the whole assembly could be placed by pick and...... placement machinery. This opens up the possibility for both an automated manufacturing process and an automated production process of toroidal magnetics such as power inductors, filtering inductors, air core inductors, transformers etc. Both the proposed hybrid and the common wire wound winding...

  20. Advanced exergoenvironmental assessment of a natural gas-fired electricity generating facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Advanced exergoenvironmental analysis was conducted for an electricity generating facility. • Exergy destructions and environmental effects were divided into parts. • Environmental relations between the components were determined. • Environmental improvement strategies of the system were determined. - Abstract: This paper presents conventional and advanced exergoenvironmental analyses of an electricity generation facility located in the Eskisehir Industry Estate Zone, Turkey. This facility consists of gas turbine and steam cycles, which generate electrical power of approximately 37 MW and 18 MW, respectively. Exergy efficiency of the system is 0.402 and exergy destruction rate of the system is 78.242 MW. Unit exergy cost of electrical power generated by the system is 25.66 $/GJ and total exergoeconomic factor of the system is 0.279. Conventional exergy analysis method was applied to the system first. Next, exergy environmental impacts of exergy destruction rate within the facility’s components were divided into four parts generally, as endogenous, exogenous, avoidable and unavoidable environmental impact of exergy destruction rate. Through this analysis, improvement potential of the environmental impacts of the components and the overall system and the environmental relations between the components were then determined. Finally, exergoenvironmental factor was determined as 0.277 and environmental impact of the electricity was 8.472 (Pts/h). The system has 33% development potential for environmental impacts while its components have weak relations because of big endogenous parts of environmental impacts (80%). It may be concluded that advanced exergoenvironmental analysis indicated that priority should be given to the GT and CC, while defining the improvement strategies

  1. ATF neutral beam injection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility is a stellarator torsatron being built at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to investigate improved plasma confinement schemes. Plasmas heating will be carried out predominantly by means of neutral beam injection. This paper describes the basic parameters of the injection system. Numerical calculations were done to optimize the aiming of the injectors. The results of these calculations and their implications on the neutral power to the machine are elaborated. The effects of improving the beam optics and altering the focal length on the power transmitted to the plasma are discussed

  2. First Results of an Experiment on Advanced Collimator Materials at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Assmann, R; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Donze, M; Francon, P; Garlasche, M; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaelli, S; Rossi, A; Calderon Cueva, M; Charitonidis, N; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment (HRMT-14) has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility on six different materials of interest for Beam Intercepting Devices (collimators, targets, dumps). Both traditional materials (Mo, W and Cu alloys) as well as advanced metal/diamond and metal/graphite composites were tested under extreme conditions as to pressure, density and temperature, leading to the development of highly dynamic phenomena as shock-waves, spallation, explosions. Experimental data were acquired, mostly in real time, relying on extensive integrated instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature and vacuum sensors) and on remote acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The experiment was a success under all points of view in spite of the technological challenges and harsh environment. First measurements are in good agreement with results of complex simulations, confirming the effectiveness of the acquisition system and the reliability of advanced numerical...

  3. The complex and unique ATLAS Toroid family

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Big parts for the toroid magnets that will be used in the ATLAS experiment have been continuously arriving at CERN since March. These structures will create the largest superconducting toroid magnet ever.

  4. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Morales, Jorge; Bos, Wouter; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David

    2012-01-01

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of t...

  5. Technology of toroidal plasma devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After research into many different magnetic confinement systems, there is now general agreement that the most favorable ones for future fusion reactors are all based on toroidal geometry, as distinct from having open ends like mirror machines. For this reason plasma physics research, even when not aimed directly at the fusion problems, has in recent years increasingly concentrated on toroidal systems. One reason is that by using their good confinement properties the experimenter has available a range of high temperature plasma parameters in quasisteady (or even steady) state conditions not otherwise available on Earth. Despite the wide variety of both geometrical possibilities and sizes, ranging from table-top experiments with plasmas a few centimetres across to near reactor scale ones like JET with plasmas several metres across, toroidal systems have many common features, both in their physical principles and of experimental design: the purpose of this paper is to highlight those common features, using some specific examples for illustration, and emphasizing some of the more practical aspects. It will also try to point out important differences between two of the main classes of toroidal systems

  6. ATLAS superconducting toroids and solenoid

    CERN Document Server

    ten Kate, H H J

    2005-01-01

    The ATLAS particle detector in the Large Hadron Collider at CERN features a hybrid system of four superconducting magnets: a Central Solenoid surrounded by 2 End-cap Toroids and a Barrel Toroid. The magnet system dimensions are 20 m in diameter and 26 m in length. With its 1.55 GJ stored energy in air, it actually is the largest superconducting magnet in the world. The construction of the magnets has started in 1998 and will end in 2006 with the completion of the installation underground. Currently, in October 2004, practically all magnet parts are manufactured and delivered to CERN for final integration. The first two out of 8 full size 25*5 m/sup 2/ size coils for the Barrel Toroid have been completed and tested while the other 6 are near to completion as well. The production of the so- called End-Cap Toroids is progressing well. The Central Solenoid is complete and ready for installation. The installation underground of the entire system including its services has commenced. In the paper the main features ...

  7. Lowering the first ATLAS toroid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    The ATLAS detector on the LHC at CERN will consist of eight toroid magnets, the first of which was lowered into the cavern in these images on 26 October 2004. The coils are supported on platforms where they will be attached to form a giant torus. The platforms will hold about 300 tonnes of ATLAS' muon chambers and will envelop the inner detectors.

  8. Toroidal solutions in Horava Gravity

    OpenAIRE

    Ghodsi, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Recently a new four-dimensional non relativistic renormalizable theory of gravity was proposed by Horava. This gravity reduces to Einstein gravity at large distances. In this paper by using the new action for gravity we present different toroidal solutions to the equations of motion. Our solutions describe the near horizon geometry with slow rotating parameter.

  9. Onsager relaxation of toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The slow relaxation of isolated toroidal plasmas towards their thermodynamical equilibrium is studied in an Onsager framework based on the entropy metric. The basic tool is a variational principle, equivalent to the kinetic equation, involving the profiles of density, temperature, electric potential, electric current. New minimization procedures are proposed to obtain entropy and entropy production rate functionals. (author)

  10. Extremely high Q-factor toroidal metamaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Basharin, Alexey A; Volsky, Nikita; Kafesaki, Maria; Economou, Eleftherios N; Ustinov, Alexey V

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate that, owing to the unique topology of the toroidal dipolar mode, its electric/magnetic field can be spatially confined within subwavelength, externally accessible regions of the metamolecules, which makes the toroidal planar metamaterials a viable platform for high Q-factor resonators due to interfering toroidal and other dipolar modes in metamolecules.

  11. ATLAS End Cap toroid in upstanding position

    CERN Multimedia

    2005-01-01

    End Cap toroid The ATLAS End Cap toroid weights 240-ton and is 12-m diameter high. The parts of this vacuum vessel had to be integrated and tested so that End Cap Toroid has no leaks. After that it could be cooled down to 80 K.

  12. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide (AERG): Practical Ways to Improve Energy Performance; Healthcare Facilities (Book)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendron, R.; Leach, M.; Bonnema, E.; Shekhar, D.; Pless, S.

    2013-09-01

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Healthcare Facilities is part of a series of retrofit guides commissioned by the U.S. Department of Energy. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as detailed descriptions and financial payback metrics for the most important and relevant energy efficiency measures (EEMs), the guides provide a practical roadmap for effectively planning and implementing performance improvements in existing buildings. The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides (AERGs) are intended to address key segments of the U.S. commercial building stock: retail stores, office buildings, K-12 schools, grocery stores, and healthcare facilities. The guides' general project planning considerations are applicable nationwide; the energy and cost savings estimates for recommended EEMs were developed based on energy simulations and cost estimates for an example hospital tailored to five distinct climate regions. These results can be extrapolated to other U.S. climate zones. Analysis is presented for individual EEMs, and for packages of recommended EEMs for two project types: existing building commissioning projects that apply low-cost and no-cost measures, and whole-building retrofits involving more capital-intensive measures.

  13. Potential applications of advanced remote handling and maintenance technology to future waste handling facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two Federal Waste Management System major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment

  14. A preliminary systems-engineering study of an advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, W. J. D.; Donakowski, T. D.; Tison, R. R.

    1975-01-01

    An advanced nuclear-electrolytic hydrogen-production facility concept was synthesized at a conceptual level with the objective of minimizing estimated hydrogen-production costs. The concept is a closely-integrated, fully-dedicated (only hydrogen energy is produced) system whose components and subsystems are predicted on ''1985 technology.'' The principal components are: (1) a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) operating a helium-Brayton/ammonia-Rankine binary cycle with a helium reactor-core exit temperature of 980 C, (2) acyclic d-c generators, (3) high-pressure, high-current-density electrolyzers based on solid-polymer electrolyte technology. Based on an assumed 3,000 MWt HTGR the facility is capable of producing 8.7 million std cu m/day of hydrogen at pipeline conditions, 6,900 kPa. Coproduct oxygen is also available at pipeline conditions at one-half this volume. It has further been shown that the incorporation of advanced technology provides an overall efficiency of about 43 percent, as compared with 25 percent for a contemporary nuclear-electric plant powering close-coupled contemporary industrial electrolyzers.

  15. Investigation of three-dimensional turbulent structures in the torsatron TJ-K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, for the first time, the three-dimensional nature of drift waves has been verified experimentally inside the confinement region of the toroidal plasma in TJ-K. The perpendicular dynamics of turbulence has been studied with the focus on the poloidal wavenumber spectra and the scaling of the turbulent structure with the drift scale. To this end, a 64 tip Langmuir probe array has been used, which is poloidally positioned on a flux surface. For the first time, the parallel dynamics of turbulence has been investigated in the core of a toroidally confined plasma. In contrast to previous experiments, multi-probe measurements were carried out to get simultaneous information on the shape and the propagation direction of the turbulent structures. The results for the parallel wave number and the parallel propagation velocity have been compared with results from the simulation code GEM3. It is demonstrated that the propagation in the direction parallel to the magnetic field is affected by Alfven dynamics. Together, these results strongly confirm previous investigations, which have demonstrated the importance of drift-wave turbulence in TJ-K and therefore also in fusion edge plasma. (orig.)

  16. Poloidal rotation velocity measurement in toroidal plasmas via microwave reflectometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of experiment modeling backscattering of microwaves from rotating plasma layer perturbed by fluctuations are presented. It was shown that auto- and crosscorrelation of reflected power have a periodicity equal to rotation period. Such periodicity was observed by microwave reflectometry in experiments on RF plasma production on U-3M torsatron and was used for measurement of plasma poloidal rotation velocity. (author)

  17. Intrinsic rotation of toroidally confined magnetohydrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Jorge A; Bos, Wouter J T; Schneider, Kai; Montgomery, David C

    2012-10-26

    The spatiotemporal self-organization of viscoresistive magnetohydrodynamics in a toroidal geometry is studied. Curl-free toroidal magnetic and electric fields are imposed. It is observed in our simulations that a flow is generated, which evolves from dominantly poloidal to toroidal when the Lundquist numbers are increased. It is shown that this toroidal organization of the flow is consistent with the tendency of the velocity field to align with the magnetic field. Up-down asymmetry of the geometry causes the generation of a nonzero toroidal angular momentum. PMID:23215195

  18. Evaluation of the advanced mixed oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced mixed-oxide (UO2-PuO2) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), is undergoing postirradiation examination (PIE). This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) (Leggett and Omberg 1987) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of twelve different types. The test was irradiated for 312 equivalent full power days (EFPD) in FFTF. It had a peak pin power of 13.7 kW/ft and reached a peak burnup of 65.2 MWd/kgM with a peak fast fluence of 9.9 /times/ 1022 n/cm2 (E > 0.1 MeV). This document discusses the test and its results. 6 refs., 19 figs., 4 tabs

  19. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved

  20. Nonideal magnetohydrodynamic instabilities and toroidal magnetic confinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-05-01

    The marked divergence of experimentally observed plasma instability phenomena from the predictions of ideal magnetohydrodynamics led in the early 1960s to the formulations of finite-resistivity stability theory. Beginning in the 1970s, advanced plasma diagnostics have served to establish a detailed correspondence between the predictions of the finite-resistivity theory and experimental plasma behavior - particularly in the case of the resistive kink mode and the tokamak plasma. Nonlinear resistive-kink phenomena have been found to govern the transport of magnetic flux and plasma energy in the reversed-field pinch. The other predicted finite-resistivity instability modes have been more difficult to identify directly and their implications for toroidal magnetic confinement are still unresolved.

  1. Fluid interaction with spinning toroidal tanks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fester, D. A.; Anderson, J. E.

    1977-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate propellant behavior in spinning torroidal tanks that could be used in a retropropulsion system of an advanced outer-planet Pioneer orbiter. Information on propellant slosh and settling and on ullage orientation and stability was obtained. The effects of axial acceleration, spin rate, spin-rate change, and spacecraft wobble, both singly and in combination, were evaluated using a one-eighth scale transparent tank in one-g and low-g environments. Liquid loadings ranged from 5% to 96% full. The impact of a surface tension acquisition device was assessed by comparison with bare-tank results. The testing simulated the behavior of the fluorine/hydrazine and nitrogen textroxide/monomethylhydrazine propellants. Results are presented that indicate that no major fluid behavior problems would be encountered with any of the four propellants in the toroidal tanks of a spin-stabilized orbiter spacecraft.

  2. Design and Simulation of Toroidal Twister Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TIAN Huifang; LIN Xizhen; ZENG Qinqin

    2006-01-01

    Toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is a new kind of structural pressure vessels, which not only has high structure efficiency of compound materials pressure vessel, good security and so on, but also has special shape and the property of utilizing toroidal space, and the prospect of the application of toroidal composite vessel winded with fiber is extremely broad. By introducing parameters establishment of toroidal vessel and elaborating the principle of filament winding for toroidal vessel, the design model of filament winding machine for toroidal vessel has been introduced, and the design model has been dynamically simulated by the software of ADAMS, which will give more referrence for the design of real toroidal vessel twister.

  3. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  4. TFTR toroidal field coil design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) Toroidal Field (TF) magnetic coils is described. The TF coil is a 44-turn, spiral-wound, two-pancake, water-cooled configuration which, at a coil current of 73.3 kiloamperes, produces a 5.2-Tesla field at a major radius of 2.48 meters. The magnetic coils are installed in titanium cases, which transmit the loads generated in the coils to the adjacent supporting structure. The TFTR utilizes 20 of these coils, positioned radially at 180 intervals, to provide the required toroidal field. Because it is very highly loaded and subject to tight volume constraints within the machine, the coil presents unique design problems. The TF coil requirements are summarized, the coil configuration is described, and the problems highlighted which have been encountered thus far in the coil design effort, together with the development tests which have been undertaken to verify the design

  5. Classification of symmetric toroidal orbifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, Maximilian; Ratz, Michael; Torrado, Jesus [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Physik-Department; Vaudrevange, Patrick K.S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-09-15

    We provide a complete classification of six-dimensional symmetric toroidal orbifolds which yield N{>=}1 supersymmetry in 4D for the heterotic string. Our strategy is based on a classification of crystallographic space groups in six dimensions. We find in total 520 inequivalent toroidal orbifolds, 162 of them with Abelian point groups such as Z{sub 3}, Z{sub 4}, Z{sub 6}-I etc. and 358 with non-Abelian point groups such as S{sub 3}, D{sub 4}, A{sub 4} etc. We also briefly explore the properties of some orbifolds with Abelian point groups and N=1, i.e. specify the Hodge numbers and comment on the possible mechanisms (local or non-local) of gauge symmetry breaking.

  6. Hollow nanotubular toroidal polymer microrings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jiyeong; Baek, Kangkyun; Kim, Myungjin; Yun, Gyeongwon; Ko, Young Ho; Lee, Nam-Suk; Hwang, Ilha; Kim, Jeehong; Natarajan, Ramalingam; Park, Chan Gyung; Sung, Wokyung; Kim, Kimoon

    2014-02-01

    Despite the remarkable progress made in the self-assembly of nano- and microscale architectures with well-defined sizes and shapes, a self-organization-based synthesis of hollow toroids has, so far, proved to be elusive. Here, we report the synthesis of polymer microrings made from rectangular, flat and rigid-core monomers with anisotropically predisposed alkene groups, which are crosslinked with each other by dithiol linkers using thiol-ene photopolymerization. The resulting hollow toroidal structures are shape-persistent and mechanically robust in solution. In addition, their size can be tuned by controlling the initial monomer concentrations, an observation that is supported by a theoretical analysis. These hollow microrings can encapsulate guest molecules in the intratoroidal nanospace, and their peripheries can act as templates for circular arrays of metal nanoparticles.

  7. Research relative to high resolution camera on the advanced X-ray astrophysics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The HRC (High Resolution Camera) is a photon counting instrument to be flown on the Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). It is a large field of view, high angular resolution, detector for the x-ray telescope. The HRC consists of a CsI coated microchannel plate (MCP) acting as a soft x-ray photocathode, followed by a second MCP for high electronic gain. The MCPs are readout by a crossed grid of resistively coupled wires to provide high spatial resolution along with timing and pulse height data. The instrument will be used in two modes, as a direct imaging detector with a limiting sensitivity of 10 to the -15 ergs sq cm sec in a 10 to the 5th second exposure, and as a readout for an objective transmission grating providing spectral resolution of several hundreds to thousands.

  8. The Scrounge-atron a phased approach to the Advanced Hydrotest Facility utilizing proton radiography

    CERN Document Server

    Alford, O J; Chargin, A K; Dekin, W D; Hartouni, E P; Hockman, J N; Ladran, A S; Libkind, M A; Moore, T L; Pastrnak, J W; Pico, R E; Souza, R J; Stoner, J M; Wilson, J H; Ruggiero, G; Ohnuma, S; Luccio, A U; MacKay, W W

    1999-01-01

    The Department of Energy has initiated its Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program (SSMP) to provide a single, integrated technical program for maintaining the continued safety and reliability of the nation's nuclear weapons stockpile in the absence of nuclear testing. Consistent with the SSMP, the Advanced Hydrotest Facility (AHF) has been conceived to provide improved radiographic imaging with multiple axes and multiple time frames. The AHF would be used to better understand the evolution of nuclear weapon primary implosion shape under normal and accident scenarios. There are three fundamental technologies currently under consideration for use on the AHF. These include linear induction acceleration, inductive-adder pulsed-power technology (both technologies using high current electron beams to produce an intense X-ray beam) and high-energy proton accelerators to produce a proton beam. The Scrounge-atron (a proton synchrotron) was conceived to be a relatively low cost demonstration of the viability of t...

  9. Jitter Suppression Via Reaction Wheel Passive Isolation for the NASA Advanced X-Ray Astrophysics Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendergast, Karl J.; Schauwecker, Chris J.

    1998-01-01

    Text: Third in the series of NASA great observatories, the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF) is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in September 1998. Following in the path of the Hubble Space Telescope and the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory, this telescope will image light at x-ray wavelengths, facilitating the detailed study of such phenomena as supernovae and quasars. The AXAF program is sponsored by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Due to exacting requirements on the performance of the AXAF optical system, it is necessary to reduce the transmission of reaction wheel jitter disturbances to the observatory. This reduction is accomplished via use of a passive mechanical isolation system which acts as an interface between the reaction wheels and the spacecraft central structure.

  10. Transport and Dynamics in Toroidal Fusion Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnack, Dalton D

    2006-05-16

    This document reports the successful completion of the OFES Theory Milestone for FY2005, namely, Perform parametric studies to better understand the edge physics regimes of laboratory experiments. Simulate at increased resolution (up to 20 toroidal modes), with density evolution, late into the nonlinear phase and compare results from different types of edge modes. Simulate a single case including a study of heat deposition on nearby material walls. The linear stability properties and nonlinear evolution of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas are investigated through numerical computation. Data from the DIII-D device at General Atomics (http://fusion.gat.com/diii-d/) is used for the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibria, but edge parameters are varied to reveal important physical effects. The equilibrium with very low magnetic shear produces an unstable spectrum that is somewhat insensitive to dissipation coefficient values. Here, linear growth rates from the non-ideal NIMROD code (http://nimrodteam.org) agree reasonably well with ideal, i.e. non-dissipative, results from the GATO global linear stability code at low toroidal mode number (n) and with ideal results from the ELITE edge linear stability code at moderate to high toroidal mode number. Linear studies with a more realistic sequence of MHD equilibria (based on DIII-D discharge 86166) produce more significant discrepancies between the ideal and non-ideal calculations. The maximum growth rate for the ideal computations occurs at toroidal mode index n=10, whereas growth rates in the non-ideal computations continue to increase with n unless strong anisotropic thermal conduction is included. Recent modeling advances allow drift effects associated with the Hall electric field and gyroviscosity to be considered. A stabilizing effect can be observed in the preliminary results, but while the distortion in mode structure is readily apparent at n=40, the growth rate is only 13% less than the non-ideal MHD

  11. Regulatory Framework for Advanced Fuel Cycle Facility Using Pyroprocess in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plants of 20 units of in Korea are generating about 700 MTU of spent fuels annually. The inventory of spent fuels in Korea were estimated about 10,087.07 MTU at end of 2008, and the storage space of spent fuels won't be available any more at 2016 due to the saturation of the spent fuel pools in the plants. In addition, in order to reduce carbon emission and correspond to the enormous electricity demand in Korea, 8 units of nuclear power plants are under construction and several more plants are under planning. The 100,000 MTU of spent fuel inventory are expected by the year of 2095 in Korea. Therefore, short term and long term of spent fuel management plans are under discussion and implementation in Korea. As a short term of spent fuel management strategy for the target year of 2016, central or local spent fuel dry interim storage options are mostly under discussion. As a long term of management plan, fast reactor and advanced fuel cycle R and D plan were approved by 255th meeting of Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) on Dec. 22, 2008. The approved advanced fuel cycle R and D plan is that the uranium and TRUs(transuranic elements) are recovered from PWR spent fuels using proliferation resistance technology such as pyrochemical processing (pyroprocessing), and formulates metal fuel for utilizing at the next-generation sodium fast reactors (Gen IVSFRs). Heat load elements of spent fuel such as Cs and Sr are removed form the spent fuel. It is known as that it can be reduced the repository burden up to 1/100, compared with the case without removal. The fission products (FP) are also recovered and transferred to a repository. As a result of pyroprocessing, both repository efficiency and U usage are increased. The recycling of recovered resources results in increased uranium usage efficiency and a marked decrease in radiotoxicity and the amount of high-level radioactive waste generated. The spent fuels are classified as a high level radioactive waste in Korea

  12. Modelling activities of experimental facilities related to advanced reactors. Considerations on 1D/3D issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The state of art of modelling activities related to integral experimental facilities of advanced passive reactors show to date important open items. The main advantage of using 1D plant codes is the capability of simulating the full interaction between components traditionally correctly modelled (condensers, heat exchangers, pipes and vessels) and other components for which codes are not 100% suitable (pools and containments). Polytechnical University of Catalonia (UPC) and Polytechnical University of Valencia (UPV) cooperated with other European research organizations in the 'Technology Enhancement for Passive Safety Systems' (TEPSS) project, within the European Fourth Framework Programme. It was a task of both Universities to supply analytical support of PANDA tests. The paper deals with the 1D/3D discussion in the framework of modelling activities related to integral passive facilities like PANDA. It starts choosing reference tests among those corresponding to our participation in TEPSS project. The discrepancies observed in a 1D simulation of the selected tests will be shown and analyzed. An evaluation of how the 3D version can lead to a better agreement with data will be included. Disadvantages of 3D codes will be shown too. Combining the use of different codes, and considering analyst criteria, will make possible to establish suitable recommendations from both engineering and scientific point of view. (author)

  13. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dan Ogden

    2014-10-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report October 2014 Highlights • Rory Kennedy, Dan Ogden and Brenden Heidrich traveled to Germantown October 6-7, for a review of the Infrastructure Management mission with Shane Johnson, Mike Worley, Bradley Williams and Alison Hahn from NE-4 and Mary McCune from NE-3. Heidrich briefed the group on the project progress from July to October 2014 as well as the planned path forward for FY15. • Jim Cole gave two invited university seminars at Ohio State University and University of Florida, providing an overview of NSUF including available capabilities and the process for accessing facilities through the peer reviewed proposal process. • Jim Cole and Rory Kennedy co-chaired the NuMat meeting with Todd Allen. The meeting, sponsored by Elsevier publishing, was held in Clearwater, Florida, and is considered one of the premier nuclear fuels and materials conferences. Over 340 delegates attended with 160 oral and over 200 posters presented over 4 days. • Thirty-one pre-applications were submitted for NSUF access through the NE-4 Combined Innovative Nuclear Research Funding Opportunity Announcement. • Fourteen proposals were received for the NSUF Rapid Turnaround Experiment Summer 2014 call. Proposal evaluations are underway. • John Jackson and Rory Kennedy attended the Nuclear Fuels Industry Research meeting. Jackson presented an overview of ongoing NSUF industry research.

  14. Authentication system for the JAERI Fast Critical Facility Advanced Containment and Surveillance System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a joint effort conducted by Sandia National Laboratories, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), an authentication system has been installed at the Fast Critical Assembly (FCA) facility in Tokai-mura, Japan. The purpose of this authentication system is to provide the IAEA with an independent means of authenticating the operator-provided Advanced Containment and Survellance (AC/S) system already in place at the facility. Authentication Controllers were installed at the AC/S Portal Monkor and Penetration Monitor to collect data and to randomly test sensor functions between IAEA inspections. During each inspection the authentication data is collected with an Inspector's portable computer and printed for comparison to the data recorded by the AC/S system. Installation of the authentication equipment took place in November 1991 and a three-month field test began in December 1991. This paper will describe the authentication system, the operator interface, and the preliminary results of the field tests

  15. Magnetic Properties of 3D Printed Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig, Lindsey; Otto, Austin; Hilpisch, Peter; Mowry, Greg; Nelson-Cheeseman, Brittany; Renewable Energy; Alternatives Lab (REAL) Team

    Transformers are ubiquitous in electronics today. Although toroidal geometries perform most efficiently, transformers are traditionally made with rectangular cross-sections due to the lower manufacturing costs. Additive manufacturing techniques (3D printing) can easily achieve toroidal geometries by building up a part through a series of 2D layers. To get strong magnetic properties in a 3D printed transformer, a composite filament is used containing Fe dispersed in a polymer matrix. How the resulting 3D printed toroid responds to a magnetic field depends on two structural factors of the printed 2D layers: fill factor (planar density) and fill pattern. In this work, we investigate how the fill factor and fill pattern affect the magnetic properties of 3D printed toroids. The magnetic properties of the printed toroids are measured by a custom circuit that produces a hysteresis loop for each toroid. Toroids with various fill factors and fill patterns are compared to determine how these two factors can affect the magnetic field the toroid can produce. These 3D printed toroids can be used for numerous applications in order to increase the efficiency of transformers by making it possible for manufacturers to make a toroidal geometry.

  16. The Design and Construction of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Mixed Treatment Project (AMWTP) privatized contract was awarded to BNFL Inc. in December 1996 and construction of the main facility commenced in August 2000. The purpose of the advanced mixed waste treatment facility is to safely treat plutonium contaminated waste, currently stored in drums and boxes, for final disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The plant is being built at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Construction was completed in 28 months, to satisfy the Settlement Agreement milestone of December 2002. Commissioning of the related retrieval and characterization facilities is currently underway. The first shipment of pre-characterized waste is scheduled for March 2003, with AMWTP characterized and certified waste shipments from June 2003. To accommodate these challenging delivery targets BNFL adopted a systematic and focused construction program that included the use of a temporary structure to allow winter working, proven design and engineering principles and international procurement policies to help achieve quality and schedule. The technology involved in achieving the AMWTP functional requirements is primarily based upon a BNFL established pedigree of plant and equipment; applied in a manner that suits the process and waste. This technology includes the use of remotely controlled floor mounted and overhead power manipulators, a high power shredder and a 2000-ton force supercompactor with the attendant glove box suite, interconnections and automated material handling. The characterization equipment includes real-time radiography (RTR) units, drum and box assay measurement systems, drum head space gas sampling / analysis and drum venting, drum coring and sampling capabilities. The project adopted a particularly stringent and intensive pre-installation testing philosophy to ensure that equipment would work safely and reliably at the required throughput. This testing included the complete off site

  17. The Design and Construction of the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrop, G.

    2003-02-27

    The Advanced Mixed Treatment Project (AMWTP) privatized contract was awarded to BNFL Inc. in December 1996 and construction of the main facility commenced in August 2000. The purpose of the advanced mixed waste treatment facility is to safely treat plutonium contaminated waste, currently stored in drums and boxes, for final disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The plant is being built at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. Construction was completed in 28 months, to satisfy the Settlement Agreement milestone of December 2002. Commissioning of the related retrieval and characterization facilities is currently underway. The first shipment of pre-characterized waste is scheduled for March 2003, with AMWTP characterized and certified waste shipments from June 2003. To accommodate these challenging delivery targets BNFL adopted a systematic and focused construction program that included the use of a temporary structure to allow winter working, proven design and engineering principles and international procurement policies to help achieve quality and schedule. The technology involved in achieving the AMWTP functional requirements is primarily based upon a BNFL established pedigree of plant and equipment; applied in a manner that suits the process and waste. This technology includes the use of remotely controlled floor mounted and overhead power manipulators, a high power shredder and a 2000-ton force supercompactor with the attendant glove box suite, interconnections and automated material handling. The characterization equipment includes real-time radiography (RTR) units, drum and box assay measurement systems, drum head space gas sampling / analysis and drum venting, drum coring and sampling capabilities. The project adopted a particularly stringent and intensive pre-installation testing philosophy to ensure that equipment would work safely and reliably at the required throughput. This testing included the complete off site

  18. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development

  19. Design of multichord Hα detector arrays for the U-3M torsatron and identification of rotating plasma perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreval, M. B.; Shapoval, A. M.; Ozherelyev, F. I.; Makhov, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    An Hα camera has been designed and installed in the U-3M torsatron for spatially and temporally resolved measurements. This device provides fast measurements of the emission brightness profile in the noisy environment of the radio frequency (RF) heated plasma. Unusual topology of diagnostics and the data acquisition system are applied. All the system components, including digitizers, are assembled in a single unit. It allows the suppression of a low-frequency electromagnetic interference by eliminating the ground loops. And the suppression of RF noises is achieved by eliminating the signal interface cables and digital interface cables in the design. The Wi-Fi interface is used to prevent a ground loop in the data transfer stage. The achieved sensitivity of our diagnostics is high enough for measuring the Hα emission from the low-density (ne ≈ (1-2)ṡ1010 cm-3) plasma with a temporal resolution of about 20 μs in the noisy environment. Different types of Hα emission fluctuations within the frequency range of 1-5 kHz and poloidal mode numbers m = 0 and m = 5 have been observed in U-3M. A simple technique of the line-of-sight data analysis, based on the U-3M magnetic surface asymmetry, is proposed and used for the spatial localization of the rotating mode and for the determination of mode numbers and its poloidal rotation direction using a single Hα array.

