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Sample records for advanced tokamak research

  1. Advanced tokamak research in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenfield, C M; Murakami, M; Ferron, J R

    2004-01-01

    Advanced tokamak (AT) research in DIII-D seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation in future devices. These regimes require high toroidal beta to maximize fusion output and high poloidal beta to maximize the self-driven bootstrap current. Achieving these conditions requires integrated, simultaneous control of the current and pressure profiles and active magnetohydrodynamic stability control. The building blocks for AT operation are in hand. Resistive wall mode stabilization by plasma rotation and active feedback with non-axisymmetric coils allows routine operation above the no-wall beta limit. Neoclassical tearing modes are stabilized by active feedback control of localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Plasma shaping and profile control provide further improvements. Under these conditions, bootstrap supplies most of the current. Steady-state operation requires replacing the remaining inductively driven current, mostly located near the half radius, with non-inductive external sources. In DIII-D this current is provided by ECCD, and nearly stationary AT discharges have been sustained with little remaining inductive current. Fast wave current drive is being developed to control the central magnetic shear. Density control, with divertor cryopumps, of AT discharges with ELMing H-mode edges facilitates high current drive efficiency at reactor relevant collisionalities. An advanced plasma control system allows integrated control of these elements. Close coupling between modelling and experiment is key to understanding the separate elements, their complex nonlinear interactions, and their integration into self-consistent high performance scenarios. This approach has resulted in fully non-inductively driven plasmas with β N ≤ 3.5 and β T ≤ 3.6% sustained for up to 1 s, which is approximately equal to one current relaxation time. Progress in this area, and its implications for next-step devices, will be illustrated by

  2. DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Research Overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    V.S. Chan; C.M. Greenfield; L.L. Lao; T.C. Luce; C.C. Petty; G.M. Staebler

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews recent progress in the development of long-pulse, high performance discharges on the DIII-D tokamak. It is highlighted by a discharge achieving simultaneously β N H of 9, bootstrap current fraction of 0.5, noninductive current fraction of 0.75, and sustained for 16 energy confinement times. The physics challenge has changed in the long-pulse regime. Non-ideal MHD modes are limiting the stability, fast ion driven modes may play a role in fast ion transport which limits the stored energy and plasma edge behavior can affect the global performance. New control tools are being developed to address these issues

  3. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, S K; Lee, K W; Hwang, C K; Hong, B G; Hong, G W [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new.

  4. Proceedings of 1995 the first Taedok international fusion symposium on advanced tokamak researches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. K.; Lee, K. W.; Hwang, C. K.; Hong, B. G.; Hong, G. W.

    1995-05-01

    This proceeding is from the First Taeduk International Fusion Symposium on advanced tokamak research, which was held at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taeduk Science Town, Korea on March 28-29, 1995. (Author) .new

  5. Advanced tokamak research with integrated modeling in JT-60 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, N.

    2010-01-01

    Researches on advanced tokamak (AT) have progressed with integrated modeling in JT-60 Upgrade [N. Oyama et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104007 (2009)]. Based on JT-60U experimental analyses and first principle simulations, new models were developed and integrated into core, rotation, edge/pedestal, and scrape-off-layer (SOL)/divertor codes. The integrated models clarified complex and autonomous features in AT. An integrated core model was implemented to take account of an anomalous radial transport of alpha particles caused by Alfven eigenmodes. It showed the reduction in the fusion gain by the anomalous radial transport and further escape of alpha particles. Integrated rotation model showed mechanisms of rotation driven by the magnetic-field-ripple loss of fast ions and the charge separation due to fast-ion drift. An inward pinch model of high-Z impurity due to the atomic process was developed and indicated that the pinch velocity increases with the toroidal rotation. Integrated edge/pedestal model clarified causes of collisionality dependence of energy loss due to the edge localized mode and the enhancement of energy loss by steepening a core pressure gradient just inside the pedestal top. An ideal magnetohydrodynamics stability code was developed to take account of toroidal rotation and clarified a destabilizing effect of rotation on the pedestal. Integrated SOL/divertor model clarified a mechanism of X-point multifaceted asymmetric radiation from edge. A model of the SOL flow driven by core particle orbits which partially enter the SOL was developed by introducing the ion-orbit-induced flow to fluid equations.

  6. Advanced Tokamak Stability Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Linjin

    2015-03-01

    The intention of this book is to introduce advanced tokamak stability theory. We start with the derivation of the Grad-Shafranov equation and the construction of various toroidal flux coordinates. An analytical tokamak equilibrium theory is presented to demonstrate the Shafranov shift and how the toroidal hoop force can be balanced by the application of a vertical magnetic field in tokamaks. In addition to advanced theories, this book also discusses the intuitive physics pictures for various experimentally observed phenomena.

  7. Advanced commercial tokamak study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomson, S.L.; Dabiri, A.E.; Keeton, D.C.; Brown, T.G.; Bussell, G.T.

    1985-12-01

    Advanced commercial tokamak studies were performed by the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) as a participant in the Tokamak Power Systems Studies (TPSS) project coordinated by the Office of Fusion Energy. The FEDC studies addressed the issues of tokamak reactor cost, size, and complexity. A scoping study model was developed to determine the effect of beta on tokamak economics, and it was found that a competitive cost of electricity could be achieved at a beta of 10 to 15%. The implications of operating at a beta of up to 25% were also addressed. It was found that the economics of fusion, like those of fission, improve as unit size increases. However, small units were found to be competitive as elements of a multiplex plant, provided that unit cost and maintenance time reductions are realized for the small units. The modular tokamak configuration combined several new approaches to develop a less complex and lower cost reactor. The modular design combines the toroidal field coil with the reactor structure, locates the primary vacuum boundary at the reactor cell wall, and uses a vertical assembly and maintenance approach. 12 refs., 19 figs

  8. Korea Superconducting tokamak advanced research project - Development of heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Byung Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    The heating and current drive systems for KSTAR based on multiple technologies (neutral beam, ion cyclotron, lower hybrid and electron cyclotron) have been designed to provide heating and current drive capabilities as well as flexibility in the control of current density and pressure profiles needed to meet the mission and research objectives of the machine. They are designed to operate for long-pulse lengths of up to 300 s. The NBI system initially delivers 8 MW of neutral beam power to the plasma from one co-directed beam line and shall be upgraded to provide 20 MW of neutral beam power with two co-directed beam lines plus one counter-directed beam line. It will be capable of being reconfigured such that the source arrangement is changed from horizontal to vertical stacking, with 6 MW beam power to the plasmas per beam line, in order to facilitate profile control. The RF system initially delivers 6 MW of rf power to the plasma, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. The system will be upgraded to proved 12 MW of rf power through 2 adjacent ports. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of RF system and the system have the capabilities to be operationable for pulse length up to 300 sec and in the 25-60 MHz frequency range. Lower hybrid system initially provides 1.5 MW LH rf power to the plasma at 3.7 GHz through a horizontal port, which has a capability to be operated for pulse length up to 300 sec, and shall be upgraded to provide 4.5 MW of LH rf power to the plasma. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of LHCD system which incorporate the TPX-type launcher and independently phase-changeable transmission system for the fully phased coupler. The ECH system will deliver up to 0.5 MW of power to the plasma for up to 0.5 sec. In the first phase, we completed the basic design of ECH system which includes an 84 GHz gyrotron system, a transmission system, and a launcher. The basic design of the low loss transmission system

  9. Present status of Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basu, Jayanta

    1991-01-01

    The scenario of thermonuclear fusion research is presented, and the tokamak which is the most promising candidate as a fusion reactor is introduced. A brief survey is given of the most noteworthy tokamaks in the global context, and fusion programmes relating to Next Step devices are outlined. Supplementary heating of tokamak plasma by different methods is briefly reviewed; the latest achievements in heating to fusion temperatures are also reported. The progress towards the high value of the fusion product necessary for ignition is described. The improvement in plasma confinement brought about especially by the H-mode, is discussed. The latest situation in pushing up Β for increasing the efficiency of a tokamak is elucidated. Mention is made of the different types of wall treatment of the tokamak vessel for impurity control, which has led to a significant improvement in tokamak performance. Different methods of current drive for steady state tokamak operation are reviewed, and the issue of current drive efficiency is addressed. A short resume is given of the various diagnostic methods which are employed on a routine basis in the major tokamak centres. A few diagnostics recently developed or proposed in the context of the advanced tokamaks as well as the Next Step devices are indicated. The important role of the interplay between theory, experiment and simulation is noted, and the areas of investigation requiring concerted effort for further progress in tokamak research are identified. (author). 17 refs

  10. Analysis of line integrated electron density using plasma position data on Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Y. U.; Chung, J.

    2010-01-01

    A 280 GHz single-channel horizontal millimeter-wave interferometer system has been installed for plasma electron density measurements on the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) device. This system has a triangular beam path that does not pass through the plasma axis due to geometrical constraints in the superconducting tokamak. The term line density on KSTAR has a different meaning from the line density of other tokamaks. To estimate the peak density and the mean density from the measured line density, information on the position of the plasma is needed. The information has been calculated from tangentially viewed visible images using the toroidal symmetry of the plasma. Interface definition language routines have been developed for this purpose. The calculated plasma position data correspond well to calculation results from magnetic analysis. With the position data and an estimated plasma profile, the peak density and the mean density have been obtained from the line density. From these results, changes of plasma density themselves can be separated from effects of the plasma movements, so they can give valuable information on the plasma status.

  11. Advanced tokamak physics in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petty, C.C.; Luce, T.C.; Politzer, P.A.; Bray, B.; Burrell, K.H.; Chu, M.S.; Ferron, J.R.; Gohil, P.; Greenfield, C.M.; Hsieh, C.-L.; Hyatt, A.W.; La Haye, R.J.; Lao, L.L.; Leonard, A.W.; Lin-Liu, Y.R.; Lohr, J.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Petrie, T.W.; Pinsker, R.I.; Prater, R.; Scoville, J.T.; Staebler, G.M.; Strait, E.J.; Taylor, T.S.; West, W.P. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, CA (United States); Wade, M.R.; Lazarus, E.A.; Murakami, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Jayakumar, R.; Lasnier, C.J.; Makowski, M.A.; Rice, B.W.; Wolf, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Austin, M.E. [University of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Fredrickson, E.D.; Gorelov, I.; Johnson, L.C.; Okabayashi, M.; Wong, K.-L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (United States); Garofalo, A.M.; Navratil, G.A. [Columbia University, New York (United States); Heidbrink, W. [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Kinsey, J.E. [Leheigh University, Bethlehem, PA (United States); McKee, G.R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Rettig, C.L.; Rhodes, T.L. [University of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Watkins, J.G. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2000-12-01

    Advanced tokamaks seek to achieve a high bootstrap current fraction without sacrificing fusion power density or fusion gain. Good progress has been made towards the DIII-D research goal of demonstrating a high-{beta} advanced tokamak plasma in steady state with a relaxed, fully non-inductive current profile and a bootstrap current fraction greater than 50%. The limiting factors for transport, stability, and current profile control in advanced operating modes are discussed in this paper. (author)

  12. Combined hydrogen and lithium beam emission spectroscopy observation system for Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lampert, M. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Anda, G.; Réfy, D.; Zoletnik, S. [Wigner RCP, Euratom Association-HAS, Budapest (Hungary); Czopf, A.; Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, BME IOP, Budapest (Hungary); Guszejnov, D.; Kovácsik, Á.; Pokol, G. I. [BME NTI, Budapest (Hungary); Nam, Y. U. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    A novel beam emission spectroscopy observation system was designed, built, and installed onto the Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research tokamak. The system is designed in a way to be capable of measuring beam emission either from a heating deuterium or from a diagnostic lithium beam. The two beams have somewhat complementary capabilities: edge density profile and turbulence measurement with the lithium beam and two dimensional turbulence measurement with the heating beam. Two detectors can be used in parallel: a CMOS camera provides overview of the scene and lithium beam light intensity distribution at maximum few hundred Hz frame rate, while a 4 × 16 pixel avalanche photo-diode (APD) camera gives 500 kHz bandwidth data from a 4 cm × 16 cm region. The optics use direct imaging through lenses and mirrors from the observation window to the detectors, thus avoid the use of costly and inflexible fiber guides. Remotely controlled mechanisms allow adjustment of the APD camera’s measurement location on a shot-to-shot basis, while temperature stabilized filter holders provide selection of either the Doppler shifted deuterium alpha or lithium resonance line. The capabilities of the system are illustrated by measurements of basic plasma turbulence properties.

  13. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-05-01

    The technical reports in this document were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting ''Research on Small Tokamaks'', September 1990, in three sessions, viz., (1) Plasma Modes, Control, and Internal Phenomena, (2) Edge Phenomena, and (3) Advanced Configurations and New Facilities. In Section (1) experiments at controlling low mode number modes, feedback control using external coils, lower-hybrid current drive for the stabilization of sawtooth activity and continuous (1,1) mode, and unmodulated and fast modulated ECRH mode stabilization experiments were reported, as well as the relation to disruptions and transport of low m,n modes and magnetic island growth; static magnetic perturbations by helical windings causing mode locking and sawtooth suppression; island widths and frequency of the m=2 tearing mode; ultra-fast cooling due to pellet injection; and, finally, some papers on advanced diagnostics, i.e., lithium-beam activated charge-exchange spectroscopy, and detection through laser scattering of discrete Alfven waves. In Section (2), experimental edge physics results from a number of machines were presented (positive biasing on HYBTOK II enhancing the radial electric field and improving confinement; lower hybrid current drive on CASTOR improving global particle confinement, good current drive efficiency in HT-6B showing stabilization of sawteeth and Mirnov oscillations), as well as diagnostic developments (multi-chord time resolved soft and ultra-soft X-ray plasma radiation detection on MT-1; measurements on electron capture cross sections in multi-charged ion-atom collisions; development of a diagnostic neutral beam on Phaedrus-T). Theoretical papers discussed the influence of sheared flow and/or active feedback on edge microstability, large edge electric fields, and two-fluid modelling of non-ambipolar scrape-off layers. Section (3) contained (i) a proposal to construct a spherical tokamak ''Proto-Eta'', (ii) an analysis of ultra-low-q and runaway

  14. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    This document consists of a collection of papers presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Research Using Small Tokamaks. It contains 22 papers on a wide variety of research aspects, including diagnostics, design, transport, equilibrium, stability, and confinement. Some of these papers are devoted to other concepts (stellarators, compact tori). Refs, figs and tabs

  15. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project is presented. (author)

  16. Joint research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Bosco, E. Del; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, M.; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Small tokamaks have an important role in fusion research. More than 40 small tokamaks are operational. Research on small tokamaks has created a scientific basis for the scaling-up to larger tokamaks. Well-known scientific and engineering schools, which are now determining the main directions of fusion science and technology, have been established through research on small tokamaks. Combined efforts within a network of small and medium size tokamaks will further enhance the contribution of small tokamaks. A new concept of interactive coordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project, is presented

  17. Advanced tokamak burning plasma experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P.T.; Ramos, J.; Schultz, J.; Nevins, W.N.

    2001-01-01

    A new reduced size ITER-RC superconducting tokamak concept is proposed with the goals of studying burn physics either in an inductively driven standard tokamak (ST) mode of operation, or in a quasi-steady state advanced tokamak (AT) mode sustained by non-inductive means. This is achieved by reducing the radiation shield thickness protecting the superconducting magnet by 0.34 m relative to ITER and limiting the burn mode of operation to pulse lengths as allowed by the TF coil warming up to the current sharing temperature. High gain (Q≅10) burn physics studies in a reversed shear equilibrium, sustained by RF and NB current drive techniques, may be obtained. (author)

  18. Research using small tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The technical reports contained in this collection of papers on research using small tokamaks fall into four main categories, i.e., (i) experimental work (heating, stability, plasma radial profiles, fluctuations and transport, confinement, ultra-low-q tokamaks, wall physics, a.o.), (ii) diagnostics (beam probes, laser scattering, X-ray tomography, laser interferometry, electron-cyclotron absorption and emission systems), (iii) theory (strong turbulence, effects of heating on stability, plasma beta limits, wave absorption, macrostability, low-q tokamak configurations and bootstrap currents, turbulent heating, stability of vortex flows, nonlinear islands growth, plasma-drift-induced anomalous transport, ergodic divertor design, a.o.), and (iv) new technical facilities (varistors applied to establish constant current and loop voltage in HT-6M), lower-hybrid-current-drive systems for HT-6B and HT-6M, radio-frequency systems for HT-6M ICR heating experimentation, and applications of fiber optics for visible and vacuum ultraviolet radiation detection as applied to tokamaks and reversed-field pinches. A total number of 51 papers are included in the collection. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Status of tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rawls, J.M.

    1979-10-01

    An overall review of the tokamak program is given with particular emphasis upon developments over the past five years in the theoretical and experimental elements of the program. A summary of the key operating parameters for the principal tokamaks throughout the world is given. Also discussed are key issues in plasma confinement, plasma heating, and tokamak design

  20. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-03-01

    This is a compendium of three separate articles on the statistical analysis of tokamak transport. The first article is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws. The second analyzes two important problems of tokamak data---colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation in detail. The third article generalizes the Swamy random coefficient model to the case of degenerate matrices. Three papers have been processed separately

  1. Summary discussion: An integrated advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauthoff, N.R.

    1994-01-01

    The tokamak concept improvement workshop addressed a wide range of issues involved in the development of a more attractive tokamak. The agenda for the workshop progressed from a general discussion of the long-range energy context (with the objective being the identification of a set of criteria and ''figures of merit'' for measuring the attractiveness of a tokamak concept) to particular opportunities for the improvement of the tokamak concept. The discussions concluded with a compilation of research program elements leading to an improved tokamak concept

  2. Examination of a duo-collection optics design for the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) Thomson scattering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Seungtae; Lee, Jong Ha

    2011-01-01

    The comparison of collective optic designs is described for the Thomson scattering system of the Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) device. The optical systems collecting the light emission induced through the interaction between the plasma electrons and a laser beam are the key components for the Thomson scattering system. In the first conceptual design of the collection optics for the KSTAR Thomson scattering system, a duo-lens system covering individually the core and the edge regions of the KSTAR plasma with two optical lens modules was proposed. In optical designs, the number of optical modules is a great concern in the case of limited system space. Here, the duo-lens system is evaluated through a comparison with a uni-lens system covering the whole region of the plasma with a single optical module. The duo-lens system turned out to have 2.0 times and 4.73 times higher light collections of the plasma core and edge compared with the uni-lens system

  3. Joint research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gryaznevich, M.P.; Del Bosco, E.; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Van Oost, G.; He, Yexi; Hegazy, H.; Hirose, A.; Hron, Martin; Kuteev, B.; Ludwig, G.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Silva, C.; Vorobyev, G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 45, č. 10 (2005), S245-S254 ISSN 0029-5515. [Fusion Energy Conference contributions. Vilamoura, 1.11.2004-6.11.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : small tokamaks * thermonuclear fusion Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 3.418, year: 2005

  4. High Beta Tokamak research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, G.A.; Mauel, M.E.; Ivers, T.H.; Sankar, M.K.V.; Eisner, E.; Gates, D.; Garofalo, A.; Kombargi, R.; Maurer, D.; Nadle, D.; Xiao, Q.

    1993-01-01

    During the past 6 months, experiments have been conducted with the HBT-EP tokamak in order to (1) test and evaluate diagnostic systems, (2) establish basic machine operation, (3) document MHD behavior as a function of global discharge parameters, (4) investigate conditions leading to passive stabilization of MHD instabilities, and (5) quantify the external saddle coil current required for DC mode locking. In addition, the development and installation of new hardware systems has occurred. A prototype saddle coil was installed and tested. A five-position (n,m) = (1,2) external helical saddle coil was attached for mode-locking experiments. And, fabrication of the 32-channel UV tomography and the multipass Thomson scattering diagnostics have begun in preparation for installation later this year

  5. Advanced statistics for tokamak transport colinearity and tokamak to tokamak variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riedel, K.S.

    1989-01-01

    This paper is an expository introduction to advanced statistics and scaling laws and their application to tokamak devices. Topics of discussion are as follows: implicit assumptions in the standard analysis; advanced regression techniques; specialized tools in statistics and their applications in fusion physics; and improved datasets for transport studies

  6. Advanced commercial Tokamak optimization studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitley, R.H.; Berwald, D.H.; Gordon, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Our recent studies have concentrated on developing optimal high beta (bean-shaped plasma) commercial tokamak configurations using TRW's Tokamak Reactor Systems Code (TRSC) with special emphasis on lower net electric power reactors that are more easily deployable. A wide range of issues were investigated in the search for the most economic configuration: fusion power, reactor size, wall load, magnet type, inboard blanket and shield thickness, plasma aspect ratio, and operational β value. The costs and configurations of both steady-state and pulsed reactors were also investigated. Optimal small and large reactor concepts were developed and compared by studying the cost of electricity from single units and from multiplexed units. Multiplexed units appear to have advantages because they share some plant equipment and have lower initial capital investment as compared to larger single units

  7. Development in Diagnostics Application to Control Advanced Tokamak Plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koide, Y.

    2008-01-01

    For continuous operation expected in DEMO, all the plasma current must be non-inductively driven, with self-generated neoclassical bootstrap current being maximized. The control of such steady state high performance tokamak plasma (so-called 'Advanced Tokamak Plasma') is a challenge because of the strong coupling between the current density, the pressure profile and MHD stability. In considering diagnostic needs for the advanced tokamak research, diagnostics for MHD are the most fundamental, since discharges which violate the MHD stability criteria either disrupt or have significantly reduced confinement. This report deals with the development in diagnostic application to control advanced tokamak plasma, with emphasized on recent progress in active feedback control of the current profile and the pressure profile under DEMO-relevant high bootstrap-current fraction. In addition, issues in application of the present-day actuators and diagnostics for the advanced control to DEMO will be briefly addressed, where port space for the advanced control may be limited so as to keep sufficient tritium breeding ratio (TBR)

  8. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUMPHREYS, D.A.; FERRON, J.R.; JOHNSON, R.D; LEUER, J.A.; PENAFLOR, B.G.; WALKER, M.L.; WELANDER, A.S.; KHAYRUTDINOV, R.R; DOKOUKA, V.; EDGELL, D.H.; FRANSSON, C.M.

    2004-03-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance

  9. The basics of spherical tokamaks and progress in European research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gusev, V K; Alladio, F; Morris, A W

    2003-01-01

    When the aspect ratio of a tokamak (A = R/a) decreases significantly, there is a transformation of the well studied tokamak toroidal magnetic configuration into the spherical tokamak (ST) configuration. This configuration has high natural plasma elongation and triangularity and other unique equilibrium and stability properties of ST configuration, which are discussed in this paper. European research into ST physics is well advanced in spite of the young age of this branch of fusion science. An overview of selected experimental and theoretical results obtained at Ioffe, Culham and Frascati is given with the emphasis on their complementarity and links to the main stream of tokamak research, such as ITER. An outline of the basic ST advantages and the potential of ST research for new insights into magnetic confinement is also given. More detailed descriptions of recent advances in ST theory and experiment may be found in the invited papers by Akers and Ono in the proceedings of this conference

  10. Experimental and theoretical basis for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, V.S.

    1994-09-01

    In this paper, arguments will be presented to support the attractiveness of advanced tokamaks as fusion reactors. The premise that all improved confinement regimes obtained to date were limited by magnetohydrodynamic stability will be established from experimental results. Accessing the advanced tokamak regime, therefore, requires means to overcome and enhance the beta limit. We will describe a number of ideas involving control of the plasma internal profiles, e.g. to achieve this. These approaches will have to be compatible with the underlying mechanisms for confinement improvement, such as shear rotation suppression of turbulence. For steady-state, there is a trade-off between full bootstrap current operation and the ability to control current profiles. The coupling between current drive and stability dictates the choice of sources and suggests an optimum for the bootstrap fraction. We summarize by presenting the future plans of the US confinement devices, DIII-D, PBX-M, C-Mod, to address the advanced tokamak physics issues and provide a database for the design of next-generation experiments

  11. Steady State Advanced Tokamak (SSAT): The mission and the machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.; Goldston, R.; Nevins, B.; Neilson, H.; Shannon, T.; Montgomery, B.

    1992-03-01

    Extending the tokamak concept to the steady state regime and pursuing advances in tokamak physics are important and complementary steps for the magnetic fusion energy program. The required transition away from inductive current drive will provide exciting opportunities for advances in tokamak physics, as well as important impetus to drive advances in fusion technology. Recognizing this, the Fusion Policy Advisory Committee and the US National Energy Strategy identified the development of steady state tokamak physics and technology, and improvements in the tokamak concept, as vital elements in the magnetic fusion energy development plan. Both called for the construction of a steady state tokamak facility to address these plan elements. Advances in physics that produce better confinement and higher pressure limits are required for a similar unit size reactor. Regimes with largely self-driven plasma current are required to permit a steady-state tokamak reactor with acceptable recirculating power. Reliable techniques of disruption control will be needed to achieve the availability goals of an economic reactor. Thus the central role of this new tokamak facility is to point the way to a more attractive demonstration reactor (DEMO) than the present data base would support. To meet the challenges, we propose a new ''Steady State Advanced Tokamak'' (SSAT) facility that would develop and demonstrate optimized steady state tokamak operating mode. While other tokamaks in the world program employ superconducting toroidal field coils, SSAT would be the first major tokamak to operate with a fully superconducting coil set in the elongated, divertor geometry planned for ITER and DEMO

  12. Tokamak advanced pump limiter experiments and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1983-06-01

    Experiments with pump limiter modules on several operating tokamaks establish such limiters as efficient collectors of particles and has demonstrated the importance of ballistic scattering as predicted theoretically. Plasma interaction with recycling neutral gas appears to become important as the plasma density increases and the effective ionization mean free path within the module decreases. In limiters with particle collection but without active internal pumping, the neutral gas pressure is found to vary nonlinearly with the edge plasma density at the highest densities studies. Both experiments and theory indicate that the energy spectrum of gas atoms in the pump ducting is non-thermal, consistent with the results of Monte Carlo neutral atom transport calculations. The distribution of plasma power over the front surface of such modules has been measured and appears to be consistent with the predictions of simple theory. Initial results from the latest experiment on the ISX-B tokamak with an actively pumped limiter module demonstrates that the core plasma density can be controlled with a pump limiter and that the scrape-off layer plasma can partially screen the core plasma from gas injection. The results from module pump limiter experiments and from the theory and design analysis of advanced pump limiters for reactors are used to suggest the major features of a definitive, axisymmetric, toroidal belt pump limiter experiment

  13. Nuclear fusion research at Tokamak Energy Ltd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Windridge, Melanie J.; Gryaznevich, Mikhail; Kingham, David

    2017-01-01

    Tokamak Energy's approach is close to the mainstream of nuclear fusion, and chooses a spherical tokamak, which is an economically developed form of Tokamak reactor design, as research subjects together with a high-temperature superconducting magnet. In the theoretical prediction, it is said that spherical tokamak can make tokamak reactor's scale compact compared with ITER or DEMO. The dependence of fusion energy multiplication factor on reactor size is small. According to model studies, it has been found that the center coil can be protected from heat and radiation damage even if the neutron shielding is optimized to 35 cm instead of 1 m. As a small tokamak with a high-temperature superconducting magnet, ST25 HTS, it demonstrated in 2015 continuous operation for more than 24 hours as a world record. Currently, this company is constructing a slightly larger ST40 type, and it is scheduled to start operation in 2017. ST40 is designed to demonstrate that it can realize a high magnetic field with a compact size and aims at attaining 8-10 keV (reaching the nuclear fusion reaction temperature at about 100 million degrees). This company will verify the startup and heating technology by the coalescence of spherical tokamak expected to have plasma current of 2 MA, and will also use 2 MW of neutral particle beam heating. In parallel with ST40, it is promoting a development program for high-temperature superconducting magnet. (A.O.)

  14. Research into controlled fusion in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zacek, F.

    1992-01-01

    During the thirty years of tokamak research, physicists have been approaching step by step the reactor breakeven condition defined by the Lawson criterion. JET, the European Community tokamak is probably the first candidate among the world largest tokamaks to reach the ignition threshold and thus to demonstrate the physical feasibility of thermonuclear reaction. The record plasma parameters achieved in JET at H plasma modes due to powerful additional plasma heating and due to substantial reduction of plasma impurities, opened the door to the first experiment with a deuterium-tritium plasma. In the paper, the conditions and results of these tritium experiments are described in detail. The prospects of the world tokamak research and of the participation of Czechoslovak physicists are also discussed. (J.U.) 3 figs., 6 refs

  15. Tokamak research in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strelkov, V.S.

    1981-01-01

    Important milestones on the way to the tokamak fusion reactor are recapitulated. Soviet tokamak research concentrated at the I.V. Kurchatov Institute in Moscow, the A.F. Ioffe Institute in Leningrad and the Physical-Technical Institute in Sukhumi successfully provides necessary scientific and technological data for reactor design. Achievments include, the successful operation of the first tokamak with superconducting windings (T-7) and the gyrotron set for microwave plasma heating in the T-10 tokamak. The following problems have intensively been studied: Various methods of additional plasma heating, heat and particle transport, and impurity control. The efficiency of electron-cyclotron resonance heating was demonstrated. In the Joule heating regime, both the heat conduction and diffusion rates are anomalously high, but the electron heat conduction rate decreases with increasing plasma density. Progress in impurity control makes it possible to obtain a plasma with effective charge approaching unity. (J.U.)

  16. A Review of Fusion and Tokamak Research Towards Steady-State Operation: A JAEA Contribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitsuru Kikuchi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Providing a historical overview of 50 years of fusion research, a review of the fundamentals and concepts of fusion and research efforts towards the implementation of a steady state tokamak reactor is presented. In 1990, a steady-state tokamak reactor (SSTR best utilizing the bootstrap current was developed. Since then, significant efforts have been made in major tokamaks, including JT-60U, exploring advanced regimes relevant to the steady state operation of tokamaks. In this paper, the fundamentals of fusion and plasma confinement, and the concepts and research on current drive and MHD stability of advanced tokamaks towards realization of a steady-state tokamak reactor are reviewed, with an emphasis on the contributions of the JAEA. Finally, a view of fusion energy utilization in the 21st century is introduced.

  17. System studies for quasi-steady-state advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Peng, Y.K.M.

    1983-11-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of veriation in physics parameters and technology limits on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, high beta, quasi-steady-state tokamak for the purpose of fusion engineering experimentation. The features and characteristics chosen from each study were embodied into a single Advanced Physics Tokamak design for which a self-consistent set of parameters was generated and a value of capital cost was estimated

  18. [High beta tokamak research and plasma theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-01-01

    Our activities on High Beta Tokamak Research during the past 12 months of the present budget period can be divided into four areas: completion of kink mode studies in HBT; completion of carbon impurity transport studies in HBT; design of HBT-EP; and construction of HBT-EP. Each of these is described briefly in the sections of this progress report

  19. Application of advanced composites in tokamak magnet systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, C.J.

    1977-11-01

    The use of advanced (high-modulus) composites in superconducting magnets for tokamak fusion reactors is discussed. The most prominent potential application is as the structure in the pulsed poloidal-field coil system, where a significant reduction in eddy currents could be achieved. Present low-temperature data on the advanced composites are reviewed briefly; they are too meager to do more than suggest a broad class of composites for a particular application

  20. [Fusion research/tokamak]. Final report, 1 May 1988 - 30 April 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-01-01

    The objectives of the Fusion Research Center Program are: (1) to advance /the transport studies of tokamaks, including the development and maintenance of the Magnetic Fusion Energy Database, and (2) to provide theoretical interpretation, modeling and equilibrium and stability studies for the text-upgrade tokamak. Work is described on five basic categories: (1) magnetic fusion energy database; (2) computational support and numerical modeling; (3) support for TEXT-upgrade and diagnostics; (4) transport studies; and (5) Alfven waves

  1. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.

    1996-01-01

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured

  2. Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John.

    1996-01-01

    This book is the first compiled collection about tokamak. At first chapter tokamak is represented from fusion point of view and also the necessary conditions for producing power. The following chapters are represent plasma physics, the specifications of tokamak, plasma heating procedures and problems related to it, equilibrium, confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, instabilities, plasma material interaction, plasma measurement and experiments regarding to tokamak; an addendum is also given at the end of the book

  3. Transport and stability studies in negative central shear advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jayakumar, R.J.

    2003-01-01

    Achieving high performance for long duration is a key goal of Advanced Tokamak (AT) research around the world. To this end, tokamak experiments are focusing on obtaining (a) a high fraction of well-aligned non-inductive plasma current (b) wide internal transport barriers (ITBs) in the ion and electron transport channels to obtain high temperatures (c) control of resistive wall modes and neoclassical Tearing Modes which limit the achievable beta. A current profile that yields a negative central magnetic shear (NCS) in the core is consistent with the above focus; Negative central shear is conducive for obtaining internal transport barriers, for high degree of bootstrap current alignment and for reaching the second stability region for ideal ballooning modes, while being stable to ideal kink modes at high beta with wall stabilization. Much progress has been made in obtaining AT performance in several tokamaks through an increasing understanding of the stability and transport properties of tokamak plasmas. RF and neutral beam current drive scenarios are routinely developed and implemented in experiments to access new advanced regimes and control plasma profiles. Short duration and sustained Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have been obtained in the ion and electron channels. The formation of an ITB is attributable to the stabilization of ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG and ETG) and trapped electron modes (TEM), enhancement of E x B flow shear rate and rarefaction of resonant surfaces near the rational q min values. (orig.)

  4. Transport and stability studies in negative central shear advanced tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayakumar, R.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Achieving high performance for long duration is a key goal of Advanced Tokamak (AT) research around the world. To this end, tokamak experiments are focusing on obtaining (a) a high fraction of well-aligned non-inductive plasma current (b) wide internal transport barriers (ITBs) in the ion and electron transport channels to obtain high temperatures (c) control of resistive wall modes and neoclassical Tearing Modes which limit the achievable beta. A current profile that yields a negative central magnetic shear (NCS) in the core is consistent with the above focus; Negative central shear is conducive for obtaining internal transport barriers, for high degree of bootstrap current alignment and for reaching the second stability region for ideal ballooning modes, while being stable to ideal kink modes at high beta with wall stabilization. Much progress has been made in obtaining AT performance in several tokamaks through an increasing understanding of the stability and transport properties of tokamak plasmas. RF and neutral beam current drive scenarios are routinely developed and implemented in experiments to access new advanced regimes and control plasma profiles. Short duration and sustained Internal Transport Barriers (ITB) have been obtained in the ion and electron channels. The formation of an ITB is attributable to the stabilization of ion and electron temperature gradient (ITG and ETG) and trapped electron modes (TEM), enhancement of E x B flow shear rate and rarefaction of resonant surfaces near the rational q{sub min} values. (orig.)

  5. Advanced probes for edge plasma diagnostics on the CASTOR tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stöckel, Jan; Adámek, Jiří; Balan, P.; Hronová-Bilyková, Olena; Brotánková, Jana; Dejarnac, Renaud; Devynck, P.; Ďuran, Ivan; Gunn, J. P.; Hron, Martin; Horáček, Jan; Ionita, C.; Kocan, M.; Martines, E.; Pánek, Radomír; Peleman, P.; Schrittwieser, R.; Van Oost, G.; Žáček, František

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 0 (2006), 012001-012002 E-ISSN 1742-6596. [SECOND INTERNATIONAL WORKSHOP AND SUMMER SCHOOL ON PLASMA PHYSICS. Kiten, 03.07.2006-09.07.2006] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : plasma * tokamak * electric probes * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  6. HIGH PERFORMANCE ADVANCED TOKAMAK REGIMES FOR NEXT-STEP EXPERIMENTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GREENFIELD, C.M.; MURAKAMI, M.; FERRON, J.R.; WADE, M.R.; LUCE, T.C.; PETTY, C.C.; MENARD, J.E; PETRIE, T.W.; ALLEN, S.L.; BURRELL, K.H.; CASPER, T.A; DeBOO, J.C.; DOYLE, E.J.; GAROFALO, A.M; GORELOV, Y.A; GROEBNER, R.J.; HOBIRK, J.; HYATT, A.W; JAYAKUMAR, R.J; KESSEL, C.E; LA HAYE, R.J; JACKSON, G.L; LOHR, J.; MAKOWSKI, M.A.; PINSKER, R.I.; POLITZER, P.A.; PRATER, R.; STRAIT, E.J.; TAYLOR, T.S; WEST, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced Tokamak (AT) research in DIII-D seeks to provide a scientific basis for steady-state high performance operation in future devices. These regimes require high toroidal beta to maximize fusion output and poloidal beta to maximize the self-driven bootstrap current. Achieving these conditions requires integrated, simultaneous control of the current and pressure profiles, and active magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stability control. The building blocks for AT operation are in hand. Resistive wall mode stabilization via plasma rotation and active feedback with non-axisymmetric coils allows routine operation above the no-wall beta limit. Neoclassical tearing modes are stabilized by active feedback control of localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). Plasma shaping and profile control provide further improvements. Under these conditions, bootstrap supplies most of the current. Steady-state operation requires replacing the remaining Ohmic current, mostly located near the half-radius, with noninductive external sources. In DIII-D this current is provided by ECCD, and nearly stationary AT discharges have been sustained with little remaining Ohmic current. Fast wave current drive is being developed to control the central magnetic shear. Density control, with divertor cryopumps, of AT discharges with edge localized moding (ELMing) H-mode edges facilitates high current drive efficiency at reactor relevant collisionalities. A sophisticated plasma control system allows integrated control of these elements. Close coupling between modeling and experiment is key to understanding the separate elements, their complex nonlinear interactions, and their integration into self-consistent high performance scenarios. Progress on this development, and its implications for next-step devices, will be illustrated by results of recent experiment and simulation efforts

  7. Research and development of JT-60 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Ryusei; Sato, Hiroshi; Murata, Toshifumi; Ito, Yoshiyasu.

    1978-01-01

    The development of nuclear fusion apparatuses for the purpose of utilizing energy due to nuclear fusion reaction has been forwarded in various countries, and in Japan, the critical plasma testing apparatus JT-60 is about to be constructed, centering around Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. This is one of four large apparatuses to be constructed in the world, and it is expected to be completed in 1982. JT-60 is a nuclear fusion apparatus of tokamak type aiming at generating critical plasma. The features of JT-60 are the formation of the plasma with small aspect ratio, the equipment of a magnetic limiter, the arrangement of the first wall of molybdenum and high temperature baking as the measures to impurities. The large toroidal magnetic field coil of JT-60 is composed of 18 unit coils. The analyses of magnetic field, thermal behavior and structural strength, the selection of materials, and the development of manufacturing techniques regarding the toroidal coil are described. The vacuum container of JT-60 is composed of the main body of torus type comprising thickwalled rings and bellows, the first wall comprising liners, fixed limiter and magnetic limiter, and observation ports. It is large torus-form container with non-circular cross section, and baking at 500 deg. C is required as the measure to ultrahigh vacuum. Complex forces including electromagnetic force act on it. (Kako, I.)

  8. Recent Activities on the Experimental Research Programme Using Small Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gryaznevich, M. P.; Bosco, E. del; Malaquias, A.; Mank, G.; Oost, G. van

    2006-01-01

    A new concept of interactive co-ordinated research using small tokamaks in the mainstream fusion science areas, in testing of new diagnostics, materials and technologies as well as in education, training and broadening of the geography of fusion research in the scope of the IAEA Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) is discussed in this paper. Besides the presentation of the recent activities on the experimental research programme using small tokamaks and scientific results achieved at the participating laboratories, information is provided about the organisation of the co-ordinated research project. Future plans of the co-ordinated activities within the CRP are discussed

  9. Understanding and Control of Transport in Advanced Tokamak Regimes in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.M. Greenfield; J.C. DeBoo; T.C. Luce; B.W. Stallard; E.J. Synakowski; L.R. Baylor; K.H. Burrell; T.A. Casper; E.J. Doyle; D.R. Ernst; J.R. Ferron; P. Gohil; R.J. Groebner; L.L. Lao; M. Makowski; G.R. McKee; M. Murakami; C.C. Petty; R.I. Pinsker; P.A. Politzer; R. Prater; C.L. Rettig; T.L. Rhodes; B.W. Rice; G.L. Schmidt; G.M. Staebler; E.J. Strait; D.M. Thomas; M.R. Wade

    1999-01-01

    Transport phenomena are studied in Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes in the DIII-D tokamak [Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research, 1986 (International Atomics Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. I, p. 159], with the goal of developing understanding and control during each of three phases: Formation of the internal transport barrier (ITB) with counter neutral beam injection takes place when the heating power exceeds a threshold value of about 9 MW, contrasting to CO-NBI injection, where P threshold N H 89 = 9 for 16 confinement times has been accomplished in a discharge combining an ELMing H-mode edge and an ITB, and exhibiting ion thermal transport down to 2-3 times neoclassical. The microinstabilities usually associated with ion thermal transport are predicted stable, implying that another mechanism limits performance. High frequency MHD activity is identified as the probable cause

  10. Development on JET of Advanced Tokamak Operations for ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuccillo, A.A.; Crisanti, F.; Litaudon, X.

    2005-01-01

    Recent research on Advanced Tokamak in JET has focused on scenarii with both monotonic and reversed shear q profiles having plasma parameters as relevant as possible for extrapolation to ITER. Wide ITBs, R∼3.7m, are formed at ITER relevant triangularity δ∼0.45, with n e /n G ∼60% and ELMs moderated by Ne injection. At higher current (I P ≤3.5MA, δ∼0.25) wide ITBs sitting at R≥ 3.5m (positive shear region) have been developed, generally MHD events terminate these barrier otherwise limited in strength by power availability. ITBs with core density close to Greenwald value are obtained with plasma target preformed by opportune timing of LHCD, pellet injection and small amount of NBI power. ITB start with toroidal rotation 4 times lower than the standard NBI heated ITBs. Full CD is achieved in reversed shear ITBs at 3T/1.8 MA, by using 10MW NBI, 5MW ICRH and 3MW LH. Wide ITBs located at R=3.6m, without impurity accumulation and type-III ELMs edge can be sustained for a time close to neo-classical resistive time. These discharges have been extended to the maximum duration allowed by subsystems (20s) with the JET record of injected energy: E∼330 MJ. Integrated control of pressure and current profile isit; feature used in these discharges. Central ICRF mode conversion electron heating, added to about 14MW NBI power, produced impressive ITBs with equivalent Q DT ∼ 0.25. Conversely ion ITBs are obtained with low torque injection, by ICRH 3 He minority heating of ions, on pure LHCD electron ITBs. Similarity experiments between JET and AUG have compared the dynamics of ITBs and have been the starting point of Hybrid Scenarios activity, then developed at ρ* as low as ρ*∼3*10 -3 . The development of hybrid regime with dominant electron heating has also started. Injection of trace of tritium and a mixture of Ar/Ne allowed studying fuel and impurities transport in many of the explored AT scenarios. (author)

  11. Small angle slot divertor concept for long pulse advanced tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, H. Y.; Sang, C. F.; Stangeby, P. C.; Lao, L. L.; Taylor, T. S.; Thomas, D. M.

    2017-04-01

    SOLPS-EIRENE edge code analysis shows that a gas-tight slot divertor geometry with a small-angle (glancing-incidence) target, named the small angle slot (SAS) divertor, can achieve cold, dissipative/detached divertor conditions at relatively low values of plasma density at the outside midplane separatrix. SAS exhibits the following key features: (1) strong enhancement of the buildup of neutral density in a localized region near the plasma strike point on the divertor target; (2) spreading of the cooling front across the divertor target with the slot gradually flaring out from the strike point, thus effectively reducing both heat flux and erosion on the entire divertor target surface. Such a divertor may potentially provide a power and particle handling solution for long pulse advanced tokamaks.

  12. Saturated ideal modes in advanced tokamak regimes in MAST

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapman, I.T.; Hua, M.-D.; Pinches, S.D.; Akers, R.J.; Field, A.R.; Hastie, R.J.; Michael, C.A.; Graves, J.P.

    2010-01-01

    MAST plasmas with a safety factor above unity and a profile with either weakly reversed shear or broad low-shear regions, regularly exhibit long-lived saturated ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities. The toroidal rotation is flattened in the presence of such perturbations and the fast ion losses are enhanced. These ideal modes, distinguished as such by the notable lack of islands or signs of reconnection, are driven unstable as the safety factor approaches unity. This could be of significance for advanced scenarios, or hybrid scenarios which aim to keep the safety factor just above rational surfaces associated with deleterious resistive MHD instabilities, especially in spherical tokamaks which are more susceptible to such ideal internal modes. The role of rotation, fast ions and ion diamagnetic effects in determining the marginal mode stability is discussed, as well as the role of instabilities with higher toroidal mode numbers as the safety factor evolves to lower values.

  13. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burrell, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    The D III-D research program is developing the scientific basis for advanced tokamak (AT) modes of operation in order to enhance the attractiveness of the tokamak as an energy producing system. Since the last International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) meeting, we have made significant progress in developing the building blocks needed for AT operation: 1) We have doubled the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) stable tokamak operating space through rotational stabilization of the resistive wall mode; 2) Using this rotational stabilization, we have achieved β N H 89 ≥ 10 for 4 τ E limited by the neoclassical tearing mode; 3) Using real-time feedback of the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) location, we have stabilized the (m,n) = (3,2) neoclassical tearing mode and then increased β T by 60%; 4) We have produced ECCD stabilization of the (2,1) neoclassical tearing mode in initial experiments; 5) We have made the first integrated AT demonstration discharges with current profile control using ECCD; 6) ECCD and electron cyclotron heating (ECH) have been used to control the pressure profile in high performance plasmas; and 7) We have demonstrated stationary tokamak operation for 6.5 s (36 τ E ) at the same fusion gain parameter of β N H 89 /q 95 2 ≅ 0.4 as ITER but at much higher q 95 = 4.2. We have developed general improvements applicable to conventional and advanced tokamak operating modes: 1) We have an existence proof of a mode of tokamak operation, quiescent H-mode, which has no pulsed, ELM heat load to the divertor and which can run for long periods of time (3.8 s or 25 τ E ) with constant density and constant radiated power; 2) We have demonstrated real-time disruption detection and mitigation for vertical disruption events using high pressure gas jet injection of noble gases; 3) We have found that the heat and particle fluxes to the inner strike points of balanced, double-null divertors are much smaller than to the outer strike points. (author)

  14. Research using small tokamaks. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1997-09-01

    The technical reports in these proceedings were presented at the IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on research Using Small Tokamaks, held in Ahmedabad, India, 6-7 December 1995. The purpose of this annual meeting is to provide a forum for the exchange of information on various small and medium sized plasma experiments, not only for tokamaks. The potential benefits of these research programmes are to: test theories, such as effects of the plasma rotation; check empirical scalings, such as density limits; develop fusion technology hardware; develop plasma diagnostics; such as tomography; and to train scientists, engineers, technicians, and students, particularly in developing IAEA Member States

  15. Lessons learned from the tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety, and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. Summarized herein are the composite conclusions and lessons developed in the course of four conceptual tokamak power-plant designs. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances in both physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advances in materials are also needed for the exploitation of environmental advantages otherwise inherent in fusion power

  16. Lessons learned from the Tokamak Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study (ARIES)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Miller, R.L.; Werley, K.A.

