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Sample records for advanced therapy medicinal

  1. Advances in Precision Medicine: Tailoring Individualized Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matchett, Kyle B; Lynam-Lennon, Niamh; Watson, R William; Brown, James A L

    2017-10-25

    The traditional bench-to-bedside pipeline involves using model systems and patient samples to provide insights into pathways deregulated in cancer. This discovery reveals new biomarkers and therapeutic targets, ultimately stratifying patients and informing cohort-based treatment options. Precision medicine (molecular profiling of individual tumors combined with established clinical-pathological parameters) reveals, in real-time, individual patient's diagnostic and prognostic risk profile, informing tailored and tumor-specific treatment plans. Here we discuss advances in precision medicine presented at the Irish Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting, highlighting examples where personalized medicine approaches have led to precision discovery in individual tumors, informing customized treatment programs.

  2. European regulatory tools for advanced therapy medicinal products.

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    Flory, Egbert; Reinhardt, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Increasing scientific knowledge and technical innovations in the areas of cell biology, biotechnology and medicine resulted in the development of promising therapeutic approaches for the prevention and treatment of human diseases. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) reflect a complex and innovative class of biopharmaceuticals as these products are highly research-driven, characterised by innovative manufacturing processes and heterogeneous with regard to their origin, type and complexity. This class of ATMP integrates gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineering products and are often individualized and patient-specific products. Multiple challenges arise from the nature of ATMPs, which are often developed by micro, small and medium sized enterprises, university and academia, for whom regulatory experiences are limited and regulatory requirements are challenging. Regulatory guidance such as the reflection paper on classification of ATMPs and guidelines highlighting product-specific issues support academic research groups and pharmaceutical companies to foster the development of safe and effective ATMPs. This review provides an overview on the European regulatory aspects of ATMPs and highlights specific regulatory tools such as the ATMP classification procedure, a discussion on the hospital exemption for selected ATMPs as well as borderline issues towards transplants/transfusion products.

  3. Advanced therapy medicinal products: current and future perspectives.

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    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cécile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are innovative therapies that encompass gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products. These therapies are expected to bring important health benefits, but also to substantially impact the pharmaceuticals budget. The aim of this study was to characterise the ATMPs in development and discuss future implications in terms of market access. Clinical trials were searched in the following databases: EudraCT (EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials), ClinicalTrials.gov, and ICTRP (International Clinical Trials Registry Platform of the World Health Organization). Trials were classified by category of ATMP as defined by European regulation EC No. 1394/2007, as well as by development phase and disease area. The database search identified 939 clinical trials investigating ATMPs (85% ongoing, 15% completed). The majority of trials were in the early stages (Phase I, I/II: 64.3%, Phase II, II/III: 27.9%, Phase 3: 6.9%). Per category of ATMP, we identified 53.6% of trials for somatic cell therapies, 22.8% for tissue-engineered products, 22.4% for gene therapies, and 1.2% for combined products (incorporating a medical device). Disease areas included cancer (24.8%), cardiovascular diseases (19.4%), musculoskeletal (10.5%), immune system and inflammation (11.5%), neurology (9.1%), and others. Of the trials, 47.2% enrolled fewer than 25 patients. Due to the complexity and specificity of ATMPs, new clinical trial methodologies are being considered (e.g., small sample size, non-randomised trials, single-arm trials, surrogate endpoints, integrated protocols, and adaptive designs). Evidence generation post-launch will become unavoidable to address payers' expectations. ATMPs represent a fast-growing field of interest. Although most of the products are in an early development phase, the combined trial phase and the potential to cure severe chronic conditions suggest that ATMPs may reach the market earlier than

  4. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

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    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  5. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

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    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  6. [Report from the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT). Pitfalls on the way from concept to medical treatment with advanced therapy medicinal products].

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    Reiss, M; Büttel, I C; Schneider, C K

    2011-07-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are highly innovative and complex medicines. They comprise gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). With the European Regulation on ATMP that came into force in 2008, a consolidated regulatory framework was created, where the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) plays a central role. This article discusses pitfalls and challenges that the CAT has experienced in its discussions of various procedures. Often ATMPs are developed by small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) which also face nonscientific challenges. The CAT wishes to meet these challenges on a scientific and regulatory level during its 2010-2015 work program.

  7. Initiative for Molecular Profiling and Advanced Cancer Therapy and challenges in the implementation of precision medicine.

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    Tsimberidou, Apostolia-Maria

    In the last decade, breakthroughs in technology have improved our understanding of genomic, transcriptional, proteomic, epigenetic aberrations and immune mechanisms in carcinogenesis. Genomics and model systems have enabled the validation of novel therapeutic strategies. Based on these developments, in 2007, we initiated the IMPACT (Initiative for Molecular Profiling and Advanced Cancer Therapy) study, the first personalized medicine program for patients with advanced cancer at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. We demonstrated that in patients referred for Phase I clinical trials, the use of tumor molecular profiling and treatment with matched targeted therapy was associated with encouraging rates of response, progression-free survival and overall survival compared to non-matched therapy. We are currently conducting IMPACT2, a randomized study evaluating molecular profiling and targeted agents in patients with metastatic cancer. Optimization of innovative biomarker-driven clinical trials that include targeted therapy and/or immunotherapeutic approaches for carefully selected patients will accelerate the development of novel drugs and the implementation of precision medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. New thoughts on the treatment of common complications of advanced liver cancer by external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Shasha

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancerous pain, hepatic ascites and intractable hiccups are common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer, but clinical symptomatic treatment cannot achieve satisfactory results. This article reviews the application of external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer and analyzes the clinical effect and feasibility of common therapeutic methods used in treatment, such as plaster sticking therapy, tumor thermotherapy, interventional therapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine, and sonophoresis of traditional Chinese medicine.

  9. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products for Rare Diseases: State of Play of Incentives Supporting Development in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas M. Farkas

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available In 2008, the European Union introduced the Advanced Medicines Regulation aiming to improve regulation of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs. We applied the ATMPs classification definitions in this Regulation to understand the link of this emerging group of medicinal products and the use of the Orphan Regulation. A total of 185 products that can be classified as ATMPs based on this Regulation have been submitted for orphan designation. Prior to its introduction in 2008, 4.5% of the products submitted for orphan designation met these criteria. This percentage went up to 15% after 2008. We analyzed several parameters associated with active ATMP ODDs focusing on sponsor type and EU-Member State origin, therapeutic area targeted, and ATMP classification [i.e., somatic cell therapy medicinal product, tissue-engineered product (TEP, or gene therapy medicinal product (GTMP] and the use of regulatory services linked to incentives such as the use of protocol assistance (PA and other Committees [Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT and the Pediatric Committee]. The aim here was to gain insight on the use of different services. The UK submits the largest number of ATMPs for ODD representing ~30% of the total to date. Few submissions have been received from central and Eastern European Member States as well as some of the larger Member States such as Germany (3.6%. ATMPs ODDs were primarily GTMPs (48.7% and SCTMPs (43.3%. TEPs only represented 8% of all submissions for this medicinal class. This is different from non-ODDs ATMPs where GTMPs make only 20% of ATMPs. A total of 11.7% of ATMP ODDs had received formal CAT classification. A total of 29.8% of all orphan drug (OD ATMPs requested PA. A total of 71.8% did not have an agreed pediatric investigation plan (PIP. Four products (Glybera one PA; Zalmoxis two; Holoclar one; Strimvelis three have received a marketing authorization (MAA and a 10-year market exclusivity. Strimvelis also completed their

  10. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products for Rare Diseases: State of Play of Incentives Supporting Development in Europe.

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    Farkas, Andreas M; Mariz, Segundo; Stoyanova-Beninska, Violeta; Celis, Patrick; Vamvakas, Spiros; Larsson, Kristina; Sepodes, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    In 2008, the European Union introduced the Advanced Medicines Regulation aiming to improve regulation of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs). We applied the ATMPs classification definitions in this Regulation to understand the link of this emerging group of medicinal products and the use of the Orphan Regulation. A total of 185 products that can be classified as ATMPs based on this Regulation have been submitted for orphan designation. Prior to its introduction in 2008, 4.5% of the products submitted for orphan designation met these criteria. This percentage went up to 15% after 2008. We analyzed several parameters associated with active ATMP ODDs focusing on sponsor type and EU-Member State origin, therapeutic area targeted, and ATMP classification [i.e., somatic cell therapy medicinal product, tissue-engineered product (TEP), or gene therapy medicinal product (GTMP)] and the use of regulatory services linked to incentives such as the use of protocol assistance (PA) and other Committees [Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) and the Pediatric Committee]. The aim here was to gain insight on the use of different services. The UK submits the largest number of ATMPs for ODD representing ~30% of the total to date. Few submissions have been received from central and Eastern European Member States as well as some of the larger Member States such as Germany (3.6%). ATMPs ODDs were primarily GTMPs (48.7%) and SCTMPs (43.3%). TEPs only represented 8% of all submissions for this medicinal class. This is different from non-ODDs ATMPs where GTMPs make only 20% of ATMPs. A total of 11.7% of ATMP ODDs had received formal CAT classification. A total of 29.8% of all orphan drug (OD) ATMPs requested PA. A total of 71.8% did not have an agreed pediatric investigation plan (PIP). Four products (Glybera one PA; Zalmoxis two; Holoclar one; Strimvelis three) have received a marketing authorization (MAA) and a 10-year market exclusivity. Strimvelis also completed their PIP

  11. Marketing Regulatory Oversight of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPs) in Europe: The EMA/CAT Perspective.

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    Salmikangas, Paula; Schuessler-Lenz, Martina; Ruiz, Sol; Celis, Patrick; Reischl, Ilona; Menezes-Ferreira, Margarida; Flory, Egbert; Renner, Matthias; Ferry, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    With the release of Regulation 1394/2007, a new framework for gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue-engineered products was established in the European Union. For all three product classes, called advanced therapy medicinal products, a centralised marketing authorisation became mandatory. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) together with its Committee for Advanced Therapies, Committee for Human Medicinal Products and the network of national agencies is responsible for scientific evaluation of the marketing authorisation applications. For a new application, data and information relating to manufacturing processes and quality control of the active substance and the final product have to be submitted for evaluation together with data from non-clinical and clinical safety and efficacy studies. Technical requirements for ATMPs are defined in the legislation, and guidance for different products is available through several EMA/CAT guidelines. Due to the diversity of ATMPs, a tailored approach for regulating these products is considered necessary. Thus, a risk-based approach has been introduced for ATMPs allowing flexibility for the regulatory requirements. Since the regulatory framework for ATMPs was established, five products have been licenced in the European Union. However, the pipeline of new ATMPs is much bigger, as seen from the significant numbers of different products discussed by the CAT in scientific advice and classification procedures. In 2013, a public consultation on the ATMP Regulation was conducted by the European Commission, and the results were published in 2014. The report proposes several improvements for the current framework and established procedures for the regulation of ATMPs.

  12. Access to advanced therapy medicinal products in the EU: where do we stand?

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    Mahalatchimy, A

    2011-05-01

    The European Union has a public health strategy and will generally ensure in all its policies and activities a "high level of human health protection". The new Regulation (EC) n 1394/2007 on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP), stems from this global policy and aims to harmonise access to the ATMP market. A real will for the harmonisation is clearly expressed in legal texts and enforced in the implementable procedures and requirements. However, several barriers remain. On the one hand, the scope of the ATMP Regulation is limited. On the other hand, Member States benefit from a wide margin of action.

  13. [Scientific advice by the national and European approval authorities concerning advanced therapy medicinal products].

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    Jost, Nils; Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Ziegele, Bettina; Reinhardt, Jens

    2015-11-01

    The aim of scientific advice is to support pharmaceutical developers in regulatory and scientific questions, thus facilitating the development of safe and efficacious new medicinal products. Recent years have shown that the development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in particular needs a high degree of regulatory support. On one hand, this is related to the complexity and heterogeneity of this group of medicinal products and on the other hand due to the fact that mainly academic research institutions and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) are developing ATMPs. These often have limited regulatory experience and resources. In 2009 the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) initiated the Innovation Office as a contact point for applicants developing ATMPs. The mandate of the Innovation Office is to provide support on regulatory questions and to coordinate national scientific advice meetings concerning ATMPs for every phase in drug development and especially with view to the preparation of clinical trial applications. On the European level, the Scientific Advice Working Party (SAWP) of the Committee for Medicinal Products for Human Use (CHMP) of the European Medicinal Agency (EMA) offers scientific advice. This article describes the concepts of national and EMA scientific advice concerning ATMPs and summarizes the experience of the last six years.

  14. Applying Precision Medicine and Immunotherapy Advances from Oncology to Host-Directed Therapies for Infectious Diseases.

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    Mahon, Robert N; Hafner, Richard

    2017-01-01

    To meet the challenges of increasing antimicrobial resistance, the infectious disease community needs innovative therapeutics. Precision medicine and immunotherapies are transforming cancer therapeutics by targeting the regulatory signaling pathways that are involved not only in malignancies but also in the metabolic and immunologic function of the tumor microenvironment. Infectious diseases target many of the same regulatory pathways as they modulate host metabolic functions for their own nutritional requirements and to impede host immunity. These similarities and the advances made in precision medicine and immuno-oncology that are relevant for the current development of host-directed therapies (HDTs) to treat infectious diseases are discussed. To harness this potential, improvements in drug screening methods and development of assays that utilize the research tools including high throughput multiplexes already developed by oncology are essential. A multidisciplinary approach that brings together immunologists, infectious disease specialists, and oncologists will be necessary to fully develop the potential of HDTs.

  15. From discovery to approval of an advanced therapy medicinal product-containing stem cells, in the EU.

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    Pellegrini, Graziella; Lambiase, Alessandro; Macaluso, Claudio; Pocobelli, Augusto; Deng, Sophie; Cavallini, Gian Maria; Esteki, Roza; Rama, Paolo

    2016-06-01

    In 1997, the human corneal epithelium was reconstructed in vitro and transplanted on patients. Later, it became a routine treatment, before regulations considered advanced therapy medicinal products and drugs on the same lines. Manufacturing, before and after good manufacturing practice setting, was established in different facilities and the clinical application in several hospitals. Advanced therapy medicinal products, including stem cells, are unique products with different challenges than other drugs: some uncertainties, in addition to benefit, cannot be avoided. This review will focus on all recent developments in the stem cell-based corneal therapy.

  16. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in type I diabetes mellitus: technological and regulatory challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Leal-Lopes

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Type 1 Diabetes mellitus (T1DM is an autoimmune disorder which arises from the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells. Currently, Brazil’s advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP, developed for clinical research and therapeutic purposes, take place in the so-called Cellular Technology Centers (CTC, according to the Resolution nº. 9/2011 of the Collegiate Board of Directors (RDC, enacted by the National Health Surveillance Agency (Anvisa. Objective: This study was conducted with the main objective of describing and discussing the development of ATMP for T1DM treatment. Method: A qualitative research, narrative review and critical discussion of the literature were under taken. Results: ATMP promote new therapeutic approaches for Diabetes, holding great potential to restore the patients’ endogenous insulin secretion, improving their life quality, overcoming the chronic complications of Diabetes and reducing the socioeconomic burden. Nowadays, ATMP in T1DM comprise: a cell therapy; b gene therapy products; c tissue engineering and d ATMPassociated to biopharmaceutical products. Conclusions: Further research should contribute to stimulate public and private organizations to effectively act towards reducing the impact of Diabetes on individuals and the society as a whole. It is essential that Brazilian legislation closely follows the biotechnological developments, supporting the scientific progress and benefiting T1DM patients with modern and cutting-edge therapies.

  17. New thoughts on the treatment of common complications of advanced liver cancer by external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine

    OpenAIRE

    PAN Shasha

    2017-01-01

    Cancerous pain, hepatic ascites and intractable hiccups are common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer, but clinical symptomatic treatment cannot achieve satisfactory results. This article reviews the application of external therapy of traditional Chinese medicine in the treatment of common complications in patients with advanced liver cancer and analyzes the clinical effect and feasibility of common therapeutic methods used in treatment, such as plaster sticking therapy, tum...

  18. EU decision-making for marketing authorization of advanced therapy medicinal products: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Wilde, Sofieke; Coppens, Delphi G M; Hoekman, Jarno; de Bruin, Marie L; Leufkens, Hubert G M; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Meij, Pauline

    2018-03-21

    A comparative analysis of assessment procedures for authorization of all European Union (EU) applications for advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) shows that negative opinions were associated with a lack of clinical efficacy and identified severe safety risks. Unmet medical need was often considered in positive opinions and outweighed scientific uncertainties. Numerous quality issues illustrate the difficulties in this domain for ATMP development. Altogether, it suggests that setting appropriate standards for ATMP authorization in Europe, similar to elsewhere, is a learning experience. The experimental characteristics of authorized ATMPs urge regulators, industry, and clinical practice to pay accurate attention to post-marketing risk management to limit patient risk. Methodologies for ATMP development and regulatory evaluations need to be continuously evaluated for the field to flourish. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of advanced therapy medicinal products in Europe and the role of academia.

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    Pearce, Kim F; Hildebrandt, Martin; Greinix, Hildegard; Scheding, Stefan; Koehl, Ulrike; Worel, Nina; Apperley, Jane; Edinger, Matthius; Hauser, Andrea; Mischak-Weissinger, Eva; Dickinson, Anne M; Lowdell, Mark W

    2014-03-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are gene therapy, somatic cell therapy or tissue-engineered products regulated under (EC) No. 1394/2007 to ensure their free movement within the European Union while guaranteeing the highest level of health protection for patients. Academic good manufacturing practice (GMP) centers are major contributors in the development of ATMPs and this study assessed the impact of regulations on them. European academic and non-industrial facilities (n = 747) were contacted, and a representative sample of 50 replied to a detailed questionnaire. Experienced centres were further selected in every Member State (MS) for semi-structured interviews. Indicators of ATMP production and development success were statistically assessed, and opinions about directive implementation were documented. Facilities experienced in manufacturing cell therapy transplant products are the most successful in developing ATMPs. New centres lacking this background struggle to enter the field, and there remains a shortage of facilities in academia participating in translational research. This is compounded by heterogeneous implementation of the regulations across MS. GMP facilities successfully developing ATMPs are present in all MS. However, the implementation of regulations is heterogeneous between MS, with substantial differences in the definition of ATMPs and in the approved manufacturing environment. The cost of GMP compliance is underestimated by research funding bodies. This is detrimental to development of new ATMPs and commercialization of any that are successful in early clinical trials. Academic GMP practitioners should strengthen their political visibility and contribute to the development of functional and effective European Union legislation in this field. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Cellular Therapy. All rights reserved.

  20. Hurdles in clinical implementation of academic advanced therapy medicinal products: A national evaluation.

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    de Wilde, Sofieke; Veltrop-Duits, Louise; Hoozemans-Strik, Merel; Ras, Thirza; Blom-Veenman, Janine; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Zandvliet, Maarten; Meij, Pauline

    2016-06-01

    Since the implementation of the European Union (EU) regulation for advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) in 2009, only six ATMPs achieved marketing authorization approval in the EU. Recognizing the major developments in the ATMP field, starting mostly in academic institutions, we investigated which hurdles were experienced in the whole pathway of ATMP development towards clinical care. Quality interviews were executed with different stakeholders in The Netherlands involved in the ATMP development field, e.g. academic research groups, national authorities and patient organizations. Based on the hurdles mentioned in the interviews, questionnaires were subsequently sent to the academic principal investigators (PIs) and ATMP good manufacturing practice (GMP) facility managers to quantify these hurdles. Besides the familiar regulatory routes of marketing authorization (MA) and hospital exemption (HE), a part of the academic PIs perceived that ATMPs should become available by the Tissues and Cells Directive or did not anticipate on the next development steps towards implementation of their ATMP towards regular clinical care. The main hurdles identified were: inadequate financial support, rapidly evolving field, study-related problems, lacking regulatory knowledge, lack of collaborations and responsibility issues. Creating an academic environment stimulating and planning ATMP development and licensing as well as investing in expanding the relevant regulatory knowledge in academic institutions seems a prerequisite to develop ATMPs from bench to patient. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Japan's advanced medicine.

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    Sho, Ri; Narimatsu, Hiroto; Murakami, Masayasu

    2013-10-01

    Like health care systems in other developed countries, Japan's health care system faces significant challenges due to aging of the population and economic stagnation. Advanced medicine (Senshin Iryou) is a unique system of medical care in Japan offering highly technology-driven medical care that is not covered by public health insurance. Advanced medicine has recently developed and expanded as part of health care reform. Will it work? To answer this question, we briefly trace the historical development of advanced medicine and describe the characteristics and current state of advanced medical care in Japan. We then offer our opinions on the future of advanced medicine with careful consideration of its pros and cons. We believe that developing advanced medicine is an attempt to bring health care reform in line rather than the goal of health care reform.

  2. Current advanced therapy cell-based medicinal products for type-1-diabetes treatment.

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    Cañibano-Hernández, Alberto; Del Burgo, Laura Sáenz; Espona-Noguera, Albert; Ciriza, Jesús; Pedraz, Jose Luis

    2018-03-27

    In the XXI century diabetes mellitus has become one of the main threats to human health with higher incidence in regions such as Europe and North America. Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) occurs as a consequence of the immune-mediated destruction of insulin producing β-cells located in the endocrine part of the pancreas, the islets of Langerhans. The administration of exogenous insulin through daily injections is the most prominent treatment for T1DM but its administration is frequently associated to failure in glucose metabolism control, finally leading to hyperglycemia episodes. Other approaches have been developed in the past decades, such as whole pancreas and islet allotransplantation, but they are restricted to patients who exhibit frequent episodes of hypoglycemia or renal failure because the lack of donors and islet survival. Moreover, patients transplanted with either whole pancreas or islets require of immune suppression to avoid the rejection of the transplant. Currently, advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP), such as implantable devices, have been developed in order to reduce immune rejection response while increasing cell survival. To overcome these issues, ATMPs must promote vascularization, guaranteeing the nutritional contribution, while providing O 2 until vasculature can surround the device. Moreover, it should help in the immune-protection to avoid acute and chronic rejection. The transplanted cells or islets should be embedded within biomaterials with tunable properties like injectability, stiffness and porosity mimicking natural ECM structural characteristics. And finally, an infinitive cell source that solves the donor scarcity should be found such as insulin producing cells derived from mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Several companies have registered their ATMPs and future studies envision new prototypes. In this review, we will discuss the mechanisms and etiology of

  3. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine combined with interventional therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Interventional therapy has become the first choice of non-surgical treatment for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC due to its advantages such as little trauma and marked local effect. However, the clinical efficiency is less than expected. One of the possibilities is the resistance of cancer cells to anti-cancer drugs. Increasing attention has been paid to the combination of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM and interventional therapy in HCC treatment. This paper reviews the progress in TCM combined with interventional therapy for HCC at animal experiment and clinical study levels in recent ten years. It is pointed out that the combination therapy with TCM and intervention for HCC has a unique advantage.

  4. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMPand exemptions to the Regulation 1394/2007: how confident can we be? An exploratory analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eVan Wilder

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The market authorisation procedure for medicinal products for human use is relying on their demonstrated efficacy, safety and pharmaceutical quality. This applies to all medicinal products whether of chemical or biological origin. Since October 2009, the first advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP has been authorised through the centralized procedure. ATMPs are gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products or tissue-engineered products.An appropriate ATMP- Regulation is dealing with ATMP requirements.Two exemptions are foreseen to the ATMP-Regulation: a. Products, which were legally on the Community market when the Regulation became applicable, should comply to the Regulation by 30 December 2012. b.the hospital exemption rule for non routine products for an individual patient. In this work we explored whether the actual application of the Regulation on ATMPs is in line with the aim of the Regulation in terms of guaranteeing the highest level of health protection for patients. Based on the analysis of the relative efficacy of the only EC authorized ATMP and its exempted alternatives, there is evidence against this Regulation 1394/2007 assumption.

  5. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products and Exemptions to the Regulation 1394/2007: How Confident Can We be? An Exploratory Analysis.

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    Van Wilder, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The market authorization procedure for medicinal products for human use is relying on their demonstrated efficacy, safety, and pharmaceutical quality. This applies to all medicinal products whether of chemical or biological origin. Since October 2009, the first advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) has been authorized through the centralized procedure. ATMPs are gene therapy medicinal products, somatic cell therapy medicinal products or tissue-engineered products. An appropriate ATMP - Regulation is dealing with ATMP requirements. Two exemptions are foreseen to the ATMP Regulation: (a) Products, which were legally on the Community market when the Regulation became applicable, should comply to the Regulation by December 30, 2012. (b) The hospital exemption rule for non-routine products for an individual patient. In this work we explored whether the actual application of the Regulation on ATMPs is in line with the aim of the Regulation in terms of guaranteeing the highest level of health protection for patients. Based on the analysis of the relative efficacy of the only EC authorized ATMP and its exempted alternatives, there is evidence against this Regulation 1394/2007 assumption.

  6. Translational research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Belardelli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  7. Translational research on advanced therapies.

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    Belardelli, Filippo; Rizza, Paola; Moretti, Franca; Carella, Cintia; Galli, Maria Cristina; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    Fostering translational research of advanced therapies has become a major priority of both scientific community and national governments. Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) are a new medicinal product category comprising gene therapy and cell-based medicinal products as well as tissue engineered medicinal products. ATMP development opens novel avenues for therapeutic approaches in numerous diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. However, there are important bottlenecks for their development due to the complexity of the regulatory framework, the high costs and the needs for good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and new end-points for clinical experimentation. Thus, a strategic cooperation between different stakeholders (academia, industry and experts in regulatory issues) is strongly needed. Recently, a great importance has been given to research infrastructures dedicated to foster translational medicine of advanced therapies. Some ongoing European initiatives in this field are presented and their potential impact is discussed.

  8. Therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, M.; Sadeghi, R.; Takavar, A.; Fard, A.; Saghari, M.

    2002-01-01

    Although there have been very significant development in the field of radionuclide therapy within the past 10 years, radionuclide therapy in the form of 131 I, 33 P,.... have been in use for over 46 years. Palliation of bone pain is a good example for radionuclide therapy. It has an especial role in advanced metastatic cancer. 32 P, 89 Sr-Cl, 186 Re-HEDP, 133 Sm-EDTMP, and 117 mSn-DTPA are used in these patients. They are usually effective and help to maintain a painless life for patients with advanced cancer. Although this kind of therapy is not as rapid as radiotherapy, its effect lasts longer. In addition re-treatment with these agents is safe and effective. Radioimmunotherapy is a new exciting technique in the radionuclide therapy. In this technique monoclonal antibodies or their fragments are labeled with a suitable radionuclide, these antibodies can irradiate tumor cells over a distance of some fraction of a millimeter. Bulky tumors are obviously unsuitable targets for Rit. Several antibodies specific for Cd 20 (B1 and 1 F 5) and CD 37 (Mb-1) labeled with 131 I have been used for hematologic malignancies with good response. Several antigens associated with carcinomas of various histologic types have been targeted for therapeutic purposes by antibodies labeled with different radionuclides. Other routes of administration like intraperitoneal, intrathecal, and intravesical have been used with different rates of success. Pre targeting techniques can be used to reduce unwanted radioactive concentration in normal tissues. The avidin-biotin system is an example, which exploits the high-affinity binding between avidin and biotin, and was first used with anti-Cea antibody. Radiation synovectomy is another aspect of radionuclide therapy 198 Au colloid, 90 Y resin colloid, and 165 Dy-FHMA are some of the radionuclides used in the field of hematology. There has been significant advances in the field of therapy in nuclear medicine in recent years, which are briefly

  9. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: How to Bring Cell-Based Medicinal Products Successfully to the Market - Report from the CAT-DGTI-GSCN Workshop at the DGTI Annual Meeting 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Hystad, Marit; Schüßler-Lenz, Martina; Doevendans, Pieter A; Flory, Egbert; Beuneu, Claire; Reischl, Ilona; Salmikangas, Paula

    2015-05-01

    On September 11, 2014, a workshop entitled 'Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: How to Bring Cell-Based Medicinal Product Successfully to the Market' was held at the 47th annual meeting of the German Society for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology (DGTI), co-organised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the DGTI in collaboration with the German Stem Cell Network (GSCN). The workshop brought together over 160 participants from academia, hospitals, small- or medium-sized enterprise developers and regulators. At the workshop, speakers from EMA, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), industry and academia addressed the regulatory aspects of development and authorisation of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), classification of ATMPs and considerations on cell-based therapies for cardiac repair. The open forum discussion session allowed for a direct interaction between ATMP developers and the speakers from EMA and CAT.

  10. Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: How to Bring Cell-Based Medicinal Products Successfully to the Market – Report from the CAT-DGTI-GSCN Workshop at the DGTI Annual Meeting 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celis, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Hystad, Marit; Schüßler-Lenz, Martina; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Flory, Egbert; Beuneu, Claire; Reischl, Ilona; Salmikangas, Paula

    2015-01-01

    On September 11, 2014, a workshop entitled ‘Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products: How to Bring Cell-Based Medicinal Product Successfully to the Market’ was held at the 47th annual meeting of the German Society for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology (DGTI), co-organised by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the DGTI in collaboration with the German Stem Cell Network (GSCN). The workshop brought together over 160 participants from academia, hospitals, small- or medium-sized enterprise developers and regulators. At the workshop, speakers from EMA, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT), industry and academia addressed the regulatory aspects of development and authorisation of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), classification of ATMPs and considerations on cell-based therapies for cardiac repair. The open forum discussion session allowed for a direct interaction between ATMP developers and the speakers from EMA and CAT. PMID:26195933

  11. [The certification of advanced therapy medicinal products. A quality label for product development in small and medium-sized enterprises].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, A; Schüle, S; Flory, E

    2011-07-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are gene therapy, cell therapy, and tissue engineered products. To gain access to the market within the European Union, ATMPs must be authorized by the European Commission (EC). Especially for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs), the European centralized procedure of marketing authorization that is conducted by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) constitutes a major challenge, because SMEs often have little experience with regulatory procedures and many have limited financial possibilities. To tackle these challenges, a certification procedure exclusively for SMEs and their ATMP development was introduced by the EC. Independently from a marketing authorization application, development and/or production processes can be certified. An issued certificate demonstrates that the respective process meets the current regulatory and scientific requirements of the EMA, representing a valuable milestone for putative investors and licensees. This article highlights the background, the detailed procedure, the minimum requirements, as well as the costs of certification, while giving further noteworthy guidance for interested parties.

  12. Precision Medicine for Advanced Pancreas Cancer: The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantrill, Lorraine A; Nagrial, Adnan M; Watson, Clare; Johns, Amber L; Martyn-Smith, Mona; Simpson, Skye; Mead, Scott; Jones, Marc D; Samra, Jaswinder S; Gill, Anthony J; Watson, Nicole; Chin, Venessa T; Humphris, Jeremy L; Chou, Angela; Brown, Belinda; Morey, Adrienne; Pajic, Marina; Grimmond, Sean M; Chang, David K; Thomas, David; Sebastian, Lucille; Sjoquist, Katrin; Yip, Sonia; Pavlakis, Nick; Asghari, Ray; Harvey, Sandra; Grimison, Peter; Simes, John; Biankin, Andrew V

    2015-05-01

    Personalized medicine strategies using genomic profiling are particularly pertinent for pancreas cancer. The Individualized Molecular Pancreatic Cancer Therapy (IMPaCT) trial was initially designed to exploit results from genome sequencing of pancreatic cancer under the auspices of the International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC) in Australia. Sequencing revealed small subsets of patients with aberrations in their tumor genome that could be targeted with currently available therapies. The pilot stage of the IMPaCT trial assessed the feasibility of acquiring suitable tumor specimens for molecular analysis and returning high-quality actionable genomic data within a clinically acceptable timeframe. We screened for three molecular targets: HER2 amplification; KRAS wild-type; and mutations in DNA damage repair pathways (BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, ATM). Tumor biopsy and archived tumor samples were collected from 93 patients and 76 were screened. To date 22 candidate cases have been identified: 14 KRAS wild-type, 5 cases of HER2 amplification, 2 mutations in BRCA2, and 1 ATM mutation. Median time from consent to the return of validated results was 21.5 days. An inability to obtain a biopsy or insufficient tumor content in the available specimen were common reasons for patient exclusion from molecular analysis while deteriorating performance status prohibited a number of patients from proceeding in the study. Documenting the feasibility of acquiring and screening biospecimens for actionable molecular targets in real time will aid other groups embarking on similar trials. Key elements include the need to better prescreen patients, screen more patients, and offer more attractive clinical trial options. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Advanced bioanalytics for precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roda, Aldo; Michelini, Elisa; Caliceti, Cristiana; Guardigli, Massimo; Mirasoli, Mara; Simoni, Patrizia

    2018-01-01

    Precision medicine is a new paradigm that combines diagnostic, imaging, and analytical tools to produce accurate diagnoses and therapeutic interventions tailored to the individual patient. This approach stands in contrast to the traditional "one size fits all" concept, according to which researchers develop disease treatments and preventions for an "average" patient without considering individual differences. The "one size fits all" concept has led to many ineffective or inappropriate treatments, especially for pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease and cancer. Now, precision medicine is receiving massive funding in many countries, thanks to its social and economic potential in terms of improved disease prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. Bioanalytical chemistry is critical to precision medicine. This is because identifying an appropriate tailored therapy requires researchers to collect and analyze information on each patient's specific molecular biomarkers (e.g., proteins, nucleic acids, and metabolites). In other words, precision diagnostics is not possible without precise bioanalytical chemistry. This Trend article highlights some of the most recent advances, including massive analysis of multilayer omics, and new imaging technique applications suitable for implementing precision medicine. Graphical abstract Precision medicine combines bioanalytical chemistry, molecular diagnostics, and imaging tools for performing accurate diagnoses and selecting optimal therapies for each patient.

  14. Precision Medicine Approach to Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer: Advances in Targeted Drug Therapy Based on Specific Signaling Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Hilda; Fallah, Parviz; Naderi Sohi, Alireza; Tavakoli, Rezvan; Naderi, Mahmood; Soleimani, Masoud; Larijani, Bagher; Haghpanah, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    Personalized medicine is a set of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches in which medical interventions are carried out based on individual patient characteristics. As life expectancy increases in developed and developing countries, the incidence of diseases such as cancer goes up among people in the community. Cancer is a disease that the response to treatment varies from one person to another and also it is costly for individuals, families, and society. Among thyroid cancers, anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is the most aggressive, lethal and unresponsive form of the disease. Unfortunately, current drugs are not targetable, and therefore they have restricted role in ATC treatment. Consequently, mortality of this cancer, despite advances in the field of diagnosis and treatment, is one of the most important challenges in medicine. Cellular, molecular and genetic evidences play an important role in finding more effective diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. Review of these evidences confirms the application of personalized medicine in cancer treatment including ATC. A growing body of evidence has elucidated that cellular and molecular mechanisms of cancer would pave the way for defining new biomarkers for targeted therapy, taking into account individual differences. It should be noted that this approach requires further progress in the fields of basic sciences, pharmacogenetics and drug design. An overview of the most important aspects in individualized anaplastic thyroid cancer treatment will be discussed in this review.

  15. Nuclear medicine therapy

    CERN Document Server

    Eary, Janet F

    2013-01-01

    One in three of the 30 million Americans who are hospitalized are diagnosed or treated with nuclear medicine techniques. This text provides a succinct overview and detailed set of procedures and considerations for patient therapy with unsealed radioactivity sources.  Serving as a complete literature reference for therapy with radiopharmaceuticals currently utilized in practice, this source covers the role of the physician in radionuclide therapy, and essential procedures and protocols required by health care personnel.

  16. Advanced polymers in medicine

    CERN Document Server

    Puoci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The book provides an up-to-date overview of the diverse medical applications of advanced polymers. The book opens by presenting important background information on polymer chemistry and physicochemical characterization of polymers. This serves as essential scientific support for the subsequent chapters, each of which is devoted to the applications of polymers in a particular medical specialty. The coverage is broad, encompassing orthopedics, ophthalmology, tissue engineering, surgery, dentistry, oncology, drug delivery, nephrology, wound dressing and healing, and cardiology. The development of polymers that enhance the biocompatibility of blood-contacting medical devices and the incorporation of polymers within biosensors are also addressed. This book is an excellent guide to the recent advances in polymeric biomaterials and bridges the gap between the research literature and standard textbooks on the applications of polymers in medicine.

  17. Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) manufacturing of advanced therapy medicinal products: a novel tailored model for optimizing performance and estimating costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-El-Enein, Mohamed; Römhild, Andy; Kaiser, Daniel; Beier, Carola; Bauer, Gerhard; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2013-03-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMP) have gained considerable attention in academia due to their therapeutic potential. Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) principles ensure the quality and sterility of manufacturing these products. We developed a model for estimating the manufacturing costs of cell therapy products and optimizing the performance of academic GMP-facilities. The "Clean-Room Technology Assessment Technique" (CTAT) was tested prospectively in the GMP facility of BCRT, Berlin, Germany, then retrospectively in the GMP facility of the University of California-Davis, California, USA. CTAT is a two-level model: level one identifies operational (core) processes and measures their fixed costs; level two identifies production (supporting) processes and measures their variable costs. The model comprises several tools to measure and optimize performance of these processes. Manufacturing costs were itemized using adjusted micro-costing system. CTAT identified GMP activities with strong correlation to the manufacturing process of cell-based products. Building best practice standards allowed for performance improvement and elimination of human errors. The model also demonstrated the unidirectional dependencies that may exist among the core GMP activities. When compared to traditional business models, the CTAT assessment resulted in a more accurate allocation of annual expenses. The estimated expenses were used to set a fee structure for both GMP facilities. A mathematical equation was also developed to provide the final product cost. CTAT can be a useful tool in estimating accurate costs for the ATMPs manufactured in an optimized GMP process. These estimates are useful when analyzing the cost-effectiveness of these novel interventions. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Gene therapy and reproductive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stribley, John M; Rehman, Khurram S; Niu, Hairong; Christman, Gregory M

    2002-04-01

    To review the literature on the principles of gene therapy and its potential application in reproductive medicine. Literature review. Gene therapy involves transfer of genetic material to target cells using a delivery system, or vector. Attention has primarily focused on viral vectors. Significant problems remain to be overcome including low efficacy of gene transfer, the transient expression of some vectors, safety issues with modified adenoviruses and retroviruses, and ethical concerns. If these issues can be resolved, gene therapy will be applicable to an increasing spectrum of single and multiple gene disorders, as the Human Genome Project data are analyzed, and the genetic component of human disease becomes better understood. Gynecologic gene therapy has advanced to human clinical trials for ovarian carcinoma, and shows potential for the treatment of uterine leiomyomata. Obstetric applications of gene therapy, including fetal gene therapy, remain more distant goals. Concerns about the safety of human gene therapy research are being actively addressed, and remarkable progress in improving DNA transfer has been made. The first treatment success for a genetic disease (severe combined immunodeficiency disease) has been achieved, and ongoing research efforts will eventually yield clinical applications in many spheres of reproductive medicine.

  19. Advances in rehabilitation medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yee Sien; Chew, Effie; Samuel, Geoffrey S; Tan, Yeow Leng; Kong, Keng He

    2013-10-01

    Rehabilitation medicine is the medical specialty that integrates rehabilitation as its core therapeutic modality in disability management. More than a billion people worldwide are disabled, and the World Health Organization has developed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health as a framework through which disability is addressed. Herein, we explore paradigm shifts in neurorehabilitation, with a focus on restoration, and provide overviews on developments in neuropharmacology, rehabilitation robotics, virtual reality, constraint-induced therapy and brain stimulation. We also discuss important issues in rehabilitation systems of care, including integrated care pathways, very early rehabilitation, early supported discharge and telerehabilitation. Finally, we highlight major new fields of rehabilitation such as spasticity management, frailty and geriatric rehabilitation, intensive care and cancer rehabilitation.

  20. Comparison of advanced therapy medicinal product gingiva and skin substitutes and their in vitro wound healing potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boink, Mireille A; Roffel, Sanne; Breetveld, Melanie; Thon, Maria; Haasjes, Michiel S P; Waaijman, Taco; Scheper, Rik J; Blok, Chantal S; Gibbs, Susan

    2018-02-01

    Skin and oral mucosa substitutes are a therapeutic option for closing hard-to-heal skin and oral wounds. Our aim was to develop bi-layered skin and gingiva substitutes, from 3 mm diameter biopsies, cultured under identical conditions, which are compliant with current European regulations for advanced therapy medicinal products. We present in vitro mode of action methods to (i) determine viability: epithelial expansion, proliferation (Ki-67), metabolic activity (MTT assay); (ii) characterize skin and gingiva substitutes: histology and immunohistochemistry; and (iii) determine potency: soluble wound healing mediator release (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Both skin and gingiva substitutes consist of metabolically active autologous reconstructed differentiated epithelium expanding from the original biopsy sheet on a fibroblast populated connective tissue matrix (donor dermis). Gingival epithelium expanded 1.7-fold more than skin epithelium during the 3 week culture period. The percentage of proliferating Ki-67-positive cells located in the basal layer of the gingiva substitute was >1.5-fold higher than in the skin substitute. Keratins 16 and 17, which are upregulated during normal wound healing, were expressed in both the skin and gingiva substitutes. Notably, the gingiva substitute secreted higher amounts of key cytokines involved in mitogenesis, motogenesis and chemotaxis (interleukin-6 > 23-fold, CXCL8 > 2.5-fold) as well as higher amounts of the anti-fibrotic growth factor, hepatocyte growth factor (>7-fold), compared with the skin substitute. In conclusion, while addressing the viability, characterization and potency of the tissue substitutes, important intrinsic differences between skin and gingiva were discovered that may explain in part the superior quality of wound healing observed in the oral mucosa compared with skin. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. [Requirements for long-term follow-up on efficacy and safety of advanced therapy medicinal products. Risk management and traceability].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, B; Reinhardt, J; Schröder, C

    2010-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are an innovative treatment option. To promote timely access of the innovative medicinal product and to safeguard public health, new elements have been introduced into legislation. A key element of the ATMP regulation is the requirement for long-term follow-up on safety and efficacy of patients enrolled in clinical trials with ATMPs, which is beyond the routine requirements on pharmacovigilance. For gene therapy medicinal products, a guideline on long-term follow-up, which lays down the technical requirements, is available. A further key element of the ATMP regulation is the traceability of the starting materials used to manufacture the ATMP. A common European coding system is imperative to ensure the traceability of starting materials, especially across the borders of European Member States.