  20. Beam Transport in Toroidal Magnetic Field

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Meusel, O; Ratzinger, U

    2016-01-01

    The concept of a storage ring with toroidal magnetic field was presented in the two previous EPAC conferences. Here we report the first results of experiments performed with beam transport in toroidal magnetic fields and details of the injection system. The beam transport experiments were carried out with 30 degree toroidal segments with an axial magnetic field of 0.6T. The multi turn injection system relies on a transverse injection coil together with an electric kicker system.

  1. Status of advanced biofuels demonstration facilities in 2012. A report to IEA Bioenergy task 39

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacovsky, Dina; Ludwiczek, Nikolaus; Ognissanto, Monica; Woergetter, Manfred

    2013-03-18

    the previous edition of this report (2010), advanced biofuels technologies have developed significantly. Hydrotreatment as pursued by e.g. Neste Oil has been commercialized and currently accounts for app. 2,4% of biofuels production worldwide. Fermentation of lignocellulosic raw material to ethanol has also seen a strong development and several large scale facilities are just coming online in Europe and North America. As for thermochemical processes, the development is recently focusing on the production of mixed alcohols rather than BtL-Diesel. Economic reasons are driving this development, and concepts like the integration into existing industries and the production of several products instead of biofuel only (biorefinery concept) receive more attention lately. But, as expected, some of the projects for advanced biofuel production have failed. As a result, companies are now more careful in making announcements of advanced biofuels projects, and several large-scale projects have been postponed recently, some even though public funding would have been granted. Nevertheless, the production capacity for biofuels from lignocellulosic feedstock has tripled since 2010 and currently accounts for some 140 000 tons per year. Hydrotreating capacity for biofuels has multiplied and stands at about 2 190 000 tons per year.

  2. An Advanced Reverse Osmosis Technology For Application in Nuclear Desalination Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of adequate supplies of clean, safe water is a growing global problem that has reached crisis proportions in many parts of the world. It is estimated that 1.5 billion people do not have access to adequate supplies of safe water, and that as a result nearly 10,000 people die every day and thousands more suffer from a range of debilitating illnesses due to water related diseases. Included in this total is an estimated 2.2 million child deaths annually. As the world's need for additional sources of fresh water continues to grow, seawater and brackish water desalination are providing an increasingly important contribution to the solution of this problem. Because desalination is an energy intensive process, nuclear desalination provides an economically attractive and environmentally sound alternative to the burning of fossil fuels for desalination. Nevertheless, the enormity of the problem dictates that additional steps must be taken to improve the efficiency of energy utilization and reduce the cost of water production in order to reduce the financial and environmental burden to communities in need. An advanced reverse osmosis (RO) desalination technology has been developed that emphasizes a nontraditional approach to system design and operation, and makes use of a sophisticated design optimization process that can lead to highly optimized design configurations and operating regimes. The technology can be coupled with a nuclear generating station (NGS) to provide an integrated facility for the co-generation of both water and electricity. Waste heat from the NGS allows the use of 'preheated' feedwater into the RO system, improving the efficiency of the RO process and reducing the cost of water production. Because waste heat, rather than process heat, is used the desalination system can be readily coupled to any existing or advanced reactor technology with little or no impact on reactor design and operation and without introducing additional reactor safety

  3. Trapped particle dynamics in toroidally rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed single particle orbit analysis is toroidally rotating plasma yields new analytical formulas for the second adiabatic invariant, the bounce frequency, and the precession frequency up to the first order correction in ρpi(poloidal ion gyroradium)/Lv(scale length of rotation velocity), for toroidal flow values of the order of ion thermal velocity. Toroidal plasma rotation effects on the trapped ion instabilities in tokamaks are investigated in the context of local theory. Toroidal plasma rotation increases both the fraction of trapped particles and their precession drift velocity. Consequently, the growth rate of trapped ion instability increases in both dissipative and collisionless regimes

  4. Computational modelling of compact toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary simulations of the formation of compact toroids are presented. This work is in support of current experiments in which compact toroids - a minimum magnetic energy configuration with linked toroidal and poloidal flux - are being formed, accelerated and compressed. Simulations were performed using MACH2, a 2D magnetohydrodynamic code with a newly implemented Van Lear transport scheme. Simulations also include a detailed modelling of the initial poloidal flux distribution produced by the external solenoidal coils, which is through to significantly effect the toroid's formation

  5. Toroidal AC transformer for beam intensity measurements in CSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intensity of a pulsed beam of charged particles in the Cooling Storage Ring Project of Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL-CSR) will be measured with a toroidal current transformer. By comparing and analyzing the properties of kinds of magnetic cores, a strip wound toroidal core is adopted, which is made of a high-permeability alloy and can measure a pulsed beam with frequency range of 0.2 to 2 MHz. The permeability of Fe-based nanocrystalline alloy varying with frequency is measured and the noises in the circuit are analyzed. By adding a low-noise operational amplifier into the circuit, the current down to 1 μA can be detected

  6. Compact toroid development. Resource needs for field reversed configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains the goals and technical approach for the five years 1985 to 1990 for the investigation of the properties of a magnetic configuration for plasma confinement identified as the field reversed configuration (FRC). The included material represents the third phase of FRC program planning. The first was reported in DOE/ER-0160: Compact Toroid Development, Status and Technical Needs, February 1983. The second was reported in DOE/ER-0197: Compact Toroid Development, Activity Plans for Field Reversed Configurations, June 1984. This planning identifies the facilities and resources needed to achieve the goals set forth in the first two phases. The information in this document is based on technical recommendations provided by the FRC community

  7. Pellet injection and toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings of a technical committee meeting on pellet injection and toroidal confinement, held in Gut Ising, Federal Republic of Germany, 24-26 October, 1988, are given in this report. Most of the major fusion experiments are using pellet injectors; these were reported at this meeting. Studies of confinement, which is favorably affected, impurity transport, radiative energy losses, and affects on the ion temperature gradient instability were given. Studies of pellet ablation and effects on plasma profiles were presented. Finally, several papers described present and proposed injection guns. Refs, figs and tabs

  8. Application of the Ball-Pen Probe in Two Low-Temperature Magnetised Plasma Devices and in Torsatron TJ-K

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Adámek, Jiří; Peterka, M.; Gyergyek, T.; Kudrna, P.; Ramisch, M.; Stroth, U.; Cavalier, Jordan; Tichý, M.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 1 (2013), s. 39-44. ISSN 0863-1042. [International Workshop on Electric Probes in Magnetized Plasmas/9./. Iasi, 21.09.2011-23.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430901; GA ČR GA202/07/0044 Institutional support: RVO:61389021 Keywords : Ball-pen probe * magnetron * torsatron * CASTOR tokamak * coefficient Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2013 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ctpp.201310007/pdf

  9. Toroidal Field Ripple reduction studies for ITER and FAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different approaches to control the Toroidal Field Ripple (TFR) amplitude in ITER and FAST devices are presented in this paper. The approach currently adopted to reduce the TFR in ITER is based on the installation of ferromagnetic inserts between the vacuum vessel shells. The same approach has been analyzed in the design of the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus (FAST) proposal. Details of the system's layout are given. A new approach based on the insertion of active coils between the outer legs of the Toroidal Field Coils (TFCs) and the plasma, has been extensively investigated for these two machines. This active system would allow reducing the TFR to values even smaller than with the ferromagnetic inserts. The case of a localized disturb like that introduced by a Test Blanket Module (TBM) for ITER is presented where only well localized active coils can produce a significant ripple reduction.

  10. The toroidal field coil design for ARIES-ST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An evolutionary process was used to develop the toroidal field (TF) coil design for the ARIES-ST (Spherical Tokamak). Design considerations included fabricability, assembly, maintenance, energy efficiency, and structural robustness. The design addresses a number of the concerns (complexity) and criticisms (high cost, high recirculating power) of fusion. It does this by: (1) Applying advanced, but available laser forming and spray casting techniques for manufacturing the TF coil system; (2) Adopting a simple single toroidal field coil system to make assembly and maintenance much easier, the single turn design avoids the necessity of using the insulation as a structural component of the TF coils, and hence is much more robust than multi-turn designs; and (3) Using a high conductivity copper alloy and modest current densities to keep the recirculating power modest

  11. Toroidal Theory of MHD Instabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We continue with the adventures of the Alfven wave and its two magnetosonic companions as they travel in the curved space of magnetic surfaces and field lines (Sec. 2), find themselves trapped in singularities of an unprecedented richness (Sec. 3), decide to get themselves better maps of the landscape to do the required twisting while some of their youthful energy is leaking away (Sec. 4), cause trouble at the edge of a powerful empire (Sec. 5), and finally see the light in a distant future (Sec. 6). Needed on the trip are the evolution equations of both ideal and resistive MHD 'derived' in reference [1], the solutions to the toroidal equilibrium equations discussed in reference [2], the general background on spectral theory of inhomogeneous plasmas presented in reference [3], which is extended in the two directions of toroidal geometry and resistivity in this lecture [4]. This leads to such intricate dynamics that numerical techniques are virtually the only way to proceed. This aspect is further elaborated in reference [5] on numerical techniques

  12. Advanced methods comparisons of reaction rates in the Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of worldwide results revealed that reaction rates in the blanket region are generally underpredicted with the discrepancy increasing with penetration; however, these results vary widely. Experiments in the large uniform Purdue Fast Breeder Blanket Facility (FBBF) blanket yield an accurate quantification of this discrepancy. Using standard production code methods (diffusion theory with 50 group cross sections), a consistent Calculated/Experimental (C/E) drop-off was observed for various reaction rates. A 50% increase in the calculated results at the outer edge of the blanket is necessary for agreement with experiments. The usefulness of refined group constant generation utilizing specialized weighting spectra and transport theory methods in correcting this discrepancy was analyzed. Refined group constants reduce the discrepancy to half that observed using the standard method. The surprising result was that transport methods had no effect on the blanket deviations; thus, transport theory considerations do not constitute or even contribute to an explanation of the blanket discrepancies. The residual blanket C/E drop-off (about half the standard drop-off) using advanced methods must be caused by some approximations which are applied in all current methods. 27 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  13. The Materials Data Facility: Data Services to Advance Materials Science Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaiszik, B.; Chard, K.; Pruyne, J.; Ananthakrishnan, R.; Tuecke, S.; Foster, I.

    2016-07-01

    With increasingly strict data management requirements from funding agencies and institutions, expanding focus on the challenges of research replicability, and growing data sizes and heterogeneity, new data needs are emerging in the materials community. The materials data facility (MDF) operates two cloud-hosted services, data publication and data discovery, with features to promote open data sharing, self-service data publication and curation, and encourage data reuse, layered with powerful data discovery tools. The data publication service simplifies the process of copying data to a secure storage location, assigning data a citable persistent identifier, and recording custom (e.g., material, technique, or instrument specific) and automatically-extracted metadata in a registry while the data discovery service will provide advanced search capabilities (e.g., faceting, free text range querying, and full text search) against the registered data and metadata. The MDF services empower individual researchers, research projects, and institutions to (I) publish research datasets, regardless of size, from local storage, institutional data stores, or cloud storage, without involvement of third-party publishers; (II) build, share, and enforce extensible domain-specific custom metadata schemas; (III) interact with published data and metadata via representational state transfer (REST) application program interfaces (APIs) to facilitate automation, analysis, and feedback; and (IV) access a data discovery model that allows researchers to search, interrogate, and eventually build on existing published data. We describe MDF's design, current status, and future plans.

  14. Toroidal Alfven wave stability in ignited tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, C.Z.; Fu, G.Y.; Van Dam, J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of fusion-product alpha particles on the stability of global-type shear Alfven waves in an ignited tokamak plasma are investigated in toroidal geometry. Finite toroidicity can lead to stabilization of the global Alfven eigenmodes, but it induces a new global shear Alfven eigenmodes, which is strongly destabilized via transit resonance with alpha particles. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Electrostatics of a Family of Conducting Toroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekner, John

    2009-01-01

    An exact solution is found for the electrostatic potential of a family of conducting charged toroids. The toroids are characterized by two lengths "a" and "b", with "a" greater than or equal to "2b". They are closed, with no hole in the "doughnut". The results are obtained by considering the potential of two equal charges, displaced from the…

  16. Cutoff frequency of toroidal plasma waveguide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cutoff frequencies of E and H-modes of empty and plasma filled toroidal waveguides are evaluated. The effects of space curvature and plasma density on cutoff frequencies for both modes are investigated. Using a suitable variable change, a scalar wave equation in the direction of propagation was obtained. The study indicates that the curvature in the direction of wave propagation in toroidal waveguide has an analogous effect as a straight waveguide filled with anisotropic media. The Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation method was employed to solve for cutoff frequencies in the first order of approximation. In the limit of small space curvature, the toroidal waveguide cutoff frequencies for both E and H-modes approach those of TM and TE modes of empty cylindrical waveguide with a radius equal to toroidal waveguide minor radius. The analysis shows that the curvature in the direction of propagation in toroidal waveguides leads to the removal of the degeneracy between E and H-modes

  17. Asymmetric Magnon Excitation by Spontaneous Toroidal Ordering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-05-01

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky-Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin-orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. The implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  18. Toroidal Vortices in Resistive Magnetohydrodynamic Equilibria

    CERN Document Server

    Montgomery, D C; Li, S; Montgomery, David; Bates, Jason W.; Li, Shuojun

    1996-01-01

    Resistive steady states in toroidal magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), where Ohm's law must be taken into account, differ considerably from ideal ones. Only for special (and probably unphysical) resistivity profiles can the Lorentz force, in the static force-balance equation, be expressed as the gradient of a scalar and thus cancel the gradient of a scalar pressure. In general, the Lorentz force has a curl directed so as to generate toroidal vorticity. Here, we calculate, for a collisional, highly viscous magnetofluid, the flows that are required for an axisymmetric toroidal steady state, assuming uniform scalar resistivity and viscosity. The flows originate from paired toroidal vortices (in what might be called a ``double smoke ring'' configuration), and are thought likely to be ubiquitous in the interior of toroidally driven magnetofluids of this type. The existence of such vortices is conjectured to characterize magnetofluids beyond the high-viscosity limit in which they are readily calculable.

  19. Development of Toroidal Core Transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon, Francisco

    2014-05-31

    The original objective of this project was to design, build and test a few prototypes of singlephase dry-type distribution transformers of 25 kVA, 2.4 kV primary to 120 V transformers using cores made of a continuous steel strip shaped like a doughnut (toroid). At different points during the development of the project, the scope was enhanced to include the more practical case of a 25 kVA transformer for a 13.8 kV primary system voltage. Later, the scope was further expanded to design and build a 50 kVA unit to transformer voltage from 7.62 kV to 2x120 V. This is a common transformer used by Con Edison of New York and they are willing to test it in the field. The project officially started in September 2009 and ended in May 2014. The progress was reported periodically to DOE in eighteen quarterly reports. A Continuation Application was submitted to DOE in June 2010. In May 2011 we have requested a non-cost extension of the project. In December 2011, the Statement of Project Objectives (SOPO) was updated to reflect the real conditions and situation of the project as of 2011. A second Continuation Application was made and funding was approved in 2013 by DOE and the end date was extended to May 2014.The technical challenges that were overcome in this project include: the development of the technology to pass the impulse tests, derive a model for the thermal performance, produce a sound mechanical design, and estimate the inrush current. However, the greatest challenge that we faced during the development of the project was the complications of procuring the necessary parts and materials to build the transformers. The actual manufacturing process is relatively fast, but getting all parts together is a very lengthy process. The main products of this project are two prototypes of toroidal distribution transformers of 7.62 kV (to be used in a 13.8 kV system) to 2x120 V secondary (standard utilization voltage); one is rated at 25 kVA and the other at 50 kVA. The 25 k

  20. Tokamak with mechanical compression of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a pressure vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A collapsible toroidal liner disposed within the pressure vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside said liner. A toroidal magnetic field is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. A toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof. Pressure is applied to the liquid metal to collapse the liner and reduce the volume of the toroidal space, thereby increasing the toroidal magnetic flux density therein.

  1. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  2. Compact toroid fueling for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical work indicates that deep fueling of ITER may be possible by Compact Toroid (CT) injection. CT velocities sufficient for center fueling of a reactor have been demonstrated in the RACE device. CT injections into the TdeV tokamak have achieved central penetration at 1.4 T, and have increased the particle inventory by more than 30% without disruption. Tests on the MARAUDER device have achieved CT mass-densities suitable for injection into 5 T tokamaks. Techniques for producing multiple-shot CT's with passive electric switching are being tested on CTIX. The advantages of deep fueling by CT injection include profile peaking to reach ignition, profile control, low tritium inventory and others. In this paper, the CT experimental results are summarized, a conceptual design of a CT fueler for ITER is presented, and the implications on ITER operation and fuel cycle are discussed. 16 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  3. NCSX Toroidal Field Coil Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalish, M.; Rushinski, J.; Myatt, L.; Brooks, A.; Dahlgren, F.; Chrzanowski, J.; Reiersen, W.; Freudenberg, K.

    2005-10-07

    The National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) is an experimental device whose design and construction is underway at the Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The primary coil systems for the NCSX device consist of the twisted plasma-shaping Modular Coils, the Poloidal Field Coils, and the Toroidal Field (TF) Coils. The TF Coils are D-shaped coils wound from hollow copper conductor, and vacuum impregnated with a glass-epoxy resin system. There are 18 identical, equally spaced TF coils providing 1/R field at the plasma. They operate within a cryostat, and are cooled by LN2, nominally, to 80K. Wedge shaped castings are assembled to the inboard face of these coils, so that inward radial loads are reacted via the nesting of each of the coils against their adjacent partners. This paper outlines the TF Coil design methodology, reviews the analysis results, and summarizes how the design and analysis support the design requirements.

  4. Safeguardability assessment on pilot-scale advanced spent fuel conditioning facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In South Korea, approximately 6,000 metric tons of spent nuclear fuel from commercial reactor operation has been accumulated with the expectation of more than 30,000 metric tons, three times the present storage capacity, by the end of 2040. To resolve these challenges in spent fuel management, the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been developing a dry reprocessing technology called Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process (ACP). This is an electrometallurgical treatment technique to convert oxide-type spent fuel into a metallic form, and the electrolytic reduction (ER) technology developed recently is known as a more efficient concept for spent fuel conditioning. The goal of the ACP study is to recover more than 99% of the actinide elements into a metallic form with minimizing the volume and heat load of spent fuel. The significant reduction of the volume and heat load of spent fuel is expected to lighten the burden of final disposal in terms of disposal size, safety, and economics. In the framework of R and D collaboration for the ACP safeguards, a joint study on the safeguardability of the ACP technology has been performed by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and KAERI. The purpose of this study is to address the safeguardability of the ACP technology, through analysis of material flow and development of a proper safeguards system that meet IAEA's comprehensive safeguards objective. The sub-processes and material flow of the pilot-scale ACP facility were analyzed, and subsequently the relevant material balance area (MBA) and key measurement point (KMP) were designed for material accounting. The uncertainties in material accounting were also estimated with international target values, and design requirements for the material accounting systems were derived

  5. Instrumentation and beam dynamics study of advanced electron-photon facility in Indiana University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Tianhuan

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips' geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been speci ed. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  6. Instrumentation and Beam Dynamics Study of Advanced Electron-Photon Facility in Indiana University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Tianhuan [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States)

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced eLectron-PHoton fAcility (ALPHA) is a compact electron accelerator under construction and being commissioned at the Indiana University Center for Exploration of Energy and Matter (CEEM). In this thesis, we have studied the refurbished Cooler Injector Synchrotron (CIS) RF cavity using both the transmission line model and SUPERFISH simulation. Both low power and high power RF measurements have been carried out to characterize the cavity. Considering the performance limit of ferrite, we have designed a new ferrite loaded, co-axial quarter wave like cavity with similar structure but a more suitable ferrite material. We have also designed a traveling wave stripline kicker for fast extraction by POISSON and Microwave Studio. The strips geometry is trimmed to maximize the uniformity of the kicking field and match the impedance of the power cables. The time response simulation shows the kicker is fast enough for machine operation. The pulsed power supply requirement has also been specified. For the beam diagnosis in the longitudinal direction, we use a wideband Wall Gap Monitor (WGM) served in CIS. With proper shielding and amplification to get good WGM signal, we have characterized the injected and extracted beam signal in single pass commissioning, and also verified the debunching effect of the ALPHA storage ring. A modulation-demodulation signal processing method is developed to measure the current and longitudinal profile of injected beam. By scanning the dipole strength in the injection line, we have reconstructed the tomography of the longitudinal phase space of the LINAC beam. In the accumulation mode, ALPHA will be operated under a low energy and high current condition, where intra beam scattering (IBS) becomes a dominant effect on the beam emittance. A self consistent simulation, including IBS effect, gas scattering and linear coupling, has been carried out to calculate the emittance of the stored beam.

  7. Automated alignment of the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) target area at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Randy S.; Awwal, Abdul A. S.; Bliss, Erlan S.; Heebner, John E.; Leach, Richard R.; Orth, Charles D.; Rushford, Michael C.; Lowe-Webb, Roger R.; Wilhelmsen, Karl C.

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a petawatt-class, short-pulse laser system designed to provide x-ray backlighting of NIF targets. ARC uses four NIF beamlines to produce eight beamlets to create a sequence of eight images of an imploding fuel capsule using backlighting targets and diagnostic instrumentation. ARC employs a front end that produces two pulses, chirps the pulses out to 2 ns, and then injects the pulses into the two halves of each of four NIF beamlines. These pulses are amplified by NIF pre- and main amplifiers and transported to compressor vessels located in the NIF target area. The pulses are then compressed and pointed into the NIF target chamber where they impinge upon an array of backlighters. The interaction of the ARC laser pulses and the backlighting material produces bursts of high-energy x-rays that illuminate an imploding fuel capsule. The transmitted x-rays are imaged by diagnostic instrumentation to produce a sequence of radiograph images. A key component of the success of ARC is the automatic alignment system that accomplishes the precise alignment of the beamlets to avoid damaging equipment and to ensure that the beamlets are directed onto the tens-of-microns scale backlighters. In this paper, we describe the ARC automatic alignment system, with emphasis on control loops used to align the beampaths. We also provide a detailed discussion of the alignment image processing, because it plays a critical role in providing beam centering and pointing information for the control loops.

  8. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  9. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  10. Compact toroid injection into C-2U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Thomas; Gota, H.; Garate, E.; Asai, T.; Matsumoto, T.; Sekiguchi, J.; Putvinski, S.; Allfrey, I.; Beall, M.; Cordero, M.; Granstedt, E.; Kinley, J.; Morehouse, M.; Sheftman, D.; Valentine, T.; Waggoner, W.; the TAE Team

    2015-11-01

    Sustainment of an advanced neutral beam-driven FRC for a period in excess of 5 ms is the primary goal of the C-2U machine at Tri Alpha Energy. In addition, a criteria for long-term global sustainment of any magnetically confined fusion reactor is particle refueling. To this end, a magnetized coaxial plasma-gun has been developed. Compact toroids (CT) are to be injected perpendicular to the axial magnetic field of C-2U. To simulate this environment, an experimental test-stand has been constructed. A transverse magnetic field of B ~ 1 kG is established (comparable to the C-2U axial field) and CTs are fired across it. As a minimal requirement, the CT must have energy density greater than that of the magnetic field it is to penetrate, i.e., 1/2 ρv2 >=B2 / 2μ0 . This criteria is easily met and indeed the CTs traverse the test-stand field. A preliminary experiment on C-2U shows the CT also capable of penetrating into FRC plasmas and refueling is observed resulting in a 20 - 30% increase in total particle number per single-pulsed CT injection. Results from test-stand and C-2U experiments will be presented.

  11. Results of the ITER toroidal field model coil project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the ITER EDA one of the seven largest projects was devoted to the development, manufacture and testing of a Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC). The industry consortium AGAN manufactured the TFMC based on on a conceptual design developed by the ITER EDA EU Home Team. The TFMC was completed and assembled in the test facility TOSKA of the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in the first half of 2001. The first testing phase started in June 2001 and lasted till October 2001. The first results have shown that the main goals of the project have been achieved

  12. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoenlein, Robert W.; Falcone, Roger W.; Abela, R.; Alivisatos, A.P.; Belkacem, A.; Berrah, N.; Bozek, J.; Bressler, C.; Cavalleri, A.; Chergui, M.; Glover, T.E.; Heimann, P.A.; Hepburn, J.; Larsson, J.; Lee, R.W.; McCusker, J.; Padmore, H.A.; Pattison, P.; Pratt, S.T.; Shank, C.V.; Wark, J.; Chang, Z.; Robin, D.W.; Schlueter, R.D.; Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    2001-12-12

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron.

  13. Proposal to DOE Basic Energy Sciences: Ultrafast X-ray science facility at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to develop a true user facility for ultrafast x-ray science at the Advanced Light Source. This facility will be unique in the world, and will fill a critical need for the growing ultrafast x-ray research community. The development of this facility builds upon the expertise from long-standing research efforts in ultrafast x-ray spectroscopy and the development of femtosecond x-ray sources and techniques at both the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and at U.C. Berkeley. In particular, the technical feasibility of a femtosecond x-ray beamline at the ALS has already been demonstrated, and existing ultrafast laser technology will enable such a beamline to operate near the practical limit for femtosecond x-ray flux and brightness from a 3rd generation synchrotron

  14. The toroid moment of Majorana neutrino

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The total set of electromagnetic characteristics of Majorana neutrinos is considered. It is shown that in the static limit (mi=mf=mν) the Majorana neutrinos possess only one electromagnetic characteristic, the toroidal dipole moment (anapole). We have calculated the diagonal toroidal moment (form factor) of the Majorana neutrino in the one-loop approximation of the Standard Model by the dispersion method. All external particles are on the mass shells and there are no problems with the physical interpretation of the final result. Different applications of the toroidal moment of Majorana neutrino are also discussed. 12 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  15. Development of safeguards technology for lab-scale advanced fuel cycle facility at KAERI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KAERI (Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been developing the DUPIC (Direct Use of PWR spent fuel in CANDU) fuel cycle and ACP (Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) technology for the purpose of spent fuel management. A safeguards system has been applied to R and D process for fabricating DUPIC fuel directly with PWR spent fuel material. Safeguards issues to be resolved were identified in the areas such as international cooperation on handling foreign origin nuclear material, technology development of operator's measurement system of bulk handling process of spent fuel material, and built-in C/S system for independent verification of material flow. All those safeguards issues have been finally resolved. The lab-scale DUPIC facility (DFDF) safeguards system was successfully established under the international cooperation program. The ACP has been under development at KAERI since 1997 to tackle the problem of the accumulation of the spent fuel. The concept is to convert the spent oxide fuel into a metallic form in a high temperature molten salt in order to reduce the heat power, volume, and radioactivity of the spent fuel. The main objective of the ACP is to treat the PWR spent fuel for a long-term storage and eventual disposal in a proliferation resistant and cost effective way. Moreover, the electrolytic reduction method of the ACP can contribute to the innovative nuclear energy system as a key technology for the preparation of the metallic fuel. Since the inactive tests of the ACP have been successfully implemented to confirm the validity of the electrolytic reduction technology, a lab-scale hot test will be undertaken in the ACP facility (ACPF) to validate the concept. Based on the results of a safeguards implementation at DFDF hot cell, the reference safeguards design conditions are established for the ACPF. Basically, the nuclear material accounting will be performed by ASNC (ACP Safeguards Neutron Counter), which is the same concept as the

  16. Los Alamos compact toroid, fast-liner, and high-density Z-pinch programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linford, R.K.; Sherwood, A.R.; Hammel, J.E.