    1994-01-01

    Lessons from the four-year ARIES (Advanced Reactor Innovation and Evaluation Study) investigation of a number of commercial magnetic-fusion-energy (MFE) power-plant embodiments of the tokamak are summarized. These lessons apply to physics, engineering and technology, and environmental, safety and health (ES ampersand H) characteristics of projected tokamak power plants. A general conclusion from this extensive investigation of the commercial potential of tokamak power plants is the need for combined, symbiotic advances relative to present understanding in physics, engineering, and materials before economic competitiveness with developing advanced energy sources can be realized. Advanced tokamak plasmas configured in the second-stability regime that achieve both high β and bootstrap fractions near unity through strong profile control offer high promise in this regard

  17. Plasma density remote control system of experimental advanced superconductive tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mingxin; Luo Jiarong; Li Guiming; Wang Hua; Zhao Dazheng; Xu Congdong

    2007-01-01

    In Tokamak experiments, experimental data and information on the density control are stored in the local computer system. Therefore, the researchers have to be in the control room for getting the data. Plasma Density Remote Control System (DRCS), which is implemented by encapsulating the business logic on the client in the B/S module, conducts the complicated science computation and realizes the synchronization with the experimental process on the client. At the same time, Web Services and Data File Services are deployed for the data exchange. It is proved in the experiments that DRCS not only meets the requirements for the remote control, but also shows an enhanced capability on the data transmission. (authors)

  18. TIBER: Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research. Final design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, C.D.; Logan, B.G.; Barr, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Tokamak Ignition/Burn Experimental Research (TIBER) device is the smallest superconductivity tokamak designed to date. In the design plasma shaping is used to achieve a high plasma beta. Neutron shielding is minimized to achieve the desired small device size, but the superconducting magnets must be shielded sufficiently to reduce the neutron heat load and the gamma-ray dose to various components of the device. Specifications of the plasma-shaping coil, the shielding, coaling, requirements, and heating modes are given. 61 refs., 92 figs., 30 tabs

  19. An advanced plasma control system for the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferron, J.R.; Kellman, A.; McKee, E.; Osborne, T.; Petrach, P.; Taylor, T.S.; Wight, J.; Lazarus, E.

    1991-11-01

    An advanced plasma control system is being implemented for the DIII-D tokamak utilizing digital technology. This system will regulate the position and shape of tokamak discharges that range from elongated limiter to single-null divertor and double-null divertor with elongation as high as 2.6. Development of this system is expected to lead to control system technology appropriate for use on future tokamaks such as ITER and BPX. The digital system will allow for increased precision in shape control through real time adjustment of the control algorithm to changes in the shape and discharge parameters such as β p , ell i and scrape-off layer current. The system will be used for research on real time optimization of discharge performance for disruption avoidance, current and pressure profile control, optimization of rf antenna loading, or feedback on heat deposition patterns through divertor strike point position control, for example. Shape control with this system is based on linearization near a target shape of the controlled parameters as a function of the magnetic diagnostic signals. This digital system is unique in that it is designed to have the speed necessary to control the unstable vertical motion of highly elongated tokamak discharges such as those produced in DIII-D and planned for BPX and ITER. a 40 MHz Intel i860 processor is interfaced to up to 112 channels of analog input signals. The commands to the poloidal field coils can be updated at 80 μs intervals for the control of vertical position with a delay between sampling of the analog signal and update of the command of less than 80 μs

  20. High-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes for ITER and FIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.M.; Sauthoff, N.R.; Kessel, C.E.; Budny, R.V.; Gorelenkov, N.; Jardin, S.C.; Schmidt, J.A.; Navratil, G.A.; Bialek, J.; Ulrickson, M.A.; Rognlein, T.; Mandrekas, J.

    2005-01-01

    An attractive tokamak-based fusion power plant will require the development of high-β steady-state advanced tokamak regimes to produce a high-gain burning plasma with a large fraction of self-driven current and high fusion-power density. Both ITER and FIRE are being designed with the objective to address these issues by exploring and understanding burning plasma physics both in the conventional H-mode regime, and in advanced tokamak regimes with β N ∼ 3 - 4, and f bs ∼50-80%. ITER has employed conservative scenarios, as appropriate for its nuclear technology mission, while FIRE has employed more aggressive assumptions aimed at exploring the scenarios envisioned in the ARIES power-plant studies. The main characteristics of the advanced scenarios presently under study for ITER and FIRE are compared with advanced tokamak regimes envisioned for the European Power Plant Conceptual Study (PPCS-C), the US ARIES-RS Power Plant Study and the Japanese Advanced Steady-State Tokamak Reactor (ASSTR). The goal of the present work is to develop advanced tokamak scenarios that would fully exploit the capability of ITER and FIRE. This paper will summarize the status of the work and indicate critical areas where further R and D is needed. (author)

  1. ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION USING THE DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SYSTEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HUMPHREYS, DA; FERRON, JR; GAROFALO, AM; HYATT, AW; JERNIGAN, TC; JOHNSON, RD; LAHAYE, RJ; LEUER, JA; OKABAYASHI, M; PENAFLOR, BG; SCOVILLE, JT; STRAIT, EJ; WALKER, ML; WHYTE, DG

    2002-01-01

    A271 ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION USING THE DIII-D PLASMA CONTROL SYSTEM. The principal focus of experimental operations in the DIII-D tokamak is the advanced tokamak (AT) regime to achieve, which requires highly integrated and flexible plasma control. In a high performance advanced tokamak, accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating must be well coordinated with MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Sophisticated monitors of the operational regime must provide detection of off-normal conditions and trigger appropriate safety responses with acceptable levels of reliability. Many of these capabilities are presently implemented in the DIII-D plasma control system (PCS), and are now in frequent or routine operational use. The present work describes recent development, implementation, and operational experience with AT regime control elements for equilibrium control, MHD suppression, and off-normal event detection and response

  2. ARIES-AT: An advanced tokamak, advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, F.; Jardin, S.C.; Tillack, M.; Waganer, L.M.

    2001-01-01

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant. Several avenues were pursued in order to arrive at plasmas with a higher β and better bootstrap alignment compared to ARIES-RS that led to plasmas with higher β N and β. Advanced technologies that are examined in detail include: (1) Possible improvements to the overall system by using high-temperature superconductors, (2) Innovative SiC blankets that lead to a high thermal cycle efficiency of ∼60%; and (3) Advanced manufacturing techniques which aim at producing near-finished products directly from raw material, resulting in low-cost, and reliable components. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.4 m, minor radius of 1.3 M, a toroidal β of 9.2% (β N =6.0) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current drive power is 24 MW. The ARIES-AT study shows that the combination of advanced tokamak modes and advanced technology leads to attractive fusion power plant with excellent safety and environmental characteristics and with a cost of electricity (5c/kWh), which is competitive with those projected for other sources of energy. (author)

  3. Abstracts of the International seminar 'Experimental possibilities of KTM tokamak and research programme'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    The International seminar 'Experimental possibilities of KTM tokamak and research programme' was held in 10-12 October 2005 in Astana city (Kazakhstan). The seminar was dedicated to problems of KTM tokamak commissioning. The Collection of abstracts comprises 45 papers

  4. Advanced fusion technologies developed for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakasai, Akira; Ishida, S.; Matsukawa, M.

    2003-01-01

    The modification of JT-60U is planned as a full superconducting tokamak (JT-60SC). The objectives of the JT-60SC program are to establish scientific and technological bases for the steady-state operation of high performance plasmas and utilization of reduced-activation materials in economically and environmentally attractive DEMO reactor. Advanced fusion technologies relevant to DEMO reactor have been developed in the superconducting magnet technology and plasma facing components for the design of JT-60SC. To achieve a high current density in a superconducting strand, Nb 3 Al strands with a high copper ratio of 4 have been newly developed for the toroidal field coils (TFC) of JT-60SC. The R and D to demonstrate applicability of Nb 3 Al conductor to the TFC by a react-and-wind technique have been carried out using a full-size Nb 3 Al conductor. A full-size NbTi conductor with low AC loss using Ni-coated strands has been successfully developed. A forced cooling divertor component with high heat transfer using screw tubes has been developed for the first time. The heat removal performance of the CFC target was successfully demonstrated on the electron beam irradiation stand. (author)

  5. Perturbative transport experiments in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mantica, P.; Gorini, G.; Sozzi, C. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Milan (Italy); Imbeaux, F.; Sarazin, Y.; Garbet, X. [Association Euratom-CEA, St. Paul-lez-Durance Cedex (France); Kinsey, J. [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania (United States); Budny, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab, New Jersey (United States); Coffey, I.; Parail, V.; Walden, A. [Euratom/UKAEA Fusion Association, Abingdon, Oxon (United Kingdom); Dux, R. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Garzotti, L. [Istituto Gas Ionizzati, Padova (Italy); Ingesson, C. [FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Kissick, M. [University of California, Los Angeles (United States)

    2003-07-01

    Perturbative transport experiments have been performed in JET Advanced Tokamak plasmas either in conditions of fully developed Internal Transport Barrier (ITB) or during a phase where an ITB was not observed. Transient peripheral cooling was induced by either Laser Ablation or Shallow Pellet Injection and the ensuing travelling cold pulse was used to probe the plasma transport in the electron and, for the first time, also in the ion channel. Cold pulses travelling through ITBs are observed to erode the ITB outer part, but, if the inner ITB portion survives, it strongly damps the propagating wave. The result is discussed in the context of proposed possible pictures for ITB formation. In the absence of an ITB, the cold pulse shows a fast propagation in the outer plasma half, which is consistent with a region of stiff transport, while in the inner half it slows down but shows the peculiar feature of amplitude growing while propagating. The data are powerful tests for the validation of theoretical transport models. (author)

  6. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  7. Plasma control issues for an advanced steady state tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Voitsekhovitch, I.

    1999-01-01

    This paper deals with specific control issues related to the advanced tokamak scenarios in which rather accurate tailoring of the current density profile is a requirement in connection with the steady state operation of a reactor in a high confinement optimized shear mode. It is found that adequate current profile control can be performed if real-time magnetic flux reconstruction is available through a set of dedicated diagnostics and computers, with sufficient accuracy to deduce the radial profile of the safety factor and of the internal plasma loop voltage. It is also shown that the safety factor can be precisely controlled in the outer half of the plasma through the surface loop voltage and the off-axis current drive power, but that a compromise must be made between the accuracy of the core safety factor control and the total duration of the current and fuel density ramp-up phases, so that the demonstration of the steady state reactor potential of the optimized/reversed shear concept in the Next Step device will demand pulse lengths of the order of one thousand seconds (or more for an ITER-size machine). (author)

  8. Characteristics of edge-localized modes in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, M.; Xu, G.S.; Xiao, C.

    2012-01-01

    Edge-localized modes (ELMs) are the focus of tokamak edge physics studies because the large heat loads associated with ELMs have great impact on the divertor design of future reactor-grade tokamaks such as ITER. In the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST), the first ELMy high...... confinement modes (H-modes) were obtained with 1 MW lower hybrid wave power in conjunction with wall conditioning by lithium (Li) evaporation and real-time Li powder injection. The ELMs in EAST at this heating power are mostly type-III ELMs. They were observed close to the H-mode threshold power and produced...

  9. First results on fast wave current drive in advanced tokamak discharges in DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prater, R.; Cary, W.P.; Baity, F.W.

    1995-07-01

    Initial experiments have been performed on the DIII-D tokamak on coupling, direct electron heating, and current drive by fast waves in advanced tokamak discharges. These experiments showed efficient central heating and current drive in agreement with theory in magnitude and profile. Extrapolating these results to temperature characteristic of a power plant (25 keV) gives current drive efficiency of about 0.3 MA/m 2

  10. INTEGATED ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION ON DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WADE, M.R.; MURAKAMI, M.; LUCE, T.C.; FERRON, J.R.; PETTY, C.C.; BRENNEN, D.P.; GAROFALO, A.M.; GREENFIELD, C.M.; HYATT, A.W.; JAYAKUMAR, R.; KINSEY, J.E.; La HAYE, R.J.; LAO, L.L.; LOHR, J.; POLITZER, P.A.; PRATER, R.; STRAIT, E.J.; WATKINS, J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the ability to sustain plasma conditions that integrate and sustain the key ingredients of Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation: high β with 1.5 min min > 2.0, plasmas with β ∼ 2.9% and 90% of the plasma current driven non-inductively have been sustained for nearly 2 s (limited only by the duration of the ECCD pulse). Negative central magnetic shear is produced by the ECCD, leading to the formation of a weak internal transport barrier even in the presence of Type I ELMs. Separate experiments have demonstrated the ability to sustain a steady current density profile using ECCD for periods as long as 1 s with β = 3.3% and > 90% of the current driven non-inductively. In addition, stable operation well above the ideal no-wall β limit has been sustained for several energy confinement times with the duration only limited by resistive relaxation of the current profile to an unstable state. Stability analysis indicates that the experimental β limit depends on the degree to which the no-wall limit can be exceeded and weakly on the actual no-wall limit. Achieving the necessary density levels required for adequate ECCD efficiency requires active divertor exhaust and reducing the wall inventory buildup prior to the high performance phase. Simulation studies indicate that the successful integration of high β operation with current profile control consistent with these experimental results should result in high β, fully non-inductive plasma operation

  11. Transients and burn dynamics in advanced tokamak fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantsinen, M.J.; Salomaa, R.R.E.

    1994-01-01

    Transient behavior of D 3 He-tokamak reactors is investigated numerically using a zero-dimensional code with prescribed profiles. Pure D 3 He start-up is compared to DT-assisted and DT-ignited start-ups. We have considered two categories of transients which could extinguish steady fusion burn: fuelling interruptions and sudden confinement changes similar to the L → H transients occurring in present-day tokamaks. Shutdown with various current and density ramp-down scenarios are studied, too. (author)

  12. The recent research progress on the J-TEXT tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Z.J.; Zhuang, G.; Gentle, K.W.

    2013-01-01

    The recent research progress on the J-TEXT tokamak is introduced. The interaction between resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) and plasma have been carried out on the J-TEXT tokamak and the results show that the m/n = 2/1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively) mode locking is obtained with sufficiently large RMPs while suppression of the m/n = 2/1 tearing mode by moderate magnetic perturbation amplitude is also observed. With a model based on reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) equations, both the mode locking and mode suppression by RMPs are simulated and the results are in good agreement with the experimental observations. To observe the current profile, a high resolution three-wave far infrared polarimeter/interferometer is set up and the first results indicate it works well. (author)

  13. Advanced research technology transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naraghi, Masud

    1977-01-01

    The importance of advanced research in the less developed countries of the world is described. Advanced research is a way of building from the top; it helps industrial development; it provides ''know-how'' economically; it enhances international understanding; it prevents the brain drain to developed countries and is of mutual benefit. The problems concerned with this type of research are pointed out

  14. Overview of physics research on the TCV tokamak

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fasoli, A.; Alberti, S.; Amorim, P.; Angioni, C.; Asp, E.; Behn, R.; Bencze, A.; Berrino, J.; Blanchard, P.; Bortolon, A.; Brunner, S.; Camenen, Y.; Cirant, S.; Coda, S.; Curchod, L.; DeMeijere, K.; Duval, B. P.; Fable, E.; Fasel, D.; Felici, F.; Furno, I.; Garcia, O.E.; Giruzzi, G.; Gnesin, S.; Goodman, T.; Graves, J.; Gudozhnik, A.; Gulejova, B.; Henderson, M.; Hogge, J. Ph.; Horáček, Jan; Joye, B.; Karpushov, A.; Kim, S.-H.; Laqua, H.; Lister, J. B.; Llobet, X.; Madeira, T.; Marinoni, A.; Marki, J.; Martin, Y.; Maslov, M.; Medvedev, S.; Moret, J.-M.; Paley, J.; Pavlov, I.; Piffl, Vojtěch; Piras, F.; Pitts, R.A.; Pitzschke, A.; Pochelon, A.; Porte, L.; Reimerdes, H.; Rossel, J.; Sauter, O.; Scarabosio, A.; Schlatter, C.; Sushkov, A.; Testa, D.; Tonetti, G.; Tskhakaya, D.; Tran, M. Q.; Turco, F.; Turri, G.; Tye, R.; Udintsev, V.; Véres, G.; Villard, L.; Weisen, H.; Zhuchkova, A.; Zucca, C.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104005-104005 ISSN 0029-5515 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : overview highlights * fusion research * tokamak TCV * self-generated current * H-mode physics * Electron internal transport barrier * electron cyclotron heating * electron cyclotron current drive physics * density peaking * MHDactivity * edge physics * reciprocating Mach probe * Pfirsch–Schlueter component. Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://stacks.iop.org/NF/49/104005

  15. ADX: a high field, high power density, advanced divertor and RF tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBombard, B.; Marmar, E.; Irby, J.; Terry, J. L.; Vieira, R.; Wallace, G.; Whyte, D. G.; Wolfe, S.; Wukitch, S.; Baek, S.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Doody, J.; Ellis, R.; Ernst, D.; Fiore, C.; Freidberg, J. P.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Greenwald, M.; Hartwig, Z. S.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J. W.; Hutchinson, I. H.; Kessel, C.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Leccacorvi, R.; Lin, Y.; Lipschultz, B.; Mahajan, S.; Minervini, J.; Mumgaard, R.; Nygren, R.; Parker, R.; Poli, F.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Rice, J.; Rognlien, T.; Rowan, W.; Shiraiwa, S.; Terry, D.; Theiler, C.; Titus, P.; Umansky, M.; Valanju, P.; Walk, J.; White, A.; Wilson, J. R.; Wright, G.; Zweben, S. J.

    2015-05-01

    The MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center and collaborators are proposing a high-performance Advanced Divertor and RF tokamak eXperiment (ADX)—a tokamak specifically designed to address critical gaps in the world fusion research programme on the pathway to next-step devices: fusion nuclear science facility (FNSF), fusion pilot plant (FPP) and/or demonstration power plant (DEMO). This high-field (⩾6.5 T, 1.5 MA), high power density facility (P/S ˜ 1.5 MW m-2) will test innovative divertor ideas, including an ‘X-point target divertor’ concept, at the required performance parameters—reactor-level boundary plasma pressures, magnetic field strengths and parallel heat flux densities entering into the divertor region—while simultaneously producing high-performance core plasma conditions that are prototypical of a reactor: equilibrated and strongly coupled electrons and ions, regimes with low or no torque, and no fuelling from external heating and current drive systems. Equally important, the experimental platform will test innovative concepts for lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequency actuators with the unprecedented ability to deploy launch structures both on the low-magnetic-field side and the high-magnetic-field side—the latter being a location where energetic plasma-material interactions can be controlled and favourable RF wave physics leads to efficient current drive, current profile control, heating and flow drive. This triple combination—advanced divertors, advanced RF actuators, reactor-prototypical core plasma conditions—will enable ADX to explore enhanced core confinement physics, such as made possible by reversed central shear, using only the types of external drive systems that are considered viable for a fusion power plant. Such an integrated demonstration of high-performance core-divertor operation with steady-state sustainment would pave the way towards an attractive pilot plant, as envisioned in the ARC concept

  16. Advancing Ethical Neuroscience Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borah, B Rashmi; Strand, Nicolle K; Chillag, Kata L

    2016-12-01

    As neuroscience research advances, researchers, clinicians, and other stakeholders will face a host of ethical challenges. The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has published two reports that provide recommendations on how to advance research endeavors ethically. The commission addressed, among other issues, how to prioritize different types of neuroscience research and how to include research participants who have impaired consent capacity. The Bioethics Commission's recommendations provide a foundation for ethical guidelines as neuroscience research advances and progresses. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  17. Recent advances in the HL-2A tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.; Ding, X.T.; Yang, Q.W.; Yan, L.W.; Liu, D.Q.; Xuan, W.M.; Chen, L.Y.; Song, X.M.; Cao, Z.; Zhang, J.H.; Mao, W.C.; Zhou, C.P.; Li, X.D.; Wang, S.J.; Yan, J.C.; Bu, M.N.; Chen, Y.H.; Cui, C.H.; Cui, Z.Y.; Deng, Z.C.; Hong, W.Y.; Hu, H.T.; Huang, Y.; Kang, Z.H.; Li, B.; Li, W.; Li, F.Z.; Li, G.S.; Li, H.J.; Li, Q.; Li, Y.G.; Li, Z.J.; Liu, Yi; Liu, Z.T.; Luo, C.W.; Mao, X.H.; Pan, Y.D.; Rao, J.; Shao, K.; Song, X.Y.; Wang, M.; Wang, M.X.; Wang, Q.M.; Xiao, Z.G.; Xie, Y.F.; Yao, L.H.; Yao, L.Y.; Zheng, Y.J.; Zhong, G.W.; Zhou, Y.; Pan, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    Two experiment campaigns were conducted on the HL-2A tokamak in 2003 and 2004 after the first plasma was obtained at the end of 2002. Progresses in many aspects have been made, especially in the divertor discharge and feedback control of plasma configuration. Up to now, the following operation parameters have been achieved: I p = 320 kA, B t = 2.2 T and discharge duration T d = 1580 ms. With the feedback control of plasma current and horizontal position, an excellent repeatability of the discharge has been achieved. The tokamak has been operated at both limiter configuration and single null (SN) divertor configuration. The HL-2A SN divertor configuration is simulated with the MHD equilibrium code SWEQU. When the divertor configuration is formed, the impurity radiation in the main plasma decreases remarkably

  18. New dual gas puff imaging system with up-down symmetry on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, S. C.; Shao, L. M.; Zweben, S. J.

    2012-01-01

    advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST). The two views are up-down symmetric about the midplane and separated by a toroidal angle of 66.6 degrees. A linear manifold with 16 holes apart by 10 mm is used to form helium gas cloud at the 130x130 mm (radial versus poloidal) objective plane. A fast camera...

  19. The contribution to the energy balance and transport in an advanced-fuel tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atzeni, S.; Vlad, G.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of synchrotron radiation emission on the energy balance of an advanced-fuel (such as D- 3 He, or catalyzed-D) tokamak plasma is considered. It is shown that a region in the β-T space exists, where the fusion energy delivered to the plasma overcomes synchrotron and bremsstrahlung energy losses, and which could then allow for ignited operation. 1-Dimensional codes results are also presented, which illustrate the main features of radial transport in a ignited, D- 3 He tokamak plasma

  20. ACHIEVING AND SUSTAINING STEADY-STATE ADVANCED TOKAMAK CONDITIONS ON DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WADE, MR; MURAKAMI, M; BRENNAN, DP; CASPER, TA; FERRON, JR; GAROFALO, AM; GREENFIELD, CM; HYATT, AW; JAYAKUMAR, R; KINSEY, JE; LAHAYE, RJ; LAO, LL; LAZARUS, EA; LOHR, J; LUCE, TC; PETTY, CC; POLITZER, PA; PRATER, R; STRAIT, EJ; TURNBULL, AD; WATKINS, JG; WEST, WP

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated the feasibility of sustaining advanced tokamak conditions that combine high fusion power density (β > 4%), high bootstrap current fraction (f BS ∼ 65%), and high non-inductive current fractions (f NI ∼ 85%) for several energy confinement times. The duration of such conditions is limited only by resistive relaxation of the current density profile. Modeling studies indicate that the application of off-axis ECCD will be able to maintain a favorable current density profile for several seconds

  1. Achieving and sustaining steady-state advanced tokamak conditions on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wade, M.R.; Murakami, M.; Brennan, D.P.

    2003-01-01

    Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have demonstrated the feasibility of sustaining advanced tokamak conditions that combine high fusion power density (β > 4%), high bootstrap current fraction (f BS ∼ 65%), and high non-inductive current fractions (f NI ∼85%) for several energy confinement times. The duration of such conditions is limited only by resistive relaxation of the current density profile. Modeling studies indicate that the application of off-axis ECCD will be able to maintain a favorable current density profile for several seconds. (author)

  2. Apollo-L2, an advanced fuel tokamak reactor utilizing direct conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emmert, G.A.; Kulcinski, G.L.; Blanchard, J.P.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Khater, H.Y.; Santarius, J.F.; Sawan, M.E.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.; Wittenberg, L.J.; Witt, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A scoping study of a tokamak reactor fueled by a D- 3 He plasma is presented. The Apollo D- 3 He tokamak capitalizes on recent advances in high field magnets (20 T) and utilizes rectennas to convert the synchrotron radiation directly to electricity. The low neutron wall loading (0.1 MW/m 2 ) permits a first wall lasting the life of the plant and enables the reactor to be classified as inherently safe. The cost of electricity is less than that from a similar power level DT reactor. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  3. q=1 advanced tokamak experiments in JET and comparison with ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Wolf, R.; Alper, B.

    2002-01-01

    The ASDEX Upgrade advanced tokamak scenario with central q close to 1 has been reproduced on JET. For almost identical q profiles, the comparative analysis does show similar features like the fishbone activity and the current profile evolution. In JET, transport analyses indicates that an internal transport barrier (ITB) has been produced. Gradient length criterions based on the ion temperature gradient turbulence stabilization are used to characterize the ITBs in both devices. The trigger of ITBs is associated with rational surfaces in both devices although the underlying physics for this triggering seems different. This experiment has the prospect to get closer to identity experiments between the two tokamaks. (author)

  4. The ARIES-AT advanced tokamak, Advanced technology fusion power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najmabadi, Farrokh; Abdou, A.; Bromberg, L.

    2006-01-01

    The ARIES-AT study was initiated to assess the potential of high-performance tokamak plasmas together with advanced technology in a fusion power plant and to identifying physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving attractive and competitive fusion power in order to guide fusion R and D. The 1000-MWe ARIES-AT design has a major radius of 5.2 m, a minor radius of 1.3 m, a toroidal β of 9.2% (β N = 5.4) and an on-axis field of 5.6 T. The plasma current is 13 MA and the current-drive power is 35 MW. The ARIES-AT design uses the same physics basis as ARIES-RS, a reversed-shear plasma. A distinct difference between ARIES-RS and ARIES-AT plasmas is the higher plasma elongation of ARIES-AT (κ x = 2.2) which is the result of a 'thinner' blanket leading to a large increase in plasma β to 9.2% (compared to 5% for ARIES-RS) with only a slightly higher β N . ARIES-AT blanket is a simple, low-pressure design consisting of SiC composite boxes with a SiC insert for flow distribution that does not carry any structural load. The breeding coolant (Pb-17Li) enters the fusion core from the bottom, and cools the first wall while traveling in the poloidal direction to the top of the blanket module. The coolant then returns through the blanket channel at a low speed and is superheated to ∼1100 deg. C. As most of the fusion power is deposited directly into the breeding coolant, this method leads to a high coolant outlet temperature while keeping the temperature of the SiC structure as well as interface between SiC structure and Pb-17Li to about 1000 deg. C. This blanket is well matched to an advanced Brayton power cycle, leading to an overall thermal efficiency of ∼59%. The very low afterheat in SiC composites results in exceptional safety and waste disposal characteristics. All of the fusion core components qualify for shallow land burial under U.S. regulations (furthermore, ∼90% of components qualify as Class-A waste, the lowest level). The ARIES

  5. ADX: A high Power Density, Advanced RF-Driven Divertor Test Tokamak for PMI studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Dennis; ADX Team

    2015-11-01

    The MIT PSFC and collaborators are proposing an advanced divertor experiment, ADX; a divertor test tokamak dedicated to address critical gaps in plasma-material interactions (PMI) science, and the world fusion research program, on the pathway to FNSF/DEMO. Basic ADX design features are motivated and discussed. In order to assess the widest range of advanced divertor concepts, a large fraction (>50%) of the toroidal field volume is purpose-built with innovative magnetic topology control and flexibility for assessing different surfaces, including liquids. ADX features high B-field (>6 Tesla) and high global power density (P/S ~ 1.5 MW/m2) in order to access the full range of parallel heat flux and divertor plasma pressures foreseen for reactors, while simultaneously assessing the effect of highly dissipative divertors on core plasma/pedestal. Various options for efficiently achieving high field are being assessed including the use of Alcator technology (cryogenic cooled copper) and high-temperature superconductors. The experimental platform would also explore advanced lower hybrid current drive and ion-cyclotron range of frequency actuators located at the high-field side; a location which is predicted to greatly reduce the PMI effects on the launcher while minimally perturbing the core plasma. The synergistic effects of high-field launchers with high total B on current and flow drive can thus be studied in reactor-relevant boundary plasmas.

  6. Overview on the progress of tokamak experimental research in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie Jikang . E-mail; Liu Yong; Wen Yizhi; Wang Long

    2001-01-01

    Tokamak experimental research in China has made important progress. The main efforts were related to quasi-steady-state operation, LHCD, plasma heating with ICRF, IBW, NBI and ECRH, fuelling with pellets and supersonic molecular beams, and first wall conditioning techniques. Plasma parameters in the experiments were much improved, for example n e =8x10 19 m -3 and a plasma pulse length of >10 s were achieved. ICRF boronization and conditioning resulted in Z eff close to unity. Steady state full LH wave current drive has been achieved for more than 3 s. LHCD ramp-up and recharge have also been demonstrated. The best η CD exp ∼0.5(1+0.085exp(4.8(B T -1.45)))n e I CD R p /P LH =10 19 m -2 A W -1 . Quasi-steady-state H-mode-like plasmas with a density close to the Greenwald limit were obtained by LHCD, where the energy confinement time was nearly five times longer than in the ohmic case. The synergy between IBW, pellet and LHCD was tested. Research on the mechanism of macroturbulence has been extensively carried out experimentally. AC tokamak operation has been successfully demonstrated. (author)

  7. Predictions of of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve this objective requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems - ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various role of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The paper addresses these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX. (author). 6 refs, 3 figs

  8. Predictions of fast wave heating, current drive, and current drive antenna arrays for advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, D.B.; Baity, F.W.; Carter, M.D.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the advanced tokamak program is to optimize plasma performance leading to a compact tokamak reactor through active, steady state control of the current profile using non-inductive current drive and profile control. To achieve these objectives requires compatibility and flexibility in the use of available heating and current drive systems--ion cyclotron radio frequency (ICRF), neutral beams, and lower hybrid. For any advanced tokamak, the following are important challenges to effective use of fast waves in various roles of direct electron heating, minority ion heating, and current drive: (1) to employ the heating and current drive systems to give self-consistent pressure and current profiles leading to the desired advanced tokamak operating modes; (2) to minimize absorption of the fast waves by parasitic resonances, which limit current drive; (3) to optimize and control the spectrum of fast waves launched by the antenna array for the required mix of simultaneous heating and current drive. The authors have addressed these issues using theoretical and computational tools developed at a number of institutions by benchmarking the computations against available experimental data and applying them to the specific case of TPX

  9. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, R. E; CANDY, J; HINTON, F. L; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, J.E

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated

  10. LH-power coupling in advanced tokamak plasmas in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joffrin, E.; Erents, K.; Gormezano, C.

    2000-02-01

    Lower Hybrid Current Drive (LHCD) is the most efficient tool to generate non-inductive current in tokamak plasmas. In JET, significant modifications of the current profile have been recently achieved in coupling up to 3MW of LH power in optimised shear discharges. However, the improved particle confinement during optimised shear plasmas results in a sharp decrease of the electron density in front the launcher close or below the cut-off density (ne=1.7.10 17 m -3 for f LH =37GHz) and makes difficult the coupling of the LH power. Deuterium gas near the launcher can help to improve the coupling, but has also the effect of increasing the ELM activity leading to the erosion of the internal transport barrier (ITB). Future development of lower hybrid launcher should include the constraints imposed by scenario such as the optimised shear. (author)

  11. Structural analysis and manufacture for the vacuum vessel of experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Yuntao; Yao Damao; Wu Songata; Weng Peide

    2006-01-01

    The experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) is an advanced steady-state plasma physics experimental device, which has been approved by the Chinese government and is being constructed as the Chinese national nuclear fusion research project. The vacuum vessel, that is one of the key components, will have to withstand not only the electromagnetic force due to the plasma disruption and the Halo current, but also the pressure of boride water and the thermal stress due to the 250 deg. C baking out by the hot pressure nitrogen gas, or the 100 deg. C hot wall during plasma operation. This paper is a report of the mechanical analyses of the vacuum vessel. According to the allowable stress criteria of American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Boiler and Pressure Vessel Committee (ASME), the maximum integrated stress intensity on the vacuum vessel is 396 MPa, less than the allowable design stress intensity 3S m (441 MPa). At the same time, some key R and D issues are presented, which include supporting system, bellows and the assembly of the whole vacuum vessel

  12. The role of high speed photography in plasma instability research on the AEC tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fletcher, J.D.; Coster, D.P.; De Villiers, J.A.M.; Kotze, P.B.; Nothnagel, G.; O'Mahony, J.R.; Roberts, D.E.; Sherwell, D.

    1986-01-01

    High speed cine photography is a useful diagnostic aid for studying plasma behaviour and plasma surface interactions in fusion research devices like tokamaks. Such a system has been installed on the AEC tokamak. This paper reports some preliminary results obtained during typical plasma discharges

  13. Tokamaks. 2. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wesson, John; Campbell, D.J.; Connor, J.W.

    1997-01-01

    It is interesting to recall the state of tokamak research when the first edition of this book was written. My judgement of the level of real understanding at that time is indicated by the virtual absence of comparisons of experiment with theory in that edition. The need then was for a 'handbook' which collected in a single volume the concepts and models which form the basis of everyday tokamak research. The experimental and theoretical endeavours of the subsequent decade have left almost all of this intact, but have brought a massive development of the subject. Firstly, there are now several areas where the experimental behaviour is described in terms of accepted theory. This is particularly true of currents parallel to the magnetic field, and of the stability limitations on the plasma pressure. Next there has been the research on large tokamaks, hardly started at the writing of the first edition. Now our thinking is largely based on the results from these tokamaks and this work has led to the long awaited achievement of significant amounts of fusion power. Finally, the success of tokamak research has brought us face to face with the problems involved in designing and building a tokamak reactor. The present edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes an account of the advances outlined above. (Author)

  14. Advanced maintenance research programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marston, T.U.; Gelhaus, F.; Burke, R.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to provide the reader with an idea of the advanced maintenance research program at the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). A brief description of the maintenance-related activities is provided as a foundation for the advanced maintenance research projects. The projects can be divided into maintenance planning, preventive maintenance program development and implementation, predictive (or conditional) maintenance, and innovative maintenance techniques. The projects include hardware and software development, human factors considerations, and technology promotion and implementation. The advanced concepts include: the incorporation of artificial intelligence into outage planning; turbine and pump maintenance; rotating equipment monitoring and diagnostics with the aid of expert systems; and the development of mobile robots for nuclear power plant maintenance

  15. Final technical report for DE-SC00012633 AToM (Advanced Tokamak Modeling)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holland, Christopher [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Orlov, Dmitri [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Izzo, Valerie [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2018-02-05

    This final report for the AToM project documents contributions from University of California, San Diego researchers over the period of 9/1/2014 – 8/31/2017. The primary focus of these efforts was on performing validation studies of core tokamak transport models using the OMFIT framework, including development of OMFIT workflow scripts. Additional work was performed to develop tools for use of the nonlinear magnetohydrodynamics code NIMROD in OMFIT, and its use in the study of runaway electron dynamics in tokamak disruptions.

  16. Advances in comprehensive gyrokinetic simulations of transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waltz, R.E.; Candy, J.; Hinton, F.L.; Estrada-Mila, C.; Kinsey, J.E.

    2005-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ*) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or globally with physical profile variation. Bohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, are illustrated. (author)

  17. ADVANCES IN COMPREHENSIVE GYROKINETIC SIMULATIONS OF TRANSPORT IN TOKAMAKS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WALTZ, RE; CANDY, J; HINTON, FL; ESTRADA-MILA, C; KINSEY, JE.

    2004-01-01

    A continuum global gyrokinetic code GYRO has been developed to comprehensively simulate core turbulent transport in actual experimental profiles and enable direct quantitative comparisons to the experimental transport flows. GYRO not only treats the now standard ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode turbulence, but also treats trapped and passing electrons with collisions and finite β, equilibrium ExB shear stabilization, and all in real tokamak geometry. Most importantly the code operates at finite relative gyroradius (ρ * ) so as to treat the profile shear stabilization and nonlocal effects which can break gyroBohm scaling. The code operates in either a cyclic flux-tube limit (which allows only gyroBohm scaling) or a globally with physical profile variation. Rohm scaling of DIII-D L-mode has been simulated with power flows matching experiment within error bars on the ion temperature gradient. Mechanisms for broken gyroBohm scaling, neoclassical ion flows embedded in turbulence, turbulent dynamos and profile corrugations, plasma pinches and impurity flow, and simulations at fixed flow rather than fixed gradient are illustrated and discussed

  18. Advancing materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langford, H.D.; Psaras, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    The topics discussed in this volume include historical perspectives in the fields of materials research and development, the status of selected scientific and technical areas, and current topics in materials research. Papers are presentd on progress and prospects in metallurgical research, microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, condensed-matter physics and materials research, quasi-periodic crystals, and new and artifically structured electronic and magnetic materials. Consideration is also given to materials research in catalysis, advanced ceramics, organic polymers, new ways of looking at surfaces, and materials synthesis and processing

  19. Absolute intensity calibration of the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, X.; Zhao, H. L.; Liu, Y., E-mail: liuyong@ipp.ac.cn; Li, E. Z.; Han, X.; Ti, A.; Hu, L. Q.; Zhang, X. D. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Domier, C. W.; Luhmann, N. C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California at Davis, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    This paper presents the results of the in situ absolute intensity calibration for the 32-channel heterodyne radiometer on the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. The hot/cold load method is adopted, and the coherent averaging technique is employed to improve the signal to noise ratio. Measured spectra and electron temperature profiles are compared with those from an independent calibrated Michelson interferometer, and there is a relatively good agreement between the results from the two different systems.

  20. Animal Production Research Advances

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Animal Production Research Advances is a peer-review journal established expressly to promote the production of all animal species utilized as food. The journal has an international scope and is intended for professionals in animal production and related sciences. We solicit contributions from animal production and ...

  1. An advanced computational algorithm for systems analysis of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dragojlovic, Zoran; Rene Raffray, A.; Najmabadi, Farrokh; Kessel, Charles; Waganer, Lester; El-Guebaly, Laila; Bromberg, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    A new computational algorithm for tokamak power plant system analysis is being developed for the ARIES project. The objective of this algorithm is to explore the most influential parameters in the physical, technological and economic trade space related to the developmental transition from experimental facilities to viable commercial power plants. This endeavor is being pursued as a new approach to tokamak systems studies, which examines an expansive, multi-dimensional trade space as opposed to traditional sensitivity analyses about a baseline design point. The new ARIES systems code consists of adaptable modules which are built from a custom-made software toolbox using object-oriented programming. The physics module captures the current tokamak physics knowledge database including modeling of the most-current proposed burning plasma experiment design (FIRE). The engineering model accurately reflects the intent and design detail of the power core elements including accurate and adjustable 3D tokamak geometry and complete modeling of all the power core and ancillary systems. Existing physics and engineering models reflect both near-term as well as advanced technology solutions that have higher performance potential. To fully assess the impact of the range of physics and engineering implementations, the plant cost accounts have been revised to reflect a more functional cost structure, supported by an updated set of costing algorithms for the direct, indirect, and financial cost accounts. All of these features have been validated against the existing ARIES-AT baseline case. The present results demonstrate visualization techniques that provide an insight into trade space assessment of attractive steady-state tokamaks for commercial use.

  2. EFFECT OF PROFILES AND SHAPE ON IDEAL STABILITY OF ADVANCED TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MAKOWSKI,MA; CASPER,TA; FERRON,JR; TAYLOR,TS; TURNBULL,AD

    2003-08-01

    OAK-B135 The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation ({kappa}), triangularity ({delta}), and squareness ({zeta}), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P{sub 0}/

    {approx} 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q{sub min} (> 2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs.

  3. Effect of Profiles and Space on Ideal Stability of Advanced Tokamak Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makowski, M A; Casper, T A; Ferron, J R; Taylor, T S; Turnbull, A D

    2003-07-07

    The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation ({kappa}), triangularity ({delta}), and squareness ({zeta}), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P{sub 0}/{l_angle}P{r_brace} {approx} 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q{sub min} (>2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs.

  4. EFFECT OF PROFILES AND SHAPE ON IDEAL STABILITY OF ADVANCED TOKAMAK EQUILIBRIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MAKOWSKI, M.A.; CASPER, T.A.; FERRON, J.R.; TAYLOR, T.S.; TURNBULL, A.D.

    2003-01-01

    OAK-B135 The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation (κ), triangularity ((delta)), and squareness (ζ), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P 0 / ∼ 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q min (> 2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs

  5. Effect of Profiles and Space on Ideal Stability of Advanced Tokamak Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makowski, M A; Casper, T A; Ferron, J R; Taylor, T S; Turnbull, A D

    2003-01-01

    The pressure profile and plasma shape, parameterized by elongation (κ), triangularity ((delta)), and squareness (ζ), strongly influence stability. In this study, ideal stability of single null and symmetric, double-null, advanced tokamak (AT) configurations is examined. All the various shapes are bounded by a common envelope and can be realized in the DIII-D tokamak. The calculated AT equilibria are characterized by P 0 /(l a ngle)P} ∼ 2.0-4.5, weak negative central shear, high q min (>2.0), high bootstrap fraction, an H-mode pedestal, and varying shape parameters. The pressure profile is modeled by various polynomials together with a hyperbolic tangent pedestal, consistent with experimental observations. Stability is calculated with the DCON code and the resulting stability boundary is corroborated by GATO runs

  6. Overview of JT-60U progress towards steady-state advanced tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ide, S.

    2005-01-01

    Recent experimental results on steady state advanced tokamak (AT) research on JT-60U are presented with emphasis on longer time scale in comparison with characteristics time scales in plasmas. Towards this, modification on control in operation, heating and diagnostics systems have been done. As the results, ∼ 60 s I p flat top and an ∼ 30 s H-mode are obtained. The long pulse modification has opened a door into a new domain for JT-60U. The high normalized beta (β N ) of 2.3 is maintained for 22.3 s and 2.5 for 16.5 s in a high β p H-mode plasma. A standard ELMy H-mode plasma is also extended and change in wall recycling in such a longer time scale has been unveiled. Development and investigation of plasmas relevant to AT operation has been continued in former 15 s discharges as well in which higherNB power (≤ 10 s) is available. Higher β N ∼ 3 is maintained for 6.2 s in high β p H-mode plasmas. High bootstrap current fraction (f BS ) of ∼ 75% is sustained for 7.4 s in an RS plasma. On NTM suppression by localized ECCD, ECRF injection preceding the mode saturation is found to be more effective to suppress the mode with less power compared to the injection after the mode saturated. The domain of the NTM suppression experiments is extended to the high β N regime, and effectiveness of m/n=3/2 mode suppression by ECCD is demonstrated at β N ∼ 2.5-3. Genuine center-solenoid less tokamak plasma start up is demonstrated. In a current hole region, it is shown that no scheme drives a current in any direction. Detailed measurement in both spatial and energy spaces of energetic ions showed dynamic change in the energetic ion profile at collective instabilities. Impact of toroidal plasma rotation on ELM behaviors is clarified in grassy ELM and QH domains. (author)

  7. Advanced tokamak reactors based on the spherical torus (ATR/ST). Preliminary design considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, R.L.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Copenhaver, C.; Schnurr, N.M.; Engelhardt, A.G.; Seed, T.J.; Zubrin, R.M.

    1986-06-01

    Preliminary design results relating to an advanced magnetic fusion reactor concept based on the high-beta, low-aspect-ratio, spherical-torus tokamak are summarized. The concept includes resistive (demountable) toroidal-field coils, magnetic-divertor impurity control, oscillating-field current drive, and a flowing liquid-metal breeding blanket. Results of parametric tradeoff studies, plasma engineering modeling, fusion-power-core mechanical design, neutronics analyses, and blanket thermalhydraulics studies are described. The approach, models, and interim results described here provide a basis for a more detailed design. Key issues quantified for the spherical-torus reactor center on the need for an efficient drive for this high-current (approx.40 MA) device as well as the economic desirability to increase the net electrical power from the nominal 500-MWe(net) value adopted for the baseline system. Although a direct extension of present tokamak scaling, the stablity and transport of this high-beta (approx.0.3) plasma is a key unknown that is resoluble only by experiment. The spherical torus generally provides a route to improved tokamak reactors as measured by considerably simplified coil technology in a configuration that allows a realistic magnetic divertor design, both leading to increased mass power density and reduced cost

  8. The CIT [compact ignition tokamak] pellet injection system: Description and supporting research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gouge, M.J.; Combs, S.K.; Fisher, P.W.; Milora, S.L.