  2. Advances toward regenerative medicine in the central nervous system: challenges in making stem cell therapy a viable clinical strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years, there has been a great deal of interest in the prospects of stem cell-based therapies for the treatment of nervous system disorders. The eagerness of scientists, clinicians, and spin-out companies to develop new therapies led to premature clinical trials in human patients, and now the initial excitement has largely turned to skepticism. Rather than embracing a defeatist attitude or pressing blindly ahead, I argue it is time to evaluate the challenges encountered by regenerative medicine in the central nervous system and the progress that is being made to solve these problems. In the twenty years since the adult brain was discovered to have an endogenous regenerative capacity, much basic research has been done to elucidate mechanisms controlling proliferation and cellular identity; how stem cells may be directed into neuronal lineages; genetic, pharmacological, and behavioral interventions that modulate neurogenic activity; and the exact nature of limitations to regeneration in the adult, aged, diseased and injured CNS. These findings should prove valuable in designing realistic clinical strategies to improve the prospects of stem cell-based therapies. In this review, I discuss how basic research continues to play a critical role in identifying both barriers and potential routes to regenerative therapy in the CNS.

  3. Proceedings of the signature series event of the international society for cellular therapy: "Advancements in cellular therapies and regenerative medicine in digestive diseases," London, United Kingdom, May 3, 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccocioppo, Rachele; Dos Santos, Claudia C; Baumgart, Daniel C; Cangemi, Giuseppina C; Cardinale, Vincenzo; Ciacci, Carolina; De Coppi, Paolo; Haldar, Debashis; Klersy, Catherine; Nostro, M Cristina; Ott, Michael; Piemonti, Lorenzo; Tomei, Alice A; Uygun, Basak; Vetrano, Stefania; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2018-03-01

    A summary of the First Signature Series Event, "Advancements in Cellular Therapies and Regenerative Medicine for Digestive Diseases," held on May 3, 2017, in London, United Kingdom, is presented. Twelve speakers from three continents covered major topics in the areas of cellular therapy and regenerative medicine applied to liver and gastrointestinal medicine as well as to diabetes mellitus. Highlights from their presentations, together with an overview of the global impact of digestive diseases and a proposal for a shared online collection and data-monitoring platform tool, are included in this proceedings. Although growing evidence demonstrate the feasibility and safety of exploiting cell-based technologies for the treatment of digestive diseases, regulatory and methodological obstacles will need to be overcome before the successful implementation in the clinic of these novel attractive therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radionuclide Therapies in Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendi, A Tuba; Moncayo, Valeria M; Nye, Jonathon A; Galt, James R; Halkar, Raghuveer; Schuster, David M

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews recent advances and applications of radionuclide therapy. Individualized precision medicine, new treatments, and the evolving role of radionuclide therapy are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Recent advances in internal medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Von Düring, Stephan; Mavrakanas, Thomas; Muller, Halima; Primmaz, Steve; Grosgurin, Olivier; Louis Simonet, Martine; Marti, Christophe; Nendaz, Mathieu; Serratrice, Jacques; Stirnemann, Jérome; Carballo, Sebastian; Darbellay Farhoumand, Pauline

    2018-01-17

    In medicine, there are progresses which radically transform practices, change recommendations and win unanimous support in the medical community. There are some which divide, questioning principles that seemed established. There are also small advances, which can answer the questions that internists ask themselves in the daily care of their patients. Here are several articles published in 2017, read and commented for you by hospitalists, selected according to their impact on the medical world.

  6. Liver regenerative medicine: advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplantation is the standard care for many end-stage liver diseases. However, donor organs are scarce and some people succumb to liver failure before a donor is found. Liver regenerative medicine is a special interdisciplinary field of medicine focused on the development of new therapies incorporating stem cells, gene therapy and engineered tissues in order to repair or replace the damaged organ. In this review we consider the emerging progress achieved in the hepatic regenerative medicine within the last decade. The review starts with the characterization of liver organogenesis, fetal and adult stem/progenitor cells. Then, applications of primary hepatocytes, embryonic and adult (mesenchymal, hematopoietic and induced pluripotent) stem cells in cell therapy of liver diseases are considered. Current advances and challenges in producing mature hepatocytes from stem/progenitor cells are discussed. A section about hepatic tissue engineering includes consideration of synthetic and natural biomaterials in engineering scaffolds, strategies and achievements in the development of 3D bioactive matrices and 3D hepatocyte cultures, liver microengineering, generating bioartificial liver and prospects for fabrication of the bioengineered liver. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Advances in individualized and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Hubert E

    2014-03-01

    Molecular and cell biology have resulted in major advances in our understanding of disease pathogenesis as well as in novel strategies for the diagnosis, therapy and prevention of human diseases. Based on modern molecular, genetic and biochemical methodologies it is on the one hand possible to identify for example disease-related point mutations and single nucleotide polymorphisms. On the other hand, using high throughput array and other technologies, it is for example possible to simultaneously analyze thousands of genes or gene products (RNA and proteins), resulting in an individual gene or gene expression profile ('signature'). Such data increasingly allow to define the individual disposition for a given disease and to predict disease prognosis as well as the efficacy of therapeutic strategies in the individual patient ('individualized medicine'). At the same time, the basic discoveries in cell biology, including embryonic and adult stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, genetically modified cells and others, have moved regenerative medicine into the center of biomedical research worldwide with a major translational impact on tissue engineering as well as transplantation medicine. All these aspects have greatly contributed to the recent advances in regenerative medicine and the development novel concepts for the treatment of many human diseases, including liver diseases. Copyright © 2014 Medical University of Bialystok. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  8. Full GMP-Compliant Validation of Bone Marrow-Derived Human CD133+ Cells as Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product for Refractory Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Belotti

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133+ cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs. In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM, ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 106 of CD133+ cells (range 2.85 × 106–30.84 × 106, with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87% and a median purity of CD133+ cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%–96,20%. Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 106 cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial.

  9. Full GMP-compliant validation of bone marrow-derived human CD133(+) cells as advanced therapy medicinal product for refractory ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Daniela; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Bassetti, Beatrice; Cabiati, Benedetta; Spaltro, Gabriella; Biagi, Ettore; Parma, Matteo; Biondi, Andrea; Cavallotti, Laura; Gambini, Elisa; Pompilio, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA) regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP) represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133(+) cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs). In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM), ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 10(6) of CD133(+) cells (range 2.85 × 10(6)-30.84 × 10(6)), with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87%) and a median purity of CD133(+) cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%-96,20%). Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 10(6) cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial).

  10. Full GMP-Compliant Validation of Bone Marrow-Derived Human CD133+ Cells as Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product for Refractory Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belotti, Daniela; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Bassetti, Beatrice; Cabiati, Benedetta; Spaltro, Gabriella; Biagi, Ettore; Parma, Matteo; Biondi, Andrea; Cavallotti, Laura; Gambini, Elisa; Pompilio, Giulio

    2015-01-01

    According to the European Medicine Agency (EMA) regulatory frameworks, Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products (ATMP) represent a new category of drugs in which the active ingredient consists of cells, genes, or tissues. ATMP-CD133 has been widely investigated in controlled clinical trials for cardiovascular diseases, making CD133+ cells one of the most well characterized cell-derived drugs in this field. To ensure high quality and safety standards for clinical use, the manufacturing process must be accomplished in certified facilities following standard operative procedures (SOPs). In the present work, we report the fully compliant GMP-grade production of ATMP-CD133 which aims to address the treatment of chronic refractory ischemic heart failure. Starting from bone marrow (BM), ATMP-CD133 manufacturing output yielded a median of 6.66 × 106 of CD133+ cells (range 2.85 × 106–30.84 × 106), with a viability ranged between 96,03% and 99,97% (median 99,87%) and a median purity of CD133+ cells of 90,60% (range 81,40%–96,20%). Based on these results we defined our final release criteria for ATMP-CD133: purity ≥ 70%, viability ≥ 80%, cellularity between 1 and 12 × 106 cells, sterile, and endotoxin-free. The abovementioned criteria are currently applied in our Phase I clinical trial (RECARDIO Trial). PMID:26495296

  11. Clinical Development and Commercialization of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the European Union: How Are the Product Pipeline and Regulatory Framework Evolving?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boráň, Tomáš; Menezes-Ferreira, Margarida; Reischl, Ilona; Celis, Patrick; Ferry, Nicolas; Gänsbacher, Bernd; Krafft, Hartmut; Lipucci di Paola, Michele; Sladowski, Dariusz; Salmikangas, Paula

    2017-09-01

    The research and development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) has been active in Europe and worldwide during recent years. Yet, the number of licensed products remains low. The main expected legal change in the near future in the European Union (EU) concerns the regulation on clinical trials (536/2014), which will come into force in 2018. With this new framework, a more harmonized and swift process for approval of clinical trials is anticipated, which is expected to support the entry of new innovations into the EU market. A survey on ATMPs in clinical trials during 2010-2015 in the EU was conducted in order to study the trends of ATMP development since the earlier survey published in 2012. According to the results, the number of clinical trials using ATMPs is slowly increasing in the EU. Yet, the focus is still in early development, and the projects are mainly carried out by small and medium-sized enterprises, academia, and hospitals. Oncology is the main area of clinical development. Yet, the balance between cell-based products and gene therapy medicinal products in this area may be changing in the future due to the new T-cell technologies. Many limitations and challenges are identified for ATMP development, requiring proportionate regulatory requirements. On the other hand, for such a novel field, the developers should be active in considering possible constraints and actively engage with authorities to look for solutions. This article provides up to-date information on forthcoming regulatory improvements and discusses the main challenges hampering the commercialization of ATMPs in the EU.

  12. Efficacy, Safety, and Cost of Therapy of the Traditional Chinese Medicine, Catalpol, in Patients Following Surgical Resection for Locally Advanced Colon Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Baogang; Dai, Wei; Zhao, Shouhe

    2018-05-15

    BACKGROUND The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy, safety, and cost of treatment of the traditional Chinese herbal medicine, catalpol, in patients following surgical resection for locally advanced colon cancer. MATERIAL AND METHODS The 345 patients who had undergone surgical resection for locally advanced colon adenocarcinoma, were divided into three groups: a placebo-treated group (n=115); patients treated with an intraperitoneal injection of 10 mg/kg catalpol twice a day for 12 weeks (treatment group) (n=115); patients treated with 5 mg/kg intravenous bevacizumab twice a week for 12 weeks (control group) (n=115). Serum levels of carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), matrix metalloproteinases-2 (MMP-2), and matrix metalloproteinases-9 (MMP-9) were measured. Patient overall survival (OS), cancer-free survival (CFS), adverse effects, and cost of therapy were evaluated. Statistical analysis included the Wilcoxon rank sum test and Tukey's test for clinicopathological response at 95% confidence interval (CI). RESULTS Patients in the catalpol-treated group had significantly reduced serum levels of CA 19-9 (p=0.0002, q=3.202), CEA (p=0.0002, q=3.007), MMP-2 (p£0.0001, q=6.883), and MMP-9 (p<0.0001, q=3.347). Only non-fatal adverse effects occurred in the catalpol treatment group (p<0.0001, q=5.375). OS and CFS were significantly increased in the catalpol treatment group compared with the placebo group (p<0.0001 q=7.586). The cost of catalpol treatment compared favorably with other treatments (p<0.0001, q=207.17). CONCLUSIONS In this preliminary study, treatment with the Chinese herbal medicine, catalpol, showed benefits in clinical outcome, at low cost, and with no serious complications.

  13. Complementary Therapies and Medicines and Reproductive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Caroline A; Armour, Mike; Ee, Carolyn

    2016-03-01

    Complementary therapies and medicines are a broad and diverse range of treatments, and are frequently used by women and their partners during the preconception period to assist with infertility, and to address pregnancy-related conditions. Despite frequent use, the evidence examining the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety for many modalities is lacking, with variable study quality. In this article, we provide an overview of research evidence with the aim of examining the evidence to inform clinical practice. During the preconception period, there is mixed evidence for acupuncture to improve ovulation, or increase pregnancy rates. Acupuncture may improve sperm quality, but there is insufficient evidence to determine whether this results in improved pregnancy and live birth rates. Acupuncture can be described as a low-risk intervention. Chinese and Western herbal medicines may increase pregnancy rates; however, study quality is low. The evaluation of efficacy, effectiveness, and safety during the first trimester of pregnancy has most commonly reported on herbs, supplements, and practices such as acupuncture. There is high-quality evidence reporting the benefits of herbal medicines and acupuncture to treat nausea in pregnancy. The benefit from ginger to manage symptoms of nausea in early pregnancy is incorporated in national clinical guidelines, and vitamin B6 is recommended as a first-line treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. The safety of ginger and vitamin B6 is considered to be well established, and is based on epidemiological studies. Acupuncture has been shown to reduce back pain and improve function for women in early pregnancy. There is little evidence to support the use of cranberries in pregnancy for prevention of urinary tract infections, and chiropractic treatment for back pain. Overall the numbers of studies are small and of low quality, although the modalities appear to be low risk of harm. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New

  14. [Personalized medicine in transplantation therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatani, Kaname

    2013-05-01

    Personalized medicine based on pharmacogenomics is being developed at the clinical stage. Various evidence is accumulating in transplantation therapy. Tacrolimus, a calcineurin inhibitor, is usually used for immunosuppressive therapy after transplantation. Tacrolimus is mainly metabolized by cytochrome P450 isozymes, CYP3A4 and CYP3A5, expressed in the intestine as well as in the liver. Recent studies of pharmacogenomics have reported that several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CYP3A5 are correlated with gene expression and enzyme activity. Phenotypes of CYP3A5 are typed as expressors (*1/*1 and *1/*3) or non-expressors (*3/*3) . In living-donor liver transplantation, CYP3A5 phenotypes could predict the blood concentration of tacrolimus. In particular, preoperative assessment of CYP3A5 genotypes in both recipients (intestine) and donors (graft liver) is required for predicting tacrolimus pharmacokinetics. In kidney transplantation, blood tacrolimus concentrations were significantly different between expressors and non-expressors. Genotyping and phenotyping of recipients were useful to predict blood tacrolimus levels in early phase of post-transplantation. Furthermore, phenotypes of CYP3A5 could predict the initial dose of tacrolimus. Combination therapy was performed after bone marrow transplantation to prevent complications. Genotyping and phenotyping of metabolic enzymes for combination dugs would be useful for predicting drug actions. In conclusion, phenotyping based on pharmacogenomics supports personalized medicine in transplantation therapy. In future, multiplex testing should be developed to support personalized medicine in various fields.

  15. Advanced Accelerator Applications in Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimjiaem, Sakhorn

    2015-01-01

    besides the original purpose on development of particle acceleratora as research tools in nuclear and high-energy physics, there are large variety of accelerators used in various fileds from fundamental research to industrial usesand applications chemistry, biology and medicine. Pratical accelators used in various field of medical applications since serveral decades. Even through, a large fraction of applications is emphasized on cancer therappy, the number of accelerators used in midicine for other diagnostics and treatments has increased steady over the years. Several types of accelerated particles are used including electron, proton, neutron and ions. Presently, relativistic electron beams and radiation from linear accelerators (linas) are widely used. A combination of positron emission tomography (PRT) and radiotherapy is an example of excellent invention early detection and treat of cancer tumors. The most developments for proton and heavy ion therapy as well as a modern boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) are also great incoming effective systems. This talk will focus on developments of the accelrator systems as well as overview on biophysical properties and medical aspects of the diacnostics and treatments.

  16. Technical advances in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in radiation therapy. Many of these advances can be applied in most radiation therapy departments without expensive improvements in equipment. Changes in radiation fractionation, chemotherapeutic sensitization, intraoperative radiation, and interstitial implants can be performed with experience and improved physician training in most medium-sized departments. Advances that require investments in expensive equipment such as particle radiation and hyperthermia will need to be evaluated at designated treatment centers. 106 references

  17. Preclinical good laboratory practice-compliant safety study to evaluate biodistribution and tumorigenicity of a cartilage advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zscharnack, Matthias; Krause, Christoph; Aust, Gabriela; Thümmler, Christian; Peinemann, Frank; Keller, Thomas; Smink, Jeske J; Holland, Heidrun; Somerson, Jeremy S; Knauer, Jens; Schulz, Ronny M; Lehmann, Jörg

    2015-05-20

    The clinical development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), a new class of drugs, requires initial safety studies that deviate from standard non-clinical safety protocols. The study provides a strategy to address the safety aspects of biodistribution and tumorigenicity of ATMPs under good laboratory practice (GLP) conditions avoiding cell product manipulation. Moreover, the strategy was applied on a human ATMP for cartilage repair. The testing strategy addresses biodistribution and tumorigenicity using a multi-step analysis without any cell manipulation to exclude changes of test item characteristics. As a safeguard measurement for meeting regulatory expectations, the project design and goals were discussed continuously with the regulatory authority using a staggered scientific advice concept. Subsequently, the strategy was applied to co.don chondrosphere® (huChon spheroid), a tissue-engineered matrix-free ATMP of human normal chondrocytes. In both the biodistribution and tumorigenicity studies, huChon spheroids were implanted subcutaneously into 40 immunodeficient mice. Biodistribution was studied 1 month after implantation. A skin disc containing the huChon spheroid, two surrounding skin rings and selected organs were analyzed by validated, gender-specific, highly-sensitive triplex qPCR and by immunohistochemistry (IHC). No human DNA was detected in distant skin rings and analyzed organs. IHC revealed no direct or indirect indications of cell migration. Tumorigenicity was assessed 6 months after huChon spheroid implantation by palpation, macroscopic inspection, histology and IHC. No mice from the huChon spheroid group developed a tumor at the implantation site. In two mice, benign tumors were detected that were negative for HLA-ABC, suggesting that they were of spontaneous murine origin. In summary, the presented strategy using a multi-step analysis was confirmed to be suitable for safety studies of ATMPs.

  18. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  19. Towards an advanced therapy medicinal product based on mesenchymal stromal cells isolated from the umbilical cord tissue: quality and safety data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, José Paulo; Santos, Jorge Miguel; de Almeida, Joana Marto; Filipe, Mariana Alves; de Almeida, Mariana Vargas Teixeira; Almeida, Sílvia Cristina Paiva; Água-Doce, Ana; Varela, Alexandre; Gilljam, Mari; Stellan, Birgitta; Pohl, Susanne; Dittmar, Kurt; Lindenmaier, Werner; Alici, Evren; Graça, Luís; Cruz, Pedro Estilita; Cruz, Helder Joaquim; Bárcia, Rita Nogueira

    2014-01-17

    Standardization of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) manufacturing is urgently needed to enable translational activities and ultimately facilitate comparison of clinical trial results. In this work we describe the adaptation of a proprietary method for isolation of a specific umbilical cord tissue-derived population of MSCs, herein designated by its registered trademark as UCX®, towards the production of an advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP). The adaptation focused on different stages of production, from cell isolation steps to cell culturing and cryopreservation. The origin and quality of materials and reagents were considered and steps for avoiding microbiological and endotoxin contamination of the final cell product were implemented. Cell isolation efficiency, MSCs surface markers and genetic profiles, originating from the use of different medium supplements, were compared. The ATMP-compliant UCX® product was also cryopreserved avoiding the use of dimethyl sulfoxide, an added benefit for the use of these cells as an ATMP. Cells were analyzed for expansion capacity and longevity. The final cell product was further characterized by flow cytometry, differentiation potential, and tested for contaminants at various passages. Finally, genetic stability and immune properties were also analyzed. The isolation efficiency of UCX® was not affected by the introduction of clinical grade enzymes. Furthermore, isolation efficiencies and phenotype analyses revealed advantages in the use of human serum in cell culture as opposed to human platelet lysate. Initial decontamination of the tissue followed by the use of mycoplasma- and endotoxin-free materials and reagents in cell isolation and subsequent culture, enabled the removal of antibiotics during cell expansion. UCX®-ATMP maintained a significant expansion potential of 2.5 population doublings per week up to passage 15 (P15). They were also efficiently cryopreserved in a DMSO-free cryoprotectant medium with

  20. Food therapy and medical diet therapy of Traditional Chinese Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Qunli Wu; Xiaochun Liang

    2018-01-01

    Food therapy of traditional Chinese medicine aims to maintain balanced nutrition through diet. Medical diet therapy, however, is to achieve the balance of Yin and Yang through the combination of nutrition and medicine. Either “food therapy” or “medical diet therapy” aims to keep health, prevent disease, remove illness and slow aging. In recent years, both food therapy and medical diet therapy have been increasingly applied in clinical nutrition therapy. In terms of traditional Chinese food th...

  1. Pharmacogenomics and Nanotechnology Toward Advancing Personalized Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizirianakis, Ioannis S.; Amanatiadou, Elsa P.

    The target of personalized medicine to achieve major benefits for all patients in terms of diagnosis and drug delivery can be facilitated by creating a sincere multidisciplinary information-based infrastructure in health care. To this end, nanotechnology, pharmacogenomics, and informatics can advance the utility of personalized medicine, enable clinical translation of genomic knowledge, empower healthcare environment, and finally improve clinical outcomes.

  2. Internal radiation dosimetry using nuclear medicine imaging in radionuclide therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyeong Min; Byun, Byun Hyun; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Lim, Sang Moo

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy has been an important field in nuclear medicine. In radionuclide therapy, relevant evaluation of internally absorbed dose is essential for the achievement of efficient and sufficient treatment of incurable disease, and can be accomplished by means of accurate measurement of radioactivity in body and its changes with time. Recently, the advances of nuclear medicine imaging and multi modality imaging processing techniques can provide chance of more accurate and easier measurement of the measures commented above, in cooperation of conventional imaging based approaches. In this review, basic concept for internal dosimetry using nuclear medicine imaging is summarized with several check points which should be considered in real practice

  3. Research advancements and applications of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Wen; Wei Hongyuan; Luo Shunzhong

    2011-01-01

    Because of their uniquely high thermal and chemical stabilities, carboranes have become a subject of study with high interest in the chemistry of supra molecules, catalysts and radiopharmaceuticals. In recent years, the role of carboranes in nuclear medicinal chemistry has been diversified, from the traditional use in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT), to the clinical applications in molecular radio imaging and therapy. This paper provides an overview of the synthesis and characterization of carboranes and their applications in nuclear medicinal chemistry, with highlights of recent key advancements in the re- search areas of BNCT and radio imaging. (authors)

  4. Advances in inmune therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kvalheim, G.

    2004-01-01

    The use of monoclonal antibodies either alone or combined with isotopes as radio immuno conjugates has proven to be very efficient treatment for cancers such as non-Hodgkin lymphomas or breast cancer. Cellular based immunotherapy treatment modalities are also currently in use. Allogeneic T lymphocytes infused during haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HTSC) mediate graft-versus-tumour effects, but also initiate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), which remains the primary complications of allogeneic HTSC. The current clinical need for GVHD prophylaxis, which at a minimum involves single agents immune suppression generally limits the success of allogeneic HTSC immunotherapy to patients with indolent or chemotherapy sensitive malignancy. Therefore the use of allogeneic HTSC as a cancer therapy still needs to augment the anti-tumour effects and improve GVHD control. During the presentation several ongoing studies addressing these questions will be discussed. Since 1996 more than 500 patients have been recruited into >30 clinical trials with dendritic cell vaccines. Most clinical trials used different protocols with variations in D C generation, Dc maturation stage, D C-Ag loading, route of administration, vaccination intervals and vaccination frequency. The overall response rate is 20%(0- >50%) with occasional complete or partial regressions, prolonged stable disease, but no cure. Little or no toxicity has been observed which might suggest that the vaccines do not work as efficient as expected. As will be discussed the reason for these modest clinical effects observed can be many. Therefore, careful study design and use of standardized clinical and immunological criteria are needed. Recently, we have started a process for production of TILs, antigen specific T cells. During our DC vaccine programs tumour specific T-cell clones have been developed and such T-cells might also be useful as therapy in the vaccinated patients. The principal of such therapy and the

  5. Evidence-Based Advances in Rabbit Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Brandão, João

    2017-09-01

    Rabbit medicine has been continuously evolving over time with increasing popularity and demand. Tremendous advances have been made in rabbit medicine over the past 5 years, including the use of imaging tools for otitis and dental disease management, the development of laboratory testing for encephalitozoonosis, or determination of prognosis in rabbits. Recent pharmacokinetic studies have been published, providing additional information on commonly used antibiotics and motility-enhancer drugs, as well as benzimidazole toxicosis. This article presents a review of evidence-based advances for liver lobe torsions, thymoma, and dental disease in rabbits and controversial and new future promising areas in rabbit medicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Holistic Medicine: Advances and Shortcomings

    OpenAIRE

    Shapiro, Edward

    1982-01-01

    Holistic medicine is an attitudinal approach to health care rather than a particular set of techniques. It addresses the psychological, familial, societal, ethical and spiritual as well as biological dimensions of health and illness. The holistic approach emphasizes the uniqueness of each patient, the mutuality of the doctor-patient relationship, each person's responsibility for his or her own health care and society's responsibility for the promotion of health.

  7. Medicinal therapy of malignant lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aul, C.; Schroeder, M.; Giagounidis, A.

    2002-01-01

    Chemotherapy represents the most important therapeutic option in malignant lymphomas. Low to intermediate risk Hodgkin's disease is treated by a combination of chemotherapy and radiation. The new chemotherapy protocol BEACOPP has improved the outcome of advanced stages in comparison with the internationally accepted standard protocol COPP/ABVD. Dependent on the initial staging, cure rates between 50 and 95% can be achieved. Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas usually present in advanced stages of disease. Chemotherapy in these cases has palliative character and aims at improving patients'quality of life and at avoiding complications due to the disease. In aggressive and very aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma chemotherapy is curative and must be initiated immediately irrespective of the staging results. The efficacy of the standard protocol CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone), that was established in the 1970s, has recently been improved by shortening of the therapy interval (CHOP-14 vs.CHOP-21),addition of etoposide (CHOEP) and combination with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (R-CHOP). The value of high dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation has been shown unequivocally only for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and relapsed Hodgkin's disease responsive to chemotherapy. The therapeutic strategy of malignant lymphomas is likely to be improved within the next years due to the introduction of novel cytostatic agents, the broadening application of monoclonal antibodies,upcoming new transplantation procedures and the development of substances with molecular targets.To rapidly increase our current knowledge on the topic it is mandatory to include patients into the large national and international multicenter studies. (orig.) [de

  8. Technological advances in precision medicine and drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggi, Elaine; Patterson, Nicole E; Montagna, Cristina

    New technologies are rapidly becoming available to expand the arsenal of tools accessible for precision medicine and to support the development of new therapeutics. Advances in liquid biopsies, which analyze cells, DNA, RNA, proteins, or vesicles isolated from the blood, have gained particular interest for their uses in acquiring information reflecting the biology of tumors and metastatic tissues. Through advancements in DNA sequencing that have merged unprecedented accuracy with affordable cost, personalized treatments based on genetic variations are becoming a real possibility. Extraordinary progress has been achieved in the development of biological therapies aimed to even further advance personalized treatments. We provide a summary of current and future applications of blood based liquid biopsies and how new technologies are utilized for the development of biological therapeutic treatments. We discuss current and future sequencing methods with an emphasis on how technological advances will support the progress in the field of precision medicine.

  9. Molecular methods in nuclear medicine therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyung Han

    2001-01-01

    Nuclear medicine has traditionally contributed to molecular oncology by allowing noninvasive monitoring of tumor metabolism, growth and genetic changes, thereby providing a basis for appropriate biology-based treatment planning. However, NM techniques are now being applied as an active therapeutic tool in novel molecular approaches for cancer treatment. Such areas include research on cancer therapy with radiolabeled ligands or oligonucleotides, and utilization of synergism between NM radiotherapy and gene transfer techniques. Here we will focus on novel aspects of nuclear medicine therapy

  10. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullane, Stephanie A; Van Allen, Eliezer M

    2016-05-01

    Precision cancer medicine, the use of genomic profiling of patient tumors at the point-of-care to inform treatment decisions, is rapidly changing treatment strategies across cancer types. Precision medicine for advanced prostate cancer may identify new treatment strategies and change clinical practice. In this review, we discuss the potential and challenges of precision medicine in advanced prostate cancer. Although primary prostate cancers do not harbor highly recurrent targetable genomic alterations, recent reports on the genomics of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer has shown multiple targetable alterations in castration-resistant prostate cancer metastatic biopsies. Therapeutic implications include targeting prevalent DNA repair pathway alterations with PARP-1 inhibition in genomically defined subsets of patients, among other genomically stratified targets. In addition, multiple recent efforts have demonstrated the promise of liquid tumor profiling (e.g., profiling circulating tumor cells or cell-free tumor DNA) and highlighted the necessary steps to scale these approaches in prostate cancer. Although still in the initial phase of precision medicine for prostate cancer, there is extraordinary potential for clinical impact. Efforts to overcome current scientific and clinical barriers will enable widespread use of precision medicine approaches for advanced prostate cancer patients.

  11. Towards a first implementation of the WLIMES approach in living system studies advancing the diagnostics and therapy in augmented personalized medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonov, Plamen L

    2017-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to advance an extensible theory of living systems using an approach to biomathematics and biocomputation that suitably addresses self-organized, self-referential and anticipatory systems with multi-temporal multi-agents. Our first step is to provide foundations for modelling of emergent and evolving dynamic multi-level organic complexes and their sustentative processes in artificial and natural life systems. Main applications are in life sciences, medicine, ecology and astrobiology, as well as robotics, industrial automation, man-machine interface and creative design. Since 2011 over 100 scientists from a number of disciplines have been exploring a substantial set of theoretical frameworks for a comprehensive theory of life known as Integral Biomathics. That effort identified the need for a robust core model of organisms as dynamic wholes, using advanced and adequately computable mathematics. The work described here for that core combines the advantages of a situation and context aware multivalent computational logic for active self-organizing networks, Wandering Logic Intelligence (WLI), and a multi-scale dynamic category theory, Memory Evolutive Systems (MES), hence WLIMES. This is presented to the modeller via a formal augmented reality language as a first step towards practical modelling and simulation of multi-level living systems. Initial work focuses on the design and implementation of this visual language and calculus (VLC) and its graphical user interface. The results will be integrated within the current methodology and practices of theoretical biology and (personalized) medicine to deepen and to enhance the holistic understanding of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Advances in the targeted therapy of liposarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Z

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhonghai Guan,1 Xiongfei Yu,1 Haohao Wang,1 Haiyong Wang,1 Jing Zhang,1 Guangliang Li,2 Jiang Cao,3 Lisong Teng1 1Department of Surgical Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital, College of Medicine, Zhejiang University, 2Department of Medicine Oncology, Zhejiang Cancer Hospital, 3Clinical Research Center, The 2nd Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Liposarcoma (LPS is the most common type of soft-tissue sarcoma. Complete surgical resection is the only curative means for localized disease; however, both radiation and conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy remain controversial for metastatic or unresectable disease. An increasing number of trials with novel targeted therapy of LPS have provided encouraging data during recent years. This review will provide an overview of the advances in our understanding of LPS and summarize the results of recent trials with novel therapies targeting different genetic and molecular aberrations for different subtypes of LPS. Keywords: well-/dedifferentiated, myxoid/round cell, pleomorphic, soft-tissue sarcoma

  13. [Ethical aspects of human embryonic stem cell use and commercial umbilical cord blood stem cell banking. Ethical reflections on the occasion of the regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virt, G

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of the European Council and Parliament on advanced therapy medicinal products also includes therapies with human embryonic stem cells. The use of these stem cells is controversially and heavily discussed. Contrary to the use of adult stem cells, medical and ethical problems concerning the use of human embryonic stem cells persists, because this use is based on the destruction of human life at the very beginning. The regulation foresees, therefore, subsidiarity within the European Member States. Although there are no ethical problems in principle with the use of stem cells from the umbilical cord blood, there are social ethical doubts with the banking of these stem cells for autologous use without any currently foreseeable medical advantage by commercial blood banks. Also in this case subsidiarity is valid.

  14. Cell therapy medicinal product regulatory framework in Europe and its application for MSC based therapy development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janis eAncans

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs, including cell therapy products, form a new class of medicines in the European Union. Since ATMPs are at the forefront of scientific innovation in medicine, specific regulatory framework has been developed for these medicines and implemented from 2009. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT has been established at European Medicines Agency (EMA for centralized classification, certification and evaluation procedures, and other ATMP related tasks. Guidance documents, initiatives and interaction platforms are available to make the new framework more accessible for small and medium-sized enterprises, academia, hospitals and foundations. Good understanding of centralised and national components of the regulatory system is required to plan product development. It is in the best interests of cell therapy developers to utilise provided resources starting with the preclinical stage. Whilst there have not been mesenchymal stem cell (MSC based medicine authorisations in the EU, three MSC products have received marketing approval in other regions since 2011. Information provided on regulatory requirements, procedures and initiatives is aimed to facilitate MSC based medicinal product development and authorisation in the EU.

  15. Nuclear medicine therapy of neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefnagel, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    Specific targeting of radionuclides to neuroblastoma, a neural crest tumor occurring predominantly in young children and associated with a relatively poor prognosis, may be achieved via the metabolic route (Mibg), receptor binding (peptides) or immunological approach (antibodies). The clinical role of 1 31 I -Mibg therapy and radioimmunotherapy in neuroblastoma is discussed. In recurrent or progressive metastatic disease after conventional treatment modalities have failed, 1 31 I -Mibg therapy, with an overall objective response rate of 35%, is probably the best palliative treatment, as the invasiveness and toxicity of this therapy compare favourably with that of chemotherapy, immunotherapy and external beam radiotherapy. In patients presenting with inoperable stage III and IV neuroblastoma, 1 31 I -Mibg therapy at diagnosis is at least as effective as combination chemotherapy but is associated with much less toxicity. In patients with recurrent disease 1 31 I -Mibg therapy in combination with hyperbaric oxygen therapy proved feasible and encouraging effects on survival have ben observed. Attempts to intensify the treatment in relapsed patients by combination of 1 31 I -Mibg therapy with high dose chemotherapy and/or total body irradiation have met with considerable toxicity. Developments in Mibg therapy aiming at improving the therapeutic index are mentioned. Early results of radioimmunotherapy using 1 31 I -UJ13A or 1 31 I -3F8 monoclonal antibodies have shown moderate objective response and considerable side effects in patients with stage IV neuroblastoma, who had relapsed or failed conventional therapy. New developments in radioimmunotherapy of neuroblastoma include the use of chimeric antibodies, the enhancement of tumor uptake by modulation of antigen expression or by increasing the tumor perfusion/vascularity/permeability, the use of other labels and multistep targeting techniques, e.g. using bispecific monoclonal antibodies

  16. Evidence-Based Advances in Avian Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summa, Noémie M; Guzman, David Sanchez-Migallon

    2017-09-01

    This article presents relevant advances in avian medicine and surgery over the past 5 years. New information has been published to improve clinical diagnosis in avian diseases. This article also describes new pharmacokinetic studies. Advances in the understanding and treatment of common avian disorders are presented in this article, as well. Although important progress has been made over the past years, there is still much research that needs to be done regarding the etiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of avian diseases and evidence-based information is still sparse in the literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Recent Advances of Metallocenes for Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Miguel M; Bastos, Pedro; Catela, Isabelle; Zalewska, Karolina; Branco, Luis C

    2017-01-01

    The recent advances for the synthesis and application of different metallocenes for Medicinal Chemistry is reviewed. This manuscript presents the different metallocene scaffolds, with special emphasis on ferrocene derivatives, and their potential pharmaceutical application. Over the last years, the synthesis of new metallocene compounds and their biological and medicinal effects against some types of diseases (e.g. anti-tumoral, antibiotics, anti-viral) have been reported. From the medicinal point of view, the attractive properties of metallocene derivatives, such as their high stability, low toxicity and appealing redox behaviors are particularly relevant. This area has attracted many researchers as well as the pharmaceutical industry due to the promising results of some metallocenes, in particular ferrocene compounds, in breast cancer and malaria. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Recent advances in paediatric respiratory medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Andrew; Balfour-Lynn, Ian M

    2016-02-01

    This review highlights important advances in paediatric respiratory medicine since 2014, excluding cystic fibrosis. It focuses mainly on the more common conditions, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, bronchiolitis and preschool wheezing, asthma, pneumonia and sleep, and highlights some of the rarer conditions such as primary ciliary dyskinesia and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  19. The clinical effects of music therapy in palliative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Walsh, Declan; Davis, Mellar P; Legrand, Susan B

    2006-08-01

    This study was to objectively assess the effect of music therapy on patients with advanced disease. Two hundred patients with chronic and/or advanced illnesses were prospectively evaluated. The effects of music therapy on these patients are reported. Visual analog scales, the Happy/Sad Faces Assessment Tool, and a behavior scale recorded pre- and post-music therapy scores on standardized data collection forms. A computerized database was used to collect and analyze the data. Utilizing the Wilcoxon signed rank test and a paired t test, music therapy improved anxiety, body movement, facial expression, mood, pain, shortness of breath, and verbalizations. Sessions with family members were also evaluated, and music therapy improved families' facial expressions, mood, and verbalizations. All improvements were statistically significant (Pmusic therapy. Objective data were obtained for a large number of patients with advanced disease. This is a significant addition to the quantitative literature on music therapy in this unique patient population. Our results suggest that music therapy is invaluable in palliative medicine.

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for chronic pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Brent A; Tilburt, Jon C; Sood, Amit; Li, Guang-Xi; Wang, Shi-Han

    2016-06-01

    Pain afflflicts over 50 million people in the US, with 30.7% US adults suffering with chronic pain. Despite advances in therapies, many patients will continue to deal with ongoing symptoms that are not fully addressed by the best conventional medicine has to offer them. The patients frequently turn to therapies outside the usual purview of conventional medicine (herbs, acupuncture, meditation, etc.) called complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Academic and governmental groups are also starting to incorporate CAM recommendations into chronic pain management strategies. Thus, for any physician who care for patients with chronic pain, having some familiarity with these therapies-including risks and benefits-will be key to helping guide patients in making evidence-based, well informed decisions about whether or not to use such therapies. On the other hand, if a CAM therapy has evidence of both safety and efficacy then not making it available to a patient who is suffering does not meet the need of the patient. We summarize the current evidence of a wide variety of CAM modalities that have potential for helping patients with chronic pain in this article. The triad of chronic pain symptoms, ready access to information on the internet, and growing patient empowerment suggest that CAM therapies will remain a consistent part of the healthcare of patients dealing with chronic pain.

  1. Recent Advances in Traditional Chinese Medicine for Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yifei; Menon, Madhav C; Deng, Yueyi; Chen, Yiping; He, John Cijiang

    2015-09-01

    Because current treatment options for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are limited, many patients seek out alternative therapies such as traditional Chinese medicine. However, there is a lack of evidence from large clinical trials to support the use of traditional medicines in patients with CKD. Many active components of traditional medicine formulas are undetermined and their toxicities are unknown. Therefore, there is a need for research to identify active compounds from traditional medicines and understand the mechanisms of action of these compounds, as well as their potential toxicity, and subsequently perform well-designed, randomized, controlled, clinical trials to study the efficacy and safety of their use in patients with CKD. Significant progress has been made in this field within the last several years. Many active compounds have been identified by applying sophisticated techniques such as mass spectrometry, and more mechanistic studies of these compounds have been performed using both in vitro and in vivo models. In addition, several well-designed, large, randomized, clinical trials have recently been published. We summarize these recent advances in the field of traditional medicines as they apply to CKD. In addition, current barriers for further research are also discussed. Due to the ongoing research in this field, we believe that stronger evidence to support the use of traditional medicines for CKD will emerge in the near future. Copyright © 2015 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent advances in nuclear medicine in endocrine oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luster, Markus; Pfestroff, Andreas; Verburg, Frederik A

    2017-01-01

    The purpose is to review recent advances concerning the role of nuclear medicine in endocrine oncology. For I therapy of thyroid cancer a thyrotropin (TSH) more than 30 mU/l has for many years been deemed a condition sine qua non. However, new data show that patients with lower TSH levels at the time of ablation have the same rate of successful ablation as those with TSH more than 30 mU/l.I-124 combined integrated positron emission tomography and computed X-ray tomography was shown to be highly accurate in predicting findings on posttherapy radioiodine scanning and was shown to have a high prognostic power.In neuroendocrine tumors, long-term complication rates of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy were reported. Furthermore first preclinical and clinical results of peptide receptor radionuclide therapy with somatostatin receptor antagonists were published.In nuclear medicine, prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA)-targeted radionuclide imaging and therapy is of interest. PSMA was shown to also be expressed in neoplasms of the thyroid, the adrenal glands and neuroendocrine tumors. Further individualization of thyroid cancer patient care by means of I-124-positron emission tomography and computed X-ray tomography-based selection of the therapeutic strategy is possible. I therapy might not require as intensive TSH stimulation as thought previously. For endocrine-related malignancies PSMA targeting deserves further investigation.