    1981-03-01

    The Compact Toroid (CT) and High Density Z-Pinch (HDZP) are two of the plasma configurations presently being studied at Los Alamos. The purpose of these two programs, plus the recently terminated (May 1979) Fast Liner (FL) program, is summarized in this section along with a brief description of the experimental facilities. The remaining sections summarize the recent results and the experimental status.

  17. Design of Stopper of Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Facility at China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    The PGNAA facility consists of the filtered collimated neutron beam, the shielding of the whole facility, the control system, the detecting equipment and the data acquisition and analysis system. The neutron beam is filtered by a mono-crystalline bismuth filter,

  18. Renovation of CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) for Development of Advanced Fast Reactor Fuel Cycle System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CPF (Chemical Processing Facility) was constructed at Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of JAEA (Japan Atomic Energy Agency) in 1980 as a basic research field where spent fuel pins from fast reactor (FR) and high level liquid waste can be dealt with. The renovation consists of remodeling of the CA-3 cell and the laboratory A, installation of globe boxes, hoods and analytical equipments to the laboratory C and the analytical laboratory. Also maintenance equipments in the CA-5 cell which had been out of order were repaired. The CA-3 cell is the main cell in which important equipments such as a dissolver, a clarifier and extractors are installed for carrying out the hot test using the irradiated FR fuel. Since the CPF had specialized originally in the research function for the Purex process, it was desired to execute the research and development of such new, various reprocessing processes. Formerly, equipments were arranged in wide space and connected with not only each other but also with utility supply system mainly by fixed stainless steel pipes. It caused shortage of operation space in flexibility for basic experimental study. Old equipments in the CA-3 cell including vessels and pipes were removed after successful decontamination, and new equipments were installed conformably to the new design. For the purpose of easy installation and rearranging the experimental equipments, equipments are basically connected by flexible pipes. Since dissolver is able to be easily replaced, various dissolution experiments is conducted. Insoluble residue generated by dissolution of spent fuel is clarified by centrifugal. This small apparatus is effective to space-saving. Mini mixer settlers or centrifugal contactors are put on to the prescribed limited space in front of the backside wall. Fresh reagents such as solvent, scrubbing and stripping solution are continuously fed from the laboratory A to the extractor by the reagent supply system with semi-automatic observation

  19. ANURIB – Advanced National facility for Unstable and Rare Ion Beams

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arup Bandyopadhyay; V Naik; S Dechoudhury; M Mondal; A Chakrabarti

    2015-09-01

    An ISOL post-accelerator type of RIB facility is being developed at Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre (VECC), Kolkata, India. In this scheme, Rare Ion Beams (RIBs) will be produced using light ion beams (, ) from the = 130 cyclotron, the RIB of interest will be separated from the other reaction products and accelerated up to about 2 MeV/u using a number of linear accelerators. Recently, a few RIBs have been produced and accelerated using this facility. As an extention of this effort, another RIB facility – ANURIB will be developed in a new campus as a green-field project. ANURIB will have two driver accelerators – a superconducting electron LINAC to produce n-rich RIBs using photofission route and a 50 MeV proton cyclotron for producing p-rich RIBs. In this paper, the status of the RIB facility in the present campus and future plans with the ANURIB facility will be discussed.

  20. Tokamak with in situ magnetohydrodynamic generation of toroidal magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Michael J.

    1986-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes an electrically conductive metal pressure vessel for defining a chamber and confining liquid therein. A liner disposed within said chamber defines a toroidal space within the liner and confines gas therein. The metal vessel provides an electrically conductive path linking the toroidal space. Liquid metal is forced outwardly through the chamber outside of the toroidal space to generate electric current in the conductive path and thereby generate a toroidal magnetic field within the toroidal space. Toroidal plasma is developed within the toroidal space about the major axis thereof.

  1. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    CERN Document Server

    Bohn, Andy; Teukolsky, Saul A

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. We present a coordinate transformation to a foliation of spacelike hypersurfaces that "cut a hole" through the event horizon surface, resulting in a toroidal event horizon. A torus could potentially provide a mechanism for violating topological censorship. However, these toroidal event horizons satisfy topological censorship by construction, because we can always trivially apply the inverse coordinate transformation to remove the topological feature.

  2. OCLATOR (One Coil Low Aspect Toroidal Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new approach to construct a tokamak-type reactor(s) is presented. Basically the return conductors of toroidal field coils are eliminated and the toroidal field coil is replaced by one single large coil, around which there will be placed several tokamaks or other toroidal devices. The elimination of return conductors should, in addition to other advantages, improve the accessibility and maintainability of the tokamaks and offer a possible alternative to the search for special materials to withstand large neutron wall loading, as the frequency of changeover would be increased due to minimum downtime. It also makes it possible to have a low aspect ratio tokamak which should improve the β limit, so that a low toroidal magnetic field strength might be acceptable, meaning that the NbTi superconducting wire could be used. This system is named OCLATOR

  3. LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The determination of the absolute energy loss due to radiation from impurities in the LASL toroidal reversed-field pinch experiment ZT-S is reported. The measurements show that over half the energy loss is accounted for by this mechanism. Thomson-scattering electron density measurements indicate only a gradual increase in temperature as the filling pressure is reduced, indicating an increased energy loss at lower pressures. Cylindrical and toroidal simulations of the experiment indicate either that a highly radiative pinch boundary or anomalous transport is needed to match the experimental results. New effects on the equilibrium due to plasma flows induced by the toroidal geometry are predicted by the toroidal simulations. The preliminary results on the low-temperature discharge cleaning of the ZT-S torus are reported. A description of the upgrade of the ZT-S experiment and the objectives, construction and theoretical predictions for the new ZT-40 experiment are given. (author)

  4. PIV-Analysis of collapsing toroidal droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairam, Ekapop; Berger, Eric; Fernandez-Nieves, Alberto; Georgia Tech Team

    2012-11-01

    Toroidal droplets are unstable and always undergo a transformation into spherical droplets driven by surface tension. They either break ala Rayleigh-Plateau if the torus is thin or grow fatter to become a single spherical droplet if the torus is fat. We analyze the velocity field inside and outside the toroidal droplet as it transforms into spherical droplets using the particle image velocimetry (PIV) method and compare with recent theoretical calculations for this process. NSF CAREER.

  5. Celebrating the Barrel Toroid commissioning

    CERN Multimedia

    Peter Jenni

    ATLAS invited Funding Agency representatives and Laboratory Heads directly related to the funding and construction of the Barrel Toroid for a small ceremony on 13th December 2006 at Point 1, in order to mark the successful first full excitation of the BT (see last eNews). On that date, which was during the December CERN Council week, several of the Funding Agency Heads or their representatives could be present, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. Speeches were delivered by the ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni thanking the Funding Partners in the name of the Collaboration, by Magnet Project Leader Herman ten Kate tracing the BT construction history, and by the CERN Director-General Robert Aymar congratulating all those who have contributed to the successful project. Herman ten Kate addressing the delegates. The text of the introductory address by Peter Jenni is reproduced here. "It is a great pleasure for me to welcome you all here...

  6. Anomalous transport in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the magnetic moment of particle is conserved, there are three mechanisms which cause anomalous transport. These are: variation of magnetic field strength in flux surface, variation of electrostatic potential in flux surface, and destruction of flux surface. The anomalous transport of different groups of particles resulting from each of these mechanisms is different. This fact can be exploited to determine the cause of transport operative in an experimental situation. This approach can give far more information on the transport than the standard confinement time measurements. To implement this approach, we have developed Monte Carlo codes for toroidal geometries. The equations of motion are developed in a set of non-canonical, practical Boozer co-ordinates by means of Jacobian transformations of the particle drift Hamiltonian equations of motion. Effects of collisions are included by appropriate stochastic changes in the constants of motion. Effects of the loop voltage on particle motions are also included. We plan to apply our method to study two problems: the problem of the hot electron tail observed in edge region of ZT-40, and the energy confinement time in TOKAPOLE II. For the ZT-40 problem three situations will be considered: a single mode in the core, a stochastic region that covers half the minor radius, a stochastic region that covers the entire plasma. A turbulent spectrum of perturbations based on the experimental data of TOKAPOLE II will be developed. This will be used to simulate electron transport resulting from ideal instabilities and resistive instabilities in TOKAPOLE II

  7. Low-n shear Alfven spectra in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In toroidal plasmas, the toroidal magnetic field is nonuniform over a magnetic surface and causes coupling of different poloidal harmonics. It is shown both analytically and numerically that the toroidicity not only breaks up the shear Alfven continuous spectrum, but also creates new, discrete, toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes with frequencies inside the continuum gaps. Potential applications of the low-n toroidicity-induced shear Alfven eigenmodes on plasma heating and instabilities are addressed. 17 refs., 4 figs

  8. Development of CFD Approaches for Modeling Advanced Concepts of Nuclear Thermal Propulsion Test Facilities Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The project will be developing a CFD approach that can handle the additional complexities needed in a NTP testing facility when modeling the combustion processes in...

  9. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This ACDR was performed following completed of the Conceptual Design Report in July 1992; the work encompassed August 1992 to January 1994. Mission of the WRAP Module 2A facility is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage at Hanford and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford from about DOE sites. This volume provides an introduction to the ACDR process and the scope of the task along with a project summary of the facility, treatment technologies, cost, and schedule. Major areas of departure from the CDR are highlighted. Descriptions of the facility layout and operations are included.

  10. Development of a microsecond X-ray protein footprinting facility at the Advanced Light Source

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Sayan; Celestre, Richard; Petzold, Christopher J.; Chance, Mark R.; Ralston, Corie

    2014-01-01

    Radiolytic labeling is established as a collaborative program at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Results indicate that white-light bend-magnet beamlines at the ALS produce flux densities high enough to allow microsecond exposures yielding sufficient modification to conduct footprinting experiments, representing a significant advance for the footprinting experiment.

  11. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (first of two) included papers on architecture, beam diagnostics, compressors, and linacs. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended

  12. Reconstruction of local emissivity profile from chord-integrated soft x-ray data in heliotron/torsatron plasmas by singular-value decomposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reconstruction method for a local soft X-ray (SX) emissivity profile based on singular-value decomposition (SVD) was applied to the chord-integrated SX data obtained in the compact helical system (CHS) heliotron/torsatron. The numerical procedure for this method was simplified by introducing the data of equilibrium magnetic surfaces to analyze the experimental data efficiently. The applicability of the Akaide information criterion (AIC) was investigated for the determination of the optimal number of parameters characterizing a local emissivity profile. This method was applied to SX data for sawtoothing plasmas of the CHS. For these CHS data, the optimal number of parameters is determined from the spatial resolution of an SX detector array rather than the AIC. A characteristic feature of the off-axis or annular sawtooth crash was clearly derived with this technique. (author)

  13. Behaviour of the radiation of the suprathermal electrons at the Uragan-3M torsatron after rf heating off from ECE measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microwave radiometry is a well-known diagnostics to obtain the information on temporal evolution and radial profile of the electron temperature at U-3M torsatron plasma experiments. However, under low plasma density with this diagnostics we report on the large production of runaway electrons after RF heating pulse off. We notice a gradually increasing of the radiometer signal at the frequencies that match the second and third harmonics of electron cyclotron emission of the extraordinary mode. This effect could be explained with the existence of the ''runaway'' electrons in U-3M discharge. A phenomenological description of this process is presented, where the time evolution of the ECE radiation signal is compared to the electron density evolution

  14. Resistive instabilities in toroidal confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low-m tearing modes constitute the dominant instability problem in present-day tokamaks. In this paper, the stability criteria for representative current profiles with q(0) values in the vicinity of unity are reviewed; sawtooth reconnection to q(0) values just at, or slightly exceeding, unity is generally destabilizing to the m = 2, n = 2 and m = 3, n = 2 modes and limits the range of stable profile shapes. Major disruptions can be produced by the simultaneous growth of m = 2, n = 1 and m = 3, n = 2 magnetic islands, leading to destabilization of higher-order modes and to the overlapping of several island chains. Internal disruptions---or sawteeth---arise in a variety of forms other than that produced by the classically reconnecting m = 1 mode. In some case, the q(r) value is apparently close to unity over a large central part of the plasma; in other cases, the q(0) value remains substantially below unity throughout a sawtooth cycle. Toroidal effects are sufficient to stabilize the resistive m = 1 mode in the latter case. Feedback stabilization of m ≥ 2 modes by rf heating or current drive, applied locally at the magnetic islands, appears feasible; feedback by island current drive is much more efficient, in terms of the radio-frequency power required, than feedback by island heating. Feedback stabilization of the m = 1 resistive mode---although yielding particularly beneficial effects for resistive-tearing and high-beta stability by allowing q(0) values substantially below unity---is more problematical, unless the m = 1 ideal MHD mode can be given sufficient positive stability. This appears possible, however, either by strong triangular shaping of the central flux surfaces or by appropriate tailoring of the current profile in the vicinity of the q = 1 surface

  15. Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A: Advanced Conceptual Design Report. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    This volume presents the Total Estimated Cost (TEC) for the WRAP (Waste Receiving and Processing) 2A facility. The TEC is $81.9 million, including an overall project contingency of 25% and escalation of 13%, based on a 1997 construction midpoint. (The mission of WRAP 2A is to receive, process, package, certify, and ship for permanent burial at the Hanford site disposal facilities the Category 1 and 3 contact handled low-level radioactive mixed wastes that are currently in retrievable storage, and are forecast to be generated over the next 30 years by Hanford, and waste to be shipped to Hanford site from about 20 DOE sites.)

  16. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended

  17. Proceedings of the Advanced Hadron Facility accelerator design workshop, February 20--25, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thiessen, H.A. (comp.)

    1990-04-01

    The International Workshop on Hadron Facility Technology was held February 20--25, 1989, at the Study Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This volume (second of two) included papers on computer controls, polarized beam, rf, magnet and power supplies, experimental areas, and instabilities. Participants included groups from AHF, Brookhaven National Laboratory, European Hadron Facility, Fermilab, and the Moscow Meson Factory. The workshop was well attended by members of the Los Alamos staff. The interchange of information and the opportunity by criticism by peers was important to all who attended.

  18. Long-wavelength microinstabilities in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Realistic kinetic toroidal eigenmode calculations have been carried out to support a proper assessment of the influence of long-wavelength microturbulence on transport in tokamak plasmas. In order to efficiently evaluate large-scale kinetic behavior extending over many rational surfaces, significant improvements have been made to a toroidal finite element code used to analyze the fully two-dimensional (r,θ) mode structures of trapped-ion and toroidal ion temperature gradient (ITG) instabilities. It is found that even at very long wavelengths, these eigenmodes exhibit a strong ballooning character with the associated radial structure relatively insensitive to ion Landau damping at the rational surfaces. In contrast to the long-accepted picture that the radial extent of trapped-ion instabilities is characterized by the ion-gyroradius-scale associated with strong localization between adjacent rational surfaces, present results demonstrate that under realistic conditions, the actual scale is governed by the large-scale variations in the equilibrium gradients. Applications to recent measurements of fluctuation properties in TFTR L-mode plasmas indicate that the theoretical trends appear consistent with spectral characteristics as well as rough heuristic estimates of the transport level. Benchmarking calculations in support of the development of a three-dimensional toroidal gyrokinetic code indicate reasonable agreement with respect to both the properties of the eigenfunctions and the magnitude of the eigenvalues during the linear phase of the simulations of toroidal ITG instabilities

  19. Advanced Education Facilities for Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Systems at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Lungeanu, Marian; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2005-01-01

    A new approach for the project- and problem-based learning method is achieved at Aalborg University. Two new laboratories called Flexible Drives System Laboratory (FDSL) and Green Power Laboratory (GPL) have been developed. A common feature is that these facilities are using entirely Simulink...

  20. ORNL Levitated Toroidal Multipole Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are studying confinement of gun-injected and microwave-produced plasmas in a levitated toroidal quadrupole in which internal hoop supports are not present to limit plasma confinement. Electromagnetic levitation is made possible by reducing the 60 Hz skin depth in the copper walls with liquid nitrogen cooling. The cooling also increases the magnetic field lifetime so that an e-folding time of 17 ms was measured after crowbarring. Computations indicate that in a properly designed, larger device, an e-folding time of 100 ms can be reached. Washer-gun hydrogen plasmas and Bostick-type lithium gun plasmas were injected into the levitated quadrupole with typical parameters: B ≥ 3 kG, Te ≈ 3 eV, ni ≈ 109 cm-3, and 1 i i ≈ 1010 cm-3, Te ≈ 30 eV, and τ/τBohm ≈ 30. Density fluctuations (Δn/n) in the region of good field curvature were less than 0.05 and in the region of bad curvature 0.10-0.25. With the removal of the magnetic well (by removing the inner hoop), τ/τBohm and ni each dropped a factor of 4 and Δn/n became greater than 0.25. Recent experiments using 200 W at λ = 3 cm have produced plasmas with higher densities (n > 1011 cm-3 assuming Te ≈ 100 eV), higher temperatures (Te ≈ 100 eV) and longer lifetimes (τ ≈ 80 μs ≈ 40 τBohm) than in the λ = 12 cm experiments. Detailed probe measurements of density and temperature are consistent with models for plasma behaviour based on computed magnetic field plots. Probe data show clear evidence of the changes in heating zones during the variation of the sinusoidal magnetic field and a large obstacle intercepting all flux lines effectively prevents the formation of the plasma. We are also studying a levitated helical hexapole, whose advantages over the quadrupole are a better ratio of connection length to radius of bad curvature and more confinement volume. (author)

  1. Superconducting toroid design for the ATLAS experiment at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ATLAS Experiment proposed for LHC will use toroidal magnet systems to achieve high muon momentum resolution. The proposal is based on an air-cored superconducting toroid magnet system consisting of a long barrel toroid with a pair of end cap toroids to provide high resolution at large rapidity. Each end cap toroid will have an outer diameter of approximately 11m and an axis length of 5m and will provide field integrals in the range 4-8Tm over the rapidity span η = 1.5--2.8. This paper presents the magnetic, mechanical and cryogenic design of the end cap toroid magnet systems

  2. Tokamak with liquid metal for inducing toroidal electrical field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1981-01-01

    A tokamak apparatus includes a vessel for defining a reservoir and confining liquid therein. A toroidal liner disposed within said vessel defines a toroidal space within the liner confines gas therein. Liquid metal fills the reservoir outside the liner. A magnetic field is established in the liquid metal to develop magnetic flux linking the toroidal space. The gas is ionized. The liquid metal and the toroidal space are moved relative to one another transversely of the space to generate electric current in the ionized gas in the toroidal space about its major axis and thereby heat plasma developed in the toroidal space.

  3. Design concepts and advanced manipulator development for nuclear fuel cycle facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division, Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. The application of advanced manipulation is viewed as an essential part of a series of design directions whose sum describes a somewhat unique blend of old and new technology. A design direction based upon the Teletec concept is explained and recent progress in the development of an advanced servomanipulator-based maintenance concept is summarized to show that a new generation of remote systems is feasible through advanced technology. 14 refs., 14 figs

  4. Modular coils: a promising toroidal-reactor-coil system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of modular coils originated from a need to find reactor-relevant stellarator windings, but its usefulness can be extended to provide an externally applied, additional rotational transform in tokamaks. Considerations of (1) basic principles of modular coils, (2) types of coils, (3) types of configurations (general, helically symmetric, helically asymmetric, with magnetic well, with magnetic hill), (4) types of rotational transform profile, and (5) structure and origin of ripples are given. These results show that modular coils can offer a wide range of vacuum magnetic field configurations, some of which cannot be obtained with the classical stellarator or torsatron coil configuration

  5. A Classification Scheme For Toroidal Molecules

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, J; Berger, Jorge; Avron, Joseph E.

    1995-01-01

    We construct a class of periodic tilings of the plane, which corresponds to toroidal arrangements of trivalent atoms, with pentagonal, hexagonal and heptagonal rings. Each tiling is characterized by a set of four integers and determines a toroidal molecule. The tiling rules are motivated by geometric considerations and the tiling patterns are rich enough to describe a wide class of toroidal carbon molecules, with a broad range of shapes and numbers of atoms. The molecular dimensions are simply related to the integers that determine the tiling. The configurational energy and the delocalisation energy of several molecules obtained in this way were computed for Tersoff and H\\"uckel models. The results indicate that many of these molecules are not strained, and may be expected to be stable. We studied the influence of size on the H\\"{u}ckel spectrum: it bears both similarities and differences as compared with the case of tubules.

  6. Quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geometric condition for quasisymmetric toroidal plasmas with large mean flows on the order of the ion thermal speed are investigated. Equilibrium momentum balance equations including the inertia term due to the large flow velocity are used to show that, for rotating quasisymmetic plasmas with no local currents crossing flux surfaces, all components of the metric tensor should be independent of the toroidal angle in the Boozer coordinates, and consequently these systems need to be rigorously axisymmetric. Unless the local radial currents vanish, the Boozer coordinates do not exist and the toroidal flow velocity cannot take any value other than a very limited class of eigenvalues corresponding to very rapid rotation especially for low beta plasmas. (author)

  7. Toroidal high temperature superconducting coils for ISTTOK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, H., E-mail: hf@ipfn.ist.utl.pt [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Goemoery, F. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 84104 Bratislava (Slovakia); Corte, A. della; Celentano, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Souc, J. [Institute of Electrical Engineering, Slovak Academy of Sciences, Dubravska cesta 9, 84104 Bratislava (Slovakia); Silva, C.; Carvalho, I.; Gomes, R. [Associacao Euratom/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusao Nuclear, Laboratorio Associado, Instituto Superior Tecnico, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Di Zenobio, A.; Messina, G. [ENEA C.R. Frascati, Via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) are very attractive to be used in fusion devices mainly due to lower operations costs. The HTS technology has reached a point where the construction of toroidal field coils for a tokamak is possible. The feasibility of a tokamak operating with HTS is extremely relevant and ISTTOK is the ideal candidate for a meaningful test due to its small size (and consequently lower cost) and the possibility to operate in a steady-state inductive regime. In this paper, a conceptual study of the ISTTOK upgrade to a superconducting device is presented, along with the relevant boundary conditions to achieve a permanent toroidal field with HTS. It is shown that the actual state of the art in HTS allows the design of a toroidal field coil capable of generating the appropriate field on plasma axis while respecting the structural specification of the machine.

  8. Toroidal high temperature superconducting coils for ISTTOK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature superconductors (HTS) are very attractive to be used in fusion devices mainly due to lower operations costs. The HTS technology has reached a point where the construction of toroidal field coils for a tokamak is possible. The feasibility of a tokamak operating with HTS is extremely relevant and ISTTOK is the ideal candidate for a meaningful test due to its small size (and consequently lower cost) and the possibility to operate in a steady-state inductive regime. In this paper, a conceptual study of the ISTTOK upgrade to a superconducting device is presented, along with the relevant boundary conditions to achieve a permanent toroidal field with HTS. It is shown that the actual state of the art in HTS allows the design of a toroidal field coil capable of generating the appropriate field on plasma axis while respecting the structural specification of the machine.

  9. Toroidal mode-conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mode-conversion is studied in the ion-cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighborhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave which deposits the wave energy through resonant interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted and could in experiments be driven to large amplitudes so as to interact efficiently with fast particles. (author) 5 figs., 1 tab., 48 refs

  10. Toroidal mode conversion in the ICRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mode conversion is studied in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF), taking into account the toroidal geometry relevant for tokamaks. The global wavefields obtained using the gyrokinetic toroidal PENN code illustrate how the fast wave propagates to the neighbourhood of the ion-ion hybrid resonance, where it is converted to a slow wave that deposits the wave energy through resonant Landau and cyclotron interactions with the particles. The power deposition profiles obtained are dramatically different from the toroidal resonance absorption, showing that Budden's fluid model is not a good approximation in the torus. Radially and poloidally localized wavefield structures characteristic of slow wave eigenmodes are predicted, which could be used in experiments to form transport barriers and to interact with fast particles. (author)

  11. The application of advanced remote systems technology to future waste handling facilities: Waste Systems Data and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has been advancing the technology in remote handling and remote maintenance of in-cell systems planned for future US nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. Much of the experience and technology developed over the past decade in this endeavor are directly applicable to the in-cell systems being considered for the facilities of the Federal Waste Management System (FWMS). The ORNL developments are based on the application of teleoperated force-reflecting servomanipulators controlled by an operator completely removed from the hazardous environment. These developments address the nonrepetitive nature of remote maintenance in the unstructured environments encountered in a waste handling facility. Employing technological advancements in dexterous manipulators, as well as basic design guidelines that have been developed for remotely maintained equipment and processes, can increase operation and maintenance system capabilities, thereby allowing the attainment of two FWMS major objectives: decreasing plant personnel radiation exposure and increasing plant availability by decreasing the mean-time-to-repair in-cell maintenance and process equipment. 5 refs., 7 figs

  12. Human Engineering Operations and Habitability Assessment: A Process for Advanced Life Support Ground Facility Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Arch, M.; Elfezouaty, Eileen Schultz; Novak, Jennifer Blume; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Design and Human Engineering (HE) processes strive to ensure that the human-machine interface is designed for optimal performance throughout the system life cycle. Each component can be tested and assessed independently to assure optimal performance, but it is not until full integration that the system and the inherent interactions between the system components can be assessed as a whole. HE processes (which are defining/app lying requirements for human interaction with missions/systems) are included in space flight activities, but also need to be included in ground activities and specifically, ground facility testbeds such as Bio-Plex. A unique aspect of the Bio-Plex Facility is the integral issue of Habitability which includes qualities of the environment that allow humans to work and live. HE is a process by which Habitability and system performance can be assessed.

  13. An advanced safeguards approach for a model 200t/a reprocessing facility, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes an advanced safeguards approach which has been developed for a model 200 t/a reprocessing plant, using near-real-time materials accountancy in the process MBA, and borrowing advanced ideas from TASTEX, the IWG-RPS, or the authors own invention for the spent fuel storage and plutonium nitrate storage MBAs. In the spent fuel storage MBA primary reliance is placed on 100% inspector observation and verification of all spent fuel receipts, and on surveillance measures to ensure that the inspector is aware of all receipts or other activities in the spent fuel cask receiving bay. The advanced safeguards approach gives more detailed consideration to the mechanical or chop-leach cell than most conventional approaches. Safeguards in the process MBA are based on n.r.t. accountancy. The n.r.t. accountancy model used assumes weekly in-process physical inventories of solution in some five buffer storage tanks. The safeguards approach suggested for the plutonium nitrate storage MBA is not significantly different from conventional approaches. The use of sequential statistical techniques for the analysis of n.r.t. accountancy data requires a significantly different philosophical approach to anomalies and anomaly resolution. This report summarizes anomaly resolution procedures, at least through the earlier stages, and describes a summary estimate of inspection effort likely to be needed to implement the advanced safeguards approach. (author)

  14. Observation of Central Toroidal Rotation Induced by ICRF on EAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiayun; Wang, Fudi; Zhang, Xinjun; Lyu, Bo; Chen, Jun; Li, Yingying; Fu, Jia; Shi, Yuejiang; Yu, Yi; Ye, Minyou; Wan, Baonian

    2016-02-01

    Core plasma rotation of both L-mode and H-mode discharges with ion cyclotron range of frequency (ICRF) minority heating (MH) scheme was measured with a tangential X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak). Co-current central impurity toroidal rotation change was observed in ICRF-heated L- and H-mode plasmas. Rotation increment as high as 30 km/s was generated at ∼1.7 MW ICRF power. Scaling results showed similar trend as the Rice scaling but with significant scattering, especially in L-mode plasmas. We varied the plasma current, toroidal field and magnetic configuration individually to study their effect on L-mode plasma rotation, while keeping the other major plasma parameters and heating unchanged during the scanning. It was found that larger plasma current could induce plasma rotation more efficiently. A scan of the toroidal magnetic field indicated that the largest rotation was obtained for on-axis ICRF heating. A comparison between lower-single-null (LSN) and double-null (DN) configurations showed that LSN discharges rendered a larger rotation change for the same power input and plasma parameters. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB112004 and 2015GB103002), National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11175208, 11305212, 11375235, 11405212 and 11261140328), the Innovative Program of Development Foundation of Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology (2014FXCX003) and Brain Korea 21 Program for Leading Universities & Students (BK21 PLUS)

  15. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  16. Advances in inertial confinement fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory-temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  17. Tagged photon facility at Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore: Possible scenarios

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    L M Pant

    2006-05-01

    Photoproduction of in nuclear medium with the ELSA facility at Bonn is discussed in the context of medium modification of hadronic properties. Utilization of Indus-2 at CAT, Indore for producing tagged bremsstrahlung photons and laser backscattered photons has been explored with a comparison between the two techniques for producing tagged high energy photons for the first time in the country with emphasis on the ADSS programme to have a precise information of (; ) reactions.