    1989-01-01

    The Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) will use an advance, high-velocity pellet injection system to achieve and maintain ignited plasmas. Two pellet injectors are provided: a moderate-velocity (1-to 1.5-km/s), single-stage pneumatic injector with high reliability and a high-velocity (4- to 5-km/s), two-stage pellet injector that uses frozen hydrogenic pellets encased in sabots. Both pellet injectors are qualified for operation with tritium feed gas. Issues such as performance, neutron activation of injector components, maintenance, design of the pellet injection vacuum line, gas loads to the reprocessing system, and equipment layout are discussed. Results and plans for supporting research and development (R and D) in the areas of tritium pellet fabrication and high-velocity, repetitive two-stage pneumatic injectors are presented. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  9. High-beta tokamak research. Annual progress report, 1 August 1982-1 August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navratil, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    The main research objectives during the past year fell into four areas: (1) detailed observations over a range of high-beta tokamak equilibria; (2) fabrication of an improved and more flexible high-beta tokamak based on our understanding of the present Torus II; (3) extension of the pulse length to 100 usec with power crowbar operation of the equilibrium field coil sets; and (4) comparison of our equilibrium and stability observations with computational models of MHD equilibrium and stability

  10. Synergism between profile and cross section shape optimization for negative central shear advanced tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turnbull, A.D.; Taylor, T.S.; Lao, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Tokamak (AT) concept is aimed at achieving high beta, high confinement, and a well aligned high bootstrap current fraction in a tokamak configuration consistent with steady state operation. The required improvements over the simple O-D scaling laws, normally used to predict standard, pulsed tokamak performance, axe obtained by taking into account the dependence of the stability and confinement on the 2-D equilibrium; the planned TPX experiment was designed to take full advantage of both advanced profiles and advanced cross-section shaping. Systematic stability studies of the promising Negative Central Shear (NCS) configuration have been performed for a wide variety of cross-section shapes and profile variations. The ideal MHD beta limit is found to be strongly dependent on both and, in fact, there is a clear synergistic relationship between the gains in beta from optimizing the profiles and optimizing the shape. Specifically, for a circular cross-section with highly peaked profiles, β is limited to normalized β values of β N = β/(I/aB) ∼ 2% (mT/MA). A small gain in beta can be achieved by broadening the pressure; however, the root-mean-square beta (β*) is slightly reduced. With peaked pressure profiles, a small increase in β N over that in a circular cross-section is also obtained by strong shaping. At fixed q, this translates to a much larger gain in β and β*. With both optimal profiles and strong shaping, however, the gain in all the relevant fusion performance parameters is dramatic; β and β* can be increased a factor 5 for example. Moreover, the bootstrap alignment is improved. For an optimized strongly shaped configuration, confinement, beta values, and bootstrap alignment adequate for a practical AT power plant appear to be realizable. Data from DIII-D supports these predictions and analysis of the DIII-D data will be presented

  11. A conceptual design of a negative-ion-grounded advanced tokamak reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shin; Ohara, Yoshihiro; Tani, Keiji

    1988-05-01

    The NAVIGATOR concept is based on the negative-ion-grounded 500 keV 20 MW neutral beam injection system (NBI system), which has been proposed and studied at JAERI. The NAVIGATOR concept contains two categories; one is the NAVIGATOR machine as a tokamak reactor, and the other is the NAVIGATOR philosophy as a guiding principle in fusion research. The NAVIGATOR machine implies an NBI heated and full inductive ramped-up reactor. The NAVIGATOR concept should be applied in a phased approach to and beyond the operating goal for the FER (Fusion Experimental Reactor, the next generation tokamak machine in Japan). The mission of the FER is to realize self-ignition and a long controlled burn of about 800 seconds and to develop and test fusion technologies, including the tritium fuel cycle, superconducting magnet, remote maintenance and breeding blanket test modules. The NAVIGATOR concept is composed of three major elements, that is, reliable operation scenarios, reliable maintenability and sufficient flexibility of the reactor. The NAVIGATOR concept well supports the ideas of phased operation and phased construction of the FER, which will result in the reduction of technological risk. The NAVIGATOR concept is expected to bring forth the fruits growing up in the present large tokamak machines in the form of next generation machines. In addition, the NAVIGATOR concept will supply many required databases for the DEMO reactor. The details of the NAVIGATOR concept is described in this paper, and the concept may indicate a feasible strategy for developing fusion research. (author)

  12. Progress on advanced tokamak and steady-state scenario development on DIII-D and NSTX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doyle, E J [Department of Electrical Engineering and PSTI, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Garofalo, A M [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Greenfield, C M [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Kaye, S M [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Menard, J E [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Murakami, M [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sabbagh, S A [Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Austin, M E [University of Texas-Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Bell, R E [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Burrell, K H [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Ferron, J R [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Gates, D A [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Groebner, R J; Hyatt, A W; Luce, T C; Petty, C C; Wade, M R; Waltz, R E [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Jayakumar, R J [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kinsey, J E [Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); LeBlanc, B P [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); McKee, G R [Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Okabayashi, M [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Peng, Y-K M [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Politzer, P A [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Rhodes, T L [Dept. of Electrical Engineering and PSTI, Univ. of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Advanced tokamak (AT) research seeks to develop steady-state operating scenarios for ITER and other future devices from a demonstrated scientific basis. Normalized target parameters for steady-state operation on ITER are 100% non-inductive current operation with a bootstrap current fraction f{sub BS} {>=} 60%, q{sub 95} {approx} 4-5 and G {identical_to}{beta}{sub N}H{sub scaling}/q{sub 95}{sup 2} {>=}0.3. Progress in realizing such plasmas is considered in terms of the development of plasma control capabilities and scientific understanding, leading to improved AT performance. NSTX has demonstrated active resistive wall mode stabilization with low, ITER-relevant, rotation rates below the critical value required for passive stabilization. On DIII-D, experimental observations and GYRO simulations indicate that ion internal transport barrier (ITB) formation at rational-q surfaces is due to equilibrium zonal flows generating high local E ? B shear levels. In addition, stability modelling for DIII-D indicates a path to operation at {beta}{sub N} {>=} 4 with q{sub min} {>=} 2, using broad, hollow current profiles to increase the ideal wall stability limit. Both NSTX and DIII-D have optimized plasma performance and expanded AT operational limits. NSTX now has long-pulse, high performance discharges meeting the normalized targets for an spherical torus-based component test facility. DIII-D has developed sustained discharges combining high beta and ITBs, with performance approaching levels required for AT reactor concepts, e.g. {beta}{sub N} = 4, H{sub 89} = 2.5, with f{sub BS} > 60%. Most importantly, DIII-D has developed ITER steady-state demonstration discharges, simultaneously meeting the targets for steady-state Q {>=} 5 operation on ITER set out above, substantially increasing confidence in ITER meeting its steady-state performance objective.

  13. Progress of the ECH·ECCD experiments. Research progress of the ECH·ECCD experiments in tokamaks and spherical tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isayama, Akihiko; Tanaka, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress in the ECH·ECCD study in tokamak and spherical tokamak devices is described. As for the tokamak study, results on the control of neoclassical tearing modes and sawtooth oscillations, the current profile, the internal transport barrier, the plasma start-up and the discharge cleaning are given. As for the spherical tokamak study, the plasma start-up by ECH·ECCD and the electron-Bernstein-wave heating and the current drive are described. (T.I.)

  14. Engineering Design of KSTAR tokamak main structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, K.H.; Cho, S.; Her, N.I.

    2001-01-01

    The main components of the KSTAR (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak including vacuum vessel, plasma facing components, cryostat, thermal shield and magnet supporting structure are in the final stage of engineering design. Hundai Heavy Industries (HHI) has been involved in the engineering design of these components. The current configuration and the final engineering design results for the KSTAR main structure are presented. (author)

  15. 20 years of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenwald, M.; Baek, S.; Barnard, H.; Beck, W.; Bonoli, P.; Brunner, D.; Burke, W.; Ennever, P.; Ernst, D.; Faust, I.; Fiore, C.; Fredian, T.; Gao, C.; Golfinopoulos, T.; Granetz, R.; Hartwig, Z.; Hubbard, A.; Hughes, J.; Hutchinson, I.; Irby, J.

    2014-01-01

    The object of this review is to summarize the achievements of research on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Hutchinson et al., Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994) and Marmar, Fusion Sci. Technol. 51, 261 (2007)] and to place that research in the context of the quest for practical fusion energy. C-Mod is a compact, high-field tokamak, whose unique design and operating parameters have produced a wealth of new and important results since it began operation in 1993, contributing data that extends tests of critical physical models into new parameter ranges and into new regimes. Using only high-power radio frequency (RF) waves for heating and current drive with innovative launching structures, C-Mod operates routinely at reactor level power densities and achieves plasma pressures higher than any other toroidal confinement device. C-Mod spearheaded the development of the vertical-target divertor and has always operated with high-Z metal plasma facing components—approaches subsequently adopted for ITER. C-Mod has made ground-breaking discoveries in divertor physics and plasma-material interactions at reactor-like power and particle fluxes and elucidated the critical role of cross-field transport in divertor operation, edge flows and the tokamak density limit. C-Mod developed the I-mode and the Enhanced Dα H-mode regimes, which have high performance without large edge localized modes and with pedestal transport self-regulated by short-wavelength electromagnetic waves. C-Mod has carried out pioneering studies of intrinsic rotation and demonstrated that self-generated flow shear can be strong enough in some cases to significantly modify transport. C-Mod made the first quantitative link between the pedestal temperature and the H-mode's performance, showing that the observed self-similar temperature profiles were consistent with critical-gradient-length theories and followed up with quantitative tests of nonlinear gyrokinetic models. RF research highlights include direct experimental

  16. Tokamaks with high-performance resistive magnets: advanced test reactors and prospects for commercial applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Williams, J.E.C.; Becker, H.; Leclaire, R.; Yang, T.

    1981-10-01

    Scoping studies have been made of tokamak reactors with high performance resistive magnets which maximize advantages gained from high field operation and reduced shielding requirements, and minimize resistive power requirements. High field operation can provide very high values of fusion power density and n tau/sub e/ while the resistive power losses can be kept relatively small. Relatively high values of Q' = Fusion Power/Magnet Resistive Power can be obtained. The use of high field also facilitates operation in the DD-DT advanced fuel mode. The general engineering and operational features of machines with high performance magnets are discussed. Illustrative parameters are given for advanced test reactors and for possible commercial reactors. Commercial applications that are discussed are the production of fissile fuel, electricity generation with and without fissioning blankets and synthetic fuel production

  17. Integrated Tokamak modeling: When physics informs engineering and research planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poli, Francesca Maria

    2018-05-01

    Modeling tokamaks enables a deeper understanding of how to run and control our experiments and how to design stable and reliable reactors. We model tokamaks to understand the nonlinear dynamics of plasmas embedded in magnetic fields and contained by finite size, conducting structures, and the interplay between turbulence, magneto-hydrodynamic instabilities, and wave propagation. This tutorial guides through the components of a tokamak simulator, highlighting how high-fidelity simulations can guide the development of reduced models that can be used to understand how the dynamics at a small scale and short time scales affects macroscopic transport and global stability of plasmas. It discusses the important role that reduced models have in the modeling of an entire plasma discharge from startup to termination, the limits of these models, and how they can be improved. It discusses the important role that efficient workflows have in the coupling between codes, in the validation of models against experiments and in the verification of theoretical models. Finally, it reviews the status of integrated modeling and addresses the gaps and needs towards predictions of future devices and fusion reactors.

  18. Twenty Years of Research on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, Martin

    2013-10-01

    Alcator C-Mod is a compact, high-field tokamak, whose unique design and operating parameters have produced a wealth of new and important results since its start in 1993, contributing data that extended tests of critical physical models into new parameter ranges and into new regimes. Using only RF for heating and current drive with innovative launching structures, C-Mod operates routinely at very high power densities. Research highlights include direct experimental observation of ICRF mode-conversion, ICRF flow drive, demonstration of Lower-Hybrid current drive at ITER-like densities and fields and, using a set of powerful new diagnostics, extensive validation of advanced RF codes. C-Mod spearheaded the development of the vertical-target divertor and has always operated with high-Z metal plasma facing components--an approach adopted for ITER. C-Mod has made ground-breaking discoveries in divertor physics and plasma-material interactions at reactor-like power and particle fluxes and elucidated the critical role of cross-field transport in divertor operation, edge flows and the tokamak density limit. C-Mod developed the I-mode and EDA H-mode regimes which have high performance without large ELMs and with pedestal transport self-regulated by short-wavelength electromagnetic waves. C-Mod has carried out pioneering studies of intrinsic rotation and found that self-generated flow shear can be strong enough to significantly modify transport. C-Mod made the first quantitative link between pedestal temperature and H-mode performance, showing that the observed self-similar temperature profiles were consistent with critical-gradient-length theories and followed up with quantitative tests of nonlinear gyrokinetic models. Disruption studies on C-Mod provided the first observation of non-axisymmetric halo currents and non-axisymmetric radiation in mitigated disruptions. Work supported by U.S. DoE

  19. The study of heat flux for disruption on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhendong; Fang, Jianan; Luo, Jiarong; Cui, Zhixue; Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Zhao, Hailin; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Meiwen

    2016-01-01

    Disruption of the plasma is one of the most dangerous instabilities in tokamak. During the disruption, most of the plasma thermal energy is lost, which causes damages to the plasma facing components. Infrared (IR) camera is an effective tool to detect the temperature distribution on the first wall, and the energy deposited on the first wall can be calculated from the surface temperature profile measured by the IR camera. This paper concentrates on the characteristics of heat flux distribution onto the first wall under different disruptions, including the minor disruption and the vertical displacement events (VDE) disruption. Several minor disruptions have been observed before the major disruption under the high plasma density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. During the minor disruption, the heat fluxes are mainly deposited on the upper/lower divertors. The magnetic configuration prior to the minor disruption is a lower single null with the radial distance between the two separatrices in the outer midplane dR_s_e_p = −2 cm, while it changes to upper single null (dR_s_e_p = 1.4 cm) during the minor disruption. As for the VDE disruption, the spatial distribution of heat flux exhibits strong toroidal and radial nonuniformity, and the maximum heat flux received on the dome plate can be up to 11 MW/m"2.

  20. Progress in Developing a High-Availability Advanced Tokamak Pilot Plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, T.; Goldston, R.; Kessel, C.; Neilson, G.; Menard, J.; Prager, S.; Scott, S.; Titus, P.; Zarnstorff, M., E-mail: tbrown@pppl.gov [Princeton University, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton (United States); Costley, A. [Henley on Thames (United Kingdom); El-Guebaly, L. [University of Wisconsin, Madison (United States); Malang, S. [Fusion Nuclear Technology Consulting, Linkenheim (Germany); Waganer, L. [St. Louis (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Full text: A fusion pilot plant study was initiated to clarify the development needs in moving from ITER to a first of a kind fusion power plant, following a path similar to the approach adopted for the commercialization of fission. The mission of the pilot plant was set to encompass component test and fusion nuclear science missions yet produce net electricity with high availability in a device designed to be prototypical of the commercial device. The objective of the study was to evaluate three different magnetic configuration options, the advanced tokamak (AT), spherical tokamak (ST) and compact stellarator (CS) in an effort to establish component characteristics, maintenance features and the general arrangement of each candidate device. With the move to look beyond ITER the fusion community is now beginning to embark on DEMO reactor studies with an emphasis on defining configuration arrangements that can meet a high availability goal. In this paper the AT pilot plant design will be presented. The selected maintenance approach, the device arrangement and sizing of the in-vessel components and details of interfacing auxiliary systems and services that impact the ability to achieve high availability operations will be discussed. Efforts made to enhance the interaction of in-vessel maintenance activities, the hot cell and the transfer process to develop simplifying solutions will also be addressed. (author)

  1. Plasma profile and shape optimization for the advanced tokamak power plant, ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Jardin, S.C.; Najmabadi, F.

    2006-01-01

    An advanced tokamak plasma configuration is developed based on equilibrium, ideal MHD stability, bootstrap current analysis, vertical stability and control, and poloidal field coil analysis. The plasma boundaries used in the analysis are forced to coincide with the 99% flux surface from the free-boundary equilibrium. Using an accurate bootstrap current model and external current drive profiles from ray tracing calculations in combination with optimized pressure profiles, β N values above 7.0 have been obtained. The minimum current drive requirement is found to lie at a lower β N of 6.0. The external kink mode is stabilized by a tungsten shell located at 0.33 times the minor radius and a feedback system. Plasma shape optimization has led to an elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.9 at the separatrix. Vertical stability could be achieved by a combination of tungsten shells located at 0.33 times the minor radius and feedback control coils located behind the shield. The poloidal field coils were optimized in location and current, providing a maximum coil current of 8.6 MA. These developments have led to a simultaneous reduction in the power plant major radius and toroidal field from those found in a previous study [S.C. Jardin, C.E. Kessel, C.G. Bathke, D.A. Ehst, T.K. Mau, F. Najmabadi, T.W. Petrie, the ARIES Team, Physics basis for a reversed shear tokamak power plant, Fusion Eng. Design 38 (1997) 27

  2. The study of heat flux for disruption on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhendong; Fang, Jianan; Gong, Xianzu; Gan, Kaifu; Luo, Jiarong; Zhao, Hailin; Cui, Zhixue; Zhang, Bin; Chen, Meiwen

    2016-05-01

    Disruption of the plasma is one of the most dangerous instabilities in tokamak. During the disruption, most of the plasma thermal energy is lost, which causes damages to the plasma facing components. Infrared (IR) camera is an effective tool to detect the temperature distribution on the first wall, and the energy deposited on the first wall can be calculated from the surface temperature profile measured by the IR camera. This paper concentrates on the characteristics of heat flux distribution onto the first wall under different disruptions, including the minor disruption and the vertical displacement events (VDE) disruption. Several minor disruptions have been observed before the major disruption under the high plasma density in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. During the minor disruption, the heat fluxes are mainly deposited on the upper/lower divertors. The magnetic configuration prior to the minor disruption is a lower single null with the radial distance between the two separatrices in the outer midplane dRsep = -2 cm, while it changes to upper single null (dRsep = 1.4 cm) during the minor disruption. As for the VDE disruption, the spatial distribution of heat flux exhibits strong toroidal and radial nonuniformity, and the maximum heat flux received on the dome plate can be up to 11 MW/m2.

  3. An advanced conceptual Tokamak fusion power reactor utilizing closed cycle helium gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    UWMAK-III is a conceptual Tokamak reactor designed to study the potential and the problems associated with an advanced version of Tokamaks as power reactors. Design choices have been made which represent reasonable extrapolations of present technology. The major features are the noncircular plasma cross section, the use of TZM, a molybdenum based alloy, as the primary structural material, and the incorporation of a closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. A conceptual design of the turbomachinery is given together with a preliminary heat exchanger analysis that results in relatively compact designs for the generator, precooler, and intercooler. This paper contains a general description of the UWMAK-III system and a discussion of those aspects of the reactor, such as the burn cycle, the blanket design and the heat transfer analysis, which are required to form the basis for discussing the power conversion system. The authors concentrate on the power conversion system and include a parametric performance analysis, an interface and trade-off study and a description of the reference conceptual design of the closed-cycle helium gas turbine power conversion system. (Auth.)

  4. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of this page please turn JavaScript on. NIH Research: Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents Story ... Photo courtesy of NIH Advances in Parkinson's Disease Research Story Landis, Ph.D., has been Director of ...

  5. Modelling of advanced tokamak physics scenarios in ALCATOR C-Mod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonoli, P.T.; Porkolab, M.; Ramos, J.

    2001-01-01

    Advanced tokamak modes of operation in Alcator C-Mod have been investigated using a simulation model which combines an MHD equilibrium and current profile control calculation with an ideal MHD stability analysis. Stable access to high β t operating modes with reversed shear current density profiles has been demonstrated using 2.4-3.0 MW of off-axis lower hybrid current drive (LHCD). Here β t =2μ 0 (p)/B 2 0 is the volume averaged toroidal plasma beta. Current profile control at the β-limit and beyond has also been demonstrated. The effects of LH power level as well as changes in the profiles of density and temperature on shear reversal radius have been quantified and are discussed. (author)

  6. Control of the Resistive Wall Mode in Advanced Tokamak Plasmas on DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garofalo, A.M.; Strait, E.J.; Bialek, J.; Frederickson, E.; Gryaznevich, M.; Jensen, T.H.; Johnson, L.C.; La Haye, R.J.; Navratil, G.A.; Lazarus, E.A.; Luce, T.C.; Makowski, M.; Okabayashi, M.; Rice, B.W.; Scoville, J.T.; Turnbull, A.D.; Walker, M.L.

    1999-01-01

    Resistive wall mode (RWM) instabilities are found to be a limiting factor in advanced tokamak (AT) regimes with low internal inductance. Even small amplitude modes can affect the rotation profile and the performance of these ELMing H-mode discharges. Although complete stabilization of the RWM by plasma rotation has not yet been observed, several discharges with increased beam momentum and power injection sustained good steady-state performance for record time extents. The first investigation of active feedback control of the RWM has shown promising results: the leakage of the radial magnetic flux through the resistive wall can be successfully controlled, and the duration of the high beta phase can be prolonged. The results provide a comparative test of several approaches to active feedback control, and are being used to benchmark the analysis and computational models of active control

  7. Inward particle transport at high collisionality in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, G. Q.; Ma, J.; Weiland, J.; Zang, Q.

    2013-01-01

    We have made the first drift wave study of particle transport in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)). The results reveal that collisions make the particle flux more inward in the high collisionality regime. This can be traced back to effects that are quadratic in the collision frequency. The particle pinch is due to electron trapping which is not very efficient in the high collisionality regime so the approach to equilibrium is slow. We have included also the electron temperature gradient (ETG) mode to give the right electron temperature gradient, since the Trapped Electron Mode (TE mode) is weak in this regime. However, at the ETG mode number ions are Boltzmann distributed so the ETG mode does not give particle transport

  8. Development of an alternating integrator for magnetic measurements for experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, D. M., E-mail: dmliu@live.cn; Zhao, W. Z.; He, Y. G.; Chen, B. [School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009 (China); Wan, B. N.; Shen, B.; Huang, J.; Liu, H. Q. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-11-15

    A high-performance integrator is one of the key electronic devices for reliably controlling plasma in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak for long pulse operation. We once designed an integrator system of real-time drift compensation, which has a low integration drift. However, it is not feasible for really continuous operations due to capacitive leakage error and nonlinearity error. To solve the above-mentioned problems, this paper presents a new alternating integrator. In the new integrator, the integrator system of real-time drift compensation is adopted as one integral cell while two such integral cells work alternately. To achieve the alternate function, a Field Programmable Gate Array built in the digitizer is utilized. The performance test shows that the developed integrator with the integration time constant of 20 ms has a low integration drift (<15 mV) for 1000 s.

  9. Transient heat transport studies in JET conventional and advanced tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mantica, P.; Coffey, I.; Dux, R.

    2003-01-01

    Transient transport studies are a valuable complement to steady-state analysis for the understanding of transport mechanisms and the validation of physics-based transport models. This paper presents results from transient heat transport experiments in JET and their modelling. Edge cold pulses and modulation of ICRH (in mode conversion scheme) have been used to provide detectable electron and ion temperature perturbations. The experiments have been performed in conventional L-mode plasmas or in Advanced Tokamak regimes, in the presence of an Internal Transport Barrier (ITB). In conventional plasmas, the issues of stiffness and non-locality have been addressed. Cold pulse propagation in ITB plasmas has provided useful insight into the physics of ITB formation. The use of edge perturbations for ITB triggering has been explored. Modelling of the experimental results has been performed using both empirical models and physics-based models. Results of cold pulse experiments in ITBs have also been compared with turbulence simulations. (author)

  10. SELF-CONSISTENT,INTEGRATED,ADVANCED TOKAMAK OPERATION ON DIII-D

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    WADE, MR; MURAKAMI, M; LUCE, TC; FERRON, JR; PETTY, CC; BRENNAN, DP; GAROFALO, AM; GREENFIELD, CM; HYATT, AW; JAYAKUMAR, R; LAHAYE, RJ; LAO, LL; LOHR, J; POLITZER, PA; PRATER, R; STRAIT, EJ

    2002-01-01

    Recent experiments on DIII-D have demonstrated the ability to sustain plasma conditions that integrate and sustain the key ingredients of Advanced Tokamak (AT) operation: high β with q min >> 1, good energy confinement, and high current drive efficiency. Utilizing off-axis (ρ 0.4) electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) to modify the current density profile in a plasma operating near the no-wall ideal stability limit with q min > 2.0, plasmas with β = 2.9% and 90% of the plasma current driven non-inductively have been sustained for nearly 2 s (limited only by the duration of the ECCD pulse). Separate experiments have demonstrated the ability to sustain a steady current density profile using ECCD for periods as long as 1 s with β = 3.3% and > 90% of the current driven non-inductively

  11. The Research Progress of the J-TEXT Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ge; Wang, Zhijiang; Ding, Yonghua; Zhang, Ming; Yang, Zhoujun; Gao, Li; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Hu, Xiwei; Pan, Yuan

    2010-11-01

    In 2004, the TEXT-U tokamak was disassembled and shipped to China, and later on settle down in Huazhong University of Science and Technology. The machine was renamed as the Joint TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak and obtained its first plasma in 2007. The typical J-TEXT Ohmic discharge was performed in the limiter configuration with the main parameters as follows: major radius R=1.05 m, minor radius a=0.27m, toroidal magnetic field BT=2.2T, plasma current Ip>200kA, line-averaged density ne˜ 2-3 . 1019/m^3, and electron temperature Te0˜ 700eV. Up till now, a few diagnostic systems used to facilitate routine operation and experimental studies were designed and developed. Benefiting from these diagnostic tools, the observation of MHD activities and the statistical analysis of disruption events were done. And measurements of the electrostatic fluctuations in the edge region and conditional analysis of the intermittent burst events near the LCFS were also made as well. The preliminary results will be presented in detail in the meeting.

  12. Continuous tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Y.K.M.

    1978-04-01

    A tokamak configuration is proposed that permits the rapid replacement of a plasma discharge in a ''burn'' chamber by another one in a time scale much shorter than the elementary thermal time constant of the chamber first wall. With respect to the chamber, the effective duty cycle factor can thus be made arbitrarily close to unity minimizing the cyclic thermal stress in the first wall. At least one plasma discharge always exists in the new tokamak configuration, hence, a continuous tokamak. By incorporating adiabatic toroidal compression, configurations of continuous tokamak compressors are introduced. To operate continuous tokamaks, it is necessary to introduce the concept of mixed poloidal field coils, which spatially groups all the poloidal field coils into three sets, all contributing simultaneously to inducing the plasma current and maintaining the proper plasma shape and position. Preliminary numerical calculations of axisymmetric MHD equilibria in continuous tokamaks indicate the feasibility of their continued plasma operation. Advanced concepts of continuous tokamaks to reduce the topological complexity and to allow the burn plasma aspect ratio to decrease for increased beta are then suggested

  13. Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, D.C.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of the new large tokamaks JET, JT-60 and TFTR important advances in magnetic confinement have been made. These include the exploitation of radio frequency and neutral beam heating on a much larger scale than previously, the demonstration of regimes of improved confinement and the demonstration of current drive at the Megamp level. A number of small and medium sized tokamaks have also come into operation recently such as WT-3 in Japan with an emphasis on radio frequency current drive and HL-1 a medium sized tokamak in China. Each of these new tokamaks is addressing specific problems which remain for the future development of the system. Of these particular problems: β, density and q limits remain important issues for the future development of the tokamak. β limits are being addressed on the DIII-D device in the USA. The anomalous confinement that the tokamak displays is being explored in detail on the TEXT device in the USA. Two other problems are impurity control and current drive. There is significant emphasis on divertor configurations at the present time with their enhanced confinement in the so called H mode. Due to improved discharge cleaning techniques and the ability to repetitively refuel using pellets, purer plasmas can be obtained even without divertors. Current drive remains a crucial issue for quasi of near steady state operation of the tokamak in the future and many current drive schemes are being investigated. (author) [pt

  14. Varennes Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cumyn, P.B.

    A consortium of five organizations under the leadership of IREQ, the Institute de Recherche d'Hydro-Quebec has completed a conceptual design study for a tokamak device, and in January 1981 its construction was authorized with funding being provided principally by Hydro-Quebec and the National Research Council, as well as by the Ministre d'Education du Quebec and Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC). The device will form the focus of Canada's magnetic-fusion program and will be located in IREQ's laboratories in Varennes. Presently the machine layout is being finalized from the physics point of view and work has started on equipment design and specification. The Tokamak de Varennes will be an experimental device, the purpose of which is to study plasma and other fusion related phenomena. In particular it will study: 1. Plasma impurities and plasma/liner interaction; 2. Long pulse or quasi-continuous operation using plasma rampdown and eventually plasma current reversal in order to maintain the plasma; and 3. Advanced diagnostics

  15. The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    The ARIES study is a community effort to develop several visions of tokamaks as fusion power reactors. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Three ARIES visions are planned, each having a different degree of extrapolation from the present data base in physics and technology. The ARIES-I design assumes a minimum extrapolation from current tokamak physics (e.g., 1st stability) and incorporates technological advances that can be available in the next 20 to 30 years. ARIES-II is a DT-burning tokamak which would operate at a higher beta in the 2nd MHD stability regime. It employs both potential advances in the physics and expected advances in technology and engineering. ARIES-II will examine the potential of the tokamak and the D 3 He fuel cycle. This report is a collection of 14 papers on the results of the ARIES study which were presented at the IEEE 13th Symposium on Fusion Engineering (October 2-6, 1989, Knoxville, TN). This collection describes the ARIES research effort, with emphasis on the ARIES-I design, summarizing the major results, the key technical issues, and the central conclusions

  16. [Research advances in dendrochronology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Ke-Yan; Chen, Qiu-Yan; Liu, Chang-Zhi; Cao, Chun-Fu; Chen, Ya-Jun; Zhou, Fei-Fei

    2014-07-01

    Tree-ring studies in China have achieved great advances since the 1990s, particularly for the dendroclimatological studies which have made some influence around the world. However, because of the uneven development, limited attention has been currently paid on the other branches of dendrochronology. We herein briefly compared the advances of dendrochronology in China and of the world and presented suggestions on future dendrochronological studies. Large-scale tree-ring based climate reconstructions in China are highly needed by employing mathematical methods and a high quality tree-ring network of the ring-width, density, stable isotope and wood anatomy. Tree-ring based field climate reconstructions provide potentials on explorations of climate forcings during the reconstructed periods via climate diagnosis and process simulation.

  17. Fusion energy research, the tokamak of CRPP-EPFL, electrotechnical equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The topics of this information meeting were: fusion energy research at CRPP, the TCV tokamak, an alternating current generator which does not stress the grid, AC/DC multi-megawatt converters, stabilisation of the plasma, a fast and modular power AC/DC converter. figs., tabs., refs

  18. DIII-D research operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D. (ed.)

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R D; and collaborative efforts.

  19. DIII-D research operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, D.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R ampersand D; and collaborative efforts

  20. Overview of recent experimental results from the DIII-D advanced tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, S.L.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of DIII-D Advanced Tokamak (AT) experiments are to investigate and optimize the upper limits of energy confinement and MHD stability in a tokamak plasma, and to simultaneously maximize the fraction of non-inductive current drive. Significant overall progress has been made in the past 2 years, as the performance figure of merit β N H 89P of 9 has been achieved in ELMing H-mode for over 16 τ E without sawteeth. We also operated at β N ∼7 for over 35 τ E or 3 τ R , with the duration limited by hardware. Real-time feedback control of β (at 95% of the stability boundary), optimizing the plasma shape (e.g., δ, divertor strike- and X-point, double/single null balance), and particle control (n e /n GW ∼0.3, Z eff N H 89P of 7. The QDB regime has been obtained to date only with counter neutral beam injection. Further modification and control of internal transport barriers (ITBs) has also been demonstrated with impurity injection (broader barrier), pellets, and ECH (strong electron barrier). The new Divertor-2000, a key ingredient in all these discharges, provides effective density, impurity and heat flux control in the high-triangularity plasma shapes. Discharges at n e /n GW ∼1.4 have been obtained with gas puffing by maintaining the edge pedestal pressure; this operation is easier with Divertor-2000. We are developing several other tools required for AT operation, including real-time feedback control of resistive wall modes (RWMs) with external coils, and control of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). (author)

  1. Animal Research International: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Animal Research International: Advanced Search ... containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ... Journal of Biomedical Research, African Journal of Biotechnology, African Journal of Chemical Education ...

  2. Advances in energy research

    CERN Document Server

    Acosta, Morena J

    2013-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive review of energy research studies from authors around the globe, including recent research in new technologies associated with the construction of nuclear power plants; oil disperse systems study using nuclear magnetic resonance relaxometry (NMRR); low energy consumption for cooling and heating systems; experimental investigation of the performance of a ground-source heat pump system for buildings heating and cooling; sustainable development of bioenergy from agricultural wastes and the environment; hazard identification and parametric analysis of toxic pollutants dispersion from large liquid hydrocarbon fuel-tank fires; maintenance benchmarking in petrochemicals plants by means of a multicriteria model; wind energy development innovation; power, people and pollution; nature and technology of geothermal energy and clean sustainable energy for the benefit of humanity and the environment; and soil thermal properties and the effects of groundwater on closed loops.

  3. Texas Experimental Tokamak, a plasma research facility: Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1995-08-01

    In the year just past, the authors made major progress in understanding turbulence and transport in both core and edge. Development of the capability for turbulence measurements throughout the poloidal cross section and intelligent consideration of the observed asymmetries, played a critical role in this work. In their confinement studies, a limited plasma with strong, H-mode-like characteristics serendipitously appeared and received extensive study though a diverted H-mode remains elusive. In the plasma edge, they appear to be close to isolating a turbulence drive mechanism. These are major advances of benefit to the community at large, and they followed from incremental improvements in diagnostics, in the interpretation of the diagnostics, and in TEXT itself. Their general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The work here demonstrates a continuing dedication to the problems of plasma transport which continue to plague the community and are an impediment to the design of future devices. They expect to show here that they approach this problem consistently, systematically, and effectively

  4. Advanced Remote Sensing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slonecker, Terrence; Jones, John W.; Price, Susan D.; Hogan, Dianna

    2008-01-01

    'Remote sensing' is a generic term for monitoring techniques that collect information without being in physical contact with the object of study. Overhead imagery from aircraft and satellite sensors provides the most common form of remotely sensed data and records the interaction of electromagnetic energy (usually visible light) with matter, such as the Earth's surface. Remotely sensed data are fundamental to geographic science. The Eastern Geographic Science Center (EGSC) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is currently conducting and promoting the research and development of three different aspects of remote sensing science: spectral analysis, automated orthorectification of historical imagery, and long wave infrared (LWIR) polarimetric imagery (PI).

  5. Animal Production Research Advances: Submissions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where this is not possible, authors should submit two copies of original article not yet published anywhere and accompanied with a 3.5” diskette containing the article labeled appropriately in MS Word version to: Editor–in–Chief, Animal Production Research Advances Tropical Animal Health and Production Research Lab

  6. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-04-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  7. ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS RESEARCH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2002-02-01

    The activities of the Advanced Gas Turbine Systems Research (AGTSR) program for this reporting period are described in this quarterly report. The report is divided into discussions of Membership, Administration, Technology Transfer (Workshop/Education), Research and Miscellaneous Related Activity. Items worthy of note are presented in extended bullet format following the appropriate heading.

  8. The circuit of polychromator for Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak edge Thomson scattering diagnostic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zang, Qing; Zhao, Junyu; Chen, Hui; Li, Fengjuan; Hsieh, C. L.

    2013-01-01

    The detector circuit is the core component of filter polychromator which is used for scattering light analysis in Thomson scattering diagnostic, and is responsible for the precision and stability of a system. High signal-to-noise and stability are primary requirements for the diagnostic. Recently, an upgraded detector circuit for weak light detecting in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) edge Thomson scattering system has been designed, which can be used for the measurement of large electron temperature (T e ) gradient and low electron density (n e ). In this new circuit, a thermoelectric-cooled avalanche photodiode with the aid circuit is involved for increasing stability and enhancing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), especially the circuit will never be influenced by ambient temperature. These features are expected to improve the accuracy of EAST Thomson diagnostic dramatically. Related mechanical construction of the circuit is redesigned as well for heat-sinking and installation. All parameters are optimized, and SNR is dramatically improved. The number of minimum detectable photons is only 10

  9. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Tritz, K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Zhu, Y. B. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, California 92697-4575 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks.

  10. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tresset, G.

    2002-01-01

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  11. Edge multi-energy soft x-ray diagnostic in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y. L.; Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Lan, H.; Liu, Y. L.; Wei, J.; Zhang, W.; Hu, G. H.; Wang, H. Q.; Duan, Y. M.; Zhao, J. L.; Wang, L.; Liu, S. C.; Ye, Y.; Li, J.; Lin, X.; Li, X. L.; Tritz, K.; Zhu, Y. B.

    2015-01-01

    A multi-energy soft x-ray (ME-SXR) diagnostic has been built for electron temperature profile in the edge plasma region in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) after two rounds of campaigns. Originally, five preamplifiers were mounted inside the EAST vacuum vessel chamber attached to five vertically stacked compact diode arrays. A custom mechanical structure was designed to protect the detectors and electronics under constraints of the tangential field of view for plasma edge and the allocation of space. In the next experiment, the mechanical structure was redesigned with a barrel structure to absolutely isolate it from the vacuum vessel. Multiple shielding structures were mounted at the pinhole head to protect the metal foils from lithium coating. The pre-amplifiers were moved to the outside of the vacuum chamber to avoid introducing interference. Twisted copper cooling tube was embedded into the back-shell near the diode to limit the temperature of the preamplifiers and diode arrays during vacuum vessel baking when the temperature reached 150 °C. Electron temperature profiles were reconstructed from ME-SXR measurements using neural networks

  12. Advanced antenna system for Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in TCABR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruchko, L.F.; Ozono, E.; Galvao, R.M.O.; Nascimento, I.C.; Degasperi, F.T.; Lerche, E.

    1998-01-01

    An advanced antenna system that has been developed for investigation of Alfven wave plasma heating and current drive in the TCABR tokamak is described. The main goal was the development of such a system that could insure the excitation of travelling single helicity modes with predefined wave mode numbers M and N. The system consists of four similar modules with poloidal windings. The required spatial spectrum is formed by proper phasing of the RF feeding currents. The impedance matching of the antenna with the four-phase oscillator is accomplished by resonant circuits which form one assembly unit with the RF feeders. The characteristics of the antenna system design with respect to the antenna-plasma coupling and plasma wave excitation, for different phasing of the feeding currents, are summarised. The antenna complex impedance Z=Z R +Z I is calculated taking into account both the plasma response to resonant excitation of fast Alfven waves and the nonresonant excitation of vacuum magnetic fields in conducting shell. The matching of the RF generator with the antenna system during plasma heating is simulated numerically, modelling the plasma response with mutually coupled effective inductances with corresponding active Z R and reactive Z I impedances. The results of the numerical simulation of the RF system performance, including both the RF magnetic field spectrum analysis and the modeling of the RF generator operation with plasma load, are presented. (orig.)

  13. New steady-state quiescent high-confinement plasma in an experimental advanced superconducting tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, J S; Sun, Z; Guo, H Y; Li, J G; Wan, B N; Wang, H Q; Ding, S Y; Xu, G S; Liang, Y F; Mansfield, D K; Maingi, R; Zou, X L; Wang, L; Ren, J; Zuo, G Z; Zhang, L; Duan, Y M; Shi, T H; Hu, L Q

    2015-02-06

    A critical challenge facing the basic long-pulse high-confinement operation scenario (H mode) for ITER is to control a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instability, known as the edge localized mode (ELM), which leads to cyclical high peak heat and particle fluxes at the plasma facing components. A breakthrough is made in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak in achieving a new steady-state H mode without the presence of ELMs for a duration exceeding hundreds of energy confinement times, by using a novel technique of continuous real-time injection of a lithium (Li) aerosol into the edge plasma. The steady-state ELM-free H mode is accompanied by a strong edge coherent MHD mode (ECM) at a frequency of 35-40 kHz with a poloidal wavelength of 10.2 cm in the ion diamagnetic drift direction, providing continuous heat and particle exhaust, thus preventing the transient heat deposition on plasma facing components and impurity accumulation in the confined plasma. It is truly remarkable that Li injection appears to promote the growth of the ECM, owing to the increase in Li concentration and hence collisionality at the edge, as predicted by GYRO simulations. This new steady-state ELM-free H-mode regime, enabled by real-time Li injection, may open a new avenue for next-step fusion development.

  14. Plasma Profile and Shape Optimization for the Advanced Tokamak Power Plant, ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Jardin, S.C.; Najmabadi, F.

    2001-01-01

    An advanced tokamak plasma configuration is developed based on equilibrium, ideal-MHD stability, bootstrap current analysis, vertical stability and control, and poloidal-field coil analysis. The plasma boundaries used in the analysis are forced to coincide with the 99% flux surface from the free-boundary equilibrium. Using an accurate bootstrap current model and external current-drive profiles from ray-tracing calculations in combination with optimized pressure profiles, beta(subscript N) values above 7.0 have been obtained. The minimum current drive requirement is found to lie at a lower beta(subscript N) of 5.4. The external kink mode is stabilized by a tungsten shell located at 0.33 times the minor radius and a feedback system. Plasma shape optimization has led to an elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.9 at the separatrix. Vertical stability could be achieved by a combination of tungsten shells located at 0.33 times the minor radius and feedback control coils located behind the shield. The poloidal-field coils were optimized in location and current, providing a maximum coil current of 8.6 MA. These developments have led to a simultaneous reduction in the power plant major radius and toroidal field

  15. Development of burning plasma and advanced scenarios in the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luce, T.C.

    2005-01-01

    Significant progress in the development of burning plasma scenarios, steady-state scenarios at high fusion performance, and basic tokamak physics has been made by the DIII-D Team. Discharges similar to the ITER baseline scenario have demonstrated normalized fusion performance nearly 50% higher than required for Q = 10 in ITER, under stationary conditions. Discharges that extrapolate to Q ∼ 10 for longer than one hour in ITER at reduced current have also been demonstrated in DIII-D under stationary conditions. Proof of high fusion performance with full noninductive operation has been obtained. Underlying this work are studies validating approaches to confinement extrapolation, disruption avoidance and mitigation, tritium retention, ELM avoidance, and operation above the no-wall pressure limit. In addition, the unique capabilities of the DIII-D facility have advanced studies of the sawtooth instability with unprecedented time and space resolution, threshold behavior in the electron heat transport, and rotation in plasmas in the absence of external torque. (author)

  16. The high beta tokamak-extended pulse magnetohydrodynamic mode control research program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maurer, D A; Bialek, J; Byrne, P J; De Bono, B; Levesque, J P; Li, B Q; Mauel, M E; Navratil, G A; Pedersen, T S; Rath, N; Shiraki, D

    2011-01-01

    The high beta tokamak-extended pulse (HBT-EP) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) mode control research program is studying ITER relevant internal modular feedback control coil configurations and their impact on kink mode rigidity, advanced digital control algorithms and the effects of plasma rotation and three-dimensional magnetic fields on MHD mode stability. A new segmented adjustable conducting wall has been installed on the HBT-EP and is made up of 20 independent, movable, wall shell segments instrumented with three distinct sets of 40 saddle coils, totaling 120 in-vessel modular feedback control coils. Each internal coil set has been designed with varying toroidal angular coil coverage of 5, 10 and 15 0 , spanning the toroidal angle range of an ITER port plug based internal coil to test resistive wall mode (RWM) interaction and multimode MHD plasma response to such highly localized control fields. In addition, we have implemented 336 new poloidal and radial magnetic sensors to quantify the applied three-dimensional fields of our control coils along with the observed plasma response. This paper describes the design and implementation of the new control shell incorporating these control and sensor coils on the HBT-EP, and the research program plan on the upgraded HBT-EP to understand how best to optimize the use of modular feedback coils to control instability growth near the ideal wall stabilization limit, answer critical questions about the role of plasma rotation in active control of the RWM and the ferritic resistive wall mode, and to improve the performance of MHD control systems used in fusion experiments and future burning plasma systems.

  17. Economic comparison of MHD equilibrium options for advanced steady state tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehst, D.A.; Kessel, C.E.; Jardin, S.C.; Krakowski, R.A.; Bathke, C.G.; Mau, T.K.; Najmabadi, F.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in theory and in tokamak experiments leads to questions of the optimal development path for commercial tokamak power plants. The economic prospects of future designs are compared for several tokamak operating modes: (high poloidal beta) first stability, second stability and reverse shear. Using a simplified economic model and selecting uniform engineering performance parameters, this comparison emphasizes the different physics characteristics - stability and non- inductive current drive - of the various equilibria. The reverse shear mode of operation is shown to offer the lowest cost of electricity for future power plants. (author)

  18. The Physics Basis For An Advanced Physics And Advanced Technology Tokamak Power Plant Configuration, ARIES-ACT1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles Kessel, et al

    2014-03-05

    The advanced physics and advanced technology tokamak power plant ARIES-ACT1 has a major radius of 6.25 m at aspect ratio of 4.0, toroidal field of 6.0 T, strong shaping with elongation of 2.2 and triangularity of 0.63. The broadest pressure cases reached wall stabilized βN ~ 5.75, limited by n=3 external kink mode requiring a conducting shell at b/a = 0.3, and requiring plasma rotation, feedback, and or kinetic stabilization. The medium pressure peaking case reached βN = 5.28 with BT = 6.75, while the peaked pressure case reaches βN < 5.15. Fast particle MHD stability shows that the alpha particles are unstable, but this leads to redistribution to larger minor radius rather than loss from the plasma. Edge and divertor plasma modeling show that about 75% of the power to the divertor can be radiated with an ITER-like divertor geometry, while over 95% can be radiated in a stable detached mode with an orthogonal target and wide slot geometry. The bootstrap current fraction is 91% with a q95 of 4.5, requiring about ~ 1.1 MA of external current drive. This current is supplied with 5 MW of ICRF/FW and 40 MW of LHCD. EC was examined and is most effective for safety factor control over ρ ~ 0.2-0.6 with 20 MW. The pedestal density is ~ 0.9x1020 /m3 and the temperature is ~ 4.4 keV. The H98 factor is 1.65, n/nGr = 1.0, and the net power to LH threshold power is 2.8- 3.0 in the flattop.

  19. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described.

  20. Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. Technical progress report, November 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1994-07-01

    The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics in order to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks and in particular to understand the role of turbulence. So that they can continue to study the physics that is most relevant to the fusion program, TEXT completed a significant device upgrade this year. The new capabilities of the device and new and innovative diagnostics were exploited in all main program areas including: (1) configuration studies; (2) electron cyclotron heating physics; (3) improved confinement modes; (4) edge physics/impurity studies; (5) central turbulence and transport; and (6) transient transport. Details of the progress in each of the research areas are described

  1. Research Staff | Advanced Manufacturing Research | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    manages wind turbine rotor blade composite manufacturing projects at the National Wind Technology Center postdoctoral researcher working to develop and validate advanced composite manufacturing processes using novel materials for wind and marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines. This includes hands-on composite

  2. What is past is prologue: future directions in tokamak power reactor design research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    Conceptual tokamak power reactor designs over the last five years have provided us with many fundamental insights regarding tokamaks as fusion reactors. This first generation of studies has helped lay the groundwork upon which to build improvements in reactor design and begin a process of optimization. After reviewing the first generation of studies and the primary conclusions they produced, we discuss four current designs that are representative of present trends in this area of research. In particular, we discuss the trends towards reduced reactor size and higher neutron wall loadings. Moving in this direction requires new approaches to many subsystem designs. We describe new approaches and future directions in first wall and blanket designs that can achieve reliable operation and reasonable lifetime, the use of cryogenic but normal aluminum magnets for the pulsed coils in a tokamak, blanket designs that allow elimination of the intermediate loop, and low activity shields and toroidal field magnets. We close with a discussion of the future role of conceptual reactor design research and the need for close interaction with ongoing experiments in fusion technology

  3. Translational research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Belardelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  4. Translational research on advanced therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belardelli, Filippo; Rizza, Paola; Moretti, Franca; Carella, Cintia; Galli, Maria Cristina; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues) is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  5. Recent results and near-term expectations in Tokamak fusion research in the U.S., Europe, and Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meade, D.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fusion is often thought about in terms of three different activities: scientific feasibility, engineering feasibility, and economic feasibility. This paper discusses the scientific feasibility of fusion. Reactor temperatures, reactor densities and confinement, particle control, plasma power handling, and self-heating are some of the issues examined. Collaboration and results from research at the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at Princeton, the JT-60U in Japan, and JET, the Joint European Torus Tokamak in Oxford are presented

  6. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stott, Peter [JET, UK (United Kingdom)

    1998-10-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  7. Tokamaks (Second Edition)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stott, Peter

    1998-01-01

    The first edition of John Wesson's book on tokamaks, published in 1987, established itself as essential reading for researchers in the field of magnetic confinement fusion: it was an excellent introduction for students to tokamak physics and also a valuable reference work for the more experienced. The second edition, published in 1997, has been completely rewritten and substantially enlarged (680 pages compared with 300). The new edition maintains the aim of providing a simple introduction to basic tokamak physics, but also includes discussion of the substantial advances in fusion research during the past decade. The new book, like its predecessor, is well written and commendable for its clarity and accuracy. In fact many of the chapters are written by a series of co-authors bringing the benefits of a wide range of expertise but, by careful editing, Wesson has maintained a uniformity of style and presentation. The chapter headings and coverage for the most part remain the same - but are expanded considerably and brought up to date. The most substantial change is that the single concluding chapter in the first edition on 'Experiments' has been replaced by three chapters: 'Tokamak experiments' which deals with some of the earlier key experiments plus a selection of recent small and medium-sized devices, 'Large experiments' which gives an excellent summary of the main results from the four large tokamaks - TFTR, JET, JT60/JT60U and DIII-D, and 'The future' which gives a very short (possibly too short in my opinion) account of reactors and ITER. This is an excellent book, which I strongly recommend should have a place - on the desk rather than in the bookshelf - of researchers in magnetic confinement fusion. (book review)

  8. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.E.; Mau, T.K.; Miller, R.L.; Najmabadi, F.; Chan, V.S.; Chu, M.S.; LaHaye, R.; Lao, L.L.; Petrie, T.W.; Politzer, P.; John, St. H.E.; Snyder, P.; Staebler, G.M.; Turnbull, A.D.; West, W.P.