  3. Conference Scene: Advances in RNA nanotechnology promise to transform medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leontis, Neocles; Sweeney, Blake; Haque, Farzin; Guo, Peixuan

    2013-07-01

    The second International Conference on RNA Nanotechnology and Therapeutics was held on the 3-5 April in Lexington, (KY, USA). The focus of the conference was on leveraging the unique chemical and biological properties of RNA to promote transformative advances in medicine. The conference convened more than 200 researchers from 15 countries and many disciplines, roughly double the participants of the first conference. While many presentations focused on the design, assembly and characterization of RNA nanoparticles and their uses for in vivo and in vitro sensing, diagnosis and therapy, others covered a variety of relevant areas of RNA biology and chemistry.

  4. Advances in nuclear medicine and in radiopharmaceuticals, International meeting in Cabo Frio. Program and abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The meeting of Advances in Nuclear Medicine and in Radiopharmaceuticals, held in Cabo Frio, Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil, in September 26-28, 2002, has provided an excellent opportunity for the presentation and the discussion of the latest achievements and new trends of nuclear medicine techniques and radiopharmaceuticals for the clinical evaluation of inflammation, infection, oncology and therapy of diseases with radionuclides

  5. Glycotherapy: new advances inspire a reemergence of glycans in medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Jason E; Bertozzi, Carolyn R

    2014-01-16

    The beginning of the 20(th) century marked the dawn of modern medicine with glycan-based therapies at the forefront. However, glycans quickly became overshadowed as DNA- and protein-focused treatments became readily accessible. The recent development of new tools and techniques to study and produce structurally defined carbohydrates has spurred renewed interest in the therapeutic applications of glycans. This review focuses on advances within the past decade that are bringing glycan-based treatments back to the forefront of medicine and the technologies that are driving these efforts. These include the use of glycans themselves as therapeutic molecules as well as engineering protein and cell surface glycans to suit clinical applications. Glycan therapeutics offer a rich and promising frontier for developments in the academic, biopharmaceutical, and medical fields. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Alzheimer's disease therapies: Selected advances and future ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alexandria Journal of Medicine. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 51, No 1 (2015) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  7. Translational Medicine Advances in von Willebrand Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillicrap, David

    2014-01-01

    Following the recognition of von Willebrand disease (VWD) in 1926 and the cloning of the gene for von Willebrand factor (VWF) in 1985, significant advances have been made in our fundamental knowledge of both the disease and the protein. Some of this new knowledge has also begun to impact the clinical management of VWD. First, the progressive increase in our understanding of the molecular genetic basis of VWD has resulted in rational applications of molecular testing to complement the current range of phenotypic tests for VWD. These molecular genetic strategies are most effectively directed at the prenatal diagnosis of type 3 VWD and confirmatory testing for types 2B and 2N disease. In contrast, the use of molecular testing to clarify the diagnosis of type 1 VWD is of marginal benefit, at best. In terms of VWD therapies, a new recombinant VWF concentrate has recently completed successful clinical trials and is now awaiting more widespread application. There have even been some pre-clinical successes with VWF gene transfer although the clinical rationale for this therapeutic strategy needs careful consideration. Much more remains to be learnt about the biology of VWF and further translational advances for the enhancement of VWD care will inevitably be realized. PMID:23809112

  8. New tools in regenerative medicine: gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz Ruiz, Miguel; Regueiro, José R

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy aims to transfer genetic material into cells to provide them with new functions. A gene transfer agent has to be safe, capable of expressing the desired gene for a sustained period of time in a sufficiently large population of cells to produce a biological effect. Identifying a gene transfer tool that meets all of these criteria has proven to be a difficult objective. Viral and nonviral vectors, in vivo, ex vivo and in situ strategies co-exist at present, although ex vivo lenti-or retroviral vectors are presently the most popular.Natural stem cells (from embryonic, hematopoietic, mesenchymal, or adult tissues) or induced progenitor stem (iPS) cells can be modified by gene therapy for use in regenerative medicine. Among them, hematopoietic stem cells have shown clear clinical benefit, but iPS cells hold humongous potential with no ethical concerns.

  9. Advances in particle therapy a multidisciplinary approach

    CERN Document Server

    Bernier, Jacques

    2018-01-01

    Hadron therapy is a groundbreaking new method of treating cancer. Boasting greater precision than other therapies, this therapy is now utilised in many clinical settings and the field is growing. More than 50 medical facilities currently perform (or are planned to perform) this treatment, with this number set to double by 2020. This new text covers the most recent advances in hadron therapy, exploring the physics, technology, biology, diagnosis, clinical applications, and economics behind the therapy. Providing essential and up-to-date information on recent developments in the field, this book will be of interest to current and aspiring specialists from a wide range of backgrounds.

  10. Multifunctional nanodiamonds in regenerative medicine: Recent advances and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitlow, Jonathan; Pacelli, Settimio; Paul, Arghya

    2017-09-10

    With recent advances in the field of nanomedicine, many new strategies have emerged for diagnosing and treating diseases. At the forefront of this multidisciplinary research, carbon nanomaterials have demonstrated unprecedented potential for a variety of regenerative medicine applications including novel drug delivery platforms that facilitate the localized and sustained release of therapeutics. Nanodiamonds (NDs) are a unique class of carbon nanoparticles that are gaining increasing attention for their biocompatibility, highly functional surfaces, optical properties, and robust physical properties. Their remarkable features have established NDs as an invaluable regenerative medicine platform, with a broad range of clinically relevant applications ranging from targeted delivery systems for insoluble drugs, bioactive substrates for stem cells, and fluorescent probes for long-term tracking of cells and biomolecules in vitro and in vivo. This review introduces the synthesis techniques and the various routes of surface functionalization that allow for precise control over the properties of NDs. It also provides an in-depth overview of the current progress made toward the use of NDs in the fields of drug delivery, tissue engineering, and bioimaging. Their future outlook in regenerative medicine including the current clinical significance of NDs, as well as the challenges that must be overcome to successfully translate the reviewed technologies from research platforms to clinical therapies will also be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Medicinal leech therapy-an overall perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sig, Ali K; Guney, Mustafa; Uskudar Guclu, Aylin; Ozmen, Erkan

    2017-12-01

    Complementary medicine methods have a long history, but modern medicine has just recently focused on their possible modes of action. Medicinal leech therapy (MLT) or hirudotherapy, an old technique, has been studied by many researchers for possible effects on various diseases such as inflammatory diseases, osteoarthritis, and after different surgeries. Hirudo medicinalis has widest therapeutic usage among the leeches, but worldwide, many different species were tested and studied. Leeches secrete more than 20 identified bioactive substances such as antistasin, eglins, guamerin, hirudin, saratin, bdellins, complement, and carboxypeptidase inhibitors. They have analgesic, anti-inflammatory, platelet inhibitory, anticoagulant, and thrombin regulatory functions, as well as extracellular matrix degradative and antimicrobial effects, but with further studies, the spectrum of effects may widen. The technique is cheap, effective, easy to apply, and its modes of action have been elucidated for certain diseases. In conclusion, for treatment of some diseases, MLT is not an alternative, but is a complementary and/or integrative choice. MLT is a part of multidisciplinary treatments, and secretes various bioactive substances. These substances vary among species and different species should be evaluated for both treatment capability and their particular secreted molecules. There is huge potential for novel substances and these could be future therapeutics.

  12. Massage Therapy in Iranian Traditional Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir-Mohammad Jaladat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Massage training and how the body is influenced by massage are common issues which are seriously under study and discussion in Iranian traditional medicine. Iranian physicians considered motion and massage as major principles of health maintenance.In this study, we examined the available literature of traditional medicine to evaluate location, purpose and use of massage therapy in Iranian medicine in comparison with other popular conventional styles.The aim of Iranian massage is to regulate the core body temperature and aid to eliminate the waste products from the body. This type of massage is divided into five categories including solid, soft, moderate, great and aggressive, based on the intensity, speed, duration and techniques of massage.Iranian physicians proposed general body massage or massage of a particular area based on subjective complaints. They recommended specific massages in particular groups including children, pregnant women, the elderly and athletes. In some cases, the effects of these recommendations have been studied in clinical trials.Conclusion: It seems that the major difference between Iranian massage and other styles of massage is special attention of Iranian massage to the individual circumstances, and the cause of the problem rather than technique of the massage.

  13. CAR-T Cell Therapies From the Transfusion Medicine Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesnak, Andrew; Lin, ChieYu; Siegel, Don L; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies has generated significant excitement over the last several years. From a transfusion medicine perspective, the implementation of CAR-T therapy as a potential mainstay treatment for not only hematologic but also solid-organ malignancies represents a significant opportunity for growth and expansion. In this review, we will describe the rationale for the development of genetically redirected T cells as a cancer therapeutic, the different elements that are required to engineer these cells, as well as an overview of the process by which patient cells are harvested and processed to create and subsequently validate CAR-T cells. Finally, we will briefly describe some of the toxicities and clinical efficacy of CAR-T cells in the setting of patients with advanced malignancy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cell therapy medicinal product regulatory framework in Europe and its application for MSC-based therapy development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancans, Janis

    2012-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), including cell therapy products, form a new class of medicines in the European Union. Since the ATMPs are at the forefront of scientific innovation in medicine, specific regulatory framework has been developed for these medicines and implemented from 2009. The Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) has been established at the European Medicines Agency (EMA) for centralized classification, certification and evaluation procedures, and other ATMP-related tasks. Guidance documents, initiatives, and interaction platforms are available to make the new framework more accessible for small- and medium-sized enterprises, academia, hospitals, and foundations. Good understanding of the centralized and national components of the regulatory system is required to plan product development. It is in the best interests of the cell therapy developers to utilize the resources provided starting with the pre-clinical stage. Whilst there have been no mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based medicine authorizations in the EU, three MSC products have received marketing approval in other regions since 2011. The information provided on the regulatory requirements, procedures, and initiatives is aimed at facilitating MSC-based medicinal product development and authorization in the EU. PMID:22912639

  15. Maggot Debridement Therapy in Disaster Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Frank; Shaban, Ramon Z; Tatham, Peter

    2016-02-01

    When disaster strikes, the number of patients requiring treatment can be overwhelming. In low-income countries, resources to assist the injured in a timely fashion may be limited. As a consequence, necrosis and wound infection in disaster patients is common and frequently leads to adverse health outcomes such as amputations, chronic wounds, and loss of life. In such compromised health care environments, low-tech and cheap wound care options are required that are in ready supply, easy to use, and have multiple therapeutic benefits. Maggot debridement therapy (MDT) is one such wound care option and may prove to be an invaluable tool in the treatment of wounds post-disaster. This report provides an overview of the wound burden experienced in various types of disaster, followed by a discussion of current treatment approaches, and the role MDT may play in the treatment of complex wounds in challenging health care conditions. Maggot debridement therapy removes necrotic and devitalized tissue, controls wound infection, and stimulates wound healing. These properties suggest that medicinal maggots could assist health care professionals in the debridement of disaster wounds, to control or prevent infection, and to prepare the wound bed for reconstructive surgery. Maggot debridement therapy-assisted wound care would be led by health care workers rather than physicians, which would allow the latter to focus on reconstructive and other surgical interventions. Moreover, MDT could provide a larger window for time-critical interventions, such as fasciotomies to treat compartment syndrome and amputations in case of life-threatening wound infection. There are social, medical, and logistic hurdles to overcome before MDT can become widely available in disaster medical aid. Thus, research is needed to further demonstrate the utility of MDT in Disaster Medicine. There is also a need for reliable MDT logistics and supply chain networks. Integration with other disaster management

  16. Music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yinger, Olivia Swedberg; Gooding, Lori

    2014-07-01

    This article summarizes the research on music therapy and music medicine for children and adolescents with diagnoses commonly treated by psychiatrists. Music therapy and music medicine are defined, effects of music on the brain are described, and music therapy research in psychiatric treatment is discussed. Music therapy research with specific child/adolescent populations is summarized, including disorders usually diagnosed in childhood, substance abuse, mood/anxiety disorders, and eating disorders. Clinical implications are listed, including suggestions for health care professionals seeking to use music medicine techniques. Strengths and weaknesses of music therapy treatment are discussed, as well as areas for future research. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Advanced Music Therapy Supervision Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2009-01-01

    supervision training excerpts live in the workshop will be offered. The workshop will include demonstrating a variety of supervision methods and techniques used in A) post graduate music therapy training programs b) a variety of work contexts such as psychiatry and somatic music psychotherapy. The workshop......The presentation will illustrate training models in supervision for experienced music therapists where transference/counter transference issues are in focus. Musical, verbal and body related tools will be illustrated from supervision practice by the presenters. A possibility to experience small...

  18. Advances on Bioactive Polysaccharides from Medicinal Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jian-Hua; Jin, Ming-Liang; Morris, Gordon A; Zha, Xue-Qiang; Chen, Han-Qing; Yi, Yang; Li, Jing-En; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Gao, Jie; Nie, Shao-Ping; Shang, Peng; Xie, Ming-Yong

    2016-07-29

    In recent decades, the polysaccharides from the medicinal plants have attracted a lot of attention due to their significant bioactivities, such as anti-tumor activity, antioxidant activity, anticoagulant activity, antidiabetic activity, radioprotection effect, anti-viral activity, hypolipidemic and immunomodulatory activities, which make them suitable for medicinal applications. Previous studies have also shown that medicinal plant polysaccharides are non-toxic and show no side effects. Based on these encouraging observations, most researches have been focusing on the isolation and identification of polysaccharides, as well as their bioactivities. A large number of bioactive polysaccharides with different structural features and biological effects from medicinal plants have been purified and characterized. This review provides a comprehensive summary of the most recent developments in physiochemical, structural features and biological activities of bioactive polysaccharides from a number of important medicinal plants, such as polysaccharides from Astragalus membranaceus, Dendrobium plants, Bupleurum, Cactus fruits, Acanthopanax senticosus, Angelica sinensis (Oliv.) Diels, Aloe barbadensis Miller, and Dimocarpus longan Lour. Moreover, the paper has also been focused on the applications of bioactive polysaccharides for medicinal applications. Recent studies have provided evidence that polysaccharides from medicinal plants can play a vital role in bioactivities. The contents and data will serve as a useful reference material for further investigation, production, and application of these polysaccharides in functional foods and therapeutic agents.

  19. Photodynamic Cancer Therapy - Recent Advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrahamse, Heidi

    2011-01-01

    The basic principle of the photodynamic effect was discovered over a hundred years ago leading to the pioneering work on PDT in Europe. It was only during the 1980s, however, when 'photoradiation therapy' was investigated as a possible treatment modality for cancer. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a photochemotherapeutic process which requires the use of a photosensitizer (PS) that, upon entry into a cancer cell is targeted by laser irradiation to initiate a series of events that contribute to cell death. PSs are light-sensitive dyes activated by a light source at a specific wavelength and can be classified as first or second generation PSs based on its origin and synthetic pathway. The principle of PS activation lies in a photochemical reaction resulting from excitation of the PS producing singlet oxygen which in turn reacts and damages cell organelles and biomolecules required for cell function and ultimately leading to cell destruction. Several first and second generation PSs have been studied in several different cancer types in the quest to optimize treatment. PSs including haematoporphyrin derivative (HpD), aminolevulinic acid (ALA), chlorins, bacteriochlorins, phthalocyanines, naphthalocyanines, pheophorbiedes and purpurins all require selective uptake and retention by cancer cells prior to activation by a light source and subsequent cell death induction. Photodynamic diagnosis (PDD) is based on the fluorescence effect exhibited by PSs upon irradiation and is often used concurrently with PDT to detect and locate tumours. Both laser and light emitting diodes (LED) have been used for PDT depending on the location of the tumour. Internal cancers more often require the use of laser light delivery using fibre optics as delivery system while external PDT often make use of LEDs. Normal cells have a lower uptake of the PS in comparison to tumour cells, however the acute cytotoxic effect of the compound on the recovery rate of normal cells is not known. Subcellular

  20. Gene and cell therapy for children--new medicines, new challenges?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Karen F; Bobby Gaspar, H

    2014-06-01

    The range of possible gene and cell therapy applications is expanding at an extremely rapid rate and advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are currently the hottest topic in novel medicines, particularly for inherited diseases. Paediatric patients stand to gain enormously from these novel therapies as it now seems plausible to develop a gene or cell therapy for a vast number of inherited diseases. There are a wide variety of potential gene and cell therapies in various stages of development. Patients who received first gene therapy treatments for primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are reaching 10 and 15 years post-treatment, with robust and sustained immune recovery. Cell therapy clinical trials are underway for a variety of tissues including corneal, retinal and muscle repair and islet cell transplantation. Various cell therapy approaches are also being trialled to enhance the safety of bone marrow transplants, which should improve survival rates in childhood cancers and PIDs. Progress in genetic engineering of lymphocyte populations to target and kill cancerous cells is also described. If successful these ATMPs may enhance or replace the existing chemo-ablative therapy for several paediatric cancers. Emerging applications of gene therapy now include skin and neurological disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa, epilepsy and leukodystrophy. Gene therapy trials for haemophilia, muscular dystrophy and a range of metabolic disorders are underway. There is a vast array of potential advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and these are likely to be more cost effective than existing medicines. However, the first clinical trials have not been without setbacks and some of the key adverse events are discussed. Furthermore, the arrival of this novel class of therapies brings many new challenges for the healthcare industry. We present a summary of the key non-clinical factors required for successful delivery of these potential treatments. Technological advances

  1. Gene and cell therapy for children — New medicines, new challenges?☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckland, Karen F.; Bobby Gaspar, H.

    2014-01-01

    The range of possible gene and cell therapy applications is expanding at an extremely rapid rate and advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) are currently the hottest topic in novel medicines, particularly for inherited diseases. Paediatric patients stand to gain enormously from these novel therapies as it now seems plausible to develop a gene or cell therapy for a vast number of inherited diseases. There are a wide variety of potential gene and cell therapies in various stages of development. Patients who received first gene therapy treatments for primary immune deficiencies (PIDs) are reaching 10 and 15 years post-treatment, with robust and sustained immune recovery. Cell therapy clinical trials are underway for a variety of tissues including corneal, retinal and muscle repair and islet cell transplantation. Various cell therapy approaches are also being trialled to enhance the safety of bone marrow transplants, which should improve survival rates in childhood cancers and PIDs. Progress in genetic engineering of lymphocyte populations to target and kill cancerous cells is also described. If successful these ATMPs may enhance or replace the existing chemo-ablative therapy for several paediatric cancers. Emerging applications of gene therapy now include skin and neurological disorders such as epidermolysis bullosa, epilepsy and leukodystrophy. Gene therapy trials for haemophilia, muscular dystrophy and a range of metabolic disorders are underway. There is a vast array of potential advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), and these are likely to be more cost effective than existing medicines. However, the first clinical trials have not been without setbacks and some of the key adverse events are discussed. Furthermore, the arrival of this novel class of therapies brings many new challenges for the healthcare industry. We present a summary of the key non-clinical factors required for successful delivery of these potential treatments. Technological advances

  2. Hemostatic radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novaes, P.E.R.S.; Possik, R.A.; Peres, O.; Abrao, A.

    1987-01-01

    Nine patients with advanced bleeding gastric cancer are treated with 4MVC linear accelerator or cobaltotherapy inparallel opposed fields to epigastric region. The radiation therapy is employed as an hemostatic procedure and the results of treatment are analysed. The doses ranged of 1000 rad to 4000 rad, 150 to 300 rad/day, five days a week. (M.A.C.) [pt

  3. Combination Therapy for Advanced Kaposi Sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this clinical trial, adult patients with any form of advanced Kaposi sarcoma will be treated with liposomal doxorubicin and bevacizumab every 3 weeks for a maximum of six treatments.  Patients who respond to this therapy or have stable disease will rec

  4. Evidence-Based Advances in Reptile Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Mark A; Perry, Sean M

    2017-09-01

    Evidence-based medicine allows veterinarians to practice high-quality medicine, because the basis for all decision making is quantitative, objective, and reproducible. Case reports and case series are limited in their scope and application. Cross-sectional studies, likewise, cannot provide answers to specific variable testing with a temporal application. It is essential for the reptile specialty to expand into case-control studies, cohort studies, and experimental/intervention studies. Unfortunately, much of the reptile literature remains limited to descriptive studies. This article reviews current evidence-based topics in reptile medicine and shares how everyone practicing in the field can contribute to improving this specialty. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Systems medicine advances in interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiffo, Flavia R; Eickelberg, Oliver; Fernandez, Isis E

    2017-09-30

    Fibrotic lung diseases involve subject-environment interactions, together with dysregulated homeostatic processes, impaired DNA repair and distorted immune functions. Systems medicine-based approaches are used to analyse diseases in a holistic manner, by integrating systems biology platforms along with clinical parameters, for the purpose of understanding disease origin, progression, exacerbation and remission.Interstitial lung diseases (ILDs) refer to a heterogeneous group of complex fibrotic diseases. The increase of systems medicine-based approaches in the understanding of ILDs provides exceptional advantages by improving diagnostics, unravelling phenotypical differences, and stratifying patient populations by predictable outcomes and personalised treatments. This review discusses the state-of-the-art contributions of systems medicine-based approaches in ILDs over the past 5 years. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  6. Evidence-Based Advances in Ferret Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Minh; Chassang, Lucile; Zoller, Graham

    2017-09-01

    This literature review covers approximately 35 years of veterinary medicine. This article develops the current state of knowledge in pet ferret medicine regarding the most common diseases according to evidence-based data and gives insight into further axis of research. Literature review was conducted through identification of keywords (title + ferret) with Web-based database searching. To appreciate the methodological quality and the level of evidence of each article included in the review, full-text versions were reviewed and questions addressed in the articles were formulated. Analysis of the articles' content was performed by the authors, and relevant clinical information was extracted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Delivering advanced therapies: the big pharma approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, J; Krishna, D; Jespers, L; Ketkar, A; Haddock, R; Imrie, J; Kili, S

    2017-09-01

    After two decades of focused development and some recent clinical successes, cell and gene therapy (CGT) is emerging as a promising approach to personalized medicines. Genetically engineered cells as a medical modality are poised to stand alongside or in combination with small molecule and biopharmaceutical approaches to bring new therapies to patients globally. Big pharma can have a vital role in industrializing CGT by focusing on diseases with high unmet medical need and compelling genetic evidence. Pharma should invest in manufacturing and supply chain solutions that deliver reproducible, high-quality therapies at a commercially viable cost. Owing to the fast pace of innovation in this field proactive engagement with regulators is critical. It is also vital to understand the needs of patients all along the patient care pathway and to establish product pricing that is accepted by prescribers, payers and patients.

  8. Second-Line Therapy for Advanced NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jared M; Stinchcombe, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer have non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) subtype and have advanced disease at the time of diagnosis. Improvements in both first-line and subsequent therapies are allowing longer survival and enhanced quality of life for these patients. The median overall survival observed in many second-line trials is approximately 9 months, and many patients receive further therapy after second-line therapy. The cytotoxic agents pemetrexed and docetaxel and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) erlotinib and gefitinib are standard second-line therapies. For patients with EGFR mutation, a TKI is the favored second-line therapy if not already used in first-line therapy. For patients without the EGFR mutation, TKIs are an option, but many oncologists favor cytotoxic therapy. The inhibitor of the EML4/ALK fusion protein, crizotinib, has recently become a standard second-line treatment for patients with the gene rearrangement and has promise for patients with the ROS1 rearrangement.

  9. Regulatory structures for gene therapy medicinal products in the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klug, Bettina; Celis, Patrick; Carr, Melanie; Reinhardt, Jens

    2012-01-01

    Taking into account the complexity and technical specificity of advanced therapy medicinal products: (gene and cell therapy medicinal products and tissue engineered products), a dedicated European regulatory framework was needed. Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007, the "ATMP Regulation" provides tailored regulatory principles for the evaluation and authorization of these innovative medicines. The majority of gene or cell therapy product development is carried out by academia, hospitals, and small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). Thus, acknowledging the particular needs of these types of sponsors, the legislation also provides incentives for product development tailored to them. The European Medicines Agency (EMA) and, in particular, its Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) provide a variety of opportunities for early interaction with developers of ATMPs to enable them to have early regulatory and scientific input. An important tool to promote innovation and the development of new medicinal products by micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises is the EMA's SME initiative launched in December 2005 to offer financial and administrative assistance to smaller companies. The European legislation also foresees the involvement of stakeholders, such as patient organizations, in the development of new medicines. Considering that gene therapy medicinal products are developed in many cases for treatment of rare diseases often of monogenic origin, the involvement of patient organizations, which focus on rare diseases and genetic and congenital disorders, is fruitful. Two such organizations are represented in the CAT. Research networks play another important role in the development of gene therapy medicinal products. The European Commission is funding such networks through the EU Sixth Framework Program. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Behaviors of providers of traditional korean medicine therapy and complementary and alternative medicine therapy for the treatment of cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun-Sang; Kim, Chun-Bae; Kim, Ki-Kyong; Lee, Ji-Eun; Kim, Min-Young

    2015-03-01

    In Korea, cancer is one of the most important causes of death. Cancer patients have sought alternative methods, like complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) together with Western medicine, to treat cancer. Also, there are many kinds of providers of CAM therapy, including providers of Korean oriental medicine therapy. The purpose of this study is to identify the behaviors of Korean oriental medicine therapy and CAM therapy providers who treat cancer patients and to provide background knowledge for establishing a new policy with the management and quality control of CAM. Structured and well organized questionnaires were made, and 350 persons were surveyed concerning the providers of CAM or Korean oriental medicine. The questionnaires were collected and analyzed. The questionnaires (182) were collected. The questionnaires identified a total of 73 known providers, such as medicinal professionals or other providers of CAM suppliers, 35.6% of whom had had experience with treating cancer patients (52.6% vs. 29.6%). The treatment methods were a little different: alternative therapy and nutritional therapy being preferred by medicinal professionals and mind body modulation therapy and alternative therapy being preferred by other CAM providers. Four patients (7.4%) experienced side effects, and 6 patients (12.5%) experienced legal problems. As the method for managing the therapy, CAM providers, medicinal professionals, and other CAM providers had different viewpoints. For example, some CAM providers stated that both legislation and an official education on CAM or a national examination were needed as a first step to establish the provider's qualifications and that as a second step, a license test was needed for quality control. To the contrary, medicinal professionals stated that a license test was needed before legislation. Adequate management and quality control of CAM providers is thought to involve both education and legislation.

  11. Translating stem cell therapies: the role of companion animals in regenerative medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Volk, Susan W.; Theoret, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Veterinarians and veterinary medicine have been integral to the development of stem cell therapies. The contributions of large animal experimental models to the development and refinement of modern hematopoietic stem cell transplantation were noted nearly five decades ago. More recent advances in adult stem cell/regenerative cell therapies continue to expand knowledge of the basic biology and clinical applications of stem cells. A relatively liberal legal and ethical regulation of stem cell r...

  12. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients.

  13. Alternative medicine: an update on cupping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, B; Li, M-Y; Liu, P-D; Guo, Y; Chen, Z-L

    2015-07-01

    To know the research progress of cupping therapy all over the world, the authors analyze the research of cupping therapy in recent 5 years. It indicates that cupping therapy can be applied to extensive curable disease, but has poor clinical evidence. Some improvements in the mechanism research of cupping therapy have been made, but it needs further research. The adverse events of cupping therapy attract attention. The standardization of cupping therapy has emerged. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Association of Physicians. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. [Advances in the application of smart phones in modern medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin; Hu, Jie; Li, Fei; Wei, Huilin; Li, Ying; Lu, Tianjian; Wang, Shuqi; Xu, Feng

    2014-02-01

    Since smart phones have been developed, significant advances in the function of mobile phone due to the development of software, hardware and accessories have been reached. Till now, smart phones have been engaged in daily life with an increasing impact. As a new medical model, mobile phone medicine is emerging and has found wide spread applications in medicine, especially in diagnosing, monitoring and screening various diseases. In addition, mo bile phone medical application shows great potential trend to improve healthcare in resource-limited regions due to its advantageous features of portability and information communication capability. Nowadays, the scientific and technological issues related to mobile phone medicine have attracted worldwide attention. In this review, we summarize state-of-the-art advances of mobile phone medicine with focus on its diagnostics applications in order to expand the fields of their applications and promote healthcare informatization.

  15. Recent Advances in Antiepileptic Herbal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchishi, Stephen M

    2018-01-01

    Epilepsy is one of the most common neurological disorders worldwide, with about 80 percent of cases thought to be in developing nations where it is mostly linked to superstition. The limited supply, high cost as well as low efficacy and adverse side effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) is a matter of major concern. Herbal medicine has always been traditionally part of treatment of epilepsy. Herbal medicines are generally well tolerated, with fewer side effects. To highlight some herbal extracts that have been studied for their anticonvulsant activity in animal models, literature search from PubMed and Science Direct, was performed. The keywords for the search consisted of combinations of the following terms: Herbal antiepileptic and/or anticonvulsant, botanicals + epilepsy. Literature published in the last five years was considered. Eighteen (18) anticonvulsant herbal agents are reported and discussed. Experiments mostly consisted of phenotypic screens in rodents, with little diversity in screening methods. In most experiments, the tested extracts prolonged the time to onset of seizures and decreased their duration. Most experimenters implicate potentiation of GABAergic activity as the mode of action of the extracts, even though some experimenters did not fully characterise the bioactive chemical composition of their extracts. Potential herbal remedies have shown positive results in animal models. It remains unclear how many make it into clinical trials and eventually making part of the AED list. More rigorous research, applying strict research methodology with uniform herbal combinations, as well as clinical studies are urgently needed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  16. Integrative Medicine and Complementary and Alternative Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... complementary therapies with your healthcare team: Are there complementary therapies that you would recommend? What research is available about this therapy’s safety and effectiveness? What are the benefits and risks of this ...

  17. Advancing pig cloning technologies towards application in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, H; Matsunari, H; Nakano, K; Watanabe, M; Umeyama, K; Nagaya, M

    2012-08-01

    Regenerative medicine is expected to make a significant contribution by development of novel therapeutic treatments for intractable diseases and for improving the quality of life of patients. Many advances in regenerative medicine, including basic and translational research, have been developed and tested in experimental animals; pigs have played an important role in various aspects of this work. The value of pigs as a model species is being enhanced by the generation of specially designed animals through cloning and genetic modifications, enabling more sophisticated research to be performed and thus accelerating the clinical application of regenerative medicine. This article reviews the significant aspects of the creation and application of cloned and genetically modified pigs in regenerative medicine research and considers the possible future directions of the technology. We also discuss the importance of reproductive biology as an interface between basic science and clinical medicine. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  18. Economic perspectives of the research on advanced therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose María Pamo Larrauri

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Since a new advanced therapy medicinal product is discovered until finally allowed its sale in the domestic market, it has to overcome a series of stages. Biomedical research is the first phase, currently its situation is encouraging to the increase in the number of clinical trials in Spain and in the rest of the world, despite the economic situation and the various difficulties that have faced the pharmaceutical laboratories. The next phase consists in obtaining the authorization of marketing of the European Medicines Agency. After authorization, will attempt to set a fair and moderate price for inclusion in the list of health provision of Social Security. A price for a drug that provides added value to health and society, a price that is generated profits for the pharmaceutical companies that hope to make up for the years of work and investment. Commitment to advanced therapy must be clear and forceful, to fund ongoing research projects and encouraging their creation with economic aid

  19. Clinical Holistic Health: Advanced Tools for Holistic Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called “gestalts”, are integrated in the present “now”. The advanced holistic physician’s expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of “stepping up” the therapy by using more and more “dramatic” methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a “therapeutic staircase” with ten steps: (1 establishing the relationship; (2 establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3 giving support and holding; (4 taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5 social healing of being in the family; (6 spiritual healing — returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7 healing the informational layer of the body; (8 healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, “controlled violence” and “acupressure through the vagina”; (9 mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10 techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient.We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the

  20. Clinical holistic health: advanced tools for holistic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Clausen, Birgitte; Nielsen, May Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-02-24

    According to holistic medical theory, the patient will heal when old painful moments, the traumatic events of life that are often called "gestalts", are integrated in the present "now". The advanced holistic physician's expanded toolbox has many different tools to induce this healing, some that are more dangerous and potentially traumatic than others. The more intense the therapeutic technique, the more emotional energy will be released and contained in the session, but the higher also is the risk for the therapist to lose control of the session and lose the patient to his or her own dark side. To avoid harming the patient must be the highest priority in holistic existential therapy, making sufficient education and training an issue of highest importance. The concept of "stepping up" the therapy by using more and more "dramatic" methods to get access to repressed emotions and events has led us to a "therapeutic staircase" with ten steps: (1) establishing the relationship; (2) establishing intimacy, trust, and confidentiality; (3) giving support and holding; (4) taking the patient into the process of physical, emotional, and mental healing; (5) social healing of being in the family; (6) spiritual healing--returning to the abstract wholeness of the soul; (7) healing the informational layer of the body; (8) healing the three fundamental dimensions of existence: love, power, and sexuality in a direct way using, among other techniques, "controlled violence" and "acupressure through the vagina"; (9) mind-expanding and consciousness-transformative techniques like psychotropic drugs; and (10) techniques transgressing the patient's borders and, therefore, often traumatizing (for instance, the use of force against the will of the patient). We believe that the systematic use of the staircase will greatly improve the power and efficiency of holistic medicine for the patient and we invite a broad cooperation in scientifically testing the efficiency of the advanced holistic

  1. Gene mutation-based and specific therapies in precision medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-04-01

    Precision medicine has been initiated and gains more and more attention from preclinical and clinical scientists. A number of key elements or critical parts in precision medicine have been described and emphasized to establish a systems understanding of precision medicine. The principle of precision medicine is to treat patients on the basis of genetic alterations after gene mutations are identified, although questions and challenges still remain before clinical application. Therapeutic strategies of precision medicine should be considered according to gene mutation, after biological and functional mechanisms of mutated gene expression or epigenetics, or the correspondent protein, are clearly validated. It is time to explore and develop a strategy to target and correct mutated genes by direct elimination, restoration, correction or repair of mutated sequences/genes. Nevertheless, there are still numerous challenges to integrating widespread genomic testing into individual cancer therapies and into decision making for one or another treatment. There are wide-ranging and complex issues to be solved before precision medicine becomes clinical reality. Thus, the precision medicine can be considered as an extension and part of clinical and translational medicine, a new alternative of clinical therapies and strategies, and have an important impact on disease cures and patient prognoses. © 2015 The Author. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  2. Advances in combination therapy of lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, Lan; Leng, Donglei; Cun, Dongmei

    2017-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease caused by a multitude of genetic and environmental factors. The progression of lung cancer involves dynamic changes in the genome and a complex network of interactions between cancer cells with multiple, distinct cell types that form tumors. Combination therapy......, including small molecule drugs and biopharmaceuticals, which make the optimization of dosing and administration schedule challenging. This article reviews the recent advances in the design and development of combinations of pharmaceuticals for the treatment of lung cancer. Focus is primarily on rationales...... for the selection of specific combination therapies for lung cancer treatment, and state of the art of delivery technologies and dosage regimens for the combinations, tested in preclinical and clinical trials....

  3. CROI 2016: Advances in Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Barbara S; Olender, Susan A; Tieu, Hong-Van; Wilkin, Timothy J

    2016-01-01

    The 2016 Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections highlighted exciting advances in antiretroviral therapy, including important data on investigational antiretroviral drugs and clinical trials. Clinical trials demonstrated benefits from a long-acting injectable coformulation given as maintenance therapy, examined intravenous and subcutaneous administration of a monoclonal antibody directed at the CD4 binding site of HIV-1, and provided novel data on tenofovir alafenamide. Several studies focused on the role of HIV drug resistance, including the significance of minority variants, transmitted drug resistance, use of resistance testing, and drug class-related resistance. Novel data on the HIV care continuum in low- and middle-income settings concentrated on differentiated HIV care delivery models and outcomes. Data on progress toward reaching World Health Organization 90-90-90 targets as well as outcomes related to expedited initiation of HIV treatment and adherence strategies were presented. Results from a trial in Malawi showed reduced rates of mother-to-child transmission among HIV-infected women who initiated antiretroviral therapy prior to pregnancy, and several studies highlighted the effect of antiretroviral therapy in pediatric populations. A special session was dedicated to the findings of studies of Ebola virus disease and treatment during the outbreak in West Africa.

  4. Advances in radiation therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong Zhengping; Zhang Yangde; Huang Fang; Liang Zhaoyu; Yang Shuren

    2007-01-01

    Modern advances in computers have fueled advances in imaging technologies. The improvements in imaging have in turn allowed a higher level of complexity to be incorporated into radiotherapy treatment planning systems. As a result of these changes, the delivery of radiotherapy evolved from therapy designed based primarily on plain (two dimensional) X-ray images and hand calculations to three-dimensional X-ray based images incorporating increasingly complex computer algorithms. More recently, biologic variables based on differences between tumor metabolism, tumor antigens, and normal tissues have been incorporated into the treatment process. In addition, greater awareness of the challenges to the accuracy of the treatment planning process, such as problems with set-error and organ movement, have begun to be systematically addressed, ushering in an era of socalled four-dimensional radiotherapy. (authors)

  5. Advanced strategies in liposomal cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Thomas Lars; Jensen, Simon Skøde; Jørgensen, Kent

    2005-01-01

    is therefore of great importance. In the first part of this review, we present current strategies in the drug delivery field, focusing on site-specific triggered drug release from liposomes in cancerous tissue. Currently marketed drug delivery systems lack the ability to actively release the carried drug......, none of them have yet led to marketed drugs and are still far from achieving this goal. The most advanced and prospective technologies are probably the prodrug strategies where nontoxic drugs are carried and activated specifically in the malignant tissue by overexpressed enzymes. In the second part......Tumor specific drug delivery has become increasingly interesting in cancer therapy, as the use of chemotherapeutics is often limited due to severe side effects. Conventional drug delivery systems have shown low efficiency and a continuous search for more advanced drug delivery principles...

  6. Stroke rehabilitation: recent advances and future therapies.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Brewer, L

    2012-09-27

    Despite advances in the acute management of stroke, a large proportion of stroke patients are left with significant impairments. Over the coming decades the prevalence of stroke-related disability is expected to increase worldwide and this will impact greatly on families, healthcare systems and economies. Effective neuro-rehabilitation is a key factor in reducing disability after stroke. In this review, we discuss the effects of stroke, principles of stroke rehabilitative care and predictors of recovery. We also discuss novel therapies in stroke rehabilitation, including non-invasive brain stimulation, robotics and pharmacological augmentation. Many trials are currently underway, which, in time, may impact on future rehabilitative practice.

  7. Advances in Text Mining and Visualization for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Hernandez, Graciela; Sarker, Abeed; O'Connor, Karen; Greene, Casey; Liu, Hongfang

    2018-01-01

    According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), precision medicine is "an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person." Although the text mining community has explored this realm for some years, the official endorsement and funding launched in 2015 with the Precision Medicine Initiative are beginning to bear fruit. This session sought to elicit participation of researchers with strong background in text mining and/or visualization who are actively collaborating with bench scientists and clinicians for the deployment of integrative approaches in precision medicine that could impact scientific discovery and advance the vision of precision medicine as a universal, accessible approach at the point of care.

  8. Holistic integrative medicine: toward a new era of medical advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Daiming

    2017-03-01

    Medicine has encountered unprecedented problems associated with changes in nature, society, and environment, as well as with new human quests for survival, longevity, and health. In the meantime, the development of medicine is facing challenges that resulted from the over-division and specialization of disciplines and the fragmentation of medical knowledge. To construct a new medical system that is more suitable for human health and disease treatment, holistic integrative medicine (HIM), which regards the human body as a holistic entity, organically integrates the most advanced knowledge and theories in each medical field and the most effective practices in various clinical specialties to revise and adjust on the basis of social, environmental, and psychological conditions. HIM is the inevitable and necessary direction for the future development of medicine. In this article, we illustrated the connotation of HIM, the differences between HIM and other medical conceptions, and the practice of HIM in recent years.