  18. Advanced Spectroscopic and Thermal Imaging Instrumentation for Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF, an aeroballistic range) at NASA Ames support basic research in aerothermodynamic phenomena of atmospheric entry, specifically shock layer radiation spectroscopy, convective and radiative heat transfer, and transition to turbulence. Innovative optical instrumentation has been developed and implemented to meet the challenges posed from obtaining such data in these impulse facilities. Spatially and spectrally resolved measurements of absolute radiance of a travelling shock wave in EAST are acquired using multiplexed, time-gated imaging spectrographs. Nearly complete spectral coverage from the vacuum ultraviolet to the near infrared is possible in a single experiment. Time-gated thermal imaging of ballistic range models in flight enables quantitative, global measurements of surface temperature. These images can be interpreted to determine convective heat transfer rates and reveal transition to turbulence due to isolated and distributed surface roughness at hypersonic velocities. The focus of this paper is a detailed description of the optical instrumentation currently in use in the EAST and HFFAF.

  19. Models for large superconducting toroidal magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior to the design of large GJ toroidal magnet systems it is appropriate to procure small scale models, which can simulate their pertinent properties and allow to investigate their relevant phenomena. The important feature of the model is to show under which circumstances the system performance can be extrapolated to large magnets. Based on parameters such as the maximum magnetic field and the current density, the maximum tolerable magneto-mechanical stresses, a simple method of designing model magnets is presented. It is shown how pertinent design parameters are changed when the toroidal dimensions are altered. In addition some conductor cost estimations are given based on reactor power output and wall loading

  20. Toroidal Horizons in Binary Black Hole Mergers

    OpenAIRE

    Bohn, Andy; Kidder, Lawrence E.; Teukolsky, Saul A.

    2016-01-01

    We find the first binary black hole event horizon with a toroidal topology. It had been predicted that generically the event horizons of merging black holes should briefly have a toroidal topology, but such a phase has never been seen prior to this work. In all previous binary black hole simulations, in the coordinate slicing used to evolve the black holes, the topology of the event horizon transitions directly from two spheres during the inspiral to a single sphere as the black holes merge. ...

  1. Toroidal Precession as a Geometric Phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.W. Burby and H. Qin

    2012-09-26

    Toroidal precession is commonly understood as the orbit-averaged toroidal drift of guiding centers in axisymmetric and quasisymmetric configurations. We give a new, more natural description of precession as a geometric phase effect. In particular, we show that the precession angle arises as the holonomy of a guiding center's poloidal trajectory relative to a principal connection. The fact that this description is physically appropriate is borne out with new, manifestly coordinate-independent expressions for the precession angle that apply to all types of orbits in tokamaks and quasisymmetric stellarators alike. We then describe how these expressions may be fruitfully employed in numerical calculations of precession.

  2. Some properties of toroidal isodynamic magnetostatic equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, J.-J. [AIM, Unite Mixte de Recherche CEA, CNRS, Universite Paris VII, UMR no 7158, Centre d' Etudes de Saclay, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    We establish some general properties of a 3D isodynamic magnetostatic equilibrium admitting a family of nested toroidal flux surfaces. In particular, we use the virial theorem to prove a simple relation between the total pressure (magnetic + thermal) and the magnetic pressure on each flux surface, and we derive some useful consequences of the latter. We also show the constancy on each rational surface of two integrals along magnetic lines. As a simple application of our results, we show the nonexistence of an equilibrium with vanishing toroidal current, and of an equilibrium with closed lines.

  3. Anomalous transport equations in toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reduced transport equations for a toroidal plasma with fluctuations are derived. These equations include the effects of both anomalous and standard neoclassical transport, and allow clarification of the structure of convective fluxes caused by electrostatic and magnetic fluctuations. Special attention is paid to the combined effects of fluctuations and toroidicity on the transport. The formulation retains the effects of a magnetic field inhomogeneity on the anomalous transport. It is shown that phase space diffusion caused by the gradient in the equilibrium magnetic field appears as a pinch flux in the real space

  4. Optical spectroscopic analysis of compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time- and space-resolved plasma emission spectra from the Weapons Laboratory compact toroid (MARAUDER) experiment have been recorded using an optical multichannel analyzer (OMA). The OMA is optically coupled to the emitting plasmas using fiber optic cables. Results are presented in terms of the composition and purity of plasma species and ionization states for compact toroids formed of hydrogen and argon. The authors use relative line strengths with a collisional radiative equilibrium (CRE) model to estimate the plasma temperature and density. Electron density has also been determined from line profile analysis of the Hβ line in hydrogen

  5. The effect of sheared toroidal rotation on pressure driven magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegna, C. C.

    2016-05-01

    The impact of sheared toroidal rotation on the evolution of pressure driven magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas is investigated using a resistive magnetohydrodynamics model augmented by a neoclassical Ohm's law. Particular attention is paid to the asymptotic matching data as the Mercier indices are altered in the presence of sheared flow. Analysis of the nonlinear island Grad-Shafranov equation shows that sheared flows tend to amplify the stabilizing pressure/curvature contribution to pressure driven islands in toroidal tokamaks relative to the island bootstrap current contribution. As such, sheared toroidal rotation tends to reduce saturated magnetic island widths.

  6. Evaluation of the advanced mixed-oxide fuel test FO-2 irradiated in the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced mixed-oxide (UO2-PuO2) test assembly, FO-2, irradiated in the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) is undergoing postirradiation examination. This is one of the first FFTF tests examined that used the advanced ferrite-martensite alloy, HT9, which is highly resistant to irradiation swelling. The FO-2 includes the first annular fueled pins irradiated in FFTF to undergo destructive examination. The FO-2 is a lead assembly for the ongoing FFTF Core Demonstration Experiment (CDE) and was designed to evaluate the effects of fuel design variables, such as pellet density, smeared density, and fuel form (annular or solid fuel), on advanced pin performance. The assembly contains a total of 169 fuel pins of 12 different types. Two L (annular) fuel pins, GF02L04 (FFTF and transient tested) and GF02L09 (FFTF only), were destructively examined. Evaluation of the FO-2 fuel pins and assembly shows the excellent and predictable performance of the mixed-oxide fuels with HT9 structural material. This, combined with the robust behavior of the pins in transient tests, and the continued excellent performance of the CDE indicate this is a superior fuel system for liquid-metal reactors. It offers greatly reduced deformation during irradiation, while maintaining good operating characteristics

  7. The importance of simulation facilities for the development of review criteria for advanced human system interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced control room (ACR) concepts are being developed in the commercial nuclear industry as part of future reactor designs. The ACRs will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role (function) in the system, the method of information presentation, the ways in which the operator interacts with the system, and the requirements on the operator to understand and supervise an increasingly complex system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The NRC is developing guidelines to support their review of these advanced designs. As part of this effort, a methodology for guidance development was established, and topics in need of further research were identified. Simulators of various kinds are likely to play important roles in the development of review guidelines and in the evaluation of ACRs. This paper describes a general approach to review criteria development, and discusses the role of simulators in addressing research needs

  8. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests at SLAC (FACET) Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amann, J.; Bane, K.; /SLAC

    2009-10-30

    This Conceptual Design Report (CDR) describes the design of FACET. It will be updated to stay current with the developing design of the facility. This CDR begins as the baseline conceptual design and will evolve into an 'as-built' manual for the completed facility. The Executive Summary, Chapter 1, gives an introduction to the FACET project and describes the salient features of its design. Chapter 2 gives an overview of FACET. It describes the general parameters of the machine and the basic approaches to implementation. The FACET project does not include the implementation of specific scientific experiments either for plasma wake-field acceleration for other applications. Nonetheless, enough work has been done to define potential experiments to assure that the facility can meet the requirements of the experimental community. Chapter 3, Scientific Case, describes the planned plasma wakefield and other experiments. Chapter 4, Technical Description of FACET, describes the parameters and design of all technical systems of FACET. FACET uses the first two thirds of the existing SLAC linac to accelerate the beam to about 20GeV, and compress it with the aid of two chicanes, located in Sector 10 and Sector 20. The Sector 20 area will include a focusing system, the generic experimental area and the beam dump. Chapter 5, Management of Scientific Program, describes the management of the scientific program at FACET. Chapter 6, Environment, Safety and Health and Quality Assurance, describes the existing programs at SLAC and their application to the FACET project. It includes a preliminary analysis of safety hazards and the planned mitigation. Chapter 7, Work Breakdown Structure, describes the structure used for developing the cost estimates, which will also be used to manage the project. The chapter defines the scope of work of each element down to level 3.

  9. New material equations for electromagnetism with toroid polarizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With regard to the toroid contributions, a modified system of equations of electrodynamics moving continuous media has been obtained. Alternative formalisms to introduce the toroid moment contributions in the equations of electromagnetism has been worked out. The two four-potential formalism has been developed. Lorentz transformation laws for the toroid polarizations has been given. Covariant form of equations of electrodynamics of continuous media with toroid polarizations has been written. (author)

  10. Coupling of Applied Non-axisymmetric Fields to Toroidal Torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, N. C.; Park, J.-K.; Menard, J. E.; Strait, E. J.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Lanctot, M. J.

    2014-10-01

    Recent advances in the modeling of neoclassical toroidal viscosity (NTV) have enabled realistic predictions of the coupling between applied non-axisymmetric fields and the resultant toroidal torque in the DIII-D tokamak. The strong dependence of the NTV on the amplified plasma kink response reduces the control of the non-resonant torque to a single mode model, in which the torque optimization is equivalent to an optimization of the net non-axisymmetric field's overlap with the spatial structure of the dominant mode. This single mode model has enabled efficient feed-forward correction of the n = 1 and n = 2 intrinsic error fields and n = 1-3 proxy error fields in NTV dominated scenarios. In addition, rotation drive toward a neoclassical offset using multiple coil sets has been optimized in accordance with the single mode model. Similar linear optimization techniques could be used to design future coil sets for rotation control, while inclusion of multimodal effects will be necessary for rotation profile control. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-AC02-09CH11466 and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  11. Development of hot laboratory facility under the project of advanced infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JMTR is preparing for its reoperation, and hot laboratory facilities are also promoting the adjustment of post-irradiation test facilities. The improvement plans from FY2010 to FY2011 are as follows: (1) transmission electron microscope for performing a highly accurate analysis that specializes in the local microscopic area of irradiated materials, (2) focused ion beam processing device, (3) improvement of composite type microstructure analysis device such as X-ray photoelectron spectrometer, (4) improvement of high-performance manipulator of visual function-equipped type, for efficiently, quickly, and safely handling microscopic test samples and large irradiation capsules, and the power manipulator for handling large capsules, and (5) improvement of RI extraction cell for extracting molybdenum-99, as the parent nuclide of technetium-99m used as a radiopharmaceutical. The improvement of these cutting-edge devices enables the development of the next generation light-water reactor as well as the research and development utilizing the state-of-the-art equipment, such as technological development of medical RI production, and gives expectations for contribution to the research and development of future technologies. (A.O.)

  12. Trapped ion mode in toroidally rotating plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of radially sheared toroidal flows on the Trapped Ion Mode (TIM) is investigated using a two-dimensional eigenmode code. These radially extended toroidal microinstabilities could significantly influence the interpretation of confinement scaling trends and associated fluctuation properties observed in recent tokamak experiments. In the present analysis, the electrostatic drift kinetic equation is obtained from the general nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in rotating plasmas. In the long perpendicular wavelength limit kτρbi much-lt 1, where ρbi is the average trapped-ion banana width, the resulting eigenmode equation becomes a coupled system of second order differential equations nmo for the poloidal harmonics. These equations are solved using finite element methods. Numerical results from the analysis of low and medium toroidal mode number instabilities are presented using representative TFTR L-mode input parameters. To illustrate the effects of mode coupling, a case is presented where the poloidal mode coupling is suppressed. The influence of toroidal rotation on a TFTR L-mode shot is also analyzed by including a beam species with considerable larger temperature. A discussion of the numerical results is presented

  13. ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet reached nominal field

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

     On 9 November the barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas, with an electrical current of 21 000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils as shown on this graph

  14. Celebration for the ATLAS Barrel Toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Representatives from Funding Agencies and Barrel Toroid Magnet Laboratories during the ceremony. From left to right: Jean Zinn-Justin (Head of DAPNIA/CEA/Saclay), CERN Director-General Robert Aymar, and Roberto Petronzio (President INFN).Allan Clark (DPNC University Geneva) and Enrique Fernandez (IFAE Barcelona) were among the guests visiting the ATLAS cavern. The barrel toroid is visible in the background. A celebration took place at Point 1 on 13 December to toast the recent powering-up of the ATLAS barrel toroid magnet to full field (Bulletin No. 47-48/06). About 70 guests were invited to attend, mainly composed of representatives from funding partners and key members of the laboratory management teams of the barrel toroid magnet, representing CEA France, INFN Italy, BMBF Germany, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Russia, JINR Dubna and CERN. An introductory speech by ATLAS spokesperson Peter Jenni the scene for evening. This was followed by the ATLAS magnet system project leader Herman Ten Kate's account of the...

  15. ATLAS: Full power for the toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    The 9th of November was a memorable day for ATLAS. Just before midnight, the gigantic Barrel toroid magnet reached its nominal field of 4 teslas in the coil windings, with an electrical current of 21000 amperes (21 kA) passing through the eight superconducting coils (as seen on the graph). This achievement was obtained after several weeks of commissioning. The ATLAS Barrel Toroid was first cooled down for about six weeks in July-August to -269°C (4.8 K) and then powered up step-by-step in successive test sessions to 21 kA. This is 0.5 kA above the current required to produce the nominal magnetic field. Afterwards, the current was safely switched off and the stored magnetic energy of 1.1 gigajoules was dissipated in the cold mass, raising its temperature to a safe -218°C (55 K). 'We can now say that the ATLAS Barrel Toroid is ready for physics,' said Herman ten Kate, project leader for the ATLAS magnet system. The ATLAS barrel toroid magnet is the result of a close collaboration between the magnet la...

  16. Reduced Magnetohydrodynamic Equations in Toroidal Geometry

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Shen-Ming; YU Guo-Yang

    2001-01-01

    By applying a new assumption of density, I.e. R2 p = const, the continuity equation is satisfied to the order ofe2`+with e being the inverse aspect ratio. In the case of large aspect ratio, a set of reduced magnetohydrodynamicequations in toroidal geometry are obtained. The new assumption about the density is supported by experimentalobservation to some extent.

  17. Chiral Anomaly in Toroidal Carbon Nanotubes

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, K.

    2001-01-01

    It is pointed out that the chiral anomaly in 1+1 dimensions should be observed in toroidal carbon nanotubes on a planar geometry with varying magnetic field. We show that the chiral anomaly is closely connected with the persistent current in a one-dimensional metallic ring.

  18. Toroidal groups line bundles, cohomology and quasi-Abelian varieties

    CERN Document Server

    Kopfermann, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    Toroidal groups are the connecting link between torus groups and any complex Lie groups. Many properties of complex Lie groups such as the pseudoconvexity and cohomology are determined by their maximal toroidal subgroups. Quasi-Abelian varieties are meromorphically separable toroidal groups. They are the natural generalisation of the Abelian varieties. Nevertheless, their behavior can be completely different as the wild groups show.

  19. On the stabilization of toroidal pinches by finite larmor radius effects and toroidal magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radial eigenvalue problem for internal modes in a large aspect ratio toriodal pinch has been solved. A particularly stable regime for a weak but nonzero toroidal magnetic field has been found. (31 refs.)

  20. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry

  1. Analysis of spiky net toroidal current in the magnetized toroidal plasma from the point of view of helicity conservation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been observed that 'runaway oscillations' in the toroidal current of the magnetized resistive toroidal plasma may cause continuous tearing activity, resulting in 'spiky' net toroidal current and modulation of toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields of the plasma with a definite phase relationship, depending upon the magnitude of vertical magnetic field. The present experimental results on current decay and recovery are explained from the point of view of helicity conservation. (author)

  2. Dynamical model for the toroidal sporadic meteors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorný, Petr; Vokrouhlický, David [Institute of Astronomy, Charles University, V Holešovičkách 2, CZ-18000 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Nesvorný, David [Department of Space Studies, Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Campbell-Brown, Margaret; Brown, Peter, E-mail: petr.pokorny@volny.cz, E-mail: vokrouhl@cesnet.cz, E-mail: davidn@boulder.swri.edu, E-mail: margaret.campbell@uwo.ca, E-mail: pbrown@uwo.ca [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-07-01

    More than a decade of radar operations by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar have allowed both young and moderately old streams to be distinguished from the dispersed sporadic background component. The latter has been categorized according to broad radiant regions visible to Earth-based observers into three broad classes: the helion and anti-helion source, the north and south apex sources, and the north and south toroidal sources (and a related arc structure). The first two are populated mainly by dust released from Jupiter-family comets and new comets. Proper modeling of the toroidal sources has not to date been accomplished. Here, we develop a steady-state model for the toroidal source of the sporadic meteoroid complex, compare our model with the available radar measurements, and investigate a contribution of dust particles from our model to the whole population of sporadic meteoroids. We find that the long-term stable part of the toroidal particles is mainly fed by dust released by Halley type (long period) comets (HTCs). Our synthetic model reproduces most of the observed features of the toroidal particles, including the most troublesome low-eccentricity component, which is due to a combination of two effects: particles' ability to decouple from Jupiter and circularize by the Poynting-Robertson effect, and large collision probability for orbits similar to that of the Earth. Our calibrated model also allows us to estimate the total mass of the HTC-released dust in space and check the flux necessary to maintain the cloud in a steady state.

  3. EMPACT: Electrons Muons Partons with Air Core Toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The EMPACT experiment utilizes a broad approach to maximize its discovery potential for new phenomena accessible at the SSC. The high resolution detector has a balances emphasis on, and large acceptance for, electrons, muons, jets, and noninteracting particles, and is capable of utilizing the ultimate luminosity of the SSC. The detector emphasizes excellent calorimetry augmented by TRD tracking, and employs an innovative system of superconducting air core toroids for muon measurements. Significant engineering effort has established the feasibility of a baseline detector concept and has addressed the related issues of support facilities, assembly, and detector integration. The design has been tested against the challenges of predicted phenomena, with the expectation that this will optimize the capacity for observing the unexpected. EMPACT's international collaboration has unprecedented support from major aerospace industries who are providing tools and expertise for project design and integration, which will assure that a detector optimized for performance and cost will be available for the first collisions at the new laboratory

  4. Development of manufacturing technologies for ITER toroidal field coil conductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is responsible for procuring 25% of the ITER toroidal field (TF) coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) for the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless-steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA has constructed a new conductor manufacturing facility. Prior to starting the conductor manufacturing, JAEA manufactured a 760 m-long Cu dummy conductor as a conductor manufacturing process qualification, such as processes of welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling. All manufacturing processes have been qualified and JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils. (author)

  5. The ion beam sputtering facility at KURRI: Coatings for advanced neutron optical devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, Masahiro, E-mail: hino@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Oda, Tatsuro [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kitaguchi, Masaaki [Center for Experimental Studies, KMI, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Yamada, Norifumi L. [Neutron Science Laboratory, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, 203-1 Shirakata, Tokai, Ibaraki 319-1106 (Japan); Tasaki, Seiji [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 615-8540 (Japan); Kawabata, Yuji [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto university, Kumatori, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2015-10-11

    We describe a film coating facility for the development of multilayer mirrors for use in neutron optical devices that handle slow neutron beams. Recently, we succeeded in fabricating a large neutron supermirror with high reflectivity using an ion beam sputtering system (KUR-IBS), as well as all neutron supermirrors in two neutron guide tubes at BL06 at J-PARC/MLF. We also realized a large flexible self-standing m=5 NiC/Ti supermirror and very small d-spacing (d=1.65 nm) multilayer sheets. In this paper, we present an overview of the performance and utility of non-magnetic neutron multilayer mirrors fabricated with the KUR-IBS.

  6. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube

  7. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  8. Advances in technology for the construction of deep-underground facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    The workshop was organized in order to address technological issues important to decisions regarding the feasibility of strategic options. The objectives of the workshop were to establish the current technological capabilities for deep-underground construction, to project those capabilities through the compressed schedule proposed for construction, and to identify promising directions for timely allocation of existing research and development resources. The earth has been used as a means of protection and safekeeping for many centuries. Recently, the thickness of the earth cover required for this purpose has been extended to the 2,000- to 3,000-ft range in structures contemplated for nuclear-waste disposal, energy storage, and strategic systems. For defensive missile basing, it is now perceived that the magnitude of the threat has increased through better delivery systems, larger payloads, and variable tactics of attack. Thus, depths of 3,000 to 8,000 ft are being considered seriously for such facilities. Moreover, it appears desirable that the facilities be operational (if not totally complete) for defensive purposes within a five-year construction schedule. Deep excavations such as mines are similar in many respects to nearsurface tunnels and caverns for transit, rail, sewer, water, hydroelectric, and highway projects. But the differences that do exist are significant. Major distinctions between shallow and deep construction derive from the stress fields and behavior of earth materials around the openings. Different methodologies are required to accommodate other variations resulting from increased depth, such as elevated temperatures, reduced capability for site exploration, and limited access during project execution. This report addresses these and other questions devoted to geotechnical characterization, design, construction, and excavation equipment.

  9. The Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Science Drivers, Technology Developments, and Synergies with Other Future Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postman, Marc; Brown, Tom; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Stahl, H. Philip; Mountain, Matt; Hyde, Tupper; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R. Michael; Tumlinson, Jason; Soummer, Remi

    2011-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astrophysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 m to 2.4 m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  10. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is being planned as a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent x-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 11 long straight sections and up to 48 bend-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams, from less than 10 eV to more than 1 keV, will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in materials and surface science, biology, atomic physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bend magnets will provide high-flux, broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Development of an Integrated Test Facility (ITF) for the advanced man machine interface evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Integrated Test Facilityu (ITF) is a human factors experimental environment to evaluate an advanced Man Machine Interface(MMI) design. The ITF includes a Human Machine Simulator (HMS) comprised of a nuclear power plant function simulator, man-machine interface, experiment control station for the experiment control and design, human behavioural data measurement system, and Data Analysis and Experiment Evaluation Supporting System(DAEXESS). The most important features of ITF is to secure the flexibility and expandibility of Man Machine Interface(MMI) design to change easily the environment of experiments to accomplish the experiment's objects. In this paper, we describe a development scope and characteristics of the ITF such as, hardware and software development scope and characteristics, system thermohydraulic modelling characteristics, and experiment station characteristics for the experiment variables design and control, to be used as an experiment enviroment for the evaluation of VDU-based control room

  12. Development of compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The application of the compact toroids injector for direct plasma controls has been investigated. The compact toroids injection can fuel particles directly into the core of the plasma and modify the plasma profiles at the desired locations. The acceleration tests of the compact toroids have been conducted at Himeji Institute of Technology. The tests showed that the hydrogen compact toroid was accelerated up to 80km/s and the plasma density of the compact toroid was compressed to 1.2 x 1021m-3. (orig.)

  13. The Unmanned Research Airplane Facility at the Cyprus Institute: Advanced Atmospheric Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Manfred A.; Argyrides, Marios; Ioannou, Stelios; Keleshis, Christos

    2014-05-01

    Unmanned Aerial Systems (UASs) have been established as versatile tools for different applications, providing data and observations for atmospheric and Earth-Systems research. They provide an urgently needed link between in-situ ground based measurements and satellite remote sensing observations and are distinguished by significant versatility, flexibility and moderate operational costs. Building on an earlier project (Autonomous Flying Platforms for Atmospheric and Earth Surface Observations project; APAESO) of the Energy, Environment and Water Research Center (EEWRC) at the Cyprus Institute (APAESO is co-financed by the European Development Fund and the Republic of Cyprus through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation), we have built up an Unmanned Research Aircraft Facility at The Cyprus Institute (CyI-URAF). The basic components of this facility comprise four CRUISERS airplanes (ET-Air, Slovakia) as UAS platforms, a substantial range of scientific instruments to be flown on these platforms, a mobile Ground Control Station and a well-equipped workshop and calibration laboratory. The APAESO platforms are suitable to carrying out atmospheric and earth-surface observations in the (Eastern) Mediterranean (and elsewhere). They enable 3D measurements for determining physical, chemical and radiative atmospheric properties, aerosol and dust concentrations and atmospheric dynamics as well as 2D investigations into land management practices, vegetation and agricultural mapping, contaminant detection and the monitoring and assessment of hydrological parameters and processes of a given region at high spatial resolution. We will report on some of the essential modifications of the platforms and some of the instrumentation that were instrumental in preparing the research airplanes for a variety of collaborative research projects with. The first scientific mission involved the employment of a DOAS-system (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) in cooperation with

  14. Approach to the open advanced facilities initiative for innovation (strategic use by industry) at the University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The University of Tsukuba, Tandem Accelerator Complex (UTTAC) possesses the 12UD Pelletron tandem accelerator and the 1 MV Tandetron accelerator for University's inter-department education research. We have actively advanced collaborative researches with other research institutes and industrial users. Since the Open Advanced Facilities Initiative for Innovation by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology started in 2007, 12 industrial experiments have been carried out at the UTTAC. This report describes efforts by University's accelerator facility to get industrial users. (author)

  15. The Budapest research reactor as an advanced research facility for the early 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Budapest Research Reactor, Hungary's first nuclear facility was originally put into operation in 1959. The reactor serves for: basic and applied research, technological and commercial applications, education and training. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research. This unique research possibility is used by a broad user community of Europe. Eight instruments for neutron scattering, radiography and activation analyses are already used, others (e.g. time of flight spectrometer, neutron reflectometer) are being installed. The majority of these instruments will get a much improved utilization when the cold neutron source is put into operation. In 1999 the Budapest Research Reactor was operated for 3129 full power hours in 14 periods. The normal operation period took 234 hours (starting Monday noon and finishing Thursday morning). The entire production for the year 1999 was 1302 MW days. This is a slightly reduced value, due to the installation of the cold neutron source. For the year 2000 a somewhat longer operation is foreseen (near to 4000 hours), as the cold neutron source will be operational. The operation of the reactor is foreseen at least up to the end of the first decade of the 21st century. (author)

  16. Recent advances in automatic alignment system for the National Iginition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Kalantar, D; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V

    2010-12-08

    The automatic alignment system for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large-scale parallel system that directs all 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path to a 50-micron focus at target chamber in less than 50 minutes. The system automatically commands 9,000 stepping motors to adjust mirrors and other optics based upon images acquired from high-resolution digital cameras viewing beams at various locations. Forty-five control loops per beamline request image processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze these images of the beams and references, and automaticallys teer the beams toward the target. This paper discusses the upgrades to the NIF automatic alignment system to handle new alignment needs and evolving requirements as related to various types of experiments performed. As NIF becomes a continuously-operated system and more experiments are performed, performance monitoring is increasingly important for maintenance and commissioning work. Data, collected during operations, is analyzed for tuning of the laser and targeting maintenance work. handling evolving alignment and maintenance needs is expected for the planned 30-year operational life of NIF.

  17. The Segmented Bifilar Contrawound Toroidal Helical Antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanvoorhies, Kurt Louis

    The segmented bifilar contrawound toroidal helical antenna, a.k.a. QuadContra antenna creates a toroidal magnetic current whose radiated electromagnetic fields emulate those of an electric dipole located normal to the plane of the toroidal helix. This antenna is a magnetic dual of the constant current electric loop antenna. Its principal advantages of reduced size and low profile result from both its circular geometry and from the velocity factor of its slow wave contrawound helical structure. This antenna is constructed by winding two conductors in contrawound relation to each other on a toroidal form, dividing the winding into an even number of segments, and reversing the pitch sense of each conductor from one segment to another. Feed ports are located on the conductors at the segment boundaries, and are connected in alternate phase to a central signal terminal via balanced and tuned transmission line elements. At resonance, each winding segment supports a quarter-wave sinusoidal current distribution. Toroidal electric current components are canceled, and poloidal current components are enhanced in the resulting anti-symmetric mode current distribution. This study measured and simulated the velocity factor, input impedance, bandwidth and simulated the radiation gain and pattern for a variety of linear and toroidal structures. The velocity factor, modeled as a power function of the ratio of axial winding length to wire length, was two to three times slower for the anti-symmetric mode contrawound helix than for a comparable monofilar helix. The radiation characteristics of the antenna were simulated using the OSU ESP4 Moment Method based program, after making extensive improvements to accommodate a wide variety of antenna configurations and to automatically find resonant frequencies. The simulated QuadContra antenna radiates with vertically polarization in a dipole-like pattern having a gain about 2 dB less than the dipole. The gain falls off dramatically for

  18. Facile Synthesis of Lithium Sulfide Nanocrystals for Use in Advanced Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuemin; Wolden, Colin A; Ban, Chunmei; Yang, Yongan

    2015-12-30

    This work reports a new method of synthesizing anhydrous lithium sulfide (Li2S) nanocrystals and demonstrates their potential as cathode materials for advanced rechargeable batteries. Li2S is synthesized by reacting hydrogen sulfide (H2S) with lithium naphthalenide (Li-NAP), a thermodynamically spontaneous reaction that proceeds to completion rapidly at ambient temperature and pressure. The process completely removes H2S, a major industrial waste, while cogenerating 1,4-dihydronaphthalene, itself a value-added chemical that can be used as liquid fuel. The phase purity, morphology, and homogeneity of the resulting nanopowders were confirmed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The synthesized Li2S nanoparticles (100 nm) were assembled into cathodes, and their performance was compared to that of cathodes fabricated using commercial Li2S micropowders (1-5 μm). Electrochemical analyses demonstrated that the synthesized Li2S were superior in terms of (dis)charge capacity, cycling stability, output voltage, and voltage efficiency. PMID:26633238

  19. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Seong Nam; Lee, Dong Hoon; Chung, Sung Hak; Kim, Dong Nam; Hwang, Sang Ho [Kyunghee Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-07-15

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals.