    2003-01-01

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented

  9. Physics Basis for the Advanced Tokamak Fusion Power Plant ARIES-AT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.C. Jardin; C.E. Kessel; T.K. Mau; R.L. Miller; F. Najmabadi; V.S. Chan; M.S. Chu; R. LaHaye; L.L. Lao; T.W. Petrie; P. Politzer; H.E. St. John; P. Snyder; G.M. Staebler; A.D. Turnbull; W.P. West

    2003-10-07

    The advanced tokamak is considered as the basis for a fusion power plant. The ARIES-AT design has an aspect ratio of A always equal to R/a = 4.0, an elongation and triangularity of kappa = 2.20, delta = 0.90 (evaluated at the separatrix surface), a toroidal beta of beta = 9.1% (normalized to the vacuum toroidal field at the plasma center), which corresponds to a normalized beta of bN * 100 x b/(I(sub)P(MA)/a(m)B(T)) = 5.4. These beta values are chosen to be 10% below the ideal-MHD stability limit. The bootstrap-current fraction is fBS * I(sub)BS/I(sub)P = 0.91. This leads to a design with total plasma current I(sub)P = 12.8 MA, and toroidal field of 11.1 T (at the coil edge) and 5.8 T (at the plasma center). The major and minor radii are 5.2 and 1.3 m, respectively. The effects of H-mode edge gradients and the stability of this configuration to non-ideal modes is analyzed. The current-drive system consists of ICRF/FW for on-axis current drive and a lower-hybrid system for off-axis. Tran sport projections are presented using the drift-wave based GLF23 model. The approach to power and particle exhaust using both plasma core and scrape-off-layer radiation is presented.

  10. The reconstruction and research progress of the TEXT-U tokamak in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; Hu, X. W.; Wang, Z. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Zhang, M.; Gao, L.; Zhang, X. Q.; Yang, Z. J.; Yu, K. X.; Gentle, K. W.; Huang, H.; J-TEXT Team

    2011-09-01

    The TEXT/(TEXT-U) tokamak, formerly built and operated by the University of Texas at Austin in USA, was dismantled and shipped to China in 2004, and renamed as the Joint TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak. The reconstruction work, which included reassembly of the machine and development of peripheral devices, was completed in the spring of 2007. Consequently, the first plasma was obtained at the end of 2007. At present, a typical J-TEXT ohmic discharge can produce a plasma with flattop current up to 220 kA and lasting for 300 ms, line-averaged density above 2 × 1019 m-3, and an electron temperature of about 800 eV, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.2 T. A number of diagnostic devices used to facilitate the routine operation and experimental scenarios were developed on the J-TEXT tokamak. Hence, the measurements of the electrostatic fluctuations in the edge region and conditional analysis of the intermittent burst events near the last closed flux surface were undertaken. The observation and simple analysis of MHD activity and disruption events were also performed. The preliminary experimental results and the future research plan for the J-TEXT are described in detail.

  11. The reconstruction and research progress of the TEXT-U tokamak in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhuang, G.; Pan, Y.; Hu, X.W.; Wang, Z.J.; Ding, Y.H.; Zhang, M.; Gao, L.; Zhang, X.Q.; Yang, Z.J.; Yu, K.X.; Gentle, K.W.; Huang, H.

    2011-01-01

    The TEXT/(TEXT-U) tokamak, formerly built and operated by the University of Texas at Austin in USA, was dismantled and shipped to China in 2004, and renamed as the Joint TEXT (J-TEXT) tokamak. The reconstruction work, which included reassembly of the machine and development of peripheral devices, was completed in the spring of 2007. Consequently, the first plasma was obtained at the end of 2007. At present, a typical J-TEXT ohmic discharge can produce a plasma with flattop current up to 220 kA and lasting for 300 ms, line-averaged density above 2 x 10 19 m -3 , and an electron temperature of about 800 eV, with a toroidal magnetic field of 2.2 T. A number of diagnostic devices used to facilitate the routine operation and experimental scenarios were developed on the J-TEXT tokamak. Hence, the measurements of the electrostatic fluctuations in the edge region and conditional analysis of the intermittent burst events near the last closed flux surface were undertaken. The observation and simple analysis of MHD activity and disruption events were also performed. The preliminary experimental results and the future research plan for the J-TEXT are described in detail.

  12. Research tokamak system with multi-mode discharges using inverter power supply

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Hiroki; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Takagi, Makoto; Takamura, Shuichi; Tashiro, Kenji

    1999-01-01

    In Current Sustaining Tokamak in Nagoya university (CSTN)-IV research tokamak system using a compact 40kHz pulse width modulation (PWM) inverter power supply, which is controlled through LabVIEW program, we construct a new tokamak discharge system with multi-mode including a stable alternating current discharge and a high-repetition high-duty one. These discharge modes can be operated continuously for as long as 60sec. The continuous discharge with long duration is able to simulate the important physical and chemical processes of long time discharges in fusion devices, in which the heat load to the wall and the particle balance in the plasma-wall system are crucial topics in order to realize a long pulse fusion reactor, like ITER. Employing ergodic divertor (ED) is one of tools to control the particle balance and the heat load to the wall. In addition, we installed another inverter power supply to generate a rotating magnetic perturbation for dynamic ergodic divertor (DED) with the appropriate measurement system so that we may carry out experiments on heat and particle control with DED at long time operation. (author)

  13. Advanced research in data privacy

    CERN Document Server

    Torra, Vicenç

    2015-01-01

    This book provides an overview of the research work on data privacy and privacy enhancing technologies carried by the participants of the ARES project. ARES (Advanced Research in Privacy an Security, CSD2007-00004) has been one of the most important research projects funded by the Spanish Government in the fields of computer security and privacy. It is part of the now extinct CONSOLIDER INGENIO 2010 program, a highly competitive program which aimed to advance knowledge and open new research lines among top Spanish research groups. The project started in 2007 and will finish this 2014. Composed by 6 research groups from 6 different institutions, it has gathered an important number of researchers during its lifetime. Among the work produced by the ARES project, one specific work package has been related to privacy. This books gathers works produced by members of the project related to data privacy and privacy enhancing technologies. The presented works not only summarize important research carried in the proje...

  14. Selected advances in materials research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1979-01-01

    Several findings emanating from materials research that should have a beneficial impact on technological advancement in the future are described. The report deals with the GRAPHNOL, a new class of high-temperature brazing alloy for joining refractory components, gel-sphere-pac process for manufacture of nuclear fuel, and noble-metal fuel cladding for service in radioisotope thermoelectric generators designed to provide auxiliary power aboard spacecraft for planetary exploration

  15. Review of ICRF antenna development and heating experiments up to advanced experiment I, 1989 on the JT-60 tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Tsuneyuki

    1992-03-01

    Two main subjects of ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating on JT-60 are described in this paper from development phase of the JT-60 ICRF heating system up to advanced experiment I, 1989. One is antenna design and development for the high power JT-60 ICRF heating system (6 MW for 10 s at a frequency range of 108 - 132 MHz). The other is the experimental investigation of characteristics of second harmonic ICRF heating in a large tokamak. (J.P.N.)

  16. Impact of maximum TF magnetic field on performance and cost of an advanced physics tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.

    1983-01-01

    Parametric studies were conducted using the Fusion Engineering Design Center (FEDC) Tokamak Systems Code to investigate the impact of variation in the maximum value of the field at the toroidal field (TF) coils on the performance and cost of a low q/sub psi/, quasi-steady-state tokamak. Marginal ignition, inductive current startup plus 100 s of inductive burn, and a constant value of epsilon (inverse aspect ratio) times beta poloidal were global conditions imposed on this study. A maximum TF field of approximately 10 T was found to be appropriate for this device

  17. Bioenergy research advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, Vijai G; Kubicek, Christian P; Saddler, Jack; Xu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Bioenergy Research: Advances and Applications brings biology and engineering together to address the challenges of future energy needs. The book consolidates the most recent research on current technologies, concepts, and commercial developments in various types of widely used biofuels and integrated biorefineries, across the disciplines of biochemistry, biotechnology, phytology, and microbiology. All the chapters in the book are derived from international scientific experts in their respective research areas. They provide you with clear and concise information on both standard and more recent bioenergy production methods, including hydrolysis and microbial fermentation. Chapters are also designed to facilitate early stage researchers, and enables you to easily grasp the concepts, methodologies and application of bioenergy technologies. Each chapter in the book describes the merits and drawbacks of each technology as well as its usefulness. The book provides information on recent approaches to graduates, post...

  18. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Kyoo; Chang, In Soon; Chung, Moon Kyoo; Hwang, Chul Kyoo; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Choi, Byung Ho; Hong, Bong Keun; Oh, Byung Hoon; Chung, Seung Ho; Yoon, Byung Joo; Yoon, Jae Sung; Song, Woo Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Choong Suk; Chang, Hong Yung; Choi, Duk In; Nam, Chang Heui [Korea Advanced Inst. of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Kyoo Sun [Hanyang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Sang Heui [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Heui Dong [Kyungpook National Univ., Taegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Koo [Pohang Inst. of Science and Technology, Kyungnam (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-11-01

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the `advanced tokamak` physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. Concept definition of KT-2, a large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with FWCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sung Kyoo; Chang, In Soon; Chung, Moon Kyoo; Hwang, Chul Kyoo; Lee, Kwang Won; In, Sang Ryul; Choi, Byung Ho; Hong, Bong Keun; Oh, Byung Hoon; Chung, Seung Ho; Yoon, Byung Joo; Yoon, Jae Sung; Song, Woo Sub; Chang, Choong Suk; Chang, Hong Yung; Choi, Duk In; Nam, Chang Heui; Chung, Kyoo Sun; Hong, Sang Heui; Kang, Heui Dong; Lee, Jae Koo

    1994-11-01

    A concept definition of the KT-2 tokamak is made. The research goal of the machine is to study the 'advanced tokamak' physics and engineering issues on the mid size large-aspect-ratio diverter tokamak with intense RF heating (>5 MW). Survey of the status of the research fields, the physics basis for the concept, operation scenarios, as well as machine design concept are presented. (Author) 86 refs., 17 figs., 22 tabs

  20. Results of Joint Experiments and other IAEA activities on research using small tokamaks

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brotánková, Jana; Dejarnac, Renaud; Dufková, Edita; Ďuran, Ivan; Hron, Martin; Sentkerestiová, Jana; Stöckel, Jan; Weinzettl, Vladimír; Zajac, Jaromír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 10 (2009), s. 104026-104026 ISSN 0029-5515. [IAEA Fusion Energy Conference/22nd./. Geneva, 13.10.2008-18.10.2008] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KJB100430504 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : Tokamak * probe diagnostics * sheared flows * edge plasma * turbulence Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 4.270, year: 2009 http://iopscience.iop.org/0029-5515/49/10/104026

  1. Multifractality in edge localized modes in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bak, P.E.; Asakura, N.; Miura, Y.; Nakano, T.; Yoshino, R.

    2001-01-01

    The temporal losses of confinement during edge localized modes in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) show multifractal scaling and the spectra are generally smooth, but in some cases there are signs of discontinuous derivatives. Dynamics of the Sugama-Horton model, interpreted as edge localized modes, also display multifractal scaling. The spectra display singularities in the derivative, which can be interpreted as a phase transition. It is argued that the multifractal spectra of edge localized modes can be used to discriminate between different experimental discharges and validate edge localized mode models

  2. Advancing neurosurgery through translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, Claire; Sutherland, Garnette

    2013-01-01

    Every year, the number of published research articles increases significantly. However, many potentially useful ideas are lost in this flood of data. Translational research provides a framework through which investigators or laboratories can maximize the likelihood that the product of their research will be adopted in medical practice. There are 2 recognizable models of translation appropriate for the majority of research: investigator driven and industry enabled. Investigator-driven research has more range because it does not have to consider the profit margin of research, but it is a slow process. The industry-enabled model accelerates the translational research process through the power of industry funding but is interested primarily in products with potential for profit. Two cases are examined to illustrate different methods of partnering with industry. IMRIS is a company founded by investigators to distribute intraoperative magnetic resonance imaging technology based on a movable high-field magnet. It took 7 years for IMRIS to make its first sale, but it is now a successful company. With neuroArm, a surgical robot, investigators decided to sell the intellectual property to an established company to ensure successful global commercialization. Translational research advances medicine by creating and distributing effective solutions to contemporary problems.

  3. Tokamak COMPASS

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řípa, Milan; Křenek, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2011), s. 32-34 ISSN 1210-4612 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20430508 Keywords : fusion * tokamak * Compass * Golem * Institute of Plasma Physics AVCR v.v * NBI * diagnostics Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics

  4. Plasma Fluctuation Studies in the TCV Tokamak: Modeling of Shaping Effects and Advanced Diagnostic Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marinoni, A.

    2009-10-01

    One of the most important issues for magnetic-confinement fusion research is the so-called anomalous transport across magnetic field lines, i.e. transport that is in excess of that caused by collisional processes. The need to reduce anomalous transport in order to increase the efficiency of a prospective fusion reactor must be addressed through an investigation of its fundamental underlying causes. This thesis is divided into two distinct components: one experimental and instrumental, and the other theoretical and based on numerical modeling. The experimental part consists of the design and installation of a new diagnostic for core turbulence fluctuations in the TCV tokamak. An extensive conceptual investigation of a number of possible solutions, including Beam Emission Spectroscopy, Reflectometry, Cross Polarization, Collective Scattering and different Imaging techniques, was carried out at first. A number of criteria, such as difficulties in data interpretation, costs, variety of physics issues that could be addressed and expected performance, were used to compare the different techniques for specific application to the TCV tokamak. The expected signal to noise ratio and the required sampling frequency for TCV were estimated on the basis of a large number of linear, local gyrokinetic simulations of plasma fluctuations. This work led to the choice of a Zernike phase contrast imaging system in a tangential launching configuration. The diagnostic was specifically designed to provide information on turbulence features up to now unknown. In particular, it is characterized by an outstanding spatial resolution and by the capability to measure a very broad range of fluctuations, from ion to electron Larmor radius scales, thus covering the major part of the instabilities expected to be at play in TCV. The spectrum accessible covers the wavenumber region from 0.9 cm -1 to 60 cm -1 at 24 radial positions with 3 MHz bandwidth. The diagnostic is an imaging technique and is

  5. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet; Caracterisation, modelisation et controle des scenarios avances dans le tokamak europeen jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresset, G

    2002-09-26

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  6. Characterisation, modelling and control of advanced scenarios in the european tokamak jet; Caracterisation, modelisation et controle des scenarios avances dans le tokamak europeen jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tresset, G

    2002-09-26

    The advanced scenarios, developed for less than ten years with the internal transport barriers and the control of current profile, give rise to a 'new deal' for the tokamak as a future thermonuclear controlled fusion reactor. The Joint European Torus (JET) in United Kingdom is presently the most powerful device in terms of fusion power and it has allowed to acquire a great experience in these improved confinement regimes. The reduction of turbulent transport, considered now as closely linked to the shape of current profile optimised for instance by lower hybrid current drive or the self-generated bootstrap current, can be characterised by a dimensionless criterion. Most of useful information related to the transport barriers are thus available. Large database analysis and real time plasma control are envisaged as attractive applications. The so-called 'S'-shaped transport models exhibit some interesting properties in fair agreement with the experiments, while the non-linear multivariate dependencies of thermal diffusivity can be approximated by a neural network, suggesting a new approach for transport investigation and modelling. Finally, the first experimental demonstrations of real time control of internal transport barriers and current profile have been performed on JET. Sophisticated feedback algorithms have been proposed and are being numerically tested to achieve steady-state and efficient plasmas. (author)

  7. Tokamak concept innovations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-04-01

    This document contains the results of the IAEA Specialists' Meeting on Tokamak Concept Innovations held 13-17 January 1986 in Vienna. Although it is the most advanced fusion reactor concept the tokamak is not without its problems. Most of these problems should be solved within the ongoing R and D studies for the next generation of tokamaks. Emphasis for this meeting was placed on innovations that would lead to substantial improvements in a tokamak reactor, even if they involved a radical departure from present thinking

  8. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Yuntao; Wu, Weiyue; Du, Shijun

    2014-01-01

    Provides a systematic introduction to tokamaks in engineering mechanics. Includes design guides based on full mechanical analysis, which makes it possible to accurately predict load capacity and temperature increases. Presents comprehensive information on important design factors involving materials. Covers the latest advances in and up-to-date references on tokamak devices. Numerous examples reinforce the understanding of concepts and provide procedures for design. Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study of mechanical/fusion engineering with a general understanding of tokamak engineering mechanics.

  9. Animal Production Research Advances: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  10. DIII-D research operations. Annual report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, D. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    This report discusses the research on the following topics: DIII-D program overview; divertor and boundary research program; advanced tokamak studies; tokamak physics; operations; program development; support services; contribution to ITER physics R&D; and collaborative efforts.

  11. Advancing Concentrating Solar Power Research (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2014-02-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) provide scientific, engineering, and analytical expertise to help advance innovation in concentrating solar power (CSP). This fact sheet summarizes how NREL is advancing CSP research.

  12. Intermediate/Advanced Research Design and Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploutz-Snyder, Robert

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this module is To provide Institutional Researchers (IRs) with an understanding of the principles of advanced research design and the intermediate/advanced statistical procedures consistent with such designs

  13. Development of high-speed and wide-angle visible observation diagnostics on Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak using catadioptric optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, J. H.; Hu, L. Q.; Zang, Q.; Han, X. F.; Shao, C. Q.; Sun, T. F.; Chen, H.; Wang, T. F.; Li, F. J.; Hu, A. L.; Yang, X. F.

    2013-01-01

    A new wide-angle endoscope for visible light observation on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) has been recently developed. The head section of the optical system is based on a mirror reflection design that is similar to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-like wide-angle observation diagnostic on the Joint European Torus. However, the optical system design has been simplified and improved. As a result, the global transmittance of the system is as high as 79.6% in the wavelength range from 380 to 780 nm, and the spatial resolution is <5 mm for the full depth of field (4000 mm). The optical system also has a large relative aperture (1:2.4) and can be applied in high-speed camera diagnostics. As an important diagnostic tool, the optical system has been installed on the HT-7 (Hefei Tokamak-7) for its final experimental campaign, and the experiments confirmed that it can be applied to the investigation of transient processes in plasma, such as ELMy eruptions in H-mode, on EAST

  14. What is past is prologue: future directions in Tokamak Power Reactor Design Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.

    1976-01-01

    After reviewing the first generation of studies and the primary conclusions they produced, four current designs are discussed that are representative of present trends in this area of research. In particular, the trends towards reduced reactor size and higher neutron wall loadings are discussed. Moving in this direction requires new approaches to many subsystem designs. New approaches and future directions in first wall and blanket designs that can achieve reliable operation and reasonable lifetime, the use of cryogenic but normal aluminum magnets for the pulsed coils in a tokamak, blanket designs that allow elimination of the intermediate loop, and low activity shields and toroidal field magnets are described. A discussion is given of the future role of conceptual reactor design research and the need for close interactions with ongoing experiments in fusion technology

  15. Recent advancement in research and planning toward high beta steady state operation in KSTAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Hyeon Keo; Hong, S.; Humphreys, D.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) research is to explore stable improved confinement regimes and technical challenge for superconducting tokamak operation and thus, to establish the basis for predictable high beta steady state tokamak plasma operation. To fulfil the goal, the current KSTAR research program is composed of three elements: 1) Exploration of anticipated engineering and technology for a stable long pulse operation of high beta plasmas including Edge Localized Mode (ELM) control with the low n (=1, 2) Resonant Magnetic Perturbation (RMP) using in-vessel control coils and innovative non-inductive current drives. The achieved long pulse operation up to ∼50s and fully non-inductive current drive will be combined in the future. Study of efficient heat exhaust will be combined with an innovative divertor design/operation. 2) Exploration of the operation boundary through establishment of true stability limits of the harmful MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) instabilities and confinement of the tokamak plasmas in KSTAR, making use of the lowest error field and magnetic ripple simultaneously achieved among all tokamaks ever built. The intrinsic machine error field has a long history of research as the source of MHD instabilities and magnetic ripple is known to be a cause of energy loss in the plasma. The achieved high beta discharges at β N ∼4 and stable discharges at q 95 (∼2) will be further improved. 3) Validation of theoretical modeling of MHD instabilities and turbulence toward predictive capability of stable high beta plasmas. In support of these research goals, the state of the art diagnostic systems, such as Electron Cyclotron Emission Imaging (ECEI) system in addition to accurate profile diagnostics, are deployed not only to provide precise 2D/3D information of the MHD instabilities and turbulence but also to challenge unresolved physics problems such as the nature of ELMs, ELM-crash dynamics and the role of the core

  16. Prospects for Tokamak Fusion Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheffield, J.; Galambos, J.

    1995-01-01

    This paper first reviews briefly the status and plans for research in magnetic fusion energy and discusses the prospects for the tokamak magnetic configuration to be the basis for a fusion power plant. Good progress has been made in achieving fusion reactor-level, deuterium-tritium (D-T) plasmas with the production of significant fusion power in the Joint European Torus (up to 2 MW) and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (up to 10 MW) tokamaks. Advances on the technologies of heating, fueling, diagnostics, and materials supported these achievements. The successes have led to the initiation of the design phases of two tokamaks, the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and the US Toroidal Physics Experiment (TPX). ITER will demonstrate the controlled ignition and extended bum of D-T plasmas with steady state as an ultimate goal. ITER will further demonstrate technologies essential to a power plant in an integrated system and perform integrated testing of the high heat flux and nuclear components required to use fusion energy for practical purposes. TPX will complement ITER by testing advanced modes of steady-state plasma operation that, coupled with the developments in ITER, will lead to an optimized demonstration power plant

  17. Design of an advanced bundle divertor for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.F.; Lee, A.Y.; Ruck, G.W.; Prevenslik, T.V.; Smeltzer, G.

    1979-01-01

    The conclusion of this work is that a bundle divertor, using an improved method of designing the magnetic field configuration, is feasible for the Demonstration Tokamak Hybrid Reactor (DTHR) investigated by Westinghouse. The most significant achievement of this design is the reduction in current density (1 kA/cm 2 ) in the divertor coils in comparison to the overall averaged current densities per tesla of field to be nulled for DITE (25 kA/cm 2 ) and for ISX-B 2 (11 kA/cm 2 ). Therefore, superconducting magnets can be built into the tight space available with a sound mechanical structure

  18. Hydrocarbon deposition in gaps of tungsten and graphite tiles in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak edge plasma parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Qian; Yang Zhongshi; Luo Guangnan

    2015-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3D) Monte Carlo code PIC-EDDY has been utilized to investigate the mechanism of hydrocarbon deposition in gaps of tungsten tiles in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), where the sheath potential is calculated by the 2D in space and 3D in velocity particle-in-cell method. The calculated results for graphite tiles using the same method are also presented for comparison. Calculation results show that the amount of carbon deposited in the gaps of carbon tiles is three times larger than that in the gaps of tungsten tiles when the carbon particles from re-erosion on the top surface of monoblocks are taken into account. However, the deposition amount is found to be larger in the gaps of tungsten tiles at the same CH 4 flux. When chemical sputtering becomes significant as carbon coverage on tungsten increases with exposure time, the deposition inside the gaps of tungsten tiles would be considerable. (author)

  19. Simulation of Heating with the Waves of Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Cheng; Zhu Sizheng; Zhang Xinjun

    2010-01-01

    Simulation on the heating scenarios in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) was performed by using a full wave code TORIC. The locations of resonance layers for these heating schemes are predicted and the simulations for different schemes in ICRF experiments in EAST, for example, ion heating (both fundamental and harmonic frequency) or electron heating (by direct fast waves or by mode conversion waves), on-axis or off-axis heating, and high-field-side (HFS) launching or low-field-side (LFS) launching, etc, were conducted. For the on-axis minority ion heating of 3 He in D( 3 He) plasma, the impacts of both density and temperature on heating were discussed in the EAST parameter ranges.

  20. Remote maintenance design activities and research and development accomplishments for the compact ignition tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1989-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires the use of remote handling technology in order to carry out maintenance operations. The remote operations consist of removing and replacing such components as first wall armor protection tiles, radio-frequency (RF) heating modules, and diagnostic modules. The major pieces of equipment being developed for maintenance operations internal to the vacuum vessel include an articulated boom manipulator (ABM), an inspection manipulator, and special tooling. For operations external to the vessel, the equipment includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system, decontamination equipment, hot cell equipment, and solid radioactive waste (rad-waste) handling and packaging equipment. The CIT Project is completing the conceptual design phase; research and development (R and D) activities, which include demonstrations of remote maintenance operations on full-size partial mock-ups are under way. (orig.)

  1. Remote maintenance design activities and research and development accomplishments for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spampinato, P.T.

    1988-01-01

    The use of deuterium-tritium (D-T) fuel for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) requires the use of remote handling technology to carry out maintenance operations. The remote operations consist of removing and replacing such components as first wall armor protection tiles, radio-frequency (rf) heating modules, and diagnostic modules. The major pieces of equipment being developed for maintenance activities internal to the vacuum vessel include an articulated boom manipulator (ABM), an inspection manipulator, and special tooling. For activities external to the vessel, the equipment includes a bridge-mounted manipulator system, decontamination equipment, hot cell equipment, and solid radiation-waste (rad-waste) handling and packaging equipment. The CIT Project is completing the conceptual design phase; research and development (R and D) activities, which include demonstrations of remote maintenance operations on full-size partial mock-ups are under way. 5 figs

  2. Particle exhaust scheme using an in-vessel cryocondensation pump in the advanced divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menon, M.M.; Mioduszewski, P.K.; Owen, L.W.; Anderson, P.M.; Baxi, C.B.; Langhorn, A.; Luxon, J.L.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Schaffer, M.J.; Schaubel, K.M.; "" class="author-name" title=" (General Atomics Co., San Diego, CA (United States))" data-affiliation=" (General Atomics Co., San Diego, CA (United States))" >Smith, J.P>

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, a particle exhaust scheme using a cryocondensation pump in the advanced divertor configuration of the DIII-D tokamak is described. In this configuration, the pump is located inside a baffle chamber within the tokamak, designed to receive particles reflected off the divertor strike region. A concentric coaxial loop with forced-convection flow of two-phase helium is selected as the cryocondensation surface. The pumping configuration is optimized by Monte Carlo techniques to provide maximum exhaust efficiency while minimizing the deleterious effects of impingement of energetic plasma particles on cryogenic surfaces. Heat loading contributions from various sources on the cryogenic surfaces are estimated, based on which the cryogenic surfaces are estimated, based on which the cryogenic flow loop for the pump is designed. The mechanical aspects of the pump, designed to meet the many challenging requirements of operating the cryopump internal to the tokamak vacuum and in close proximity with the high-temperature plasma, are also outlined

  3. Simulations of the L-H transition on experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weiland, Jan

    2014-01-01

    We have simulated the L-H transition on the EAST tokamak [Baonian Wan, EAST and HT-7 Teams, and International Collaborators, “Recent experiments in the EAST and HT-7 superconducting tokamaks,” Nucl. Fusion 49, 104011 (2009)] using a predictive transport code where ion and electron temperatures, electron density, and poloidal and toroidal momenta are simulated self consistently. This is, as far as we know, the first theory based simulation of an L-H transition including the whole radius and not making any assumptions about where the barrier should be formed. Another remarkable feature is that we get H-mode gradients in agreement with the α – α d diagram of Rogers et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 4396 (1998)]. Then, the feedback loop emerging from the simulations means that the L-H power threshold increases with the temperature at the separatrix. This is a main feature of the C-mod experiments [Hubbard et al., Phys. Plasmas 14, 056109 (2007)]. This is also why the power threshold depends on the direction of the grad B drift in the scrape off layer and also why the power threshold increases with the magnetic field. A further significant general H-mode feature is that the density is much flatter in H-mode than in L-mode

  4. Recent advances in the theory and simulation of pellet ablation and fast fuel relocation in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parks, P.B.; Baylor, L.R.; Ishizaki, R.; Jardin, S.C.; Samtaney, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents new theory and simulation of pellet ablation, and the rapid cross-field redistribution of the ionized pellet mass following pellet injection in tokamaks. The first 2-D time-dependent simulations describing the expansion of pellet ablation flow against the magnetic field is presented here using the Eulerian code CAP. The early-time expansion is characterized by the formation of an ellipsoidal diamagnetic cavity surrounding the pellet, which diverts heat flux around the pellet, thereby reducing the ablation rate. Near-pellet cloud properties from CAP provide initial conditions for the subsequent ExB advection of the ionized clouds caused by polarization in the inhomogeneous toroidal magnetic field. The first complete set of time-dependent equations describing mass redistribution has been developed and solved for numerically using the PRL code. New effects identified, including curvature drive by near sonic field-aligned flows, rotational transform of the magnetic field lines and magnetic shear are considered from the viewpoint of the parallel vorticity equation. Close agreement between theory and experimental fuel deposition profiles are obtained for both inner and outer wall pellet injection on the DIII-D tokamak, providing improved predictive capability for ITER. A new 3-D MHD simulation code AMR was started, which provides the required fine-scale mesh size needed for accurate modeling of pellet clouds having sharp perpendicular-to-B gradients. (author)

  5. Edge plasma diagnostics on Tore Supra tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Junji

    1991-01-01

    From 1988 to 1991, the international scientific research 'Diagnosis of peripheral plasma in Tore Supra tokamak' was carried out as a three-year plan receiving the support of the scientific research expense of the Ministry of Education. This is to apply the method of measuring electron density distribution by neutral lithium beam probe spectroscopy to the measurement of the electron density distribution in the peripheral plasma in Tore Supra Tokamak in France. Among many tokamaks in operation doing respective characteristics researches, the Tore Supra generates the toroidal magnetic field by using superconducting coils, and aims at the long time discharge for 30 sec. for the time being, and for 300 sec. in future. In the plasma generators for long time discharge like this, the technology of particle control is a large problem. For this purpose, a divertor was added to the Tore Supra. In order to advance the research on particle control, it is necessary to examine the behavior of plasma in the peripheral part in detail. The measurement of peripheral plasma in tokamaks, beam probe spectroscopy, the Tore Supra tokamak, the progress of the joint research, the problems in the joint research and the perspective of hereafter are reported. (K.I.)

  6. Advances in multi-megawatt lower hybrid technology in support of steady-state tokamak operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, L.; Achard, J.; Armitano, A.; Artaud, J. F.; Bae, Y. S.; Belo, J. H.; Berger-By, G.; Bouquey, F.; Cho, M. H.; Corbel, E.; Decker, J.; Do, H.; Dumont, R.; Ekedahl, A.; Garibaldi, P.; Goniche, M.; Guilhem, D.; Hillairet, J.; Hoang, G. T.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, H.; Kwak, J. G.; Magne, R.; Mollard, P.; Na, Y. S.; Namkung, W.; Oh, Y. K.; Park, S.; Park, H.; Peysson, Y.; Poli, S.; Prou, M.; Samaille, F.; Yang, H. L.; The Tore Supra Team

    2014-10-01

    It has been demonstrated that lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) systems play a crucial role for steady-state tokamak operation, owing to their high current drive (CD) efficiency and hence their capability to reduce flux consumption. This paper describes the extensive technology programmes developed for the Tore Supra (France) and the KSTAR (Korea) tokamaks in order to bring continuous wave (CW) LHCD systems into operation. The Tore Supra LHCD generator at 3.7 GHz is fully CW compatible, with RF power PRF = 9.2 MW available at the generator to feed two actively water-cooled launchers. On Tore Supra, the most recent and novel passive active multijunction (PAM) launcher has sustained 2.7 MW (corresponding to its design value of 25 MW m-2 at the launcher mouth) for a 78 s flat-top discharge, with low reflected power even at large plasma-launcher gaps. The fully active multijunction (FAM) launcher has reached 3.8 MW of coupled power (24 MW m-2 at the launcher mouth) with the new TH2103C klystrons. By combining both the PAM and FAM launchers, 950 MJ of energy, using 5.2 MW of LHCD and 1 MW of ICRH (ion cyclotron resonance heating), was injected for 160 s in 2011. The 3.7 GHz CW LHCD system will be a key element within the W (for tungsten) environment in steady-state Tokamak (WEST) project, where the aim is to test ITER technologies for high heat flux components in relevant heat flux density and particle fluence conditions. On KSTAR, a 2 MW LHCD system operating at 5 GHz is under development. Recently the 5 GHz prototype klystron has reached 500 kW/600 s on a matched load, and studies are ongoing to design a PAM launcher. In addition to the studies of technology, a combination of ray-tracing and Fokker-Planck calculations have been performed to evaluate the driven current and the power deposition due to LH waves, and to optimize the N∥ spectrum for the future launcher design. Furthermore, an LHCD system at 5 GHz is being considered for a future upgrade of the ITER

  7. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Korpio, T.; Leerink, S.; Nora, M.; Heikkinen, J.A.; Ogando, F.

    2010-01-01

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Unified Ideal Stability Limits for Advanced Tokamak and Spherical Torus Plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bell, M.G.; Bell, R.E.; Gates, D.A.; Kaye, S.M.; LeBlanc, B.P.; Sabbagh, S.A.; Fredrickson, E.D.; Jardin, S.C.; Maingi, R.; Manickam, J.; Mueller, D.; Ono, M.; Paoletti, F.; Peng, Y.-K.M.; Soukhanovskii, V.; Stutman, D.; Synakowski, E.J.

    2003-01-01

    Ideal magnetohydrodynamic stability limits of shaped tokamak plasmas with high bootstrap fraction are systematically determined as a function of plasma aspect ratio. For plasmas with and without wall stabilization of external kink modes, the computed limits are well described by distinct and nearly invariant values of a normalized beta parameter utilizing the total magnetic field energy density inside the plasma. Stability limit data from the low aspect ratio National Spherical Torus Experiment is compared to these theoretical limits and indicates that ideal nonrotating plasma no-wall beta limits have been exceeded in regimes with sufficiently high cylindrical safety factor. These results could impact the choice of aspect ratio in future fusion power plants

  9. Recent advances in gyrokinetic full-f particle simulation of medium sized Tokamaks with ELMFIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janhunen, S.J.; Kiviniemi, T.P.; Korpio, T.; Leerink, S.; Nora, M. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Heikkinen, J.A. [VTT, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Ogando, F. [Helsinki University of Technology, Euratom-Tekes Association, Espoo (Finland); Universidad Nacional de Educacion a Distancia, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Large-scale kinetic simulations of toroidal plasmas based on first principles are called for in studies of transition from low to high confinement mode and internal transport barrier formation in the core plasma. Such processes are best observed and diagnosed in detached plasma conditions in mid-sized tokamaks, so gyrokinetic simulations for these conditions are warranted. A first principles test-particle based kinetic model ELMFIRE[1] has been developed and used in interpretation[1,2] of FT-2 and DIII-D experiments. In this work we summarize progress in Cyclone (DIII-D core) and ASDEX Upgrade pedestal region simulations, and show that in simulations the choice of adiabatic electrons results in quenching of turbulence (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  10. Advanced limiter test (ALT-I) in the TEXTOR tokamak - concept and experimental design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conn, R.W.; Grotz, S.P.; Prinja, A.K.

    1983-01-01

    The concept and experimental design of a pump-limiter for the TEXTOR tokamak is described. The module is constructed of stainless steel with a compound curvature head designed to limit the maximum heat flux to 300 W/cm 2 . The head is made of TiC-coated graphite containing a variable aperture slot to admit plasma to a deflector plate for ballistic pumping action. The assembly is actively pumped using Zr-Al getters with an estimated hydrogen pumping speed of 2x10 4 1/s. The aspect ratio of the pump duct and the length of the plasma channel are both variable to permit study of plasma plugging, ballistic scattering, and enhanced gas conduction effects. The module can be moved radially by 10 cm to permit its operation either as the primary or secondary limiter. Major diagnostics include Langmuir and solid state probes, bolometers, infrared thermography, thermocouples, ion gauges, manometers, and a gas mass analyzer. (author)

  11. Progress of JT-60SA Project: EU-JA joint efforts for assembly and fabrication of superconducting tokamak facilities and its research planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shirai, Hiroshi, E-mail: shirai.hiroshi@jaea.go.jp [JT-60SA Project Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan); Barabaschi, Pietro [JT-60SA EU-Home Team, Fusion for Energy, Boltsmannstr 2, Garching 85748 (Germany); Kamada, Yutaka [JT-60SA JA-Home Team, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 801-1 Mukoyama, Naka, Ibaraki 311-0193 (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • JT-60SA Project is promoted under the BA Agreement and JA national programme. • JT-60SA is designed to operate in break-even equivalent condition for a long period. • JT-60SA Project supports and complements the ITER project, and promotes DEMO design. • Fabrication of JT-60SA components and assembly in Naka are steadily going on. • JT-60SA Research Plan has been developed jointly by EU and JA fusion communities. - Abstract: Aiming at supporting the early realization of fusion energy, the JT-60SA Project has shown steady progress for several years toward the first plasma in 2019 under the dual frameworks: the Satellite Tokamak Programme of the Broader Approach Agreement between EU and Japan, and the Japanese national programme. JT-60SA is a superconducting tokamak designed to operate in break-even equivalent conditions for a long pulse duration (typically 100 s) with a maximum plasma current of 5.5 MA. A variety of plasma control capabilities enable JT-60SA to contribute directly to the ITER project and also to DEMO by addressing key engineering and physics issues for advanced plasma operation. Design and fabrication of JT-60SA components, shared by the EU and Japan, started in 2007. Assembly in the torus hall started in January 2013, and welding work of the vacuum vessel sectors (seven 40° sectors and two 30° sectors) is currently ongoing on the cryostat base. Other components such as TF coils, PF coils, power supplies, cryogenic system, cryostat vessel, thermal shields and so on were or are being delivered to the Naka site for installation, assembly and commissioning. This paper gives technical progress on fabrication, installation and assembly of tokamak components and ancillary systems, as well as progress of the JT-60SA Research Plan being developed jointly by European and Japanese fusion communities.

  12. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Kyu; Pak, H. D.; Kim, K. H. [and others

    2000-05-01

    The fabrication technology of the U{sub 3}Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2} fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 {approx} 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The {gamma}-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U{sub 3}Si{sub 2}. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano

  13. RESEARCH CENTRIFUGE- ADVANCED TOOL SEPERATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mahajan Ashwini; Prof. B.V. Jain; Dr Surajj Sarode

    2015-01-01

    A centrifuge is a critical piece of equipment for the laboratory. Purpose of this study was to study research centrifuge in detail, its applications, uses in different branches and silent features. Their are two types of research centrifuge study here revolutionary research centrifuge and microprocessor research centrifuge. A centrifuge is a device that separates particles from a solution through use of a rotor. In biology, the particles are usually cells, sub cellular organelles, or large mo...

  14. Advancing Microgrid Research at NREL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-04-25

    NREL expanded its microgrid research capabilities at the Energy System Integration Facility (ESIF) with the purchase of a Schweitzer Engineering Laboratories (SEL) microgrid controller, resulting in a more comprehensive microgrid research platform. NREL's microgrid research platform allows manufacturers, utilities, and integrators to develop and evaluate their technology or configuration at full power before implementation - something only possible at a handful of facilities in the world.

  15. Ethiopian Journal of Development Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Ethiopian Journal of Development Research: Advanced Search ... containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; ... Ethiopian Journal of Business and Economics (The), Ethiopian Journal of Development Research ...

  16. Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROMOTING ACCESS TO AFRICAN RESEARCH ... Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research: Advanced Search ... containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., .... and Applied Sciences, Nigerian Journal of Biotechnology, Nigerian Journal of Chemical Research ...

  17. The Fusion Science Research Plan for the Major U.S. Tokamaks. Advisory report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    In summary, the community has developed a research plan for the major tokamak facilities that will produce impressive scientific benefits over the next two years. The plan is well aligned with the new mission and goals of the restructured fusion energy sciences program recommended by FEAC. Budget increases for all three facilities will allow their programs to move forward in FY 1997, increasing their rate of scientific progress. With a shutdown deadline now established, the TFTR will forego all but a few critical upgrades and maximize operation to achieve a set of high-priority scientific objectives with deuterium-tritium plasmas. The DIII-D and Alcator C-Mod facilities will still fall well short of full utilization. Increasing the run time in vii DIII-D is recommended to increase the scientific output using its existing capabilities, even if scheduled upgrades must be further delayed. An increase in the Alcator C-Mod budget is recommended, at the expense of equal and modest reductions (~1%) in the other two facilities if necessary, to develop its capabilities for the long-term and increase its near-term scientific output.

  18. A need for non-tokamak approaches to magnetic fusion energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bathke, C.G.; Krakowski, R.A.; Miller, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Focusing exclusively on conventional tokamak physics in the quest for commercial fusion power is premature, and the options for both advanced-tokamak and non-tokamak concepts need continued investigation. The basis for this claim is developed, and promising advanced-tokamak and non-tokamak options are suggested

  19. Simulations of toroidal Alfvén eigenmode excited by fast ions on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Youbin; Xiang, Nong; Shen, Wei; Hu, Youjun; Todo, Y.; Zhou, Deng; Huang, Juan

    2018-05-01

    Kinetic-MagnetoHydroDynamic (MHD) hybrid simulations are carried out to study fast ion driven toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). The first part of this article presents the linear benchmark between two kinetic-MHD codes, namely MEGA and M3D-K, based on a realistic EAST equilibrium. Parameter scans show that the frequency and the growth rate of the TAE given by the two codes agree with each other. The second part of this article discusses the resonance interaction between the TAE and fast ions simulated by the MEGA code. The results show that the TAE exchanges energy with the co-current passing particles with the parallel velocity |v∥ | ≈VA 0/3 or |v∥ | ≈VA 0/5 , where VA 0 is the Alfvén speed on the magnetic axis. The TAE destabilized by the counter-current passing ions is also analyzed and found to have a much smaller growth rate than the co-current ions driven TAE. One of the reasons for this is found to be that the overlapping region of the TAE spatial location and the counter-current ion orbits is narrow, and thus the wave-particle energy exchange is not efficient.

  20. Experimental investigation of density behaviors in front of the lower hybrid launcher in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Ding, B. J.; Li, M. H.; Kong, E. H.; Wei, W.; Liu, F. K.; Shan, J. F.; Wu, Z. G.; Zhu, L.; Ma, W. D.; Tong, Y. Y.; Li, Y. C.; Wang, M.; Zhao, L. M.; Hu, H. C.; Liu, L.

    2013-01-01

    A triple Langmuir probe is mounted on the top of the Lower Hybrid (LH) antenna to measure the electron density near the LH grills in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. In this work, the LH power density ranges from 2.3 MWm −2 to 10.3 MWm −2 and the rate of puffing gas varies from 1.7 × 10 20 el/s to 14 × 10 20 el/s. The relation between the edge density (from 0.3 × n e-cutoff to 20 × n e-cutoff , where n e-cutoff is the cutoff density, n e-cutoff = 0.74 × 10 17 m −3 for 2.45 GHz lower hybrid current drive) near the LH grill and the LH power reflection coefficients is investigated. The factors, including the gap between the LH grills and the last closed magnetic flux surface, line-averaged density, LH power, edge safety factor, and gas puffing, are analyzed. The experiments show that injection of LH power is beneficial for increasing edge density. Gas puffing is beneficial for increasing grill density but excess gas puffing is unfavorable for coupling and current drive

  1. Effect of Wave Accessibility on Lower Hybrid Wave Current Drive in Experimental Advanced Superconductor Tokamak with H-Mode Operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Xin-Xia; Xiang Nong; Gan Chun-Yun

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the wave accessibility condition on the lower hybrid current drive in the experimental advanced superconductor Tokamak (EAST) plasma with H-mode operation is studied. Based on a simplified model, a mode conversion layer of the lower hybrid wave between the fast wave branch and the slow wave branch is proved to exist in the plasma periphery for typical EAST H-mode parameters. Under the framework of the lower hybrid wave simulation code (LSC), the wave ray trajectory and the associated current drive are calculated numerically. The results show that the wave accessibility condition plays an important role on the lower hybrid current drive in EAST plasma. For wave rays with parallel refractive index n ‖ = 2.1 or n ‖ = 2.5 launched from the outside midplane, the wave rays may penetrate the core plasma due to the toroidal geometry effect, while numerous reflections of the wave ray trajectories in the plasma periphery occur. However, low current drive efficiency is obtained. Meanwhile, the wave accessibility condition is improved if a higher confined magnetic field is applied. The simulation results show that for plasma parameters under present EAST H-mode operation, a significant lower hybrid wave current drive could be obtained for the wave spectrum with peak value n ‖ = 2.1 if a toroidal magnetic field B T = 2.5 T is applied. (paper)

  2. Prediction of density limits in tokamaks: Theory, comparison with experiment, and application to the proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stacey, Weston M.

    2002-01-01

    A framework for the predictive calculation of density limits in future tokamaks is proposed. Theoretical models for different density limit phenomena are summarized, and the requirements for additional models are identified. These theoretical density limit models have been incorporated into a relatively simple, but phenomenologically comprehensive, integrated numerical calculation of the core, edge, and divertor plasmas and of the recycling neutrals, in order to obtain plasma parameters needed for the evaluation of the theoretical models. A comparison of these theoretical predictions with observed density limits in current experiments is summarized. A model for the calculation of edge pedestal parameters, which is needed in order to apply the density limit predictions to future tokamaks, is summarized. An application to predict the proximity to density limits and the edge pedestal parameters of the proposed Fusion Ignition Research Experiment is described

  3. Nontraditional machining processes research advances

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    Nontraditional machining employs processes that remove material by various methods involving thermal, electrical, chemical and mechanical energy or even combinations of these. Nontraditional Machining Processes covers recent research and development in techniques and processes which focus on achieving high accuracies and good surface finishes, parts machined without burrs or residual stresses especially with materials that cannot be machined by conventional methods. With applications to the automotive, aircraft and mould and die industries, Nontraditional Machining Processes explores different aspects and processes through dedicated chapters. The seven chapters explore recent research into a range of topics including laser assisted manufacturing, abrasive water jet milling and hybrid processes. Students and researchers will find the practical examples and new processes useful for both reference and for developing further processes. Industry professionals and materials engineers will also find Nontraditional M...

  4. Introduction condition of a tokamak fusion power plant as an advanced technology in world energy scenario

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiwatari, R.; Tokimatsu, K.; Asaoka, Y.; Okano, K.; Konishi, S.; Ogawa, Y.

    2005-01-01

    The present study reveals the following two introduction conditions of a tokamak fusion power plant in a long term world energy scenario. The first condition is the electric breakeven condition, which is required for the fusion energy to be recognized as a suitable candidate of an alternative energy source in the long term world energy scenario. As for the plasma performance (normalized beta value β N , confinement improvement factor for H-mode HH, the ratio of plasma density to Greenwald density limit fn GW ), the electric breakeven condition requires the simultaneous achievement of 1.2 N GW tmax =16 T, thermal efficiency η e =30%, and current drive power P NBI N ∼1.8, HH∼1.0, and fn GW ∼0.9, which correspond to the ITER reference operation parameters, have a strong potential to achieve the electric breakeven condition. The second condition is the economic breakeven condition, which is required to be selected as an alternative energy source. By using a long term world energy and environment model, the potential of the fusion energy in the long term world energy scenario is being investigated. Under the constraint of 550 ppm CO 2 concentration in the atmosphere, a breakeven price for introduction of the fusion energy in the year 2050 is estimated from 65mill/kWh to 135mill/kWh, which is considered as the economic breakeven condition in the present study. Under the conditions of B tmax =16T, η e =40%, plant availability 60%, and a radial build with/without CS coil, the economic breakeven condition requires β N ∼2.5 for 135mill/kWh of higher breakeven price case and β N ∼6.0 for 65mill/kWh of lower breakeven price case. Finally, the demonstration of steady state operation with β N ∼3.0 in the ITER project leads to the prospect to achieve the upper region of breakeven price in the world energy scenario. (author)

  5. African Research Review: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  6. Research advances in industrial engineering

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book provides discussions and the exchange of information on principles, strategies, models, techniques, methodologies and applications of industrial engineering. It communicates the latest developments and research activity on industrial engineering and is useful for all those interested in the technological challenges in the field.