  9. START: an advanced radiation therapy information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocco, A; Valentini, V; Balducci, M; Mantello, G

    1996-01-01

    START is an advanced radiation therapy information system (RTIS) which connects direct information technology present in the devices with indirect information technology for clinical, administrative, information management integrated with the hospital information system (HIS). The following objectives are pursued: to support decision making in treatment planning and functional and information integration with the rest of the hospital; to enhance organizational efficiency of a Radiation Therapy Department; to facilitate the statistical evaluation of clinical data and managerial performance assessment; to ensure the safety and confidentiality of used data. For its development a working method based on the involvement of all operators of the Radiation Therapy Department, was applied. Its introduction in the work activity was gradual, trying to reuse and integrate the existing information applications. The START information flow identifies four major phases: admission, visit of admission, planning, therapy. The system main functionalities available to the radiotherapist are: clinical history/medical report linking function; folder function; planning function; tracking function; electronic mail and banner function; statistical function; management function. Functions available to the radiotherapy technician are: the room daily list function; management function: to the nurse the following functions are available: patient directing function; management function. START is a departmental client (pc-windows)-server (unix) developed on an integrated database of all information of interest (clinical, organizational and administrative) coherent with the standard and with a modular architecture which can evolve with additional functionalities in subsequent times. For a more thorough evaluation of its impact on the daily activity of a radiation therapy facility, a prolonged clinical validation is in progress.

  10. Medicinal therapy of malignant lymphomas; Medikamentoese Therapie maligner Lymphome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aul, C.; Schroeder, M.; Giagounidis, A. [Medizinische Klinik II, St.-Johannes-Hospital Duisburg (Germany)

    2002-12-01

    Chemotherapy represents the most important therapeutic option in malignant lymphomas. Low to intermediate risk Hodgkin's disease is treated by a combination of chemotherapy and radiation. The new chemotherapy protocol BEACOPP has improved the outcome of advanced stages in comparison with the internationally accepted standard protocol COPP/ABVD. Dependent on the initial staging, cure rates between 50 and 95% can be achieved. Indolent non-Hodgkin's lymphomas usually present in advanced stages of disease. Chemotherapy in these cases has palliative character and aims at improving patients'quality of life and at avoiding complications due to the disease. In aggressive and very aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma chemotherapy is curative and must be initiated immediately irrespective of the staging results. The efficacy of the standard protocol CHOP (cyclophosphamide,doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone), that was established in the 1970s, has recently been improved by shortening of the therapy interval (CHOP-14 vs.CHOP-21),addition of etoposide (CHOEP) and combination with the monoclonal antibody rituximab (R-CHOP). The value of high dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation has been shown unequivocally only for aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma and relapsed Hodgkin's disease responsive to chemotherapy. The therapeutic strategy of malignant lymphomas is likely to be improved within the next years due to the introduction of novel cytostatic agents, the broadening application of monoclonal antibodies,upcoming new transplantation procedures and the development of substances with molecular targets.To rapidly increase our current knowledge on the topic it is mandatory to include patients into the large national and international multicenter studies. (orig.) [German] Die Chemotherapie stellt die wichtigste Behandlungsoption maligner Lymphome dar. Bei Hodgkin-Lymphomen niedrigen bzw. intermediaeren Risikoprofils wird eine kombinierte Behandlung

  11. Evidence-Based Advances in Aquatic Animal Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergneau-Grosset, Claire; Larrat, Sylvain

    2017-09-01

    Fish and aquatic invertebrates deserve evidence-based medicine. Pharmacologic information is available; most pharmacokinetic studies are derived from the aquaculture industry and extrapolated to ornamental fish. Conversely, advanced diagnostics and information regarding diseases affecting only ornamental fish and invertebrates require more peer-reviewed experimental studies; the examples of carp edema virus, sea star wasting disease, seahorse nutrition, and gas bubble disease of fish under human care are discussed. Antinociception is also a controversial topic of growing interest in aquatic animal medicine. This article summarizes information regarding new topics of interest in companion fish and invertebrates and highlights some future avenues for research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Storytelling as therapy: implications for medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawlis, G F

    1995-05-01

    Storytelling is an art developed during the beginning of human history, probably to teach the wisdom of generations past, including basic mental and physical health principles. This approach, based on sound behavioral medicine principles, is explored here for use as an integral part of medical practice. Also, practical considerations are addressed concerning the conduct of storytelling, with emphasis on relaxation, imagery, and lifestyle change implementations.

  13. Women in academic medicine: perceived obstacles to advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, N M; Nickerson, K G

    1992-01-01

    To investigate perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine, we sent a questionnaire assessing perceptions of the fairness and supportiveness of the academic environment to the 229 female teaching and research faculty of the School of Physicians & Surgeons at Columbia University. The overall response rate was 85%. Forty-six percent believed that they had not had the same professional opportunities as their male colleagues, 52% believed that salaries were not equivalent for men and women in similar positions, and 50% believed that promotions were awarded in a biased manner. Thirty percent reported that sexist behavior was common and that sexual harassment occurred in the workplace. Eighty-one percent experienced conflicts between their professional and personal lives and most believed that the institution failed to adequately address the needs of women with children. This survey indicates that there are significant perceived obstacles to the advancement of women in academic medicine that must be addressed.

  14. Oxetanes: Recent Advances in Synthesis, Reactivity, and Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, James A; Croft, Rosemary A; Davis, Owen A; Doran, Robert; Morgan, Kate F

    2016-10-12

    The four-membered oxetane ring has been increasingly exploited for its contrasting behaviors: its influence on physicochemical properties as a stable motif in medicinal chemistry and its propensity to undergo ring-opening reactions as a synthetic intermediate. These applications have driven numerous studies into the synthesis of new oxetane derivatives. This review takes an overview of the literature for the synthesis of oxetane derivatives, concentrating on advances in the last five years up to the end of 2015. These methods are clustered by strategies for preparation of the ring and further derivatization of preformed oxetane-containing building blocks. Examples of the use of oxetanes in medicinal chemistry are reported, including a collation of oxetane derivatives appearing in recent patents for medicinal chemistry applications. Finally, examples of oxetane derivatives in ring-opening and ring-expansion reactions are described.

  15. Recent advances of nanotechnology in medicine and engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, Lucio; Nobile, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of some advances of nanotechnology in medicine and engineering, exploring typical applications of these emerging technologies. The mechanical properties of such small structures determine their utility and are therefore of considerable interest. Based on nanometer scale tests, a theoretical model to predict the bending strength of a nanobeam is proposed. A fracture approach which takes into account imperfections on the beam surface and crack growth is employed.

  16. Recent advances of nanotechnology in medicine and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nobile, Lucio; Nobile, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of some advances of nanotechnology in medicine and engineering, exploring typical applications of these emerging technologies. The mechanical properties of such small structures determine their utility and are therefore of considerable interest. Based on nanometer scale tests, a theoretical model to predict the bending strength of a nanobeam is proposed. A fracture approach which takes into account imperfections on the beam surface and crack growth is employed.

  17. Recent advances of nanotechnology in medicine and engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nobile, Lucio [Department DICAM-Campus of Cesena, University of Bologna, Via Cavalcavia 61,47521 Cesena, Italy. Email:lucio.nobile@unibo.it (Italy); Nobile, Stefano [Maternal and Child Department, Ospedali Riuniti di Ancona, Italy, via F. Corridoni 11,60123 Ancona, Italy. Email:stefano.nobile@ospedaliriuniti.marche.it (Italy)

    2016-05-18

    The aim of this paper is to give an overview of some advances of nanotechnology in medicine and engineering, exploring typical applications of these emerging technologies. The mechanical properties of such small structures determine their utility and are therefore of considerable interest. Based on nanometer scale tests, a theoretical model to predict the bending strength of a nanobeam is proposed. A fracture approach which takes into account imperfections on the beam surface and crack growth is employed.

  18. Preoperative chemoradiation therapy for advanced rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujinaka, Toshimasa; Murotani, Masahiro; Iihara, Keisuke

    1997-01-01

    Preoperative concurrent chemoradiation therapy with 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was applied for advanced rectal cancer. Eligible criteria were as follows: no previous treatment, more than hemicircular occupation, T 3 or more, invasion to adjacent organs or lymph node metastasis on CT scan, tumor fixation by digital examination. Eleven patients were enrolled with this regimen consisting of 5-FU; 500 mg/day x 5/w x 4, CDDP; 10 mg/day x 5/w x 4 and radiation; 2 Gy x 5/w x 4. As a toxicity, grade 2 leukopenia in 2 cases, grade 2 GI symptoms in one case and radiation dermatitis was observed in 8 cases. As a local response, there were PR in 10 cases and NC in 1 case. Surgical resection was performed on 8 patients. Histological responses in the resected specimens were grade 2, 5 cases; grade 1b, 1 case; and grade 1a, 2 cases. Operative radicalities were grade A, 3 cases; grade B, 3 cases; and grade C, 2 cases. Preoperative chemoradiation is one of the effective options in multimodal treatment for advanced rectal cancer. (author)

  19. Medicinal mushroom science: Current perspectives, advances, evidences, and challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomon P Wasser

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The main target of the present review is to draw attention to the current perspectives, advances, evidences, challenges, and future development of medicinal mushroom science in the 21 st century. Medicinal mushrooms and fungi are thought to possess approximately 130 medicinal functions, including antitumor, immunomodulating, antioxidant, radical scavenging, cardiovascular, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antiviral, antibacterial, anti-parasitic, antifungal, detoxification, hepatoprotective, and antidiabetic effects. Many, if not all, higher Basidiomycetes mushrooms contain biologically active compounds in fruit bodies, cultured mycelium, and cultured broth. Special attention is paid to mushroom polysaccharides. The data on mushroom polysaccharides and different secondary metabolites are summarized for approximately 700 species of higher hetero- and homobasidiomycetes. Numerous bioactive polysaccharides or polysaccharide-protein complexes from the medicinal mushrooms described appear to enhance innate and cell-mediated immune responses, and exhibit antitumor activities in animals and humans. Whilst the mechanism of their antitumor actions is still not completely understood, stimulation and modulation of key host immune responses by these mushroom compounds appear central. Polysaccharides and low-molecular-weight secondary metabolites are particularly important due to their antitumor and immunostimulating properties. Several of the mushroom compounds have been subjected to Phase I, II, and III clinical trials, and are used extensively and successfully in Asia to treat various cancers and other diseases. Special attention is given to many important unsolved problems in the study of medicinal mushrooms.

  20. Evolution of magnetic therapy from alternative to traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallbona, C; Richards, T

    1999-08-01

    Static or electromagnetic fields have been used for centuries to control pain and other biologic problems, but scientific evidence of their effect had not been gathered until recently. This article explores the value of magnetic therapy in rehabilitation medicine in terms of static magnetic fields and time varying magnetic fields (electromagnetic). A historical review is given and the discussion covers the areas of scientific criteria, modalities of magnetic therapy, mechanisms of the biologic effects of magnetic fields, and perspectives on the future of magnetic therapy.

  1. Regenerative Medicine: Advances from Developmental to Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Nicholas F; Frith, Thomas J R; Barbaric, Ivana

    2017-01-01

    Chronic tissue and organ failure caused by an injury, disease, ageing or congenital defects represents some of the most complex therapeutic challenges and poses a significant financial healthcare burden. Regenerative medicine strategies aim to fulfil the unmet clinical need by restoring the normal tissue function either through stimulating the endogenous tissue repair or by using transplantation strategies to replace the missing or defective cells. Stem cells represent an essential pillar of regenerative medicine efforts as they provide a source of progenitors or differentiated cells for use in cell replacement therapies. Whilst significant leaps have been made in controlling the stem cell fates and differentiating them to cell types of interest, transitioning bespoke cellular products from an academic environment to off-the-shelf clinical treatments brings about a whole new set of challenges which encompass manufacturing, regulatory and funding issues. Notwithstanding the need to resolve such issues before cell replacement therapies can benefit global healthcare, mounting progress in the field has highlighted regenerative medicine as a realistic prospect for treating some of the previously incurable conditions.

  2. Palliative medicine consultation for preparedness planning in patients receiving left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swetz, Keith M; Freeman, Monica R; AbouEzzeddine, Omar F; Carter, Kari A; Boilson, Barry A; Ottenberg, Abigale L; Park, Soon J; Mueller, Paul S

    2011-06-01

    To assess the benefit of proactive palliative medicine consultation for delineation of goals of care and quality-of-life preferences before implantation of left ventricular assist devices as destination therapy (DT). We retrospectively reviewed the cases of patients who received DT between January 15, 2009, and January 1, 2010. Of 19 patients identified, 13 (68%) received proactive palliative medicine consultation. Median time of palliative medicine consultation was 1 day before DT implantation (range, 5 days before to 16 days after). Thirteen patients (68%) completed advance directives. The DT implantation team and families reported that preimplantation discussions and goals of care planning made postoperative care more clear and that adverse events were handled more effectively. Currently, palliative medicine involvement in patients receiving DT is viewed as routine by cardiac care specialists. Proactive palliative medicine consultation for patients being considered for or being treated with DT improves advance care planning and thus contributes to better overall care of these patients. Our experience highlights focused advance care planning, thorough exploration of goals of care, and expert symptom management and end-of-life care when appropriate.

  3. Collaboration in academic medicine: reflections on gender and advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Phyllis L; Pololi, Linda; Knight, Sharon; Conrad, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Collaboration in academic medicine is encouraged, yet no one has studied the environment in which faculty collaborate. The authors investigated how faculty experienced collaboration and the institutional atmosphere for collaboration. In 2007, as part of a qualitative study of faculty in five disparate U.S. medical schools, the authors interviewed 96 medical faculty at different career stages and in diverse specialties, with an oversampling of women, minorities, and generalists, regarding their perceptions and experiences of collaboration in academic medicine. Data analysis was inductive and driven by the grounded theory tradition. Female faculty expressed enthusiasm about the potential and process of collaboration; male faculty were more likely to focus on outcomes. Senior faculty experienced a more collaborative environment than early career faculty, who faced numerous barriers to collaboration: the hierarchy of medical academe, advancement criteria, and the lack of infrastructure supportive of collaboration. Research faculty appreciated shared ideas, knowledge, resources, and the increased productivity that could result from collaboration, but they were acutely aware that advancement requires an independent body of work, which was a major deterrent to collaboration among early career faculty. Academic medicine faculty have differing views on the impact and benefits of collaboration. Early career faculty face concerning obstacles to collaboration. Female faculty seemed more appreciative of the process of collaboration, which may be of importance for transitioning to a more collaborative academic environment. A reevaluation of effective benchmarks for promotion of faculty is warranted to address the often exclusive reliance on individualistic achievement.

  4. Adaptation through Collaboration: Developing Novel Platforms to Advance the Delivery of Advanced Therapies to Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadaki, Magdalini

    2017-01-01

    For the nascent field of advanced therapies, collaboration will be a game-changer, turning scientific progress that was once unimaginable into transformative medical practice. Despite promise for lifelong management and even cure of disease, skepticism remains about the feasibility of their delivery to patients, fueling investment risks. With the potential for long-term effectiveness in need of frequent reassessment, current approaches to predict real-life drug performance bear little relevance, necessitating novel and iterative schemes to monitoring the benefit-risk profiles throughout the life span of advanced therapies. This work explains that reinventing an adoption route for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products is as much about the scientific and clinical components, as it is about the organizational structures, requiring an unprecedented level of interactions between stakeholders not traditionally connected; from developers and regulators, to payers, patients, and funders. By reflecting on the successes and lessons learned from the growing space of global precompetitive consortia and public-private partnerships, as well as a number of emerging accelerated development pathways, this work aims to inform the foundations for a future roadmap that can smooth the path to approval, reimbursement, and access, while delivering value to all stakeholders. Echoing the growing demands to bring these transformative products to patients, it provides critical insights to enhance our capacity in three fundamental domains: deploying the operational flexibilities offered by the growing space of collaborations, utilizing emerging flexible and accelerated pathways to tackle challenges in quantifying long-term effectiveness, and building the necessary digital and clinical infrastructure for knowledge development.

  5. Adaptation through Collaboration: Developing Novel Platforms to Advance the Delivery of Advanced Therapies to Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalini Papadaki

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For the nascent field of advanced therapies, collaboration will be a game-changer, turning scientific progress that was once unimaginable into transformative medical practice. Despite promise for lifelong management and even cure of disease, skepticism remains about the feasibility of their delivery to patients, fueling investment risks. With the potential for long-term effectiveness in need of frequent reassessment, current approaches to predict real-life drug performance bear little relevance, necessitating novel and iterative schemes to monitoring the benefit–risk profiles throughout the life span of advanced therapies. This work explains that reinventing an adoption route for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products is as much about the scientific and clinical components, as it is about the organizational structures, requiring an unprecedented level of interactions between stakeholders not traditionally connected; from developers and regulators, to payers, patients, and funders. By reflecting on the successes and lessons learned from the growing space of global precompetitive consortia and public–private partnerships, as well as a number of emerging accelerated development pathways, this work aims to inform the foundations for a future roadmap that can smooth the path to approval, reimbursement, and access, while delivering value to all stakeholders. Echoing the growing demands to bring these transformative products to patients, it provides critical insights to enhance our capacity in three fundamental domains: deploying the operational flexibilities offered by the growing space of collaborations, utilizing emerging flexible and accelerated pathways to tackle challenges in quantifying long-term effectiveness, and building the necessary digital and clinical infrastructure for knowledge development.

  6. Advances of Chinese and Western Medicine on Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na-na HE

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is a kind of chronic general immunological disease with primary clinical characteristic being joint synovitis, and no specific treatment has been found at present. In China, its morbidity is in an increasing trend, and also shows a trend of getting younger. RA is complicated in symptoms and chronic disease course, leading to joint ankylosis, deformity and even disability, which seriously threaten patients' psychological and physical health as well as the quality of life (QOL. RA, which belongs to “ Bi” symdrome, is termed as “arthroncus of knee” or “severe and migratory arthralgia” in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM, for which TCM focuses on expelling wind to remove cold, tonifying qi to activate blood and dispelling dampness to smooth collaterals while the western medicines mainly based on the principles of anti-inflammation, analgesia and inhibiting autoimmune response. However, both Chinese and western medicines have certain advantages in treating RA. Therefore, this study primarily reviewed the advances of Chinese and western medicines in RA treatment in the hope of providing theoretical basis for the clinical treatment of RA.

  7. Advancing Simulation-Based Education in Pain Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Naileshni; Nielsen, Alison A; Copenhaver, David J; Sheth, Samir J; Li, Chin-Shang; Fishman, Scott M

    2018-02-27

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has recently implemented milestones and competencies as a framework for training fellows in Pain Medicine, but individual programs are left to create educational platforms and assessment tools that meet ACGME standards. In this article, we discuss the concept of milestone-based competencies and the inherent challenges for implementation in pain medicine. We consider simulation-based education (SBE) as a potential tool for the field to meet ACGME goals through advancing novel learning opportunities, engaging in clinically relevant scenarios, and mastering technical and nontechnical skills. The sparse literature on SBE in pain medicine is highlighted, and we describe our pilot experience, which exemplifies a nascent effort that encountered early difficulties in implementing and refining an SBE program. The many complexities in offering a sophisticated simulated pain curriculum that is valid, reliable, feasible, and acceptable to learners and teachers may only be overcome with coordinated and collaborative efforts among pain medicine training programs and governing institutions.

  8. Addressing Pressing Needs in the Development of Advanced Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, David; Ussi, Anton; Migliaccio, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    The commercial development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) represents great opportunity for therapeutic innovation but is beset by many challenges for its developers. Although the ATMP field continues to progress at a rapid pace, evidenced by the increasing number of clinical trials conducted over the past few years, several factors continue to complicate the introduction of ATMPs as a curative treatment for multiple disease types, by blocking their translational pathway from research to the patient. While several recent publications (Trounson and McDonald, 2015; Abou-El-Enein et al., 2016a,b) as well as an Innovative Medicines Initiative consultation (IMI, 2016) this year have highlighted the major gaps in ATMP development, with manufacturing, regulatory, and reimbursement issues at the forefront, there remains to be formulated a coherent strategy to address these by bringing the relevant stakeholders to a single forum, whose task it would be to design and execute a delta plan to alleviate the most pressing bottlenecks. This article focuses on two of the most urgent areas in need of attention in ATMP development, namely manufacturing and reimbursement, and promotes the concept of innovation-dedicated research infrastructures to support a multi-sector approach for ensuring the successful development, entry, and ensuing survival of ATMPs in the healthcare market.

  9. Addressing Pressing Needs in the Development of Advanced Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Morrow

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The commercial development of advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs represents great opportunity for therapeutic innovation but is beset by many challenges for its developers. Although the ATMP field continues to progress at a rapid pace, evidenced by the increasing number of clinical trials conducted over the past few years, several factors continue to complicate the introduction of ATMPs as a curative treatment for multiple disease types, by blocking their translational pathway from research to the patient. While several recent publications (Trounson and McDonald, 2015; Abou-El-Enein et al., 2016a,b as well as an Innovative Medicines Initiative consultation (IMI, 2016 this year have highlighted the major gaps in ATMP development, with manufacturing, regulatory, and reimbursement issues at the forefront, there remains to be formulated a coherent strategy to address these by bringing the relevant stakeholders to a single forum, whose task it would be to design and execute a delta plan to alleviate the most pressing bottlenecks. This article focuses on two of the most urgent areas in need of attention in ATMP development, namely manufacturing and reimbursement, and promotes the concept of innovation-dedicated research infrastructures to support a multi-sector approach for ensuring the successful development, entry, and ensuing survival of ATMPs in the healthcare market.

  10. Molecular targeted therapy for advanced gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong Gwang

    2013-03-01

    Although medical treatment has been shown to improve quality of life and prolong survival, no significant progress has been made in the treatment of advanced gastric cancer (AGC) within the last two decades. Thus, the optimum standard first-line chemotherapy regimen for AGC remains debatable, and most responses to chemotherapy are partial and of short duration; the median survival is approximately 7 to 11 months, and survival at 2 years is exceptionally > 10%. Recently, remarkable progress in tumor biology has led to the development of new agents that target critical aspects of oncogenic pathways. For AGC, many molecular targeting agents have been evaluated in international randomized studies, and trastuzumab, an anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody, has shown antitumor activity against HER-2-positive AGC. However, this benefit is limited to only ~20% of patients with AGC (patients with HER-2-positive AGC). Therefore, there remains a critical need for both the development of more effective agents and the identification of molecular predictive and prognostic markers to select those patients who will benefit most from specific chemotherapeutic regimens and targeted therapies.

  11. Advances in imaging to allow personalized medicine in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurath, Markus F

    2015-08-01

    Crohn's disease is a destructive inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin that may lead to various complications such as strictures, stenosis, fistulas and colitis-associated neoplasias. However, the course of the disease varies substantially among patients and disease behaviour may also change with time. At diagnosis behaviour is inflammatory in the majority of patients, while penetrating or structuring behaviour become more prominent at later time points. Thus, medication in Crohn's disease needs frequent optimization over time. Therefore, new strategies for prediction of response to therapy are urgently needed. Here, recent advantages in imaging techniques for personalized medicine in Crohn's disease are reviewed. Such advantages include ultrasonography, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and new endoscopic approaches such as molecular endoscopy. It is expected that these novel techniques will lead to marked improvements in the assessment of disease behaviour and the prediction of response to clinical therapy with biologicals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Systematic reviews of complementary therapies - an annotated bibliography. Part 2: herbal medicine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Linde, K.; ter Riet, G.; Hondras, M.; Vickers, A.; Saller, R.; Melchart, D.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complementary therapies are widespread but controversial. We aim to provide a comprehensive collection and a summary of systematic reviews of clinical trials in three major complementary therapies (acupuncture, herbal medicine, homeopathy). This article is dealing with herbal medicine.

  13. Nuclear medicine therapy: current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    Radioisotope therapy began in 1942 with the use of 131 I for Graves disease and 32 P for polycythemia vera. Local therapy with radioisotopes includes radiocolloids for malignant pleural and peritoneal effusions, intra-articular radiocolloids for chronic synovitis, intra-arterial radioactive microspheres for liver metastases, and intralymphatic administration for malignancies of the lymphatic system. The most widely practised use of radioisotopes for therapy is for the management of hyperthyroidism by 131 I. 131 is also being used effectively for thyroid cancer, particularly at the Radiation Medicine Centre, BARC. There is hope that a new generation of radiolabelled compounds is round the corner for therapy. Radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies aimed against specific tumor antigens have already shown great promise. Another area of interest is the use of minute lipid spheroids (vesicles) enclosing the radioactive drug which can be targeted to the tumor. (author). 19 refs

  14. Low-Intensity Extracorporeal Shockwave Therapy in Sexual Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fode, Mikkel; Lowenstein, Lior; Reisman, Yacov

    2017-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Low-intensity extracorporeal shockwave therapy (LI-ESWT) has emerged as a treatment option for male sexual dysfunction. However, results have been contradictory. AIM: To investigate the knowledge, practice patterns, and attitudes regarding LI-ESWT among experts in sexual medicine....... METHODS: A study-specific questionnaire was handed out at the 18th Congress for the European Society for Sexual Medicine. Participants were queried on their knowledge about LI-ESWT and about their use of the equipment. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Descriptive data on the knowledge of LI-ESWT and perception...... of treatment effects. RESULTS: One hundred ninety-two questionnaires were available for analysis. Most respondents were physicians (79.7%) and most of these specialized in urology (58.9%). Overall, 144 of 192 (75%) reported that they were familiar with LI-ESWT in sexual medicine. Twenty-seven (14.1%) had...

  15. Nuclear medicine. Clinical value of the medicine methods. Nuklearmedizin. Klinische Bedeutung nuklearmedizinischer Diagnostik und Therapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, H A.E. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus Bethesda Gemeinnuetzige G.m.b.H., Duisburg (Germany, F.R.). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik; Ortiz Berrocal, J [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; eds.

    1979-01-01

    This proceedings volume of the 16th International Annual Meeting of the Gesellschaft fuer Nuklearmedizin, which took place in Madrid on October 24-27, 1978, contains 183 compacts on the following subjects: Metrology and data processing, cyclotron products and radiopharmaceuticals, nuclear medicine as compared with computerized tomography and sonography, radioimmunoassay, haematology, thyreology, osteology, pulmonology, cardiology, angiology, nephrology, gastroenterology and hepatology, oncology, nuclear therapy methods and some free lectures and thus give a good picture of the state of the art in nuclear medicine at the time.

  16. The advancement of stem cells in radiation medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Li; Fan Hongxue

    2003-01-01

    It may result in acute radiation syndrome after body is exposed to ionizing radiation. The one of long-term effects of irradiation injury is leukemia. The bone marrow cells (BMC) transplantation including stem cells is the only effective therapy for acute radiation syndrome patients. Recently, with the advancement of stem cell research that the stem cells have multipotential and can convert each other, it may supply the new stem source for the irradiation injury patients. At the same time with the further research of radioprotective reagents, the hematopoietic stem cells proliferation after irradiation injury is promoted

  17. North African Medicinal Plants Traditionally Used in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves-Silva, Jorge M; Romane, Abderrahmane; Efferth, Thomas; Salgueiro, Lígia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cancer is a major cause of mortality worldwide with increasing numbers by the years. In North Africa, the number of cancer patients is alarming. Also shocking is that a huge number of cancer patients only have access to traditional medicines due to several factors, e.g., economic difficulties. In fact, medicinal plants are widely used for the treatment of several pathologies, including cancer. Truthfully, herbalists and botanists in North African countries prescribe several plants for cancer treatment. Despite the popularity and the potential of medicinal plants for the treatment of cancer, scientific evidence on their anticancer effects are still scarce for most of the described plants. Objective: Bearing in mind the lack of comprehensive and systematic studies, the aim of this review is to give an overview of studies, namely ethnobotanical surveys and experimental evidence of anticancer effects regarding medicinal plants used in North Africa for cancer therapy. Method: The research was conducted on several popular search engines including PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus and Web of Science. The research focused primarily on English written papers published between the years 2000 and 2016. Results: This review on plants traditionally used by herbalists in North Africa highlights that Morocco and Algeria are the countries with most surveys on the use of medicinal plants in folk medicine. Among the plethora of plants used, Nigella sativa and Trigonella foenum-graecum are the most referred ones by herbalists for the treatment of cancer. Moreover, a plethora of scientific evidence qualifies them as candidates for further drug development. Furthermore, we report on the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms. Conclusion: Overall, this review highlights the therapeutic potential of some medicinal plants as anticancer agents. The North African flora offers a rich source of medicinal plants for a wide array of diseases, including cancer. The elucidation of

  18. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anlauf, Manfred

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects.Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects. With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost.The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least

  19. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors’ perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the “integration” of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms

  20. Complementary and alternative drug therapy versus science-oriented medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anlauf, Manfred; Hein, Lutz; Hense, Hans-Werner; Köbberling, Johannes; Lasek, Rainer; Leidl, Reiner; Schöne-Seifert, Bettina

    2015-01-01

    This opinion deals critically with the so-called complementary and alternative medical (CAM) therapy on the basis of current data. From the authors' perspective, CAM prescriptions and most notably the extensive current endeavours to the "integration" of CAM into conventional patient care is problematic in several respects. Thus, several CAM measures are used, although no specific effects of medicines can be proved in clinical studies. It is extensively explained that the methods used in this regard are those of evidence-based medicine, which is one of the indispensable pillars of science-oriented medicine. This standard of proof of efficacy is fundamentally independent of the requirement of being able to explain efficacy of a therapy in a manner compatible with the insights of the natural sciences, which is also essential for medical progress. Numerous CAM treatments can however never conceivably satisfy this requirement; rather they are justified with pre-scientific or unscientific paradigms. The high attractiveness of CAM measures evidenced in patients and many doctors is based on a combination of positive expectations and experiences, among other things, which are at times unjustified, at times thoroughly justified, from a science-oriented view, but which are non-specific (context effects). With a view to the latter phenomenon, the authors consider the conscious use of CAM as unrevealed therapeutic placebos to be problematic. In addition, they advocate that academic medicine should again systematically endeavour to pay more attention to medical empathy and use context effects in the service of patients to the utmost. The subsequent opinion discusses the following after an introduction to medical history: the definition of CAM; the efficacy of most common CAM procedures; CAM utilisation and costs in Germany; characteristics of science-oriented medicine; awareness of placebo research; pro and contra arguments about the use of CAM, not least of all in terms of

  1. Advances in the Molecular Analysis of Breast Cancer: Pathway Toward Personalized Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Marilin

    2015-04-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that encompasses a wide range of clinical behaviors and histological and molecular variants. It is the most common type of cancer affecting women worldwide and is the second leading cause of cancer death. A comprehensive literature search was performed to explore the advances in molecular medicine related to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. During the last few decades, advances in molecular medicine have changed the landscape of cancer treatment as new molecular tests complement and, in many instances, exceed traditional methods for determining patient prognosis and response to treatment options. Personalized medicine is becoming the standard of care around the world. Developments in molecular profiling, genomic analysis, and the discovery of targeted drug therapies have significantly improved patient survival rates and quality of life. This review highlights what pathologists need to know about current molecular tests for classification and prognostic/ predictive assessment of breast carcinoma as well as their role as part of the medical team.

  2. Refining Preoperative Therapy for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    In the PROSPECT trial, patients with locally advanced, resectable rectal cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either standard neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy or neoadjuvant FOLFOX chemotherapy, with chemoradiation reserved for nonresponders.

  3. Translational research: precision medicine, personalized medicine, targeted therapies: marketing or science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquet, Pierre; Longeray, Pierre-Henry; Barlesi, Fabrice; Ameye, Véronique; Augé, Pascale; Cazeneuve, Béatrice; Chatelut, Etienne; Diaz, Isabelle; Diviné, Marine; Froguel, Philippe; Goni, Sylvia; Gueyffier, François; Hoog-Labouret, Natalie; Mourah, Samia; Morin-Surroca, Michèle; Perche, Olivier; Perin-Dureau, Florent; Pigeon, Martine; Tisseau, Anne; Verstuyft, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Personalized medicine is based on: 1) improved clinical or non-clinical methods (including biomarkers) for a more discriminating and precise diagnosis of diseases; 2) targeted therapies of the choice or the best drug for each patient among those available; 3) dose adjustment methods to optimize the benefit-risk ratio of the drugs chosen; 4) biomarkers of efficacy, toxicity, treatment discontinuation, relapse, etc. Unfortunately, it is still too often a theoretical concept because of the lack of convenient diagnostic methods or treatments, particularly of drugs corresponding to each subtype of pathology, hence to each patient. Stratified medicine is a component of personalized medicine employing biomarkers and companion diagnostics to target the patients likely to present the best benefit-risk balance for a given active compound. The concept of targeted therapy, mostly used in cancer treatment, relies on the existence of a defined molecular target, involved or not in the pathological process, and/or on the existence of a biomarker able to identify the target population, which should logically be small as compared to the population presenting the disease considered. Targeted therapies and biomarkers represent important stakes for the pharmaceutical industry, in terms of market access, of return on investment and of image among the prescribers. At the same time, they probably represent only the first generation of products resulting from the combination of clinical, pathophysiological and molecular research, i.e. of translational research. © 2015 Société Française de Pharmacologie et de Thérapeutique.

  4. Low cost biological lung volume reduction therapy for advanced emphysema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bakeer M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mostafa Bakeer,1 Taha Taha Abdelgawad,1 Raed El-Metwaly,1 Ahmed El-Morsi,1 Mohammad Khairy El-Badrawy,1 Solafa El-Sharawy2 1Chest Medicine Department, 2Clinical Pathology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University, Mansoura, Egypt Background: Bronchoscopic lung volume reduction (BLVR, using biological agents, is one of the new alternatives to lung volume reduction surgery.Objectives: To evaluate efficacy and safety of biological BLVR using low cost agents including autologous blood and fibrin glue.Methods: Enrolled patients were divided into two groups: group A (seven patients in which autologous blood was used and group B (eight patients in which fibrin glue was used. The agents were injected through a triple lumen balloon catheter via fiberoptic bronchoscope. Changes in high resolution computerized tomography (HRCT volumetry, pulmonary function tests, symptoms, and exercise capacity were evaluated at 12 weeks postprocedure as well as for complications.Results: In group A, at 12 weeks postprocedure, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and residual volume/total lung capacity (% predicted (P-value: <0.001 and 0.038, respectively. In group B, there was significant improvement in the mean value of HRCT volumetry and (residual volume/total lung capacity % predicted (P-value: 0.005 and 0.004, respectively. All patients tolerated the procedure with no mortality.Conclusion: BLVR using autologous blood and locally prepared fibrin glue is a promising method for therapy of advanced emphysema in term of efficacy, safety as well as cost effectiveness. Keywords: BLVR, bronchoscopy, COPD, interventional pulmonology

  5. Advances in cryo-electron tomography for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koning, Roman I; Koster, Abraham J; Sharp, Thomas H

    2018-05-01

    Cryo-electron tomography (CET) utilizes a combination of specimen cryo-fixation and multi-angle electron microscopy imaging to produce three-dimensional (3D) volume reconstructions of native-state macromolecular and subcellular biological structures with nanometer-scale resolution. In recent years, cryo-electron microscopy (cryoEM) has experienced a dramatic increase in the attainable resolution of 3D reconstructions, resulting from technical improvements of electron microscopes, improved detector sensitivity, the implementation of phase plates, automated data acquisition schemes, and improved image reconstruction software and hardware. These developments also greatly increased the usability and applicability of CET as a diagnostic and research tool, which is now enabling structural biologists to determine the structure of proteins in their native cellular environment to sub-nanometer resolution. These recent technical developments have stimulated us to update on our previous review (Koning, R.I., Koster, A.J., 2009. Cryo-electron tomography in biology and medicine. Ann Anat 191, 427-445) in which we described the fundamentals of CET. In this follow-up, we extend this basic description in order to explain the aforementioned recent advances, and describe related 3D techniques that can be applied to the anatomy of biological systems that are relevant for medicine. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Training the "assertive practitioner of behavioral science": advancing a behavioral medicine track in a family medicine residency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Dennis J; Holloway, Richard L; Fons, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the development of a Behavioral Medicine track in a family medicine residency designed to train physicians to proactively and consistently apply advanced skills in psychosocial medicine, psychiatric care, and behavioral medicine. The Behavioral Medicine track emerged from a behavioral science visioning retreat, an opportunity to restructure residency training, a comparative family medicine-psychiatry model, and qualified residents with high interest in behavioral science. Training was restructured to increase rotational opportunities in core behavioral science areas and track residents were provided an intensive longitudinal counseling seminar and received advanced training in psychopharmacology, case supervision, and mindfulness. The availability of a Behavioral Medicine track increased medical student interest in the residency program and four residents have completed the track. All track residents have presented medical Grand Rounds on behavioral science topics and have lead multiple workshops or research sessions at national meetings. Graduate responses indicate effective integration of behavioral medicine skills and abilities in practice, consistent use of brief counseling skills, and good confidence in treating common psychiatric disorders. As developed and structured, the Behavioral Medicine track has achieved the goal of producing "assertive practitioners of behavioral science in family medicine" residents with advanced behavioral science skills and abilities who globally integrate behavioral science into primary care.

  7. Looking into the Future: Toward Advanced 3D Biomaterials for Stem-Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhongmin; Tang, Mingliang; Zhao, Jinping; Chai, Renjie; Kang, Jiuhong

    2018-04-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies have the potential to provide novel solutions for the treatment of a variety of diseases, but the main obstacles to such therapies lie in the uncontrolled differentiation and functional engraftment of implanted tissues. The physicochemical microenvironment controls the self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells, and the key step in mimicking the stem cell microenvironment is to construct a more physiologically relevant 3D culture system. Material-based 3D assemblies of stem cells facilitate the cellular interactions that promote morphogenesis and tissue organization in a similar manner to that which occurs during embryogenesis. Both natural and artificial materials can be used to create 3D scaffolds, and synthetic organic and inorganic porous materials are the two main kinds of artificial materials. Nanotechnology provides new opportunities to design novel advanced materials with special physicochemical properties for 3D stem cell culture and transplantation. Herein, the advances and advantages of 3D scaffold materials, especially with respect to stem-cell-based therapies, are first outlined. Second, the stem cell biology in 3D scaffold materials is reviewed. Third, the progress and basic principles of developing 3D scaffold materials for clinical applications in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are reviewed. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Evidence from the Cochrane Collaboration for Traditional Chinese Medicine Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, Susan; Kimbrough, Elizabeth; Cheng, Ker; Berman, Brian M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The Cochrane Collaboration, an international not-for-profit organization that prepares and maintains systematic reviews of randomized trials of health care therapies, has produced reviews summarizing much of the evidence on Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM). Our objective was to review the evidence base according to Cochrane systematic reviews. Methods In order to detect reviews focusing on TCM, we searched the titles and abstracts of all reviews in Issue 4, 2008 of the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. For each review, we extracted data on the number of trials included and the total number of participants. We provided an indication of the strength of the review findings by assessing the reviewers' abstract conclusions statement. We supplemented our assessment of the abstract conclusions statements with a listing of the comparisons and outcomes showing statistically significant meta-analyses results. Results We identified 70 Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM, primarily acupuncture (n = 26) and Chinese herbal medicine (n = 42), and 1 each of moxibustion and t'ai chi. Nineteen (19) of 26 acupuncture reviews and 22/42 herbal medicine reviews concluded that there was not enough good quality trial evidence to make any conclusion about the efficacy of the evaluated treatment, while the remaining 7 acupuncture and 20 herbal medicine reviews and each of the moxibustion and t'ai chi reviews indicated a suggestion of benefit, which was qualified by a caveat about the poor quality and quantity of studies. Most reviews included many distinct interventions, controls, outcomes, and populations, and a large number of different comparisons were made, each with a distinct forest plot. Conclusions Most Cochrane systematic reviews of TCM are inconclusive, due specifically to the poor methodology and heterogeneity of the studies reviewed. Some systematic reviews provide preliminary evidence of Chinese medicine's benefits to certain patient populations

  9. Advanced practice for therapy radiographers - A discussion paper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eddy, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this discussion paper is to explore issues related to advanced practice for therapy radiographers. Key themes: The paper will focus on key themes that have impacted on advanced practice for therapy radiographers such as government initiatives and policy, confounding terminology associated with advanced practice such as role extension, role expansion, role development, and expert practice. The theory and development of expert practice is explored and paralleled to existing roles in therapy using the Benner model to define stages of professional development and competence. Evidence for advanced practice, and education and training will also be explored. All of these issues will be considered within the perspective of the current clinical and political environment that therapy radiographers operate in. Conclusions: The application of advanced practice can and should incorporate elements of role extension and role development, with some tangible skills ladder to guide and shape the development of potential consultant practitioners. There is a need to identify the current position of advanced practice nationally, and to monitor existing and emerging roles, possibly though a longitudinal study. The skill mix as a whole within departments need to be part of an ongoing evaluation with close collaboration between the professional body, departmental managers and higher education institutes to develop curricula to support existing and emerging roles. There are also key lessons to be learned from other professions with more experience with advanced practitioners if recruitment and retention is not going to continue to be a problem

  10. Advanced methods in diagnosis and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    This important meeting covers the following topics: use and optimization of monoclonal antibobies in oncology: - Tumor markers: Clinical follow-up of patients through tumor marker serum determinations. - Cancer and medical imaging: The use of monoclonal antibodies in immunoscintigraphy. - Immunoradiotherapy: Monoclonal antibodies as therapeutic vectors. Advanced methods in diagnosis: - Contribution of monoclonal antibodies in modern immunochemistry (RIA, EIA). - Interest of monoclonal antibody in immunohistochemical pathology diagnosis. - In vitro diagnosis future prospects: with receptors and oncogenes. - Immunofluoroassay: a new sensitive immunoanalytical procedure with broad applications. Recent advances in brachitherapy: - Interest of computer processing. Blood products irradiation: - Interest in transfusion and bone marrow transplantations [fr

  11. Genome medicine: gene therapy for the millennium, 30 September-3 October 2001, Rome, Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenert, D C; Novelli, G; Dallapiccola, B; Colosimo, A

    2002-06-01

    The recent surge of DNA sequence information resulting from the efforts of agencies interested in deciphering the human genetic code has facilitated technological developments that have been critical in the identification of genes associated with numerous disease pathologies. In addition, these efforts have opened the door to the opportunity to develop novel genetic therapies to treat a broad range of inherited disorders. Through a joint effort by the University of Vermont, the University of Rome, Tor Vergata, University of Rome, La Sapienza, and the CSS Mendel Institute, Rome, an international meeting, 'Genome Medicine: Gene Therapy for the Millennium' was organized. This meeting provided a forum for the discussion of scientific and clinical advances stimulated by the explosion of sequence information generated by the Human Genome Project and the implications these advances have for gene therapy. The meeting had six sessions that focused on the functional evaluation of specific genes via biochemical analysis and through animal models, the development of novel therapeutic strategies involving gene targeting, artificial chromsomes, DNA delivery systems and non-embryonic stem cells, and on the ethical and social implications of these advances.