  20. A human factors evaluation of advanced control facilities in Korea Next Generation Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study are as follows: to evaluate the impacts of advanced MMIs on operator performance; to identify new types of human errors; to present Human Factors Engineering (HFE) issues to support the safety reviews performed by the Korea Institute for Nuclear Safety. General trends in the performance measures of cognitive task demand, mental workload, and situation awareness were analyzed. The results showed that the conventional plant was superior to KNGR on the operator performance. The results of the questionnaire revealed that WDS was the most frequently used MMI resource, followed by CPS, LDP, SC, and AS. The evaluation of operator's satisfaction showed that WDS was the most satisfactory resource, followed by LDP, SC, CPS', and AS, AS was rated as the most worst resource due to inappropriate functional organization and lack of operator's visibility. Stepwise regression analyses showed that human errors of SRO and RO were mainly dominated by the cognitive behavior of 'interpretation' with WDS, while the cognitive behavior of TO was mainly dominated by 'observation' with WDS and AS. The ten HFE issues for the KNGR MCR were presented to address important design deficiencies identified in this study. The issues should be resolved to improve safety of KNGR at least up to the level of the conventional NPPs. Verification and validation activities after implementing those resolutions should be also performed to reach optimal plant safety and other operational goals

  1. Advanced tokamak research at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility in support of ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fusion energy research aims to develop an economically and environmentally sustainable energy system. The tokamak, a doughnut shaped plasma confined by magnetic fields generated by currents flowing in external coils and the plasma, is a leading concept. Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in the DIII-D tokamak seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation. This necessitates replacing the inherently pulsed inductive method of driving plasma current. Our approach emphasizes high pressure to maximize fusion gain while maximizing the self-driven bootstrap current, along with external current profile control. This requires integrated, simultaneous control of many characteristics of the plasma with a diverse set of techniques. This has already resulted in noninductive conditions being maintained at high pressure on current relaxation timescales. A high degree of physical understanding is facilitated by a closely coupled integrated modelling effort. Simulations are used both to plan and interpret experiments, making possible continued development of the models themselves. An ultimate objective is the capability to predict behaviour in future AT experiments. Analysis of experimental results relies on use of the TRANSP code via the FusionGrid, and our use of the FusionGrid will increase as additional analysis and simulation tools are made available

  2. In-situ resource utilization in the design of advanced lunar facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-11-01

    Resource utilization will play an important role in the establishment and support of a permanently manned lunar base. At the University of Houston - College of Architecture and the Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture, a study team recently investigated the potential use of lunar in-situ materials in the design of lunar facilities. The team identified seven potential lunar construction materials; concrete, sulfur concrete, cast basalt, sintered basalt, glass, fiberglass, and metals. Analysis and evaluation of these materials with respect to their physical properties, processes, energy requirements, resource efficiency, and overall advantages and disadvantages lead to the selection of basalt materials as the more likely construction material for initial use on a lunar base. Basalt materials can be formed out of in-situ lunar regolith, with minor material beneficiation, by a simple process of heating and controlled cooling. The team then conceptualized a construction system that combines lunar regolith sintering and casting to make pressurized structures out of lunar resources. The design uses a machine that simultaneously excavates and sinters the lunar regolith to create a cylindrical hole, which is then enclosed with cast basalt slabs, allowing the volume to be pressurized for use as a living or work environment. Cylinder depths of up to 4 to 6 m in the lunar mare or 10 to 12 m in the lunar highlands are possible. Advantages of this construction system include maximum resource utilization, relatively large habitable volumes, interior flexibility, and minimal construction equipment needs. Conclusions of this study indicate that there is significant potential for the use of basalt, a lunar resource derived construction material, as a low cost alternative to Earth-based materials. It remains to be determined when in lunar base phasing this construction method should be implemented.

  3. Muon dynamics in a toroidal sector magnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present scenario for the cooling channel in a high brightness muon collider calls for a quasi-continuous solenoidal focusing channel. The beam line consists of a periodic array of hydrogen absorbers immersed in a solenoid with alternating focusing field and rf linacs at the zero field points. Solenoids and toroidal sectors have a natural place in muon collider design given the large emittance of the beam and consequently, the large transverse momentum of the initial pion beam or the decay muon beam. Bent solenoids as shown were studied for use at the front end of the machine, as part of the capture channel and more recently as part of a diagnostic setup to measure the position and momentum of muons. The authors present a Hamiltonian formulation of muon dynamics in toroidal sector solenoids (bent solenoid)

  4. Anomalous transport theory for toroidal helical plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anomalous transport coefficients in toroidal helical plasmas are studied, based on the innovative theoretical method. The self-sustained turbulence is analyzed by balancing the nonlinear growth due to the current diffusivity with the nonlinear damping by the ion viscosity and thermal conductivity. Interchange and ballooning mode turbulence is investigated, and the geometrical dependence of the anomalous transport coefficient is clarified. Variation of transport owing to the geometrical difference in toroidal helical plasmas is illustrated. The mechanism for confinement improvement is searched for. To verify the nonlinear destabilization and the self-sustained state, the nonlinear simulation of the interchange mode turbulence is performed in a sheared slab. It is demonstrated that the nonlinear enhancement of the growth rate occurs when the fluctuation amplitude exceeds the critical level. In the saturation stage, the fluctuation level becomes higher associated with the enhanced nonlinear growth. (author)

  5. Diffusiophoresis of a charged toroidal polyelectrolyte.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shiojenn; Hsu, Yen-Rei; Hsu, Jyh-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Considering recent application of concentration driven motion of charged nanoparticles in sensing technology, we model the diffusiophoresis of an isolated toroidal polyelectrolyte (PE) for the first time. Choosing an aqueous KCl solution for illustration, its behavior under various conditions is simulated by varying the double layer thickness, the size of toroid, and its softness and fixed charge density. We show that the behavior of the present PE can be different both quantitatively and qualitatively from that of the corresponding spherical PE. This arises from the competition of the hydrodynamic force and the electric force acting on a PE. The geometry and the nature of a PE can also influence appreciably its behavior, yielding complicated and interesting results. PMID:26970033

  6. Antimicrobial Peptides in Toroidal and Cylindrical Pores

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlovic, Maja; Lazaridis, Themis

    2010-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are small, usually cationic peptides, which permeabilize biological membranes. Their mechanism of action is still not well understood. Here we investigate the preference of alamethicin and melittin for pores of different shapes, using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the peptides in pre-formed toroidal and cylindrical pores. When an alamethicin hexamer is initially embedded in a cylindrical pore, at the end of the simulation the pore remains cylindrical or ...

  7. Kinetic Damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.Y. Fu; H.L. Berk; A. Pletzer

    2005-05-03

    The damping of Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes in JET plasmas is investigated by using a reduced kinetic model. Typically no significant damping is found to occur near the center of the plasma due to mode conversion to kinetic Alfven waves. In contrast, continuum damping from resonance near the plasma edge may be significant, and when it is, it gives rise to damping rates that are compatible with the experimental observations.

  8. Toroidal geometry subroutines for MORSE-CG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equations, coding, and procedures that are required to include a torus in the Combinatorial Geometry subroutines of the MORSE-CG code are described. The derivation and solutions of the quartic equation that describes a torus along with additional subroutines and the modifications to existing subroutines required to carry out the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in toroidal geometry are presented. The input requirements and a sample problem are included

  9. Stellarator approach to toroidal plasma confinement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An overview is presented of the development and current status of the stellarator approach to controlled thermonuclear confinement. Recent experimental, theoretical, and systems developments have made this concept a viable option for the evolution of the toroidal confinement program. Some experimental study of specific problems associated with departure from two-dimensional symmetry must be undertaken before the full advantages and opportunities of steady-state, net-current-free operation can be realized

  10. On the characteristic difference of neoclassical bootstrap current and its effects on MHD equilibria between CHS heliotron/torsatron and CHS-qa quasi-axisymmetric stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristic difference of neoclassical bootstrap current and its effects on MHD equilibria are described for the CHS heliotron/torsatron and the CHS-qa quasi-axisymmetric stellarator. The direction of bootstrap current strongly depends on collisionality in CHS, whereas it does not in CHS-qa because of quasi-axisymmetry. In the CHS configuration, it appears that enhanced bumpy (B01) and sideband components of helical ripple (B11) play an important role in reducing the magnetic geometrical factor, which is a key factor in evaluating the value of bootstrap current, and determining its polarity. The bootstrap current in CHS-qa is theoretically predicted to be larger than that in CHS and produces significant effects on the resulting rotational transform and magnetic shear. In the finite β plasmas, the magnetic well becomes deeper in both CHS and CHS-qa and its region is expanded in CHS. The existence of co-flowing bootstrap current makes the magnetic well shallow in comparison with that in currentless equilibrium. (author)

  11. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, R.W.; Kazimi, M.S.

    1979-07-01

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The only potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting toroidal magnets. It is found that the two general classifications of protection methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which allow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed.

  12. Advanced nutrient root feeding system for conveyer-type cylindrical plant growth facilities developed for microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovich, Yuliy A.; Smolyanina, Svetlana O.; Krivobok, Anna; Krivobok, Nikolay

    A new brand of cylindrical conveyer-type space plant growth facilities (PGF) has been created to improve of cosmonauts’ diet in the microgravity conditions. Up to date several ground prototypes of the space PGF have been made and tested: “Phytocycle”, “Vitacycle”, “Phytocycle-LED”, “Phytoconveyer”; now the space PGF “Vitacycle-T” for the Russian segment of the ISS is under developing. In the PGFs the ion-exchange salt-saturated fibrous artificial soil (AS) is used as a root medium. We have proposed the system for enrichment of irrigation water by nutrients to decrease of the AS store required for PGF working during the long space mission. The system includes root modules filled in fibrous ion-exchange AS, the enrichment column with crumble salt-saturation ion-exchange resin and the cassette with slow releasing fertilizer (SRF). Both substrates (ion-exchange resin and SRF) are necessary because of the SRF contains mostly N, P and K but another three essential elements S, Ca, Mg are provided by the ion-exchange resin. In the system water goes throw the enrichment column with ion-exchange resin fertilizing by the nutrients and comes into the mixer cell fertilize equipped with the electrical conductivity sensor. When the signal of the conductivity sensor is coming to the controller it turns on the pump directed the water flow throw the cassette with SRF until the electric conductivity of the solution in the mixer cell will reach the setpoint. The nutrient root feeding system was tested during 88 days when Chinese cabbage grew in PGF “Phytocycle-LED”. The crop has been continuously illuminated by red and blue LEDs in the PPF ratio 7 to 1; an integral PPF level has been (240 ± 10) µmol/(m2×s). There was no renewal of the used fibrous AS during the experiment. The PGF total electric power consumption was of 0,45 kW. The average fresh biomass productivity of the PGF during steady state working mode was equal 135×g/day per m2 of the illuminated

  13. Toroidal rotation and halo current produced by disruptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Henry; Sugiyama, Linda; Paccagnella, Roberto; Breslau, Joshua; Jardin, Stephen

    2013-10-01

    In several experiments including JET, it was observed that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal rotation. There is a concern that there may be a resonance between rotating toroidal perturbations and the resonant frequencies of the ITER vacuum vessel, causing enhanced damage. MHD simulations with M3D demonstrate that disruptions produce toroidal rotation. The toroidal velocity can produce several rotations of the sideways force during a disruption. Edge localized modes (ELMs) also produce poloidal and toroidal rotation. A theory of rotation produced by MHD activity will be presented. In the case of ELMs, the theory gives toroidal rotation Alfven Mach number, Mϕ ~10-2βN . This is consistent with a scaling for intrinsic toroidal rotation in H mode tokamaks. It was also discovered on JET that disruptions were accompanied by toroidal variation of the plasma current Iϕ. From ∇ . j = 0 , the toroidal current variation ΔIϕ is proportional to the 3D halo current, ∮Jn Rdl , where Jn is the normal current density at the wall. The 3D halo current is calculated analytically and computationally. A bound on ΔIϕ /Iϕ is found, proportional to the halo current fraction and toroidal peaking factor. Supported by USDOE and ITER.

  14. Reflectometer end station for synchrotron calibrations of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility flight optics and for spectrometric research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preparations have been underway to construct and test a facility for grazing incidence reflectance calibrations of flat mirrors at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The purpose is to conduct calibrations on witness flats to the coating process of the flight mirrors for NASA's Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (AXAF). The x-ray energy range required is 50 eV--12 keV. Three monochromatic beamlines (X8C, X8A, U3A) will provide energy tunability over this entire range. The goal is to calibrate the AXAF flight mirrors with uncertainties approaching 1%. A portable end station with a precision-positioning reflectometer has been developed for this work. We have resolved the vacuum cleanliness requirements to preserve the coating integrity of the flats with the strict grazing-angle certainty requirements placed on the rotational control system of the reflectometer. A precision positioning table permits alignment of the system to the synchrotron beam to within 10 arcsec; the reflectometer's rotational control system can then produce grazing angle accuracy to within less than 2 arcsec, provided that the electron orbit is stable. At 10--12 keV, this degree of angular accuracy is necessary to achieve the calibration accuracy required for AXAF. However the most important energy regions for the synchrotron calibration are in the 2000--3200 eV range, where the M-edge absorption features of the coating element, iridium, appear, and the 300--700 eV range of the Ir N edges. The detail versus energy exhibited in these features cannot be traced adequately without a tunable energy source, which necessitates a synchrotron for this work. We present the mechanical designs, motion control systems, detection and measurement capabilities, and selected procedures for our measurements, as well as reflectance data

  15. Implementation of advanced control system in 700 MWe fuelling machine test facility using FPGA and Industrial PCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuelling machines are required to perform ON-POWER refuelling in Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors (PHWR). Fuelling machine is an example of high level engineered and precision robotics, which performs more then thousands of complex operations with the help of mechanical actuators using electrical and fluid hydraulic powers. The complete refuelling operation is performed remotely by an automatic control system which is specifically designed to cater the step by step needs of fuelling operation along with built in safety feature to avoid any damage to man, machine and reactor safety. As the design evolution of PHWR from 220 MWe to 700 MWe has resulted in significant changes, Fuelling machines have also experienced substantial advances and design modification from each reactor. These design changes are required to be simulated and verified to ascertain the intended behaviour during actual reactor operation. In view of the above, to validate and verify the design changes of 700 MWe Fuelling machine, a fully automatic Fuelling Machine Test facility (FMTF) is developed at R and D Centre, NPCIL. This facility, with the help of three similar reactor coolant channels, is able to simulate the conditions as in actual reactor environment and performs full refuelling sequence in complete auto mode. The control system philosophy for 700 MWe FMTF was to have fully automatic and safe operating sequence with PC based architecture using minimum hardware to have compact and simplified design. This resulted in the use of Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) based hardwired logic implementation along with Industrial Computer based control and display system using Data acquisition Cards. This design has drastically reduced the complex wiring implementation of combinational and sequential logic as compared to the earlier control system of FM and resulted in a very compact and sophisticated operator console. This paper brings out the details of FMTF control system which offers numerous

  16. Design status of the NET toroidal coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Toroidal Field Coil System consists of 16 superconducting coil windings, their coil casings and the intercoil structure. All of these components are located inside a common cryostat vessel and will therefore be at a temperature of about 4.50 degK during operation of the machine. The 16 coils are arranged in a toroidal configuration in order to provide a magnetic field for the confinement of the ring shaped plasma. The inner legs of the D-shaped coils form a vault which is subjected to the centering forces that are caused by the toroidal field itself. The interaction between the poloidal field and the toroidal currents creates Lorentz Forces which are perpendicular to the TF coil plane. Intercoil structure and vault have to resist these forces. The huge size of the coils in combination with the fact that an A15 conductor material has to be used require techniques that are somewhat beyond the present state of the art. Therefore, a conductor and magnet development program has been launched. The development studies carried out by Associated Laboratories in cooperation with NET Team have resulted in several flow cooled composite conductors. Futheron, full size conductor samples were manufactured and two subsize conductors were manufactured and wound into two 12 T model coils. Proposals for the manufacture of the coil winding, the power supply and quench protection system, the cooling system and the instrumentation have been worked out in the course of these studies. To ensure the feasibility of the cois two study contracts have been placed with industry. This report will stress the most difficult aspects of the coil manufacture, the assembly of the winding in its steel casing and the assembly of the 16 coils with the intercoil structure to a toroidal configuration. The results of the thermomechanical and electromagnetic analysis (e.g. eddy currents in coils case, stress, a.c. losses) - will be reported and their impact on the design of the TF system will be

  17. An overview on research developments of toroidal continuously variable transmissions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    As environmental protection agencies enact new regulations for automotive fuel economy and emission, the toroidal continuously variable transmissions (CVTs) keep on contribute to the advent of system technologies for better fuel consumption of automobiles with internal combustion engines (ICE). Toroidal CVTs use infinitely adjustable drive ratios instead of stepped gears to achieve optimal performance. Toroidal CVTs are one of the earliest patents to the automotive world but their torque capacities and reliability have limitations in the past. New developments and implementations in the control strategies, and several key technologies have led to development of more robust toroidal CVTs, which enables more extensive automotive application of toroidal CTVs. This paper concerns with the current development, upcoming and progress set in the context of the past development and the traditional problems associated with toroidal CVTs.

  18. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Savinov, V; Zheludev, N I

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving toroidal multipoles have been predicted to produce vector potential in the absence of electromagnetic fields. Existence of the toroidal response in metamaterials was recently demonstrated and is now a growing field of research. However, no direct analytical link has yet been established between the transmission and reflection of macroscopic electromagnetic media and toroidal dipole excitations. To address this essential gap in electromagnetic theory we have developed an analytical approach linking microscopic and macrosc...

  19. Alignment mask design and image processing for the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Richard R.; Awwal, Abdul; Cohen, Simon; Lowe-Webb, Roger; Roberts, Randy; Salmon, Thad; Smauley, David; Wilhelmsen, Karl

    2015-09-01

    The Advance Radiographic Capability (ARC) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a laser system that employs up to four petawatt (PW) lasers to produce a sequence of short pulses that generate X-rays which backlight high-density inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. ARC is designed to produce multiple, sequential X-ray images by using up to eight back lighters. The images will be used to examine the compression and ignition of a cryogenic deuterium-tritium target with tens-of-picosecond temporal resolution during the critical phases of an ICF shot. Multi-frame, hard-X-ray radiography of imploding NIF capsules is a capability which is critical to the success of NIF's missions. As in the NIF system, ARC requires an optical alignment mask that can be inserted and removed as needed for precise positioning of the beam. Due to ARC's split beam design, inserting the nominal NIF main laser alignment mask in ARC produced a partial blockage of the mask pattern. Requirements for a new mask design were needed. In this paper we describe the ARC mask requirements, the resulting mask design pattern, and the image analysis algorithms used to detect and identify the beam and reference centers required for ARC alignment.

  20. First qualification of ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductor jacketing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamada, Kazuya, E-mail: hamada.kazuya@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Isono, Takaaki; Nunoya, Yoshihiko; Matsui, Kunihiro; Kawano, Katsumi; Oshikiri, Masayuki; Tsutsumi, Fumiaki; Koizumi, Norikiyo; Nakajima, Hideo; Okuno, Kiyoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Japan); Matsuda, Hidemitsu; Yano, Yoshitaka [Nippon Steel Engineering Co. Ltd (Japan); Devred, Arnauld; Bessette, Denis [ITER Organization (France)

    2011-10-15

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility to procure 25% of the ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) in the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA started to produce strand, cables and jacket sections and to construct a conductor manufacturing (jacketing) facility in 2008. Following preparation in December 2009 of the jacketing facility, the dummy cable, the jacket sections and fabrication procedures, such as welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling, JAEA manufactured a 760 m long Cu dummy conductor for process qualification. Into the 760 m long Cu dummy conductor jacketing, JAEA successfully inserted the cable with a maximum force of 32 kN. The outer diameter of the cross section of the spooled conductor was 43.7 {+-} 0.15 mm, which complies with the ITER target requirement of 43.7 {+-} 0.3 mm. Following qualification of all manufacturing processes, JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils.

  1. First qualification of ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductor jacketing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) has the responsibility to procure 25% of the ITER Toroidal Field Coil conductors as the Japanese Domestic Agency (JADA) in the ITER project. The TF conductor is a circular shaped, cable-in-conduit conductor, composed of a cable and a stainless steel conduit (jacket). The outer diameter and maximum length of the TF conductor are 43.7 mm and 760 m, respectively. JAEA started to produce strand, cables and jacket sections and to construct a conductor manufacturing (jacketing) facility in 2008. Following preparation in December 2009 of the jacketing facility, the dummy cable, the jacket sections and fabrication procedures, such as welding, cable insertion, compaction and spooling, JAEA manufactured a 760 m long Cu dummy conductor for process qualification. Into the 760 m long Cu dummy conductor jacketing, JAEA successfully inserted the cable with a maximum force of 32 kN. The outer diameter of the cross section of the spooled conductor was 43.7 ± 0.15 mm, which complies with the ITER target requirement of 43.7 ± 0.3 mm. Following qualification of all manufacturing processes, JAEA has started to fabricate superconducting conductors for the TF coils.

  2. Discovery of electric pulsation in a toroidal helical plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A self-organized pulsation in electrostatic potential has been discovered in a low density plasma of CHS heliotron/torsatron with combined ECH+NBI heating. The potential profiles repeat transition between two distinctive states (Δφ(0) - 0.5Te - 0.6kV) in a constant external magnetic field when there is a continuous supply of particles and energy. Each transition, which occurs on microseconds time scale that is much faster than the diffusive one of milliseconds, is accompanied with drastic changes in density and temperature profiles. This discovery clearly demonstrates that spontaneously generated 'electric' field can affect transports and other properties of 'magnetically' confined plasmas. (author)

  3. Macroscopic electromagnetic response of metamaterials with toroidal resonances

    OpenAIRE

    Savinov, V.; Fedotov, V. A.; Zheludev, N. I.

    2013-01-01

    Toroidal dipole, first described by Ia. B. Zeldovich [Sov. Phys. JETP 33, 1184 (1957)], is a distinct electromagnetic excitation that differs both from the electric and the magnetic dipoles. It has a number of intriguing properties: static toroidal nuclear dipole is responsible for parity violation in atomic spectra; interactions between static toroidal dipole and oscillating magnetic dipole are claimed to violate Newton's Third Law while non-stationary charge-current configurations involving...

  4. Improved models of β-limit, anomalous transport and radial electric field with loss cone loss in Heliotron/torsatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theoretical study is made on the physics mechanisms which determine the beta-limit, the anomalous transport, and the radial electric field and loss cone. New theory is developed to analyze the stability boundary against the interchange mode in high-aspect-ratio toroidal helical plasmas, taking into account the transport processes. The stability β-limit is given at finite β-value, and the dependences on the plasma parameters and on the transport coefficient are investigated. It is found that the current-diffusive interchange mode is more important than the resistive mode in hot plasmas. The β-limit is predicted in the range of experimental observation for the anomalous transport. The dynamics of the pressure gradient and mode amplitude around this stability boundary are analysed. As the heating power is increased, the dynamics changes from the monotonous saturation, through the saturation with overshoot, and to the sawtoothing. Using the mean-field theory approach of statistical physics for the microscopic current-diffusive interchange mode, the anomalous transport theory is developed. The expression of the thermal transport coefficient is obtained. The pressure gradient, not the temperature itself, enhances the transport coefficient. Comparison with experimental observations from various aspects is made, and the model explains experimental observations. The method to obtain the self-consistent picture of the radial electric field Er and the loss cone loss is explored. The structure of Er and the loss cone are obtained, and it is confirmed that the direct ion loss makes Er near edge more negative. Effects of other nonclassical loss are also evaluated. (author)

  5. Toroidal plasma enhanced CVD of diamond films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An inductively coupled toroidal plasma source is used as an alternative to microwave plasmas for chemical vapor deposition of diamond films. The source, operating at a frequency of 400 kHz, synthesizes diamond films from a mixture of argon, methane, and hydrogen. The toroidal design has been adapted to create a highly efficient environment for diamond film deposition: high gas temperature and a short distance from the sample to the plasma core. Using a toroidal plasma geometry operating in the medium frequency band allows for efficient (≈90%) coupling of AC line power to the plasma and a scalable path to high-power and large-area operation. In test runs, the source generates a high flux of atomic hydrogen over a large area, which is favorable for diamond film growth. Using a deposition temperature of 900–1050 °C and a source to sample distance of 0.1–2.0 cm, diamond films are deposited onto silicon substrates. The results showed that the deposition rate of the diamond films could be controlled using the sample temperature and source to sample spacing. The results also show the films exhibit good-quality polycrystalline diamond as verified by Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy. The scanning electron microscopy and x-ray diffraction results show that the samples exhibit diamond (111) and diamond (022) crystallites. The Raman results show that the sp3 peak has a narrow spectral width (FWHM 12 ± 0.5 cm−1) and that negligible amounts of the sp2 band are present, indicating good-quality diamond films

  6. Edge ambipolar potential in toroidal fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spizzo, G., E-mail: gianluca.spizzo@igi.cnr.it; Vianello, N.; Agostini, M.; Puiatti, M. E.; Scarin, P.; Spolaore, M.; Terranova, D. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association and Istituto Gas Ionizzati del CNR, Corso Stati Uniti, 4 35127 Padova (Italy); White, R. B. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Abdullaev, S. S.; Schmitz, O. [Institut für Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Association EURATOM-FZJ, Jülich (Germany); Cavazzana, R. [Consorzio RFX, Euratom-ENEA Association, Corso Stati Uniti, 4 35127 Padova (Italy); Ciaccio, G. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli studi di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2014-05-15

    A series of issues with toroidally confined fusion plasmas are related to the generation of 3D flow patterns by means of edge magnetic islands, embedded in a chaotic field and interacting with the wall. These issues include the Greenwald limit in Tokamaks and reversed-field pinches, the collisionality window for ELM mitigation with the resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) in Tokamaks, and edge islands interacting with the bootstrap current in stellarators. Measurements of the 2D map of the edge electric field E{sup r}(r=a,θ,ϕ) in the RFX reversed-field pinch show that E{sup r} has the same helicity of the magnetic islands generated by a m/n perturbation: in fact, defining the helical angle u=mθ−nϕ+ωt, maps show a sinusoidal dependence as a function of u, E{sup r}=E{sup ~r}sin u. The associated E × B flow displays a huge convective cell with v(a)≠0 which, in RFX and near the Greenwald limit, determines a stagnation point for density and a reversal of the sign of E{sup r}. From a theoretical point of view, the question is how a perturbed toroidal flux of symmetry m/n gives rise to an ambipolar potential Φ=Φ{sup ~}sin u. On the basis of a model developed with the guiding center code ORBIT and applied to RFX and the TEXTOR tokamak, we will show that the presence of an m/n perturbation in any kind of device breaks the toroidal symmetry with a drift proportional to the gyroradius ρ, thus larger for ions (ρ{sub i} ≫ ρ{sub e}). Immediately, an ambipolar potential arises to balance the drifts, with the same symmetry as the original perturbation.

  7. Electrical disruption in toroidal plasma of hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial phase of ionization of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated using zero-dimensional model. The model describes the temporal evolution of plasma by spatial medium of particle density and temperature, on whole plasma volume. The energy and particle (electrons and ions) balance equations are considered. The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss involves ionization, Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating converter gives the initial voltage necessary to disruption. (M.C.K.)

  8. Plasma current resonance in asymmetric toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazeltine, R. D. [Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Catto, Peter J. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 167 Albany Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-09-15

    The well-known singularity in the magnetic differential equation for plasma current in an asymmetric toroidal confinement system is resolved by including in the pressure tensor corrections stemming from finite Larmor radius. The result provides an estimate of the amplitude of spikes in the parallel current that occur on rational magnetic surfaces. Resolution of the singularity is shown to depend on both the ambipolarity condition—the requirement of zero surface-averaged radial current—and the form of the magnetic differential equation near the rational surface.