  7. Advanced Energy Projects FY 1990 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-09-01

    This report serves as a guide to prepare proposals and provides summaries of the research projects active in FY 1990, sponsored by the Office of Basic Energy Sciences Division of Advanced Energy Projects, Department of Energy. (JF)

  8. Bringing Advanced Computational Techniques to Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Julie C

    2012-11-17

    Please find attached our final technical report for the BACTER Institute award. BACTER was created as a graduate and postdoctoral training program for the advancement of computational biology applied to questions of relevance to bioenergy research.

  9. Advancing Research on Undergraduate Science Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Susan Rundell

    2013-01-01

    This special issue of "Journal of Research in Science Teaching" reflects conclusions and recommendations in the "Discipline-Based Education Research" (DBER) report and makes a substantial contribution to advancing the field. Research on undergraduate science learning is currently a loose affiliation of related fields. The…

  10. Advanced Research Reactor Fuel Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C. K.; Park, H. D.; Kim, K. H. (and others)

    2006-04-15

    RERTR program for non-proliferation has propelled to develop high-density U-Mo dispersion fuels, reprocessable and available as nuclear fuel for high performance research reactors in the world. As the centrifugal atomization technology, invented in KAERI, is optimum to fabricate high-density U-Mo fuel powders, it has a great possibility to be applied in commercialization if the atomized fuel shows an acceptable in-reactor performance in irradiation test for qualification. In addition, if rod-type U-Mo dispersion fuel is developed for qualification, it is a great possibility to export the HANARO technology and the U-Mo dispersion fuel to the research reactors supplied in foreign countries in future. In this project, reprocessable rod-type U-Mo test fuel was fabricated, and irradiated in HANARO. New U-Mo fuel to suppress the interaction between U-Mo and Al matrix was designed and evaluated for in-reactor irradiation test. The fabrication process of new U-Mo fuel developed, and the irradiation test fuel was fabricated. In-reactor irradiation data for practical use of U-Mo fuel was collected and evaluated. Application plan of atomized U-Mo powder to the commercialization of U-Mo fuel was investigated.

  11. Research Advance in Smart Metamaterials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Xiang-long

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials, man-made materials, enable us to design our own "atoms", and thereby to create materials with unprecedented effective properties that have not yet been found in nature. Smart metamaterial is one of those that is an intelligent perceptive to the changes from external environments and simultaneously having the capability to respond to thermal and mechanical stimuli. This paper can provide a review on these smart metamaterials in perspective of science, engineering and industrial products. We divide smart metamaterials according to what they are tuning into: optical, mechanical, thermal and coupled smart metamaterials. The rest of two techniques we addressed are modelling/simulation and fabrication/gene engineering. All of these types smart materials presented here are associated with at least five fundamental research: coupled mechanism of multi-physics fields, man-made design for atom/molecular, metamaterials coupled with natural materials, tunability of metamaterials, and mechanism of sensing metamaterials. Therefore, we give a systematic overview of various potential smart metamaterials together with the upcoming challenges in the intriguing and promising research field.

  12. Magnetic confinement experiment -- 1: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1994-01-01

    This report reviews presentations made at the 15th IAEA Conference on Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion on experimental tokamak physics, particularly on advances in core plasma physics, divertor and edge physics, heating and current drive, and tokamak concept optimization

  13. Impact of E × B flow shear on turbulence and resulting power fall-off width in H-mode plasmas in experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Q. Q., E-mail: yangqq@ipp.ac.cn; Zhong, F. C., E-mail: gsxu@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Jia, M. N. [College of Science, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China); Xu, G. S., E-mail: gsxu@ipp.ac.cn, E-mail: fczhong@dhu.edu.cn; Wang, L.; Wang, H. Q.; Chen, R.; Yan, N.; Liu, S. C.; Chen, L.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, J. B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The power fall-off width in the H-mode scrape-off layer (SOL) in tokamaks shows a strong inverse dependence on the plasma current, which was noticed by both previous multi-machine scaling work [T. Eich et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 093031 (2013)] and more recent work [L. Wang et al., Nucl. Fusion 54, 114002 (2014)] on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. To understand the underlying physics, probe measurements of three H-mode discharges with different plasma currents have been studied in this work. The results suggest that a higher plasma current is accompanied by a stronger E×B shear and a shorter radial correlation length of turbulence in the SOL, thus resulting in a narrower power fall-off width. A simple model has also been applied to demonstrate the suppression effect of E×B shear on turbulence in the SOL and shows relatively good agreement with the experimental observations.

  14. Advanced accelerator research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1974-01-01

    Research and development on the Positron-Electron Project (PEP), the electron rings, the superconducting accelerator (ESCAR), and the superconductivity program are reported. Efforts relating to the proposed PEP include work on: (1) the injection system; (2) the rf system; (3) the main-ring bend magnets; (4) the magnet power supplies and controls; (5) alignment; (6) radiation and shielding; (7) the vacuum system; and (8) conventional facilities (utilities, etc.). Experimental and theoretical work continued on the development of suitably intense electron rings as vehicles for the collective acceleration of ions. The most difficult problem was found to be the longitudinal (negative mass) instability. Design work was begun for ESCAR (Experimental Superconducting Accelerating Ring), a small proton synchrotron and storage ring using superconducting magnets, which should aid in the design of future large superconducting facilities. Magnet development was largely directed toward the detailed design of the dipole units. A superconducting beam transport line was installed at the Bevatron. (PMA)

  15. Traditional machining processes research advances

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    This book collects several examples of research in machining processes. Chapter 1 provides information on polycrystalline diamond tool material and its emerging applications. Chapter 2 is dedicated to the analysis of orthogonal cutting experiments using diamond-coated tools with force and temperature measurements. Chapter 3 describes the estimation of cutting forces and tool wear using modified mechanistic models in high performance turning. Chapter 4 contains information on cutting under gas shields for industrial applications. Chapter 5 is dedicated to the machinability of magnesium and its alloys. Chapter 6 provides information on grinding science. Finally, chapter 7 is dedicated to flexible integration of shape and functional modelling of machine tool spindles in a design framework.    

  16. Advanced control scenario of high-performance steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamai, H.; Kurita, G.; Matsukawa, M.; Urata, K.; Sakurai, S.; Tsuchiya, K.; Morioka, A.; Miura, Y.M.; Kizu, K.; Kamada, Y.; Sakasai, A.; Ishida, S.

    2004-01-01

    Plasma control on high-β N steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting modification is discussed. Accessibility to high-β N exceeding the free-boundary limit is investigated with the stabilising wall of reduced-activated ferritic steel and the active feedback control of the in-vessel non-axisymmetric field coils. Taking the merit of superconducting magnet, advanced plasma control for steady-state high performance operation could be expected. (authors)

  17. Survey of Tokamak experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bickerton, R.J.

    1977-01-01

    The survey covers the following topics:- Introduction and history of tokamak research; review of tokamak apparatus, existing and planned; remarks on measurement techniques and their limitations; main results in terms of electron and ion temperatures, plasma density, containment times, etc. Empirical scaling; range of operating densities; impurities, origin, behaviour and control (including divertors); data on fluctuations and instabilities in tokamak plasmas; data on disruptive instabilities; experiments on shaped cross-sections; present experimental evidence on β limits; auxiliary heating; experimental and theoretical problems for the future. (author)

  18. Progress of recent experimental research on the J-TEXT tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, G.; Gentle, K. W.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chen, Z. P.; Yang, Z. J.; Zheng, Wei; Hu, Q. M.; Chen, J.; Rao, B.; Zhong, W. L.; Zhao, K. J.; Gao, L.; Cheng, Z. F.; Zhang, X. Q.; Wang, L.; Jiang, Z. H.; Xu, T.; Zhang, M.; Wang, Z. J.; Ding, Y. H.; Yu, K. X.; Hu, X. W.; Pan, Y.; Huang, H.; the J-TEXT Team

    2017-10-01

    The progress of experimental research over the last two years on the J-TEXT tokamak is reviewed and reported in this paper, including: investigations of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the J-TEXT operation region show that moderate amplitude of applied RMPs either increases the density limit from less than 0.7n G to 0.85n G (n G is the Greenwald density, {{n}\\text{G}}={{I}\\text{p}}/π {{a}2} ) or lowers edge safety factor q a from 2.15 to nearly 2.0; observations of influence of RMPs with a large m/n  =  3/1 dominant component (where m and n are the toroidal and poloidal mode numbers respectively) on electron density indicate electron density first increases (decreases) inside (around/outside) of the 3/1 rational surface, and it is increased globally later together with enhanced edge recycling; investigations of the effect of RMPs on the behavior of runaway electrons/current show that application of RMPs with m/n  =  2/1 dominant component during disruptions can reduce runaway production. Furthermore, its application before the disruption can reduce both the amplitude and the length of runaway current; experimental results in the high-density disruption plasmas confirm that local current shrinkage during a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge can directly terminate the discharge; measurements by a multi-channel Doppler reflectometer show that the quasi-coherent modes in the electron diamagnetic direction occur in the J-TEXT ohmic confinement regime in a large plasma region (r/a ~ 0.3-0.8) with frequency of 30-140 kHz.

  19. Introduction: Recent advances in expertise research.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rikers, Remy; Paas, Fred

    2007-01-01

    During the 55th meeting of the American Educational Research Association (AERA, 2004) in San Diego, a symposium was organized on Recent Advances in Expertise Research. Most papers in this special issue of Applied Cognitive Psychology were presented in this symposium. The aim of this special issue is

  20. Development and integration of a 50 Hz pellet injection system for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Xingjia [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Science Island Branch of Graduate School, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230029 (China); Chen, Yue [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Hu, Jiansheng, E-mail: hujs@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Vinyar, Igor; Lukin, Alexander [PELIN, Saint-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Yuan, Xiaoling; Li, Changzheng; Liu, Haiqing [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • The design of the pumping system fits the operation requirement well not only theoretically but also experimentally. • The data showed that the averaged pellet injection velocity and propellant gas pressure had a relationship submitting to the power function. • The reliability of the injected pellet was mostly around 90% which is higher than the PI-20 system thanks to the improved pumping system and the new pellet fabrication and acceleration system. - Abstract: A 50 Hz pellet injection system, which is designed for edge-localized mode (ELM) control, has been successfully developed and integrated for the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST). Pellet injection is achieved by two separated injection system modules that can be operated independently from 1 to 25 Hz. The nominal injection velocity is 250 m/s with a scatter of ±50 m/s at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. A buffer tank and a two-stage differential pumping system of the pellet injection system was designed to increase hydrogen/deuterium ice quality and eliminate the influence of propellant gas on plasma operation, respectively. The pressure of the buffer tank could be pumped to 1 × 10{sup 2} Pa, and the pressure in the second differential chamber could reach 1 × 10{sup −4} Pa during the experiment. Engineering experiments, which consisted of 50 Hz pellet injection and guiding tube mock-up experiments, were also systematically carried out in a laboratory environment and demonstrated that the pellet injection system can reliably inject pellets at a repetitive frequency of 50 Hz.

  1. Study on lower hybrid current drive efficiency at high density towards long-pulse regimes in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, M. H.; Ding, B. J.; Zhang, J. Z.; Gan, K. F.; Wang, H. Q.; Zhang, L.; Wei, W.; Li, Y. C.; Wu, Z. G.; Ma, W. D.; Jia, H.; Chen, M.; Yang, Y.; Feng, J. Q.; Wang, M.; Xu, H. D.; Shan, J. F.; Liu, F. K.; Peysson, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress on both L- and H-mode long-pulse discharges has been made recently in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) [J. Li et al., Nature Phys. 9, 817 (2013) And B. N. Wan et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 104006 (2013).]. In this paper, LHCD experiments at high density in L-mode plasmas have been investigated in order to explore possible methods of improving current drive (CD) efficiency, thus to extend the operational space in long-pulse and high performance plasma regime. It is observed that the normalized bremsstrahlung emission falls much more steeply than 1/n e-av (line-averaged density) above n e-av  = 2.2 × 10 19  m −3 indicating anomalous loss of CD efficiency. A large broadening of the operating line frequency (f = 2.45 GHz), measured by a radio frequency (RF) probe located outside the EAST vacuum vessel, is generally observed during high density cases, which is found to be one of the physical mechanisms resulting in the unfavorable CD efficiency. Collisional absorption of lower hybrid wave in the scrape off layer (SOL) may be another cause, but this assertion needs more experimental evidence and numerical analysis. It is found that plasmas with strong lithiation can improve CD efficiency largely, which should be benefited from the changes of edge parameters. In addition, several possible methods are proposed to recover good efficiency in future experiments for EAST

  2. Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasma with high density and high radiation loss operation in JT-60U

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.; Asakura, N.; Kubo, H.; Higashijima, S.; Konoshima, S.; Nakano, T.; Oyama, N.; Ide, S.; Fujita, T.; Takizuka, T.; Kamada, Y.; Miura, Y.; Porter, G.D.; Rognlien, T.D.; Rensink, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Compatibility of advanced tokamak plasmas with high density and high radiation loss has been investigated in both reversed shear (RS) plasmas and high β p H-mode plasmas with a weak positive shear on JT-60U. In the RS plasmas, the operation regime is extended to high density above the Greenwald density (n GW ) with high confinement (HH y2 >1) and high radiation loss fraction (f rad >0.9) by tailoring the internal transport barriers (ITBs). High confinement of HH y2 =1.2 is sustained even with 80% radiation from the main plasma enhanced by accumulated metal impurity. The divertor radiation is enhanced by Ne seeding and the ratio of the divertor radiation to the total radiation is increased from 20% without seeding to 40% with Ne seeding. In the high β p H-mode plasmas, high confinement (HH y2 =0.96) is maintained at high density (n-bar e /n GW =0.92) with high radiation loss fraction (f rad ∼1) by utilizing high-field-side pellets and Ar injections. The high n-bar e /n GW is obtained due to a formation of clear density ITB. Strong core-edge parameter linkage is observed, as well as without Ar injection. In this linkage, the pedestal β p , defined as β p ped =p ped /(B p 2 /2μ 0 ) where p ped is the plasma pressure at the pedestal top, is enhanced with the total β p . The radiation profile in the main plasma is peaked due to Ar accumulation inside the ITB and the measured central radiation is ascribed to Ar. The impurity transport analyses indicate that Ar accumulation by a factor of 2 more than the electron, as observed in the high β p H-mode plasma, is acceptable even with peaked density profile in a fusion reactor for impurity seeding. (author)

  3. Advancing Normal Birth: Organizations, Goals, and Research

    OpenAIRE

    Hotelling, Barbara A.; Humenick, Sharron S.

    2005-01-01

    In this column, the support for advancing normal birth is summarized, based on a comparison of the goals of Healthy People 2010, Lamaze International, the Coalition for Improving Maternity Services, and the midwifery model of care. Research abstracts are presented to provide evidence that the midwifery model of care safely and economically advances normal birth. Rates of intervention experienced, as reported in the Listening to Mothers survey, are compared to the forms of care recommended by ...

  4. Physics and safety of advanced research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boening, K.; Hardt, P. von der

    1987-01-01

    Advanced research reactor concepts are presently being developed in order to meet the neutron-based research needs of the nineties. Among these research reactors, which are characterized by an average power density of 1-10 MW per liter, highest priority is now generally given to the 'beam tube reactors'. These provide very high values of the thermal neutron flux (10 14 -10 16 cm -2 s -1 ) in a large volume outside of the reactor core, which can be used for sample irradiations and, in particular, for neutron scattering experiments. The paper first discusses the 'inverse flux trap concept' and the main physical aspects of the design and optimization of beam tube reactors. After that two examples of advanced research reactor projects are described which may be considered as two opposite extremes with respect to the physical optimization principle just mentioned. The present situation concerning cross section libraries and neutronic computer codes is more or less satisfactory. The safety analyses of advanced research reactors can largely be updated from those of current new designs, partially taking advantage of the immense volume of work done for power reactors. The paper indicates a few areas where generic problems for advanced research reactor safety are to be solved. (orig.)

  5. Bibliography of fusion product physics in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hively, L.M.; Sigmar, D.J.

    1989-09-01

    Almost 700 citations have been compiled as the first step in reviewing the recent research on tokamak fusion product effects in tokamaks. The publications are listed alphabetically by the last name of the first author and by subject category

  6. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Schaumburg, Kjeld

    1995-01-01

    An important aspect of molecular engineering is the `property directed' synthesis of large molecules and molecular assemblies. Synthetic expertise has advanced to a state which allows the assembly of supramolecules containing thousands of atoms using a `construction kit' of molecular building blocks. Expansion in the field is driven by the appearance of new building blocks and by an improved understanding of the rules for joining them in the design of nanometer-sized devices. Another aspect is the transition from supramolecules to materials. At present no single molecule (however large) has been demonstrated to function as a device, but this appears to be only a matter of time. In all of this research, which has a strongly multidisciplinary character, both existing and yet to be developed analytical techniques are and will remain indispensable. All this and more is discussed in Molecular Engineering for Advanced Materials, which provides a masterly and up to date summary of one of the most challenging researc...

  7. Status of the tokamak program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, J.

    1981-08-01

    For a specific configuration of magnetic field and plasma to be economically attractive as a commercial source of energy, it must contain a high-pressure plasma in a stable fashion while thermally isolating the plasma from the walls of the containment vessel. The tokamak magnetic configuration is presently the most successful in terms of reaching the considered goals. Tokamaks were developed in the USSR in a program initiated in the mid-1950s. By the early 1970s tokamaks were operating not only in the USSR but also in the U.S., Australia, Europe, and Japan. The advanced state of the tokamak program is indicated by the fact that it is used as a testbed for generic fusion development - for auxiliary heating, diagnostics, materials - as well as for specific tokamak advancement. This has occurred because it is the most economic source of a large, reproducible, hot, dense plasma. The basic tokamak is considered along with tokamak improvements, impurity control, additional heating, particle and power balance in a tokamak, aspects of microscopic transport, and macroscopic stability.

  8. Features and Initial Results of the DIII-D Advanced Tokamak Radiative Divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    R.C. O'Neill; A.S. Bozek; M.E. Friend; C.B. Baxi; E.E. Reis; M.A. Mahdavi; D.G. Nilson; S.L. Allen; W.P. West

    1999-01-01

    The Radiative Divertor Program of DIII-D is in its final phase with the installation of the cryopump and baffle structure (Phase 1B Divertor) in the upper inner radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel at the end of this calendar year. This divertor, in conjunction with the Advanced Divertor and the Phase 1A Divertor, located in the lower and upper outer radius of the DIII-D vacuum vessel respectively, provides pumping for density control of the plasma while minimizing the effects on the core confinement. Each divertor consists of a cryobelium cooling ring and a shielded protective structure. The cryo/helium-cooled pumps of all three diverters exhaust helium from the plasma. The protective shielded structure or baffle structure, in the case of the diverters located at the top of the vacuum vessel, provides baffling of neutral charged particles and minimize the flow of impurities back into the core of the plasma. The baffles, which consist of water-cooled panels that allow for the attachment of tiles of various sizes and shapes, house gas puff systems. The intent of the puffing systems is to inject gas in and around the divertor to minimize the heat flux on specific areas on the divertor and its components. The reduction of the heat flux on the divertor minimizes the impurities that are generated from excess heat on divertor components, specifically tiles. Experiments involving the gas puff systems and the divertor structures have shown the heat flux can be spread over a large area of the divertor, reducing the peak heat flux in specific areas. The three diverters also incorporate a variety of diagnostic tools such as halo current monitors, magnetic probes and thermocouples to monitor certain plasma characteristics as well as determine the effectiveness of the cryopumps and baffle configurations. The diverters were designed to optimize pumping performance and to withstand the electromagnetic loads from both halo currents and toroidal induced currents. Incorporated also

  9. Animal Production Research Advances: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. Animal production research advances is a peer-review journal established expressly to promote the production of all animal species utilized as food. The journal has an international scope and is intended for professionals in animal production and related sciences. We solicit contributions from animal ...

  10. Advanced energy projects FY 1992 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-09-01

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are beyond the scope of ongoing applied research or technology development programs. The Division provides a mechanism for converting basic research findings to applications that eventually could impact the Nation's energy economy. Technical topics include physical, chemical, materials, engineering, and biotechnologies. Projects can involve interdisciplinary approaches to solve energy-related problems. Projects are supported for a finite period of time, which is typically three years. Annual funding levels for projects are usually about $300,000 but can vary from approximately $50,000 to $500,000. It is expected that, following AEP support, each concept will be sufficiently developed and promising to attract further funding from other sources in order to realize its full potential. There were 39 research projects in the Division of Advanced Energy Projects during Fiscal Year 1992 (October 1, 1991 -- September 30, 1992). The abstracts of those projects are provided to introduce the overall program in Advanced Energy Projects. Further information on a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator, who is listed below the project title. Projects completed during FY 1992 are indicated

  11. Coordinating Space Nuclear Research Advancement and Education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bess, John D.; Webb, Jonathon A.; Gross, Brian J.; Craft, Aaron E.

    2009-01-01

    The advancement of space exploration using nuclear science and technology has been a goal sought by many individuals over the years. The quest to enable space nuclear applications has experienced many challenges such as funding restrictions; lack of political, corporate, or public support; and limitations in educational opportunities. The Center for Space Nuclear Research (CSNR) was established at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) with the mission to address the numerous challenges and opportunities relevant to the promotion of space nuclear research and education.1 The CSNR is operated by the Universities Space Research Association and its activities are overseen by a Science Council comprised of various representatives from academic and professional entities with space nuclear experience. Program participants in the CSNR include academic researchers and students, government representatives, and representatives from industrial and corporate entities. Space nuclear educational opportunities have traditionally been limited to various sponsored research projects through government agencies or industrial partners, and dedicated research centers. Centralized research opportunities are vital to the growth and development of space nuclear advancement. Coordinated and focused research plays a key role in developing the future leaders in the space nuclear field. The CSNR strives to synchronize research efforts and provide means to train and educate students with skills to help them excel as leaders.

  12. A fast-time-response extreme ultraviolet spectrometer for measurement of impurity line emissions in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ling; Xu, Zong; Wu, Zhenwei; Zhang, Pengfei; Wu, Chengrui; Gao, Wei; Shen, Junsong; Chen, Yingjie; Liu, Xiang; Wang, Yumin; Gong, Xianzu; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Junlin; Zhang, Xiaodong; Wan, Baonian; Li, Jiangang [Institute of Plasma Physics Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026, Anhui (China); Morita, Shigeru; Ohishi, Tetsutarou; Goto, Motoshi [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Department of Fusion Science, Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan); Dong, Chunfeng [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041, Sichuan (China); and others

    2015-12-15

    A flat-field extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectrometer working in the 20-500 Å wavelength range with fast time response has been newly developed to measure line emissions from highly ionized tungsten in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST) with a tungsten divertor, while the monitoring of light and medium impurities is also an aim in the present development. A flat-field focal plane for spectral image detection is made by a laminar-type varied-line-spacing concave holographic grating with an angle of incidence of 87°. A back-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD) with a total size of 26.6 × 6.6 mm{sup 2} and pixel numbers of 1024 × 255 (26 × 26 μm{sup 2}/pixel) is used for recording the focal image of spectral lines. An excellent spectral resolution of Δλ{sub 0} = 3-4 pixels, where Δλ{sub 0} is defined as full width at the foot position of a spectral line, is obtained at the 80-400 Å wavelength range after careful adjustment of the grating and CCD positions. The high signal readout rate of the CCD can improve the temporal resolution of time-resolved spectra when the CCD is operated in the full vertical binning mode. It is usually operated at 5 ms per frame. If the vertical size of the CCD is reduced with a narrow slit, the time response becomes faster. The high-time response in the spectral measurement therefore makes possible a variety of spectroscopic studies, e.g., impurity behavior in long pulse discharges with edge-localized mode bursts. An absolute intensity calibration of the EUV spectrometer is also carried out with a technique using the EUV bremsstrahlung continuum at 20-150 Å for quantitative data analysis. Thus, the high-time resolution tungsten spectra have been successfully observed with good spectral resolution using the present EUV spectrometer system. Typical tungsten spectra in the EUV wavelength range observed from EAST discharges are presented with absolute intensity and spectral identification.

  13. Using Lean to Advance Quality Improvement Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmore, Christopher Craig; Williams, Barbara L; Ching, Joan M; Chafetz, Lynne A; Kaplan, Gary S

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement research skills are not commonplace among quality improvement practitioners, and research on the effectiveness of quality improvement has not always kept pace with improvement innovation. However, the Lean tools applied to quality improvement should be equally relevant to the advancement of quality improvement research. We applied the Lean methods to develop a simplified quality improvement publication pathway enabling a small research methodology group to increase quality improvement research throughout the institution. The key innovations of the pathway are horizontal integration of the quality improvement research methods group across the institution, implementation of a Lean quality improvement research pathway, and application of a just-in-time quality improvement research toolkit. This work provides a road map and tools for the acceleration of quality improvement research. At our institution, the Lean quality improvement research approach was associated with statistically significant increases in the number (annual mean increase from 3.0 to 8.5, p = .03) and breadth of published quality improvement research articles, and in the number of quality improvement research projects currently in process. Application of Lean methods to the quality improvement research process can aid in increasing publication of quality improvement articles from across the institution.

  14. Aims of advanced photon science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Toyoaki

    2004-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Research Center (APRC) of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute is pursing the research and development of advanced photon sources such as a compact, ultra-short, high intensity laser, x-ray laser, and a superconducting linac-based free electron laser (FEL) and their applications. These compact and high-intensity lasers have various capabilities of producing radiations with distinguishing characteristics of ultra-short pulse, high coherence, etc. Hence, they can provide novel means of research in the field of nuclear energy applications and industrial and medical technologies. It is important for us to promote these researches on these high-intensity laser applications comprehensively and effectively under the collaborations with nationwide universities and industry. From this point of view it is expected that the APRC plays a role as a COE for these researches. Through these research activities for development of high-intensity lasers and their applications, we will develop ''photon science and technology'' as a leading key technology in the 21st century and contribute the development of science and technology including nuclear energy technology and production of new industries. (author)

  15. Advanced energy projects FY 1997 research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-09-01

    The mission of the Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) program is to explore the scientific feasibility of novel energy-related concepts that are high risk, in terms of scientific feasibility, yet have a realistic potential for a high technological payoff. The concepts supported by the AEP are typically at an early stage of scientific development. They often arise from advances in basic research and are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. Some are based on discoveries of new scientific phenomena or involve exploratory ideas that span multiple scientific and technical disciplines which do not fit into an existing DOE program area. In all cases, the objective is to support evaluation of the scientific or technical feasibility of the novel concepts involved. Following AEP support, it is expected that each concept will be sufficiently developed to attract further funding from other sources to realize its full potential. Projects that involve evolutionary research or technology development and demonstration are not supported by AEP. Furthermore, research projects more appropriate for another existing DOE research program are not encouraged. There were 65 projects in the AEP research portfolio during Fiscal Year 1997. Eigheen projects were initiated during that fiscal year. This document consists of short summaries of projects active in FY 1997. Further information of a specific project may be obtained by contacting the principal investigator.

  16. [Research Advances in Cyprinid Herpesvirus 3].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shucheng; Wang, Qing; Li, Yingying; Zeng, Weiwei; Wang, Yingying; Liu, Chun; Liang, Hongru; Shi, Cunbin

    2016-01-01

    Cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (CyHV-3) is the causative agent of an extremely contagious and aggressive disease afflicting common corp Cyprinus carpio L. termed koi herpesvirus disease (KHVD). Since it was first reported in 1997, the virus has spread worldwide rapidly, leading to enormous financial losses in industries based on common carp and koi carp. This review summarizes recent advances in CyHV-3 research on the etiology, epidemiology, pathogenesis, diagnosis, prevention, and control of KHVD.

  17. Medical technology advances from space research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pool, S. L.

    1972-01-01

    Details of medical research and development programs, particularly an integrated medical laboratory, as derived from space technology are given. The program covers digital biotelemetry systems, automatic visual field mapping equipment, sponge electrode caps for clinical electroencephalograms, and advanced respiratory analysis equipment. The possibility of using the medical laboratory in ground based remote areas and regional health care facilities, as well as long duration space missions is discussed.

  18. Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2000-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center. It currently operates under a multiple year grant/cooperative agreement that began on October 1, 1997 and is up for renewal in the year 2002. Ames has been designated NASA's Center of Excellence in Information Technology. In this capacity, Ames is charged with the responsibility to build an Information Technology Research Program that is preeminent within NASA. RIACS serves as a bridge between NASA Ames and the academic community, and RIACS scientists and visitors work in close collaboration with NASA scientists. RIACS has the additional goal of broadening the base of researchers in these areas of importance to the nation's space and aeronautics enterprises. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of information technology research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: (1) Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems. Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth; (2) Human-Centered Computing. Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities; (3) High Performance Computing and Networking. Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to data analysis of large datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply information technology research to a

  19. Advancing research on loyalty programs: a future research agenda

    OpenAIRE

    Breugelmans, Els; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Zhang, Jie; Basso, Leonardo J.; Dorotic, Matilda; Kopalle, Praveen; Minnema, Alec; Mijnlieff, Willem Jan; Wünderlich, Nancy V.

    2015-01-01

    This is the authors’ accepted and refereed manuscript to the article Despite the growing literature on loyalty program (LP) research, many questions remain underexplored. Driven by advancements in information technology, marketing analytics, and consumer interface platforms (e.g., mobile devices), there have been many recent developments in LP practices around the world. They impose new challenges and create exciting opportunities for future LP research. The main objective of this paper is...

  20. Research opportunities to advance solar energy utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Nathan S

    2016-01-22

    Major developments, as well as remaining challenges and the associated research opportunities, are evaluated for three technologically distinct approaches to solar energy utilization: solar electricity, solar thermal, and solar fuels technologies. Much progress has been made, but research opportunities are still present for all approaches. Both evolutionary and revolutionary technology development, involving foundational research, applied research, learning by doing, demonstration projects, and deployment at scale will be needed to continue this technology-innovation ecosystem. Most of the approaches still offer the potential to provide much higher efficiencies, much lower costs, improved scalability, and new functionality, relative to the embodiments of solar energy-conversion systems that have been developed to date. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  1. UZIG USGS research: Advances through interdisciplinary interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, J.R.; Andraski, Brian J.; Rafael, M.-C.

    2009-01-01

    BBecause vadose zone research relates to diverse disciplines, applications, and modes of research, collaboration across traditional operational and topical divisions is especially likely to yield major advances in understanding. The Unsaturated Zone Interest Group (UZIG) is an informal organization sponsored by the USGS to encourage and support interdisciplinary collaboration in vadose or unsaturated zone hydrologic research across organizational boundaries. It includes both USGS and non-USGS scientists. Formed in 1987, the UZIG operates to promote communication, especially through periodic meetings with presentations, discussions, and field trips. The 10th meeting of the UZIG at Los Alamos, NM, in August 2007 was jointly sponsored by the USGS and Los Alamos National Laboratory. Presentations at this meeting served as the initial basis for selecting papers for this special section of Vadose Zone Journal, the purpose of which is to present noteworthy cutting-edge unsaturated zone research promoted by, facilitated by, or presented in connection with the UZIG.

  2. Advanced energy projects FY 1994 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-09-01

    The Division of Advanced Energy Projects (AEP) provides support to explore the feasibility of novel, energy-related concepts that evolve from advances in basic research. These concepts are typically at an early stage of scientific definition and, therefore, are premature for consideration by applied research or technology development programs. The AEP also supports high-risk, exploratory concepts that do not readily fit into a program area but could have several applications that may span scientific disciplines or technical areas. Projects supported by the Division arise from unsolicited ideas and concepts submitted by researchers. The portfolio of projects is dynamic and reflects the broad role of the Department in supporting research and development for improving the Nation's energy outlook. FY 1994 projects include the following topical areas: novel materials for energy technology; renewable and biodegradable materials; exploring uses of new scientific discoveries; alternate pathways to energy efficiency; alternative energy sources; and innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction. Summaries are given for 66 projects

  3. Advanced energy projects: FY 1987 research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-09-01

    This report contains brief summaries of all projects active in the Division of Advanced Energy Projects during Fiscal Year 1987 (October 1, 1986-September 30, 1987). The intent of this compilation is to provide a convenient means for quickly acquainting an interested reader with the program in Advanced Energy Projects. More detailed information on research activities in a particular project may be obtained by contacting directly the principal investigator. Some projects will have reached the end of their contract periods by the time this book appears, and will, therefore, no longer be active. Those cases in which work was completed in FY '87 are indicated by the footnote: Project completed. The annual funding level of each project is shown

  4. Enhancement of confinement in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1986-01-01

    The analysis begins by identifying a hypothetical model of tokamak confinement that is designed to take into account the conflict between Tsub(e)(r)-profile shapes arising from microscopic transport and J(r)-profile shapes required for gross stability. On the basis of this model, a number of hypothetical lines of advance are developed. Some TFTR experiments that may point the way to a particularly attractive type of tokamak reactor regime are discussed. (author)

  5. [Advances in genetic research of cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fang-Fang; Luo, Rong; Qu, Yi; Mu, De-Zhi

    2017-09-01

    Cerebral palsy is a group of syndromes caused by non-progressive brain injury in the fetus or infant and can cause disabilities in childhood. Etiology of cerebral palsy has always been a hot topic for clinical scientists. More and more studies have shown that genetic factors are closely associated with the development of cerebral palsy. With the development and application of various molecular and biological techniques such as chromosome microarray analysis, genome-wide association study, and whole exome sequencing, new achievements have been made in the genetic research of cerebral palsy. Chromosome abnormalities, copy number variations, susceptibility genes, and single gene mutation associated with the development of cerebral palsy have been identified, which provides new opportunities for the research on the pathogenesis of cerebral palsy. This article reviews the advances in the genetic research on cerebral palsy in recent years.

  6. Texas Experimental Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootton, A.J.

    1993-04-01

    This progress report covers the period from November 1, 1990 to April 30, 1993. During that period, TEXT was operated as a circular tokamak with a material limiter. It was devoted to the study of basic plasma physics, in particular to study of fluctuations, turbulence, and transport. The purpose is to operate and maintain TEXT Upgrade as a complete facility for applied tokamak physics, specifically to conduct a research program under the following main headings: (1) to elucidate the mechanisms of working gas, impurity, and thermal transport in tokamaks, in particular to understand the role of turbulence; (2) to study physics of the edge plasma, in particular the turbulence; (3) to study the physics or resonant magnetic fields (ergodic magnetic divertors, intra island pumping); and (4) to study the physics of electron cyclotron heating (ECRH). Results of studies in each of these areas are reported

  7. Geysers advanced direct contact condenser research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henderson, J.; Bahning, T.; Bharathan, D.

    1997-12-31

    The first geothermal application of the Advanced Direct Contact Condenser (ADCC) technology developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is now operational and is being tested at The Geysers Power Plant Unit 11. This major research effort is being supported through the combined efforts of NREL, The Department of Energy (DOE), and Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E). NREL and PG&E have entered into a Cooperative Research And Development Agreement (CRADA) for a project to improve the direct-contact condenser performance at The Geysers Power Plant. This project is the first geothermal adaptation of an advanced condenser design developed for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems. PG&E expects this technology to improve power plant performance and to help extend the life of the steam field by using steam more efficiently. In accordance with the CRADA, no money is transferred between the contracting parties. In this case the Department of Energy is funding NREL for their efforts in this project and PG&E is contributing funds in kind. Successful application of this technology at The Geysers will provide a basis for NREL to continue to develop this technology for other geothermal and fossil power plant systems.

  8. ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steiner, D.; Embrechts, M.

    1990-07-01

    This is a status report on technical progress relative to the tasks identified for the fifth year of Grant No. FG02-85-ER52118. The ARIES tokamak reactor study is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of the tokamak as an attractive fusion reactor with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The ARIES study is being coordinated by UCLA and involves a number of institutions, including RPI. The RPI group has been pursuing the following areas of research in the context of the ARIES-I design effort: MHD equilibrium and stability analyses; plasma-edge modeling and blanket materials issues. Progress in these areas is summarized herein

  9. HT-7U superconducting tokamak: Physics design, engineering progress and schedule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Yuanxi

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting tokamak research program begun in China in ASIPP since 1994. The program is included in existent superconducting tokamak HT-7 and the next new superconducting tokamak HT-7U which is one of national key research projects in China. With the elongation cross-section, divertor and higher plasma parameter the main objectives of HT-7U are widely investigation both of the physics and technology for steady state advanced tokamak as well as the investigation of power and particle handle under steady-state operation condition. The physics and engineering design have been completed and significant progresses on R and D and fabrication have been achieved. HT-7U will begin assembly at 2003 and possible to get first plasma around 2004. (author)

  10. Annual report of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and the Division of Large Tokamak Development for the period of April 1, 1977 to March 31, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    Research and development works in fiscal year 1977 of the Division of Thermonuclear Fusion Research and the Division of Large Tokamak Development are described. 1) Theoretical studies on tokamak confinement have continued with more emphasis on computations. A task was started of developing a computer code system for mhd behavior of tokamak plasmas. 2) Experimental studies of lower hybrid heating up to 140 kW were made in JFT-2. The ion temperature was increased by 50% -- 60% near the plasma center. Plasma-wall interactions (particle and thermal fluxes to the wall, and titanium gettering) were studied. In JFT-2a (DIVA) ion sputtering, arcing and evaporation were identified, and the impurity ion sputtering was found to be a dominant origin of metal impurities in the present tokamaks. High temperature and high-density plasma divertor actions were demonstrated; i.e. the divertor decreases the radiation power loss by a factor of 3 and increases the energy confinement time by a factor of 2.5. Various diagnostic instruments operated sufficiently to provide useful information for the research with JFT-2 and JFT-2a(DIVA). 3) JFT-2 and JFT-2a(DIVA) operated as scheduled. Technological improvements were made such as titanium coating of the chamber wall, discharge cleaning and pre-ionization. 4) Detailed design of the prototype JT-60 neutral beam injector was made. A 200 kW, 650 MHz radiofrequency heating system for JFT-2 was completed; a lower hybrid heating experiment in JFT-2 was successful 5) In particle-surface interactions, the sputtering and surface erosion were studied. 6) Improvement designs of a superconducting cluster test facility and a test module coil were made in the toroidal coil development. 7) Second preliminary design of the tokamak experimental fusion reactor JXFR started in April 1977. Safety analyses were made of the main components and system of JXFR on the basis of the first preliminary design. (J.P.N.)

  11. Advancing LGBTQI2 rights in developing countries through research ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2018-05-10

    May 10, 2018 ... Advancing LGBTQI2 rights in developing countries through research ... the role of research in advancing the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, ... cities were discussed at ADAPTO's second international workshop.

  12. The design of the KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, G.S.; Kim, J.; Hwang, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    The Korea superconducting tokamak advanced research (KSTAR) project is the major effort of the Korean national fusion program (KNFP) to develop a steady-state-capable advanced superconducting tokamak to establish a scientific and technological basis for an attractive fusion reactor. Major parameters of the tokamak are: major radius 1.8 m, minor radius 0.5 m, toroidal field 3.5 Tesla, and plasma current 2 MA with a strongly shaped plasma cross-section and double-null divertor. The initial pulse length provided by the poloidal magnet system is 20 s, but the pulse length can be increased to 300 s through non-inductive current drive. The plasma heating and current drive system consists of neutral beam, ion cyclotron waves, lower hybrid waves, and electron-cyclotron waves for flexible profile control. A comprehensive set of diagnostics is planned for plasma control and performance evaluation and physics understanding. The project has completed its conceptual design phase and moved to the engineering design phase. The target date of the first plasma is set for year 2002. (orig.)

  13. New directions in tokamak reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    New directions for tokamak research are briefly mentioned. Some of the areas for new considerations are the following: reactor size, beta ratio, current drivers, blankets, impurity control, and modular designs

  14. New advances in gastrointestinal motility research

    CERN Document Server

    Pullan, A; Farrugia, G

    2013-01-01

    Research into gastrointestinal motility has received renewed interest in part due to recent advances in the techniques for measuring the structure and function of gastrointestinal cells, tissue and organs. The integration of this wealth of data into biophysically based computation models can aid in interpretation of experimental and clinical measurements and the refinement of measurement techniques. The contents of this book span multiple scales - from cell, tissue, organ, to whole body and is divided into four broad sections covering: i) gastrointestinal cellular activity and tissue structure; (ii) techniques for measuring, analyzing and visualizing high-resolution extra-cellular recordings; (iii) methods for sensing gastroelectrical activity using non-invasive bio-electro-magnetic fields and for modulating the underlying gastric electrical activity, and finally; (iv) methods for assessing manometric and videographic motility patterns and the application of these data for predicting the flow and mixing behav...

  15. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Barbosa, L.F.W.; Patire Junior, H.; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  16. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma] (and others)

    2003-07-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  17. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, G.O.; Del Bosco, E.; Ferreira, J.G.; Berni, L.A.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Ueda, M.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma; Barbosa, L.F.W. [Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UNIVAP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Div. de Mecanica Espacial e Controle; The high-power microwave sources group

    2003-12-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experimento Tokamak Esferico) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  18. Spherical tokamak development in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Bosco, Edson Del; Ferreira, Julio Guimaraes

    2003-01-01

    The general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief view of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide are described. The paper presents also the steps in the development of the ETE (Experiment Tokamak spheric) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of December, 2002 a the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  19. Economic evaluation of tokamak power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1977-01-01

    This study reports the impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  20. Experimental and modeling researches of dust particles in the HL-2A tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhi-Hui; Yan, Long-Wen; Tomita, Yukihiro; Feng, Zhen; Cheng, Jun; Hong, Wen-Yu; Pan, Yu-Dong; Yang, Qing-Wei; Duan, Xu-Ru

    2015-02-01

    The investigation of dust particle characteristics in fusion devices has become more and more imperative. In the HL-2A tokamak, the morphologies and compositions of dust particles are analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDX) with mapping. The results indicate that the sizes of dust particles are in a range from 1 μm to 1 mm. Surprisingly, stainless steel spheres with a diameter of 2.5 μm-30 μm are obtained. The production mechanisms of dust particles include flaking, disintegration, agglomeration, and arcing. In addition, dynamic characteristics of the flaking dust particles are observed by a CMOS fast framing camera and simulated by a computer program. Both of the results display that the ion friction force is dominant in the toroidal direction, while the centrifugal force is crucial in the radial direction. Therefore, the visible dust particles are accelerated toriodally by the ion friction force and migrated radially by the centrifugal force. The averaged velocity of the grain is on the order of ˜ 100 m/s. These results provide an additional supplement for one of critical plasma-wall interaction (PWI) issues in the framework of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) programme. Project supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Grant Nos. 2014GB107000 and 2013GB112008), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11320101005, 11175060, 11375054, and 11075046), and the China-Korean Joint Foundation (Grant No. 2012DFG02230).

  1. Advances in research on Zika virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Amjad Ali; Braira Wahid; Shazia Rafique; Muhammad Idrees

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is rapidly spreading across the America and its devastating outcomes for pregnant women and infants have driven this previously ignored pathogen into the limelight. Clinical manifestations are fever, joint pain or rash and conjunctivitis. Emergence of ZIKV started with a first outbreak in the Pacific area in 2007, a second large outbreak occurred in the Pacific in 2013/2014 and subsequently the virus spread in other Pacific islands. Threat of explosive global pandemic and severe clinical complications linked with the more immediate and recurrent epidemics necessitate the development of an effective vaccine. Several vaccine platforms such as DNA vaccine, recombinant subunit vaccine, ZIKV purified inactivated vaccine, and chimeric vaccines have shown potent efficacyin vitro andin vivo trials. Moreover, number of drugs such as Sofosbuvir, BCX4450, NITD008 and 7-DMA are ready to enter phase I clinical trial because of proven anti-ZIKV activity. Monoclonal based antibodies offer promise as an intervention effective for use in pregnant women. In this review, we describe the advances in research on ZIKV such as research strategies for the development of antiviral drugs & vaccines, molecular evolution, epidemiology emergence, neurological complications and other teratogenic outcomes as well as pathogenesis.

  2. Advances in Functionalized Materials Research 2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Predoi, D.; Motelica-Heino, M.; Guegan, R.; Coustumer, L.Ph.

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, due to the rapid progress of technology, new materials at nano metric scale with special properties have become a flourishing field of research in materials science. The unique physicochemical properties of materials induced by various parameters such as mean size, shape, purity, crystallographic structure, and surface can generate effective solutions to challenging environmental and biomedical problems. As a result of this approach a large number of techniques were developed that enable obtaining novel materials at nano metric scale with specific and reproducible properties and parameters. Below will be highlighted studies on promising properties on the applicability of new materials that could lead to innovative applications in the medical field. Therefore, this special issue is focused on expected advances in the area of functionalized materials at nano metric scale. Due to multidisciplinarity of this topic, this special issue is comprised of a wide range of original research articles as well as review papers on the design and synthesis of functionalized nano materials, their structural, morphological, and biological characterization, and their potential uses in medical and environmental applications

  3. Comparison of particle confinement in the high confinement mode plasmas with the edge localized mode of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade and the DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaga, H.; Mahdavi, M.A.; Baker, D.R.

    2001-01-01

    Particle confinement was compared for the high confinement mode plasmas with the edge localized mode in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60 Upgrade (JT-60U) [S. Ishida, JT-60 Team, Nucl. Fusion 39, 1211 (1999)] and the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon et al., Plasma Physics and Controlled Nuclear Fusion Research 1986 (International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna, 1987), Vol. 1, p. 159] considering separate confinement times for particles supplied by neutral beam injection (NBI) (center fueling) and by recycling and gas-puffing (edge fueling). Similar dependence on the NBI power was obtained in JT-60U and DIII-D. The particle confinement time for center fueling in DIII-D was smaller by a factor of 4 in the low density discharges and by a factor of 1.8 in the high density discharges than JT-60U scaling, respectively, suggesting the stronger dependence on the density in DIII-D. The particle confinement time for edge fueling in DIII-D was comparable with JT-60U scaling in the low density discharges. However, it decreased to a much smaller value in the high density discharges

  4. Research on CDA for advanced fuel FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirano, Go; Hirakawa, Naohiro; Kawada, Ken-ichi; Niwa, Hazime.