  12. New Advanced Technologies in Stem Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-01

    James, J. N. Zara , M. Corselli et al., “An abundant perivascular source of stem cells for bone tissue engineering,” Stem Cells Translational Medicine...vol. 1, no. 9, pp. 673–684, 2012. [89] A.W. James, J. N. Zara , X. Zhang et al., “Perivascular stem cells: a prospectively purified mesenchymal stem...1, pp. 54–63, 2009. [176] A. Askarinam, A. W. James, J. N. Zara et al., “Human perivas- cular stem cells show enhanced osteogenesis and

  13. [Advancements of computer chemistry in separation of Chinese medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lingjuan; Hong, Hong; Xu, Xuesong; Guo, Liwei

    2011-12-01

    Separating technique of Chinese medicine is not only a key technique in the field of Chinese medicine' s research and development, but also a significant step in the modernization of Chinese medicinal preparation. Computer chemistry can build model and look for the regulations from Chinese medicine system which is full of complicated data. This paper analyzed the applicability, key technology, basic mode and common algorithm of computer chemistry applied in the separation of Chinese medicine, introduced the mathematic mode and the setting methods of Extraction kinetics, investigated several problems which based on traditional Chinese medicine membrane procession, and forecasted the application prospect.

  14. Advanced Small Animal Conformal Radiation Therapy Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sunil; Narayanasamy, Ganesh; Przybyla, Beata; Webber, Jessica; Boerma, Marjan; Clarkson, Richard; Moros, Eduardo G; Corry, Peter M; Griffin, Robert J

    2017-02-01

    We have developed a small animal conformal radiation therapy device that provides a degree of geometrical/anatomical targeting comparable to what is achievable in a commercial animal irradiator. small animal conformal radiation therapy device is capable of producing precise and accurate conformal delivery of radiation to target as well as for imaging small animals. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device uses an X-ray tube, a robotic animal position system, and a digital imager. The system is in a steel enclosure with adequate lead shielding following National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements 49 guidelines and verified with Geiger-Mueller survey meter. The X-ray source is calibrated following AAPM TG-61 specifications and mounted at 101.6 cm from the floor, which is a primary barrier. The X-ray tube is mounted on a custom-made "gantry" and has a special collimating assembly system that allows field size between 0.5 mm and 20 cm at isocenter. Three-dimensional imaging can be performed to aid target localization using the same X-ray source at custom settings and an in-house reconstruction software. The small animal conformal radiation therapy device thus provides an excellent integrated system to promote translational research in radiation oncology in an academic laboratory. The purpose of this article is to review shielding and dosimetric measurement and highlight a few successful studies that have been performed to date with our system. In addition, an example of new data from an in vivo rat model of breast cancer is presented in which spatially fractionated radiation alone and in combination with thermal ablation was applied and the therapeutic benefit examined.

  15. Advanced Restoration Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    improve functional outcome post-SCI. SCI was induced at segment T9 in adult rats . The sensory and motor functions were evaluated in the weeks following...the injury. 2) Specific objectives: We tested the outcome of TMS therapy on sensory and motor functions in three groups: SCI rats that received TMS...acute- TMS) have shown greater sensory responses in primary somatosensory cortex of HL representation compared to rats that did not receive any TMS

  16. Advanced hemodynamic monitoring in intensive care medicine : A German web-based survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saugel, B; Reese, P C; Wagner, J Y; Buerke, M; Huber, W; Kluge, S; Prondzinsky, R

    2018-04-01

    Advanced hemodynamic monitoring is recommended in patients with complex circulatory shock. To evaluate the current attitudes and beliefs among German intensivists, regarding advanced hemodynamic monitoring, the actual hemodynamic management in clinical practice, and the barriers to using it. Web-based survey among members of the German Society of Medical Intensive Care and Emergency Medicine. Of 284 respondents, 249 (87%) agreed that further hemodynamic assessment is needed to determine the type of circulatory shock if no clear clinical diagnosis can be made. In all, 281 (99%) agreed that echocardiography is helpful for this purpose (transpulmonary thermodilution: 225 [79%]; pulmonary artery catheterization: 126 [45%]). More than 70% of respondents agreed that blood flow variables (cardiac output, stroke volume) should be measured in patients with hemodynamic instability. The parameters most respondents agreed should be assessed in a patient with hemodynamic instability were mean arterial pressure, cardiac output, and serum lactate. Echocardiography is available in 99% of ICUs (transpulmonary thermodilution: 91%; pulmonary artery catheter: 63%). The respondents stated that, in clinical practice, invasive arterial pressure measurements and serum lactate measurements are performed in more than 90% of patients with hemodynamic instability (cardiac output monitoring in about 50%; transpulmonary thermodilution in about 40%). The respondents did not feel strong barriers to the use of advanced hemodynamic monitoring in clinical practice. This survey study shows that German intensivists deem advanced hemodynamic assessment necessary for the differential diagnosis of circulatory shock and to guide therapy with fluids, vasopressors, and inotropes in ICU patients.

  17. The advance in the therapy of therapy-resistant keloids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao Hongxia; Zhang Jinshan

    2009-01-01

    Keloids are huamn benign dermal tumors, excessive fibroproliferative disorders that enlarge and extend beyond the margins of the origin wounds. Some keloids have proven to be very resistant to treatment, for example, several treatment modalities including surgical excision in combination with radiotherapy in the form of roentgen radiation (X-ray), pharmaceuticals, intralesional corticosteroids or calcium ions blocking agents, silicone gel sheets, physical therapy such as pressuretherapy, lasertherapy, cryotherpay might be less efficacious, and sometimes they cannot be performed because of limited conditions. Some keloids have higher recurrence rates. It is difficult to treat some keloids with complications of infection. 32 P-phosphours combination with vittamin E may be iuseful to treat therapy-resistant keloids. (authors)

  18. Advanced Tissue Sciences Inc.: learning from the past, a case study for regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pangarkar, Nitin; Pharoah, Marc; Nigam, Avinav; Hutmacher, Dietmar W; Champ, Simon

    2010-09-01

    On 31st March 2003 Advanced Tissue Sciences (ATS) was liquidated, with the effect that in excess of US$300 million of stakeholder financing was destroyed. Although successful in the development of breakthrough technologies in the regenerative medicine arena and the building of a substantial portfolio of patents, the company never made a profit. In this case study, ATS’ business strategy, market and competitive environment will be discussed in the context of the company’s historical development. A number of important lessons from this case are discussed. From a management perspective the most critical lesson is the importance of effective financial planning and management of costs, and in particular R&D costs, including the significant costs associated with clinical trials. In addition, a clear strategic focus is extremely important due to the significant resources required in the development of a new therapy. From an investor’s perspective the lessons to be gathered from the ATS case are related to the risk involved in investing in the field of regenerative medicine. This case indicates that both professional and private investors did not fully question the validity of ATS’ business strategy and financial forecasts. A clear and focused strategy based on long-term investor commitment is essential for the successful commercialization of regenerative medicine.

  19. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine; Terapia metabolica mediante radiofarmacos en medicina nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  20. The advanced therapy classification procedure. Overview of experience gained so far.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voltz-Girolt, C; Celis, P; Boucaumont, M; D'Apote, L; Pinheiro, M-H; Papaluca-Amati, M

    2011-07-01

    The classification procedure, introduced by the European Regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs), has received a tremendous interest from companies, academic and public sponsors developing ATMPs. This procedure gives companies the opportunity to verify whether or not the product they are developing can be considered an ATMP and can therefore benefit from the new regulatory pathway introduced in the European Union for these types of medicinal products. This procedure is optional, free of charge and may take place at any stage of the development of an ATMP in advance of applying for a marketing authorisation. In case of doubt, briefing meetings organised by the European Medicines Agency Innovation Task Force may help preparing for an ATMP classification and are a starting point for the interactions between the Agency and the developers of ATMPs. This article reviews the advantages of the classification procedure for both the developers of ATMPs and the European regulatory network. Since the introduction of this procedure and up to 10 November 2010, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) has finalised 38 applications for classification.

  1. Recent advances in neutron capture therapy (NCT)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fairchild, R.G.

    1985-01-01

    The application of the 10 B(n,α) 7 Li reaction to cancer radiotherapy (Neutron Capture therapy, or NCT) has intrigued investigators since the discovery of the neutron. This paper briefly summarizes data describing recently developed boronated compounds with evident tumor specificity and extended biological half-lives. The implication of these compounds to NCT is evaluated in terms of Therapeutic Gain (TG). The optimization of NCT using band-pass filtered beams is described, again in terms of TG, and irradiation times with these less intense beams are estimated. 24 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs

  2. Chinese medicine protein and peptide in gene and cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yinglu; Yin, Zifei; Zhang, Daniel; Srivastava, Arun; Ling, Chen

    2018-06-11

    The success of gene and cell therapy in clinic during the past two decades as well as our expanding ability to manipulate these biomaterials are leading to new therapeutic options for a wide range of inherited and acquired diseases. Combining conventional therapies with this emerging field is a promising strategy to treat those previously-thought untreatable diseases. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has evolved for thousands of years in China and still plays an important role in human health. As part of the active ingredients of TCM, proteins and peptides have attracted long-term enthusiasm of researchers. More recently, they have been utilized in gene and cell therapy, resulting in promising novel strategies to treat both cancer and non-cancer diseases. This manuscript presents a critical review on this field, accompanied with perspectives on the challenges and new directions for future research in this emerging frontier. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. The efficacy discussion of interventional therapy for advanced pancreatic carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Tian; Yin Shimeng; Sun Rongyue; Shen Lan; Qian Yu

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy of interventional therapy for advanced pancreatic carcinoma. Methods: 33 cases of advanced pancreatic carcinoma accepted interventional therapy from April 2005 were retrospectively analyzed. All patients were unoperable and accepted one or more times of celiac and superior mesenteric arterial chemotheraputics perfusion with dosage of 2:1. The embolization was further introduced with the addition of liver invasion. The repetition interval was kept at 6 weeks with no severe complications. Results: The one with follow-up CT imagings showed obvious decrease of the lesion size, together with release or disappearance of the sensation of abdominal pain and abdominal distention. The life span prolonged with average survival of 13 months, including the longest of 22 months and the life quality improved. Conclusions: The interventional therapy could be the first method of choice in the management of advanced pancreatic carcinoma. (authors)

  4. Advanced therapies for the treatment of hemophilia: future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liras, Antonio; Segovia, Cristina; Gabán, Aline S

    2012-12-13

    Monogenic diseases are ideal candidates for treatment by the emerging advanced therapies, which are capable of correcting alterations in protein expression that result from genetic mutation. In hemophilia A and B such alterations affect the activity of coagulation factors VIII and IX, respectively, and are responsible for the development of the disease. Advanced therapies may involve the replacement of a deficient gene by a healthy gene so that it generates a certain functional, structural or transport protein (gene therapy); the incorporation of a full array of healthy genes and proteins through perfusion or transplantation of healthy cells (cell therapy); or tissue transplantation and formation of healthy organs (tissue engineering). For their part, induced pluripotent stem cells have recently been shown to also play a significant role in the fields of cell therapy and tissue engineering. Hemophilia is optimally suited for advanced therapies owing to the fact that, as a monogenic condition, it does not require very high expression levels of a coagulation factor to reach moderate disease status. As a result, significant progress has been possible with respect to these kinds of strategies, especially in the fields of gene therapy (by using viral and non-viral vectors) and cell therapy (by means of several types of target cells). Thus, although still considered a rare disorder, hemophilia is now recognized as a condition amenable to gene therapy, which can be administered in the form of lentiviral and adeno-associated vectors applied to adult stem cells, autologous fibroblasts, platelets and hematopoietic stem cells; by means of non-viral vectors; or through the repair of mutations by chimeric oligonucleotides. In hemophilia, cell therapy approaches have been based mainly on transplantation of healthy cells (adult stem cells or induced pluripotent cell-derived progenitor cells) in order to restore alterations in coagulation factor expression.

  5. Recent advances in regenerative medicine to treat enteric neuropathies: use of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamp, L A; Young, H M

    2017-01-01

    As current options for treating most enteric neuropathies are either non-effective or associated with significant ongoing problems, cell therapy is a potential attractive possibility to treat congenital and acquired neuropathies. Studies using animal models have shown that following transplantation of enteric neural progenitors into the bowel of recipients, the transplanted cells migrate, proliferate, and generate neurons that are electrically active and receive synaptic inputs. Recent studies have transplanted human enteric neural progenitors into the mouse colon and shown engraftment. In this article, we summarize the significance of these recent advances and discuss priorities for future research that might lead to the use of regenerative medicine to treat enteric neuropathies in the clinic. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Advances in computational modelling for personalised medicine after myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangion, Kenneth; Gao, Hao; Husmeier, Dirk; Luo, Xiaoyu; Berry, Colin

    2018-04-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is a leading cause of premature morbidity and mortality worldwide. Determining which patients will experience heart failure and sudden cardiac death after an acute MI is notoriously difficult for clinicians. The extent of heart damage after an acute MI is informed by cardiac imaging, typically using echocardiography or sometimes, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR). These scans provide complex data sets that are only partially exploited by clinicians in daily practice, implying potential for improved risk assessment. Computational modelling of left ventricular (LV) function can bridge the gap towards personalised medicine using cardiac imaging in patients with post-MI. Several novel biomechanical parameters have theoretical prognostic value and may be useful to reflect the biomechanical effects of novel preventive therapy for adverse remodelling post-MI. These parameters include myocardial contractility (regional and global), stiffness and stress. Further, the parameters can be delineated spatially to correspond with infarct pathology and the remote zone. While these parameters hold promise, there are challenges for translating MI modelling into clinical practice, including model uncertainty, validation and verification, as well as time-efficient processing. More research is needed to (1) simplify imaging with CMR in patients with post-MI, while preserving diagnostic accuracy and patient tolerance (2) to assess and validate novel biomechanical parameters against established prognostic biomarkers, such as LV ejection fraction and infarct size. Accessible software packages with minimal user interaction are also needed. Translating benefits to patients will be achieved through a multidisciplinary approach including clinicians, mathematicians, statisticians and industry partners. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless

  7. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  8. Role of Nuclear Medicine in the cardiac resinchronization therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Simone Cristina Soares, E-mail: simonecordis@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Giorgi, Maria Clementina Pinto; D' Orio, Silvana Angelina; Meneghetti, Jose Claudio [Instituto do Coracao (InCor/FM/USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) emerged as one of the most promising approaches in the treatment of cardiac dyssynchrony in heart failure patients' refractory to medical treatment. However, despite very promising clinical and functional results, individual response analyses show that a significant number of patients do not respond to treatment. The role of nuclear medicine and molecular imaging in the selection of CRT candidates by the assessment of cardiac dyssynchrony, myocardial viability, myocardial perfusion and blood flow and sympathetic cardiac activity has been discussed in this review. The potential utilization of this tool to improve the comprehension of detrimental effects of dyssynchrony on cardiac function and the evaluation and monitoring of the response to CRT were also considered. Other molecular targets that characterize glucose and fatty acid metabolism, apoptosis, angiotensin converting enzyme activity and angiogenesis that can be evaluated with this technique were described. (author)

  9. [Advances on pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine under disease states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zi-peng; Chen, Ying; Zhang, Rui-jie; Yang, Qing; Zhu, Xiao-xin

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, more and more research shows that the pharmacokinetic parameter of traditional Chinese medicine can be affected by the disease states. It's possible that drug metabolic enzymes, transporters, cell membrane permeability and the change of microbes group could be interfered with physiological and pathological changes, which enables the pharmacokinetics of traditional Chinese medicine in the body to be altered, including the process of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion, and then the pharmacokinetic parameters of traditional chinese medicine are altered. It's found that investigating the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the pathological state is more useful than that of in normal state because the great part of traditional Chinese medicine is mainly used to treat disease. This article reflects the latest research on the pharmacokinetic of traditional Chinese medicine in the disease state such as diabete, cerebral ischemia, liver injury, inflammatory disease, nervous system disorders and fever in order to provide certain reference for clinicians designing reasonable administration dose.

  10. Advances in Anti-IgE Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Didem Yalcin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Omalizumab depletes free IgE in the blood and interstitial space and inhibits IgE binding to FcεRI on basophils, mast cells, and dendritic cells. We stopped omalizumab treatment after four years. Recurrences of urticaria symptoms were found to be higher in patients with chronic urticaria than recurrences of asthmatic symptoms in severe persistent asthma patients. For the very first time, we used omalizumab in symptomatic therapy of recurrent laryngeal oedema and urticaria attacks in a patient with postoperative pulmonary carcinoid tumor for eight months. During the four years of follow-up, no recurrence was noted in pulmonary carcinoid tumor. Control PET CT results revealed normal findings. After omalizumab treatment, laryngeal oedema and urticaria symptoms were decreased. The most common adverse reaction from omalizumab is injection site induration, injection site itching, injection site pain, and bruising but the package insert contains warnings regarding parasitic infections. While there are no reports of fatal anaphylaxis as a result of omalizumab, some cases have been serious and potentially life-threatening. Therefore, the FDA requires that people receiving omalizumab be monitored in the physician’s office for a period of time after their injections.

  11. Recent Advances In Topical Therapy In Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Thappa Devinder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available With changing times various newer topical agents are introduced in the field of dermatology. Tacrolimus and pimecrolimus are immunisuppressants, which are effective topically and are tried in the management of atopic dermatitis as well as other disorders including allergic contact dermatitis, atrophic lichen planus, pyoderma gangrenosum. Imiquimod, an immune response modifier, is presently in use for genital warts but has potentials as anti- tumour agent and in various other dermatological conditions when used topically. Tazarotene is a newer addition to the list of topical reginoids, which is effective in psoriasis and has better effect in combination with calcipotriene, phototherapy and topical costicosteroids. Tazarotene and adapelene are also effective in inflammatory acne. Calcipotriol, a vitamin D analogue has been introduced as a topical agent in the treatment of psoriasis. Steroid components are also developed recently which will be devoid of the side effects but having adequate anti-inflammatory effect. Topical photodynamic therapy has also a wide range of use in dermatology. Newer topical agents including cidofovir, capsaicin, topical sensitizers, topical antifungal agents for onychomycosis are also of use in clinical practice. Other promising developments include skin substitutes and growth factors for wound care.

  12. World Workshop on Oral Medicine VI: an international validation study of clinical competencies for advanced training in oral medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, John C; Clark, Hadleigh J; Hong, Catherine H L; Jurge, Sabine; Muthukrishnan, Arvind; Kerr, A Ross; Wray, David; Prescott-Clements, Linda; Felix, David H; Sollecito, Thomas P

    2015-08-01

    To explore international consensus for the validation of clinical competencies for advanced training in Oral Medicine. An electronic survey of clinical competencies was designed. The survey was sent to and completed by identified international stakeholders during a 10-week period. To be validated, an individual competency had to achieve 90% or greater consensus to keep it in its current format. Stakeholders from 31 countries responded. High consensus agreement was achieved with 93 of 101 (92%) competencies exceeding the benchmark for agreement. Only 8 warranted further attention and were reviewed by a focus group. No additional competencies were suggested. This is the first international validated study of clinical competencies for advanced training in Oral Medicine. These validated clinical competencies could provide a model for countries developing an advanced training curriculum for Oral Medicine and also inform review of existing curricula. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Evidence - based medicine/practice in sports physical therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manske, Robert C; Lehecka, B J

    2012-10-01

    A push for the use of evidence-based medicine and evidence-based practice patterns has permeated most health care disciplines. The use of evidence-based practice in sports physical therapy may improve health care quality, reduce medical errors, help balance known benefits and risks, challenge views based on beliefs rather than evidence, and help to integrate patient preferences into decision-making. In this era of health care utilization sports physical therapists are expected to integrate clinical experience with conscientious, explicit, and judicious use of research evidence in order to make clearly informed decisions in order to help maximize and optimize patient well-being. One of the more common reasons for not using evidence in clinical practice is the perceived lack of skills and knowledge when searching for or appraising research. This clinical commentary was developed to educate the readership on what constitutes evidence-based practice, and strategies used to seek evidence in the daily clinical practice of sports physical therapy.

  14. Recent advances in cell-based therapy for Parkinson disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Cooper, Oliver; Vinuela, Angel

    2008-01-01

    In this review, the authors discuss recent advances in the field of cell therapy for Parkinson disease (PD). They compare and contrast recent clinical trials using fetal dopaminergic neurons. They attribute differences in cell preparation techniques, cell type specification, and immunosuppression...

  15. Left ventricular assist device therapy in advanced heart failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Finn; Rogers, Joseph G

    2017-01-01

    Despite improvements in pharmacological therapy and pacing, prognosis in advanced heart failure (HF) remains poor, with a 1-year mortality of 25-50%. While heart transplantation provides excellent survival and quality of life for eligible patients, only a few can be offered this treatment due...

  16. Self-reported use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in a reflexology randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gwen; Sikorskii, Alla; You, Mei

    2013-01-01

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), about one-third of American cancer patients have used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The objective of this secondary analysis was an assessment of the use of other CAM by women with advanced breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy and who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) studying the safety and efficacy of reflexology. For this secondary analysis, the research team hypothesized an increased CAM use due to exposure to the reflexology trial. For this secondary analysis, the team conducted telephone interviews at baseline, wk 5, and wk 11 to assess the use of 23 common CAM therapies. The study took place at 14 medical oncology clinics across the Midwestern United States. Participants included women with advanced breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. In the study related to this secondary analysis, the research team randomly assigned the women to one of three primary groups: (1) reflexology; (2) lay foot manipulation (LFM); and (3) control. In addition, the research team used two test groups to establish the study's protocol: (1) test reflexology and (2) test LFM. For this secondary analysis, the research team considered the two reflexology groups (test and intervention) and the two LFM groups (test and intervention) to be the active groups, comparing their use of CAM to the control group's use at the selected time points. The research team used a linear, mixed-effects model to analyze the number of therapies used at the three time points. The team performed t tests to compare therapy use at baseline for those women who completed the study vs those who dropped out. The team used the CAM-use instrument. In total, 385 women participated. The research team found no differences in CAM use for the active groups vs the control group over time or in those women who stayed in the study vs those who dropped out. The team

  17. TH-AB-206-01: Advances in Radionuclide Therapy - From Radioiodine to Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humm, J.

    2016-01-01

    In the past few decades, the field of nuclear medicine has made long strides with the continued advancement of related sciences and engineering and the availability of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides. Leveraging these advancements while combining the advantages of therapeutic and diagnostic radionuclides into one radiopharmaceutical has also created a new subfield “theranostics” in nuclear medicine that has the potential to further propel the field into the future. This session is composed of two talks; one focused on the physics principles of theranostics from properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides to dosimetric models and quantification; while the second describes preclinical and clinical applications of theranostics and discusses the challenges and opportunities of bringing them to the clinic. At the end of the session the listener should be able to identify: The different properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides Which radionuclides are selected for which nuclear medicine therapies and why How PET can be used to accurately quantify the uptake of tumor targeting molecules How individualized dosimetry can be performed from the management of thyroid cancer to novel radiolabeled antibody therapies Promising pre-clinical radiopharmaceutical pairs in prostate cancer and melanoma. Promising clinical Theranostics in neuroendocrine cancers. Challenges of bringing Theranostics to the clinic. E. Delpassand, RITA Foundation -Houston; SBIR Grant; CEO and share holder of RadioMedix.

  18. TH-AB-206-01: Advances in Radionuclide Therapy - From Radioiodine to Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humm, J. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    In the past few decades, the field of nuclear medicine has made long strides with the continued advancement of related sciences and engineering and the availability of diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides. Leveraging these advancements while combining the advantages of therapeutic and diagnostic radionuclides into one radiopharmaceutical has also created a new subfield “theranostics” in nuclear medicine that has the potential to further propel the field into the future. This session is composed of two talks; one focused on the physics principles of theranostics from properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides to dosimetric models and quantification; while the second describes preclinical and clinical applications of theranostics and discusses the challenges and opportunities of bringing them to the clinic. At the end of the session the listener should be able to identify: The different properties of beta and alpha emitting radionuclides Which radionuclides are selected for which nuclear medicine therapies and why How PET can be used to accurately quantify the uptake of tumor targeting molecules How individualized dosimetry can be performed from the management of thyroid cancer to novel radiolabeled antibody therapies Promising pre-clinical radiopharmaceutical pairs in prostate cancer and melanoma. Promising clinical Theranostics in neuroendocrine cancers. Challenges of bringing Theranostics to the clinic. E. Delpassand, RITA Foundation -Houston; SBIR Grant; CEO and share holder of RadioMedix.

  19. Recent advances in herbal medicines treating Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xu-Zhao; Zhang, Shuai-Nan; Liu, Shu-Min; Lu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Herbal medicines have attracted considerable attention in recent years, which are used to treat Parkinson's disease (PD) in China based on traditional Chinese medicine or modern pharmacological theories. We summarized and analyzed the anti-Parkinsonian activities of herbal medicines and herbal formulations investigated in PD models and provide future references for basic and clinical investigations. All the herbal medicines and herbal formulations were tested on PD models in vitro and in vivo. The relevant compounds and herbal extracts with anti-Parkinsonian activities were included and analyzed according to their genera or pharmacological activities. A total of 38 herbal medicines and 11 herbal formulations were analyzed. The relevant compounds, herbal extracts and formulations were reported to be effective on PD models by modulating multiple key events or signaling pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of PD. The plant species of these herbal medicines belong to 24 genera and 18 families, such as Acanthopanax, Alpinia and Astragalus, etc. These herbal medicines can be an alternative and valuable source for anti-Parkinsonian drug discovery. The plant species in these genera and families may be the most promising candidates for further investigation and deserve further consideration in clinical trials. Active components in some of the herbal extracts and the compatibility law of herbal formulations remain to be further investigated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Hierarchy as a barrier to advancement for women in academic medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conrad, Peter; Carr, Phyllis; Knight, Sharon; Renfrew, Megan R; Dunn, Mary B; Pololi, Linda

    2010-04-01

    Research on barriers to professional advancement for women in academic medicine has not adequately considered the role of environmental factors and how the structure of organizations affects professional advancement and work experiences. This article examines the impact of the hierarchy, including both the organization's hierarchical structure and professionals' perceptions of this structure, in medical school organization on faculty members' experience and advancement in academic medicine. As part of an inductive qualitative study of faculty in five disparate U.S. medical schools, we interviewed 96 medical faculty at different career stages and in diverse specialties, using in-depth semistructured interviews, about their perceptions about and experiences in academic medicine. Data were coded and analysis was conducted in the grounded theory tradition. Our respondents saw the hierarchy of chairs, based on the indeterminate tenure of department chairs, as a central characteristic of the structure of academic medicine. Many faculty saw this hierarchy as affecting inclusion, reducing transparency in decision making, and impeding advancement. Indeterminate chair terms lessen turnover and may create a bottleneck for advancement. Both men and women faculty perceived this hierarchy, but women saw it as more consequential. The hierarchical structure of academic medicine has a significant impact on faculty work experiences, including advancement, especially for women. We suggest that medical schools consider alternative models of leadership and managerial styles, including fixed terms for chairs with a greater emphasis on inclusion. This is a structural reform that could increase opportunities for advancement especially for women in academic medicine.

  1. Nanoparticles for cancer gene therapy: Recent advances, challenges, and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kui; Kievit, Forrest M; Zhang, Miqin

    2016-12-01

    Compared to conventional treatments, gene therapy offers a variety of advantages for cancer treatment including high potency and specificity, low off-target toxicity, and delivery of multiple genes that concurrently target cancer tumorigenesis, recurrence, and drug resistance. In the past decades, gene therapy has undergone remarkable progress, and is now poised to become a first line therapy for cancer. Among various gene delivery systems, nanoparticles have attracted much attention because of their desirable characteristics including low toxicity profiles, well-controlled and high gene delivery efficiency, and multi-functionalities. This review provides an overview on gene therapeutics and gene delivery technologies, and highlight recent advances, challenges and insights into the design and the utility of nanoparticles in gene therapy for cancer treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Myasthenia gravis: recent advances in immunopathology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, John-Ih; Jander, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    Myasthenia gravis is the most frequent acquired disorder of neuromuscular transmission. In the majority of cases, pathogenic antibodies against components of the postsynaptic muscle endplate membrane can be detected. In recent years there have been significant advances in the pathophysiological understanding and therapy of the disease. Areas covered: PubMed searches were conducted for the term 'myasthenia gravis' cross-referenced with the terms 'immunology', 'subgroups', 'antibody', 'ocular', 'thymoma', 'treatment' and 'thymectomy'. Additionally, we summarized the current state of immunopathology and therapy. Expert commentary: Immunological research defined new target antigens at the postsynaptic neuromuscular junction which along with clinical features allow a refined definition of disease subgroups. Overall the prognosis of myasthenia gravis with best possible symptomatic, immunosuppressive and supportive treatment is good but new immunomodulatory treatment options are developed for patients who do not respond well to the first line therapy. For most patients individually adapted long-term drug therapy is needed.

  3. Radiation or chemoradiation: initial utility study of selected therapy for local advanced stadium cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramitasari, D. A.; Gondhowiardjo, S.; Nuranna, L.

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to compare radiation only or chemo radiation treatment of local advanced cervical cancers by examining the initial response of tumors and acute side effects. An initial assessment employed value based medicine (VBM) by obtaining utility values for both types of therapy. The incidences of acute lower gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and hematology side effects in patients undergoing chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those undergoing radiation alone. Utility values for patients who underwent radiation alone were higher compared to those who underwent chemoradiation. It was concluded that the complete response of patients who underwent chemoradiation did not differ significantly from those who underwent radiation alone.

  4. Fast neutron therapy in advanced malignant tumour treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avinc, A.

    1998-01-01

    In this report the fast neutron therapy applications were examined by thoroughly consideration of the fast neutron sources and the interactions of the fast neutron by the medium. The efficacy of fast neutron radiotherapy with that of patients with locally advanced tumours were compared. Radiological data indicate that fast neutrons could bring benefit in the treatment of some tumour types especially salivary glands, paranasal sinuses, soft tissue sarcomas, prostatic adenocarcinomas, palliative treatment of melanoma and rectum. There is a significant improvement in local/regional control for the neutron group, but no improvement in the survival. The neutron therapy is suggested through which this benefit could be achieved

  5. Recent advance in oxazole-based medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hui-Zhen; Zhao, Zhi-Long; Zhou, Cheng-He

    2018-01-20

    Oxazole compounds containing nitrogen and oxygen atoms in the five-membered aromatic ring are readily able to bind with a variety of enzymes and receptors in biological systems via diverse non-covalent interactions, and thus display versatile biological activities. The related researches in oxazole-based derivatives including oxazoles, isoxazoles, oxazolines, oxadiazoles, oxazolidones, benzoxazoles and so on, as medicinal drugs have been an extremely active topic, and numerous excellent achievements have been acquired. Noticeably, a large number of oxazole compounds as clinical drugs or candidates have been frequently employed for the treatment of various types of diseases, which have shown their large development value and wide potential as medicinal agents. This work systematically reviewed the recent researches and developments of the whole range of oxazole compounds as medicinal drugs, including antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antitubercular, anticancer, anti-inflammatory and analgesic, antidiabetic, antiparasitic, anti-obesitic, anti-neuropathic, antioxidative as well as other biological activities. The perspectives of the foreseeable future in the research and development of oxazole-based compounds as medicinal drugs are also presented. It is hoped that this review will serve as a stimulant for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic oxazole medicinal drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances*

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology. PMID:24626675

  7. Women in medicine and dermatology: history and advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    França, Katlein; Ledon, Jennifer; Savas, Jessica; Nouri, Keyvan

    2014-01-01

    The history of women in medicine has been marked by many challenges and achievements. Although the role of women in the "art of healing" can be traced back many centuries, only males are traditionally highlighted in history. Across antiquity, access to medical education was denied to females. Dermatology is a medical specialty in which women displayed particular skill and proficiency. Gradually, determination and competence allowed women to lay claim in an essentially male-dominated world. This article presents a brief review of the performance, progress and achievements of women in the history of medicine and dermatology.

  8. Gender Disparities Across the Spectrum of Advanced Cardiac Therapies: Real or Imagined?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogaev, Roberta C

    2016-11-01

    Cardiovascular disease has been responsible for more deaths in women than in men each year since 1985. This review discusses federal laws that have influenced the inclusion of women in research and reporting sex-specific differences, then addresses gender differences and gender disparities in four areas of clinical cardiovascular medicine: coronary heart disease, valvular heart disease, electrophysiology, and heart failure. The prevalence of disease in women is highlighted, the clinical characteristics of women at the time of referral for advanced therapies are reviewed, and the clinical outcomes of women are discussed. With the emergence of new technology such as smaller devices and less invasive procedures, more women are being referred for advanced therapies. However, a gap in awareness and diagnosis remains, contributing to later referrals for women. Women who do undergo advanced therapies often have more comorbidities and worse outcomes than men. A call is made to increase awareness, educate healthcare providers, and report more sex-specific data to resolve these gender disparities.

  9. A One Health overview, facilitating advances in comparative medicine and translational research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroud, Cheryl; Dmitriev, Igor; Kashentseva, Elena; Bryan, Jeffrey N; Curiel, David T; Rindt, Hans; Reinero, Carol; Henry, Carolyn J; Bergman, Philip J; Mason, Nicola J; Gnanandarajah, Josephine S; Engiles, Julie B; Gray, Falon; Laughlin, Danielle; Gaurnier-Hausser, Anita; Wallecha, Anu; Huebner, Margie; Paterson, Yvonne; O'Connor, Daniel; Treml, Laura S; Stannard, James P; Cook, James L; Jacobs, Marc; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Likins, Lee; Sabbagh, Ubadah; Skaff, Andrew; Guloy, Amado S; Hays, Harlen D; LeBlanc, Amy K; Coates, Joan R; Katz, Martin L; Lyons, Leslie A; Johnson, Gayle C; Johnson, Gary S; O'Brien, Dennis P; Duan, Dongsheng; Calvet, James P; Gandolfi, Barbara; Baron, David A; Weiss, Mark L; Webster, Debra A; Karanu, Francis N; Robb, Edward J; Harman, Robert J

    2016-08-01

    A1 One health advances and successes in comparative medicine and translational researchCheryl StroudA2 Dendritic cell-targeted gorilla adenoviral vector for cancer vaccination for canine melanomaIgor Dmitriev, Elena Kashentseva, Jeffrey N. Bryan, David T. CurielA3 Viroimmunotherapy for malignant melanoma in the companion dog modelJeffrey N. Bryan, David Curiel, Igor Dmitriev, Elena Kashentseva, Hans Rindt, Carol Reinero, Carolyn J. HenryA4 Of mice and men (and dogs!): development of a commercially licensed xenogeneic DNA vaccine for companion animals with malignant melanomaPhilip J. BergmanA5 Successful immunotherapy with a recombinant HER2-expressing Listeria monocytogenes in dogs with spontaneous osteosarcoma paves the way for advances in pediatric osteosarcomaNicola J. Mason, Josephine S. Gnanandarajah, Julie B. Engiles, Falon Gray, Danielle Laughlin, Anita Gaurnier-Hausser, Anu Wallecha, Margie Huebner, Yvonne PatersonA6 Human clinical development of ADXS-HER2Daniel O'ConnorA7 Leveraging use of data for both human and veterinary benefitLaura S. TremlA8 Biologic replacement of the knee: innovations and early clinical resultsJames P. StannardA9 Mizzou BioJoint Center: a translational success storyJames L. CookA10 University and industry translational partnership: from the lab to commercializationMarc JacobsA11 Beyond docking: an evolutionarily guided OneHealth approach to drug discoveryGerald J. Wyckoff, Lee Likins, Ubadah Sabbagh, Andrew SkaffA12 Challenges and opportunities for data applications in animal health: from precision medicine to precision husbandryAmado S. GuloyA13 A cloud-based programmable platform for healthHarlen D. HaysA14 Comparative oncology: One Health in actionAmy K. LeBlancA15 Companion animal diseases bridge the translational gap for human neurodegenerative diseaseJoan R. Coates, Martin L. Katz, Leslie A. Lyons, Gayle C. Johnson, Gary S. Johnson, Dennis P. O'BrienA16 Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene therapyDongsheng DuanA17 Polycystic

  10. Clinical benefit of antiangiogenic therapy in advanced and metastatic chondrosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Robin L; Katz, Daniela; Loggers, Elizabeth T; Davidson, Darin; Rodler, Eve T; Pollack, Seth M

    2017-08-29

    Chondrosarcoma is the most common bone sarcoma in adults. Conventional chondrosarcoma, the commonest histological subtype, is largely resistant to anthracycline-based chemotherapy. There have been anecdotal reports of durable clinical benefit with antiangiogenic agents in this disease. A retrospective search of patients treated at three sarcoma referral centers was performed to identify patients with advanced chondrosarcoma treated with antiangiogenic agents. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of antiangiogenic agents in advanced chondrosarcoma. Ten patients were identified; seven with conventional, one each with clear cell, extraskeletal mesenchymal chondrosarcoma and extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma. The median progression-free survival for patients with conventional and clear cell sarcoma was 22.6 months. Median overall survival has not been met. Antiangiogenic therapy was well tolerated in this series of patients. Our retrospective data suggest that antiangiogenic therapy can provide prolonged clinical benefit in advanced chondrosarcoma patients. Further prospective trials are required to precisely define the role of this class of agent in advanced chondrosarcoma.

  11. Influence of interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the immune function of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Tinghui; Wu Shiyan; Chen Yue; Zhang Qingquan; Zhang Weiwei; Shen Xubo; Wang Qianyao

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the influence of interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine on the immune function in elderly patients with advanced lung cancer and to establish a comprehensive therapeutic pattern which is effective and economical with lower side-effects. Methods: A total of 60 aged patients with lung cancer were randomly and equally divided into two groups with 30 patients in each group. Patients in group A were purely treated with traditional Chinese medicine and patients in group B were treated with a combination of interventional chemotherapy and traditional Chinese medicine. And two therapeutic courses (6-8 weeks) were conducted in both groups. The serum T-lymphocyte subsets levels of CD3, CD4, CD8, CD4/CD8, NK cells and CD4 + CD25 + Treg cell levels were estimated with flow cytometry. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: No significant difference in serum levels of T cell subsets and CD4 + CD25 + Treg cell levels existed between the two groups, both before and after the treatment (P > 0.05). However, after the treatment the CD4 + CD25 + Treg cell level in group B was significantly lower than that in group A (P < 0.05). The short-term effective rate and the total clinical benefit rate in group B were 40% and 73.3% respectively, which were much better than those in group A (20% and 63.3% respectively). Conclusion: Interventional chemotherapy combined with traditional Chinese medicine will not damage the immune function of elderly patients with advanced lung cancer, on the contrary, the combination therapy, through effectively reducing the suppressor T cell level,shows excellent short-term effect. It indicates that interventional chemotherapy combined with Chinese medicine is an effective comprehensive therapeutic mode for elderly patients with advanced lung cancer. (authors)

  12. Current status and prospect of therapy with advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watari, Tsutomu

    1979-01-01

    Symtomatic or palliative therapy of the patients with advanced cancer must be directed to the relief of specific distressing symptoms caused by or associated with neoplasm. The radiotherapy must have a clear concepts of the potential accomplishments of other treatment modalities, such as neurosurgery, anesthesiology, chemotherapy, pharmacology and psychotherapy, so that he may use his own method in proper perspective. I discussed following is an list of contents in this papers. Relief of pain, Psychotherapy, SVC obstruction, Obstructive jaundice, Brain and lung metastasis, prevention of fracture, Skin metastasis, Liver metastasis and treatment of advanced pediaric tumor etc. For the future: 1) Establishment of Stage and Grade of advanced cancer. 2) Development of new chemotherapeutic drug and immunotherapy. 3) Combination of multidisciplinary team and multidisciplinary treatment. (author)

  13. Chinese Herbal Medicines as an Adjunctive Therapy for Unresectable Pancreatic Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic cancer is a common malignancy with a high mortality. Most patients present clinically with advanced pancreatic cancer. Moreover, the effect of radiotherapy or chemotherapy is limited. Complementary and alternative medicines represent exciting adjunctive therapies. In this study, we ascertained the beneficial and adverse effects of Chinese herbal medicine (CHM in combination with conventional therapy for inoperable pancreatic cancer by using meta-analysis methods for controlled clinical trials. We extracted data for studies searched from six electronic databases that were searched and also assessed the methodological quality of the included studies. We evaluated the following outcome measures: 6-month and 1-year survival rate, objective response rate, disease control rate, quality of life, and adverse effects. The final analysis showed CHM is a promising strategy as an adjunctive therapy to treat advanced or inoperable pancreatic cancer and that CHM in combination with conventional therapy is a promising strategy for resistant disease. However, convincing evidence must be obtained and confirmed by high-quality trials in future studies.