  9. General Atomic's superconducting toroidal field coil concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    General Atomic's concept for a superconducting toroidal field coil is presented. The concept is generic for large tokamak devices, while a specific design is indicated for a 3.8 meter (major radius) ignition/burn machine. The concept utilizes bath cooled NbTi conductor to generate a peak field of 10 tesla at 4.2 K. The design is simple and straightforward, requires a minimum of developmental effort, and draws extensively upon the perspective of past experience in the design and construction of large superconducting magnets for high energy physics. Thus, the primary emphasis is upon economy, reliability, and expeditious construction scheduling. (author)

  10. Proposal to produce large compact toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Relatively large, hot compact toroids might be produced in the annular space between two concentric one-turn coils. With currents in the two coils flowing in the same direction, the magnetic fields on each side of the plasma are in opposite directions. As the fields are raised, the plasma ring is heated and compressed radially towards the center of the annular space. By the addition of two sets of auxiliary coils, the plasma ring can be ejected out one end of the two-coil system into a long axial magnetic field

  11. Electric disruption in a hydrogen toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By using a zero-dimensional model the ionizing initial phase of a toroidal plasma produced in hydrogen was investigated. The model consists on describing the plasma time evolution through the density and particle temperature space averaged on the plasma volume. The involved equations are energy and particles balance equations (electrons and ions). The electron loss is due to ambipolar diffusion in the presence of magnetic field. The electron energy loss is due to ionizing, processes of Coulomb interaction and diffusion. The ohmic heating transformer gives a initial voltage necessary to the breaking

  12. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement

    CERN Document Server

    Bouzar, Lila; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically.

  13. Toroidal membrane vesicles in spherical confinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzar, Lila; Menas, Ferhat; Müller, Martin Michael

    2015-09-01

    We investigate the morphology of a toroidal fluid membrane vesicle confined inside a spherical container. The equilibrium shapes are assembled in a geometrical phase diagram as a function of scaled area and reduced volume of the membrane. For small area the vesicle can adopt its free form. When increasing the area, the membrane cannot avoid contact and touches the confining sphere along a circular contact line, which extends to a zone of contact for higher area. The elastic energies of the equilibrium shapes are compared to those of their confined counterparts of spherical topology to predict under which conditions a topology change is favored energetically. PMID:26465512

  14. 3D Printing the ATLAS' barrel toroid

    CERN Document Server

    Goncalves, Tiago Barreiro

    2016-01-01

    The present report summarizes my work as part of the Summer Student Programme 2016 in the CERN IR-ECO-TSP department (International Relations – Education, Communication & Outreach – Teacher and Student Programmes). Particularly, I worked closely with the S’Cool LAB team on a science education project. This project included the 3D designing, 3D printing, and assembling of a model of the ATLAS’ barrel toroid. A detailed description of the project' development is presented and a short manual on how to use 3D printing software and hardware is attached.

  15. Pulsar Wind Nebulae with Thick Toroidal Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Chevalier, Roger A.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate a class of pulsar wind nebulae that show synchrotron emission from a thick toroidal structure. The best studied such object is the small radio and X-ray nebula around the Vela pulsar, which can be interpreted as the result of interaction of a mildly supersonic inward flow with the recent pulsar wind. Such a flow near the center of a supernova remnant can be produced in a transient phase when the reverse shock reaches the center of the remnant. Other nebulae with a thick toroida...

  16. Burn control resulting from toroidal field ripple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The enhanced transport due to toroidal magnetic field ripple is proposed as a means of averting thermal runaway in a tokamak reactor in the post-ignition stage. A theoretical analysis applied to a typical reactor design reveals that peak-to-average edge ripple of the order of 2% is sufficient to terminate the thermal excursion at reasonable values of β without significantly increasing the difficulty of reaching ignition. These analytic predictions, which are shown to agree well with radial transport code results, suggest that a properly specified ripple is one way of achieving a controlled burn in tokamak reactors. (author)

  17. Continuum damping of ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A perturbation theory based on the two dimensional (2D) ballooning transform is systematically developed for ideal toroidal Alfven eigenmodes (TAEs). A formula, similar to the Fermi golden rule for decaying systems in quantum mechanics, is derived for the continuum damping rate of the TAE; the decay (damping) rate is expressed explicitly in terms of the coupling of the TAE to the continuum spectrum. Numerical results are compared with previous calculations. It is found that in some narrow intervals of the parameter mε the damping rate varies very rapidly. These regions correspond precisely to the root missing intervals of the numerical solution by Rosenbluth et al

  18. 3D blob dynamics in toroidal geometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anders Henry; Reiser, Dirk

    DIESEL code is an extension of the ESEL code [1]. It solves a simple interchange model in full 3D tokamak geometry, where the toroidal direction is divided into a number of drift planes. On each drift plane the equations are solved in a domain corresponding to the full 2D cross section of the tokamak and...... communicate parallel with the nearest drift planes using parameterized velocities, the ion sound speed, Cs for the density equation and the Alfvén speed VA for the vorticity equation. Results show that a decrease of Alfvénic interaction of electric potential and current density leads to the expected radial...

  19. Computer simulation of magnetic field circuits in ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed design of the Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) contains several closely coupled magnetic field circuits that are being modeled using the SUPER*SCEPTRE computer program in order to predict their transient behavior. The results of this transient analysis study will be used to determine component values and/or special precautions that may be required for power supply and other circuit element protection due to the mutual coupling between circuits. ATF is a continuous-coil torsatron device using resistive coils in a pulsed mode of operation in which a current fluctuation in one coil induces voltages in the other circuit element protection due to the mutual coupling between circuits. ATF is a continuous-coil torsatron device using resistive coils in a pulsed mode of operation in which a current fluctuation in one coil induces voltages in the other circuit that may not be desirable. The model contains the solid-state power supplies' equivalent circuits, the resistance and self-inductance of each magnetic field coil, and the mutual inductances of every coil combination. The SUPER*SCEPTRE program allows for the direct input of all electrical components as well as the mutual inductances. The power supply voltages are entered as preprogrammed wave shapes designed to achieve the desired magnetic field strengths. The outputs of this program are tables and plots of voltages and currents associated with each circuit component

  20. The key role of critical mock-up facilities for neutronic physics assessment of advanced reactors: an overview of Cea Cadarache tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Experimental Physics section of CEA Cadarache operates three critical facilities devoted to neutronic studies of advanced reactors (EOLE, MINERVE and MASURCA) covering a large scope of interests. These include 100% MOX core in ABWR qualification, knowledge improvement of basic nuclear data for heavy nuclides for new options of the fuel cycle - especially the multi-recycling of plutonium - and accelerator-driven systems neutronic behaviour for transmutation studies. The paper describes these facilities, the scientific programmes associated and the progressive improvement of experimental techniques, the aim being to significantly reduce the uncertainties regarding the evaluation of the physical parameters. (authors)

  1. Aspects of Tokamak toroidal magnet protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simple but conservative geometric models are used to estimate the potential for damage to a Tokamak reactor inner wall and blanket due to a toroidal magnet field collapse. The ofly potential hazard found to exist is due to the MHD pressure rise in a lithium blanket. A survey is made of proposed protection methods for superconducting torgidal magnets. It is found that the two general classificatigls of protectign methods are thermal and electrical. Computer programs were developed which aldow the toroidal magnet set to be modeled as a set of circular filaments. A simple thermal model of the conductor was used which allows heat transfer to the magnet structure and which includes the effect of temperature dependent properties. To be effective in large magnets an electrical protection system should remove at least 50% of the stored energy in the protection circuit assuming that all of the superconductor in the circuit quenches when the circuit is activated. A protection system design procedure based on this criterion was developed

  2. Microwave produced plasma in a Toroidal Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Edwards, W. F.; Held, E. D.

    2010-11-01

    A currentless toroidal plasma device exhibits a large range of interesting basic plasma physics phenomena. Such a device is not in equilibrium in a strict magneto hydrodynamic sense. There are many sources of free energy in the form of gradients in plasma density, temperature, the background magnetic field and the curvature of the magnetic field. These free energy sources excite waves and instabilities which have been the focus of studies in several devices in last two decades. A full understanding of these simple plasmas is far from complete. At Utah State University we have recently designed and installed a microwave plasma generation system on a small tokamak borrowed from the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada. Microwaves are generated at 2.45 GHz in a pulsed dc mode using a magnetron from a commercial kitchen microwave oven. The device is equipped with horizontal and vertical magnetic fields and a transformer to impose a toroidal electric field for current drive. Plasmas can be obtained over a wide range of pressure with and without magnetic fields. We present some preliminary measurements of plasma density and potential profiles. Measurements of plasma temperature at different operating conditions are also presented.

  3. Propulsion using the electron spiral toroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new propulsion method is proposed which could potentially reduce propellant needed for space travel by three orders of magnitude. It uses the newly patented electron spiral toroid (EST), which stores energy as magnetic field energy. The EST is a hollow toroid of electrons, all spiraling in parallel paths in a thin outer shell. The electrons satisfy the coupling condition, forming an electron matrix. Stability is assured as long as the coupling condition is satisfied. The EST is held in place with a small external electric field; without an external magnetic field. The EST system is contained in a vacuum chamber. The EST can be thought of as an energetic entity, with electrons at 10,000 electron volts. Propulsion would not use combustion, but would heat propellant through elastic collisions with the EST surface and eject them for thrust. Chemical rocket combustion heats propellant to 4000 deg. C; an EST will potentially heat the propellant 29,000 times as much, reducing propellant needs accordingly. The thrust can be turned ON and OFF. The EST can be recharged as needed

  4. Computational simulation of compact toroidal plasma formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following computational efforts are part of the MARAUDER (magnetically accelerated rings to achieve ultra-high directed energy and radiation) research program at the High Energy Plasma Division of the Weapons Laboratory. The program is investigating plasma toroids with magnetic fields similar to those of tokamaks. These fields confine the plasma between a pair of cylindrical conductors. The objective of the research is to first form such toroids and then compress and accelerate them. A 500 kJ capacitor bank will be used for the formation, and the 9 MJ Shiva Star will be used for acceleration. The first set of experiments and current computational work consider only the formation process. The computer program used for these simulations is MACH2. It is a two-dimensional MHD code and was originally developed by Mission Research Corporation under a Weapons Laboratory contract to support z-pinch research. MACH2 is an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian code with an adaptive mesh capability. Its diffusion routines use a multigrid technique to accelerate convergence. Recently, a second-order advection scheme has been added

  5. Greenhouse gas accounting of the proposed landfill extension and advanced incineration facility for municipal solid waste management in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burgeoning of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal issue and climate change have drawn massive attention from people. On the one hand, Hong Kong is facing a controversial debate over the implementation of proposed landfill extension (LFE) and advanced incineration facility (AIF) to curb the MSW disposal issue. On the other hand, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government is taking concerted efforts to reduce the carbon intensity in this region. This paper discusses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from four proposed waste disposal scenarios, covering the proposed LFE and AIF within a defined system boundary. On the basis of the data collected, assumptions made, and system boundary defined in this study, the results indicate that AIF releases less GHG emissions than LFE. The GHG emissions from LFE are highly contributed by the landfill methane (CH4) emissions but offset by biogenic carbon storage, while the GHG emissions from AIF are mostly due to the stack discharge system but offset by the energy recovery system. Furthermore, parametric sensitivity analyses show that GHG emissions are strongly dependent on the landfill CH4 recovery rate, types of electricity displaced by energy recovery systems, and the heating value of MSW, altering the order of preferred waste disposal scenarios. This evaluation provides valuable insights into the applicability of a policy framework for MSW management practices in reducing GHG emissions. Highlights: • AIF is better than LFE with regard to GHG emissions in Hong Kong. • Major individual sub-processes of LFE and AIF for GHG emissions are investigated. • GHG emissions for LFE and AIF are strongly dependent on studied parametric sensitivity analyses. • Findings are valuable for sustainable MSW management and GHG reductions in waste sector

  6. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, G.; Comotti, D.; Fabris, L.; Grassi, M.; Lodola, L.; Malcovati, P.; Manghisoni, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Vacchi, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Casarosa, G.; Forti, F.; Morsani, F.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Pancheri, L.; Verzellesi, G.; Xu, H.; Mendicino, R.; Benkechkache, M. A.

    2015-02-01

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC.

  7. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  8. The PixFEL project: development of advanced X-ray pixel detectors for application at future FEL facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PixFEL project aims to develop an advanced X-ray camera for imaging suited for the demanding requirements of next generation free electron laser (FEL) facilities. New technologies can be deployed to boost the performance of imaging detectors as well as future pixel devices for tracking. In the first phase of the PixFEL project, approved by the INFN, the focus will be on the development of the microelectronic building blocks, carried out with a 65 nm CMOS technology, implementing a low noise analog front-end channel with high dynamic range and compression features, a low power ADC and high density memory. At the same time PixFEL will investigate and implement some of the enabling technologies to assembly a seamless large area X-ray camera composed by a matrix of multilayer four-side buttable tiles. A pixel matrix with active edge will be developed to minimize the dead area of the sensor layer. Vertical interconnection of two CMOS tiers will be explored to build a four-side buttable readout chip with small pixel pitch and all the on-board required functionalities. The ambitious target requirements of the new pixel device are: single photon resolution, 1 to 104 photons @ 1 keV to 10 keV input dynamic range, 10-bit analog to digital conversion up to 5 MHz, 1 kevent in-pixel memory and 100 μm pixel pitch. The long term goal of PixFEL will be the development of a versatile X-ray camera to be operated either in burst mode (European XFEL), or in continuous mode to cope with the high frame rates foreseen for the upgrade phase of the LCLS-II at SLAC

  9. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: A high-brightness soft x-ray synchrotron-radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30--50 ns) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 20 eV to above 2 keV. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of hard x-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. 8 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  10. Evaluation of prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) pack for use by the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) on Space Station Freedom (SSF)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John; Murphy, Linda; Kizzee, Victor D.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose is to evaluate the prototype Advanced Life Support (ALS) Pack which was developed for the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF). This pack will enable the Crew Medical Officer (CMO) to have ready access to advanced life support supplies and equipment for time critical responses to any situation within the Space Station Freedom. The objectives are: (1) to evaluate the design of the pack; and (2) to collect comments for revision to the design of the pack. The in-flight test procedures and other aspects of the KC-135 parabolic test flight to simulate weightlessness are presented.

  11. Performance of a Folded-Strip Toroidally Wound Induction Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Jack, Alan G.; Atkinson, Glynn J.; Mecrow, Barrie C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the measured experimental results from a four-pole toroidally wound induction machine, where the stator is constructed as a pre-wound foldable strip. It shows that if the machine is axially restricted in length, the toroidally wound induction machine can have substantially sho...

  12. Effect of toroidal magnetic field and plasma rotation on compact toriequilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of toroidal magnetic field and plasma rotation on compact tori equilibrium configurations is studied. It is found that the equilibrium configurations exist in any toroidal fields. The field dependences of toroidal parameters are analyzed. The effect of opening of the toroidal separatrix and the influence of the toroidal magnetic field, toroidal rotation, the pressure profile type behind the separatrix on it is studied as well. 13 refs.; 11 figs.; 2 tabs

  13. Development of a Code for the Long Term Radiological Safety Assessment of Radioactive Wastes from Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the purpose of evaluating annual individual doses from a potential repository disposing of radioactive wastes from the operation of the prospective advanced nuclear fuel cycle facilities in Korea, the new safety assessment code based on the Goldsim has been developed. It was designed to compare the environmental impacts from many fuel cycle options such as direct disposal, wet and dry recycling. The code based on the compartment theory can be applied to assess both normal and what if scenarios

  14. Computer programs for capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes for laser fusion and other advanced technology facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three FORTRAN programs, CAPITAL, VENTURE, and INDEXER, have been developed to automate computations used in assessing the economic viability of proposed or conceptual laser fusion and other advanced-technology facilities, as well as conventional projects. The types of calculations performed by these programs are, respectively, capital cost estimation, lifetime economic performance simulation, and computation of cost indexes. The codes permit these three topics to be addressed with considerable sophistication commensurate with user requirements and available data

  15. Plasmonic Toroidal Dipolar Response under Radially Polarized Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanjun; Zhu, Xing; Fang, Zheyu

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic toroidal resonance has attracted growing interests because of its low loss electromagnetic properties and potential high sensitive nanophotonic applications. However, the realization in a metamaterial requires three-dimensional complicated structural design so far. In this paper, we design a simple metal-dielectric-metal (MIM) sandwich nanostructure, which exhibits a strong toroidal dipolar resonance under radially polarized excitation. The toroidal dipole moment as the dominant contribution for the scattering is demonstrated by the mirror-image method and further analyzed by Lagrangian hybridization model. The proposed toroidal configuration also shows a highly tolerant for misalignment between the structure center and the incident light focus. Our study proves the way for the toroidal plasmonic application with the cylindrical vector beams. PMID:26114966

  16. Toroidal gyrofluid equations for simulations of tokamak turbulence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of nonlinear gyrofluid equations for simulations of tokamak turbulence are derived by taking moments of the nonlinear toroidal gyrokinetic equation. The moment hierarchy is closed with approximations that model the kinetic effects of parallel Landau damping, toroidal drift resonances, and finite Larmor radius effects. These equations generalize the work of Dorland and Hammett [Phys. Fluids B 5, 812 (1993)] to toroidal geometry by including essential toroidal effects. The closures for phase mixing from toroidal rB and curvature drifts take the basic form presented in Waltz, et al. [Phys. Fluids B 4, 3138 (1992)], but here a more rigorous procedure is used, including an extension to higher moments, which provides significantly improved accuracy. In addition, trapped ion effects and collisions are incorporated. This reduced set of nonlinear equations accurately models most of the physics considered important for ion dynamics in core tokamak turbulence and is simple enough to be used in high resolution direct numerical simulations

  17. Quench propagation and protection analysis of the ATLAS Toroids

    CERN Document Server

    Dudarev, A; ten Kate, H H J; Baynham, D Elwyn; Courthold, M J D; Lesmond, C

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS superconducting magnet system consists of the Barrel Toroid, two End Cap Toroids and the Central Solenoid. However, the Toroids of eight coils each are magnetically separate systems to the Central Solenoid. The Toroids are electrically connected in series and energized by a single power supply. The quench protection system is based on the use of relatively small external dump resistances in combination with quench-heaters activated after a quench event detection to initiate the internal dump of stored energy in all the coils. A rather strong quench-back effect due to eddy-currents in the coil casings at the transport current decay is beneficial for the quench protection efficiency in the event of heater failures. The quench behaviour of the ATLAS Toroids was computer simulated for normal operation of the quench protection system and its complete non-operation (failure) mode. (3 refs).

  18. Perturbing macroscopic magnetohydrodynamic stability for toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comer, Kathryn J.

    We have introduced a new perturbative technique to rapidly explore the dependence of long wavelength ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities on equilibrium profiles, shaping properties, and wall parameters. Traditionally, these relations are studied with numerical parameter scans using computationally intensive stability codes. Our perturbative technique first finds the equilibrium and stability using traditional methods. Subsequent small changes in the original equilibrium parameters change the stability. We quickly find the new stability with an expansion of the energy principle, rather than with another run of the stability codes. We first semi-analytically apply the technique to the screw pinch after eliminating compressional Alfven wave effects. The screw pinch results validate the approach, but also indicate that allowable perturbations to equilibria with certain features may be restricted. Next, we extend the approach to toroidal geometry using experimental equilibria and a simple constructed equilibrium, with the ideal MHD stability code GATO. Stability properties are successfully predicted from perturbed toroidal equilibria when only the vacuum beyond the plasma is perturbed (through wall parameter variations), rather than the plasma itself. Small plasma equilibrium perturbations to both experimental and simple equilibria result in very large errors to the predicted stability, and valid results are found only over a narrow range of most perturbations. Despite the large errors produced when changing plasma parameters, the wall perturbations revealed two useful applications of this technique. Because the calculations are non-iterative matrix multiplications, the convergence issues that can disrupt a full MHD stability code are absent. Marginal stability, therefore, is much easier to find with the perturbative technique. Also, the perturbed results can be input as the initial guess for the eigenvalue for a full stability code, and improve subsequent

  19. Completion of the ITER toroidal field model coil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the scope of the ITER EDA a Toroidal Field Model Coil (TFMC) has been manufactured accompanied by a thorough Quality Assurance (QA) test program. This large superconducting coil has been conceptually designed by the ITER European Home Team (EUHT) and manufactured by European industry. The coil is being completed and will be tested at the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe in spring 2001. The race track shaped winding is made of a cable-in-conduit conductor in a circular 316LN stainless steel jacket. From this conductor five double pancake (DP) modules were fabricated. Results of conductor and DP manufacture were already presented at previous conferences and are therefore only summarized here. The paper concentrates on the subsequent manufacturing steps, namely the stacking of the DP modules, the insulation and impregnation of the winding pack, the outer joint manufacture by electron beam welding, the assembly of the winding pack with the stainless steel case, the mounting of the helium pipes, the sensors and the busbars. To assemble the coil into the TOSKA facility and to fit it to the EU-LCT coil a heavy Inter-Coil Structure (ICS) has been built, in which the TFMC will rest on four wedges

  20. Research and development for the ITER toroidal field coils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ITER Toroidal Field (TF) coils are made up of a winding pack enclosed in a case. In the central region the noses of the coils are wedge shaped and fit together to form a circular vault. On the outside an intercoil support structure joins the coil above and below the equator. The goal of the ITER project L2 is to verify the design principles, design procedures, design criteria, operating margins, analysis methods and manufacturing process, including Quality Assurance (QA) capable of application to the ITER TF coils. The project is divided into two subprojects: TF Model Coil (TFMC) construction and testing and TF coil case fabrication demonstration. The conceptual design of the ITER TFMC has been carried out by the ITER EU HT, the engineering design and construction by European Industries. The testing of the TFMC is foreseen in the TOSKA facility at FZK Karlsruhe starting in the first quarter of 2001. The feasibility demonstration of the TF coil case is being carried out also by European industry by: Forging trapezoidal tubes with variable wall thickness, casting new modified 316LN type material for the intercoil structure and the parts of the case subject to lower stresses, qualifying the welding and NDT methods to be applied to the heavy thickness (∼250mm) to be joined together to form the casing. (author)

  1. EMPACT: Electrons Muons Partons with Air Core Toroids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, M.D. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (USA))

    1990-05-25

    The EMPACT experiment utilizes a broad approach to maximize its discovery potential for new phenomena accessible at the SSC. The high resolution detector has a balances emphasis on, and large acceptance for, electrons, muons, jets, and noninteracting particles, and is capable of utilizing the ultimate luminosity of the SSC. The detector emphasizes excellent calorimetry augmented by TRD tracking, and employs an innovative system of superconducting air core toroids for muon measurements. Significant engineering effort has established the feasibility of a baseline detector concept and has addressed the related issues of support facilities, assembly, and detector integration. The design has been tested against the challenges of predicted phenomena, with the expectation that this will optimize the capacity for observing the unexpected. EMPACT's international collaboration has unprecedented support from major aerospace industries who are providing tools and expertise for project design and integration, which will assure that a detector optimized for performance and cost will be available for the first collisions at the new laboratory.

  2. Toroidicity and shape dependence of peeling mode growth rates in axisymmetric toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth rate of the peeling mode instability with large toroidal mode number is calculated for general axisymmetric toroidal plasmas, including tokamaks and the spherical torus (ST) equilibia by using formalism presented by Connor et al. Analytic equilibia with non-zero edge current density and quasi-uniform current profiles are assumed. It is found that in sharp D-shape tokamak plasma, the derivative of the safety factor with respect to the poloidal flux becomes very large, making the perturbed poloidal motion very large, in turn making a significant reduction of the growth rate of the peeling mode, similar to the X-point effect in diverted plasma. The large aspect ratio effect is also studied, which reduces the growth rate further. (physics of gases, plasmas, and electric discharges)

  3. FAST, the Fusion Advanced Studies Torus, a proposal for a facility in support of the development of fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FAST is a new machine proposed to support ITER experimental exploitation as well as to anticipate DEMO relevant physics and technology. FAST is aimed at studying, in burning plasma relevant conditions, fast particle physics, plasma operations and plasma wall interaction in an integrated way. FAST has the capability to approach all the ITER scenarios significantly closer than present day experiments by using Deuterium plasmas. The necessity of achieving ITER relevant performance with a moderate cost has led to conceiving a compact Tokamak (R=1.82 m, a= 0.64 m) with high toroidal field (BT up to 8.5 T) and plasma current (Ip up to 8 MA). In order to study fast particle behaviours in conditions similar to those of ITER, the project has been provided with a dominant Ion Cyclotron Resonance Heating System (ICRH; 30 MW on the plasma). Moreover, the experiment foresees the use of 6 MW of Lower Hybrid (LHCD), essentially for plasma control and for non-inductive Current Drive, and of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH, 4MW) for localized electron heating and plasma control. The ports have been designed to accommodate up to 10 MW of negative beams (NNBI) in the energy range of 0.5-1 MeV. The total power input will be in the 30-40 MW range in the different plasma scenarios with a wall power load comparable with that of ITER (P/R∼22 MW/m). All the ITER scenarios will be studied: from the reference H-mode, with plasma edge and ELMs characteristics similar to the ITER ones (Q up to ≅ 2.5), to a full current drive scenario, lasting around 170 s. The first wall as well as the divertor plates will be of Tungsten in order to ensure reactor relevant operation regimes. The divertor itself is designed to be completely removable by remote handling. This will allow studying (in view of DEMO) the behaviour of innovative divertor concepts, such as those based on liquid Lithium. FAST is capable of operations with very long pulses, up to 170 s, despite that it is a copper machine

  4. Helicity of a toroidal vortex with swirl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bannikova, E. Yu.; Kontorovich, V. M.; Poslavsky, S. A.

    2016-04-01

    Based on the solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equation, we discuss the helicity of a thin toroidal vortex in the presence of swirl, orbital motion along the torus directrix. The relation between the helicity and circulations along the small and large linked circumferences (the torus directrix and generatrix) is shown to depend on the azimuthal velocity distribution in the core of the swirling ring vortex. In the case of nonuniform swirl, this relation differs from the well-known Moffat relation, viz., twice the product of such circulations multiplied by the number of linkages. The results can find applications in investigating the vortices in planetary atmospheres and the motions in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  5. Helicity of the toroidal vortex with swirl

    CERN Document Server

    Bannikova, Elena Yu; Poslavsky, Sergey A

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of solutions of the Bragg-Hawthorne equations we discuss the helicity of thin toroidal vortices with the swirl - the orbital motion along the torus diretrix. It is shown that relationship of the helicity with circulations along the small and large linked circles - directrix and generatrix of the torus - depends on distribution of the azimuthal velocity in the core of the swirling vortex ring. In the case of non-homogeneous swirl this relationship differs from the well-known Moffat relationship - the doubled product of such circulations multiplied by the number of links. The results can be applied to vortices in planetary atmospheres and to vortex movements in the vicinity of active galactic nuclei.

  6. Toroidal microinstability studies of high temperature tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W.M.

    1989-07-01

    Results from comprehensive kinetic microinstability calculations are presented showing the effects of toroidicity on the ion temperature gradient mode and its relationship to the trapped-electron mode in high-temperature tokamak plasmas. The corresponding particle and energy fluxes have also been computed. It is found that, although drift-type microinstabilities persist over a wide range of values of the ion temperature gradient parameter /eta//sub i/ /equivalent to/ (dlnT/sub i//dr)/(dlnn/sub i//dr), the characteristic features of the dominant mode are those of the /eta//sub i/-type instability when /eta//sub i/ > /eta//sub ic/ /approximately/1.2 to 1.4 and of the trapped-electron mode when /eta//sub i/ < /eta//sub ic/. 16 refs., 7 figs.

  7. The theory of toroidally confined plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    White, Roscoe B

    2014-01-01

    This graduate level textbook develops the theory of magnetically confined plasma, with the aim of bringing the reader to the level of current research in the field of thermonuclear fusion. It begins with the basic concepts of magnetic field description, plasma equilibria and stability, and goes on to derive the equations for guiding center particle motion in an equilibrium field. Topics include linear and nonlinear ideal and resistive modes and particle transport. It is of use to workers in the field of fusion both for its wide-ranging account of tokamak physics and as a kind of handbook or formulary. This edition has been extended in a number of ways. The material on mode-particle interactions has been reformulated and much new information added, including methodology for Monte Carlo implementation of mode destabilization. These results give explicit means of carrying out mode destabilization analysis, in particular for the dangerous fishbone mode. A new chapter on cyclotron motion in toroidal geometry has ...