    1997-03-01

    For the purpose of evaluating possibility of the re-criticality of a metallic fueled reactor, Tohoku university and Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation have made a joint research entitled 'Research on CDA for advanced fuel FBR'. The results of this year are the following. The accident initiator considered is a loss-of-flow accident with ATWS. The LOF analysis was performed for the metallic fueled 600 MWe homogeneous two region reactors, both for a metallic fuel only and for a metallic fuel core with ZrH pin. The SAS3D CDA initiation phase analysis code was used to investigate the re-criticality potential at the severe accident. The change mainly in the constants was necessary to apply the code for the analysis of a metallic fueled reactor. These changes were made by assuming appropriate models. LOF with flow decay half time of t 1/2 =0.5(s) (all blackout case) and 5.5(s) (ordinary LOF case) were analyzed. Independent of the conditions of the analysis, the results show all the cases could avoid to become prompt-critical. Depending on the analysis condition, it becomes necessary to transfer to the transient phase, it is also shown there is a possibility to avoid re-criticality due to the motion of molten fuel both for the metallic fuel and for the metallic fuel with ZrH moderator. However, because of the constants used for the material property the results might overestimate the fuel motion. It is shown that the moderator is effective to terminate the accident at an early stage. The behavior of metallic fueled reactors at CDA was analyzed with SAS3D code by modifying the constants of material properties to be applied to the reactor. It is shown that a metallic fueled reactor has a possibility to avoid re-criticality at CDA. (J.P.N.)

  5. The life test of a DC circuit breaker of tokamak device JT-60 for a nuclear fusion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Ryuichi; Tani, Keiji; Kishimoto, Hiroshi; Tamura, Sanae; Yanabu, Satoru.

    1979-01-01

    In the Tokamak devices for nuclear fusion research, the construction of the current transformer circuits having plasma as the secondary circuit and the change of the primary circuit current are necessary for generating current in the plasma. This is considered to be fairly difficult in practice if conventional methods using capacitor discharge and iron core coils are employed. Considering such circumstances, it was decided for JT-60 to use an air-core current transformer coil and to employ the method of storing energy in the form of current in the coil inductance instead of a capacitor. For this reason, a DC circuit breaker is required to interrupt coil current. The authors improved an AV vacuum breaker, which had been developed as the vacuum breaker of longitudinal magnetic field type applying a magnetic field in parallel with an arc, to get the one for DC circuit for the purpose of applying it to JT-60. In this paper, the operational characteristic of the DC breaker is described, the construction and function of the life test circuit is explained, and the test results are reported. Finally, interruptions of 10,000 times at 20 kA were carried out. It is successful that the restrike of arc occurring during tens of milli-seconds after interruptions was improved to 0.05% or less for 10,000 times operations. Further, it was found that the generation of arc restrike can be reduced practically to zero with two breakers in series. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Thermal analysis of a coaxial helium panel of a cryogenic vacuum pump for advanced divertor of DIII-D tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Langhorn, A.; Schaubel, K.; Smith, J.

    1991-08-01

    It is planned to install a 50,000 1/s cryogenic pump for particle removal in the D3-D tokamak. A critical component of this cryogenic pump will be a helium panel which has to be maintained at a liquid helium temperature. The outer surface area of the helium panel has an area of 1 m 2 and consists of a 2.5 cm diameter, 10 m long tube. From design considerations, a coaxial geometry is preferable since it requires a minimum number of welds. However, the coaxial geometry also results in a counter flow heat exchanger arrangement, where the outgoing warm fluid will exchange heat with incoming cold fluid. This is of concern since the helium panel must be cooled from liquid nitrogen temperature to liquid helium temperature in less than 5 minutes for successful operation of the cryogenic pump. In order to analyze the thermal performance of the coaxial helium panel, a finite difference computer model of the geometry was prepared. The governing equations took into account axial as well as radial conduction through the tube walls. The variation of thermal properties was modeled. The results of the analysis showed that although the coaxial geometry behaves like a counter flow heat exchanger, within the operating range of the cryogenic pump a rapid cooldown of the helium panel from liquid nitrogen temperature to the operating temperature is feasible. A prototypical experiment was also performed at General Atomics (GA) which verified the concept and the analysis. 4 refs., 8 figs

  7. Advances in measurement and modeling of the high-confinement-mode pedestal on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.W.; LaBombard, B.; Mossessian, D.A.; Hubbard, A.E.; Terry, J.; Biewer, T.

    2006-01-01

    Edge transport barrier (ETB) studies on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak [Phys. Plasmas 1, 1511 (1994)] investigate pedestal scalings and the radial transport of plasma and neutrals. Pedestal profiles show trends with plasma operational parameters such as total current I P . A ballooning-like I P 2 dependence is seen in the pressure gradient, despite calculated stability to ideal ballooning modes. A similar scaling is seen in the near scrape-off layer for both low-confinement (L-mode) and H-mode discharges, possibly due to electromagnetic fluid drift turbulence setting transport near the separatrix. Neutral density diagnosis allows an examination of D 0 fueling in H-modes, yielding profiles of effective particle diffusivity in the ETB, which vary as I P is changed. Edge neutral transport is studied using a one-dimensional kinetic treatment. In both experiment and modeling, the C-Mod density pedestal exhibits a weakly increasing pedestal density and a nearly invariant density pedestal width as the D 0 source rate increases. Identical modeling performed on pedestal profiles typical of DIII-D [Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] reveal differences in pedestal scalings qualitatively similar to experimental results

  8. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-12

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development.

  9. The Texas Experimental Tokamak: A plasma research facility. A proposal submitted to the Department of Energy in response to Program Notice 95-10: Innovations in toroidal magnetic confinement systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    The Fusion Research Center (FRC) at the University Texas will operate the tokamak TEXT-U and its associated systems for experimental research in basic plasma physics. While the tokamak is not innovative, the research program, diagnostics and planned experiments are. The fusion community will reap the benefits of the success in completing the upgrades (auxiliary heating, divertor, diagnostics, wall conditioning), developing diverted discharges in both double and single null configurations, exploring improved confinement regimes including a limiter H-mode, and developing unique, critical turbulence diagnostics. With these new regimes, the authors are poised to perform the sort of turbulence and transport studies for which the TEXT group has distinguished itself and for which the upgrade was intended. TEXT-U is also a facility for collaborators to perform innovative experiments and develop diagnostics before transferring them to larger machines. The general philosophy is that the understanding of plasma physics must be part of any intelligent fusion program, and that basic experimental research is the most important part of any such program. The emphasis of the proposed research is to provide well-documented plasmas which will be used to suggest and evaluate theories, to explore control techniques, to develop advanced diagnostics and analysis techniques, and to extend current drive techniques. Up to 1 MW of electron cyclotron heating (ECH) will be used not only for heating but as a localized, perturbative tool. Areas of proposed research are: (1) core turbulence and transport; (2) edge turbulence and transport; (3) turbulence analysis; (4) improved confinement; (5) ECH physics; (6) Alfven wave current drive; and (7) diagnostic development

  10. Advanced research workshop: nuclear materials safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jardine, L J; Moshkov, M M.

    1999-01-01

    The Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on Nuclear Materials Safety held June 8-10, 1998, in St. Petersburg, Russia, was attended by 27 Russian experts from 14 different Russian organizations, seven European experts from six different organizations, and 14 U.S. experts from seven different organizations. The ARW was conducted at the State Education Center (SEC), a former Minatom nuclear training center in St. Petersburg. Thirty-three technical presentations were made using simultaneous translations. These presentations are reprinted in this volume as a formal ARW Proceedings in the NATO Science Series. The representative technical papers contained here cover nuclear material safety topics on the storage and disposition of excess plutonium and high enriched uranium (HEU) fissile materials, including vitrification, mixed oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication, plutonium ceramics, reprocessing, geologic disposal, transportation, and Russian regulatory processes. This ARW completed discussions by experts of the nuclear materials safety topics that were not covered in the previous, companion ARW on Nuclear Materials Safety held in Amarillo, Texas, in March 1997. These two workshops, when viewed together as a set, have addressed most nuclear material aspects of the storage and disposition operations required for excess HEU and plutonium. As a result, specific experts in nuclear materials safety have been identified, know each other from their participation in t he two ARW interactions, and have developed a partial consensus and dialogue on the most urgent nuclear materials safety topics to be addressed in a formal bilateral program on t he subject. A strong basis now exists for maintaining and developing a continuing dialogue between Russian, European, and U.S. experts in nuclear materials safety that will improve the safety of future nuclear materials operations in all the countries involved because of t he positive synergistic effects of focusing these diverse backgrounds of

  11. Advanced scenarios for ITER operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sips, A.C.C. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    In thermonuclear fusion research using magnetic confinement, the tokamak is the leading candidate for achieving conditions required for a reactor. An international experiment, ITER is proposed as the next essential and critical step on the path to demonstrating the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion energy. ITER is to produce and study plasmas dominated by self heating. This would give unique opportunities to explore, in reactor relevant conditions, the physics of {alpha}-particle heating, plasma turbulence and turbulent transport, stability limits to the plasma pressure and exhaust of power and particles. Important new results obtained in experiments, theory and modelling, enable an improved understanding of the physical processes occurring in tokamak plasmas and give enhanced confidence in ITER achieving its goals. In particular, progress has been made in research to raise the performance of tokamaks, aimed to extend the discharge pulse length towards steady-state operation (advanced scenarios). Standard tokamak discharges have a current density increasing monotonically towards the centre of the plasma. Advanced scenarios on the other hand use a modified current density profile. Different advanced scenarios range from (i) plasmas that sustain a central region with a flat current density profile (zero magnetic shear), capable of operating stationary at high plasma pressure, to (ii) discharges with an off axis maximum of the current density profile (reversed magnetic shear in the core), able to form internal transport barriers, to increase the confinement of the plasma. The physics of advanced tokamak discharges is described, together with an overview of recent results from different tokamak experiments. International collaboration between experiments aims to provide a better understanding, control and optimisation of these plasmas. The ability to explore advanced scenarios in ITER is very desirable, in order to verify the result obtained in

  12. DIII-D research operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Haye, R.J.

    1994-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. In doing so, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R ampersand D outputs to aid the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY93 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics. The major goals of the Divertor and Boundary Physics studies are the control of impurities, efficient heat removal and understanding the strong role that the edge plasma plays in the global energy confinement of the plasma. The advanced tokamak studies initiated the investigation into new techniques for improving energy confinement, controlling particle fueling and increasing plasma beta. The major goal of the Tokamak Physics Studies is the understanding of energy and particle transport in a reactor relevant plasma

  13. L to H mode transitions and associated phenomena in divertor tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Punjabi, A.

    1990-09-01

    This is the final report for the research project titled ''L to H Mode Transitions and Associated Phenomena in Divertor Tokamaks.'' The period covered by this project is the fiscal year 1990. This report covers the development of Advanced Two Chamber Model

  14. Mode Conversion of High-Field-Side-Launched Fast Waves at the Second Harmonic of Minority Hydrogen in Advanced Tokamak Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sund, R.; Scharer, J.

    2003-01-01

    Under advanced tokamak reactor conditions, the Ion-Bernstein wave (IBW) can be generated by mode conversion of a fast magnetosonic wave incident from the high-field side on the second harmonic resonance of a minority hydrogen component, with near 100% efficiency. IBWs have the recognized capacity to create internal transport barriers through sheared plasma flows resulting from ion absorption. The relatively high frequency (around 200 MHz) minimizes parasitic electron absorption and permits the converted IBW to approach the 5th tritium harmonic. It also facilitates compact antennas and feeds, and efficient fast wave launch. The scheme is applicable to reactors with aspect ratios < 3 such that the conversion and absorption layers are both on the high field side of the magnetic axis. Large machine size and adequate separation of the mode conversion layer from the magnetic axis minimize poloidal field effects in the conversion zone and permit a 1-D full-wave analysis. 2-D ray tracing of the IBW indicates a slightly bean-shaped equilibrium allows access to the tritium resonance

  15. How Symmetrical Assumptions Advance Strategic Management Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foss, Nicolai Juul; Hallberg, Hallberg

    2014-01-01

    We develop the case for symmetrical assumptions in strategic management theory. Assumptional symmetry obtains when assumptions made about certain actors and their interactions in one of the application domains of a theory are also made about this set of actors and their interactions in other...... application domains of the theory. We argue that assumptional symmetry leads to theoretical advancement by promoting the development of theory with greater falsifiability and stronger ontological grounding. Thus, strategic management theory may be advanced by systematically searching for asymmetrical...

  16. Next Steps: Water Technology Advances (Research)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This project will focus on contaminants and their impact on health, adequate removal of contaminants from various water systems, and water and resource recovery within treatment systems. It will develop the next generation of technological advances to provide guidance in support ...

  17. Proceedings of the 6th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-06-01

    The 6th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at JAERI-Kansai in Kyoto on November 4-5, 2004. The symposium has been held once a year since 1999, to promote the advanced photon research through speeches, information exchanges, discussion by researchers on the front line of advanced photon research in Japan and abroad, not only reports of latest research results and plans at Advanced Photon Research Center. The numbers of speeches were 16, including 5 invited speeches, and the numbers of poster presentations were 56, including the report of presentations and cooperative research and joint research performed in FY2003. The 56 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. Proceedings of the first symposium on advanced photon research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    This report consists of 76 contributed papers of the First Symposium on Advanced Photon Research, which was held at Keihanna Plaza and JAERI Advanced Photon Research Center in Kyoto on November 8-9, 1999. The numbers of oral presentations including a special invited talk and poster presentations were 14 and 68, respectively. (J.P.N.)

  19. Proceedings of the fourth symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2003-07-01

    This report consists of 67 contributed papers of the Fourth Symposium on Advanced Photon Research, which was held at JAERI Advanced Photon Research Center in Kyoto on November 28-29, 2002. The numbers of speeches were 14, including 5 invited speeches, and the numbers of poster presentations were 62, including FY 2001 joint research and cooperative research presentations. The 66 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Computational studies of tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takizuka, Tomonori; Tsunematsu, Toshihide; Tokuda, Shinji

    1981-02-01

    Computational studies of tokamak plasmas are extensively advanced. Many computational codes have been developed by using several kinds of models, i.e., the finite element formulation of MHD equations, the time dependent multidimensional fluid model, and the particle model with the Monte-Carlo method. These codes are applied to the analyses of the equilibrium of an axisymmetric toroidal plasma (SELENE), the time evolution of the high-beta tokamak plasma (APOLLO), the low-n MHD stability (ERATO-J) and high-n ballooning mode stability (BOREAS) in the INTOR tokamak, the nonlinear MHD stability, such as the positional instability (AEOLUS-P), resistive internal mode (AEOLUS-I) etc., and the divertor functions. (author)

  1. Participatory action research advances climate change adaptation ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2012-05-01

    May 1, 2012 ... The Application of Participatory Action Research to Climate Change Adaptation in ... Soil fertility management · A series of country case studies ... to 2012 as a joint initiative of Canada's International Development Research ...

  2. Research | Integral geometry and advanced stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sabrina Tang; Plessis, Andrew du

    2015-01-01

    This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2014.......This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2014....

  3. Research | Integral geometry and advanced stereology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Sabrina Tang; Plessis, Andrew du

    2014-01-01

    This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2013.......This contribution to the journal CSGB annual report summarises my research on topology and digital image analysis until 2013....

  4. Advanced Radioisotope Power Systems Segmented Thermoelectric Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caillat, Thierry

    2004-01-01

    Flight times are long; - Need power systems with >15 years life. Mass is at an absolute premium; - Need power systems with high specific power and scalability. 3 orders of magnitude reduction in solar irradiance from Earth to Pluto. Nuclear power sources preferable. The Overall objective is to develop low mass, high efficiency, low-cost Advanced Radioisotope Power System with double the Specific Power and Efficiency over state-of-the-art Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs).

  5. Research overview: Advanced Manufacturing in Switzerland

    OpenAIRE

    Schärer, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    SATW is convinced that industrial production methods will see fundamental changes over the coming years. Mastering new production technologies (advanced manufacturing) such as additive manufacturing and industry 4.0 will be vital to keep Swiss production at a competitive level. New additive manufacturing processes such as 3D printing offer revolutionary opportunities and have the potential to replace traditional production methods. Industry 4.0 has seen the definition of a new concept for...

  6. Advanced Pediatric Brain Imaging Research Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    pediatric magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of brain injury, its potential for recovery, and...training program, advanced MRI , brain injury. 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE...is located at www.MilitaryMedED.com. The site can be accessed from any device web browser (personal computer, tablet or phone) and operating system

  7. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    TPX is a national project involving a large number of US fusion laboratories, universities, and industries. The element of the TPX requirements that is a primary driver for the hardware design is the fact that TPX tokamak hardware is being designed to accommodate steady state operation if the external systems are upgraded from the 1,000 second initial operation. TPX not only incorporates new physics, but also pioneers new technologies to be used in ITER and other future reactors. TPX will be the first tokamak with fully superconducting magnetic field coils using advanced conductors, will have internal nuclear shielding, will use robotics for machine maintenance, and will remove the continuous, concentrated heat flow from the plasma with new dispersal techniques and with special materials that are actively cooled. The Conceptual Design for TPX was completed during Fiscal Year 1993. The Preliminary Design formally began at the beginning of Fiscal Year 1994. Industrial contracts have been awarded for the design, with options for fabrication, of the primary tokamak hardware. A large fraction of the design and R and D effort during FY94 was focused on the tokamak and in turn on the tokamak magnets. The reason for this emphasis is because the magnets require a large design and R and D effort, and are critical to the project schedule. The magnet development is focused on conductor development, quench protection, and manufacturing R and D. The Preliminary Design Review for the Magnets is planned for fall, 1995

  8. Research on the penetration characteristic of supersonic molecule beam on the HL-1M tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Jiafu; Luo Junling; Tang Nianyi; Li Wei; Zhong Yunze; Liu Yi; Fu Binzhong; Yao Lianghua; Feng Baibing; Qin Yunwen

    2002-01-01

    In the HL-1M plasma experiments, two refueling ways, the pellet injection and the gas puffing, are usually used. In recent years, a new refueling method, the supersonic molecular beam (SMB) injection, has been developed. In this paper, the penetration characteristics of SMB has been analyzed and researched. The SMB experiments were analyzed with H α emissivity measurement. The H α emissivity distribution in the plasma was calculated from multi-channel chord emission singles by means of the asymmetry Abel inversion method

  9. Diagnostics for the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Donne, A. J. H.

    1994-01-01

    The research program of the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project is concentrated on the study of plasma transport processes. The RTP tokamak is therefore equipped with an extensive set of multichannel diagnostics, including a 19-channel FIR interferometer, a 20-channel heterodyne ECE system, an 80-channel

  10. MAST: a Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darke, A.C.; Harbar, J.R.; Hay, J.H.; Hicks, J.B.; Hill, J.W.; McKenzie, J.S.; Morris, A.W.; Nightingale, M.P.S.; Todd, T.N.; Voss, G.M.; Watkins, J.R.

    1995-01-01

    The highly successful tight aspect ratio tokamak research pioneered on the START machine at Culham, together with the attractive possibilities of the concept, suggest a larger device should be considered. The design of a Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak is described, operating at much higher currents and over longer pulses than START and compatible with strong additional heating. (orig.)

  11. Technical advances in rhinologic basic science research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Murugappan; Turner, Justin H; Lane, Andrew P

    2009-10-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is the single most common self-reported chronic health condition in the United States and is estimated to affect 16% of the adult population annually. Despite the prevalence of this disease, there still exists an incomplete understanding of CRS pathophysiology. In this review, the authors highlight technological advances in rhinology: real-time polymerase chain reaction, epithelial cell culture, flow cytometry, genomics/single-nucleotide polymorphism detection, microarrays, and genetic/nongenetic animal models of sinusitis. The purpose of this review is to describe these methodologies and their contributions toward achieving a better understanding of CRS.

  12. Software development of the KSTAR Tokamak Monitoring System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K.H.; Lee, T.G.; Baek, S.; Lee, S.I.; Chu, Y.; Kim, Y.O.; Kim, J.S.; Park, M.K.; Oh, Y.K.

    2008-01-01

    The Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) project, which is constructing a superconducting Tokamak, was launched in 1996. Much progress in instrumentation and control has been made since then and the construction phase will be finished in August 2007. The Tokamak Monitoring System (TMS) measures the temperatures of the superconducting magnets, bus-lines, and structures and hence monitors the superconducting conditions during the operation of the KSTAR Tokamak. The TMS also measures the strains and displacements on the structures in order to monitor the mechanical safety. There are around 400 temperature sensors, more than 240 strain gauges, 10 displacement gauges and 10 Hall sensors. The TMS utilizes Cernox sensors for low temperature measurement and each sensor has its own characteristic curve. In addition, the TMS needs to perform complex arithmetic operations to convert the measurements into temperatures for each Cernox sensor for this large number of monitoring channels. A special software development effort was required to reduce the temperature conversion time and multi-threading to achieve the higher performance needed to handle the large number of channels. We have developed the TMS with PXI hardware and with EPICS software. We will describe the details of the implementations in this paper

  13. Special Education Research Advances Knowledge in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Sharon; Swanson, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Research in special education has yielded beneficial outcomes for students with disabilities as well as typical achieving students. The authors provide examples of the valuable knowledge special education research has generated, including the elements of response to intervention (e.g., screening and progress monitoring), instructional practices…

  14. Beyond competence: advance directives in dementia research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K.R. Jongsma (Karin); S. van de Vathorst (Suzanne)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractDementia is highly prevalent and incurable. The participation of dementia patients in clinical research is indispensable if we want to find an effective treatment for dementia. However, one of the primary challenges in dementia research is the patients’ gradual loss of the capacity to

  15. The Role of Research in Advanced Dental Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profitt, William R.; Vig, Peter S.

    1980-01-01

    Even though research is an integral part of quality advanced dental programs, many dental departments with postdoctoral programs lack faculty and other resources for research productivity. Programs to produce clinical faculty with research training are called for through the development of clinical research centers. (JSR)

  16. Environmental research at the Advanced Photon Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kemner, K.M.; Boyanov, M.I.; Eng, P.; Fenter, P.; Heald, S.; Lai, B.; Lee, S.S.; Scheckel, K.G.; Skanthakumar, S.; Sutton, S.R.; Wilson, R.E.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the importance of probing molecular-scale chemical and physical structure of environmental samples in their natural and often hydrated state, synchrotron radiation has been a powerful tool for environmental scientists for decades. Thus, the crucial role that a highly coherent and high-brightness hard X-ray source such as the Advance Photon Source (APS) can play in addressing many of the outstanding questions in molecular environmental science (MES) was recognized even before 'first light' at the facility. No single synchrotron-based technique or experimental approach can adequately address the tremendous temporal and spatial heterogeneities of the chemistry, physics, and biology of natural environmental samples. Thus, it is common at the APS that multiple X-ray techniques and experimental systems are employed to investigate environmental samples, often chosen for their ability to focus on solute species, plants, microbes, organics, interfacial species, or solids.

  17. Advancing Global Cancer Research @ AACR 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research Priorities for NCI’s Center for Global Health' and included presentations on our mission, objectives, currently funded programs, and future programs given by Dr. Lisa Stevens and Paul Pearlman, as well as three special presentations by NCI grantees.

  18. Baking system for ports of experimental advanced super-conducting tokamak vacuum vessel and thermal stress analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Yali; Bao Liman; Song Yuntao; Yao Damao

    2006-01-01

    The baking system of Experimental Advanced Super-Conducting Toakamk (EAST) vacuum vessel is necessary to obtain the baking temperature of 150 degree C. In order to define suitable alloy heaters and achieve their reasonable layouts, thermal analysis was carried out with ANSYS code. The analysis results indicate that the temperature distribution and thermal stress of most parts of EAST vacuum vessel ports are uniform, satisfied for the requirement, and are safe based on ASME criterion. Feasible idea on reducing the stress focus is also considered. (authors)

  19. Strategic decisions on research for advanced reactors: USNRS perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, M.

    2008-01-01

    This document provided a perspective on strategic decision on research for advanced reactors. He pointed out that advanced reactors are fundamentally different from LWR and that regulatory tools currently available (e.g. codes and data) will not be applicable to advanced designs. He stated that international co-operation is the only practical way to work together for identifying needed capabilities and tools, including the use of industry facilities. He proposed that, in consideration of its good experience at coordinating research, the CSNI establishes a task group to identify and prioritize research needs. (author)

  20. Power and particle exhaust in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stambaugh, R.D.

    1998-01-01

    The status of power and particle exhaust research in tokamaks is reviewed in the light of ITER requirements. There is a sound basis for ITER's nominal design positions; important directions for further research are identified

  1. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    SCHLEYER, TITUS; BUTLER, BRIAN S.; SONG, MEI; SPALLEK, HEIKO

    2013-01-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture, and evaluation. Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers’ need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators’ desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user’s primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems. PMID:24376309

  2. Conceptualizing and Advancing Research Networking Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleyer, Titus; Butler, Brian S; Song, Mei; Spallek, Heiko

    2012-03-01

    Science in general, and biomedical research in particular, is becoming more collaborative. As a result, collaboration with the right individuals, teams, and institutions is increasingly crucial for scientific progress. We propose Research Networking Systems (RNS) as a new type of system designed to help scientists identify and choose collaborators, and suggest a corresponding research agenda. The research agenda covers four areas: foundations, presentation, architecture , and evaluation . Foundations includes project-, institution- and discipline-specific motivational factors; the role of social networks; and impression formation based on information beyond expertise and interests. Presentation addresses representing expertise in a comprehensive and up-to-date manner; the role of controlled vocabularies and folksonomies; the tension between seekers' need for comprehensive information and potential collaborators' desire to control how they are seen by others; and the need to support serendipitous discovery of collaborative opportunities. Architecture considers aggregation and synthesis of information from multiple sources, social system interoperability, and integration with the user's primary work context. Lastly, evaluation focuses on assessment of collaboration decisions, measurement of user-specific costs and benefits, and how the large-scale impact of RNS could be evaluated with longitudinal and naturalistic methods. We hope that this article stimulates the human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, and related communities to pursue a broad and comprehensive agenda for developing research networking systems.

  3. Advanced nuclear reactor safety issues and research needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    On 18-20 February 2002, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organised, with the co-sponsorship of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and in collaboration with the European Commission (EC), a Workshop on Advanced Nuclear Reactor Safety Issues and Research Needs. Currently, advanced nuclear reactor projects range from the development of evolutionary and advanced light water reactor (LWR) designs to initial work to develop even further advanced designs which go beyond LWR technology (e.g. high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and liquid metal-cooled reactors). These advanced designs include a greater use of advanced technology and safety features than those employed in currently operating plants or approved designs. The objectives of the workshop were to: - facilitate early identification and resolution of safety issues by developing a consensus among participating countries on the identification of safety issues, the scope of research needed to address these issues and a potential approach to their resolution; - promote the preservation of knowledge and expertise on advanced reactor technology; - provide input to the Generation IV International Forum Technology Road-map. In addition, the workshop tried to link advancement of knowledge and understanding of advanced designs to the regulatory process, with emphasis on building public confidence. It also helped to document current views on advanced reactor safety and technology, thereby contributing to preserving knowledge and expertise before it is lost. (author)

  4. Tokamak physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    The physical conditions required for breakeven in thermonuclear fusion are derived, and the early conceptual ideas of magnetic confinement and subsequent development are followed, leading to present-day large scale tokamak experiments. Confinement and diffusion are developed in terms of particle orbits, whilst magnetohydrodynamic stability is discussed from energy considerations. From these ideas are derived the scaling laws that determine the physical size and parameters of this fusion configuration. It becomes clear that additional heating is required. However there are currently several major gaps in our understanding of experiments; the causes of anomalous electron energy loss and the major current disruption, the absence of the 'bootstrap' current and what physics determines the maximum plasma pressure consistent with stability. The understanding of these phenomena is a major challenge to plasma physicists. (author)

  5. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Jeong, S. H.; Yoony, J. S.; Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Ju, M. H.

    1998-05-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs

  6. Ion cyclotron system design for KSTAR tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, B. G.; Hwang, C. K.; Jeong, S. H.; Yoony, J. S.; Bae, Y. D.; Kwak, J. G.; Ju, M. H

    1998-05-01

    The KSTAR (Korean Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research) tokamak (R=1.8 m, a=0.5 m, k=2, b=3.5T, I=2MA, t=300 s) is being constructed to do long-pulse, high-b, advanced-operating-mode fusion physics experiments. The ion cyclotron (IC) system (in conjunction with an 8-MW neutral beam and a 1.5-MW lower hybrid system) will provide heating and current drive capability for the machine. The IC system will deliver 6 MW of RF power to the plasma in the 25 to 60 MHz frequency range, using a single four-strap antenna mounted in a midplane port. It will be used for ion heating, fast-wave current drive (FWCD), and mode-conversion current drive (MCCD). The phasing between current straps in the antenna will be adjustable quickly during operation to provide the capability of changing the current-drive efficiency. This report describes the design of the IC system hardware: the electrical characteristics of the antenna and the matching system, the requirements on the power sources, and electrical analyses of the launcher. (author). 7 refs., 2 tabs., 40 figs.

  7. International Journal of Educational Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  8. Mtafiti Mwafrika (African Researcher): Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  9. Global Journal of Educational Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  10. Nanotechnology: Advancing the translational respiratory research

    OpenAIRE

    Dua, Kamal; Shukla, Shakti Dhar; de Jesus Andreoli Pinto, Terezinha; Hansbro, Philip Michael

    2017-01-01

    Considering the various limitations associated with the conventional dosage forms, nanotechnology is gaining increased attention in drug delivery particularly in respiratory medicine and research because of its advantages like targeting effects, improved pharmacotherapy, and patient compliance. This paper provides a quick snapshot about the recent trends and applications of nanotechnology to various translational and formulation scientists working on various respiratory diseases, which can he...

  11. African Journal of Biomedical Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  12. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included

  13. Research in Hospitality Management: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  14. Beginnings and advances in heavy ion research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, P.

    1979-01-01

    The very important field of heavy ion research is briefly reviewed from the beginnings up to the present time. The article was intended to be a scientific lecture for the general public read on the occasion of the 70th birthday of Prof. Schmelzer. (KBE)

  15. Highland Medical Research Journal: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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  16. Nigerian Journal of Technological Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  17. Tanzania Journal of Health Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  18. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I.

    1997-01-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  19. Zimbabwe Journal of Educational Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  20. Moor Journal of Agricultural Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  1. International Journal of Community Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  2. African Journal of AIDS Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  3. Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  4. Nigerian Journal of Pharmaceutical Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  5. Tropical Journal of Medical Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  6. Plant Products Research Journal: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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  7. Journal of Business Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  8. African Journal of Management Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  9. Research Journal of Health Sciences: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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  10. Advanced Energy Projects: FY 1993, Research summaries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    AEP has been supporting research on novel materials for energy technology, renewable and biodegradable materials, new uses for scientific discoveries, alternate pathways to energy efficiency, alternative energy sources, innovative approaches to waste treatment and reduction, etc. The summaries are grouped according to projects active in FY 1993, Phase I SBIR projects, and Phase II SBIR projects. Investigator and institutional indexes are included.

  11. Global Journal of Engineering Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  12. Advances in Bayesian Modeling in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Roy

    2016-01-01

    In this article, I provide a conceptually oriented overview of Bayesian approaches to statistical inference and contrast them with frequentist approaches that currently dominate conventional practice in educational research. The features and advantages of Bayesian approaches are illustrated with examples spanning several statistical modeling…

  13. Advances in Music-Reading Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudmundsdottir, Helga Rut

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to construct a comprehensive review of the research literature in the reading of western staff notation. Studies in music perception, music cognition, music education and music neurology are cited. The aim is to establish current knowledge in music-reading acquisition and what is needed for further progress in this…

  14. Advances in insect physiology. Progress in mosquito research

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book review briefly summarizes the most interesting topics/chapters from the book: "Advances in Insect Physiology: Progress in mosquito Research". The book is an excellent overview of the recent advances in mosquito biology. This volume encompasses 13 chapters from 32 contributing authors who ...

  15. Advancing translational research with the Semantic Web.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim; Bug, William; Samwald, Matthias; Bodenreider, Olivier; Chen, Helen; Doherty, Donald; Forsberg, Kerstin; Gao, Yong; Kashyap, Vipul; Kinoshita, June; Luciano, Joanne; Marshall, M Scott; Ogbuji, Chimezie; Rees, Jonathan; Stephens, Susie; Wong, Gwendolyn T; Wu, Elizabeth; Zaccagnini, Davide; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Neumann, Eric; Herman, Ivan; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2007-05-09

    A fundamental goal of the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" is to strengthen Translational Research, defined as the movement of discoveries in basic research to application at the clinical level. A significant barrier to translational research is the lack of uniformly structured data across related biomedical domains. The Semantic Web is an extension of the current Web that enables navigation and meaningful use of digital resources by automatic processes. It is based on common formats that support aggregation and integration of data drawn from diverse sources. A variety of technologies have been built on this foundation that, together, support identifying, representing, and reasoning across a wide range of biomedical data. The Semantic Web Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLSIG), set up within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium, was launched to explore the application of these technologies in a variety of areas. Subgroups focus on making biomedical data available in RDF, working with biomedical ontologies, prototyping clinical decision support systems, working on drug safety and efficacy communication, and supporting disease researchers navigating and annotating the large amount of potentially relevant literature. We present a scenario that shows the value of the information environment the Semantic Web can support for aiding neuroscience researchers. We then report on several projects by members of the HCLSIG, in the process illustrating the range of Semantic Web technologies that have applications in areas of biomedicine. Semantic Web technologies present both promise and challenges. Current tools and standards are already adequate to implement components of the bench-to-bedside vision. On the other hand, these technologies are young. Gaps in standards and implementations still exist and adoption is limited by typical problems with early technology, such as the need for a critical mass of practitioners and installed base

  16. Advancing gut microbiome research using cultivation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sommer, Morten OA

    2015-01-01

    Culture-independent approaches have driven the field of microbiome research and illuminated intricate relationships between the gut microbiota and human health. However, definitively associating phenotypes to specific strains or elucidating physiological interactions is challenging for metagenomic...... approaches. Recently a number of new approaches to gut microbiota cultivation have emerged through the integration of high-throughput phylogenetic mapping and new simplified cultivation methods. These methodologies are described along with their potential use within microbiome research. Deployment of novel...... cultivation approaches should enable improved studies of xenobiotic tolerance and modification phenotypes and allow a drastic expansion of the gut microbiota reference genome catalogues. Furthermore, the new cultivation methods should facilitate systematic studies of the causal relationship between...

  17. Microfluidic Devices in Advanced Caenorhabditis elegans Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muniesh Muthaiyan Shanmugam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The study of model organisms is very important in view of their potential for application to human therapeutic uses. One such model organism is the nematode worm, Caenorhabditis elegans. As a nematode, C. elegans have ~65% similarity with human disease genes and, therefore, studies on C. elegans can be translated to human, as well as, C. elegans can be used in the study of different types of parasitic worms that infect other living organisms. In the past decade, many efforts have been undertaken to establish interdisciplinary research collaborations between biologists, physicists and engineers in order to develop microfluidic devices to study the biology of C. elegans. Microfluidic devices with the power to manipulate and detect bio-samples, regents or biomolecules in micro-scale environments can well fulfill the requirement to handle worms under proper laboratory conditions, thereby significantly increasing research productivity and knowledge. The recent development of different kinds of microfluidic devices with ultra-high throughput platforms has enabled researchers to carry out worm population studies. Microfluidic devices primarily comprises of chambers, channels and valves, wherein worms can be cultured, immobilized, imaged, etc. Microfluidic devices have been adapted to study various worm behaviors, including that deepen our understanding of neuromuscular connectivity and functions. This review will provide a clear account of the vital involvement of microfluidic devices in worm biology.

  18. The United States Advanced Reactor Technologies Research and Development Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O’Connor, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The following aspects are addressed: • Nuclear energy mission; • Reactor research development and deployment (RD&D) programs: - Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program; - Small Modular Reactor Licensing Technical Support; - Advanced Reactor Technologies (ART)

  19. Research and development of advanced materials using ion beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namba, Susumu [Nagasaki Inst. of Applied Science, Nagasaki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    A wide range of research and development activities of advanced material synthesis using ion beams will be discussed, including ion beam applications to the state-of-the-art electronics from giant to nano electronics. (author)

  20. Advancing prion science: guidance for the National Prion Research Program

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Erdtmann, Rick; Sivitz, Laura

    2004-01-01

    In Advancing Prion Science , the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies Assessment of Relevant Science recommends priorities for research and investment to the Department of Defenseâ...

  1. Institute for Advanced Learning and Research names new executive director

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech News

    2008-01-01

    Virginia Tech's Institute for Advanced Learning and Research has named Liam E. Leightley as executive director, effective Oct. 6, 2008, according to Mike Henderson, chair of the institute's board of trustees.

  2. Advancing translational research with the Semantic Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttenberg, Alan; Clark, Tim; Bug, William; Samwald, Matthias; Bodenreider, Olivier; Chen, Helen; Doherty, Donald; Forsberg, Kerstin; Gao, Yong; Kashyap, Vipul; Kinoshita, June; Luciano, Joanne; Marshall, M Scott; Ogbuji, Chimezie; Rees, Jonathan; Stephens, Susie; Wong, Gwendolyn T; Wu, Elizabeth; Zaccagnini, Davide; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Neumann, Eric; Herman, Ivan; Cheung, Kei-Hoi

    2007-01-01

    Background A fundamental goal of the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH) "Roadmap" is to strengthen Translational Research, defined as the movement of discoveries in basic research to application at the clinical level. A significant barrier to translational research is the lack of uniformly structured data across related biomedical domains. The Semantic Web is an extension of the current Web that enables navigation and meaningful use of digital resources by automatic processes. It is based on common formats that support aggregation and integration of data drawn from diverse sources. A variety of technologies have been built on this foundation that, together, support identifying, representing, and reasoning across a wide range of biomedical data. The Semantic Web Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLSIG), set up within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium, was launched to explore the application of these technologies in a variety of areas. Subgroups focus on making biomedical data available in RDF, working with biomedical ontologies, prototyping clinical decision support systems, working on drug safety and efficacy communication, and supporting disease researchers navigating and annotating the large amount of potentially relevant literature. Results We present a scenario that shows the value of the information environment the Semantic Web can support for aiding neuroscience researchers. We then report on several projects by members of the HCLSIG, in the process illustrating the range of Semantic Web technologies that have applications in areas of biomedicine. Conclusion Semantic Web technologies present both promise and challenges. Current tools and standards are already adequate to implement components of the bench-to-bedside vision. On the other hand, these technologies are young. Gaps in standards and implementations still exist and adoption is limited by typical problems with early technology, such as the need for a critical mass of

  3. Advancing translational research with the Semantic Web

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall M Scott

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A fundamental goal of the U.S. National Institute of Health (NIH "Roadmap" is to strengthen Translational Research, defined as the movement of discoveries in basic research to application at the clinical level. A significant barrier to translational research is the lack of uniformly structured data across related biomedical domains. The Semantic Web is an extension of the current Web that enables navigation and meaningful use of digital resources by automatic processes. It is based on common formats that support aggregation and integration of data drawn from diverse sources. A variety of technologies have been built on this foundation that, together, support identifying, representing, and reasoning across a wide range of biomedical data. The Semantic Web Health Care and Life Sciences Interest Group (HCLSIG, set up within the framework of the World Wide Web Consortium, was launched to explore the application of these technologies in a variety of areas. Subgroups focus on making biomedical data available in RDF, working with biomedical ontologies, prototyping clinical decision support systems, working on drug safety and efficacy communication, and supporting disease researchers navigating and annotating the large amount of potentially relevant literature. Results We present a scenario that shows the value of the information environment the Semantic Web can support for aiding neuroscience researchers. We then report on several projects by members of the HCLSIG, in the process illustrating the range of Semantic Web technologies that have applications in areas of biomedicine. Conclusion Semantic Web technologies present both promise and challenges. Current tools and standards are already adequate to implement components of the bench-to-bedside vision. On the other hand, these technologies are young. Gaps in standards and implementations still exist and adoption is limited by typical problems with early technology, such as the need

  4. The collaborative tokamak control room

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schissel, D.P.

    2006-01-01

    Magnetic fusion experiments keep growing in size and complexity resulting in a concurrent growth in collaborations between experimental sites and laboratories worldwide. In the US, the National Fusion Collaboratory Project is developing a persistent infrastructure to enable scientific collaboration for all aspects of magnetic fusion energy research by creating a robust, user-friendly collaborative environment and deploying this to the more than 1000 US fusion scientists in 40 institutions who perform magnetic fusion research. This paper reports on one aspect of the project which is the development of the collaborative tokamak control room to enhance both collocated and remote scientific participation in experimental operations. This work includes secured computational services that can be scheduled as required, the ability to rapidly compare experimental data with simulation results, a means to easily share individual results with the group by moving application windows to a shared display, and the ability for remote scientists to be fully engaged in experimental operations through shared audio, video, and applications. The project is funded by the USDOE Office of Science, Scientific Discovery through Advanced Computing (SciDAC) Program and unites fusion and computer science researchers to directly address these challenges

  5. Defense Department funds advanced military wireless networks research

    OpenAIRE

    Crumbley, Liz

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Defense has awarded a $246,000 Defense University Research Instrumentation Program (DURIP) grant to researchers in Virginia Tech's Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering for advanced research on wireless communications networks that are critical during military maneuvers.

  6. Strategy to Promote Active Learning of an Advanced Research Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Hilary J.; Dovey, Terence M.

    2013-01-01

    Research methods courses aim to equip students with the knowledge and skills required for research yet seldom include practical aspects of assessment. This reflective practitioner report describes and evaluates an innovative approach to teaching and assessing advanced qualitative research methods to final-year psychology undergraduate students. An…

  7. Observation of Molybdenum Emission from Impurity-Induced Long-Lived m = 1 Mode on the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong-Cai, Shen; Bo, Lyu; Fu-Di, Wang; Yue-Jiang, Shi; Bin, Wu; Ying-Ying, Li; Jia, Fu; Bao-Nian, Wan; EAST Team

    2016-06-01

    Not Available Supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China under Grant Nos 2013GB112004 and 2015GB103002, the Natural Science Research Key Project of Education Department of Anhui Province under Grant No KJ2016A434, the Doctoral Scientific Research Foundation of Anqing Normal University under Grant No 044-140001000024, the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos 11275231, 11305212, 11405212 and 11261140328, the Innovative Program of Development Foundation of Hefei Center for Physical Science and Technology under Grant No 2014FXCX003, and the Hefei Science Center CAS Users with Potential Project under Grant No 2015HSC-UP007.

  8. Advanced ASON prototyping research activities in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, WeiSheng; Jin, Yaohui; Guo, Wei; Su, Yikai; He, Hao; Sun, Weiqiang

    2005-02-01

    This paper provides an overview of prototyping research activities of automatically switched optical networks and transport networks (ASONs/ASTNs) in China. In recent years, China has recognized the importance and benefits of the emerging ASON/ASTN techniques. During the period of 2001 and 2002, the national 863 Program of China started the preliminary ASON research projects with the main objectives to build preliminary ASON testbeds, develop control plane protocols and test their performance in the testbeds. During the period of 2003 and 2004, the 863 program started ASTN prototyping equipment projects for more practical applications. Totally 12 ASTN equipments are being developed by three groups led by Chinese venders: ZTE with Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications (BUPT), Wuhan Research Institute of Posts and Telecommunication (WRI) with Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU), and Huawei Inc. Meanwhile, as the ASTN is maturing, some of the China"s carries are participating in the OIF"s World Interoperability Demonstration, carrying out ASTN test, or deploying ASTN backbone networks. Finally, several ASTN backbone networks being tested or deployed now will be operated by the carries in 2005. The 863 Program will carry out an ASTN field trail in Yangtse River Delta, and finally deploy the 3TNET. 3TNET stands for Tbps transmission, Tbps switching, and Tbps routing, as well as a network integrating the above techniques. A task force under the "863" program is responsible for ASTN equipment specifications and interoperation agreements, technical coordination among all the participants, schedule of the whole project during the project undergoing, and organization of internetworking of all the equipments in the laboratories and field trials.

  9. Advanced Research Workshop on Nonlinear Hyperbolic Problems

    CERN Document Server

    Serre, Denis; Raviart, Pierre-Arnaud

    1987-01-01

    The field of nonlinear hyperbolic problems has been expanding very fast over the past few years, and has applications - actual and potential - in aerodynamics, multifluid flows, combustion, detonics amongst other. The difficulties that arise in application are of theoretical as well as numerical nature. In fact, the papers in this volume of proceedings deal to a greater extent with theoretical problems emerging in the resolution of nonlinear hyperbolic systems than with numerical methods. The volume provides an excellent up-to-date review of the current research trends in this area.

  10. Advances in lactoferrin research concerning bovine mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazaki, Kei-Ichi; Kawai, Kazuhiro

    2017-02-01

    Lactoferrin is a multifunctional, iron-binding glycoprotein found in milk and other exocrine secretions. Lactoferrin in milk plays vital roles in the healthy development of newborn mammals, and is also an innate resistance factor involved in the prevention of mammary gland infection by microorganisms. Inflammation of the udder because of bacterial infection is referred to as mastitis. There have been many investigations into the relationships between lactoferrin and mastitis, which fall into several categories. The main categories are fluctuations in the lactoferrin concentration of milk, lactoferrin activity against mastitis pathogens, elucidation of the processes underlying the onset of mastitis, participation of lactoferrin in the immune system, and utilization of lactoferrin in mastitis treatment and prevention. This minireview describes lactoferrin research concerning bovine mastitis. In the 1970s, many researchers reported that the lactoferrin concentration fluctuates in milk from cows with mastitis. From the late 1980s, many studies clarified the infection-defense mechanism in the udder and the contribution of lactoferrin to the immune system. After the year 2000, the processes underlying the onset of mastitis were elucidated in vivo and in vitro, and lactoferrin was applied for the treatment and prevention of mastitis.

  11. Connectomics in psychiatric research: advances and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cao M

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Miao Cao,* Zhijiang Wang,* Yong He State Key Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience and Learning and IDG/McGovern Institute for Brain Research, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Psychiatric disorders disturb higher cognitive functions and severely compromise human health. However, the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying psychiatric disorders are very complex, and understanding these mechanisms remains a great challenge. Currently, many psychiatric disorders are hypothesized to reflect “faulty wiring” or aberrant connectivity in the brains. Imaging connectomics is arising as a promising methodological framework for describing the structural and functional connectivity patterns of the human brain. Recently, alterations of brain networks in the connectome have been reported in various psychiatric disorders, and these alterations may provide biomarkers for disease diagnosis and prognosis for the evaluation of treatment efficacy. Here, we summarize the current achievements in both the structural and functional connectomes in several major psychiatric disorders (eg, schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and autism based on multi-modal neuroimaging data. We highlight the current progress in the identification of these alterations and the hypotheses concerning the aberrant brain networks in individuals with psychiatric disorders and discuss the research questions that might contribute to a further mechanistic understanding of these disorders from a connectomic perspective.Keywords: psychiatric disorders, connectome, graph theory, functional connectivity, structural connectivity

  12. Research on geothermal chemistry and advanced instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertus, R. J.; Shannon, D. W.; Sullivan, R. G.; Kindle, C. H.; Pool, K. H.

    1985-09-01

    Research at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) focuses on long-term geothermal power plant reliability. Past work concentrated on development of continuous high-temperature probes for monitoring process variables. PNL also completed a comprehensive handbook of brine treatment processes as they relate to injection well longevity. A recently completed study analyzed corrosion in the hydrocarbon system of a binary cycle plant. Over the two-year monitoring period, corrosion rates were less than 1 MPY in any part of the hydrocarbon system. The system was kept completely dry so the rates seem reasonable. Present projects include: (1) determination of gas breakout conditions at the Herber Binary Demonstration Plant operated by San Diego Gas and Electric Company; (2) generation of water mixing solubility data; (3) installation of prototype leak detectors at the Herber Plant; and (4) evaluation of state-of-the-art particle counters.

  13. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venhuizen, James R.

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications

  14. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, James Robert

    2002-04-01

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  15. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2001

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, James R.