  14. Topical Yunnan Baiyao administration as an adjunctive therapy for bleeding complications in adolescents with advanced cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladas, E J; Karlik, J B; Rooney, D; Taromina, K; Ndao, D H; Granowetter, L; Kelly, K M

    2012-12-01

    Yunnan Baiyao (White Medicine from Yunnan, YNB) is a Chinese herbal medicinal powder used to stop bleeding and improve circulation in traumatic injuries. We describe the use of YNB in adolescents with cancer as an adjunct to uncontrolled bleeding in the palliative care setting. Through a retrospective chart review of all patients receiving integrative medicine consultations at the Integrative Therapies Program at Columbia University from January 1, 2007 to January 31, 2012, we describe the outcome of patients treated with YNB for management of uncontrolled bleeding. Four patients were identified who received topical YNB for uncontrolled bleeding; patients included two males and two females with diagnoses of solid tumors (n = 3) and Burkitt's lymphoma (n = 1). Mean age was 15.5 years (range 15-17). Fifty percent had life-threatening bleeding from the tumor site and 50 % experienced uncontrollable epistaxis. All patients received preceding therapy with packed red blood cells and platelet transfusions, topical thrombin, and oral aminocaproic acid. Two patients used YNB in the inpatient setting, and all four patients used YNB as outpatients. In all patients, bleeding control improved with the addition of YNB to conventional hemostatic interventions. Two patients using YNB in their home reported control of bleeding episodes. There were no adverse events reported. YNB may be an efficacious agent for uncontrolled bleeding in conjunction with conventional hemostatic agents in adolescents with advanced cancer. It is well accepted by patients. YNB may be especially valuable in the outpatient setting to prevent the recurrence of hemorrhage.

  15. Shielding estimation for nuclear medicine therapy ward: our experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skopljak-Beganovic, A.; Kucukalic-Selimovic, E.; Beganovic, A.; Drljevic, A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The aim of this study was to calculate and estimate the shielding thickness for a new Nuclear Medicine Therapy Ward. Parameters available for shielding calculation were: ground plan of the ward, radionuclides planned for use, maximum administered activity of I-131, maximum delivered activity of I-131 to the ward per week, average time spent in the hospital after the treatment. The most hazardous and most commonly used radioisotope is I-131. The target dose that needs to be met for occupationally exposed workers is 0.3 mSv per year. There are several factors that could be changed in order to achieve this value: distance from the source, shielding thickness, angle of incidence, occupational and usage factors. The maximum dose rate at 1 meter from the thyroid gland of the patient was considered to be 100 mSv/h. The distances and incidence angles could not be changed since these vales were predetermined in the ground plan. Different usage and occupational factors were used for different rooms in the ward. We used occupational factor 1 for the bed and 1/6 for the bathroom, and usage factor 1 for nurses' room and patient room and 1/6 for the corridors, etc. The easiest way of calculating dose attenuation in material was by introducing the HVL and TVL for broad beams. TVL and HVL were taken from the graph.The results show that shielding thickness should be in the range of 3 mmPb for room doors to 30 mmPb for the wall adjacent to the nurse's office. Most of the walls are 20 mmPb thick. These values were calculated using conservative assumptions and are more then enough to protect staff, patients and public from external radiation. If the construction cannot support the weight of lead some rearrangements regarding patient positions could be made. (author)

  16. Advanced Bayesian processing of clinical data in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jirsa, L.

    1999-11-01

    The Bayesian methodology was applied with a view to improving the quality of thyroid gland disease treatment at a nuclear medicine department. The specific tasks included: formulation of the estimation tasks from the theoretical point of view; elaborating algorithms to estimate various physical, medical and dosimetric quantities used in radiodiagnosis and radiotherapy of thyroid gland diseases; testing their numerical precision; testing their numerical stability on a large set of clinical data; implementation of the algorithms at a level applicable in routine conditions of the nuclear medicine department and replace by them the data processing methods used there so far; exploring and testing the quality improvement of the estimates; and in dependence on the results, proposing hints where improvement of the data measurement methodology is necessary

  17. Advancing Precision Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging for Lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Chadwick L; Maly, Joseph J; Zhang, Jun; Knopp, Michael V

    2017-01-01

    PET with fluorodeoxyglucose F 18 ( 18 F FDG-PET) is a meaningful biomarker for the detection, targeted biopsy, and treatment of lymphoma. This article reviews the evolution of 18 F FDG-PET as a putative biomarker for lymphoma and addresses the current capabilities, challenges, and opportunities to enable precision medicine practices for lymphoma. Precision nuclear medicine is driven by new imaging technologies and methodologies to more accurately detect malignant disease. Although quantitative assessment of response is limited, such technologies will enable a more precise metabolic mapping with much higher definition image detail and thus may make it a robust and valid quantitative response assessment methodology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Advancements in anti-inflammatory therapy for dry eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Erin; Narayanan, Srihari

    2009-10-01

    The goal of this literature review is to discuss recent discoveries in the pathophysiology of dry eye and the subsequent evolution of diagnostic and management techniques. The mechanisms of various anti-inflammatory treatments are reviewed, and the efficacy of common pharmacologic agents is assessed. Anti-inflammatory therapy is evaluated in terms of its primary indications, target population, and utility within a clinical setting. The Medline PubMed database and the World Wide Web were searched for current information regarding dry eye prevalence, pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management. After an analysis of the literature, major concepts were integrated to generate an updated portrayal of the status of dry eye syndrome. Inflammation appears to play a key role in perpetuating and sustaining dry eye. Discoveries of inflammatory markers found within the corneal and conjunctival epithelium of dry eye patients have triggered recent advancements in therapy. Pharmacologic anti-inflammatory therapy for dry eye includes 2 major categories: corticosteroids and immunomodulatory agents. Fatty acid and androgen supplementation and oral antibiotics have also shown promise in dry eye therapy because of their anti-inflammatory effects. Anti-inflammatory pharmacologic agents have shown great success in patients with moderate to severe dry eye when compared with alternative treatment modalities. A deeper understanding of the link between inflammation and dry eye validates the utilization of anti-inflammatory therapy in everyday optometric practice.

  19. Beyond radioiodine: novel therapies in advanced thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugen, Bryan R.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Thyroid cancer is a relatively common endocrine malignancy. Fortunately, many patients do well with standard therapy including surgery and radioiodine. A minority of patients have poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma that is unresponsive to radioiodine therapy. Redifferentiation agents that 'reprogram ' these tumors to concentrate radioiodine would be of great value in treating patients with advanced thyroid cancer. The retinoid isotretinoin is the most extensively studied of these agents. It appears that 20-40% of patients respond to isotretinoin treatment by concentration of radioiodine in metastatic tumors, but the clinical utility of this redifferentiation is still unclear. In vitro studies suggest that the retinoid receptors RARβ and RXRγ are required for this effect. Abnormal DNA methylation may be an early event in thyroid tumorigenesis and methylation of the sodium iodide symporter (NIS) may play a role in loss of iodine concentration in these tumors. Inhibitors of methylation (5-azacytidine, phenylacetate and sodium butyrate) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in cell culture models, but published trials in humans are not yet available. Histone acetylation is required for efficient transcription of genes necessary for differentiated function. Proteins that cause histone deacetylation inhibit gene transcription and differentiated function. Inhibitors of histone deacetylation (depsipeptide, trichostatin A) have been shown to increase NIS expression and iodine uptake in poorly differentiated and undifferentiated cell lines. Finally, commonly used agents such as thiazolidine diones (diabetes) and HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (hypercholesterolemia) have shown promise in preliminary in vitro studies in advanced thyroid cancer cell lines. Our own work has focused on receptor-selective retinoids and thiazolidine diones as potential therapy in patients with advanced thyroid cancer based on nuclear hormone receptor

  20. The Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx Project: Linking Clinical Data with Molecular Analysis to Advance Personalized Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy C. Keen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of how genetic mutations or variability can directly affect phenotypic outcomes, the development of disease, or determination of a tailored treatment protocol is fundamental to advancing personalized medicine. To understand how a genotype affects gene expression and specific phenotypic traits, as well as the correlative and causative associations between such, the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx Project was initiated The GTEx collection of biospecimens and associated clinical data links extensive clinical data with genotype and gene expression data to provide a wealth of data and resources to study the underlying genetics of normal physiology. These data will help inform personalized medicine through the identification of normal variation that does not contribute to disease. Additionally, these data can lead to insights into how gene variation affects pharmacodynamics and individualized responses to therapy.

  1. Social and cultural efficacies of medicines: Complications for antiretroviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardon Anita

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Using ethnographic examples of medicine use, prescription, distribution and production, the authors argue that social and cultural effects of pharmaceuticals should be taken into account. Non-medical effects deeply influence the medical outcome of medicine use. Complications around the advent of anti-AIDS medicines in poor countries are taken as a point in case. The authors are medical anthropologists specialised in the social and cultural analysis of pharmaceuticals.

  2. Nontraditional Therapies (Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and Chiropractic) in Exotic Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marziani, Jessica A

    2018-05-01

    The nontraditional therapies of Traditional Chinese Veterinary Medicine and chiropractic care are adjunct treatments that can be used in conjunction with more conventional therapies to treat a variety of medical conditions. Nontraditional therapies do not need to be alternatives to Western medicine but, instead, can be used simultaneously. Exotic animal practitioners should have a basic understanding of nontraditional therapies for both client education and patient referral because they can enhance the quality of life, longevity, and positive outcomes for various cases across multiple taxa. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Functionally Assessing Candidate Drivers Advances Precision Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kenneth L; Powers, Scott

    2016-08-08

    The complexity of genomic alterations in cancer has made it difficult to identify oncogenic drivers for the development of targeted therapies. The study by Berger et al. in this issue of Cancer Cell demonstrates that high-throughput functional profiling can uncover impactful mutations and oncogenic driver alleles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Advances in Medicinal Plant Research | Hafez | African Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Food, Agriculture, Nutrition and Development. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 11, No 6 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  5. Novel advances in shotgun lipidomics for biology and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Miao; Wang, Chunyan; Han, Rowland H; Han, Xianlin

    2016-01-01

    The field of lipidomics, as coined in 2003, has made profound advances and been rapidly expanded. The mass spectrometry-based strategies of this analytical methodology-oriented research discipline for lipid analysis are largely fallen into three categories: direct infusion-based shotgun lipidomics, liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based platforms, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry-based approaches (particularly in imagining lipid distribution in tissues or cells). This review focuses on shotgun lipidomics. After briefly introducing its fundamentals, the major materials of this article cover its recent advances. These include the novel methods of lipid extraction, novel shotgun lipidomics strategies for identification and quantification of previously hardly accessible lipid classes and molecular species including isomers, and novel tools for processing and interpretation of lipidomics data. Representative applications of advanced shotgun lipidomics for biological and biomedical research are also presented in this review. We believe that with these novel advances in shotgun lipidomics, this approach for lipid analysis should become more comprehensive and high throughput, thereby greatly accelerating the lipidomics field to substantiate the aberrant lipid metabolism, signaling, trafficking, and homeostasis under pathological conditions and their underpinning biochemical mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain tumour stem cells: implications for cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Martin, Manuel

    2008-09-01

    The cancer relapse and mortality rate suggest that current therapies do not eradicate all malignant cells. Currently, it is accepted that tumorigenesis and organogenesis are similar in many respects, as for example, homeostasis is governed by a distinct sub-population of stem cells in both situations. There is increasing evidence that many types of cancer contain their own stem cells: cancer stem cells (CSC), which are characterized by their self-renewing capacity and differentiation ability. The investigation of solid tumour stem cells has gained momentum particularly in the area of brain tumours. Gliomas are the most common type of primary brain tumours. Nearly two-thirds of gliomas are highly malignant lesions with fast progression and unfortunate prognosis. Despite recent advances, two-year survival for glioblastoma (GBM) with optimal therapy is less than 30%. Even among patients with low-grade gliomas that confer a relatively good prognosis, treatment is almost never curative. Recent studies have demonstrated the existence of a small fraction of glioma cells endowed with features of primitive neural progenitor cells and a tumour-initiating function. In general, this fraction is characterized for forming neurospheres, being endowed with drug resistance properties and often, we can isolate some of them using sorting methods with specific antibodies. The molecular characterization of these stem populations will be critical to developing an effective therapy for these tumours with very dismal prognosis. To achieve this aim, the development of a mouse model which recapitulates the nature of these tumours is essential. This review will focus on glioma stem cell knowledge and discuss future implications in brain cancer therapy and regenerative medicine.

  7. Recent advances of genomic testing in perinatal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, David G; Yatsenko, Svetlana A; Surti, Urvashi; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2015-02-01

    Rapid progress in genomic medicine in recent years has made it possible to diagnose subtle genetic abnormalities in a clinical setting on routine basis. This has allowed for detailed genotype-phenotype correlations and the identification of the genetic basis of many congenital anomalies. In addition to the availability of chromosomal microarray analysis, exome and whole-genome sequencing on pre- and postnatal samples of cell-free DNA has revolutionized the field of prenatal diagnosis. Incorporation of these technologies in perinatal pathology is bound to play a major role in coming years. In this communication, we briefly present the current experience with use of classical chromosome analysis, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and microarray testing, development of whole-genome analysis by next-generation sequencing technology, offer a detailed review of the history and current status of non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA, and discuss the advents of these new genomic technologies in perinatal medicine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies for the anesthesiologist and pain practitioner: a narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodbury, Anna; Soong, Stephen Neal; Fishman, David; García, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    This narrative review provides an overview of the complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) therapies that anesthesiologists and pain management practitioners commonly encounter along with recommendations for evaluation and implementation. A literature search of PubMed was performed using the comprehensive MeSH term, "Complementary Therapies OR Dietary Supplements", and a search was conducted of the various licensing organizations and books published on the topics of CAM and integrative medicine. In North America, the most commonly encountered CAM therapies include 1) manipulation and procedural therapies; 2) herbs, nutritional supplements (nutraceuticals), and dietary therapies; and 3) mind-body and energy therapies. Controversy exists regarding many of these therapies, particularly those with a higher risk of harm, such as chiropractic manipulation, acupuncture, and nutraceutical use. Several well-conducted studies were analyzed to show how research in CAM can control for placebo responses. Practical considerations are provided for patients and practitioners interested in pursuing or already employing CAM in perioperative and chronic pain management settings. Complementary and alternative medicine therapies in general may provide a useful adjunct in the management of chronic pain. Nevertheless, many patients are not aware of the risks and benefits of individual therapies. In the perioperative setting, the most concerning CAM therapy is the use of herbs and other supplements that may produce physiologic and metabolic derangements and may interact with prescription medications. Resources exist to aid pain specialists, anesthesiologists, and patients in the evidence-based utilization of CAM therapies.

  9. Radiation therapy for unresectable locally advanced breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horikawa, Noriko; Inoue, Masayoshi; Uehara, Tomoko; Miyasaka, T.; Miyasaka, M.; Tabata, Yoji; Sakamoto, Nobuyuki; Nakagawa, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Thirteen cases of inoperable advanced breast cancer were treated with radiotherapy between 2002 to 2012 at Nara Prefectural Hospital. All cases were treated by radiotherapy and chemo-endocrine therapy. Patients received 60-81 Gy (median 60 Gy) to the primary breast tumor. Response of the breast tumors were complete response in 3 cases (23%), partial response in 8 cases (62%) and stable disease in 2 cases (15%) (response rate: 85%). All breast tumors had been controlled and skin troubles were reduced. Radiotherapy for breast cancer is useful for primary tumor control and improved quality of life (QOL). Radiotherapy should be considered to be useful modality in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. (author)

  10. Recent advances in targeted drug therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FAN Yongqiang

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available More and more clinical trials have proved the efficacy of targeted drugs in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. With the development of science and technology, more and more targeted drugs have appeared. In recent years, targeted drugs such as regorafenib and ramucirumab have shown great potential in related clinical trials. In addition, there are ongoing clinical trials for second-line candidate drugs, such as c-Met inhibitors tivantinib and cabozantinib and a VEGFR-2 inhibitor ramucirumab. This article summarizes the advances in targeted drug therapy for HCC and related trial data, which provides a reference for further clinical trials and treatment.

  11. Research advances in traditional Chinese medicine syndromes in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qing; Luo, Yun-quan; Wang, Wen-hai; Liu, Xuan; Li, Qi; Su, Shi-bing

    2016-01-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) syndrome, also known as TCM ZHENG or TCM pattern, is an integral and essential part of TCM theory that helps to guide the design of individualized treatments. A TCM syndrome, in essence, is a characteristic profile of all clinical manifestations in one patient that can be readily identified by a TCM practitioner. In this article, the authors reviewed the presentations of TCM syndromes in seven common malignancies (liver, lung, gastric, breast, colorectal, pancreatic and esophageal cancers), the objectivity and the standardization of TCM syndrome differentiation, the evaluation of TCM syndrome modeling in cancer research, and syndrome differentiation-guided TCM treatment of cancers. A better understanding of TCM syndrome theory, as well as its potential biological basis, may contribute greatly to the clinical TCM diagnosis and the treatment of cancer.

  12. Advances in stem cells and regenerative medicine: single-cell dynamics, new models and translational perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigger, Alecia-Jane; Scheel, Christina H

    2017-09-01

    An international cohort of over 300 stem cell biologists came together in Heidelberg, Germany in May 2017 as delegates of the 'Advances in Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine' conference run through the European Molecular Biology Organization. This Meeting Review highlights the novel insights into stem cell regulation, new technologies aiding in discovery and exciting breakthroughs in the field of regenerative medicine that emerged from the meeting. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Recent advances in echocardiography for nuclear medicine physician

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Geu Ru; Shin, Dong Gu

    2005-01-01

    Echocardiography is one of the most frequently used techniques for diagnosing cardiovascular diseases. Over the last twenty years, technological advances have enabled the application of high-quality imaging. Important recent developments have occurred in echocardiography that are already being used clinically. Equipment and hardware is now available to produce real time three-dimensional and contrast enhanced imaging. Tissue Doppler and stress echocardiography have provided potential benefit to analyze hemodynamic information of heart. This review discusses each of these new developments and their potential impact on the practice of echocardiography and cardiology in general

  14. Advances in the Traditional Chinese Medicine-Based Management of Viral Myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yong; Xu, Xia; Zhang, Peiying

    2015-09-01

    Viral myocarditis (VMC) is a common clinical condition; however, no specific treatment has been available from the perspective of modern western medicine, and typically only symptomatic treatment is provided in clinical settings. The traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has shown certain advantages in treating VMC. Last few years have witnessed certain advances in the TCM-based research on the etiology and pathogenesis of VMC and its clinical management. This article reviews the clinical advances made in the TCM-based management of VMC in the last 5 years.

  15. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Sami; Saini, Bandana; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy. Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software. Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients. This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future policies for the

  16. The Role of Medicinal Cannabis in Clinical Therapy: Pharmacists' Perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami Isaac

    Full Text Available Medicinal cannabis has recently attracted much media attention in Australia and across the world. With the exception of a few countries, cannabinoids remain illegal-known for their adverse effects rather than their medicinal application and therapeutic benefit. However, there is mounting evidence demonstrating the therapeutic benefits of cannabis in alleviating neuropathic pain, improving multiple sclerosis spasticity, reducing chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, and many other chronic conditions. Many are calling for the legalisation of medicinal cannabis including consumers, physicians and politicians. Pharmacists are the gatekeepers of medicines and future administrators/dispensers of cannabis to the public, however very little has been heard about pharmacists' perspectives. Therefore the aim of this study was to explore pharmacists' views about medicinal cannabis; its legalisation and supply in pharmacy.Semi-structured interviews with 34 registered pharmacists in Australia were conducted. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed ad verbatim and thematically analysed using the NVivo software.Emergent themes included stigma, legislation, safety and collaboration. Overall the majority of pharmacists felt national legalisation of a standardised form of cannabis would be suitable, and indicated various factors and strategies to manage its supply. The majority of participants felt that the most suitable setting would be via a community pharmacy setting due to the importance of accessibility for patients.This study explored views of practicing pharmacists, revealing a number of previously undocumented views and barriers about medicinal cannabis from a supply perspective. There were several ethical and professional issues raised for consideration. These findings highlight the important role that pharmacists hold in the supply of medicinal cannabis. Additionally, this study identified important factors, which will help shape future

  17. [Device-aided therapies in advanced Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, A A

    Advanced stages of Parkinson's disease (PD) is a consequence of the severe neurodegenerative process and are characterized by the development of motor fluctuations and dyskinesia, aggravation of non-motor symptoms. Treatment with peroral and transdermal drugs can't provide an adequate control of PD symptoms and quality-of-life of the patients at this stage of disease. Currently, three device-aided therapies: deep brain stimulation (DBS), intrajejunal infusion of duodopa, subcutaneous infusion of apomorphine can be used in treatment of patients with advanced stages of PD. Timely administration of device-aided therapies and right choice of the method determine, to a large extent, the efficacy and safety of their use. Despite the high efficacy of all three methods with respect to the fluctuation of separate symptoms, each method has its own peculiarities. The authors reviewed the data on the expediency of using each method according to the severity of motor and non-motor symptoms, patient's age, PD duration, concomitant pathology and social support of the patients.

  18. Stroke: advances in medical therapy and acute stroke intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kevin M; Lal, Brajesh K; Meschia, James F

    2015-10-01

    Evidence-based therapeutic options for stroke continue to emerge based on results from well-designed clinical studies. Ischemic stroke far exceeds hemorrhagic stroke in terms of prevalence and incidence, both in the USA and worldwide. The public health effect of reducing death and disability related to ischemic stroke justifies the resources that have been invested in identifying safe and effective treatments. The emergence of novel oral anticoagulants for ischemic stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation has introduced complexity to clinical decision making for patients with this common cardiac arrhythmia. Some accepted ischemic stroke preventative strategies, such as carotid revascularization for asymptomatic carotid stenosis, require reassessment, given advances in risk factor management, antithrombotic therapy, and surgical techniques. Intra-arterial therapy, particularly with stent retrievers after intravenous tissue plasminogen activator, has recently been demonstrated to improve functional outcomes and will require investment in system-based care models to ensure that effective treatments are received by patients in a timely fashion. The purpose of this review is to describe recent advances in medical and surgical approaches to ischemic stroke prevention and acute treatment. Results from recently published clinical trials will be highlighted along with ongoing clinical trials addressing key questions in ischemic stroke management and prevention where equipoise remains.

  19. Recent Advances in Monoclonal Antibody Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Dasari, Harika; Abdelrahim, Murtada A.; Henley, John R.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Warrington, Arthur E.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS and results in neurological disability. Existing immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive approaches lower the number of relapses but do not cure or reverse existing deficits nor improve long-term disability in MS patients. Areas Covered Monogenic antibodies were described as treatment options for MS, however the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies hampered the efficacy of potential therapeutics in humans. Availability of improved antibody production technologies resulted in a paradigm shift in MS treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of immunotherapies for MS that use conventional monoclonal antibodies reactive to immune system and their properties and mechanisms of action will be discussed, including recent advances in MS therapeutics and highlight natural autoantibodies (NAbs) that directly target CNS cells. Expert Opinion Recent challenges for MS therapy are the identification of relevant molecular and cellular targets, time frame of treatment, and antibody toxicity profiles to identify safe treatment options for MS patients. The application of monoclonal antibody therapies with better biological efficacy associated with minimum side effects possesses huge clinical potential. Advances in monoclonal antibody technologies that directly target cells of nervous system may promote the CNS regeneration field from bench to bedside. PMID:26914737

  20. Repairing quite swimmingly: advances in regenerative medicine using zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goessling, Wolfram; North, Trista E

    2014-07-01

    Regenerative medicine has the promise to alleviate morbidity and mortality caused by organ dysfunction, longstanding injury and trauma. Although regenerative approaches for a few diseases have been highly successful, some organs either do not regenerate well or have no current treatment approach to harness their intrinsic regenerative potential. In this Review, we describe the modeling of human disease and tissue repair in zebrafish, through the discovery of disease-causing genes using classical forward-genetic screens and by modulating clinically relevant phenotypes through chemical genetic screening approaches. Furthermore, we present an overview of those organ systems that regenerate well in zebrafish in contrast to mammalian tissue, as well as those organs in which the regenerative potential is conserved from fish to mammals, enabling drug discovery in preclinical disease-relevant models. We provide two examples from our own work in which the clinical translation of zebrafish findings is either imminent or has already proven successful. The promising results in multiple organs suggest that further insight into regenerative mechanisms and novel clinically relevant therapeutic approaches will emerge from zebrafish research in the future. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. An advanced search engine for patent analytics in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Teodoro, Douglas; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Vishnykova, Dina; Lovis, Christian; Ruch, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Patent collections contain an important amount of medical-related knowledge, but existing tools were reported to lack of useful functionalities. We present here the development of TWINC, an advanced search engine dedicated to patent retrieval in the domain of health and life sciences. Our tool embeds two search modes: an ad hoc search to retrieve relevant patents given a short query and a related patent search to retrieve similar patents given a patent. Both search modes rely on tuning experiments performed during several patent retrieval competitions. Moreover, TWINC is enhanced with interactive modules, such as chemical query expansion, which is of prior importance to cope with various ways of naming biomedical entities. While the related patent search showed promising performances, the ad-hoc search resulted in fairly contrasted results. Nonetheless, TWINC performed well during the Chemathlon task of the PatOlympics competition and experts appreciated its usability.

  2. Equine-Assisted Therapies: Complementary Medicine or Not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliffe, Katherine T.; Sanekane, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Equine-assisted therapies are interventions that use the unique qualities of a horse to assist persons with disabilities to improve their gross motor, language, social, and self-help skills. Programs offering these services are varied and operate on all major continents across the world. The effectiveness of equine-assisted therapies is generally…

  3. Preclinical imaging methods for assessing the safety and efficacy of regenerative medicine therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Lauren; Brillant, Nathalie; Kumar, J. Dinesh; Ali, Noura; Alrumayh, Ahmed; Amali, Mohammed; Barbellion, Stephane; Jones, Vendula; Niemeijer, Marije; Potdevin, Sophie; Roussignol, Gautier; Vaganov, Anatoly; Barbaric, Ivana; Barrow, Michael; Burton, Neal C.; Connell, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Edsbagge, Josefina; French, Neil S.; Holder, Julie; Hutchinson, Claire; Jones, David R.; Kalber, Tammy; Lovatt, Cerys; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Patel, Sara; Patrick, P. Stephen; Piner, Jacqueline; Reinhardt, Jens; Ricci, Emanuelle; Sidaway, James; Stacey, Glyn N.; Starkey Lewis, Philip J.; Sullivan, Gareth; Taylor, Arthur; Wilm, Bettina; Poptani, Harish; Murray, Patricia; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Park, B. Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Regenerative medicine therapies hold enormous potential for a variety of currently incurable conditions with high unmet clinical need. Most progress in this field to date has been achieved with cell-based regenerative medicine therapies, with over a thousand clinical trials performed up to 2015. However, lack of adequate safety and efficacy data is currently limiting wider uptake of these therapies. To facilitate clinical translation, non-invasive in vivo imaging technologies that enable careful evaluation and characterisation of the administered cells and their effects on host tissues are critically required to evaluate their safety and efficacy in relevant preclinical models. This article reviews the most common imaging technologies available and how they can be applied to regenerative medicine research. We cover details of how each technology works, which cell labels are most appropriate for different applications, and the value of multi-modal imaging approaches to gain a comprehensive understanding of the responses to cell therapy in vivo.

  4. Research advances in proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAI Shuyang

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, one of the most common malignancies with high prevalence and mortality rate, usually results in poor prognosis and limited survival. A comprehensive analysis on the number and location of tumors, Child-Pugh grade, and Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer stage will help the development of suitable treatment programs and improve prediction of prognosis. A majority of patients are complicated by cirrhosis, enlarged tumor, multiple lesions, vascular invasion, and even cancer embolus in the portal vein. With the growth of knowledge about the radiation tolerance of normal tissue and the advances in radiotherapy techniques, radiotherapy has become an important tool for step-down therapy and adjuvant therapy for liver cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT is emerging as a novel radiotherapy for the management of HCC, which, benefiting from the effect of Bragg Peak from PBT, effectively decreases the toxicity of traditional radiotherapies to the liver and does little harm to the uninvolved liver tissue or the surrounding structures while intensifying the destruction in targeted malignant lesions. Furthermore, several previous studies on the treatment of HCC with PBT revealed excellent local control. The distinctive biophysical attributes of PBT in the treatment of HCC, as well as the available literature regarding clinical outcomes and toxicity of using PBT for HCC, are reviewed. Current evidence provides limited indications for PBT, which suggests that further study on the relationship between liver function and PBT is required to gain further insight into its indication and standardization.

  5. Recent Advancements in Gene Therapy for Hereditary Retinal Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Öner

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hereditary retinal dystrophies (HRDs are degenerative diseases of the retina which have marked clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Common presentations among these disorders include night or colour blindness, tunnel vision, and subsequent progression to complete blindness. The known causative disease genes have a variety of developmental and functional roles, with mutations in more than 120 genes shown to be responsible for the phenotypes. In addition, mutations within the same gene have been shown to cause different disease phenotypes, even amongst affected individuals within the same family, highlighting further levels of complexity. The known disease genes encode proteins involved in retinal cellular structures, phototransduction, the visual cycle, and photoreceptor structure or gene regulation. Significant advancements have been made in understanding the genetic pathogenesis of ocular diseases, and gene replacement and gene silencing have been proposed as potentially efficacious therapies. Because of its favorable anatomical and immunological characteristics, the eye has been at the forefront of translational gene therapy. Recent improvements have been made in the safety and specificity of vector-based ocular gene transfer methods. Dozens of promising proofs of concept have been obtained in animal models of HRDs and some of them have been relayed to the clinic. The results from the first clinical trials for a congenital form of blindness have generated great interest and have demonstrated the safety and efficacy of intraocular administrations of viral vectors in humans. This review summarizes the clinical development of retinal gene therapy.

  6. Nuclear medicine imaging of locally advanced laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medvedeva, A.; Chernov, V.; Zeltchan, R.; Sinilkin, I.; Bragina, O.; Chijevskaya, S.; Choynzonov, E.; Goldberg, A.

    2017-09-01

    The diagnostic capabilities of nuclear medicine imaging in the detection and assessment of the spread of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer were studied. A total of 40 patients with histologically verified laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal lesions were included into the study. Submucosal injections of 99mTc-MIBI and 99mTc-Alotech were made around the tumor. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed 20 minutes after the injection of 99mTc-MIBI. Sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) were detected in 26 patients. In 18 hours after the injection of 99mTc-Alotech, SPECT was performed. In 24 hours after the injection of 99mTc-Alotech, intraoperative SLN detection was performed using Gamma Finder II. SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI revealed laryngeal and hypopharyngeal tumors in 38 of the 40 patients. The 99mTc-MIBI uptake in metastatic lymph nodes was visualized in 2 (17%) of the 12 patients. Twenty eight SLNs were detected by SPECT and 31 SLNs were identified using the intraoperative gamma probe. The percentage of 99mTc-Alotech in the SLN was 5-10% of the radioactivity in the injection site by SPECT and 18-33% by intraoperative gamma probe detection. Thus, SPECT with 99mTc-MIBI is an effective tool for the diagnosis of laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of this technique were 95%, 80% and 92%, respectively. The use of 99mTc-Alotech for the detection of SLNs in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer is characterized by 92.8% sensitivity.

  7. Advances in using MRI probes and sensors for in vivo cell tracking as applied to regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Amit K; Kadayakkara, Deepak K; Bar-Shir, Amnon; Gilad, Assaf A; McMahon, Michael T; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2015-04-01

    The field of molecular and cellular imaging allows molecules and cells to be visualized in vivo non-invasively. It has uses not only as a research tool but in clinical settings as well, for example in monitoring cell-based regenerative therapies, in which cells are transplanted to replace degenerating or damaged tissues, or to restore a physiological function. The success of such cell-based therapies depends on several critical issues, including the route and accuracy of cell transplantation, the fate of cells after transplantation, and the interaction of engrafted cells with the host microenvironment. To assess these issues, it is necessary to monitor transplanted cells non-invasively in real-time. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a tool uniquely suited to this task, given its ability to image deep inside tissue with high temporal resolution and sensitivity. Extraordinary efforts have recently been made to improve cellular MRI as applied to regenerative medicine, by developing more advanced contrast agents for use as probes and sensors. These advances enable the non-invasive monitoring of cell fate and, more recently, that of the different cellular functions of living cells, such as their enzymatic activity and gene expression, as well as their time point of cell death. We present here a review of recent advancements in the development of these probes and sensors, and of their functioning, applications and limitations. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. Clinical advances of nanocarrier-based cancer therapy and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Michel, Edurne; Imbuluzqueta, Edurne; Sebastián, Víctor; Blanco-Prieto, María J

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide and efficient new strategies are urgently needed to combat its high mortality and morbidity statistics. Fortunately, over the years, nanotechnology has evolved as a frontrunner in the areas of imaging, diagnostics and therapy, giving the possibility of monitoring, evaluating and individualizing cancer treatments in real-time. Areas covered: Polymer-based nanocarriers have been extensively studied to maximize cancer treatment efficacy and minimize the adverse effects of standard therapeutics. Regarding diagnosis, nanomaterials like quantum dots, iron oxide nanoparticles or gold nanoparticles have been developed to provide rapid, sensitive detection of cancer and, therefore, facilitate early treatment and monitoring of the disease. Therefore, multifunctional nanosystems with both imaging and therapy functionalities bring us a step closer to delivering precision/personalized medicine in the cancer setting. Expert opinion: There are multiple barriers for these new nanosystems to enter the clinic, but it is expected that in the near future, nanocarriers, together with new 'targeted drugs', could replace our current treatments and cancer could become a nonfatal disease with good recovery rates. Joint efforts between scientists, clinicians, the pharmaceutical industry and legislative bodies are needed to bring to fruition the application of nanosystems in the clinical management of cancer.

  9. Early experience of proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Youjirou; Nakamura, Tatsuya; Takada, Akinori; Takayama, Kanako; Makita, Chiyoko; Suzuki, Motohisa; Azami, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Yasuhiro; Fuwa, Nobukazu

    2013-01-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, 10 patients with advanced oropharyngeal cancer underwent proton therapy combined with chemotherapy. The initial results of this therapy were 8 complete response (CR) and 2 partial response (PR), local recurrence was detected 1 patient. Proton beam therapy combined with chemotherapy is thought to be an effective treatment for locally advanced oropharyngeal cancer. (author)

  10. Current and future regenerative medicine - principles, concepts, and therapeutic use of stem cell therapy and tissue engineering in equine medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Berg, Lise Charlotte; Betts, Dean H.

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides a bird's-eye perspective of the general principles of stem-cell therapy and tissue engineering; it relates comparative knowledge in this area to the current and future status of equine regenerative medicine.The understanding of equine stem cell biology, biofactors, and scaffolds...... mesenchymal stromal cells, unless there is proof that they exhibit the fundamental in vivo characteristics of pluripotency and the ability to self-renew. That said, these cells from various tissues hold great promise for therapeutic use in horses. The 3 components of tissue engineering - cells, biological...... factors, and biomaterials - are increasingly being applied in equine medicine, fuelled by better scaffolds and increased understanding of individual biofactors and cell sources.The effectiveness of stem cell-based therapies and most tissue engineering concepts has not been demonstrated sufficiently...

  11. Gold decorated porous biosilica nanodevices for advanced medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terracciano, Monica; Napolitano, Michela; De Stefano, Luca; Chiara De Luca, Anna; Rea, Ilaria

    2018-06-01

    Diatomite is a fossil material made of amorphous porous silica. In this work, polyethylene glycol (PEG)-modified diatomite NPs (PEG-DNPs) are decorated with gold NPs (AuNPs) by one-pot liquid-phase synthesis. Nanocomplexes (PEG-DNPs@AuNPs), with an average size of about 450 nm, are characterized by dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption/desorption analysis, UV–vis and photoluminescence spectroscopies. Preliminary studies on the use of the nanocomplex in nanomedicine are also presented. Tests performed incubating PEG-DNPs@AuNPs in physiological conditions reveal a good stability of material. Cellular uptake of labeled PEG-DNPs@AuNPs is investigated by confocal microscopy after incubation with human cervix epithelioid carcinoma (HeLa) cells up to 48 h: an efficient cytoplasmic localization is observed. In vitro cytotoxicity of nanocomplexes with a concentration up to 400 μg ml‑1 for 72 h is also evaluated. The results suggest the use of PEG-DNPs@AuNPs as advanced nanodevices adding imaging features to the nanocomplexes, due to AuNPs as contrast agent.

  12. 5th International Conference on Advancements of Medicine and Health Care through Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Roman, Nicolae

    2017-01-01

    This volume presents the contributions of the fifth International Conference on Advancements of Medicine and Health Care through Technology (Meditech 2016), held in in Cluj-Napoka, Romania. The papers of this Proceedings volume present new developments in - Health Care Technology, - Medical Devices, Measurement and Instrumentation, - Medical Imaging, Image and Signal Processing, - Modeling and Simulation, - Molecular Bioengineering, - Biomechanics.

  13. Bioengineering the Uterus: An Overview of Recent Advances and Future Perspectives in Reproductive Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Hannes; Cervelló, Irene; Simón, Carlos

    2017-07-01

    Since the initial in vitro attempts to more complex models, research on uterine regeneration is moving towards the creation of a functional bioengineered uterus with possible clinical applications. We describe here the most relevant advances in bioengineering of the uterus published in the last decades considering the use of stem cells and biomaterials as well as future developing techniques in Regenerative Medicine.

  14. Computed tomography, nuclear medicine, ultrasound. Advanced diagnostic imaging for problematic areas in paediatric otolaryngology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noyek, A.M.; Friedberg, J.; Fitz, C.R.; Greyson, N.D.; Gilday, D.; Ash, J.; Miskin, M.; Rothberg, R.

    1982-01-01

    This presentation considers the diagnostic role of three major advanced imaging modalities in paediatric otolaryngology: computed tomography, nuclear medicine and ultrasound. These techniques allow for both more specific diagnosis, and for more precise understanding of the natural history of diagnoses already rendered. (Auth.)

  15. Hyperfractionation radiation therapy in advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Hee; Ye, Ji Won

    2003-01-01

    The effects of hyperfractionation radiation therapy, such as the failure pattern and survival, on the treatment results in advanced stage head and neck cancer were studied. Between September 1990 and October 1998, 24 patients with advanced stage (III, IV) head and neck cancers, were treated using hyperfractionation radiation therapy in the Department at Radiation Oncology at the Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. The male to female ratio was 7 ; 1, and the age range from 38 to 71 years with the median of 56 years. With regard to the TNM stage, 11 patients were stage III and 13 were stage IV. The sites of primary cancer were the nasopharynx in six, the hypopharynx in 6, the larynx in five, the oropharynx in three, the maxillary sinus in three, and the oral cavity in one patient. The radiotherapy was delivered by 6 MV X-ray, with a fraction size of 1.2 Gy at two fractions a day, with at least 6 hours inter-fractional interval. The mean total radiation doses was 72 Gy, (ranging from 64.4 to 76.8 Gy). Fallow-up periods ranged between 3 and 136 months, with the median of 52 months. The overall survival rates at 3 and 5 years in all patients were 66.7% and 52.4%. The disease-free survival rates at 3 and 5 years (3YDFS, 5YDFS) in all patients Were 66.7% and 47.6%. The 3YDFS and 5YDFS in stage III patients were 81.8% and 63.6%, and those in stage IV patients were 53.8% and 32.3%. Ten patients were alive with no local nor distant failures at the time of analyses. Six patients (25%) died due to distant metastasis and 12.5% died due to local failure. Distant metastasis was the major cause of failure, but 2 patients died due to unknown failures and 3 of other diseases. The distant metastasis sites were the lung (3 patients), the bone (1 patient), and the liver (2 patients). One patient died of second esophageal cancer. There were no severe late complications, with the exception of 1 osteoradionecrosis of the mandible 58 months after treatment. Although this study was

  16. Medicinal Plants Useful For Malaria Therapy In Okeigbo, Ondo State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is increasing resistance of malaria parasites to chloroquine, the cheapest and commonly used drug for malaria in Nigeria. Artemisin, a product from medicinal plant indigenous to China, based on active principle of Artemisia annua, has been introduced into the Nigerian market. However not much has been done to ...

  17. College of Science Magazine explores genetic medicine, cancer therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Doss, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The newest issue of the College of Science Magazine features a host of scientific research projects underway at Virginia Tech. New avenues in genetic medicine, environmental links to breast cancer, and resistance training for diabetics are just a few of the topics.