  8. Petascale Parallelization of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ethier, Stephane; Adams, Mark; Carter, Jonathan; Oliker, Leonid

    2010-05-01

    The Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) is a global, three-dimensional particle-in-cell application developed to study microturbulence in tokamak fusion devices. The global capability of GTC is unique, allowing researchers to systematically analyze important dynamics such as turbulence spreading. In this work we examine a new radial domain decomposition approach to allow scalability onto the latest generation of petascale systems. Extensive performance evaluation is conducted on three high performance computing systems: the IBM BG/P, the Cray XT4, and an Intel Xeon Cluster. Overall results show that the radial decomposition approach dramatically increases scalability, while reducing the memory footprint - allowing for fusion device simulations at an unprecedented scale. After a decade where high-end computing (HEC) was dominated by the rapid pace of improvements to processor frequencies, the performance of next-generation supercomputers is increasingly differentiated by varying interconnect designs and levels of integration. Understanding the tradeoffs of these system designs is a key step towards making effective petascale computing a reality. In this work, we examine a new parallelization scheme for the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) [?] micro-turbulence fusion application. Extensive scalability results and analysis are presented on three HEC systems: the IBM BlueGene/P (BG/P) at Argonne National Laboratory, the Cray XT4 at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and an Intel Xeon cluster at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Overall results indicate that the new radial decomposition approach successfully attains unprecedented scalability to 131,072 BG/P cores by overcoming the memory limitations of the previous approach. The new version is well suited to utilize emerging petascale resources to access new regimes of physical phenomena.

  9. Advancing automation of power distribution facilities and the cost reduction measures. Activities o technology development for advanced automation systems; Susumu haiden setsubi no jidoka, cost teigen taisaku. Jidoka system no kodoka eno gijutsu kaihatsu no torikumi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hayami, M.; Matsui, Y. [Hitachi, Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-07-01

    Electric power companies in Japan are making efforts to reduce the cost by improving the operation rate of existing facilities through the employment of advanced automation systems in the sector of distribution. This paper introduces the systems of Hitachi. A 22 kV-line automation system using high-speed photo-transmission line is adopted for the maintenance of widely extended distribution facilities. This system includes a 22 kV/240-415 V transformer and a 22 kV/105-210 V transformer. To supervise and control these transformers and switches, and to recover the accidents, this system consists of a computer system, a remote host station, and remote end terminals. Based on the information of distribution facilities of substations, end terminals and a host station, monitor/control of these facilities and recovery of accidents are conducted using computers. A system plan supporting system is also introduced, which aims at improvements of facility utilization factor, operation efficiency, and distribution operation efficiency. 5 figs.

  10. Experiments on large superconducting toroidal coil in LCT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiment on Large Coil Task (LCT) project which is the works of developing the superconductive coils for nuclear fusion, and has been advanced centering around IEA, was successfully completed on September 3, 1987. In these works which were accompanied by huge hardwares and took 10 years, the contents of the experiment carried out in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory in USA, which was the highlight, and the perspective of the evaluation are described. This paper is intended to let those concerned with the technical development of atomic energy understand the experimental results of LCT coils and the contents of the development of large scale technology. The fundamental constitution of the LCT is as follows. ORNL determined the specification of the performance of superconductive toroidal coils. The participants decided their own specification of the construction. The coils were assembled in torus form, and the aptitude of the construction and materials was tested and evaluated under the same condition. The features of six coils made in USA, Euratom, Switzerland and Japan, the experimental items and the most difficult points, the results of precooling and temperature rise, the characteristics of the Japanese coil, the general comparison of six coils, and the technical problems surrounding coils are reported. (Kako, I.)

  11. Test results of the FER/ITER conductors in the FENIX test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has developed the Advanced Disk and the Hollow Monolithic conductors for the FER/ITER Toroidal Field coils. The advanced Disk conductor is a Cable-in-Conduit conductor which consists of 324 Nb3Sn strands. The Hollow monolithic conductor has hollow cooling channels and 23 Nb3Sn strands. The JA-FENIX sample consists of a pair of straight legs: one leg is the Advanced disk conductor and another is the Hollow Monolithic one. The FENIX facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) can provide a magnetic field up to 13T on a sample conductor of over 40cm-length. The performance test of the JA-sample was carried out in Autumn 1992. The critical current, the current sharing temperature, and the stability margin of each conductor were measured in this test. These results are presented and discussed

  12. Kinetic effect of toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, W., E-mail: wfguo@ipp.ac.cn; Ye, L.; Zhou, D.; Xiao, X. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Wang, S. [Department of Modern Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Kinetic effects of the toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode are theoretically investigated. It is found that when the toroidal rotation increases, the damping rate increases in the weak rotation regime due to the rotation enhancement of wave-particle interaction, and it decreases in the strong rotation regime due to the reduction of the number of resonant particles. Theoretical results are consistent with the behaviors of the geodesic acoustic mode recently observed in DIII-D and ASDEX-Upgrade. The kinetic damping effect of the rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode may shed light on the regulation of turbulence through the controlling the toroidal rotation.

  13. Toroidal dipole resonances in the relativistic random phase approximation

    CERN Document Server

    Vretenar, D; Ring, P

    2002-01-01

    The isoscalar toroidal dipole strength distributions in spherical nuclei are calculated in the framework of a fully consistent relativistic random phase approximation, based on effective mean-field Lagrangians with nonlinear meson self-interaction terms. It is suggested that the recently observed "low-lying component of the isoscalar dipole mode" might in fact correspond to the toroidal giant dipole resonance. Although predicted by several theoretical models, the existence of toroidal resonances has not yet been confirmed in experiment. In the present analysis the vortex dynamics of these states is displayed by the corresponding velocity fields.

  14. Laser-induced production of large carbon-based toroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the production of large carbon-based toroids (CBTs) from fullerenes. The process involves two-step laser irradiation of a mixed fullerene target (76% C60, 22% C70). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly identifies toroidal-shaped structures as well as Q-shaped constructs. The typical diameters of the CBTs are ∼0.2-0.3 μm with tubular diameters of ∼50-100 nm, but toroids as wide as 0.5 μm are observed making them nanostructures on the verge of being microstructures

  15. Toroidal Spiral Strings in Higher-dimensional Spacetime

    CERN Document Server

    Igata, Takahisa

    2010-01-01

    We report on our progress in research of separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings with a symmetric configuration in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a Hopf loop string which is a special class of the toroidal spirals, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black hole and for the general toroidal spiral in Minkowski background.

  16. Validation of Advanced Computer Codes for VVER Technology: LB-LOCA Transient in PSB-VVER Facility

    OpenAIRE

    M. Benčík; Zakutaev, M. O.; Zaitsev, S. I.; Schekoldin, V. I.; F. D'Auria; I. V. Elkin; Melikhov, O. I.; Adorni, M.; Del Nevo, A.

    2012-01-01

    The OECD/NEA PSB-VVER project provided unique and useful experimental data for code validation from PSB-VVER test facility. This facility represents the scaled-down layout of the Russian-designed pressurized water reactor, namely, VVER-1000. Five experiments were executed, dealing with loss of coolant scenarios (small, intermediate, and large break loss of coolant accidents), a primary-to-secondary leak, and a parametric study (natural circulation test) aimed at characterizing the VVER system...

  17. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large

  18. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W.

    2015-12-01

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τR/τV ≫ 1, where τR and τV represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τR/τV ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  19. Influence of toroidal rotation on resistive tearing modes in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.; Ma, Z. W., E-mail: zwma@zju.edu.cn [Institute for Fusion Theory and Simulation, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2015-12-15

    Influence of toroidal equilibrium plasma rotation on m/n = 2/1 resistive tearing modes is studied numerically using a 3D toroidal MHD code (CLT). It is found that the toroidal rotation with or without shear can suppress the tearing instability and the Coriolis effect in the toroidal geometry plays a dominant role on the rotation induced stabilization. For a high viscosity plasma (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≫ 1, where τ{sub R} and τ{sub V} represent resistive and viscous diffusion time, respectively), the effect of the rotation shear combined with the viscosity appears to be stabilizing. For a low viscosity plasmas (τ{sub R}/τ{sub V} ≪ 1), the rotation shear shows a destabilizing effect when the rotation is large.

  20. Effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of toroidicity during lower hybrid mode conversion is examined by treating the wave propagation in an inhomogeneous medium as an eigenvalue problem for ω2(m,n),m,n poloidal and toroidal wave numbers. Since the frequency regime near ω2 = ω/sub LH/2 is an accumulation point for the eigenvalue spectrum, the degenerate perturbation technique must be applied. The toroidal eigenmodes are constructed by a zeroth order superposition of monochromatic solutions with different poloidal dependence m, thus they generically exhibit a wide spectrum in k/sub parallel/ for given fixed ω2 even for small inverse aspect ratio epsilon. In case that the average is in the neighborhood of k/sub min/, the minimum wave number for accessibility of the mode conversion regime, it is expected that excitation of toroidal modes rather than geometric optics will determine the wave coupling to the plasma

  1. Turbulent and neoclassical toroidal momentum transport in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of magnetic confinement devices such as tokamaks is to produce energy from nuclear fusion reactions in plasmas at low densities and high temperatures. Experimentally, toroidal flows have been found to significantly improve the energy confinement, and therefore the performance of the machine. As extrinsic momentum sources will be limited in future fusion devices such as ITER, an understanding of the physics of toroidal momentum transport and the generation of intrinsic toroidal rotation in tokamaks would be an important step in order to predict the rotation profile in experiments. Among the mechanisms expected to contribute to the generation of toroidal rotation is the transport of momentum by electrostatic turbulence, which governs heat transport in tokamaks. Due to the low collisionality of the plasma, kinetic modeling is mandatory for the study of tokamak turbulence. In principle, this implies the modeling of a six-dimensional distribution function representing the density of particles in position and velocity phase-space, which can be reduced to five dimensions when considering only frequencies below the particle cyclotron frequency. This approximation, relevant for the study of turbulence in tokamaks, leads to the so-called gyrokinetic model and brings the computational cost of the model within the presently available numerical resources. In this work, we study the transport of toroidal momentum in tokamaks in the framework of the gyrokinetic model. First, we show that this reduced model is indeed capable of accurately modeling momentum transport by deriving a local conservation equation of toroidal momentum, and verifying it numerically with the gyrokinetic code GYSELA. Secondly, we show how electrostatic turbulence can break the axisymmetry and generate toroidal rotation, while a strong link between turbulent heat and momentum transport is identified, as both exhibit the same large-scale avalanche-like events. The dynamics of turbulent transport are

  2. Low-aspect-ratio toroidal equilibria of electron clouds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toroidal electron clouds with a low aspect ratio (as small as 1.3) and lasting for thousands of poloidal rotation periods have been formed in the laboratory. Characteristic toroidal effects like a large inward shift of the minor axis of equipotential contours, elliptical and triangular deformations, etc., have been observed experimentally for the first time. The results of new analytic and numerical investigations of low-aspect-ratio electron cloud equilibria, which reproduce many of the observed features, are also presented

  3. Effective toroidal curvature and error field on NBT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effective toroidal curvature and the poloidal drift velocity for transit electrons with v sub(parallel)/v = 1 are measured for NBT-I device by use of an electron beam probing. The axis of the drift surfaces shifts inward by 12 cm due to the toroidal effect. The error field averaged along the torus is found to be spatially varying and is 1.1 x 10-3 at the minor axis. (author)

  4. Numerical solution of quasilinear kinetic diffusion equations in toroidal plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Höök, Lars Josef

    2013-01-01

    One of the main challenges for the realization of a working fusion power plant is an increased detailed understanding of kinetic phenomena in toroidal plasmas. The tokamak is a toroidal, magnetically confined plasma device and is currently the main line towards a power plant. The spatial and temporal scales in a tokamak plasma are extreme and the only tractable path for quantitative studies is to rely on computer simulations. Present day simulation codes can resolve only some of these scales....

  5. Efficient magnetic fields for supporting toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landreman, Matt; Boozer, Allen H.

    2016-03-01

    The magnetic field that supports tokamak and stellarator plasmas must be produced by coils well separated from the plasma. However, the larger the separation, the more difficult it is to produce a given magnetic field in the plasma region, so plasma configurations should be chosen that can be supported as efficiently as possible by distant coils. The efficiency of an externally generated magnetic field is a measure of the field's shaping component magnitude at the plasma compared to the magnitude near the coils; the efficiency of a plasma equilibrium can be measured using the efficiency of the required external shaping field. Counterintuitively, plasma shapes with low curvature and spectral width may have low efficiency, whereas plasma shapes with sharp edges may have high efficiency. Two precise measures of magnetic field efficiency, which correctly identify such differences in difficulty, will be examined. These measures, which can be expressed as matrices, relate the externally produced normal magnetic field on the plasma surface to the either the normal field or current on a distant control surface. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of either matrix yields an efficiency ordered basis for the magnetic field distributions. Calculations are carried out for both tokamak and stellarator cases. For axisymmetric surfaces with circular cross-section, the SVD is calculated analytically, and the range of poloidal and toroidal mode numbers that can be controlled to a given desired level is determined. If formulated properly, these efficiency measures are independent of the coordinates used to parameterize the surfaces.

  6. Toroidal nanotraps for cold polar molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salhi, Marouane; Passian, Ali; Siopsis, George

    2015-09-01

    Electronic excitations in metallic nanoparticles in the optical regime that have been of great importance in surface-enhanced spectroscopy and emerging applications of molecular plasmonics, due to control and confinement of electromagnetic energy, may also be of potential to control the motion of nanoparticles and molecules. Here, we propose a concept for trapping polarizable particles and molecules using toroidal metallic nanoparticles. Specifically, gold nanorings are investigated for their scattering properties and field distribution to computationally show that the response of these optically resonant particles to incident photons permit the formation of a nanoscale trap when proper aspect ratio, photon wavelength, and polarization are considered. However, interestingly the resonant plasmonic response of the nanoring is shown to be detrimental to the trap formation. The results are in good agreement with analytic calculations in the quasistatic limit within the first-order perturbation of the scalar electric potential. The possibility of extending the single nanoring trapping properties to two-dimensional arrays of nanorings is suggested by obtaining the field distribution of nanoring dimers and trimers.

  7. Experimental study of high beta toroidal plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments on the Wisconsin Levitated Toroidal Octupole have produced a wide range of stable high β plasmas with β significantly above single fluid MHD theory predictions. A stable β approx. 8% plasma, twice the fluid limit, is obtained with 5 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/ and tau/sub β/ approx. = 6000 tau/sub Alfven/ = 600 μsec. The enhanced stability is explained with a kinetic treatment that includes the effect of finite ion gyroradius which couples the ballooning mode to an ion drift wave. In a more collisional, large gyroradius (2 rho/sub i/ approx. L/sub n/) regime, a stable β approx. 35% plasma is obtained with a decay time of 1000 Alfven times. Measurement of the equilibrium magnetic field in this regime indicates that the diamagnetic current density is five times smaller than predicted by ideal MHD, probably due to ion gyroviscosity. Particle transport is anomalous and ranges from agreement with the classical diffusion rate at the highest beta, lowest field plasma (B/sub P/ = 200 G), to thirteen times the classical rate in a β=11%, high field plasma (B/sub P/ = 860 G) where the level of enhancement increase with magnetic field. Fluctuations in density, electrostatic potential, and magnetic field have been studied in plasmas with β from 0.1% to 40%

  8. Sawtooth Instability in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herfindal, J. L.; Maurer, D. A.; Hartwell, G. J.; Ennis, D. A.; Knowlton, S. F.

    2015-11-01

    Sawtooth instabilities have been observed in the Compact Toroidal Hybrid (CTH), a current-carrying stellarator/tokamak hybrid device. The sawtooth instability is driven by ohmic heating of the core plasma until the safety factor drops below unity resulting in the growth of an m = 1 kink-tearing mode. Experiments varying the vacuum rotational transform from 0.02 to 0.13 are being conducted to study sawtooth property dependance on vacuum flux surface structure. The frequency of the sawtooth oscillations increase from 2 kHz to 2.8 kHz solely due the decrease in rise time of the oscillation, the crash time is unchanged. CTH has three two-color SXR cameras, a three-channel 1mm interferometer, and a new bolometer system capable of detecting the signatures of sawtooth instabilities. The new bolometer system consists of two cameras, each containing a pair of diode arrays viewing the plasma directly or through a beryllium filter. Electron temperature measurements are found with the two-color SXR cameras through a ratio of the SXR intensities. Impurity radiation can drastically affect the electron temperature measurement, therefore new filters consisting of aluminum and carbon were selected to avoid problematic line radiation while maximizing the signal for a 100 eV plasma. This work is supported by U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-00ER54610.

  9. Ballooning mode spectrum in general toroidal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewar, R.L.; Glasser, A.H.

    1982-04-01

    A WKB formalism for constructing normal modes of short-wavelength ideal hydromagnetic, pressure-driven instabilities (ballooning modes) in general toroidal magnetic containment devices with sheared magnetic fields is developed. No incompressibility approximation is made. A dispersion relation is obtained from the eigenvalues of a fourth order system of ordinary differential equations to be solved by integrating along a line of force. Higher order calculations are performed to find the amplitude equation and the phase change at a caustic. These conform to typical WKB results. In axisymmetric systems, the ray equations are integrable, and semiclassical quantization leads to a growth rate spectrum consisting of an infinity of discrete eigenvalues, bounded above by an accumulation point. However, each eigenvalue is infinitely degenerate. In the nonaxisymmetric case, the rays are unbounded in a four dimensional phase space, and semiclassical quantization breaks down, leading to broadening of the discrete eigenvalues and accumulation point of the axisymmetric case into continuum bands. Analysis of a model problem indicates that the broadening of the discrete eigenvalues is numerically very small, the dominant effect being broadening of the accumulation point.

  10. Tearing Mode Stability of Evolving Toroidal Equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletzer, A.; McCune, D.; Manickam, J.; Jardin, S. C.

    2000-10-01

    There are a number of toroidal equilibrium (such as JSOLVER, ESC, EFIT, and VMEC) and transport codes (such as TRANSP, BALDUR, and TSC) in our community that utilize differing equilibrium representations. There are also many heating and current drive (LSC and TORRAY), and stability (PEST1-3, GATO, NOVA, MARS, DCON, M3D) codes that require this equilibrium information. In an effort to provide seamless compatibility between the codes that produce and need these equilibria, we have developed two Fortran 90 modules, MEQ and XPLASMA, that serve as common interfaces between these two classes of codes. XPLASMA provides a common equilibrium representation for the heating and current drive applications while MEQ provides common equilibrium and associated metric information needed by MHD stability codes. We illustrate the utility of this approach by presenting results of PEST-3 tearing stability calculations of an NSTX discharge performed on profiles provided by the TRANSP code. Using the MEQ module, the TRANSP equilibrium data are stored in a Fortran 90 derived type and passed to PEST3 as a subroutine argument. All calculations are performed on the fly, as the profiles evolve.

  11. Pseudo-Anosov flows in toroidal manifolds

    CERN Document Server

    Barbot, Thierry

    2010-01-01

    We first prove rigidity results for pseudo-Anosov flows in prototypes of toroidal 3-manifolds: we show that a pseudo-Anosov in a Seifert fibered manifold is up to finite covers topologically conjugate to a geodesic flow. We also show that a pseudo-Anosov flow in a solv manifold is topologically conjugate to a suspension Anosov flow. Then we analyse immersed and embedded incompressible tori in optimal position with respect to a pseudo-Anosov flow. We also study the interaction of a pseudo-Anosov flow with possible Seifert fibered pieces in the torus decomposition: if the fiber is associated to a periodic orbit of the flow, we produce a standard form for the flow in the piece using Birkhoff annuli. Finally we introduce several new classes of examples, some of which are generalized pseudo-Anosov flows which have one prong singularities. The examples show that the results above in Seifert fibered and solvable manifolds do not apply to one prong pseudo-Anosov flows. In addition we also construct a large new class ...

  12. ''Turbulent Equipartition'' Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mode-independent part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density (Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)) which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of 'magnetically weighted angular momentum density', nmi U#parallel# R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustrated that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  13. Turbulent Equipartition Theory of Toroidal Momentum Pinch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T.S. Hahm, P.H. Diamond, O.D. Gurcan, and G. Rewaldt

    2008-01-31

    The mode-independet part of magnetic curvature driven turbulent convective (TuroCo) pinch of the angular momentum density [Hahm et al., Phys. Plasmas 14,072302 (2007)] which was originally derived from the gyrokinetic equation, can be interpreted in terms of the turbulent equipartition (TEP) theory. It is shown that the previous results can be obtained from the local conservation of "magnetically weighted angular momentum density," nmi U|| R/B2, and its homogenization due to turbulent flows. It is also demonstrated that the magnetic curvature modification of the parallel acceleration in the nonlinear gyrokinetic equation in the laboratory frame, which was shown to be responsible for the TEP part of the TurCo pinch of angular momentum density in the previous work, is closely related to the Coriolis drift coupling to the perturbed electric field. In addition, the origin of the diffusive flux in the rotating frame is highlighted. Finally, it is illustratd that there should be a difference in scalings between the momentum pinch originated from inherently toroidal effects and that coming from other mechanisms which exist in a simpler geometry.

  14. Confinement and heating of high beta plasma with emphasis on compact toroids. Compact toroid research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two older projects associated with very high energy density plasmas, specifically the High Density Field Reversed Configuration and the Liner Plasma Compression Experiment, have been completed. Attention has been turned to compact toroid experiments of more conventional density, and three experiments have been initiated. These include the Coaxial Slow Source Experiment, the Variable Length FRC Experiment, and Variable Angle CthetaP Experiment. In each case, the project was begun in order to provide basic plasma physics information on specific unresolved issues of progammatic importance to the national CT Program

  15. CALIBRATION AND HOT TESTING OF THE ADVANCED NUCLEAR MEASUREMENT SYSTEMS USED FOR WASTE CHARACTERIZATION IN COGEMA'S NEW ACC COMPACTION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent nuclear fuel from commercial power reactors is reprocessed at the COGEMA plant in La Hague. After shearing and dissolution of the fuel assemblies, the hulls and nozzles are sent to COGEMA's new compaction facility (ACC) to reduce the final volume of waste. Technological waste generated in the reprocessing plant is also sent to the ACC facility. Compacted waste is characterized by two measurement stations: a gamma spectrometry station and an active and passive neutron measurement station. The main purpose of these measurement stations is to determine the guaranteed nuclear parameters of the compacted waste and their associated uncertainties: (1) total U and Pu masses, (2) Pu, Cm, and total alpha activities, (3) 137Cs, 90Sr-90Y,241Pu beta activities, (4) decay heat. After giving a description of the measurement stations, this paper will describe the qualification tests performed in the context of the ACC project. The extensive calibration tests performed on site with different sources and different waste matrices will be described (approximately 500 neutron and gamma experiments). Hot tests that were conducted after hot start-up at the end of 2001 and prior to the start of commercial operation will be also presented. A number of drums produced by the upstream facilities were introduced one by one into the ACC facility in order to avoid mixing of different fuel assemblies. This procedure allows comparison between characterization performed in the upstream facilities on the basis of fuel data available before processing and the measurements performed on the new ACC stations. These comparisons showed good agreement between the different methods of characterization and thus validated the innovative technologies and methods used by COGEMA for compacted waste generated by the ACC facility

  16. An important step for the ATLAS toroid magnet

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    The ATLAS experiment's prototype toroid coil arrives at CERN from the CEA laboratory in Saclay on 6 October. The world's largest superconducting toroid magnet is under construction for the ATLAS experiment. A nine-metre long fully functional prototype coil was delivered to CERN at the beginning of October and has since been undergoing tests in the West Area. Built mainly by companies in France and Italy under the supervision of engineers from the CEA-Saclay laboratory near Paris and Italy's INFN-LASA, the magnet is a crucial step forward in the construction of the ATLAS superconducting magnet system. Unlike any particle detector that has gone before, the ATLAS detector's magnet system consists of a large toroidal system enclosing a small central solenoid. The barrel part of the toroidal system will use eight toroid coils, each a massive 25 metres in length. These will dwarf the largest toroids in the world when ATLAS was designed, which measure about six metres. So the ATLAS collaboration decided to build a...

  17. Toroidal Momentum Pinch Velocity due to the Coriolis Drift Effect on Small Scale Instabilities in a Toroidal Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter, the influence of the ''Coriolis drift'' on small scale instabilities in toroidal plasmas is shown to generate a toroidal momentum pinch velocity. Such a pinch results because the Coriolis drift generates a coupling between the density and temperature perturbations on the one hand and the perturbed parallel flow velocity on the other. A simple fluid model is used to highlight the physics mechanism and gyro-kinetic calculations are performed to accurately assess the magnitude of the pinch. The derived pinch velocity leads to a radial gradient of the toroidal velocity profile even in the absence of a torque on the plasma and is predicted to generate a peaking of the toroidal velocity profile similar to the peaking of the density profile. Finally, the pinch also affects the interpretation of current experiments

  18. Development of ITER toroidal field insert. International collaboration with Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Central Solenoid (CS) model coil programme was performed since 1992 as one of the projects in the Engineering Design Activity (EDA) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor(ITER). The CS model coil programme involves a plan to develop the Toroidal Field (TF) insert to demonstrate the conductor performance of ITER TF coils under a magnetic flux density of 13T. The TF insert was fabricated by Russia and tested by Japan under the framework of the ITER-EDA. The TF insert developed a single-layer solenoid with nine turns. It is wound with a cable-in-conduit (CIC) conductor which consists of 1,152 Nb3Sn strands, a thin titanium jacket and a central channel. The outer diameter, height and weight of the TF insert are 1.56 m, 3.2 m and 3.1 ton, respectively. Fabrication of the TF insert was completed in May 2001 at the D.V.Efremov Scientific Research Institute for Electrophysical Apparatus (Efremov institute) in St. Petersburg, Russia. The TF insert was then transported to the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). Installation of the TF insert to CS model coil test facility was completed in August, 2001. Experiments including the cooldown and warmup processes, were completed in November 2001. The TF insert was charged to 13T with 46 kA without any instability under a back up magnetic field from the CS model coil. This report introduces an overview of the fabrication, installation and experiments for the TF insert conducted under collaboration between Japan and Russia. (author)

  19. The Oxnard advanced water purification facility: combining indirect potable reuse with reverse osmosis concentrate beneficial use to ensure a California community's water sustainability and provide coastal wetlands restoration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozier, Jim; Ortega, Ken

    2010-01-01

    The City of Oxnard in California is implementing a strategic water resources program known as the Groundwater Recovery Enhancement and Treatment (GREAT) program, which includes an Advanced Water Purification Facility (AWPF) that will use a major portion of the secondary effluent from the City's existing Water Pollution Control Facility to produce high-quality treated water to be used for irrigation of edible food crops, landscape irrigation, injection into the groundwater basin to form a barrier to seawater intrusion, and other industrial uses. The AWPF, currently under design by CH2M HILL, will employ a multiple-barrier treatment train consisting of microfiltration, reverse osmosis, and ultravioletlightbased advanced oxidation processes to purify the secondary effluent to conform to California Department of Public Health Title 22 Recycled Water Criteria for groundwater recharge. The AWPF, which will have initial and build-out capacities of ca. 24,000 and ca 95,000 m(3)/day, respectively, was limited to a 1.8-hectare site, with 0.4 hectares dedicated to a Visitor's Center and administration building. Further, the depth below grade and height of the AWPF's structures were constrained because of the high groundwater table at the site, the high cost of excavation and dewatering, and local codes. To accommodate these various restrictions, an innovative design approach has been developed. This paper summarizes the design constraints and innovative solutions for the design of the AWPF. PMID:20220237

  20. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Charitonidis, N; Charrondiere, C; Dallocchio, A; Fernandez Carmona, P; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Marques dos Santos, S D; Moyret, P; Peroni, L; Redaelli, S; Scapin, M

    2013-01-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser ...

  1. An experiment to test advanced materials impacted by intense proton pulses at CERN HiRadMat facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertarelli, A., E-mail: alessandro.bertarelli@cern.ch [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Berthome, E. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Boccone, V. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Carra, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Cerutti, F. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Charitonidis, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Machines and Experimental Facilities Group (EN-MEF), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Charrondiere, C. [CERN, Engineering Department, Industrial Controls and Engineering Group (EN-ICE), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Dallocchio, A.; Fernandez Carmona, P.; Francon, P.; Gentini, L.; Guinchard, M.; Mariani, N. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Masi, A. [CERN, Engineering Department, Sources, Targets and Interactions Group (EN-STI), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Marques dos Santos, S.D.; Moyret, P. [CERN, Engineering Department, Mechanical and Materials Engineering Group (EN-MME), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Peroni, L. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy); Redaelli, S. [CERN, Beams Department, Accelerators and Beams Physics Group (BE-ABP), CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Scapin, M. [Politecnico di Torino, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (DIMEAS), Corso Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino (Italy)

    2013-08-01

    Predicting the consequences of highly energetic particle beams impacting protection devices as collimators or high power target stations is a fundamental issue in the design of state-of-the-art facilities for high-energy particle physics. These complex dynamic phenomena can be successfully simulated resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, however, these codes require reliable material constitutive models that, at the extreme conditions induced by a destructive beam impact, are scarce and often inaccurate. In order to derive or validate such models a comprehensive, first-of-its-kind experiment has been recently carried out at CERN HiRadMat facility: performed tests entailed the controlled impact of intense and energetic proton pulses on a number of specimens made of six different materials. Experimental data were acquired relying on embedded instrumentation (strain gauges, temperature probes and vacuum sensors) and on remote-acquisition devices (laser Doppler vibrometer and high-speed camera). The method presented in this paper, combining experimental measurements with numerical simulations, may find applications to assess materials under very high strain rates and temperatures in domains well beyond particle physics (severe accidents in fusion and fission nuclear facilities, space debris impacts, fast and intense loadings on materials and structures etc.)