    2002-04-30

    This report summarizes the major activities and accomplishments of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2001. Applications of supportive research and development, as well as technology deployment in the fields of chemistry, radiation physics and dosimetry, and neutron source design and demonstration are described. Contributions in the fields of physics and biophysics include development of advanced patient treatment planning software, feasibility studies of accelerator neutron source technology for Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT), and completion of major modifications to the research reactor at Washington State University to produce an epithermal-neutron beam for NCT research applications.

  16. Research advancements in palm oil nutrition*

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Choo Yuen; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi

    2014-01-01

    Palm oil is the major oil produced, with annual world production in excess of 50 million tonnes. About 85% of global palm oil produced is used in food applications. Over the past three decades, research on nutritional benefits of palm oil have demonstrated the nutritional adequacy of palm oil and its products, and have resulted in transitions in the understanding these attributes. Numerous studies have demonstrated that palm oil was similar to unsaturated oils with regards to effects on blood lipids. Palm oil provides a healthy alternative to trans-fatty acid containing hydrogenated fats that have been demonstrated to have serious deleterious effects on health. The similar effects of palm oil on blood lipids, comparable to other vegetable oils could very well be due to the structure of the major triglycerides in palm oil, which has an unsaturated fatty acid in the stereospecific numbers (sn)-2 position of the glycerol backbone. In addition, palm oil is well endowed with a bouquet of phytonutrients beneficial to health, such as tocotrienols, carotenoids, and phytosterols. This review will provide an overview of studies that have established palm oil as a balanced and nutritious oil. PMID:25821404

  17. Research advancements in palm oil nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Choo Yuen; Nesaretnam, Kalanithi

    2014-10-01

    Palm oil is the major oil produced, with annual world production in excess of 50 million tonnes. About 85% of global palm oil produced is used in food applications. Over the past three decades, research on nutritional benefits of palm oil have demonstrated the nutritional adequacy of palm oil and its products, and have resulted in transitions in the understanding these attributes. Numerous studies have demonstrated that palm oil was similar to unsaturated oils with regards to effects on blood lipids. Palm oil provides a healthy alternative to trans-fatty acid containing hydrogenated fats that have been demonstrated to have serious deleterious effects on health. The similar effects of palm oil on blood lipids, comparable to other vegetable oils could very well be due to the structure of the major triglycerides in palm oil, which has an unsaturated fatty acid in the stereospecific numbers ( sn) -2 position of the glycerol backbone. In addition, palm oil is well endowed with a bouquet of phytonutrients beneficial to health, such as tocotrienols, carotenoids, and phytosterols. This review will provide an overview of studies that have established palm oil as a balanced and nutritious oil.

  18. Diterpenes: Advances in Neurobiological Drug Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Md Torequl; da Silva, Claucenira Bandeira; de Alencar, Marcus Vinícius Oliveira Barros; Paz, Márcia Fernanda Correia Jardim; Almeida, Fernanda Regina de Castro; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho

    2016-06-01

    A significant number of studies have been performed with diterpene effect on the brain. Our study aims to make a systematic revision on them. The initial purpose of this review was to screen diterpenes with neurological activity, in particular those that have already been studied and published in different journals (databases until August 2015). The second purpose was to make an action-wise discussion as results viewed on them by taking into drug discovery and development account. Diterpenes considered in this review were selected on the basis of updated information on them and having sufficient information on their screenings. We identified several examples of diterpenes having an interest in further study. We have included the possible sources of them as observed in evidence, their known molecular neurobiological mechanisms, and the active constituents responsible for such activities with the doses and test systems. Results suggest diterpenes to have neurobiological activities like neuro-protection, anti-epileptic, anxiolytic, anti-Alzheimer's disease, anti-Parkinson's disease, anti-cerebral ischemia, anti-neuropathic pain, anti-neuro-inflammatory, and many more. In conclusion, diterpenes may be the prominent candidates in neurobiological drug research. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. PPPL tokamak program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1984-10-01

    The economic prospects of the tokamak are reviewed briefly and found to be favorable - if the size of ignited tokamak plasmas can be kept small and appropriate auxiliary systems can be developed. The main objectives of the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory tokamak program are: (1) exploration of the physics of high-temperature toroidal confinement, in TFTR; (2) maximization of the tokamak beta value, in PBX; (3) development of reactor-relevant rf techniques, in PLT

  20. Advancing the Science of Qualitative Research to Promote Health Equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Derek M; Shelton, Rachel C; Kegler, Michelle

    2017-10-01

    Qualitative methods have long been a part of health education research, but how qualitative approaches advance health equity has not been well described. Qualitative research is an increasingly important methodologic tool to use in efforts to understand, inform, and advance health equity. Qualitative research provides critical insight into the subjective meaning and context of health that can be essential for understanding where and how to intervene to inform health equity research and practice. We describe the larger context for this special theme issue of Health Education & Behavior, provide brief overviews of the 15 articles that comprise the issue, and discuss the promise of qualitative research that seeks to contextualize and illuminate answers to research questions in efforts to promote health equity. We highlight the critical role that qualitative research can play in considering and incorporating a diverse array of contextual information that is difficult to capture in quantitative research.

  1. A preliminary study of a D-T tokamak fusion reactor with advanced blanket using the compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ishikawa, M.; Umoto, J.; Fukuyama, A.; Mitarai, O.; Okamoto, M.; Sekimoto, H.; Nagatsu, M.

    1995-01-01

    Preliminary key issues for a synchrotron radiation-enhanced compact fusion advanced Brayton (CFAB) cycle fusion reactor similar to the CFAR (compact fusion advanced Rankine) cycle reactor are presented. These include plasma operation windows as a function of the first wall reflectivity and related issues, to estimate an allowance for deterioration of the first wall reflectivity due to dpa effects. It was found theoretically that first wall reflectivities down to 0.8 are still adequate for operation at an energy confinement scaling of 3 times Kaye-Goldston. Measurements of the graphite first wall reflectivities at Nagoya University indicate excellent reflectivities in excess of 90% for CC-312, PCC-2S, and PD-330S in the submillimeter regime, even at high temperatures in excess of 1000K. Some engineering issues inherent to the CFAB cycle are also discussed briefly in comparison with the CFAR cycle which uses hazardous limited-resource materials but is capable of using mercury as coolant for high heat removal. The CFAB cycle using helium coolant is found to achieve higher net plant conversion efficiencies in excess 60% using a non-equilibrium magnetohydrodynamic disk generator in the moderate pressure range, even at the cost of a relatively large pumping power, and at the penalty of high temperature materials, although excellent heat removal characteristics in the moderate pressure range need to be guaranteed in the future. (orig.)

  2. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms.

  3. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms

  4. Recent advances in aerosol research a bibliographical review

    CERN Document Server

    Davies, C N

    1964-01-01

    Recent Advances in Aerosol Research: A Bibliographical Review presents a bibliographic review of advances in aerosol research covering the period from the beginning of 1957 to the end of 1962. Topics covered include chemical reactions, combustion, coagulation and diffusion, and adhesion of particles. References on filtration, evaporation and condensation, nucleation and growth, and laminar flow and impingement are also included. This volume is comprised of 19 chapters and begins by citing research on acoustic, ultrasonic, and shock wave effects, along with adhesion of particles, chemical react

  5. Proceedings of national symposium on advanced instrumentation for nuclear research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    The National Symposium on Advanced Instrumentation for Nuclear Research was held in Bombay during January 27-29, 1993 at BARC. Progress of modern nuclear research is closely related to the availability of state of the art instruments and systems. With the advancements in experimental techniques and sophisticated detector developments, the performance specifications have become more stringent. State of the art techniques and diverse applications of sophisticated nuclear instrumentation systems are discussed along with indigenous efforts to meet the specific instrumentation needs of research programs in nuclear sciences. Papers of relevance to nuclear science and technology are indexed separately. (original)

  6. Proceedings of the 1st symposium on advanced science research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-09-01

    The 1st symposium on advanced science research was held in Tokai-mura, Ibaraki-ken, on 23-24 March, 1995, under the auspices of JAERI. Two hundred and sixty scientists attended the symposium; over 40% of the attendants were from universities and laboratories outside JAERI. This proceedings consists of 6 oral presentations of the research activities in the Advanced Science Research Center, 70 poster presentations on the field of basic science from both the inside and outside of JAERI and 2 panel discussions on the actinide physics and biocrystallography. (author)

  7. NATO Advanced Research Institute on the Efficiency of Manufacturing Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Berg, C; French, D

    1983-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute (A.R. 1.) on "the efficiency of Manufacturing Systems" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programm~ Panel on Systems Science as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international co-operation. Advanced Research Institutes are organised for the purpose of bringing together experts in a particular field of interest to identify and make known the present state of knowledge in that area and, through informed debate, to make recommendations for directions for future research that would benefit the community at large. To this end two kinds of contribution were obtained by invitation. There were those papers which were about the current state of work in the area of manufacturing systems and its organisation; in addition three theme papers were presented to provide a stimulus to the discussion in terms of ways of thinking, both about the area and about the kind of research needed.

  8. Establishment of Research Infrastructure for National Advanced Radiation Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuk, Il Hiun; Byun, Myung Woo; Jeong, Il Yun; and others

    2007-07-15

    Construction of fundamental analysis system for RT/RFT advancement and pilot scale laboratory/facility for industry support and Assembly/installation of 30 MeV cyclotron for RI production and research utilizing positron beam, and construction of /distribution system for industrial and medical purpose were carried out for fast settlement for research environment of ARTI (a Jeongeup branch of KAERI)

  9. Tokamaks - Third Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogister, A L

    2004-01-01

    John Wesson's well known book, now re-edited for the third time, provides an excellent introduction to fusion oriented plasma physics in tokamaks. The author's task was a very challenging one, for a confined plasma is a complex system characterised by a variety of dimensionless parameters and its properties change qualitatively when certain threshold values are reached in this multi-parameter space. As a consequence, theoretical description is required at different levels, which are complementary: particle orbits, kinetic and fluid descriptions, but also intuitive and empirical approaches. Theory must be carried out on many fronts: equilibrium, instabilities, heating, transport etc. Since the properties of the confined plasma depend on the boundary conditions, the physics of plasmas along open magnetic field lines and plasma surface interaction processes must also be accounted for. Those subjects (and others) are discussed in depth in chapters 2-9. Chapter 1 mostly deals with ignition requirements and the tokamak concept, while chapter 14 provides a list of useful relations: differential operators, collision times, characteristic lengths and frequencies, expressions for the neoclassical resistivity and heat conduction, the bootstrap current etc. The presentation is sufficiently broad and thorough that specialists within tokamak research can either pick useful and up-to-date information or find an authoritative introduction into other areas of the subject. It is also clear and concise so that it should provide an attractive and accurate initiation for those wishing to enter the field and for outsiders who would like to understand the concepts and be informed about the goals and challenges on the horizon. Validation of theoretical models requires adequately resolved experimental data for the various equilibrium profiles (clearly a challenge in the vicinity of transport barriers) and the fluctuations to which instabilities give rise. Chapter 10 is therefore devoted to

  10. A two-time-scale dynamic-model approach for magnetic and kinetic profile control in advanced tokamak scenarios on JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreau, D.; Mazon, D.; Ariola, M.; Tommasi, G. De; Laborde, L.; Piccolo, F.; Sartori, F.; Zabeo, L.; Boboc, A.; Brix, M.; Challis, C.D.; Felton, R.; Hawkes, N.; Tala, T.; Bouvier, E.; Cordoliani, V.; Brzozowski, J.; Cocilovo, V.; Crisanti, F.; Luna, E. de la

    2008-01-01

    Real-time simultaneous control of several radially distributed magnetic and kinetic plasma parameters is being investigated on JET, in view of developing integrated control of advanced tokamak scenarios. This paper describes the new model-based profile controller which has been implemented during the 2006-2007 experimental campaigns. The controller aims to use the combination of heating and current drive (H and CD) systems-and optionally the poloidal field (PF) system-in an optimal way to regulate the evolution of plasma parameter profiles such as the safety factor, q(x), and gyro-normalized temperature gradient, ρ Te *(x). In the first part of the paper, a technique for the experimental identification of a minimal dynamic plasma model is described, taking into account the physical structure and couplings of the transport equations, but making no quantitative assumptions on the transport coefficients or on their dependences. To cope with the high dimensionality of the state space and the large ratio between the time scales involved, the model identification procedure and the controller design both make use of the theory of singularly perturbed systems by means of a two-time-scale approximation. The second part of the paper provides the theoretical basis for the controller design. The profile controller is articulated around two composite feedback loops operating on the magnetic and kinetic time scales, respectively, and supplemented by a feedforward compensation of density variations. For any chosen set of target profiles, the closest self-consistent state achievable with the available actuators is uniquely defined. It is reached, with no steady state offset, through a near-optimal proportional-integral control algorithm. Conventional optimal control is recovered in the limiting case where the ratio of the plasma confinement time to the resistive diffusion time tends to zero. Closed-loop simulations of the controller response have been performed in preparation for

  11. Data-driven robust control of the plasma rotational transform profile and normalized beta dynamics for advanced tokamak scenarios in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, W.; Wehner, W.P.; Barton, J.E.; Boyer, M.D. [Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Schuster, E., E-mail: schuster@lehigh.edu [Mechanical Engineering and Mechanics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, PA 18015 (United States); Moreau, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13018 St Paul lez Durance (France); Walker, M.L.; Ferron, J.R.; Luce, T.C.; Humphreys, D.A.; Penaflor, B.G.; Johnson, R.D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA 92121 (United States)

    2017-04-15

    A control-oriented, two-timescale, linear, dynamic, response model of the rotational transform ι profile and the normalized beta β{sub N} is proposed based on experimental data from the DIII-D tokamak. Dedicated system-identification experiments without feedback control have been carried out to generate data for the development of this model. The data-driven dynamic model, which is both device-specific and scenario-specific, represents the response of the ι profile and β{sub N} to the electric field due to induction as well as to the heating and current drive (H&CD) systems during the flat-top phase of an H-mode discharge in DIII-D. The control goal is to use both induction and the H&CD systems to locally regulate the plasma ι profile and β{sub N} around particular target values close to the reference state used for system identification. A singular value decomposition (SVD) of the plasma model at steady state is carried out to decouple the system and identify the most relevant control channels. A mixed-sensitivity robust control design problem is formulated based on the dynamic model to synthesize a stabilizing feedback controller without input constraints that minimizes the reference tracking error and rejects external disturbances with minimal control energy. The feedback controller is then augmented with an anti-windup compensator, which keeps the given controller well-behaved in the presence of magnitude constraints in the actuators and leaves the nominal closed-loop system unmodified when no saturation is present. The proposed controller represents one of the first feedback profile controllers integrating magnetic and kinetic variables ever implemented and experimentally tested in DIII-D. The preliminary experimental results presented in this work, although limited in number and constrained by actuator problems and design limitations, as it will be reported, show good progress towards routine current profile control in DIII-D and leave valuable lessons

  12. Robust Sliding Mode Control for Tokamaks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Garrido

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear fusion has arisen as an alternative energy to avoid carbon dioxide emissions, being the tokamak a promising nuclear fusion reactor that uses a magnetic field to confine plasma in the shape of a torus. However, different kinds of magnetohydrodynamic instabilities may affect tokamak plasma equilibrium, causing severe reduction of particle confinement and leading to plasma disruptions. In this sense, numerous efforts and resources have been devoted to seeking solutions for the different plasma control problems so as to avoid energy confinement time decrements in these devices. In particular, since the growth rate of the vertical instability increases with the internal inductance, lowering the internal inductance is a fundamental issue to address for the elongated plasmas employed within the advanced tokamaks currently under development. In this sense, this paper introduces a lumped parameter numerical model of the tokamak in order to design a novel robust sliding mode controller for the internal inductance using the transformer primary coil as actuator.

  13. Theory of incremental turbulent transport in tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Similon, P.L.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this research is to understand how the various aspect of turbulent transport operate in tokamaks, in the presence of low frequency fluctuations such as drift waves or trapped electron modes

  14. Advanced Research Projects Agency on Materials Preparation and Characterization Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briefly summarized is research concerned with such topics as: Preparation of silica glass from amorphous silica; Glass structure by Raman ...ferroelectrics; Silver iodide crystals; Vapor phase growth; Refractory optical host materials; Hydroxyapatite ; Calcite; Characterization of single crystals with a double crystal spectrometer; Characterization of residual strain.

  15. Research advances in regorafenib in treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CHEN Weibo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is the most common malignant liver tumor, and there are limited systemic treatments for patients with advanced HCC. Regorafenib is an oral multi-kinase inhibitor, and phase III clinical trial has shown that regorafenib can significantly extend the median survival of patients with advanced HCC by 2.8 months, which makes it a second-line drug approved by FDA for the treatment of advanced HCC, just after sorafenib. This article reviews the basic and clinical research on regorafenib in the field of HCC.

  16. Tokamak Systems Code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Barrett, R.J.; Brown, T.G.

    1985-03-01

    The FEDC Tokamak Systems Code calculates tokamak performance, cost, and configuration as a function of plasma engineering parameters. This version of the code models experimental tokamaks. It does not currently consider tokamak configurations that generate electrical power or incorporate breeding blankets. The code has a modular (or subroutine) structure to allow independent modeling for each major tokamak component or system. A primary benefit of modularization is that a component module may be updated without disturbing the remainder of the systems code as long as the imput to or output from the module remains unchanged

  17. The ETE spherical Tokamak project. IAEA report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, Gerson Otto; Del Bosco, E.; Berni, L.A.; Ferreira, J.G.; Oliveira, R.M.; Andrade, M.C.R.; Shibata, C.S.; Barroso, J.J.; Castro, P.J.; Patire Junior, H. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Lab. Associado de Plasma]. E-mail: ludwig@plasma.inpe.br

    2002-07-01

    This paper describes the general characteristics of spherical tokamaks, or spherical tori, with a brief overview of work in this area already performed or in progress at several institutions worldwide. The paper presents also the historical development of the ETE (Spherical Tokamak Experiment) project, its research program, technical characteristics and operating conditions as of October, 2002 at the Associated Plasma Laboratory (LAP) of the National Space Research Institute (INPE) in Brazil. (author)

  18. Commercial feasibility of fusion power based on the tokamak concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, R.L.; Steiner, D.

    1977-01-01

    The impact of plasma operating characteristics, engineering options, and technology on the capital cost trends of tokamak power plants is determined. Tokamak power systems are compared to other advanced energy systems and found to be economically competitive. A three-phase strategy for demonstrating commercial feasibility of fusion power, based on a common-site multiple-unit concept, is presented

  19. Physics design requirements for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neilson, G.H.; Goldston, R.J.; Jardin, S.C.; Reiersen, W.T.; Porkolab, M.; Ulrickson, M.

    1993-01-01

    The design of TPX is driven by physics requirements that follow from its mission. The tokamak and heating systems provide the performance and profile controls needed to study advanced steady state tokamak operating modes. The magnetic control systems provide substantial flexibility for the study of regimes with high beta and bootstrap current. The divertor is designed for high steady state power and particle exhaust

  20. Proceedings of the fifth symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-06-01

    This report consists of 69 contributed papers of the Fifth Symposium on Advanced Photon Research, which was held at JAERI-Kansai in Kyoto on November 20-21, 2003. The numbers of speeches were 14, including 4 invited speeches, and the numbers of poster presentations were 60, including FY2002 and cooperative research and joint research presentations. The 69 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  1. Tokamak devices: towards controlled fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trocheris, M.

    1975-01-01

    The Tokamak family is from Soviet Union. These devices were exclusively studied at the Kurchatov Institute in Moscow for more than ten years. The first occidental Tokamak started in 1970 at Princeton. The TFR (Tokamak Fontenay-aux-Roses) was built to be superior to the Russian T4. Tokamak future is now represented by the JET (Joint European Tokamak) [fr

  2. Physics of thin films advances in research and development

    CERN Document Server

    Hass, Georg; Vossen, John L

    2013-01-01

    Physics of Thin Films: Advances in Research and Development, Volume 12 reviews advances that have been made in research and development concerning the physics of thin films. This volume covers a wide range of preparative approaches, physics phenomena, and applications related to thin films. This book is comprised of four chapters and begins with a discussion on metal coatings and protective layers for front surface mirrors used at various angles of incidence from the ultraviolet to the far infrared. Thin-film materials and deposition conditions suitable for minimizing reflectance changes with

  3. DIII-D research advancing the scientific basis for burning plasmas and fusion energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. M. SolomonThe DIII-D Team

    2017-10-01

    The DIII-D tokamak has addressed key issues to advance the physics basis for ITER and future steady-state fusion devices. In work related to transient control, magnetic probing is used to identify a decrease in ideal stability, providing a basis for active instability sensing. Improved understanding of 3D interactions is emerging, with RMP-ELM suppression correlated with exciting an edge current driven mode. Should rapid plasma termination be necessary, shattered neon pellet injection has been shown to be tunable to adjust radiation and current quench rate. For predictive simulations, reduced transport models such as TGLF have reproduced changes in confinement associated with electron heating. A new wide-pedestal variant of QH-mode has been discovered where increased edge transport is found to allow higher pedestal pressure. New dimensionless scaling experiments suggest an intrinsic torque comparable to the beam-driven torque on ITER. In steady-state-related research, complete ELM suppression has been achieved that is relatively insensitive to q 95, having a weak effect on the pedestal. Both high-q min and hybrid steady-state plasmas have avoided fast ion instabilities and achieved increased performance by control of the fast ion pressure gradient and magnetic shear, and use of external control tools such as ECH. In the boundary, experiments have demonstrated the impact of E× B drifts on divertor detachment and divertor asymmetries. Measurements in helium plasmas have found that the radiation shortfall can be eliminated provided the density near the X-point is used as a constraint in the modeling. Experiments conducted with toroidal rings of tungsten in the divertor have indicated that control of the strike-point flux is important for limiting the core contamination. Future improvements are planned to the facility to advance physics issues related to the boundary, transients and high performance steady-state operation.

  4. Fast IR diodes thermometer for tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xiangbo

    2001-01-01

    A 30 channel fast IR pyrometry array has been constructed for tokamak, which has 0.5 μs time response, 10 mm diameter spatial resolution and 5 degree C temperature resolution. The temperature measuring range is from 250 degree C to 1200 degree C. The two dimensional temperature profiles of the first wall during both major and minor disruptions can be measured with an accuracy of about 1% measuring temperature, which is adequate for tokamak experiments. This gives a very useful tool for the disruption study, especially for the divertor physics and edge heat flux research on tokamak and other magnetic confinement devices

  5. Storytelling to access social context and advance health equity research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, JoAnne

    2012-11-01

    Increased understanding of individual and social determinants of health is crucial to moving toward health equity. This essay examines storytelling as a vehicle for advancing health equity research. Contemplative examination of storytelling as a research strategy. An overview of story theory is provided. This is followed by an examination of storytelling as a tool for increasing understanding about the contexts in which people negotiate health, strengthening participation of communities in addressing health issues, and building bridges between researchers and target populations. Storytelling can be a powerful tool for advancing health equity research. However, its effective use requires a renegotiation of relationships between researchers and target communities, as well as setting aside routine time to attend storytelling events and read a variety of stories. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Prospects for pilot plants based on the tokamak, spherical tokamak and stellarator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menard, J.E.; Bromberg, L.; Brown, T.; Burgess, Thomas W.; Dix, D.; Gerrity, T.; Goldston, R.J.; Hawryluk, R.; Kastner, R.; Kessel, C.; Malang, S.; Minervini, J.; Neilson, G.H.; Neumeyer, C.L.; Prager, S.; Sawan, M.; Sheffield, J.; Sternlieb, A.; Waganer, L.; Whyte, D.G.; Zarnstorff, M.C.

    2011-01-01

    A potentially attractive next-step towards fusion commercialization is a pilot plant, i.e. a device ultimately capable of small net electricity production in as compact a facility as possible and in a configuration scalable to a full-size power plant. A key capability for a pilot-plant programme is the production of high neutron fluence enabling fusion nuclear science and technology (FNST) research. It is found that for physics and technology assumptions between those assumed for ITER and nth-of-a-kind fusion power plant, it is possible to provide FNST-relevant neutron wall loading in pilot devices. Thus, it may be possible to utilize a single facility to perform FNST research utilizing reactor-relevant plasma, blanket, coil and auxiliary systems and maintenance schemes while also targeting net electricity production. In this paper three configurations for a pilot plant are considered: the advanced tokamak, spherical tokamak and compact stellarator. A range of configuration issues is considered including: radial build and blanket design, magnet systems, maintenance schemes, tritium consumption and self-sufficiency, physics scenarios and a brief assessment of research needs for the configurations.

  7. Health physics around a controlled fusion research device: the Tokamak at Fontenay-aux-Roses (T.F.R.)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The X and neutron dosimetry measurement near the magnetic confinement device for hot plasma, called T.F.R. (Tokamak, Fontenay-aux-Roses) are presented. The biological shielding consists of an ordinary concrete wall 30 cm thick; the dose rate is thus limited at 10 -1 mrem per discharge (corresponding to 10 mrem per day) in the whole area frequented by people during T.F.R. operation. A numerical calculation, taking into account the true geometry and X ray reflexion by the walls and roof, and normalized to the measurements, gives some indications on the electron beam which produces X rays. The photoneutron source (up to 10 10 neutrons per dischage) and the activation of the vacuum vessel result from high energy electrons (>= 10 MeV) supporting a 10 to 1,000 A current [fr

  8. Magnetic confinement experiment. I: Tokamaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goldston, R.J.

    1995-08-01

    Reports were presented at this conference of important advances in all the key areas of experimental tokamak physics: Core Plasma Physics, Divertor and Edge Physics, Heating and Current Drive, and Tokamak Concept Optimization. In the area of Core Plasma Physics, the biggest news was certainly the production of 9.2 MW of fusion power in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor, and the observation of unexpectedly favorable performance in DT plasmas. There were also very important advances in the performance of ELM-free H- (and VH-) mode plasmas and in quasi-steady-state ELM'y operation in JT-60U, JET, and DIII-D. In all three devices ELM-free H-modes achieved nTτ's ∼ 2.5x greater than ELM'ing H-modes, but had not been sustained in quasi-steady-state. Important progress has been made on the understanding of the physical mechanism of the H-mode in DIII-D, and on the operating range in density for the H-mode in Compass and other devices

  9. ITER tokamak device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doggett, J.; Salpietro, E.; Shatalov, G.

    1991-01-01

    The results of the Conceptual Design Activities for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) are summarized. These activities, carried out between April 1988 and December 1990, produced a consistent set of technical characteristics and preliminary plans for co-ordinated research and development support of ITER; and a conceptual design, a description of design requirements and a preliminary construction schedule and cost estimate. After a description of the design basis, an overview is given of the tokamak device, its auxiliary systems, facility and maintenance. The interrelation and integration of the various subsystems that form the ITER tokamak concept are discussed. The 16 ITER equatorial port allocations, used for nuclear testing, diagnostics, fuelling, maintenance, and heating and current drive, are given, as well as a layout of the reactor building. Finally, brief descriptions are given of the major ITER sub-systems, i.e., (i) magnet systems (toroidal and poloidal field coils and cryogenic systems), (ii) containment structures (vacuum and cryostat vessels, machine gravity supports, attaching locks, passive loops and active coils), (iii) first wall, (iv) divertor plate (design and materials, performance and lifetime, a.o.), (v) blanket/shield system, (vi) maintenance equipment, (vii) current drive and heating, (viii) fuel cycle system, and (ix) diagnostics. 11 refs, figs and tabs

  10. 2017 Publications Demonstrate Advancements in Wind Energy Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2018-01-17

    In 2017, wind energy experts at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) made significant strides to advance wind energy. Many of these achievements were presented in articles published in scientific and engineering journals and technical reports that detailed research accomplishments in new and progressing wind energy technologies. During fiscal year 2017, NREL wind energy thought leaders shared knowledge and insights through 45 journal articles and 25 technical reports, benefiting academic and national-lab research communities; industry stakeholders; and local, state, and federal decision makers. Such publications serve as important outreach, informing the public of how NREL wind research, analysis, and deployment activities complement advanced energy growth in the United States and around the world. The publications also illustrate some of the noteworthy outcomes of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Laboratory Directed Research and Development funding, as well as funding and facilities leveraged through strategic partnerships and other collaborations.

  11. Advancing a Program of Research within a Nursing Faculty Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nolan, Marie T.; Wenzel, Jennifer; Han, Hae-Ra.; Allen, Jerilyn K.; Paez, Kathryn A.; Mock, Victoria

    2008-01-01

    Doctoral students and new faculty members often seek advice from more senior faculty on how to advance their program of research. Students may ask whether they should choose the manuscript option for their dissertation or whether they should seek a postdoctoral fellowship. New faculty members wonder whether they should pursue a career development (K) award and whether they need a mentor as they strive to advance their research while carrying out teaching, service, and practice responsibilities. In this paper, we describe literature on the impact of selected aspects of pre and postdoctoral training and faculty strategies on scholarly productivity in the faculty role. We also combine our experiences at a school of nursing within a research-intensive university to suggest strategies for success. Noting the scarcity of research that evaluates the effect of these strategies we are actively engaged in collecting data on their relationship to the scholarly productivity of students and faculty members within our own institution. PMID:19022210

  12. Proceedings of the 10th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-06-01

    The 10th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on October 21 - 22, 2009. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. The 38 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  13. INL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James Venhuizen

    2005-06-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2004. Topics covered include boron analysis in biological samples, computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and collaborative dosimetry studies at the RA-1 facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

  14. Proceedings of the 13th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-09-01

    The 13th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto on November 15 - 16, 2012. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. (author)

  15. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report for 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. R. Venhuizen

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

  16. INEEL Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program Annual Report 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venhuizen, J.R.

    2003-05-23

    This report summarizes the activities and major accomplishments for the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) Advanced Radiotherapy Research Program for calendar year 2002. Topics covered include computational dosimetry and treatment planning software development, medical neutron source development and characterization, and boron analytical chemistry.

  17. Defining Neighborhood Boundaries for Social Measurement: Advancing Social Work Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kirk A.; Hipp, J. Aaron

    2011-01-01

    Much of the current neighborhood-based research uses variables aggregated on administrative boundaries such as zip codes, census tracts, and block groups. However, other methods using current technological advances in geographic sciences may broaden our ability to explore the spatial concentration of neighborhood factors affecting individuals and…

  18. Proceedings of the 9th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    The 9th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on July 31- August 1, 2008. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in The Symposium. The 25 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  19. Proceedings of the 11th symposium on advanced photon research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2011-03-01

    The 11th Symposium on Advanced Photon Research was held at Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA-KPSI) in Kizugawa, Kyoto on June 24 - 25, 2010. This report consists of invited and contributed papers presented at the oral and poster sessions in the Symposium. The 29 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Advancing multilevel thinking and methods in HRM research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renkema, Maarten; Meijerink, Jeroen Gerard; Bondarouk, Tatiana

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Despite the growing belief that multilevel research is necessary to advance HRM understanding, there remains a lack of multilevel thinking – the application of principles for multilevel theory building. The purpose of this paper is to propose a systematic approach for multilevel HRM

  1. [The advances of suppression in research of amblyopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S; Liu, H

    2016-04-11

    Suppression that is the result of interocular competition is an important machanism of amblyopia. The imbalance of suppression may lead the consequence to amblyopia. In the early study, researchers had raised the theory of II. Quadratic Summation which had revealed the relationship of interocular interaction and suppression. In some basic researches, other studies had showed the most possible anatomic location of suppression. Recently, researchers found a new method to quantify the interocular suppression named the noise model. Further studies found a novel disinhibition therapy to treat amblyopia. We summarized the research advances in suppression and disinhibition treatment in amblyopia. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 305-308).

  2. Ninth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU from 16–19 September, 2012 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA. It was built upon the overwhelming success of seven previous symposia hosted by JSU.

  3. Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Eighth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU from September 18-21, 2011 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. It was built upon the overwhelming success of seven previous symposia hosted by JSU. [...

  4. Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) power supply design and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neumeyer, C.; Bronner, G.; Lu, E.; Ramakrishnan, S.

    1995-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) is an advanced tokamak project aimed at the production of quasi-steady state plasmas with advanced shape, heating, and particle control. TPX is to be built at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) using many of the facilities from the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR). TPX will be the first tokamak to utilize superconducting (SC) magnets in both the toroidal field (TF) and poloidal field (PF) systems. This new feature requires a departure from the traditional tokamak power supply schemes. This paper describes the plan for the adaptation of the PPPL/FTR power system facilities to supply TPX. Five major areas are addressed, namely the AC power system, the TF, PF and Fast Plasma Position Control (FPPC) power supplies, and quench protection for the TF and PF systems. Special emphasis is placed on the development of new power supply and protection schemes

  5. Full power in the European tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lallia, P.P.; Hugon, M.

    1987-01-01

    A new research campaign begins at Jet (Abingdon, UK). At this occasion, authors review and compare the performances of the three big Tokamaks that are currently in competition: Jet, JT60 and TFTR, insisting upon the European one. Conditions of ignition are reviewed together and energy losses are specified. Magnetic configurations used in tokamaks are shown, together with the technological responses brought these last years

  6. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Physical Properties of Nano systems

    CERN Document Server

    Bonca, Janez

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in nanoscience have demonstrated that fundamentally new physical phenomena are found when systems are reduced to sizes comparable to the fundamental microscopic length scales of the material investigated. There has been great interest in this research due, in particular, to its role in the development of spintronics, molecular electronics and quantum information processing. The contributions to this volume describe new advances in many of these fundamental and fascinating areas of nanophysics, including carbon nanotubes, graphene, magnetic nanostructures, transport through coupled quantum dots, spintronics, molecular electronics, and quantum information processing.

  7. An overview on plasma disruption mitigation and avoidance in tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Kaihui; Pan Chuanhong; Feng Kaiming

    2002-01-01

    Plasma disruption, which seems to be unavoidable in Tokamak operation, occurs very fast and uncontrolled. In order to keep Tokamak plasma from disruption and mitigate the disruption frequency, the research on Tokamak plasma major disruption constitutes one of the main topics in plasma physics. The phenomena and processes of the precursor, thermal quench, current quench, VDE, halo current and runaway electrons generation during plasma disruption are analyzed in detail and systematically based on the data obtained from current Tokamaks such as TFTR, JET, JT-60U and ASDEX-U, etc. The methods to mitigate and avoid disruption in Tokamak are also highlighted schematically. Therefore, it is helpful and instructive for plasma disruption research in next generation large Tokamak such as ITER-FEAT

  8. Tokamak engineering mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Song, Yuntao; Du, Shijun

    2013-01-01

    Tokamak Engineering Mechanics offers concise and thorough coverage of engineering mechanics theory and application for tokamaks, and the material is reinforced by numerous examples. Chapter topics include general principles, static mechanics, dynamic mechanics, thermal fluid mechanics and multiphysics structural mechanics of tokamak structure analysis. The theoretical principle of the design and the methods of the analysis for various components and load conditions are presented, while the latest engineering technologies are also introduced. The book will provide readers involved in the study

  9. Activities of the Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliger, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) was established by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) on June 6, 1983. RIACS is privately operated by USRA, a consortium of universities with research programs in the aerospace sciences, under contract with NASA. The primary mission of RIACS is to provide research and expertise in computer science and scientific computing to support the scientific missions of NASA ARC. The research carried out at RIACS must change its emphasis from year to year in response to NASA ARC's changing needs and technological opportunities. Research at RIACS is currently being done in the following areas: (1) parallel computing; (2) advanced methods for scientific computing; (3) high performance networks; and (4) learning systems. RIACS technical reports are usually preprints of manuscripts that have been submitted to research journals or conference proceedings. A list of these reports for the period January 1, 1994 through December 31, 1994 is in the Reports and Abstracts section of this report.

  10. Study of intelligent system for control of the tokamak-ETE plasma positioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbosa, Luis Filipe de Faria Pereira Wiltgen

    2003-01-01

    The development of an intelligent neural control system of the neural type, capable to perform real time control of the plasma displacement in the experiment tokamak spheric - ETE (spherical tokamak experiment ) is presented. The ETE machine is in operation since Nov 2000, in the LAP - Plasma Associated Laboratory of the Brazilian Institute on Spatial Research (INPE) in Sao Jose dos Campos, S P, Brazil. The experiment is dedicated to study the magnetic confinement of a fusion plasma in a configuration favorable for the construction of future reactors. Nuclear fusion constitutes a renewable energy source with low environmental impact, which uses atomic energy in pacific applications for the sustainable development of humanity. One of the important questions for the attainment of fusion relates to the stability of the plasma and control of its position during the reactor operation. Therefore, the development of systems to control the plasma in tokamaks constitutes a necessary technological advance for the feasibility of nuclear fusion. In particular, the research carried out in this thesis concerns the proposal of a system to control the vertical displacement of the plasma in the ETE tokamak, aiming to obtain steady pulses in this machine. A Magnetic Levitation system (Mag Lev) was developed as part of this work, allowing to study the nonlinear behavior of a device that, from the aspect of position control, is similar (analogous) to the plasma in the ETE tokamak, This magnetic levitation system was designed, mathematically modeled and built in order to test both classical and intelligent type controllers. The results of this comparison are very promising for the use of intelligent controllers in the ETE tokamak as well as other control applications. (author)

  11. Tokamak confinement scaling laws

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, J.

    1998-01-01

    The scaling of energy confinement with engineering parameters, such as plasma current and major radius, is important for establishing the size of an ignited fusion device. Tokamaks exhibit a variety of modes of operation with different confinement properties. At present there is no adequate first principles theory to predict tokamak energy confinement and the empirical scaling method is the preferred approach to designing next step tokamaks. This paper reviews a number of robust theoretical concepts, such as dimensional analysis and stability boundaries, which provide a framework for characterising and understanding tokamak confinement and, therefore, generate more confidence in using empirical laws for extrapolation to future devices. (author)

  12. Advancing nursing science through health trajectory research: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyman, Jean F; Henly, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    The Minnesota Center for Health Trajectory Research has focused on developing ways to better understand how interventions influence health trajectories during transitional, acute, or chronic health challenges across the life span. The health trajectory perspective advances nursing science by providing a person-centered point of view that emphasizes change in health over time within individuals, families, groups, or communities. Theoretical considerations and statistical modeling approaches used in studying health trajectories, along with exemplars from nursing research studies from this special issue of Nursing Research, are highlighted.

  13. A new facility for advanced rocket propulsion research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoeckler, Joseph G.; Green, James M.; Raitano, Paul

    1993-06-01

    A new test facility was constructed at the NASA Lewis Research Center Rocket Laboratory for the purpose of conducting rocket propulsion research at up to 8.9 kN (2000 lbf) thrust, using liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen propellants. A laser room adjacent to the test cell provides access to the rocket engine for advanced laser diagnostic systems. The size and location of the test cell provide the ability to conduct large amounts of testing in short time periods, with rapid turnover between programs. These capabilities make the new test facility an important asset for basic and applied rocket propulsion research.

  14. Cost/Benefit Prioritization for Advanced Safeguards Research and Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeMuth, S.F.; Adeli, R.; Thomas, K.E.

    2008-01-01

    A system level study utilizing commercially available Extend TM software, has been initiated to perform cost/benefit analyses for advanced safeguards research and development. The methodology is focused on estimating standard error in the inventory difference (SEID) for reprocessing and fuel fabrication facilities, for various proposed advanced safeguards measurement technologies. The inventory duration, and consequent number of inventories per year, is dictated by the detection of a significant quantity of special nuclear material (SNM). Detection is limited by the cumulative measurement uncertainty for the entire system. The cost of inventories is then compared with the cost of advanced instrumentation and/or process design changes. Current progress includes development of the methodology, future efforts will be focused on ascertaining estimated costs and performance. Case studies will be provided as examples of the methodology. (author)

  15. Neutral beam in ALVAND IIC tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghrannevisse, M.; Moradshahi, M.; Avakian, M.

    1992-01-01

    Neutral beams have a wide application in tokamak experiments. It used to heat; fuel; adjust electric potentials in plasmas and diagnose particles densities and momentum distributions. It may be used to sustain currents in tokamaks to extend the pulse length. A 5 KV; 500 mA ion source has been constructed by plasma physics group, AEOI and it used to produce plasma and study the plasma parameters. Recently this ion source has been neutralized and it adapted to a neutral beam source; and it used to heat a cylindrical DC plasma and the plasma of ALVAND IIC Tokamak which is a small research tokamak with a minor radius of 12.6 cm, and a major radius of 45.5 cm. In this paper we report the neutralization of the ion beam and the results obtained by injection of this neutral beam into plasmas. (author) 2 refs., 4 figs

  16. Advancing the research agenda for diagnostic error reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwaan, Laura; Schiff, Gordon D; Singh, Hardeep

    2013-10-01

    Diagnostic errors remain an underemphasised and understudied area of patient safety research. We briefly summarise the methods that have been used to conduct research on epidemiology, contributing factors and interventions related to diagnostic error and outline directions for future research. Research methods that have studied epidemiology of diagnostic error provide some estimate on diagnostic error rates. However, there appears to be a large variability in the reported rates due to the heterogeneity of definitions and study methods used. Thus, future methods should focus on obtaining more precise estimates in different settings of care. This would lay the foundation for measuring error rates over time to evaluate improvements. Research methods have studied contributing factors for diagnostic error in both naturalistic and experimental settings. Both approaches have revealed important and complementary information. Newer conceptual models from outside healthcare are needed to advance the depth and rigour of analysis of systems and cognitive insights of causes of error. While the literature has suggested many potentially fruitful interventions for reducing diagnostic errors, most have not been systematically evaluated and/or widely implemented in practice. Research is needed to study promising intervention areas such as enhanced patient involvement in diagnosis, improving diagnosis through the use of electronic tools and identification and reduction of specific diagnostic process 'pitfalls' (eg, failure to conduct appropriate diagnostic evaluation of a breast lump after a 'normal' mammogram). The last decade of research on diagnostic error has made promising steps and laid a foundation for more rigorous methods to advance the field.

  17. Advances in Statistical Methods for Substance Abuse Prevention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, David P.; Lockwood, Chondra M.

    2010-01-01

    The paper describes advances in statistical methods for prevention research with a particular focus on substance abuse prevention. Standard analysis methods are extended to the typical research designs and characteristics of the data collected in prevention research. Prevention research often includes longitudinal measurement, clustering of data in units such as schools or clinics, missing data, and categorical as well as continuous outcome variables. Statistical methods to handle these features of prevention data are outlined. Developments in mediation, moderation, and implementation analysis allow for the extraction of more detailed information from a prevention study. Advancements in the interpretation of prevention research results include more widespread calculation of effect size and statistical power, the use of confidence intervals as well as hypothesis testing, detailed causal analysis of research findings, and meta-analysis. The increased availability of statistical software has contributed greatly to the use of new methods in prevention research. It is likely that the Internet will continue to stimulate the development and application of new methods. PMID:12940467

  18. [Activities of Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anthony R. (Technical Monitor); Leiner, Barry M.

    2001-01-01

    The Research Institute for Advanced Computer Science (RIACS) carries out basic research and technology development in computer science, in support of the National Aeronautics and Space Administrations missions. RIACS is located at the NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California. RIACS research focuses on the three cornerstones of IT research necessary to meet the future challenges of NASA missions: 1. Automated Reasoning for Autonomous Systems Techniques are being developed enabling spacecraft that will be self-guiding and self-correcting to the extent that they will require little or no human intervention. Such craft will be equipped to independently solve problems as they arise, and fulfill their missions with minimum direction from Earth. 2. Human-Centered Computing Many NASA missions require synergy between humans and computers, with sophisticated computational aids amplifying human cognitive and perceptual abilities. 3. High Performance Computing and Networking Advances in the performance of computing and networking continue to have major impact on a variety of NASA endeavors, ranging from modeling and simulation to analysis of large scientific datasets to collaborative engineering, planning and execution. In addition, RIACS collaborates with NASA scientists to apply IT research to a variety of NASA application domains. RIACS also engages in other activities, such as workshops, seminars, visiting scientist programs and student summer programs, designed to encourage and facilitate collaboration between the university and NASA IT research communities.

  19. Advancing Alzheimer's research: A review of big data promises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Simon, Gyorgy; Yu, Fang

    2017-10-01

    To review the current state of science using big data to advance Alzheimer's disease (AD) research and practice. In particular, we analyzed the types of research foci addressed, corresponding methods employed and study findings reported using big data in AD. Systematic review was conducted for articles published in PubMed from January 1, 2010 through December 31, 2015. Keywords with AD and big data analytics were used for literature retrieval. Articles were reviewed and included if they met the eligibility criteria. Thirty-eight articles were included in this review. They can be categorized into seven research foci: diagnosing AD or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n=10), predicting MCI to AD conversion (n=13), stratifying risks for AD (n=5), mining the literature for knowledge discovery (n=4), predicting AD progression (n=2), describing clinical care for persons with AD (n=3), and understanding the relationship between cognition and AD (n=3). The most commonly used datasets are AD Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) (n=16), electronic health records (EHR) (n=11), MEDLINE (n=3), and other research datasets (n=8). Logistic regression (n=9) and support vector machine (n=8) are the most used methods for data analysis. Big data are increasingly used to address AD-related research questions. While existing research datasets are frequently used, other datasets such as EHR data provide a unique, yet under-utilized opportunity for advancing AD research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Advances in thermoelectric materials research: Looking back and moving forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Jian; Tritt, Terry M

    2017-09-29

    High-performance thermoelectric materials lie at the heart of thermoelectrics, the simplest technology applicable to direct thermal-to-electrical energy conversion. In its recent 60-year history, the field of thermoelectric materials research has stalled several times, but each time it was rejuvenated by new paradigms. This article reviews several potentially paradigm-changing mechanisms enabled by defects, size effects, critical phenomena, anharmonicity, and the spin degree of freedom. These mechanisms decouple the otherwise adversely interdependent physical quantities toward higher material performance. We also briefly discuss a number of promising materials, advanced material synthesis and preparation techniques, and new opportunities. The renewable energy landscape will be reshaped if the current trend in thermoelectric materials research is sustained into the foreseeable future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  1. NORA project offers unique reactor research and advanced training opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1961-01-01

    An international program for reactor research and advanced training for a period of three years has been established in connection with the Norwegian critical assembly NORA. The aim of the project is to determine, through integral experiments, the basic reactor physics data for lattices moderated with light-water, heavy-water or mixtures of heavy and light water, with fuels of different sizes and spacing, three different enrichments and compositions. The objectives, programme, and facilities are described in details

  2. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 1 presents articles about junction electroluminescence; metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) physics; ion implantation in semiconductors; and electron transport through insulating thin films. The book describes the basic physics of carrier injection; energy transfer and recombination mechanisms; state of the art efficiencies; and future prospects for light emitting diodes. The text then discusses solid state spectroscopy, which is the pair spectra observed in gallium phosphide photoluminescence. The extensive studies

  3. Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vrieling, P. Douglas [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-01-01

    SNL/CA proposes the Collaboration in Research and Engineering for Advanced Technology and Education (CREATE) facility to support customer-driven national security mission requirements while demonstrating a fiscally responsible approach to cost-control. SNL/CA realizes that due to the current backlog of capital projects in NNSA that following the normal Line Item process to procure capital funding is unlikely and therefore SNL/CA will be looking at all options including Alternative Financing.

  4. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 4 covers articles on single crystal compound semiconductors and complex polycrystalline materials. The book discusses narrow gap semiconductors and solid state batteries. The text then describes the advantages of hot-pressed microcrystalline compacts of oxygen-octahedra ferroelectrics over single crystal materials, as well as heterostructure junction lasers. Solid state physicists, materials scientists, electrical engineers, and graduate students studying the subjects being discussed will find the book invaluable.