  18. Optimizing the use of intravenous therapy in internal medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Karine; Mouly, Stéphane; Lloret-Linares, Celia; Lopes, Amanda; Vicaut, Eric; Bergmann, Jean-François

    2013-10-01

    We aimed to evaluate the impact of physicians' educational programs in the reduction of inappropriate intravenous lines in internal medicine. Fifty-six French internal medicine units were enrolled in a nationwide, prospective, blinded, randomized controlled trial. Forms describing the patients with an intravenous line and internal medicine department characteristics were filled out on 2 separate days in January and April 2007. Following the first visit, all units were randomly assigned to either a specific education program on the appropriate indications of an intravenous line, during February and March 2007, or no training (control group). The Investigators' Committee then blindly evaluated the clinical relevance of the intravenous line according to pre-established criteria. The primary outcome was the percentage of inappropriate intravenous lines. During January 2007, intravenous lines were used in 475 (24.9%) of the 1910 hospitalized patients. Of these, 80 (16.8%) were considered inappropriate. In April 2007, 416 (22.8%) of the 1823 hospitalized patients received an intravenous line, which was considered in 10.2% (21/205) of patients managed by trained physicians, versus 16.6% (35/211) of patients in the control group (relative difference 39%; 95% confidence interval, -0.6-13.3; P = .05). Reduced intravenous administration of fluids, antibiotics, and analgesics accounted for the observed decrease. The use of a simple education program reduced the rate of inappropriate intravenous lines by almost 40% in an internal medicine setting (NCT01633307). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Radiation therapy combined with hyperthermia in advanced cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuma, Akiko; Terashima, Hiromi; Torii, Yoshikuni; Nakata, Hajime; Inatomi, Hisato

    1986-01-01

    Radiation therapy combined with radiofrequency (RF) hyperthermia was performed on 5 advanced cancer patients. Included were one each with urinary bladder cancer, hepatoma with left axillary node metastasis, breast cancer, tongue cancer with left cervical metastasis, and mandibular cancer. All had large tumors, which were judged to be uncontrollable by radiotherapy alone. They were treated with irradiation (Linac: 10 MV X-ray 1.8 - 2.0 Gy/day, 5 days/week), followed within an hour by RF hyperthermia once or twice a week. Partial response was obtained in the urinary bladder cancer patient. Surface overheating around the margin of electrodes occurred in all but no severe complications were observed. (author)

  20. Ocular inserts - Advancement in therapy of eye diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anita Kumari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ocular insert represents a significant advancement in the therapy of eye disease. Ocular inserts are defined as sterile, thin, multilayered, drug-impregnated, solid or semisolid consistency devices placed into the cul-de-sac or conjuctival sac, whose size and shape are especially designed for ophthalmic application. They are composed of a polymeric support that may or may not contain a drug. The drug can later be incorporated as dispersion or a solution in the polymeric support. They offer several advantages as increased ocular residence and sustained release of medication into the eye. The insert includes a body portion sized to position within a lachrymal canaliculus of the eyelid. The inserts are classified according to their solubility as insoluble, soluble, or bioerodible inserts. The release of drug from the insert depends upon the diffusion, osmosis, and bioerosion of the drug, and this article is an attempt to present a brief about this newer drug delivery system.

  1. Advances in endovascular therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Lu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Endovascular therapy for ischemic cerebrovascular diseases has developed rapidly in recent years. The latest clinical trials of acute ischemic stroke have shown promising results with the continued advancement of concepts, techniques, and materials. Mechanical thrombectomy is recommended in the treatment of acute ischemic stroke caused by large vessel occlusion of the anterior circulation, according to the guidelines updated in Europe, USA, and China. The long-term therapeutic efficacy of endovascular stenting for carotid artery stenosis has also been proved noninferior to that of carotid endarterectomy. However, the latest clinical trials have shown that the efficacy of stenting for intracranial artery and vertebral artery stenosis is inferior to that of medical treatment alone, which needs urgent attention through further development and studies. Keywords: Ischemic cerebrovascular diseases, Interventional surgery, Progress

  2. Ilaj bil hijamah (cupping therapy) in the Unani system of medicine: anecdotal practice to evidence based therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Zaidi, S M; Jameel, S S; Jafri, Kehkashan; Khan, Shariq A; Ahmad, Ehsan

    2016-08-01

    Cupping (Hijamah) therapy is very well documented as a result of several thousand years of clinical experiences in Unani medicine. In this procedure, suction is created by various means either with or without bloodletting. Though this therapy is being widely practiced across the globe for treating many chronic and intractable ailments but many reports reveal its unscientific and improper practices which results in many complications. Therefore to develop standard operative procedures and to propose protocols of cupping therapy in various diseases is the need of hour. A thorough literature review of relevant journals and textbooks was performed to gather the maximum available data on cupping therapy. This paper seeks to introduce the general concepts of cupping therapy in Unani medicine and other traditional systems of medicine, shortcomings and limitations of the currently published studies and suggest ways to improve these technical/methodological flaws. In addition, the authors have also attempted to provide the cupping related materials, hypotheses, observations which will provide the researchers the base for evaluating their usefulness in future clinical trials.

  3. In-Patient Treatment of Fibromyalgia: A Controlled Nonrandomized Comparison of Conventional Medicine versus Integrative Medicine including Fasting Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Michalsen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fibromyalgia poses a challenge for therapy. Recent guidelines suggest that fibromyalgia should be treated within a multidisciplinary therapy approach. No data are available that evaluated multimodal treatment strategies of Integrative Medicine (IM. We conducted a controlled, nonrandomized pilot study that compared two inpatient treatment strategies, an IM approach that included fasting therapy and a conventional rheumatology (CM approach. IM used fasting cure and Mind-Body-Medicine as specific methods. Of 48 included consecutive patients, 28 were treated with IM, 20 with CM. Primary outcome was change in the Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ score after the 2-week hospital stay. Secondary outcomes included scores of pain, depression, anxiety, and well being. Assessments were repeated after 12 weeks. At 2 weeks, there were significant improvements in the FIQ (P<0.014 and for most of secondary outcomes for the IM group compared to the CM group. The beneficial effects for the IM approach were reduced after 12 weeks and no longer statistically significant with the exception of anxiety. Findings indicate that a multimodal IM treatment with fasting therapy might be superior to CM in the short term and not inferior in the mid term. Longer-term studies are warranted to assess the clinical impact of integrative multimodal treatment in fibromyalgia.

  4. [OMICS AND BIG DATA, MAJOR ADVANCES TOWARDS PERSONALIZED MEDICINE OF THE FUTURE?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheen, A J

    2015-01-01

    The increasing interest for personalized medicine evolves together with two major technological advances. First, the new-generation, rapid and less expensive, DNA sequencing method, combined with remarkable progresses in molecular biology leading to the post-genomic era (transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics). Second, the refinement of computing tools (IT), which allows the immediate analysis of a huge amount of data (especially, those resulting from the omics approaches) and, thus, creates a new universe for medical research, that of analyzed by computerized modelling. This article for scientific communication and popularization briefly describes the main advances in these two fields of interest. These technological progresses are combined with those occurring in communication, which makes possible the development of artificial intelligence. These major advances will most probably represent the grounds of the future personalized medicine.

  5. Clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy: current overview and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Wang, Kui; Li, Qifu; Nice, Edouard C; Zhang, Haiyuan; Huang, Canhua

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common disease that is a leading cause of death worldwide. Currently, early detection and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed for more effective management of cancer. Importantly, protein profiling using clinical proteomic strategies, with spectacular sensitivity and precision, offer excellent promise for the identification of potential biomarkers that would direct the development of targeted therapeutic anticancer drugs for precision medicine. In particular, clinical sample sources, including tumor tissues and body fluids (blood, feces, urine and saliva), have been widely investigated using modern high-throughput mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches combined with bioinformatic analysis, to pursue the possibilities of precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy. Discussed in this review are the current advantages and limitations of clinical proteomics, the available strategies of clinical proteomics for the management of precision medicine, as well as the challenges and future perspectives of clinical proteomics-driven precision medicine for targeted cancer therapy.

  6. WE-H-209-01: Advances in Ultrasound Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hynynen, K. [University of Toronto (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments.

  7. WE-H-209-01: Advances in Ultrasound Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hynynen, K.

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound has been shown to be the only method that allows noninvasive thermal coagulation of tissues and recently this potential has been explored for image-guided drug delivery. In this presentation, the advances in ultrasound phased array technology for energy delivery, exposure monitoring and control will be discussed. Experimental results from novel multi-frequency transmit/receive arrays will be presented. In addition, the feasibility of fully electronically focused and steered high power arrays with many thousands of transducer elements will be discussed. Finally, some of the recent clinical and preclinical results for the treatment of brain disease will be reviewed. Learning Objectives: Introduce FUS therapy principles and modern techniques Discuss use of FUS for drug delivery Cover the technology required to deliver FUS and monitor therapy Present clinical examples of the uses of these techniques This research was supported by funding from The Canada Research Chair Program, Grants from CIHR and NIH (no. EB003268).; K. Hynynen, Canada Foundation for Innovation; Canadian Institutes of Health Research; Focused Ultrasound Surgery Foundation; Canada Research Chair Program; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada; Ontario Research Fund; National Institutes of Health; Canadian Cancer Society Research Institute; The Weston Brain Institute; Harmonic Medical; Focused Ultrasound Instruments

  8. Medicinal Plants from Near East for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Darwish, Mohammad S.; Efferth, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    Background: Cancer is one of the major problems affecting public health worldwide. As other cultures, the populations of the Near East rely on medicinal herbs and their preparations to fight cancer. Methods: We compiled data derived from historical ethnopharmacological information as well as in vitro and in vivo results and clinical findings extracted from different literature databases including (PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar) during the past two decades. Results: In this survey, we analyzed the huge amount of data available on anticancer ethnopharmacological sources used in the Near East. Medicinal herbs are the most dominant ethnopharmacological formula used among cancer’s patients in the Near East. The data obtained highlight for the first time the most commonly used medicinal plants in the Near East area for cancer treatment illustrating their importance as natural anticancer agents. The literature survey reveals that various Arum species, various Artemisia species, Calotropis procera, Citrullus colocynthis, Nigella sativa, Pulicaria crispa, various Urtica species, Withania somnifera, and others belong to the most frequently used plants among cancer patients in the Near East countries. Molecular modes of action that have been investigated for plant extracts and isolated compounds from Near East include cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction with participation of major player in these processes such as p53 and p21, Bcl-2, Bax, cytochrome c release, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage, activation of caspases, etc. Conclusion: The ethnopharmacology of the Near East was influenced by Arabic and Islamic medicine and might be promising for developing new natural and safe anticancer agents. Further research is required to elucidate their cellular and molecular mechanisms and to estimate their clinical activity. PMID:29445343

  9. Reliance on medicinal plant therapy among cancer patients in Jamaica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Kimberley; Younger, Novie; Aiken, William; Brady-West, Doreen; Delgoda, Rupika

    2017-11-01

    Patients' perspective of their treatment regime plays a vital role in its success. Recognizing the high prevalence of medicinal plant usage among Jamaicans at large, we investigated the engagement of such remedies by cancer patients, with the aim of uncovering self-medicating habits, perceptions and details of utilized plants. A structured, interviewer-based questionnaire was administered to 100 patients attending the oncology and urology clinics at the University Hospital of the West Indies in Kingston, Jamaica. A method of convenience sampling was employed and the data were analyzed using summary statistics and statistical significance tests. A large proportion (n = 80, 80%) of interviewed patients, engaged medicinal plants in their treatment regimes. Such habits were independent of person's education, economic status and were higher among the 55-74 age groups (p Petiveria alliacea L. were the most commonly used plants for treating breast and prostate cancers, respectively. A large proportion of Jamaican cancer patients use medicinal plants in self-medicating practices and their perceptions and habits need to be considered by physicians, in the design of safe and effective care regimes.

  10. Recent advances in antisense oligonucleotide therapy in genetic neuromuscular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Verma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic neuromuscular diseases are caused by defective expression of nuclear or mitochondrial genes. Mutant genes may reduce expression of wild-type proteins, and strategies to activate expression of the wild-type proteins might provide therapeutic benefits. Also, a toxic mutant protein may cause cell death, and strategies that reduce mutant gene expression may provide therapeutic benefit. Synthetic antisense oligonucleotide (ASO can recognize cellular RNA and control gene expression. In recent years, advances in ASO chemistry, creation of designer ASO molecules to enhance their safety and target delivery, and scientific controlled clinical trials to ascertain their therapeutic safety and efficacy have led to an era of plausible application of ASO technology to treat currently incurable neuromuscular diseases. Over the past 1 year, for the first time, the United States Food and Drug Administration has approved two ASO therapies in genetic neuromuscular diseases. This overview summarizes the recent advances in ASO technology, evolution and use of synthetic ASOs as a therapeutic platform, and the mechanism of ASO action by exon-skipping in Duchenne muscular dystrophy and exon-inclusion in spinal muscular atrophy, with comments on their advantages and limitations.

  11. Tuberous sclerosis complex: Recent advances in manifestations and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wataya-Kaneda, Mari; Uemura, Motohide; Fujita, Kazutoshi; Hirata, Haruhiko; Osuga, Keigo; Kagitani-Shimono, Kuriko; Nonomura, Norio

    2017-09-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by generalized involvement and variable manifestations with a birth incidence of 1:6000. In a quarter of a century, significant progress in tuberous sclerosis complex has been made. Two responsible genes, TSC1 and TSC2, which encode hamartin and tuberin, respectively, were discovered in the 1990s, and their functions were elucidated in the 2000s. Hamartin-Tuberin complex is involved in the phosphoinositide 3-kinase-protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin signal transduction pathway, and suppresses mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 activity, which is a center for various functions. Constitutive activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 causes variable manifestations in tuberous sclerosis complex. Recently, genetic tests were launched to diagnose tuberous sclerosis complex, and mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 inhibitors are being used to treat tuberous sclerosis complex patients. As a result of these advances, new diagnostic criteria have been established and an indispensable new treatment method; that is, "a cross-sectional medical examination system," a system to involve many experts for tuberous sclerosis complex diagnosis and treatments, was also created. Simultaneously, the frequency of genetic tests and advances in diagnostic technology have resulted in new views on symptoms. The numbers of tuberous sclerosis complex patients without neural symptoms are increasing, and for these patients, renal manifestations and pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis have become important manifestations. New concepts of tuberous sclerosis complex-associated neuropsychiatric disorders or perivascular epithelioid cell tumors are being created. The present review contains a summary of recent advances, significant manifestations and therapy in tuberous sclerosis complex. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  12. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  13. Intraoperative radiation therapy for locally advanced gynecological malignancies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haddock, M.G.; Petersen, I.A.; Webb, M.J.; Wilson, T.O.; Podratz, K.C.; Gunderson, L.L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate disease control and survival in patients with locally advanced gynecological malignancies who received intraoperative radiation therapy with electrons (IOERT) as a component of treatment. Methods and Materials: Between March 1983 and June 1995, 63 patients (pts) with locally advanced primary (9 pts) or recurrent (54 pts) gynecological malignancies received IOERT as a component of attempted curative therapy. The site of origin was uterine cervix in 40 pts, uterine corpus in 16 pts, vagina in 5 pts, and ovary in 2 pts. Thirty-eight patients with recurrent disease had been previously irradiated (median prior RT dose 5040 cGy, range 900-8400). External beam radiotherapy (EBRT) was given to 43 of 63 pts either before or after IOERT (900-6570 cGy, median 4960 cGy). Chemotherapy was given to 21 pts prior to IOERT and following IOERT in 2 pts. IOERT doses ranged from 800 cGy to 2500 cGy with a median of 1750 cGy. The median IOERT dose was 2000 cGy in 20 patients with gross residual disease and 1500 cGy in 43 patients with microscopic residual disease. Endpoints included central control within the IOERT cone, local control, distant failure, disease free survival and overall survival. Variables evaluated for impact on disease outcome included tumor grade, primary site, prior RT, IOERT dose, EBRT dose, residual disease at time of IOERT, and use of chemotherapy. Results: Survival and disease control data are presented in the table below. There was no impact of any disease or treatment related variable on local or central failure. Pts with microscopic residual disease at the time of IOERT had significantly fewer distant metastases than pts with gross residual (5 yr 31% vs. 77%, p = 0.001) and improved survival (5 yr 37% vs. 10%, p = 0.02). Patients with recurrent disease after previous RT had survival and disease control rates which were similar to those seen in pts without priot RT. Toxicity ≥ grade 3 due to IOERT was observed in 11 pts (17%). Conclusion: A

  14. The Medical Academic Advancement Program at the University of Virginia School of Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, W L; Woode, M K; Carey, R M; Apprey, M; Schuyler, J M; Atkins-Brady, T L

    1999-04-01

    Since 1984 the University of Virginia School of Medicine has conducted the Medical Academic Advancement Program for minority and disadvantaged students interested in careers in medicine. The program is a six-week residential program for approximately 130 undergraduate and post-baccalaureate students per year. It emphasizes academic course work--biology, chemistry, physics, and essay writing--to prepare the participants for the Medical College Admission Test. Non-graded activities, such as a clinical medicine lecture series, clinical experiences, and a special lecture series, and special workshops are also offered. The participants take two simulated MCAT exams. Between 1984 and 1998, 1,497 students have participated in the program, with complete follow-up information available for 690 (46%). Of the 1,487 participants, 80 (5%) have graduated from the University of Virginia School of Medicine and 174 (12%) from other medical schools; 44 (3%) are attending the medical school now, and 237 (16%) are at other medical schools; 44 (3%) have graduated from other health professions schools, and 54 (3%) are attending such schools. The retention rate for participants at the University of Virginia School of Medicine is 91% (that is, all but seven of the 80 who matriculated have been retained past the first year). The Medical Academic Advancement Program has been successful in increasing the number of underrepresented minority students matriculating into and continuing in medical education. Such programs warrant continued support and encouragement.

  15. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy Therapy of the Achilles Tendinitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun-ha

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Achilles Tendinitis Methods : From 4th August, 2008 to 14th August, 2008, 1 female patient diagnosed as Chronic Achilles Tendinitis (clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy(acupuncture, moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results : The patient's chief complaints- Lt. heel pain and stiffness, dorsi-flexion limitation, nodules in the achilles tendon- were notably improved. Conclusions : This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has significant effect in improving symptoms of achilles tendinitis. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  16. Progressing a human embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy towards the clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiting, Paul; Kerby, Julie; Coffey, Peter; da Cruz, Lyndon; McKernan, Ruth

    2015-10-19

    Since the first publication of the derivation of human embryonic stem cells in 1998, there has been hope and expectation that this technology will lead to a wave of regenerative medicine therapies with the potential to revolutionize our approach to managing certain diseases. Despite significant resources in this direction, the path to the clinic for an embryonic stem-cell-based regenerative medicine therapy has not proven straightforward, though in the past few years progress has been made. Here, with a focus upon retinal disease, we discuss the current status of the development of such therapies. We also highlight some of our own experiences of progressing a retinal pigment epithelium cell replacement therapy towards the clinic. © 2015 The Author(s).

  17. Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Parents/Teachers Resource Links for Students Glossary Nuclear Medicine What is nuclear medicine? What are radioactive tracers? ... funded researchers advancing nuclear medicine? What is nuclear medicine? Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty that uses ...

  18. Traditional Chinese medicine as adjunctive therapy improves the long-term survival of lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yueh-Hsiang; Li, Chia-Ing; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Li, Tsai-Chung

    2017-12-01

    Traditional Chinese medicine is one of the popular alternative treatments for cancer, mainly enhancing host immune response and reducing adverse effect of chemotherapy. This study first explored traditional Chinese medicine treatment effect on long-term survival of lung cancer patients. This study evaluated whether traditional Chinese medicine combined with conventional cancer treatment improved overall survival of lung cancer patients. We had conducted a retrospective cohort study on 111,564 newly diagnosed lung cancer patients in 2000-2009 from National Health Insurance Program database. A total of 23,803 (21.31%) patients used traditional Chinese medicine for lung cancer care. Eligible participants were followed up until 2011 with a mean follow-up period of 1.96 years (standard deviation 2.55) for non-TCM users and 3.04 years (2.85) for traditional Chinese medicine users. Patients with traditional Chinese medicine utilization were significantly more likely to have a 32% decreased risk of death [hazard ratio = 0.62; 95% confidence interval = 0.61-0.63], compared with patients without traditional Chinese medicine utilization after multivariate adjustment. We also observed a similar significant reduction risk across various subgroups of chronic lung diseases. Qing Zao Jiu Fei Tang was the most effective traditional Chinese medicine agent for mortality reduction both in the entire lung cancer (0.81; 0.72-0.91) and matched populations (0.86; 0.78-0.95). This study demonstrated adjunctive therapy with traditional Chinese medicine may improve overall survival of lung cancer patients. This study also suggested traditional Chinese medicine may be used as an adjunctive therapy for cancer treatment. These observational findings need being validated by future randomized controlled trials to rule out the possibility of effect due to holistic care.

  19. Recent Advances in Developing Insect Natural Products as Potential Modern Day Medicines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norman Ratcliffe

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Except for honey as food, and silk for clothing and pollination of plants, people give little thought to the benefits of insects in their lives. This overview briefly describes significant recent advances in developing insect natural products as potential new medicinal drugs. This is an exciting and rapidly expanding new field since insects are hugely variable and have utilised an enormous range of natural products to survive environmental perturbations for 100s of millions of years. There is thus a treasure chest of untapped resources waiting to be discovered. Insects products, such as silk and honey, have already been utilised for thousands of years, and extracts of insects have been produced for use in Folk Medicine around the world, but only with the development of modern molecular and biochemical techniques has it become feasible to manipulate and bioengineer insect natural products into modern medicines. Utilising knowledge gleaned from Insect Folk Medicines, this review describes modern research into bioengineering honey and venom from bees, silk, cantharidin, antimicrobial peptides, and maggot secretions and anticoagulants from blood-sucking insects into medicines. Problems and solutions encountered in these endeavours are described and indicate that the future is bright for new insect derived pharmaceuticals treatments and medicines.

  20. Contributions of nuclear medicine to the therapy of malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik)

    1991-11-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic application of radionuclides on oncology has led to an increased efficiency in the treatment of malignant tumors. - Regarding diagnosis, measuring metabolic reactions in tumor tissue, especially by positron emission tomography, opened the potential for assaying tumor response to different treatment modalities and thus eventually for tailoring effective treatment of a given tumor in the individual patient. - Regarding treatment, attention is given to the choice of the radionuclide for optimal deposition of the desired radiation in tumor cells avoiding exposure of normal cells; in this context microdosimetric considerations are essential with respect to {beta}-emitters, {alpha}-emitters, the Auger-effect and neutron capture therapy. Examples of therapeutic uses of radionuclides in the inorganic form are 131-I for thyroid cancer and 32-P for polycythemia vera; organically bound radionuclides are employed with precursors for tumor cell metabolism or with receptor seeking agents, such as MIBG and monoclonal antibodies which presently enjoy a particular interest and bear great promise. Stable nuclides, if property accumulated within tumors, may be activated for therapy in situ, for example by thermal neutrons, as in neutron capture therapy using the 10-B (n, {alpha})7-Li reaction. - Treatment planning and execution with radionuclides have gained momentum over the past decade, yet much more needs to be done. (orig.).

  1. Leech therapy- a holistic approach of treatment in unani (greeko-arab) medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Azad Hussain; Ahmad, Tanzeel; Anwar, Mohd; Habib, Shahida; Sofi, Gh; Imam, Hashmat

    2011-07-01

    The Unani System of Medicine also known as Greeko-Arab medicine, founded by Hippocrates is based on the concept of equilibrium and balance of natural body humours (blood, bile, black bile and phlegm). The imbalance in the quality and quantity of these humours leads to diseases whereas restoration of this balance maintains health of a person. The treatment methodology of diseases is based on four therapeutic modalities viz. Regimental therapy, Dieto-therapy, Pharmacotherapy and surgery. Irsale Alaq (Leech or Hirudo therapy) is one of the most important and widely practised methods of regimental therapy used for local evacuation of morbid humours. It is a procedure of treatment with the use of medicinal leeches. It has been suggested and successfully practised by Greeko-Arab physicians in the management of musculoskeletal diseases, gynaecological disorders, chronic skin diseases, thromboembolic diseases, varicose veins, ENT disorders etc since long. According to Unani doctrine, the efficacy of leech therapy is attributed to the analgesic and resolvent activities of leeches. However, from modern perspective, the saliva of leech contains about 100 pharmacologically active biological substances like Hirudin, hyaluronidase, vasodilators, anesthetics, antibacterial, fibrinases, collagenase etc. These substances are injected into human body while sucking of the blood and are responsible for the analgesic, anti inflammatory and anesthetic effects of leech therapy.

  2. Current advances in the generation of human iPS cells: implications in cell-based regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revilla, Ana; González, Clara; Iriondo, Amaia; Fernández, Bárbara; Prieto, Cristina; Marín, Carlos; Liste, Isabel

    2016-11-01

    Over the last few years, the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from human somatic cells has proved to be one of the most potentially useful discoveries in regenerative medicine. iPSCs are becoming an invaluable tool to study the pathology of different diseases and for drug screening. However, several limitations still affect the possibility of applying iPS cell-based technology in therapeutic prospects. Most strategies for iPSCs generation are based on gene delivery via retroviral or lentiviral vectors, which integrate into the host's cell genome, causing a remarkable risk of insertional mutagenesis and oncogenic transformation. To avoid such risks, significant advances have been made with non-integrative reprogramming strategies. On the other hand, although many different kinds of somatic cells have been employed to generate iPSCs, there is still no consensus about the ideal type of cell to be reprogrammed. In this review we present the recent advances in the generation of human iPSCs, discussing their advantages and limitations in terms of safety and efficiency. We also present a selection of somatic cell sources, considering their capability to be reprogrammed and tissue accessibility. From a translational medicine perspective, these two topics will provide evidence to elucidate the most suitable combination of reprogramming strategy and cell source to be applied in each human iPSC-based therapy. The wide variety of diseases this technology could treat opens a hopeful future for regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Radiation therapy and arterial infusion chemotherapy for advanced gallbladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hokodate, Hirofumi; Saito, Hiroya; Takeuchi, Shuhei; Horikawa, Masahiro; Takamura, Akio

    2009-01-01

    The standard therapy is not yet established for the unresectable advanced gallbladder cancer (AGC). Here described is the outcome of authors' therapeutic protocol for AGC during the time Jan., 1989-Dec., 2008. Subjects are 73 patients (M 32/F 41, average age 65 y) with AGC of Stage IV. One shot arterial infusion (AI) of EEP regimen (etoposide (VP16)/4'epiadriamycin (EPIR)/cisplatin (CDDP)) is conducted via hepatic artery proper or common at the first angiography and one week later, external radiation therapy (RT), with about 30-50 Gy/6 fractions (actually, 12-61.6 Gy). AI is weekly done with FP regimen (CDDP/5-fluorouracil (FU)) through the reservoir indwelled in the gastroduodenal artery for 6 months where a metal stent for the stegnosis of bile duct is used if necessary after RT, and in recent days, additionally with biweekly CDDP/gemcitabin (GEM) regimen depending on patient's state after FP. As a result, RT is conducted to 62 cases (RT alone 8 cases), AI, 64 (alone, 10), and RT+AI, 54. Response is found to be 49% (CR 7 cases and PR, 28). Survivals 1- and 3-year are 39 and 6%, respectively, and average survival time, 408 days. Survival rate in (RT+AI) is significantly superior to that in AI alone and in RT alone. Prognosis in patients with jaundice, hepatic or duodenal invasion is significantly inferior to those without the symptom, and in non-responded cases, to responded cases. Complications like hepatic abscess are seen in 4 cases at 6 months after treatment. Four actual case-reports are presented in details with their images. Combination of RT+AI is suggested to be of utility for AGC, of which multi-center trial is awaited with addition of newer anti-cancers developed recently. (K.T.)

  4. Locally advanced cervix carcinoma - innovation in combined modality therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift, Patrick S.

    1996-01-01

    Locally advanced cervical carcinoma continues to be a challenge to the clinician due to local failure as well as systemic metastases. Standard intracavitary and external beam techniques result in local control rates of only 35-65%, with long term survival rates of 25-60% in patients with state IIIA-IVA disease, indicating the need to identify new treatment strategies. Optimization programs for remote-afterloading interstitial brachytherapy allow the delivery of higher local doses of radiation to volumes that more closely approximate tumor target volumes as identified on MR scans, leading to improved therapeutic ratios. Identification of subsets of patients more likely to fail standard therapy, either locally or systemically, may be possible through such techniques as in vivo measurements of hypoxia with Eppendorf oxygen electrodes, interstitial fluid pressure measurements, the Comet assay, and nitroimidazole binding methods. Traditional chemotherapies, administered in either a neoadjuvant role or concomitantly with radiation have been disappointing in prospective trials. A variety of new agents are being investigated to determine if they can increase the frequency or duration of complete response. The taxanes, with response rates of 17-23% by themselves, are being assessed as potential radiosensitizers. The camptotheicin CRT-11 (Irinotecan) has demonstrated activity in platinum resistant cervix cancer, with response rates of 24%. Bioradiotherapeutic approaches, using 13-cis-retinoic acid and interferon-2a, are undergoing phase II studies. Neoangiogenesis inhibitors and vaccines against HPV are also being examined. The aggressive pursuit of techniques that help identify those patients most likely to fail, that allow the delivery of higher radiation doses more safely to the target volume, and that incorporate the use of more effective systemic therapies is necessary to improve the outcome for this disease

  5. A Bright Future for Precision Medicine: Advances in Fluorescent Chemical Probe Design and Their Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Megan; Yim, Joshua J; Bogyo, Matthew

    2016-01-21

    The Precision Medicine Initiative aims to use advances in basic and clinical research to develop therapeutics that selectively target and kill cancer cells. Under the same doctrine of precision medicine, there is an equally important need to visualize these diseased cells to enable diagnosis, facilitate surgical resection, and monitor therapeutic response. Therefore, there is a great opportunity for chemists to develop chemically tractable probes that can image cancer in vivo. This review focuses on recent advances in the development of optical probes, as well as their current and future applications in the clinical management of cancer. The progress in probe development described here suggests that optical imaging is an important and rapidly developing field of study that encourages continued collaboration among chemists, biologists, and clinicians to further refine these tools for interventional surgical imaging, as well as for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. General medicine advanced training: lessons from the John Hunter training programme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackel, D; Attia, J; Pickles, R

    2014-03-01

    Recent years have seen a rapid growth in the number of advanced trainees pursuing general medicine as a specialty. This reflects an awareness of the need for broader training experiences to equip future consultant physicians with the skills to manage the healthcare challenges arising from the demographic trends of ageing and increasing comorbidity. The John Hunter Hospital training programme in general medicine has several characteristics that have led to the success in producing general physicians prepared for these challenges. These include support from a core group of committed general physicians, an appropriate and sustainable funding model, flexibility with a focus on genuine training and developing awareness of a systems approach, and strong links with rural practice. © 2014 The Authors; Internal Medicine Journal © 2014 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. The Current Status and Future Directions of Heavy Charged Particle Therapy in Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Richard P.; Blakely, Eleanor A.; Chu, William T.; Coutrakon, George B.; Hug, Eugen B.; Kraft, Gerhard; Tsujii, Hirohiko

    2009-03-01

    will require: (1) sophisticated target delineation that integrates CT, MRI and PET imaging; (2) reliable RBE modeling algorithms; (3) efficient beam-scanning technology that compensates for organ movements; (4) online beam control proximal to and within the patient; and (5) better understanding of dose-fractionation parameters. The current status and the anticipated future directions of the role of particle therapy in medicine is a complex subject that involves a very intimate interplay of radiobiology, accelerator physics and radiation oncology. The intention of this relatively brief manuscript is to describe the underlying principles, present the historical developments, highlight the clinical results, focus on the technical advances, and suggest likely future directions. We have also attempted to present a balanced, consensus view of the past achievements and current strategies in particle therapy, in a manner of interest both to long-term experts and to educated newcomers to this field.

  8. Antibody phage display applications for nuclear medicine imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winthrop, M.D.; Denardo, G.L.; Denardo, S.J.

    2000-01-01

    Antibody-based constructs genetically engineered from genes of diverse origin provide a remarkable opportunity to develop functional molecular imaging techniques and specific molecular targeted radionuclide therapies. Phage display libraries of antibody fragment genes can be used to select antibody-based constructs that bind any chosen epitope. A large naive human antibody-based library was used to illustrate binding of antibody constructs to a variety of common and unique antigens. Antibody-based libraries from hybridoma cells, lymphocytes from immunized humans or from mice and human antibody repertoires produced in transgenic mice have also been described. Several orders of magnitude of affinity enhancement can be achieved by random or site specific mutations of the selected binding peptide domains of the scFv. Affinities (K d ) as high as 10 - 11 M (10 pM) for affinity-matured scFv have been documented. Such gene libraries thus offer an almost limitless variety of antibody-based molecular binding peptide modules that can be used in creative ways for the construction of new targeting agents for functional or molecular imaging and therapy

  9. Selection and Training of Personnel for the New Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy Centre in Bariloche

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: A basic strategy for the development of a new organization is the selection of personnel, especially if it is an institute that offers a technological and professional innovation. This work aims to define specific profiles for the Centre for Nuclear Medicine and Radiation Therapy, Bariloche, and to design a plan for selecting and training professionals. (author

  10. [Corticosteroid therapy and therapeutic education: experience of an internal medicine department

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Ane, A.M.; Afroun, A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2003, we sought to determine what were the needs of patients prescribed with long-term glucocorticoid therapy in our internal medicine department. Following this inventory, we decided to homogenize the medical practices regarding glucocorticoid prescriptions in our institution. We also set up a

  11. [Advanced organ failure in the elderly. Some issues from a geriatrics, palliative medicine and bioethics perspectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Renedo, Francisco Javier; González-Ercilla, Leire; Iráizoz-Apezteguía, Itziar

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the literature as regards the knowledge, skills and attitudes that these disciplines can provide in improving technical, ethical and human quality health care in the elderly with advanced organ failure, multimorbidity, frailty and progressive dementia. A comprehensive review focused on available references on the interrelationship between geriatric medicine and palliative medicine, education in bioethics, prognostic tools, functional status, and the humanization of health care. Advance care planning, comprehensive geriatric assessment, the study of the values of the patient and their introduction in decision-making process, as well as the need to promote moral, care, and healthcare organizational ethics, are essential elements to achieve this objective. Practitioners and healthcare organizations should seek excellence as a moral requirement. To achieve this, there is a priority to acquire virtues of care and fundamental concepts of geriatric and palliative medicine, assessing functional status, advance care planning and patient/family needs as essential issues to protect, care for and promote them in all care settings. Copyright © 2013 SEGG. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. MicroRNAs and Chinese Medicinal Herbs: New Possibilities in Cancer Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Ming; Wang, Ning; Tan, Hor Yue [School of Chinese Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Tsao, Sai-Wah [Department of Anatomy, Li KaShing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China); Feng, Yibin, E-mail: yfeng@hku.hk [School of Chinese Medicine, Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong (China)

    2015-08-24

    In recent decades Chinese medicine has been used worldwide as a complementary and alternative medicine to treat cancer. Plenty of studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play fundamental roles in many pathological processes, including cancer, while the anti-cancer mechanisms of Chinese medicinal herbs targeting miRNAs also have been extensively explored. Our previous studies and those of others on Chinese medicinal herbs and miRNAs in various cancer models have provided a possibility of new cancer therapies, for example, up-regulating the expression of miR-23a may activate the positive regulatory network of p53 and miR-23a involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-tumor effect of berberine in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this review, we survey the role of Chinese medicinal herbal products in regulating miRNAs in cancer and the use of mediating miRNAs for cancer treatment. In addition, the controversial roles of herb-derived exogenous miRNAs in cancer treatment are also discussed. It is expected that targeting miRNAs would provide a novel therapeutic approach in cancer therapy by improving overall response and survival outcomes in cancer treatment, especially when combined with conventional therapeutics and Chinese medicinal herbal products.

  13. MicroRNAs and Chinese Medicinal Herbs: New Possibilities in Cancer Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Ming; Wang, Ning; Tan, Hor Yue; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    In recent decades Chinese medicine has been used worldwide as a complementary and alternative medicine to treat cancer. Plenty of studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play fundamental roles in many pathological processes, including cancer, while the anti-cancer mechanisms of Chinese medicinal herbs targeting miRNAs also have been extensively explored. Our previous studies and those of others on Chinese medicinal herbs and miRNAs in various cancer models have provided a possibility of new cancer therapies, for example, up-regulating the expression of miR-23a may activate the positive regulatory network of p53 and miR-23a involved in the mechanism underlying the anti-tumor effect of berberine in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). In this review, we survey the role of Chinese medicinal herbal products in regulating miRNAs in cancer and the use of mediating miRNAs for cancer treatment. In addition, the controversial roles of herb-derived exogenous miRNAs in cancer treatment are also discussed. It is expected that targeting miRNAs would provide a novel therapeutic approach in cancer therapy by improving overall response and survival outcomes in cancer treatment, especially when combined with conventional therapeutics and Chinese medicinal herbal products

  14. Advancing Molecular Therapies through In Vivo Bioluminescent Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton McCaffrey

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Effective development of therapeutics that target the molecular basis of disease is dependent on testing new therapeutic moieties and delivery strategies in animal models of human disease. Accelerating the analyses of these models and improving their predictive value through whole animal imaging methods, which provide data in real time and are sensitive to the subtle changes, are crucial for rapid advancement of these approaches. Modalities based on optics are rapid, sensitive, and accessible methods for in vivo analyses with relatively low instrumentation costs. In vivo bioluminescent imaging (BLI is one of these optically based imaging methods that enable rapid in vivo analyses of a variety of cellular and molecular events with extreme sensitivity. BLI is based on the use of light-emitting enzymes as internal biological light sources that can be detected externally as biological indicators. BLI has been used to test spatio-temporal expression patterns of both target and therapeutic genes in living laboratory animals where the contextual influences of whole biological systems are preserved. BLI has also been used to analyze gene delivery, immune cell therapies, and the in vivo efficacy of inhibitory RNAs. New tools for BLI are being developed that will offer greater flexibility in detection and analyses. BLI can be used to accelerate the evaluation of experimental therapeutic strategies and whole body imaging offers the opportunity of revealing the effects of novel approaches on key steps in disease processes.

  15. Results of irradiation therapy for advanced uterine cervical cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Haruo; Asakawa, Hiroshi; Otawa, Hirokazu; Nemoto, Kenji; Saito, Hiroyuki

    1983-01-01

    152 patients with advanced uterine cervical cancer (76 in stage III, 47 in stage IV and 29 in recurrence) were treated at Miyagi Seijinbyo Center in fifteen years (1967-1981). Our standard treatment was a combined therapy of 6 MVX ray whole pelvis irradiation and intracavitary radium irradiation (or simple total hysterectomy) The actuarial 5-year-survival rate was 46.0% in stage III, 9.4% in stage IV and 10.3% in recurrence. In stage III, the actuarial 5-year-survival rate in nine cases with external irradiation alone was (22.2%), in 44 cases with intracavitary irradiation and external irradiation 48.7%; in 14 cases with operation and external irradiation 57.1%. No five year survival was found in nine interrupted-irradation cases. Moderate complications in the rectum and/or the urinary bladder were found in eight of 67 (12%) irradiation-completed patients in stage III. Five 5-year-survival cases (two in stage IV and three in recurrence) were reported. (author)

  16. Technological advances in renal replacement therapy: five years and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Anjay; Nissenson, Allen R

    2009-12-01

    The worldwide epidemic of chronic kidney disease shows no signs of abating in the near future. Current dialysis forms of renal replacement therapy (RRT), even though successful in sustaining life and improving quality of life somewhat for patients with ESRD, have many limitations that result in still unacceptably high morbidity and mortality. Transplantation is an excellent option but is limited by the scarcity of organs. An ideal form of RRT would mimic the functions of natural kidneys and be transparent to the patient, as well as affordable to society. Recent advances in technology, although generally in early stages of development, might achieve these goals. The application of nanotechnology, microfluidics, bioreactors with kidney cells, and miniaturized sorbent systems to regenerate dialysate makes clinical reality seem closer than ever before. Finally, stem cells hold much promise, both for kidney disease and as a source of tissues and organs. In summary, nephrology is at an exciting crossroad with the application of innovative and novel technologies to RRT that hold considerable promise for the near future.

  17. Genomics and advances towards precision medicine for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Waes, Carter; Musbahi, Omar

    2017-10-01

    To provide a review of emerging knowledge from genomics and related basic science, preclinical, and clinical precision medicine studies in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). The Cancer Genome Atlas Network (TCGA) publications, PubMed-based literature review, and ClinicalTrials.gov. TCGA publications, PubMed, and ClinicalTrials.gov were queried for genomics and related basic science, preclinical, and developmental clinical precision medicine studies in HNSCC. TCGA reported comprehensive genomic analyses of 279 HNSCC, defining the landscape and frequency of chromosomal copy number alterations, mutations, and expressed genes that contribute to pathogenesis, prognosis, and resistance to therapy. This provides a road map for basic science and preclinical studies to identify key pathways in cancer and cells of the tumor microenvironment affected by these alterations, and candidate targets for new small molecule and biologic therapies. Recurrent chromosomal abnormalities, mutations, and expression of genes affecting HNSCC subsets are associated with differences in prognosis, and define molecules, pathways, and deregulated immune responses as candidates for therapy. Activity of molecularly targeted agents appears to be enhanced by rational combinations of these agents and standard therapies targeting the complex alterations that affect multiple pathways and mechanisms in HNSCC. NA.