  2. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  3. Computer simulations of compact toroid formation and acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experiments to form, accelerate, and focus compact toroid plasmas will be performed on the 9.4 MJ SHIVA STAR fast capacitor bank at the Air Force Weapons Laboratory during the 1990. The MARAUDER (magnetically accelerated rings to achieve ultrahigh directed energy and radiation) program is a research effort to accelerate magnetized plasma rings with the masses between 0.1 and 1.0 mg to velocities above 10 8 cm/sec and energies above 1 MJ. Research on these high-velocity compact toroids may lead to development of very fast opening switches, high-power microwave sources, and an alternative path to inertial confinement fusion. Design of a compact toroid accelerator experiment on the SHIVA STAR capacitor bank is underway, and computer simulations with the 2 1/2-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics code, MACH2, have been performed to guide this endeavor. The compact toroids are produced in a magnetized coaxial plasma gun, and the acceleration will occur in a configuration similar to a coaxial railgun. Detailed calculations of formation and equilibration of a low beta magnetic force-free configuration (curl B = kB) have been performed with MACH2. In this paper, the authors discuss computer simulations of the focusing and acceleration of the toroid

  4. Toroidal linear force-free magnetic fields with axial symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandas, M.; Romashets, E.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: Interplanetary magnetic flux ropes are often described as linear force-free fields. To account for their curvature, toroidal configurations must be used. The aim is to find an analytic description of a linear force-free magnetic field of the toroidal geometry in which the cross section of flux ropes can be controlled. Methods: The solution is found as a superposition of fields given by linear force-free cylinders tangential to a generating toroid. The cylindrical field is expressed in a series of terms that are not all cylindrically symmetric. Results: We found the general form of a toroidal linear force-free magnetic field. The field is azimuthally symmetric with respect to the torus axis. It depends on a set of coefficients that enables controlling the flux rope shape (cross section) to some extent. By varying the coefficients, flux ropes with circular and elliptic cross sections were constructed. Numerical comparison suggests that the simple analytic formula for calculating the helicity in toroidal flux ropes of the circular cross section can be used for flux ropes with elliptic cross sections if the minor radius in the formula is set to the geometric mean of the semi-axes of the elliptic cross section.

  5. Application of life-cycle information for advancement in safety of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. Application of safety information to advanced safety management support system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Risk management is major concern to nuclear energy reprocessing plants to improve plant and process reliability and ensure their safety. This is because we are required to predict potential risks before any accident or disaster occurs. The advancement of safety design and safety systems technologies showed large amount of useful safety-related knowledge that can be of great importance to plant operation to reduce operation risks and ensure safety. This research proposes safety knowledge modeling framework on the basis of ontology technologies to systematically construct plant knowledge model, which includes plant structure, operation, and the associated behaviors. In such plant knowledge model safety related information is defined and linked to the different elements of plant knowledge model. Ontology editor is employed to define the basic concepts and their inter-relations, which are used to capture and construct plant safety knowledge. In order to provide detailed safety knowledgebase, HAZOP results are analyzed and structured so that safety-related knowledge are identified and structured within the plant knowledgebase. The target safety knowledgebase includes: failures, deviations, causes, consequences, and fault propagation as mapped to plant knowledge. The proposed ontology-based safety framework is applied on case study nuclear plant to structure failures, causes, consequences, and fault propagation, which are used to support plant operation. (author)

  6. Recent Advances in Antenna Measurement Techniques at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinbjerg, Olav; Pivnenko, Sergey; Kim, Oleksiy S.; Nielsen, Jeppe Majlund

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports recent antenna measurement projects and research at the DTU-ESA Spherical Near-Field Antenna Test Facility at the Technical University of Denmark. High-accuracy measurement projects for the SMOS, SENTINEL-1, and BIOMASS missions of the European Space Agency were driven by...... uncertainty requirements of a few hundredths of dB for the directivity and correspondingly strong requirements for gain and/or phase. Research and development of 1:3 bandwidth range probes, and the near-field to far-field transformation algorithm accounting for the higher-order azimuthal modes in the...

  7. Optical toroidal dipolar response by an asymmetric double-bar metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Dong, Zheng-Gao; Rho, Junsuk; Li, Jia-Qi; Lu, Changgui; Yin, Xiaobo; Zhang, X; 10.1063/1.4757613

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate that the toroidal dipolar response can be realized in the optical regime by designing a feasible nanostructured metamaterial, comprising asymmetric double-bar magnetic resonators assembled into a toroid-like configuration. It is confirmed numerically that an optical toroidal dipolar moment dominates over other moments. This response is characterized by a strong confinement of an E-field component at the toroid center, oriented perpendicular to the H-vortex plane. The resonance-enhanced optical toroidal response can provide an experimental avenue for various interesting optical phenomena associated with the elusive toroidal moment.

  8. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are the single-cell concept, the low-flow ventilation concept, television viewing, equipment-mounting racks, and force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. 14 refs., 3 figs

  9. Design concepts and advanced telerobotics development for facilities in the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Fuel Recycle Division at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), a comprehensive remote systems development program has existed for the past seven years. The new remote technology under development is expected to significantly improve remote operations by extending the range of tasks accomplished by remote means and increasing the efficiency of remote work undertaken. Five areas of the development effort are primary contributors to the goal of higher operating efficiency for major facilities for the back end of the nuclear fuel cycle. These areas are (1) the single-cell concept, (2) the low-flow ventilation concept, (3) television viewing, (4) equipment-mounting racks, and (5) force-reflecting manipulation. These somewhat innovative directions are products of a design process where the technical scenario to be accomplished, the remote equipment to accomplish the scenario, and the facility design to house the equipment, are considered in an iterative design process to optimize performance, maximize long-term costs effectiveness, and minimize initial capital outlay. (author)

  10. Future Advanced Nuclear Systems and the Role of MYRRHA as a Waste Transmutation R&D Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose hYbrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is an experimental accelerator driven system (ADS) currently being developed at SCK•CEN in replacement of its material testing reactor BR2. The MYRRHA facility is conceived as a flexible fast spectrum irradiation facility, which is able to run in both subcritical and critical modes. The applications catalogue of MYRRHA includes fuel developments for innovative reactor systems, material developments for GEN IV systems and fusion reactors, doped silicon production, radioisotope production and fundamental science applications thanks to the high power proton accelerator. Next to these applications, MYRRHA will demonstrate the ADS full concept by coupling a high power proton accelerator, a multi-megawatt spallation target and a subcritical reactor at reasonable power level to allow operational feedback, scalable to an industrial demonstrator and allow the study of efficient transmutation of high level nuclear waste. Since MYRRHA is based on heavy liquid metal technology, namely lead–bismuth eutectic, it will be able to significantly contribute to the development of lead fast reactor (LFR) technology and will fill the role of the European Technology Pilot Plant in the roadmap for LFR. The current design of the MYRRHA ADS and its ability to contribute to the European Commission strategy for high level waste management through partitioning and transmutation are discussed in this paper. (author)

  11. The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility for education and advanced diagnostics development for OMEGA, Z and the NIF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrasso, R.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Armstrong, E.; Han, H. W.; Kabadi, N.; Lahmann, B.; Orozco, D.; Rojas Herrera, J.; Sio, H.; Sutcliffe, G.; Frenje, J.; Li, C. K.; Séguin, F. H.; Leeper, R.; Ruiz, C. L.; Sangster, T. C.

    2015-11-01

    The MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility utilizes a 135-keV linear electrostatic ion accelerator, a D-T neutron source and two x-ray sources for development and characterization of nuclear diagnostics for OMEGA, Z, and the NIF. The ion accelerator generates D-D and D-3He fusion products through acceleration of D ions onto a 3He-doped Erbium-Deuteride target. Fusion reaction rates around 106 s-1 are routinely achieved, and fluence and energy of the fusion products have been accurately characterized. The D-T neutron source generates up to 6 × 108 neutrons/s. The two x-ray generators produce spectra with peak energies of 35 keV and 225 keV and maximum dose rates of 0.5 Gy/min and 12 Gy/min, respectively. Diagnostics developed and calibrated at this facility include CR-39 based charged-particle spectrometers, neutron detectors, and the particle Time-Of-Flight (pTOF) and Magnetic PTOF CVD-diamond-based bang time detectors. The accelerator is also a vital tool in the education of graduate and undergraduate students at MIT. This work was supported in part by SNL, DOE, LLE and LLNL.

  12. Dynamics of the Disruption Halo Current Toroidal Asymmetry in NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.P. Gerhardt

    2012-09-27

    This paper describes the dynamics of disruption halo current non-axisymmetries in the lower divertor of the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While. The halo currents typically have a strongly asymmetric structure where they enter the divertor floor, and this asymmetry has been observed to complete up to 7 toroidal revolutions over the duration of the halo current pulse. However, the rotation speed and toroidal extend of the asymmetry can vary significantly during the pulse. The rotation speed, halo current pulse duration, and total number of revolutions tend to be smaller in cases with large halo currents. The halo current pattern is observed to become toroidally symmetric at the end of the halo current pulse. It is proposed that this symmeterization is due to the loss of most or all of the closed field line geometry in the final phase of the vertical displacement event.

  13. Toroidal drift waves with an equilibrium velocity field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author investigated the effect of a radially sheared poloidal velocity field on the toroidal drift wave which is well known to escape magnetic shear damping through toroidal coupling between different poloidal harmonics centered on individual rational surfaces. He endeavored to model the velocity profile according to that observed at the plasma edge during H-mode shots. The resultant wave formed by the interference of different poloidal harmonics now sees an antiwell created by the H-mode type velocity profile in the radial direction (in contrast to a well formed by the diamagnetic frequency in the absence of velocity fields). The wave, therefore, convects energy outward and hence undergoes damping. Outgoing wave boundary condition then introduces a negative imaginary contribution to the global eigenvalue -- once again confirming the stabilizing role of H-mode type velocity profiles. On the other hand, L-mode type velocity profiles have destabilizing action on toroidal drift waves

  14. Axion Haloscopes with Toroidal Geometry at CAPP/IBS

    CERN Document Server

    Ko, B R

    2016-01-01

    The present state of the art axion haloscope employs a cylindrical resonant cavity in a solenoidal field. We, the Center for Axion and Precision Physics Research (CAPP) of the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) in Korea, are also pursuing halo axion discovery using this cylindrical geometry. However, the presence of end caps of cavities increases challenges as we explore higher frequency regions for the axion at above 2 GHz. To overcome these challenges we exploit a toroidal design of cavity and magnetic field. A toroidal geometry offers several advantages, two of which are a larger volume for a given space and greatly reduced fringe fields which interfere with our preamps, in particular the planned quantum-based devices. We introduce the concept of toroidal axion haloscopes and present ongoing research activities and plans at CAPP/IBS.

  15. Reduction of toroidal ripple by using high Tc superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we present a new method to reduce the toroidal ripple with use of high Tc superconductors. High Tc superconductors can behave as ferromagnetic or diamagnetic materials depending on their magnetic hysteresis. If they are appropriately arranged and magnetized between the toroidal field coils, they possibly decrease the toroidal field ripple. Here, the preliminary design of ITER is taken as an example, and the effect of the high Tc superconductors on the ripple is evaluated. The magnetic induction due to the superconductors is calculated by the current vector potential method based on the critical state model. Several arrangements of the high Tc superconductors were quantitatively examined in order to reduce the ripple. The results obtained by the calculation show that the maximum ripple value can be reduced to be the required value. (orig.)

  16. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with shearad toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throumoulopoulos, George; Kuiroukidis, Apostolos; Tasso, Henri

    2015-11-01

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e. the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis. This work has received funding from (a) the National Programme for the Controlled Thermonuclear Fusion, Hellenic Republic, (b) Euratom research and training programme 2014-2018 under grant agreement No 633053.

  17. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with shearad toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Kuiroukidis, Ap; Tasso, H

    2015-01-01

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e. the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  18. Bi-2223 HTS winding in toroidal configuration for SMES coil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kondratowicz-Kucewicz, B; Kozak, S; Kozak, J; Wojtasiewicz, G; Majka, M [Electrotechnical Institute in Warsaw (Poland); Janowski, T, E-mail: t.janowski@pollub.p [Lublin University of Technology (Poland)

    2010-06-01

    Energy can be stored in the magnetic field of a coil. Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) is very promising as a power storage system for load levelling or power stabilizer. However, the strong electromagnetic force caused by high magnetic field and large coil current is a problem in SMES systems. A toroidal configuration would have a much less extensive external magnetic field and electromagnetic forces in winding. The paper describes the design of HTS winding for SMES coil in modular toroid configuration consist of seven Bi-2223 double-pancakes as well as numerical analysis of SMES magnet model using FLUX 3D package. As the results of analysis the paper presents the optimal coil configuration and the parameters such as radius of toroidal magnet, energy stored in magnet and magnetic field distribution.

  19. Vlasov tokamak equilibria with sheared toroidal flow and anisotropic pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuiroukidis, Ap, E-mail: kouirouki@astro.auth.gr [Technological Education Institute of Serres, 62124 Serres (Greece); Throumoulopoulos, G. N., E-mail: gthroum@uoi.gr [Department of Physics, University of Ioannina, GR 451 10 Ioannina (Greece); Tasso, H., E-mail: het@ipp.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2015-08-15

    By choosing appropriate deformed Maxwellian ion and electron distribution functions depending on the two particle constants of motion, i.e., the energy and toroidal angular momentum, we reduce the Vlasov axisymmetric equilibrium problem for quasineutral plasmas to a transcendental Grad-Shafranov-like equation. This equation is then solved numerically under the Dirichlet boundary condition for an analytically prescribed boundary possessing a lower X-point to construct tokamak equilibria with toroidal sheared ion flow and anisotropic pressure. Depending on the deformation of the distribution functions, these steady states can have toroidal current densities either peaked on the magnetic axis or hollow. These two kinds of equilibria may be regarded as a bifurcation in connection with symmetry properties of the distribution functions on the magnetic axis.

  20. Linear wave propagation in a hot axisymmetric toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic effects on the propagation of the Alfven wave are studied for the first time in a toroidal plasma relevant for experiments. This requires the resolution of a set of coupled partial differential equations whose coefficients depend locally on the plasma parameters. For this purpose, a numerical wave propagation code called PENN has been developed using either a bilinear or a bicubic Hermite finite element discretization. It solves Maxwell's equations in toroidal geometry, with a dielectric tensor operator that takes into account the linear response of the plasma. Two different models have been implemented and can be used comparatively to describe the same physical case: the first treats the plasma as resistive fluids and gives results which are in good agreement with toroidal fluid codes. The second is a kinetic model and takes into account the finite size of the Larmor radii; it has successfully been tested against a kinetic plasma model in cylindrical geometry. New results have been obtained when studying kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. Two different conversion mechanisms to the kinetic Alfven wave have been described: one occurs at toroidally coupled resonant surfaces and is the kinetic counterpart of the fluid models' resonance absorption. The other has no such correspondence and results directly from the toroidal coupling between the kinetic Alfven wave and the global wavefield. An analysis of a heating scenario suggests that it might be difficult to heat a plasma with Alfven waves up to temperatures that are relevant for a tokamak reactor. Kinetic effects are studied for three types of global Alfven modes (GAE, TAE, BAE) and a new class of kinetic eigenmodes is described which appear inside the fluid gap: it could be related to recent observations in the JET (Joint European Torus) tokamak. (author) 56 figs., 6 tabs., 58 refs

  1. On rotation of multi-species plasmas in toroidal systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the poloidal and toroidal spin-up of an isothermal plasma in toroidal equilibria. The mechanism is the Stringer spin-up mechanism which will be generalized to an arbitrary toroidal equilibrium using the Hamada coordinate system. Viscous damping or magnetic pumping balances the accelerating forces and determines the threshold of spin-up. The accelerating forces arise from the Coriolis forces which couple the radial flow to the poloidal flow velocity. The theory presented here is a continuation of a previous paper and applies to a multi-species plasma with impurities. In the two-fluid model - or including impurities - in a multi-fluid model, the flux-friction relations derived on every magnetic surface are the basic equations for computing the poloidal and toroidal flow velocities of the particle species. Futhermore, the effect of turbulent forces on the mean flow is analysed. The Reynolds stresses resulting from anisotropic turbulence provide a force in the tangential direction and thus contribute to the poloidal and toroidal spin-up. Furthermore, turbulence increases the Stringer spin-up mechanism and introduces enhanced plasma losses. The final result is a set of differential equations describing the poloidal and toroidal flow on every magnetic surface. The formalism is valid in every regime of collisionality; however, to obtain specific results, appropriate appoximations must be found for every regime. This will be outlined for the collisional regime where the viscous forces are given by Braginskii's equations. The relation between plasma rotation and the zonal circulation in planetary atmospheres will be discussed. (Author)

  2. High Energy Tests of Advanced Materials for Beam Intercepting Devices at CERN HiRadMat Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Bertarelli, A; Berthome, E; Boccone, V; Carra, F; Cerutti, F; Dallocchio, A; Dos Santos, S; Francon, P; Gentini, L; Guinchard, M; Mariani, N; Masi, A; Moyret, P; Redaeelli, S; Peroni, L; Scapin, M

    2012-01-01

    Predicting by simulations the consequences of LHC particle beams hitting Collimators and other Beam Intercepting Devices (BID) is a fundamental issue for machine protection: this can be done by resorting to highly non-linear numerical tools (Hydrocodes). In order to produce accurate results, these codes require reliable material models that, at the extreme conditions generated by a beam impact, are either imprecise or non-existent. To validate relevant constitutive models or, when unavailable, derive new ones, a comprehensive experimental test foreseeing intense particle beam impacts on six different materials, either already used for present BID or under development for future applications, is being prepared at CERN HiRadMat facility. Tests will be run at medium and high intensity using the SPS proton beam (440 GeV). Material characterization will be carried out mostly in real time relying on embarked instrumentation (strain gauges, microphones, temperature and pressure sensors) and on remote acquisition dev...

  3. Toroidal vortices as a solution to the dust migration problem

    CERN Document Server

    Loren-Aguilar, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    In an earlier letter, we reported that dust settling in protoplanetary discs may lead to a dynamical dust-gas instability that produces global toroidal vortices. In this letter, we investigate the evolution of a dusty protoplanetary disc with two different dust species (1 mm and 50 cm dust grains), under the presence of the instability. We show how toroidal vortices, triggered by the interaction of mm grains with the gas, stop the radial migration of metre-sized dust, potentially offering a natural and efficient solution to the dust migration problem.

  4. Experiments with a fully toroidal Extrap Z-pinch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Extrap plasma confinement scheme, a Z-pinch is produced along the null of an octupole field generated by currents in external conductors. In the paper, studies of the discharge startup process in a fully toroidal configuration are described. Startup involves first breaking down a toroidal discharge and then driving up the current in order to reach the pinch parameter regime. Current densities of 2x106 A·m-2 have been achieved. The estimated plasma density is 6x1020m-3, and the temperature is about 4 eV. These parameters correspond to pinch conditions. (author)

  5. Low frequency wave propagation in hot toroidal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The equation for low frequency wave propagation in full toroidal geometry with arbitrary cross section is derived. It is mainly shown that, when including self consistently the various absorption terms from Vlasov equation in the dielectric tensor, the global wave structure is described by a fourth order system, which even reduces to a second order Helmoltz type equation when neglecting toroidal corrections. Close to the singular ion ion conversion layer, the structure of the wave is strongly affected. Finite Larmor radius conversion effects there compete with simple absorption mechanisms via Landau or cyclotron Landau damping making the FLR effects not likely to dominate nor even occur

  6. Toroidal equilibrium of plasma with concentrated relativistic electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simplified model has been given for toroidal equilibrium of a tokamak-type plasma with high-current concentrated electron beam. The plasma has a thermal pressure, and the electron beam has effective inertial pressure. Strong deformations of tokamak equilibria have been simulated by numerical calculations. Toroidal equilibria with relatively large vertical field are obtained when we consider high-energy intense electron beam. The beam orbit, which is shifted outward from the magnetic axis of the plasma, is closed by the sum of the externally applied relatively large vertical field and the poloidal magnetic field of the plasma. (author)

  7. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    2013-01-01

    comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified by...

  8. Development and verification of printed circuit board toroidal transformer model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pejtersen, Jens; Mønster, Jakob Døllner; Knott, Arnold

    comparing calculated parameters with 3D finite element simulations and experimental measurement results. The developed transformer model shows good agreement with the simulated and measured results. The model can be used to predict the parameters of printed circuit board toroidal transformer configurations......An analytical model of an air core printed circuit board embedded toroidal transformer configuration is presented. The transformer has been developed for galvanic isolation of very high frequency switch-mode dc-dc power converter applications. The theoretical model is developed and verified by...

  9. Comparative study between toroidal coordinates and the magnetic dipole field

    CERN Document Server

    Chávez-Alarcón, Esteban

    2012-01-01

    There is a similar behaviour between the toroidal coordinates and the dipole magnetic field produced by a circular loop. In this work we evaluate up to what extent the former can be used as a representation of the latter. While the tori in the toroidal coordinates have circular cross sections, those of the circular loop magnetic field are nearly elliptical ovoids, but they are very similar for large aspect ratios.The centres of the latter displace from the axis faster than the former. By making a comparison between tori of similar aspect ratios, we find quantitative criteria to evaluate the accuracy of the approximation.

  10. Self-interference of a toroidal Bose–Einstein condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate the self-interference of a single Bose–Einstein condensate on a non-simply connected geometry, focussing on a toroidally trapped ring-shaped condensate. First, we show how the opposite parts of the ring can interfere using the Wigner function representation. Then, using analytical expressions for the time-evolution of a freely expanding ring-shaped condensate with and without a persistent current, we show that the self-interference of the ring-shaped condensate is possible only in the absence of the persistent current. We conclude by proposing an experimental protocol for the creation of ring dark solitons using the toroidal self-interference

  11. Ion temperature gradient modes in toroidal helical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linear properties of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes in helical systems are studied. The real frequency, growth rate, and eigenfunction are obtained for both stable and unstable cases by solving a kinetic integral equation with proper analytic continuation performed in the complex frequency plane. Based on the model magnetic configuration for toroidal helical systems like the Large Helical Device (LHD), dependences of the ITG mode properties on various plasma equilibrium parameters are investigated. Particularly, relative effects of ∇B-curvature drifts driven by the toroidicity and by the helical ripples are examined in order to compare the ITG modes in helical systems with those in tokamaks. (author)

  12. Toroidal Spiral Strings in Higher-dimensional Spacetime

    OpenAIRE

    Igata, Takahisa; Ishihara, Hideki

    2010-01-01

    We report on our progress in research of separability of the Nambu-Goto equation for test strings with a symmetric configuration in a shape of toroidal spiral in a five-dimensional Kerr-AdS black hole. In particular, for a Hopf loop string which is a special class of the toroidal spirals, we show the complete separation of variables occurs in two cases, Kerr background and Kerr-AdS background with equal angular momenta. We also obtain the dynamical solution for the Hopf loop around a black ho...

  13. Reevaluation of the Braginskii viscous force for toroidal plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Johnson, Robert W

    2009-01-01

    The model by Braginskii for the viscous stress tensor is used to determine the shear and gyroviscous forces acting within a toroidally confined plasma. Comparison is made to previous evaluations which contain an inconsistent treatment of the radial derivative and neglect the effect of the pitch angle. A radial gyroviscous force is found to survive the limit of constant density and rigid toroidal rotation of the flux surface, and a radial shear viscous force may develop for sufficient vertical asymmetry to the ion velocity profile.

  14. Induction Motor with Switchable Number of Poles and Toroidal Winding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, A.

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a study of an induction motor provided with toroidal stator winding. The ring-type coils offer a higher versatility in obtaining a different number of pole pairs by means of delta/star and series/parallel connections respectively. As consequence, the developed torque can vary within large limits and the motor can be utilized for applications that require, for example, high load torque values for a short time. The study involves experimental tests and FEM simulation for an induction machine with three configurations of pole pairs. The conclusions attest the superiority of the toroidal winding for certain applications such as electric vehicles or lifting machines.

  15. Operation of beam line facilities for real-time x-ray studies at Sector 7 of the advanced photon source. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Report documents the research accomplishments achieved in the first phase of operations of a new Advanced Photon Source beam line (7-ID MHATT-CAT) dedicated to real-time x-ray studies. The period covered by this report covers the establishment of a world-class facility for time-dependent x-ray studies of materials. During this period many new and innovative research programs were initiated at Sector 7 with support of this grant, most notably using a combination of ultrafast lasers and pulsed synchrotron radiation. This work initiated a new frontier of materials research: namely, the study of the dynamics of materials under extreme conditions of high intensity impulsive laser irradiation

  16. Science drivers and requirements for an Advanced Technology Large Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST): Implications for technology development and synergies with other future facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Postman, Marc; Sembach, Kenneth; Giavalisco, Mauro; Traub, Wesley; Stapelfeldt, Karl; Calzetti, Daniela; Oegerle, William; Rich, R Michael; Stahl, H Phillip; Tumlinson, Jason; Mountain, Matt; Soummer, Rémi; Hyde, Tupper; 10.1117/12.857044

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Large-Aperture Space Telescope (ATLAST) is a concept for an 8-meter to 16-meter UVOIR space observatory for launch in the 2025-2030 era. ATLAST will allow astronomers to answer fundamental questions at the forefront of modern astronphysics, including "Is there life elsewhere in the Galaxy?" We present a range of science drivers that define the main performance requirements for ATLAST (8 to 16 milliarcsec angular resolution, diffraction limited imaging at 0.5 {\\mu}m wavelength, minimum collecting area of 45 square meters, high sensitivity to light wavelengths from 0.1 {\\mu}m to 2.4 {\\mu}m, high stability in wavefront sensing and control). We will also discuss the synergy between ATLAST and other anticipated future facilities (e.g., TMT, EELT, ALMA) and the priorities for technology development that will enable the construction for a cost that is comparable to current generation observatory-class space missions.

  17. Multipurpose monochromator for the Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center Collaborative Access Team beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source x-ray facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Basic Energy Science Synchrotron Radiation Center (BESSRC) Collaborative Access Team (CAT) will construct x-ray beamlines at two sectors of the Advanced Photon Source facility. In most of the beamlines the first optical element will be a monochromator, so that a standard design for this critical component is advantageous. The monochromator is a double-crystal, fixed exit scheme with a constant offset designed for ultrahigh vacuum windowless operation. In this design, the crystals are mounted on a turntable with the first crystal at the center of rotation. Mechanical linkages are used to correctly position the second crystal and maintain a constant offset. The main drive for the rotary motion is provided by a vacuum compatible Huber goniometer isolated from the main vacuum chamber. The design of the monochromator is such that it can accommodate water, gallium, or liquid-nitrogen cooling for the crystal optics

  18. Upgrades to Power Systems and Magnetic Field Coils in the Pegasus Toroidal Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J. M.; Bongard, M. W.; Bradisse, M. R.; Fonck, R. J.; Lewicki, B. T.; Swager, S. M.

    2012-10-01

    A set of facility upgrades for Pegasus is currently underway to improve the control and performance of the power systems and the magnetic field coils, with the aim of increased helicity-driven current drive for non-inductive startup. The plasma current achieved through helicity injection goes as √ITF Iinj , the toroidal field rod current and injector bias current, respectively. To increase this quantity, the toroidal field power system will be upgraded. Eight new high-current IGBT bridges will replace the 6 bridges currently in place, bringing ITF from 288 kA-turns to 600 kA-turns. Iinj is increased via a new 14 kA, 2.2 kV, single-quadrant IGCT switching power supply. The main poloidal field coil system is expanded to provide faster vertical field penetration of the vessel wall, thereby providing more flexible control of plasma position during startup and current growth. The L/R time for these coils is reduced by ˜40%. New divertor coils are being installed to provide more shaping flexibility and separatrix-limited operations. Overall power supply control will be improved and simplified by deployment of digital feedback controllers using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) to replace PWM analog feedback controllers. FPGAs will provide faster control frequencies, improved fault-handling capability, and streamlined recording of power system operations.

  19. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Shear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) (M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)). The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.

  20. Effects of Toroidal Rotation Sshear on Toroidicity-induced Alfven Eigenmodes in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Podesta, M; Fredrickson, E D; Gorelenkov, N N; LeBlanc, B P; Heidbrink, W W; Crocker, N A; Kubota, S

    2010-08-19

    The effects of a sheared toroidal rotation on the dynamics of bursting Toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes are investigated in neutral beam heated plasmas on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 557 (2000)]. The modes have a global character, extending over most of the minor radius. A toroidal rotation shear layer is measured at the location of maximum drive for the modes. Contrary to results from other devices, no clear evidence of increased damping is found. Instead, experiments with simultaneous neutral beam and radio-frequency auxiliary heating show a strong correlation between the dynamics of the modes and the instability drive. It is argued that kinetic effects involving changes in the mode drive and damping mechanisms other than rotation shear, such as continuum damping, are mostly responsible for the bursting dynamics of the modes.