  5. Advances in research on poultry and rabbit meat quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerolamo Xiccato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Main force and weakness points of poultry and rabbit production chains are presented and meat quality discussed in relation to nutritional and technological issues. An analysis of the most important poultry and rabbit meat quality traits and their major relationships with production factors (genotype, feeding, housing, pre-slaughter handling, slaughtering, and processing is provided. Most recent research advancements are presen- ted in view of the consumer’s demand for healthy and safe products obtained respecting animal welfare.

  6. Fossil Energy Advanced Research and Technology Development Materials Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cole, N.C.; Judkins, R.R. (comps.)

    1992-12-01

    Objective of this materials program is to conduct R and D on materials for fossil energy applications with focus on longer-term and generic needs of the various fossil fuel technologies. The projects are organized according to materials research areas: (1) ceramics, (2) new alloys: iron aluminides, advanced austenitics and chromium niobium alloys, and (3) technology development and transfer. Separate abstracts have been prepared.

  7. UCLA program in reactor studies: The ARIES tokamak reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-01-01

    The ARIES research program is a multi-institutional effort to develop several visions of tokamak reactors with enhanced economic, safety, and environmental features. The aims are to determine the potential economics, safety, and environmental features of a range of possible tokamak reactors, and to identify physics and technology areas with the highest leverage for achieving the best tokamak reactor. Four ARIES visions are currently planned for the ARIES program. The ARIES-1 design is a DT-burning reactor based on ''modest'' extrapolations from the present tokamak physics database and relies on either existing technology or technology for which trends are already in place, often in programs outside fusion. ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 are DT-burning reactors which will employ potential advances in physics. The ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs employ the same plasma core but have two distinct fusion power core designs; ARIES-2 utilize the lithium as the coolant and breeder and vanadium alloys as the structural material while ARIES-4 utilizes helium is the coolant, solid tritium breeders, and SiC composite as the structural material. Lastly, the ARIES-3 is a conceptual D- 3 He reactor. During the period Dec. 1, 1990 to Nov. 31, 1991, most of the ARIES activity has been directed toward completing the technical work for the ARIES-3 design and documenting the results and findings. We have also completed the documentation for the ARIES-1 design and presented the results in various meetings and conferences. During the last quarter, we have initiated the scoping phase for ARIES-2 and ARIES-4 designs

  8. Stability at high performance in the MAST spherical tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buttery, R.J.; Akers, R.; Arends, E. =

    2003-01-01

    The development of reliable H-modes on MAST, together with advances in heating power and a range of powerful diagnostics, has provided a platform to enable MAST to address some of he most important issues of tokamak stability. In particular the high β potential of the ST is highlighted with stable operation at β N ∼5-6 , β T ∼ 16% and β p as high as 1.9, confirmed by a range of profile diagnostics. Calculations indicate that β N levels are in the vicinity of no-wall stability limits. Studies have provided the first identification of the Neoclassical Tearing Mode (NTM) in the ST, using its behaviour to quantitatively validate predictions of NTM theory, previously only applied to conventional tokamaks. Experiments have demonstrated that sawteeth play a strong role in triggering NTMs - by avoiding large sawteeth much higher β N can, and has, been reached. Further studies have confirmed the NTM's significance, with large islands observed using the 300 point Thomson diagnostic, and locking of large n=1 modes frequently leading to disruptions. H-mode plasmas are also limited by ELMs, with confinement degraded as ELM frequency rises. However, unlike the conventional tokamak, the ELMs in high performing regimes on MAST (H IPB98Y2 ∼1) appear to be type III in nature. Modelling identifies instability to peeling modes, consistent with a type III interpretation, and shows considerable scope to raise pressure gradients (despite n=∞ ballooning theory predictions of instability) before ballooning type modes (perhaps associated with type I ELMs) occur. Finally sawteeth are shown not to remove the q=1 surface in the ST - other promising models are being explored. Thus research on MAST is not only demonstrating stable operation at high performance levels, and developing methods to control instabilities; it is also providing detailed tests of the stability physics and models applicable to conventional tokamaks, such as ITER. (author)

  9. Advanced High-Level Waste Glass Research and Development Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeler, David K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Vienna, John D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Schweiger, Michael J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Fox, Kevin M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection (ORP) has implemented an integrated program to increase the loading of Hanford tank wastes in glass while meeting melter lifetime expectancies and process, regulatory, and product quality requirements. The integrated ORP program is focused on providing a technical, science-based foundation from which key decisions can be made regarding the successful operation of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) facilities. The fundamental data stemming from this program will support development of advanced glass formulations, key process control models, and tactical processing strategies to ensure safe and successful operations for both the low-activity waste (LAW) and high-level waste (HLW) vitrification facilities with an appreciation toward reducing overall mission life. The purpose of this advanced HLW glass research and development plan is to identify the near-, mid-, and longer-term research and development activities required to develop and validate advanced HLW glasses and their associated models to support facility operations at WTP, including both direct feed and full pretreatment flowsheets. This plan also integrates technical support of facility operations and waste qualification activities to show the interdependence of these activities with the advanced waste glass (AWG) program to support the full WTP mission. Figure ES-1 shows these key ORP programmatic activities and their interfaces with both WTP facility operations and qualification needs. The plan is a living document that will be updated to reflect key advancements and mission strategy changes. The research outlined here is motivated by the potential for substantial economic benefits (e.g., significant increases in waste throughput and reductions in glass volumes) that will be realized when advancements in glass formulation continue and models supporting facility operations are implemented. Developing and applying advanced

  10. NATO Advanced Research Institute on Health Services Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Werff, Albert; Hirsch, Gary; Barnard, Keith

    1984-01-01

    The Advanced Research Institute on "Health Services Systems" was held under the auspices of the NATO Special Programme Panel on Systems Science as a part of the NATO Science Committee's continuous effort to promote the advancement of science through international cooperation. A special word is said in this respect supra by Pro­ fessor Checkland, Chairman of the Systems Science Panel. The Advanced Research Institute (ARI) was organized for the purpose of bringing together senior scientists to seek a consensus on the assessment of the present state of knowledge on the specific topic of "health services systems" and to present views and recom­ mendations for future health services research directions, which should be of value to both the scientific community and the people in charge of reorienting health services. The conference was structured so as to permit the assembly of a variety of complementary viewpoints through intensive group discussions to be the basis of this final report. Invitees were selected fr...

  11. DIII-D research operations. Annual report to the Department of Energy, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simonen, T.C.; Baker, D.

    1993-01-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics for the U.S. Department of Energy. The DIII-D is the most flexible and best diagnosed tokamak in the world and the second largest tokamak in the U.S. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data needed by ITER and to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The DIII-D long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY92 the DIII-D research program concentrated in three major areas: Tokamak Physics, Divertor and Boundary Physics, and Advanced Tokamak Studies

  12. Advancing HIV research with pregnant women: navigating challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krubiner, Carleigh B; Faden, Ruth R; Cadigan, R Jean; Gilbert, Sappho Z; Henry, Leslie M; Little, Margaret O; Mastroianni, Anna C; Namey, Emily E; Sullivan, Kristen A; Lyerly, Anne D

    2016-09-24

    Concerns about including pregnant women in research have led to a dearth of evidence to guide safe and effective treatment and prevention of HIV in pregnancy. To better understand why these evidence gaps persist and inform guidance for responsible inclusion of pregnant women in the HIV research agenda, we aimed to learn what HIV experts perceive as barriers and constraints to conducting this research. We conducted a series of group and one-on-one consultations with 62 HIV investigators and clinicians to elicit their views and experiences conducting HIV research involving pregnant women. Thematic analysis was used to identify priorities and perceived barriers to HIV research with pregnant women. Experts discussed a breadth of needed research, including safety, efficacy, and appropriate dosing of: newer antiretrovirals for pregnant women, emerging preventive strategies, and treatment for coinfections. Challenges to conducting research on pregnancy and HIV included ethical concerns, such as how to weigh risks and benefits in pregnancy; legal concerns, such as restrictive interpretations of current regulations and liability issues; financial and professional disincentives, including misaligned funder priorities and fear of reputational damage; and analytical and logistical complexities, such as challenges recruiting and retaining pregnant women to sufficiently power analyses. Investigators face numerous challenges to conducting needed HIV research with pregnant women. Advancing such research will require clearer guidance regarding ethical and legal uncertainties; incentives that encourage rather than discourage investigators to undertake such research; and a commitment to earlier development of safety and efficacy data through creative trial designs.

  13. Advanced accelerator and mm-wave structure research at LANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-22

    This document outlines acceleration projects and mm-wave structure research performed at LANL. The motivation for PBG research is described first, with reference to couplers for superconducting accelerators and structures for room-temperature accelerators and W-band TWTs. These topics are then taken up in greater detail: PBG structures and the MIT PBG accelerator; SRF PBG cavities at LANL; X-band PBG cavities at LANL; and W-band PBG TWT at LANL. The presentation concludes by describing other advanced accelerator projects: beam shaping with an Emittance Exchanger, diamond field emitter array cathodes, and additive manufacturing of novel accelerator structures.

  14. Tokamak control simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelbaum, T.N.; Serben, S.; Var, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A computer model of a tokamak experimental power reactor and its control system is being constructed. This simulator will allow the exploration of various open loop and closed loop strategies for reactor control. This paper provides a brief description of the simulator and some of the potential control problems associated with this class of tokamaks

  15. DIII-D research operations. Annual report, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Haye, R.J. [ed.

    1994-05-01

    The DIII-D tokamak research program is carried out by General Atomics (GA) for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The DIII-D is the most flexible tokamak in the world. The primary goal of the DIII-D tokamak research program is to provide data to develop a conceptual physics blueprint for a commercially attractive electrical demonstration plant (DEMO) that would open a path to fusion power commercialization. In doing so, the DIII-D program provides physics and technology R&D outputs to aid the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) and the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Specific DIII-D objectives include the steady-state sustainment of plasma current as well as demonstrating techniques for microwave heating, divertor heat removal, fuel exhaust and tokamak plasma control. The DIII-D program is addressing these objectives in an integrated fashion with high beta and with good confinement. The long-range plan is organized into two major thrusts; the development of an advanced divertor and the development of advanced tokamak concepts. These two thrusts have a common goal: an improved DEMO reactor with lower cost and smaller size than the present DEMO which can be extrapolated from the conventional ITER operational scenario. In order to prepare for the long-range program, in FY93 the DIII-D research program concentrated on three major areas: Divertor and Boundary Physics, Advanced Tokamak Studies, and Tokamak Physics. The major goals of the Divertor and Boundary Physics studies are the control of impurities, efficient heat removal and understanding the strong role that the edge plasma plays in the global energy confinement of the plasma. The advanced tokamak studies initiated the investigation into new techniques for improving energy confinement, controlling particle fueling and increasing plasma beta. The major goal of the Tokamak Physics Studies is the understanding of energy and particle transport in a reactor relevant plasma.

  16. Advanced Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology Research and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wayne A.

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology program is developing next generation power conversion technologies that will enable future missions that have requirements that cannot be met by either the ubiquitous photovoltaic systems or by current Radioisotope Power System (RPS) technology. Performance goals of advanced radioisotope power systems include improvement over the state-of-practice General Purpose Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator by providing significantly higher efficiency to reduce the number of radioisotope fuel modules, and increase specific power (watts/kilogram). Other Advanced RPS goals include safety, long-life, reliability, scalability, multi-mission capability, resistance to radiation, and minimal interference with the scientific payload. NASA has awarded ten contracts in the technology areas of Brayton, Stirling, Thermoelectric, and Thermophotovoltaic power conversion including five development contracts that deal with more mature technologies and five research contracts. The Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team includes members from NASA GRC, JPL, DOE and Orbital Sciences whose function is to review the technologies being developed under the ten Radioisotope Power Conversion Technology contracts and assess their relevance to NASA's future missions. Presented is an overview of the ten radioisotope power conversion technology contracts and NASA's Advanced RPS Systems Assessment Team.

  17. Research reactor of the future: The advanced neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appleton, B.; West, C.

    1994-01-01

    Agents for cancer detection and treatment, stronger materials, better electronic gadgets, and other consumer and industrial products - these are assured benefits of a research reactor project proposed for Oak Ridge. Just as American companies have again assumed world leadership in producing semiconductor chips as well as cars and trucks, the United States is poised to retake the lead in neutron science by building and operating the $2.9 billion Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) research reactor by the start of the next century. In 1985, the neutron community, led by ORNL researchers, proposed a pioneering project, later called the ANS. Scheduled to begin operation in 2003, the ANS is seen not only as a replacement for the aging HFIR and HFBR but also as the best laboratory in the world for conducting neutron-based research

  18. The advanced neutron source research and development plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selby, D.L.

    1995-08-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is being designed as a user-oriented neutron research laboratory centered around the most intense continuous beams of thermal and subthermal neutrons in the world (an order of magnitude more intense than beams available from the most advanced existing reactors). The ANS will be built around a new research reactor of 330-MW fission power, producing an unprecedented peak thermal flux of >7 · 10 19 · m -2 · s -1 . Primarily a research facility, the ANS will accommodate more than 1000 academic, industrial, and government researchers each year. They will conduct basic research in all branches of science as well as applied research leading to better understanding of new materials, including high temperature super conductors, plastics, and thin films. Some 48 neutron beam stations will be set up in the ANS beam rooms and the neutron guide hall for neutron scattering and for fundamental and nuclear physics research. There also will be extensive facilities for materials irradiation, isotope production, and analytical chemistry. The top level work breakdown structure (WBS) for the project. As noted in this figure, one component of the project is a research and development (R ampersand D) program (WBS 1.1). This program interfaces with all of the other project level two WBS activities. Because one of the project guidelines is to meet minimum performance goals without relying on new inventions, this R ampersand D activity is not intended to produce new concepts to allow the project to meet minimum performance goals. Instead, the R ampersand D program will focus on the four objectives described

  19. Utilization of MCNP code in the research and design for China advanced research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Feng

    2006-01-01

    MCNP, which is the internationalized neutronics code, is used for nuclear research and design in China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR). MCNP is an important neutronics code in the research and design for CARR since many calculation tasks could be undertaken by it. Many nuclear parameters on reactor core, the design and optimization research for many reactor utilizations, much verification for other nuclear calculation code and so on are conducted with help of MCNP. (author)

  20. Advanced nuclear reactor safety design technology research in NPIC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, H.

    2014-01-01

    After the Fukushima accident happen, Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs) construction has been suspended in China for a time. Now the new regulatory rule has been proposed that the most advanced safety standard must be adopted for the new NPPs and practical elimination of large fission product release by design during the next five plans period. So the advanced reactor research is developing in China. NPIC is engaging on the ACP1000 and ACP100 (Small Module Reactor) design. The main design character will be introduced in this paper. The Passive Combined with Active (PCWA) design was adopted during the ACP1000 design to reduce the core damage frequency (CDF); the Cavity Injection System (CIS) is design to mitigation the consequence of the severe accident. Advance passive safety system was designed to ensure the long term residual heat removal during the Small Module Reactor (SMR). The SMR will be utilized to be the floating reactors, district heating reactor and so on. Besides, the Science and Technology on Reactor System Design Technology Laboratory (LRSDT) also engaged on the fundamental thermal-hydraulic characteristic research in support of the system validation. (author)

  1. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strait, E. J.; Park, J. K.; Marmar, E. S.; Ahn, J. W.; Berkery, J. W.; Burrell, K. H.; Canik, J. M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Ferraro, N. M.; Garofalo, A. M.; Gates, D. A.; Greenwald, M.; Kim, K.; King, J. D.; Lanctot, M. J.; Lazerson, S. A.; Liu, Y. Q.; Lore, J. D.; Menard, J. E.; Nazikian, R.; Shafer, M. W.; Paz-Soldan, C.; Reiman, A. H.; Rice, J. E.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Sugiyama, L.; Turnbull, A. D.; Volpe, F.; Wang, Z. R.; Wolfe, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10 -4 of the main axisymmetric field, such ''3D'' fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data

  2. Quantify Plasma Response to Non-Axisymmetric (3D) Magnetic Fields in Tokamaks, Final Report for FES (Fusion Energy Sciences) FY2014 Joint Research Target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Park, J. -K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Marmar, E. S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Ahn, J. -W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Berkery, J. W. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Burrell, K. H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Canik, J. M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Delgado-Aparicio, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Ferraro, N. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Garofalo, A. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Gates, D. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Greenwald, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kim, K. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); King, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lanctot, M. J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazerson, S. A. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Liu, Y. Q. [Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom). Euratom/CCFE Association; Logan, N. C. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Lore, J. D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Menard, J. E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Nazikian, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Shafer, M. W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Paz-Soldan, C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Reiman, A. H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Rice, J. E. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Sabbagh, S. A. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Sugiyama, L. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Turnbull, A. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Volpe, F. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Wang, Z. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Wolfe, S. M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2014-09-30

    The goal of the 2014 Joint Research Target (JRT) has been to conduct experiments and analysis to investigate and quantify the response of tokamak plasmas to non-axisymmetric (3D) magnetic fields. Although tokamaks are conceptually axisymmetric devices, small asymmetries often result from inaccuracies in the manufacture and assembly of the magnet coils, or from nearby magnetized objects. In addition, non-axisymmetric fields may be deliberately applied for various purposes. Even at small amplitudes of order 10-4 of the main axisymmetric field, such “3D” fields can have profound impacts on the plasma performance. The effects are often detrimental (reduction of stabilizing plasma rotation, degradation of energy confinement, localized heat flux to the divertor, or excitation of instabilities) but may in some case be beneficial (maintenance of rotation, or suppression of instabilities). In general, the magnetic response of the plasma alters the 3D field, so that the magnetic field configuration within the plasma is not simply the sum of the external 3D field and the original axisymmetric field. Typically the plasma response consists of a mixture of local screening of the external field by currents induced at resonant surfaces in the plasma, and amplification of the external field by stable kink modes. Thus, validated magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) models of the plasma response to 3D fields are crucial to the interpretation of existing experiments and the prediction of plasma performance in future devices. The non-axisymmetric coil sets available at each facility allow well-controlled studies of the response to external 3D fields. The work performed in support of the 2014 Joint Research Target has included joint modeling and analysis of existing experimental data, and collaboration on new experiments designed to address the goals of the JRT. A major focus of the work was validation of numerical models through quantitative comparison to experimental data, in

  3. Los Alamos NEP research in advanced plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenberg, Kurt; Gerwin, Richard

    1991-01-01

    Research was initiated in advanced plasma thrusters that capitalizes on lab capabilities in plasma science and technology. The goal of the program was to examine the scaling issues of magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster performance in support of NASA's MPD thruster development program. The objective was to address multi-megawatt, large scale, quasi-steady state MPD thruster performance. Results to date include a new quasi-steady state operating regime which was obtained at space exploration initiative relevant power levels, that enables direct coaxial gun-MPD comparisons of thruster physics and performance. The radiative losses are neglible. Operation with an applied axial magnetic field shows the same operational stability and exhaust plume uniformity benefits seen in MPD thrusters. Observed gun impedance is in close agreement with the magnetic Bernoulli model predictions. Spatial and temporal measurements of magnetic field, electric field, plasma density, electron temperature, and ion/neutral energy distribution are underway. Model applications to advanced mission logistics are also underway.

  4. Status report on research on advanced fundamental engineering in 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute) has been promoting the cooperative research program on advanced fundamental engineering with the Japanese Universities. It is the 5th year of this program on 1999. JNC has been calling for the research themes of utilizing the equipment and facilities of JNC, which must be the leading research for the JNC projects. The expert committee has selected the issues from the applications of the universities; This report includes the list of the researches and individual summaries implemented in 1999, in which total 49 issues are categorized in the three fields, these are, fast breeder reactor, nuclear fuel cycle, and environment technology. The 26 issues are included in the field of fast breeder reactor. Topics in this area are neutron beam technology to measure voids, laser technology to detect failed fuel, ultra-sonic velocity meter to estimate passive cooling characteristics, behavior of sodium coolant in accidents, physics on TRU fuel, and mechanical and/or chemical characteristics on irradiated solid metals, ceramics and liquids. The 9 issues are included in the field of nuclear fuel cycle. Topics in this area are chemical erosion of material, computerized simulation on actinide by molecular orbit model, chemical stability on advanced reprocessing, laser technology to measure fuel particles, decomposition of fluoride oil, advanced dose evaluation. The 9 issues are included in the field of environment technology. Topics in this area are behavior of underground water, radioactivity ecology of plants, biochemical activities of microbes in deep bedrock. The individual report describes the title, related personnel, its time schedule, objectives, facilities, status, and references in the prearranged format. (Tanaka, T.)

  5. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Suk Ho; Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, Ji Su [and others

    2000-04-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  6. Basic research and industrialization of CANDU advanced fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, Suk Ho; Park, Joo Hwan; Jun, Ji Su

    2000-04-01

    Wolsong Unit 1 as the first heavy water reactor in Korea has been in service for 17 years since 1983. It would be about the time to prepare a plan for the solution of problems due to aging of the reactor. The aging of CANDU reactor could lead especially to the steam generator cruding and pressure tube sagging and creep and then decreases the operation margin to make some problems on reactor operations and safety. The counterplan could be made in two ways. One is to repair or modify reactor itself. The other is to develop new advanced fuel to increase of CANDU operation margin effectively, so as to compensate the reduced operation margin. Therefore, the first objectives in the present R and D is to develop the CANFLEX-NU (CANDU Flexible fuelling-Natural Uranium) fuel as a CANDU advanced fuel. The second objectives is to develop CANDU advanced fuel bundle to utilize advanced fuel cycles such as recovered uranium, slightly enriched uranium, etc. and so to raise adaptability for change in situation of uranium market. Also, it is to develop CANDU advanced fuel technology which improve uranium utilization to cope with a world-wide imbalance between uranium supply and demand, without significant modification of nuclear reactor design and refuelling strategies. As the implementations to achieve the above R and D goal, the work contents and scope of technology development of CANDU advanced fuel using natural uranium (CANFLEX-NU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the nuclear design and fuel management analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the safety analysis, fuel fabrication technologies, the out-pile thermalhydraulic test and in-pile irradiation tests performed. At the next, the work scopes and contents of feasibility study of CANDU advanced fuel using recycled uranium (CANFLEX-RU) are the fuel element/bundle designs, the reactor physics analysis, the thermalhydraulic analysis, the basic safety analysis of a CANDU-6 reactor with CANFLEX-RU fuel, the fabrication and

  7. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2016

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-12-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on “Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)”, has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2016 (April 1st, 2016 - March 31st, 2017), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2016. (author)

  8. Intensive Research Program on Advances in Nonsmooth Dynamics 2016

    CERN Document Server

    Jeffrey, Mike; Lázaro, J; Olm, Josep

    2017-01-01

    This volume contains extended abstracts outlining selected talks and other selected presentations given by participants throughout the "Intensive Research Program on Advances in Nonsmooth Dynamics 2016", held at the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM) in Barcelona from February 1st to April 29th, 2016. They include brief research articles reporting new results, descriptions of preliminary work or open problems, and outlines of prominent discussion sessions. The articles are all the result of direct collaborations initiated during the research program. The topic is the theory and applications of Nonsmooth Dynamics. This includes systems involving elements of: impacting, switching, on/off control, hybrid discrete-continuous dynamics, jumps in physical properties, and many others. Applications include: electronics, climate modeling, life sciences, mechanics, ecology, and more. Numerous new results are reported concerning the dimensionality and robustness of nonsmooth models, shadowing variables, numbers of limit...

  9. Seventh International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is dedicated to the publication of selected papers presented at the Seventh International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research. The Symposium was organized by Jackson State University (JSU from September 12–15, 2010 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi. It was built upon the overwhelming success of previous symposia hosted by JSU and co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, the U.S. Department of Education Title III Graduate Education Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the JSU Office of Academic Affairs, and the JSU Office of Research and Federal Relations. [...

  10. Sixth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul B. Tchounwou

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health highlights selected papers presented at the Sixth International Symposium on Recent Advances in Environmental Health Research organized by Jackson State University (JSU from September 13−16, 2009 at the Marriott Hotel in Jackson, Mississippi, USA. The Symposium was built upon the overwhelming success of previous symposia hosted by JSU and co-sponsored by the National Institutes of Health (NIH RCMI-Center for Environmental Health, the U.S. Department of Education Title III Graduate Education Program, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the JSU Office of Academic Affairs, and the JSU Office of Research and Federal Relations. [...

  11. Advances in mechanisms, robotics and design education and research

    CERN Document Server

    Schmiedeler, James; Sreenivasan, S; Su, Hai-Jun

    2013-01-01

    This book contains papers on a wide range of topics in the area of kinematics, mechanisms, robotics, and design, addressing new research advances and innovations in design education. The content is divided into  five main categories headed ‘Historical Perspectives’, ‘Kinematics and Mechanisms’, ‘Robotic Systems’, ‘Legged Locomotion’, and ‘Design Engineering Education’. Contributions take the form of survey articles, historical perspectives, commentaries on trends on education or research, original research contributions, and papers on design education.   This volume celebrates the achievements of Professor Kenneth Waldron who has made innumerable and invaluable contributions to these fields in the last fifty years. His leadership and his pioneering work have influenced thousands of people in this discipline.

  12. Review of research on advanced computational science in FY2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2017-01-01

    Research on advanced computational science for nuclear applications, based on 'Plan to Achieve Medium- to Long-term Objectives of the Japan Atomic Energy Agency (Medium- to Long-term Plan)', has been performed at Center for Computational Science and e-Systems (CCSE), Japan Atomic Energy Agency. CCSE established the committee consisting of outside experts and authorities which does research evaluation and advices for the assistance of the research and development. This report summarizes the followings. (1) Results of the R and D performed at CCSE in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016), (2) Results of the evaluation on the R and D by the committee in FY 2015 (April 1st, 2015 - March 31st, 2016). (author)

  13. Three novel tokamak plasma regimes in TFTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furth, H.P.

    1985-10-01

    Aside from extending ''standard'' ohmic and neutral beam heating studies to advanced plasma parameters, TFTR has encountered a number of special plasma regimes that have the potential to shed new light on the physics of tokamak confinement and the optimal design of future D-T facilities: (1) High-powered, neutral beam heating at low plasma densities can maintain a highly reactive hot-ion population (with quasi-steady-state beam fueling and current drive) in a tokamak configuration of modest bulk-plasma confinement requirements. (2) Plasma displacement away from limiter contact lends itself to clarification of the role of edge-plasma recycling and radiation cooling within the overall pattern of tokamak heat flow. (3) Noncentral auxiliary heating (with a ''hollow'' power-deposition profile) should serve to raise the central tokamak plasma temperature without deterioration of central region confinement, thus facilitating the study of alpha-heating effects in TFTR. The experimental results of regime (3) support the theory that tokamak profile consistency is related to resistive kink stability and that the global energy confinement time is determined by transport properties of the plasma edge region

  14. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, Jeff B; Marshall, Frances M [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Allen, Todd R [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2012-03-15

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  15. Assessment of Research Needs for Advanced Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1985-11-01

    The DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Working Group (AFCWG) was formed and asked to perform a scientific evaluation of the current status of fuel cells, with emphasis on identification of long-range research that may have a significant impact on the practical utilization of fuel cells in a variety of applications. The AFCWG held six meetings at locations throughout the country where fuel cell research and development are in progress, for presentations by experts on the status of fuel cell research and development efforts, as well as for inputs on research needs. Subsequent discussions by the AFCWG have resulted in the identification of priority research areas that should be explored over the long term in order to advance the design and performance of fuel cells of all types. Surveys describing the salient features of individual fuel cell types are presented in Chapters 2 to 6 and include elaborations of long-term research needs relating to the expeditious introduction of improved fuel cells. The Introduction and the Summary (Chapter 1) were prepared by AFCWG. They were repeatedly revised in response to comments and criticism. The present version represents the closest approach to a consensus that we were able to reach, which should not be interpreted to mean that each member of AFCWG endorses every statement and every unexpressed deletion. The Introduction and Summary always represent a majority view and, occasionally, a unanimous judgment. Chapters 2 to 6 provide background information and carry the names of identified authors. The identified authors of Chapters 2 to 6, rather than AFCWG as a whole, bear full responsibility for the scientific and technical contents of these chapters.

  16. Research on the Academic Benefits of the Advanced Placement Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell T. Warne

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With more than 3 million participants per year, the Advanced Placement (AP program is one of the most popular programs in the United States for exposing high-achieving high school students to advanced academic content. Sponsored by the College Board, the AP program provides a framework in which high school teachers can teach introductory college-level courses to high school students. These students then take one of 34 standardized tests at the end of the year, and students who score well on their course’s AP test can receive college credit from their university in which they later enroll. Despite the popularity of the AP program, remarkably little independent research has been conducted on the academic benefits of AP. In this article, I summarize the state of knowledge about the academic benefits of AP. Previous research and descriptive data indicate that AP students outperform non-AP students on a variety of academic measures, but many other aspects of the program are poorly understood, partially due to variability across AP subjects. These aspects include the causal impact of AP, which components of the program are most effective in boosting academic achievement, and how students engage with the AP program. I also conclude by making suggestions for researchers to use new methodologies to investigate new scientific and policy questions and new student populations to improve the educational scholars’ and practitioners’ understanding of the AP program.

  17. Design and construction of electronic components for a ''Novillo'' Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez C, R.

    1986-07-01

    The goal of this effort was to design, construct and make functional the electronic components for a ''Novillo'' Tokamak currently being experimentally investigated at the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. The problem was to develop programmable electronic switches capable of discharging high voltage kilowatt energies stored in capacitator banks onto the coils of the Tokamak. (author)

  18. First observation of a new zonal-flow cycle state in the H-mode transport barrier of the experimental advanced superconducting Tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, G.S.; Wang, H. Q.; Wan, B. N.

    2012-01-01

    A new turbulence-flow cycle state has been discovered after the formation of a transport barrier in the H-mode plasma edge during a quiescent phase on the EAST superconducting tokamak. Zonal-flow modulation of high-frequency-broadband (0.05-1MHz) turbulence was observed in the steep-gradient region...... leading to intermittent transport events across the edge transport barrier. Good confinement (H-98y,H-2 similar to 1) has been achieved in this state, even with input heating power near the L-H transition threshold. A novel model based on predator-prey interaction between turbulence and zonal flows...... reproduced this state well. © 2012 American Institute of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4769852]...

  19. Research advances on multifocal electroretinogram in primary open angle glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng-Fei Mo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Primary open angle glaucoma is a chronic and progressive optic neuropathy. It can lead to serious damage of visual impairment, and it is an important eye disease of blindness. Multifocal electroretinogram is a new way to measure visual electrophysiology. It can measure electroretinogram of the whole visual field of many small parts in a relatively short period of time, and it can reflect the function of regional retina. It has an extremely important value for early diagnosis of primary open angle glaucoma. The research advances on multifocal electroretinogram in diagnosing primary open angle glaucoma were summarized in this paper.

  20. Advances in research and development of mango industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian S. E. Bally

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available World mango production is spread over 100 countries that produce over 34.3 million tons of fruit annually. Eighty percent of this production is based in the top nine producing nations that also consume upward of 90% of their production domestically. One to 2 percent of fruit is traded internationally in to markets in the European Community, USA, Arabian Peninsula and Asia. This paper outlines some of the recent research and development advances in mango breeding and genomics, rootstock development, disease management and harvest technologies that are influencing the production and quality of mango fruit traded domestically and internationally.

  1. Oklahoma State University proposed Advanced Technology Research Center. Environmental Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA) evaluating the construction and equipping of the proposed Advanced Technology Research Center (ATRC) at Oklahoma State University (OSU) in Stillwater, Oklahoma. Based on the analysis in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required.

  2. New era of neutron scattering research on advanced materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikeda, Susumu

    2001-01-01

    The projects of the next generation of pulsed spallation neutron source are planed in USA, Europe and Japan. They are one order of magnitude more powerful than the most powerful existing neutron source, ISIS in UK. They offer the exciting prospects for the future, and will open the new era of neutron scattering research on advanced materials. The Japanese project is named as the 'Joint project' between JAERI and KEK on high-intensity proton accelerators. The details of the neutron science facility in the 'Joint project' and the sciences to be developed are summarized. (author)

  3. The Polaris Project: Undergraduate Research Catalyzing Advances in Arctic Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, J. D.; Holmes, R. M.; Natali, S.; Mann, P. J.; Bunn, A. G.; Frey, K. E.

    2017-12-01

    With guidance and sufficient resources, undergraduates can drive the exploration of new research directions, lead high impact scientific products, and effectively communicate the value of science to the public. As mentors, we must recognize the strong contribution undergraduates make to the advancement of scientific understanding and their unique ability and desire to be transdisciplinary and to translate ideas into action. Our job is to be sure students have the resources and tools to successfully explore questions that they care about, not to provide or lead them towards answers we already have. The central goal of the Polaris Project is to advance understanding of climate change in the Arctic through an integrated research, training, and outreach program that has at its heart a research expedition for undergraduates to a remote field station in the Arctic. Our integrative approach to training provides undergraduates with strong intellectual development and they bring fresh perspectives, creativity, and a unique willingness to take risks on new ideas that have an energizing effect on research and outreach. Since the projects inception in summer 2008, we have had >90 undergraduates participate in high-impact field expeditions and outreach activities. Over the years, we have also been fortunate enough to attract an ethnically, racially, and culturally diverse group of students, including students from Puerto Rico, Hispanic-, African- and Native-Americans, members of the LGBT community, and first-generation college students. Most of these students have since pursued graduate degrees in ecology, and many have received NSF fellowships and Fulbright scholarships. One of our major goals is to increase the diversity of the scientific community, and we have been successful in our short-term goal of recruiting and retaining a diverse group of students. The goal of this presentation is to provide a description of the mentoring model at the heart of the Polaris Project

  4. Parametric dependence of density limits in the Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research (TEXTOR): Comparison of thermal instability theory with experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, F.A.; Stacey, W.M.; Rapp, J.

    2001-01-01

    The observed dependence of the TEXTOR [Tokamak Experiment for Technology Oriented Research: E. Hintz, P. Bogen, H. A. Claassen et al., Contributions to High Temperature Plasma Physics, edited by K. H. Spatschek and J. Uhlenbusch (Akademie Verlag, Berlin, 1994), p. 373] density limit on global parameters (I, B, P, etc.) and wall conditioning is compared with the predicted density limit parametric scaling of thermal instability theory. It is necessary first to relate the edge parameters of the thermal instability theory to n(bar sign) and the other global parameters. The observed parametric dependence of the density limit in TEXTOR is generally consistent with the predicted density limit scaling of thermal instability theory. The observed wall conditioning dependence of the density limit can be reconciled with the theory in terms of the radiative emissivity temperature dependence of different impurities in the plasma edge. The thermal instability theory also provides an explanation of why symmetric detachment precedes radiative collapse for most low power shots, while a multifaceted asymmetric radiation from the edge MARFE precedes detachment for most high power shots

  5. Tokamak reactor studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, C.C.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of tokamak reactor studies with particular attention to commercial reactor concepts developed within the last three years. Emphasis is placed on DT fueled reactors for electricity production. A brief history of tokamak reactor studies is presented. The STARFIRE, NUWMAK, and HFCTR studies are highlighted. Recent developments that have increased the commercial attractiveness of tokamak reactor designs are discussed. These developments include smaller plant sizes, higher first wall loadings, improved maintenance concepts, steady-state operation, non-divertor particle control, and improved reactor safety features

  6. Tokamak ARC damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage

  7. Tokamak ARC damage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, J.G.; Gorker, G.E.

    1985-01-01

    Tokamak fusion reactors will have large plasma currents of approximately 10 MA with hundreds of megajoules stored in the magnetic fields. When a major plasma instability occurs, the disruption of the plasma current induces voltage in the adjacent conducting structures, giving rise to large transient currents. The induced voltages may be sufficiently high to cause arcing across sector gaps or from one protruding component to another. This report reviews a tokamak arcing scenario and provides guidelines for designing tokamaks to minimize the possibility of arc damage.

  8. Women's career advancement in organisations: Integrative framework for research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mišić-Andrić Marijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary organisations, caught in the middle of global economic and social crisis, are facing different business challenges, having to respond to quick changes in business environment and demographic changes in workforce composed by increasing number of women. Although the number of women in workforce is on the rise, they are still underrepresented in manager positions, especially higher management. This implies that certain barriers are in place which makes difficult for women to develop their careers, especially in reaching manager positions. The aim of this paper is to analyse and present a theoretical framework for further study of professional carrier advancement for women. The paper especially analyse integrative theoretical framework which stresses the equal importance of researching individual factors (personal influence and organisational factors (social inclusion, having in mind how the organisational context can improve or deter women's carrier. The paper presents possible directions for future research based on the analysis of the theoretical framework and especially individual and organisational factors.

  9. European conference on advances in flood research. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstert, A; Bismuth, C; Menzel, L [eds.

    2000-11-01

    Following concern expressed by several Member States in the 1990's, the EC directorate General of Research and Development (DG XII) has initiated and/or funded a variety of activities in order to improve the scientific basis and to intensify knowledge transfer into practice concerning flood forecasting, risk mitigation, and the impact analysis of environmental change effects. After more then half a decade of research in this field, this conference is aimed to present the results achieved and to highlight the scientific advances. Besides the presentations of the EUROTAS-project results, the contributions are grouped into the following sub-sessions: impact of land use and climate on flooding, flood management and assessment of flood risk, catchment modelling and management systems, and impact of river engineering on flooding conditions. (orig.)

  10. European conference on advances in flood research. Vol. 1. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstert, A; Bismuth, C; Menzel, L [eds.

    2000-11-01

    Following concern expressed by several Member States in the 1990's, the EC directorate General of Research and Development (DG XII) has initiated and/or funded a variety of activities in order to improve the scientific basis and to intensify knowledge transfer into practice concerning flood forecasting, risk mitigation, and the impact analysis of environmental change effects. After more then half a decade of research in this field, this conference is aimed to present the results achieved and to highlight the scientific advances. Besides the presentations of the EUROTAS-project results, the contributions are grouped into the following sub-sessions: impact of land use and climate on flooding, flood management and assessment of flood risk, catchment modelling and management systems, and impact of river engineering on flooding conditions. (orig.)

  11. European conference on advances in flood research. Vol. 1. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstert, A.; Bismuth, C.; Menzel, L. [eds.

    2000-11-01

    Following concern expressed by several Member States in the 1990's, the EC directorate General of Research and Development (DG XII) has initiated and/or funded a variety of activities in order to improve the scientific basis and to intensify knowledge transfer into practice concerning flood forecasting, risk mitigation, and the impact analysis of environmental change effects. After more then half a decade of research in this field, this conference is aimed to present the results achieved and to highlight the scientific advances. Besides the presentations of the EUROTAS-project results, the contributions are grouped into the following sub-sessions: impact of land use and climate on flooding, flood management and assessment of flood risk, catchment modelling and management systems, and impact of river engineering on flooding conditions. (orig.)

  12. European conference on advances in flood research. Vol. 2. Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bronstert, A.; Bismuth, C.; Menzel, L. [eds.

    2000-11-01

    Following concern expressed by several Member States in the 1990's, the EC directorate General of Research and Development (DG XII) has initiated and/or funded a variety of activities in order to improve the scientific basis and to intensify knowledge transfer into practice concerning flood forecasting, risk mitigation, and the impact analysis of environmental change effects. After more then half a decade of research in this field, this conference is aimed to present the results achieved and to highlight the scientific advances. Besides the presentations of the EUROTAS-project results, the contributions are grouped into the following sub-sessions: impact of land use and climate on flooding, flood management and assessment of flood risk, catchment modelling and management systems, and impact of river engineering on flooding conditions. (orig.)

  13. Social work and research in advanced welfare states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    and North-Western Europe more generally, there are other countries where the public spend on welfare is relatively high. The contributors to this book explore and exemplify ways in which social work and research are distinctive for advanced welfare states. This involves exploring their connection......The aim of this book is to exemplify the ways in which social work and research develop in ‘advanced’ welfare states - countries where public spending is relatively high as a proportion of GNP. While such countries have traditionally been associated with Scandinavian countries in particular...... to professional identities, histories and welfare systems, their associations with academic, theoretical and cultural traditions of collaboration between academic and social work practice, and the distinctive links with community, national policy, governmentality and agency, with respect to forms of knowledge...

  14. Irradiation Facilities of the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kurashima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The ion beam facility at the Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, the National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, consists of a cyclotron and three electrostatic accelerators, and they are dedicated to studies of materials science and bio-technology. The paper reviews this unique accelerator complex in detail from the viewpoint of its configuration, accelerator specification, typical accelerator, or irradiation technologies and ion beam applications. The institute has also irradiation facilities for electron beams and 60Co gamma-rays and has been leading research and development of radiation chemistry for industrial applications in Japan with the facilities since its establishment. The configuration and utilization of those facilities are outlined as well.

  15. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Homogeneous and Heterogeneous Photocatalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Serpone, Nick

    1986-01-01

    Ever since the oil crisis of 1973, researchers in various fields of chemistry have proposed various schemes to conserve energy, as well to convert the sun's abundant and limitless supply of energy to produce chemical fuels (e. g. , hydrogen from water, . •. ). The enthusiasm had no previous parallel in the mid-1970's. Unfortunately, despite the several good proposals, the results have proven - in retrospect - somewhat disappointing from an economic viable point of view. The reasons for the meagre results are manyfold not the least of which are the experimental difficulties encountered in storage systems. Moreover, the lack of a concerted, well orchestrated interdisciplinary approach has been significant. By contrast, the chemical advances made in the understanding of the processes involved in such schemes have been phenomenal. A recent book on this issue ( M. Gratzel, Energy Resources through Photochemistry and Catalysis, 1983) is witness to the various efforts and approaches taken by researchers. In the re...

  16. Basic researches for advancement of man-machine systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshikawa, Hidekazu

    1994-01-01

    The historical development of plant instrumentation and control system accompanying the introduction of automation is shown by the example of nuclear power plants. It is explained, and the change in the role of operators in the man-machine system is mentioned. Human errors are the serious problem in various fields, and automation resolves it. But complex systems also caused various disasters due to the relation of men and machines. The problem of human factors in high risk system automation is considered as the heightening of reliability and the reduction of burden on workers by decreasing human participation, and the increase of the risk of large accidents due to the lowering of reliability of human elements and the strengthening of the training of workers. Human model and the framework of human error analysis, the development of the system for man-machine system design and information analysis and evaluation, the significance of physiological index measurement and the perspective of the application, the analysis of the behavior of subjects in the abnormality diagnosis experiment using a plant simulator, and the development to the research on mutual adaptation interface are discussed. In this paper, the problem of human factors in system safety, that technical advancement brings about is examined, and the basic research on the advancement of man-machine systems by the author is reported. (K.I.)

  17. Economic perspectives of the research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose María Pamo Larrauri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since a new advanced therapy medicinal product is discovered until finally allowed its sale in the domestic market, it has to overcome a series of stages. Biomedical research is the first phase, currently its situation is encouraging to the increase in the number of clinical trials in Spain and in the rest of the world, despite the economic situation and the various difficulties that have faced the pharmaceutical laboratories. The next phase consists in obtaining the authorization of marketing of the European Medicines Agency. After authorization, will attempt to set a fair and moderate price for inclusion in the list of health provision of Social Security. A price for a drug that provides added value to health and society, a price that is generated profits for the pharmaceutical companies that hope to make up for the years of work and investment. Commitment to advanced therapy must be clear and forceful, to fund ongoing research projects and encouraging their creation with economic aid

  18. Research Advance on Metasequoia: Applications of New Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Qin; Yang, Hong; Wang, Li

    2010-10-01

    The plant genus Metasequoia Miki, 1941 and its sole living relict species Metasequoia glyptostroboides Hu et Cheng, 1948 have been of special interest for both the public and scientists since 1941 when the genus was established. Due to its unique discovery history (fossils discovered earlier than the living species) and incomparable scientific value in the research of plant evolution and its relationship with environmental and climatic changes, Metasequoia becomes arguably the most comprehensively studied higher plant in both fossil and living forms. This paper summarized recent advance in Metasequoia research by reviewing the research history of Metasequoia and the scientific value of this genus, while paid special attention to the application of new methods and techniques in the research field of Metasequoia in the recent decades. The application of biogeochemical (organic geochemistry and stable isotope) analysis as well as the new and innovated methods of preparing large-sized cuticular membrane from leaves with originally thin and fragile cuticles further secure Metasequoia's super star status for the research of palaeoclimatic reconstruction.

  19. A programmatic framework for the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomassen, K.I.; Goldston, R.J.; Neilson, G.H.

    1993-01-01

    Significant advances have been made in the confinement of reactor-grade plasmas, so that the authors are now preparing for experiments at the open-quotes power breakevenclose quotes level in the JET and TFTR experiments. In ITER the authors will extend the performance of tokamaks into the burning plasma regime, develop the technology of fusion reactors, and produce over a gigawatt of fusion power. Besides taking these crucial steps toward the technical feasibility of fusion, the authors must also take steps to ensure its economic acceptability. The broad requirements for economically attractive tokamak reactors based on physics advancements have been set forth in a number of studies. An advanced physics data base is emerging from a physics program of concept improvement using existing tokamaks around the world. This concept improvements program is emerging as the primary focus of the US domestic tokamak program, and a key element of that program is the proposed Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). With TPX the authors can develop the scientific data base for compact, continuously-operating fusion reactors, using advanced steady-state control techniques to improve plasma performance. The authors can develop operating techniques needed to ensure the success of ITER and provide first-time experience with several key fusion reactor technologies. This paper explains the relationships of TPX to the current US fusion physics program, to the ITER program, and to the development of an attractive tokamak demonstration plant for this next stage in the fusion program

  20. PREFACE: 7th EEIGM International Conference on Advanced Materials Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Roberts

    2013-12-01

    The 7th EEIGM Conference on Advanced Materials Research (AMR 2013) was held at Luleå University of Technology on the 21-22 March 2013 in Luleå, SWEDEN. This conference is intended as a meeting place for researchers involved in the EEIGM programme, in the 'Erasmus Mundus' Advanced Materials Science and Engineering Master programme (AMASE) and the 'Erasmus Mundus' Doctoral Programme in Materials Science and Engineering (DocMASE). This is great opportunity to present their on-going research in the various fields of Materials Science and Engineering, exchange ideas, strengthen co-operation as well as establish new contacts. More than 60 participants representing six countries attended the meeting, in total 26 oral talks and 19 posters were presented during two days. This issue of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering presents a selection of articles from EEIGM-7 conference. Following tradition from previous EEIGM conferences, it represents the interdisciplinary nature of Materials Science and Engineering. The papers presented in this issue deal not only with basic research but also with applied problems of materials science. The presented topics include theoretical and experimental investigations on polymer composite materials (synthetic and bio-based), metallic materials and ceramics, as well as nano-materials of different kind. Special thanks should be directed to the senior staff of Division of Materials Science at LTU who agreed to review submitted papers and thus ensured high scientific level of content of this collection of papers. The following colleagues participated in the review process: Professor Lennart Walström, Professor Roberts Joffe, Professor Janis Varna, Associate Professor Marta-Lena Antti, Dr Esa Vuorinen, Professor Aji Mathew, Professor Alexander Soldatov, Dr Andrejs Purpurs, Dr Yvonne Aitomäki, Dr Robert Pederson. Roberts Joffe October 2013, Luleå Conference photograph EEIGM7 conference participants, 22 March 2013 The PDF