  18. Integrative therapies for low back pain that include complementary and alternative medicine care: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizhakkeveettil, Anupama; Rose, Kevin; Kadar, Gena E

    2014-09-01

    Systematic review of the literature. To evaluate whether an integrated approach that includes different Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) therapies combined or CAM therapies combined with conventional medical care is more effective for the management of low back pain (LBP) than single modalities alone. LBP is one of the leading causes of disability worldwide, yet its optimal management is still unresolved. The PRISMA Statement guidelines were followed. The Cochrane Back Review Group scale was used to rate the quality of the studies found. Twenty-one studies were found that met the inclusion criteria. The CAM modalities used in the studies included spinal manipulative therapy, acupuncture, exercise therapy, physiotherapy, massage therapy, and a topical ointment. Twenty studies included acupuncture and/or spinal manipulative therapy. Nine high quality studies showed that integrative care was clinically effective for the management of LBP. Spinal manipulative therapy combined with exercise therapy and acupuncture combined with conventional medical care or with exercise therapy appears to be promising approaches to the management of chronic cases of LBP. There is support in the literature for integrated CAM and conventional medical therapy for the management of chronic LBP. Further research into the integrated management of LBP is clearly needed to provide better guidance for patients and clinicians.

  19. Orthotopic liver transplantation after the combined use of locoregional therapy and sorafenib for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoo EJ

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Eun Jin Yoo,1,* Hye Sun Shin,1,* Seung Up Kim,1,2,7 Dong Jin Joo,3,4 Jun Yong Park,1,2,7 Gi Hong Choi,3 Do Young Kim,1,2,7 Sang Hoon Ahn,1,2,7 Jinsil Seong,5 Myung Joo Koh,6 Kwang-Hyub Han,1,2,7 Chae Yoon Chon1,2,7 1Department of Internal Medicine, 2Institute of Gastroenterology, 3Department of Surgery, 4Research Institute for Transplantation, 5Department of Radiation Oncology, 6Department of Pathology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, South Korea; 7Liver Cirrhosis Clinical Research Center, Seoul, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: We herein report a patient with advanced hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent orthotopic liver transplantation after successful HCC downstaging that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria, using concurrent chemoradiation therapy with a combination of repeated hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC and sorafenib. A 52-year-old male was diagnosed with advanced hepatitis B virus-related HCC beyond the Milan criteria. He underwent concurrent chemoradiation therapy (50 Gy with 20 fractions over 5 weeks with HAIC using 5-fluorouracil at a dose of 500 mg/day, which was administered during the first and fifth weeks of radiation therapy as an initial treatment modality. This was followed by the combined use of HAIC using 5-fluorouracil (500 mg/m2 for 5 hours on days 1–3 and cisplatin (60 mg/m2 for 2 hours on day 2 every 4 weeks (twelve cycles and sorafenib (from the third to the twelfth cycle of HAIC to treat the remaining HCC. Because a remarkable decrease in the tumor burden that satisfied the University of California, San Francisco criteria was observed after these combination treatments, the patient underwent orthotopic liver transplantation with curative aim and survived for 11 months without evidence of HCC recurrence. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver transplantation

  20. [Surgical intensive care medicine. Current therapy concepts for septic diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederbichler, A D; Ipaktchi, K; Jokuszies, A; Hirsch, T; Altintas, M A; Handschin, A E; Busch, K H; Gellert, M; Steinau, H-U; Vogt, P M; Steinsträsser, L

    2009-10-01

    The clinical appearance of septic disorders is characterized by an enormous dynamic. The sepsis-induced dysbalance of the immune system necessitates immediate and aggressive therapeutic interventions to prevent further damage progression of the disease to septic shock and multiple organ failure. This includes supportive therapy to normalize and maintain organ and tissue perfusion as well as the identification of the infection focus. In cases where an infectious focus is identified, surgical source control frequently is a key element of the treatment strategy besides pharmacologic and supportive measures. The integrative approach of the management of septic patients requires rapid communication between the involved medical disciplines and the nursing personnel. Therefore, this article outlines current therapeutic concepts of septic diseases as well as central nursing aspects.

  1. Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medicines can treat diseases and improve your health. If you are like most people, you need to take medicine at some point in your life. You may need to take medicine every day, or you may only need to ...

  2. Perceptions of family members of palliative medicine and hospice patients who experienced music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Lisa M; Lagman, Ruth; Bates, Debbie; Edsall, Melissa; Eden, Patricia; Janaitis, Jessica; Rybicki, Lisa

    2017-06-01

    Evidence shows that music therapy aids in symptom management and improves quality of life for palliative medicine and hospice patients. The majority of previous studies have addressed patient needs, while only a few addressed the needs of family members. The primary purpose of this study was to understand family members' perceptions of music therapy experienced by a relative in palliative medicine or hospice. Patient self-reported scales and music therapist assessment of change were also investigated. Patients scored their symptoms (pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, and mood) before and after music therapy sessions. One family member present during the session assessed perceived effect on the patient's pain, anxiety, depression, shortness of breath, stress level, restlessness, comfort level, mood, and quality of life. The effect on family member's stress level, quality of life, and mood and helpfulness of the music therapy session for the patient and self were studied. Recommendations about future patient participation in music therapy and qualitative comments were also solicited. Fifty family member/patient dyads participated in the study. Family member perceptions were positive, with 82% of responders indicating improvement for self and patient in stress, mood, and quality of life; 80% rating the session as extremely helpful; and 100% of 49 recommending further music therapy sessions for the patient. Patients reported statistically significant improvement in pain, depression, distress, and mood scores. Family members of patients in palliative medicine and hospice settings reported an immediate positive impact of music therapy on the patient and on themselves. More research needs to be conducted to better understand the benefits of music therapy for family members.

  3. [Translational/regulatory science researches of NIHS for regenerative medicine and cellular therapy products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yoji

    2014-01-01

    In 2013, the Japanese Diet passed the Regenerative Medicine Promotion Act and the revisions to the Pharmaceutical Affairs Act, which was also renamed as the Therapeutic Products Act (TPA). One of the aims of the new/revised Acts is to promote the development and translation of and access to regenerative/cellular therapies. In the TPA, a product derived from processing cells is categorized as a subgroup of "regenerative medicine, cellular therapy and gene therapy products" (RCGPs), products distinct from pharmaceuticals and medical devices, allowing RCGPs to obtain a conditional and time- limited marketing authorization much earlier than that under the conventional system. To foster not only RCGPs, but also innovative pharmaceuticals and medical devices, the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare recently launched Translational Research Program for Innovative Pharmaceuticals, Medical Devices and RCGPs. This mini-review introduces contributions of the National Institute of Health Sciences (NIHS) to research projects on RCGPs in the Program.

  4. The Combination of Light and Stem Cell Therapies: A Novel Approach in Regenerative Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, Juanita; Moges, Helina; Wu, Xingjia; Ilev, Ilko; Waynant, Ronald; Longo, Leonardo

    2010-01-01

    Light therapy commonly referred to as low level laser therapy can alter cellular functions and clinical conditions. Some of the commonly reported in vitro and in vivo effects of light therapy include cellular proliferation, alterations in the inflammatory response to injury, and increases in mitochondrial respiration and adenosine triphosphate synthesis. Based on the known effects of light on cells and tissues in general and on reports in the last 5 years on the interaction of light with stem cells, evidence is mounting indicating that light therapy could greatly benefit stem cell regenerative medicine. Experiments on a variety of harvested adult stem cells demonstrate that light therapy enhances differentiation and proliferation of the cells and alters the expression of growth factors in a number of different types of adult stem cells and progenitors in vitro. It also has the potential to attenuate cytotoxic effects of drugs used to purge harvested autologous stem cells and to increase survival of transplanted cells.

  5. Complementary Therapies for Significant Dysfunction from Tinnitus: Treatment Review and Potential for Integrative Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Q. Wolever

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus is a prevalent and costly chronic condition; no universally effective treatment exists. Only 20% of patients who report tinnitus actually seek treatment, and when treated, most patients commonly receive sound-based and educational (SBE therapy. Additional treatment options are necessary, however, for nonauditory aspects of tinnitus (e.g., anxiety, depression, and significant interference with daily life and when SBE therapy is inefficacious or inappropriate. This paper provides a comprehensive review of (1 conventional tinnitus treatments and (2 promising complementary therapies that have demonstrated some benefit for severe dysfunction from tinnitus. While there has been no systematic study of the benefits of an Integrative Medicine approach for severe tinnitus, the current paper reviews emerging evidence suggesting that synergistic combinations of complementary therapies provided within a whole-person framework may augment SBE therapy and empower patients to exert control over their tinnitus symptoms without the use of medications, expensive devices, or extended programs.

  6. Advances in gene therapy of myocardial ischemia and the monitoring with molecular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Guopeng; Zhang Yongxue

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are harmful for people. Recent advances in understanding the molecular basis of cardiovascular diseases, together with some studies of the gene therapy on cardiovascular disorders, have offered possibilities for new treatments. Gene therapies have demonstrated potential usefulness in treating myocardial ischemia. Therefore, the monitoring of the expression of therapy gene and therapeutic efficacy has become an important issue. (authors)

  7. Medicinal folk recipes used as traditional phyto therapies in district Dera Ismail Khan, KPK, Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marwat, S.K.; Rehman, F.; Khan, M.A.; Ahmad, M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is based on the results of an ethno medicinal research work conducted in Dera Ismail Khan (D.I. Khan) District, Khyber Pakhtun Khwa (KPK), Pakistan, during May 2006 to March 2007. The study was focused for documentation of traditional knowledge of local people about the use of medicinal folk recipes of native plants. During field survey, questionnaires were used to interview the local inhabitants, older people including men and women both, who were familiar with traditional uses of indigenous plants. In total 40 new medicinal folk recipes of 26 plant species, belonging to 19 families were recorded. These folk recipes are used as traditional phyto therapies in the area. Plant specimens were identified, preserved and vouchers were deposited in the Department of Botany, Quaid-i-University Islamabad for future references. Results were systematically arranged by alphabetic order of botanical names followed by medicinal folk recipes. English name, local name, family name and voucher no., were listed. (author)

  8. Medicinal Leech Therapy for Glans Penis Congestion After Primary Bladder Exstrophy-Epispadias Repair in an Infant: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagenheim, Gavin N; Au, Jason; Gargollo, Patricio C

    2016-01-01

    Many postoperative complications have been reported after repair of classic bladder exstrophy. We present a case of medicinal leech therapy for glans penis congestion following exstrophy repair in an infant. A 2-week-old male with classic bladder exstrophy underwent complete primary repair. On postoperative day 1, he developed rapidly worsening glans penis venous congestion. Medicinal leech therapy was instituted with antibiotics and blood transfusions to maintain a hematocrit >30%. After 24 hours, venous congestion improved and therapy was discontinued. The patient's remaining hospital course was uncomplicated. Medicinal leeches are an effective therapy to relieve glans penis venous congestion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine on platelets, coagulative functions and inflammatory cytokines with ulcerative colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Xia Lei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the effects of combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine on platelets, coagulative functions and inflammatory cytokines in patients with ulcerative colitis (UC. Methods: A total of 267 patients with UC were collected. 137 patients were treated with combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine as experimental group and 130 patients were treated with only western medicine as controls. Platelet count, coagulation function indexes and inflammatory cytokines were measured before and 15 d after the treatment. Results: No significantly differences were found in all indexes before treatment between two groups. After different treatments, platelet count (PLT, platelet distribution width (PDW were significantly decreased in both groups, but mean platelet volumn (MPV were significantly increased than before treatment. PLT and PDW were significantly lower and MPV were significantly higher in experimental group than control group. Fibrinogen (Fib and D-dimer (DD decreased significantly after treatment. Fib and DD in experimental group were significantly lower than controls. No significantly differences were found in activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT and prothrobin time (PT. Tumor necrosisi factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin-6 (IL-6 and interleukin-8 (IL-8 decreased significantly in both group after treatment. TNF-毩, IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly lower in experimental group than controls. Conclusion: Combined therapy of traditional Chinese medicine and western medicine can more effectively improve the cogulation, fibrinolysis and inflammation in patients with UC than only western medicine therapy.

  10. Advances in nuclear medicine instrumentation: considerations in the design and selection of an imaging system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Links, J.M.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear medicine remains a vibrant and dynamic medical specialty because it so adeptly marries advances in basic science research, technology, and medical practice in attempting to solve patients' problems. As a physicist, it is my responsibility to identify or design new instrumentation and techniques, and to implement, validate, and help apply these new approaches in the practice of nuclear medicine. At Johns Hopkins, we are currently in the process of purchasing both a single-photon/coincidence tomographic imaging system and a dedicated positron emission tomography (PET) scanner. Given the exciting advances that have been made, but the conflicting opinions of manufacturers and colleagues alike regarding ''best'' choices, it seemed useful to review what is new now, and what is on the horizon, to help identify all of the important considerations in the design and selection of an imaging system. It is important to note that many of the ''advances'' described here are in an early stage of development, and may never make it to routine clinical practice. Further, not all of the advances are of equal importance, or have the same degree of general clinical applicability. Please also note that the references contained herein are for illustrative purposes and are not all-inclusive; no implication that those chosen are ''better'' than others not mentioned is intended. (orig.)

  11. Dosimetry-guided high-activity 131I therapy in patients with advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma: initial experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verburg, Frederik A.; Haenscheid, Heribert; Biko, Johannes; Hategan, Maria C.; Lassmann, Michael; Kreissl, Michael C.; Reiners, Christoph; Luster, Markus

    2010-01-01

    In patients with advanced differentiated thyroid carcinoma (DTC), therapy with the highest safe 131 I activity is desirable to maximize the tumour radiation dose yet avoid severe myelotoxicity. Recently, the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) published a standard operational procedure (SOP) for pre-therapeutic dosimetry in DTC patients incorporating a safety threshold of a 2 Gy absorbed dose to the blood as a surrogate for the red marrow. We sought to evaluate the safety and effectiveness in everyday tertiary referral centre practice of treating advanced DTC with high 131 I activities chosen primarily based on the results of dosimetry following this SOP. We retrospectively assessed toxicity as well as biochemical and scintigraphic response in our first ten patients receiving such therapy for advanced DTC. The 10 patients received a total of 13 dosimetrically guided treatments with a median administered activity of 14.0 GBq (range: 7.0-21.4 GBq) 131 I. After 6 of 13 treatments in 6 of 10 patients, short-term side effects of 131 I therapy, namely nausea, vomiting or sialadenitis, were observed. Leukocyte and platelet counts dropped significantly in the weeks after 131 I treatment, but returned to pre-treatment levels by 3 months post-therapy. Serum thyroglobulin levels decreased after 12 of 13 treatments (median reduction: 58%) in 9 of 10 patients. In our initial patient cohort, high-activity 131 I therapy for advanced DTC based on pre-therapeutic blood dosimetry following the EANM SOP was safe and well tolerated. Such treatment almost always produced a partial biochemical tumour response. (orig.)

  12. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A. (Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (US)) (and others)

    2008-03-15

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED >= 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted.

  13. Post-operative radiation therapy for locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Hideki; Sasaki, Ryohei; Yoshida, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    We retrospectively analyzed the treatment outcomes of post-operative radiation therapy (PORT) after radical surgery for locally advanced hypopharyngeal carcinoma. From August 2000 to July 2009, 62 patients with hypopharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma were treated with radical surgery followed by PORT in our institute. All patients were followed up for more than 6 months or until any events. All patients underwent a total laryngectomy and neck node dissection prior to PORT. There were 55 male and 7 female patients, with ages ranging from 45 to 82 years (median: 64). Pathologic stage was IVA in 55 and IVB in 7 patients. Irradiation dose ranged from 46 to 70 Gy (median: 60). Twenty-four patients received concurrent chemotherapy. The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 43 months. The 3-year overall and relapse-free survival rates were 56% and 51%, respectively. There was 1 patient with local recurrence and 9 patients with neck node recurrence, and the 3-year loco-regional control rate was 85%. There were 16 patients with distant metastases and the 3-year freedom form distant metastasis rate was 71%. Patients with extra nodal invasion (ENI) had a statistically poorer prognosis (p=0.008). The incidence rate of loco-regional recurrence and distant metastasis were statistically higher in the patients with ENI (p=0.017 and p=0.009, respectively). PORT with concurrent chemotherapy is deemed to be a standard treatment for such high-risk patients. Conformal and precise radiation treatment such as IMRT might also be considered for such high-risk patients in the near future. (author)

  14. Clinical benefit of palliative radiation therapy in advanced gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Michelle M.; Rana, Vishal; Janjan, Nora A.

    2008-01-01

    Background. Local progression of advanced gastric cancer often manifests as bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, or pain. We evaluated the magnitude and durability of palliation with radiotherapy (RT). Material and methods. From 1996 to 2004, 37 gastric cancer patients were treated with palliative RT (median dose 35Gy in 14 fractions). Nearly two-thirds of all patients received concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CRT). Index pre-treatment symptoms were gastric bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain in 54%, 43%, and 19% of patients, respectively. Results. The rates of control for bleeding, dysphagia/obstruction, and pain were 70% (14/20), 81% (13/16), and 86% (6/7), respectively. These symptoms were controlled without additional interventions for a median of 70%, 81%, and 49% of the patient's remaining life, respectively. Patients receiving CRT had a trend towards better median overall survival than those receiving RT alone (6.7 vs. 2.4 months, p=0.08). Lower (<41 Gy) biologically effective dose (BED, assuming an alpha/beta ratio of 10 for early responding tissues) predicted for poorer local control (6-month local control 70% vs. 100%, p=0.05) while T4 tumors had a trend towards inferior local control (6-month LC 56% vs. 100%, p=0.06). Discussion. Palliative RT controls symptoms for most of the remaining life in the majority of gastric cancer patients. The role of a higher dose of RT (BED ≥ 41 Gy), especially in patients with T4 tumors, remains to be established. In order to accurately define the role for radiotherapy in palliation of these symptoms, prospective randomized studies need to be conducted

  15. MCNP speed advances for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goorley, J.T.; McKinney, G.; Adams, K.; Estes, G.

    1998-04-01

    The Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) treatment planning process of the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center-M.I.T team relies on MCNP to determine dose rates in the subject's head for various beam orientations. In this time consuming computational process, four or five potential beams are investigated. Of these, one or two final beams are selected and thoroughly evaluated. Recent advances greatly decreased the time needed to do these MCNP calculations. Two modifications to the new MCNP4B source code, lattice tally and tracking enhancements, reduced the wall-clock run times of a typical one million source neutrons run to one hour twenty five minutes on a 200 MHz Pentium Pro computer running Linux and using the GNU FORTRAN compiler. Previously these jobs used a special version of MCNP4AB created by Everett Redmond, which completed in two hours two minutes. In addition to this 30% speedup, the MCNP4B version was adapted for use with Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) on personal computers running the Linux operating system. MCNP, using PVM, can be run on multiple computers simultaneously, offering a factor of speedup roughly the same as the number of computers used. With two 200 MHz Pentium Pro machines, the run time was reduced to forty five minutes, a 1.9 factor of improvement over the single Linux computer. While the time of a single run was greatly reduced, the advantages associated with PVM derive from using computational power not already used. Four possible beams, currently requiring four separate runs, could be run faster when each is individually run on a single machine under Windows NT, rather than using Linux and PVM to run one after another with each multiprocessed across four computers. It would be advantageous, however, to use PVM to distribute the final two beam orientations over four computers

  16. [Research advances in secondary development of Chinese patent medicines based on quality by design concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xing-Chu; Chen, Teng; Qu, Hai-Bin

    2017-03-01

    Quality by design (QbD) concept is an advanced pharmaceutical quality control concept. The application of QbD concept in the research and development of pharmaceutical processes of traditional Chinese medicines (TCM) mainly contains five parts, including the definition of critical processes and their evaluation criteria, the determination of critical process parameters and critical material attributes, the establishment of quantitative models, the development of design space, as well as the application and continuous improvement of control strategy. In this work, recent research advances in QbD concept implementation methods in the secondary development of Chinese patent medicines were reviewed, and five promising fields of the implementation of QbD concept were pointed out, including the research and development of TCM new drugs and Chinese medicine granules for formulation, modeling of pharmaceutical processes, development of control strategy based on industrial big data, strengthening the research of process amplification rules, and the development of new pharmaceutical equipment.. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  17. Acupuncture and Traditional Herbal Medicine Therapy Prevent Deliriumin Patients with Cardiovascular Disease in Intensive Care Units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto-Miyazaki, Jun; Ushikoshi, Hiroaki; Miyata, Shusaku; Miyazaki, Nagisa; Nawa, Takahide; Okada, Hideshi; Ojio, Shinsuke; Ogura, Shinji; Minatoguchi, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of combination therapy consisting of acupuncture and traditional herbal medicine (Kampo medicine) for reducing the incidence rate of delirium in patients with cardiovascular (CV) disease in ICUs. Twenty-nine patients who had been urgently admitted to the ICU in the control period were treated with conventional intensive care. Thirty patients in the treatment period received conventional therapy plus a combination therapy consisting of acupuncture and herbal medicine. Acupuncture treatment was performed once a day, and the herbal formula was administered orally three times a day during the first week of the ICU stay. The standard acupuncture points were GV20, Ex-HN3, HT7, LI4, Liv3, and KI3, and the main herbal preparation was Kamikihito. The incident rates of delirium, assessed using the confusion assessment method for ICU, in the treatment and control period were compared. The incidence rate of delirium was significantly lower in the treatment group than in the control group (6.6% vs. 37.9%, [Formula: see text]). Moreover, sedative drugs and non-pharmacological approaches against aggressive behavior of patients who were delirious were used less in the treatment group than in the control group. No serious adverse events were observed in the treatment group. Combination therapy consisting of acupuncture and herbal medicine was found to be effective in lowering the incidence of delirium in patients with CV disease in ICUs. Further studies with a large sample size and parallel randomized controlled design would be required to establish the effects of this therapy.

  18. [Advances in animal model and traditional Chinese medicine prevention in coronary microvascular dysfunction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lei; Liu, Jian-Xun; Ren, Jian-Xun; Guo, Hao; Lin, Cheng-Ren

    2017-01-01

    Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) is a common mechanism for some heart disease like cardiac X syndrome and no-reflow phenomenon after percutaneous coronary intervention(PCI). With the development of medical imageology, CMD has received increased attention. Animal model of CMD is indispensable tool for the research of pathogenesis and treatment evaluation, therefor choose an appropriate animal model is the first issue to carry out CMD research. Experimental and clinical studies have shown unique effectiveness of traditional Chinese medicine(TCM) in CMD therapy. Clarifying of the TCM therapeutic effect mechanisms and seeking an optimal solution of combination of traditional Chinese and western medicine will be the focus of future research. This paper reviewed the establishment and evaluation of CMD animal model, as well as the intervention study of TCM on CMD. The article aims to provide reference for the basic research of CMD and the TCM experimental study on CMD. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  19. Nuclear medicine in Uzbekistan and current status of radionuclide therapy in the country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rasulova, N.; Khodjibekova, M.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: The population of Uzbekistan is 26 million and to cater to this population we have only two nuclear medicine departments; one at the Clinical Centre for Surgery and the other at the Institute of Endocrinology, both situated in Tashkent, the capital city of Uzbekistan. Over the years through its own initiatives and through the support provided by several International Organizations including the IAEA, Uzbekistan has been able to marginally improve its nuclear medicine services. SPECT imaging was introduced through generous support from IAEA in the year 2001. As a result of this, the country is now able to provide modern in vivo nuclear medicine service to the population in a limited scale. At the Clinical Centre for Surgery we are able to provide gamma camera and SPECT imaging services to patients suffering from various nephro-urological, cardiac, neuro and oncological disorders. The other nuclear medicine centre at the Institute of Endocrinology does not have any modern imaging system. However it has been engaged in providing radionuclide therapy service for thyroid diseases like thyroid cancer and hyperthyroidism. From the year 1983 to 1999 the country has reported a total number of 6374 cases of Thyroid Cancer. This number is growing each year, for example the incidence of thyroid cancer in 1989 was 1.95 per 100,000, which has grown to 2.39 per 100,000 in 1999. While the Institute of Endocrinology provides therapeutic service to thyroid diseases, the main role of the Nuclear Medicine Department of Republic Specialized Center of Surgery is in following-up of patients after therapy by performing large dose I-131 whole body imaging, screening for metastases and for assessment of results of radioactive iodine therapy. Besides treating thyroid diseases with I-131 limited services are also available for treatment of polycythemia vera rubra with P-32 and radionuclide therapy for metastatic bone pain. Radionuclide therapy is growing rapidly around the world

  20. Adjuvant neutron therapy in complex treatment of patients with locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, V. A.; Velikaya, V. V.; Startseva, Zh. A.; Popova, N. O.; Goldberg, V. E.

    2017-09-01

    The study included 128 patients with stage T2-4N0-3M0 locally advanced breast cancer. All patients were divided into two groups. Group I (study group) consisted of 68 patients, who received neutron therapy, and group II (control group) comprised 60 patients, who received electron beam therapy. Neutron therapy was well tolerated by the patients and 1-2 grade radiation skin reactions were the most common. Neutron therapy was shown to be effective in multimodality treatment of the patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The 8-year recurrence-free survival rate in the patients with locally advanced breast cancer was 94.5 ± 4.1% after neutron therapy and 81.4 ± 5.9% after electron beam therapy (p = 0.05).

  1. Gender and academic medicine: a good pipeline of women graduates is not advancing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puljak, Livia; Kojundzic, Sanja Lovric; Sapunar, Damir

    2008-01-01

    Women are underrepresented in the higher levels of appointment in academic medicine, despite the so-called feminization of medicine. A 27-year (1979-2006) retrospective study was conducted regarding the success and advancement of women and men at the University of Split School of Medicine in Croatia. Data were collected from the school's archive, including number of women and men among applicants, enrollees, graduates, teachers, department chairs and the school management: high school grade averages and admission tests scores by applicant gender and gender-based graduation grade averages. The number and gender patterns of all employed and unemployed physicians in the Split-Dalmatia county were also collected. Men represent the minority among applicants, enrollees, and graduates, whereas women were in the minority among faculty, department chairs, and the school management across all 27 years. Graduation grades from high school and medical school showed that women were statistically better students, although the difference was slight. In the same geographic area, women are more often unemployed and less likely to specialize. More women are applying, enrolling and graduating from the University of Split School of Medicine. Women also perform statistically better on entrance exam and have better graduation grades, yet they remain a minority in faculty and leadership positions. A review of county-wise employment statistics revealed that women were more frequently unemployed and less likely to specialize in this study.

  2. Steady advance of stem cell therapies: report from the 2011 World Stem Cell Summit, Pasadena, California, October 3-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swan, Melanie

    2011-12-01

    Stem cell research and related therapies (including regenerative medicine and cellular therapies) could have a significant near-term impact on worldwide public health and aging. One reason is the industry's strong linkage between policy, science, industry, and patient advocacy, as was clear in the attendance and programming at the 7(th) annual World Stem Cell Summit held in Pasadena, California, October 3-5, 2011. A special conference session sponsored by the SENS Foundation discussed how stem cell therapies are being used to extend healthy life span. Stem cells are useful not only in cell-replacement therapies, but also in disease modeling, drug discovery, and drug toxicity screening. Stem cell therapies are currently being applied to over 50 diseases, including heart, lung, neurodegenerative, and eye disease, cancer, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Dozens of companies are developing therapeutic solutions that are in different stages of clinical use and clinical trials. Some high-profile therapies include Dendreon's Provenge for prostate cancer, Geron's first-ever embryonic stem cell trials for spinal cord injury, Fibrocell's laViv cellular therapy for wrinkles, and well-established commercial skin substitutes (Organogenesis' Apligraf and Advanced BioHealing's Dermagraft). Stem cell policy issues under consideration include medical tourism, standards for large-scale stem cell manufacturing, and lingering ethical debates over the use of embryonic stem cells. Contemporary stem cell science advances include a focus on techniques for the direct reprogramming of cells from one lineage to another without returning to pluripotency as an intermediary step, improved means of generating and characterizing induced pluripotent cells, and progress in approaches to neurodegenerative disease.

  3. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabán-Martinez Alberto J

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A case report—a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case—provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new “case reports” section to provide the busy clinician with a forum in which to document any authentic clinical case that provide educational value to current clinical practice. The aim is for this article type to be reviewed, wherever possible, by specialized Associate Editors for the journal, in order to provide rapid but thorough decision making. New ideas often garnered by and documented in case reports will support the advancement of medical science — one research note at a time.

  4. Advancing medicine one research note at a time: the educational value in clinical case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabán-Martinez, Alberto J; Beltrán, Wilfredo F García

    2012-07-06

    A case report--a brief written note that describes unique aspects of a clinical case--provides a significant function in medicine given its rapid, succinct, and educational contributions to scientific literature and clinical practice. Despite the growth of, and emphasis on, randomized clinical trials and evidenced-based medicine, case reports continue to provide novel and exceptional knowledge in medical education. The journal BMC Research Notes introduces a new "case reports" section to provide the busy clinician with a forum in which to document any authentic clinical case that provide educational value to current clinical practice. The aim is for this article type to be reviewed, wherever possible, by specialized Associate Editors for the journal, in order to provide rapid but thorough decision making. New ideas often garnered by and documented in case reports will support the advancement of medical science--one research note at a time.

  5. Opening plenary speaker: Human genomics, precision medicine, and advancing human health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Eric D

    2016-08-01

    Starting with the launch of the Human Genome Project in 1990, the past quarter-century has brought spectacular achievements in genomics that dramatically empower the study of human biology and disease. The human genomics enterprise is now in the midst of an important transition, as the growing foundation of genomic knowledge is being used by researchers and clinicians to tackle increasingly complex problems in biomedicine. Of particular prominence is the use of revolutionary new DNA sequencing technologies for generating prodigious amounts of DNA sequence data to elucidate the complexities of genome structure, function, and evolution, as well as to unravel the genomic bases of rare and common diseases. Together, these developments are ushering in the era of genomic medicine. Augmenting the advances in human genomics have been innovations in technologies for measuring environmental and lifestyle information, electronic health records, and data science; together, these provide opportunities of unprecedented scale and scope for investigating the underpinnings of health and disease. To capitalize on these opportunities, U.S. President Barack Obama recently announced a major new research endeavor - the U.S. Precision Medicine Initiative. This bold effort will be framed around several key aims, which include accelerating the use of genomically informed approaches to cancer care, making important policy and regulatory changes, and establishing a large research cohort of >1 million volunteers to facilitate precision medicine research. The latter will include making the partnership with all participants a centerpiece feature in the cohort's design and development. The Precision Medicine Initiative represents a broad-based research program that will allow new approaches for individualized medical care to be rigorously tested, so as to establish a new evidence base for advancing clinical practice and, eventually, human health.

  6. Harnessing Preclinical Molecular Imaging to Inform Advances in Personalized Cancer Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Peter M; Ebiana, Victoria A; Gosa, Laura; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Nathanson, David A

    2017-05-01

    Comprehensive molecular analysis of individual tumors provides great potential for personalized cancer therapy. However, the presence of a particular genetic alteration is often insufficient to predict therapeutic efficacy. Drugs with distinct mechanisms of action can affect the biology of tumors in specific and unique ways. Therefore, assays that can measure drug-induced perturbations of defined functional tumor properties can be highly complementary to genomic analysis. PET provides the capacity to noninvasively measure the dynamics of various tumor biologic processes in vivo. Here, we review the underlying biochemical and biologic basis for a variety of PET tracers and how they may be used to better optimize cancer therapy. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  7. Clinical holistic medicine: avoiding the Freudian trap of sexual transference and countertransference in psychodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-04-14

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an "idealized father" figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem "Freud's Trap". Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient's internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  8. Geographic mobility advances careers: study of the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) program for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Marsha R; Morahan, Page S; Dannels, Sharon A; McDade, Sharon A

    2013-11-01

    To explore whether geographic mobility is associated with career advancement of women in U.S. medical schools who are entering mid- to executive-level positions. Using an existing dataset of 351 participants in academic medicine who attended the Executive Leadership in Academic Medicine (ELAM) Program for Women (1996-2005) (adjusted to 345 participants in some analyses because data on initial faculty rank were missing), the authors conducted a quantitative study in 2009 to determine whether geographic mobility was associated with administrative promotion for those who relocated geographically (from employer while attending ELAM to employer at last job of record). Twenty-four percent of women (83/345) relocated geographically (movers) after attending ELAM. Moving had a positive association with career advancement (P = .001); odds for promotion were 168% higher for movers than for stayers [odds ratio Exp(β) = 2.684]. Movers attained higher administrative positions (P = .003), and more movers (60%) were promoted at the most recent job compared with stayers (40%) (P = .0001). Few movers changed city size; 70% already resided in large or urban cities where most medical schools are located. Age was not a barrier to mobility. Career advancement was not related to research reputation (National Institutes of Health grant award ranking) of participants' schools (either at time of attending ELAM or post-ELAM). Similar to findings outside academic medicine, 24% of women classified as geographic "movers" among midcareer faculty in medical schools attained career advantages. Psychosocial and socioeconomic factors underlying women's relocation decisions require additional study.

  9. Recruitment and Early Retention of Women with Advanced Breast Cancer in a Complementary and Alternative Medicine Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla Sikorskii

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available More than 80% of women with breast cancer are now reported to be using complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies during conventional treatment. A randomized clinical trial (RCT of reflexology with late stage breast cancer patients serves as the data source for this article. The purposes were to investigate: (i reasons for refusal to participate in a RCT of reflexology; (ii the differences between those who completed the baseline interview and those who dropped out before baseline; and (iii the utility of the Palliative Prognostic Score (PPS as a prognostic screening tool in minimizing early attrition (before baseline from the trial. Eligible women (N = 400 approached at 12 cancer centers in the Midwest had advanced breast cancer, were on chemotherapy or hormonal therapy, and had a PPS of 11 or less. Comparisons of those who dropped out early (N = 33 to those who stayed in the trial (N = 240 were carried out using Wilcoxon rank, t-, chi-squared and Fisher's exact tests. The reasons of being “too sick” or “overwhelmed” were given by less than 12% of the women who refused to participate. There was a higher early dropout rate among black women compared to other (primarily white women (P = .01. Cancer recurrence and metastasis, age, and the PPS were not predictive of early retention of women. Specialized techniques may be needed to ensure black women remain in the trial once consented. Women with advanced disease were likely to enter and remain in the trial despite deterioration in health.

  10. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Margalit, Danielle N., E-mail: dmargalit@partners.org [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States); Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K. [Harvard Cancer Consortium and Brigham and Women' s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)-conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher's exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01-0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique

  11. Technological Advancements and Error Rates in Radiation Therapy Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margalit, Danielle N.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Heckman, Kenneth; Vivenzio, Todd; Nissen, Kristopher; Wolfsberger, Luciant D.; Cormack, Robert A.; Mauch, Peter; Ng, Andrea K.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Technological advances in radiation therapy (RT) delivery have the potential to reduce errors via increased automation and built-in quality assurance (QA) safeguards, yet may also introduce new types of errors. Intensity-modulated RT (IMRT) is an increasingly used technology that is more technically complex than three-dimensional (3D)–conformal RT and conventional RT. We determined the rate of reported errors in RT delivery among IMRT and 3D/conventional RT treatments and characterized the errors associated with the respective techniques to improve existing QA processes. Methods and Materials: All errors in external beam RT delivery were prospectively recorded via a nonpunitive error-reporting system at Brigham and Women’s Hospital/Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Errors are defined as any unplanned deviation from the intended RT treatment and are reviewed during monthly departmental quality improvement meetings. We analyzed all reported errors since the routine use of IMRT in our department, from January 2004 to July 2009. Fisher’s exact test was used to determine the association between treatment technique (IMRT vs. 3D/conventional) and specific error types. Effect estimates were computed using logistic regression. Results: There were 155 errors in RT delivery among 241,546 fractions (0.06%), and none were clinically significant. IMRT was commonly associated with errors in machine parameters (nine of 19 errors) and data entry and interpretation (six of 19 errors). IMRT was associated with a lower rate of reported errors compared with 3D/conventional RT (0.03% vs. 0.07%, p = 0.001) and specifically fewer accessory errors (odds ratio, 0.11; 95% confidence interval, 0.01–0.78) and setup errors (odds ratio, 0.24; 95% confidence interval, 0.08–0.79). Conclusions: The rate of errors in RT delivery is low. The types of errors differ significantly between IMRT and 3D/conventional RT, suggesting that QA processes must be uniquely adapted for each technique

  12. Research advances in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease with polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qin; Wang, Shun-Chun; Ding, Kan

    2017-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the loss of patients' memory and their cognitive abilities and the mechanism is not completely clear. Although a variety of drugs have been approved for the AD treatment, substances which can prevent and cure AD are still in great need. The effect of polysaccharides from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) on anti-AD has gained great progress and attained more and more attention in recent years. In this review, research advances in TCM-polysaccharides on AD made in this decade are summarized. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Prospective regenerative medicine therapies for obstetric trauma-induced fecal incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Nina; Kumar, Lalit; Emmanuel, Anton; Day, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Fecal incontinence is a major public health issue that has yet to be adequately addressed. Obstetric trauma and injury to the anal sphincter muscles are the most common cause of fecal incontinence. New therapies are emerging aimed at repair or regeneration of sphincter muscle and restoration of continence. While regenerative medicine offers an attractive option for fecal incontinence there are currently no validated techniques using this approach. Although many challenges are yet to be resolved, the advent of regenerative medicine is likely to offer disruptive technologies to treat and possibly prevent the onset of this devastating condition. This article provides a review on regenerative medicine approaches for treating fecal incontinence and a critique of the current landscape in this area.

  14. Integrating motivational interviewing and narrative therapy to teach behavior change to family medicine resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshman, Lauren D; Combs, Gene N

    2016-05-01

    Motivational interviewing is a useful skill to address the common problem of patient ambivalence regarding behavior change by uncovering and strengthening a person's own motivation and commitment to change. The Family Medicine Milestones underline the need for clear teaching and monitoring of skills in communication and behavior change in Family Medicine postgraduate training settings. This article reports the integration of a motivational interviewing curriculum into an existing longitudinal narrative therapy-based curriculum on patient-centered communication. Observed structured clinical examination for six participants indicate that intern physicians are able to demonstrate moderate motivational interviewing skill after a brief 2-h workshop. Participant self-evaluations for 16 participants suggest a brief 2-h curriculum was helpful at increasing importance of learning motivational interviewing by participants, and that participants desire further training opportunities. A brief motivational interviewing curriculum can be integrated into existing communication training in a Family Medicine residency training program. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. General practitioners, complementary therapies and evidence-based medicine: the defence of clinical autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, J

    2000-12-01

    Amidst the substantial change currently gripping primary health care are two developments central to contemporary debate regarding the very nature, territory and identity of general practice - the integration of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) and the rise of evidence-based medicine (EBM). This paper reports findings from a study based upon 25 in-depth interviews with general practitioners (GPs) personally practising complementary therapies alongside more conventional medicine to treat their NHS patients. The paper outlines the GPs' perceptions of EBM, its relationship to their personal development of CAM, and their notions of good clinical practice more generally. Analysis of the GPs' accounts demonstrates how CAM can be seen as a useful resource with which some GPs defend their clinical autonomy from what they perceive to be the threat of EBM. Copyright 2000 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  16. The early career researcher's toolkit:translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products

    OpenAIRE

    Rafiq, Qasim A.; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I.; Wilson, Samantha L.; Patel, Asha K.; Barnes, Amanda L.; Adams, Christopher F.; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in...

  17. Challenges in implementing individualized medicine illustrated by antimetabolite therapy of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nersting, Jacob; Borst, Louise; Schmiegelow, Kjeld

    2011-01-01

    , but also multiplied the complex interaction of genetic and other laboratory parameters that can be used for therapy adjustments. Thus, with the advances in the laboratory techniques, post laboratory issues have become major obstacles for treatment individualization. Many of these challenges have been...

  18. Medicinal Plants of the Family Lamiaceae in Pain Therapy: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M. Uritu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, numerous side effects of synthetic drugs have lead to using medicinal plants as a reliable source of new therapy. Pain is a global public health problem with a high impact on life quality and a huge economic implication, becoming one of the most important enemies in modern medicine. The medicinal use of plants as analgesic or antinociceptive drugs in traditional therapy is estimated to be about 80% of the world population. The Lamiaceae family, one of the most important herbal families, incorporates a wide variety of plants with biological and medical applications. In this study, the analgesic activity, possible active compounds of Lamiaceae genus, and also the possible mechanism of actions of these plants are presented. The data highlighted in this review paper provide valuable scientific information for the specific implications of Lamiaceae plants in pain modulation that might be used for isolation of potentially active compounds from some of these medicinal plants in future and formulation of commercial therapeutic agents.

  19. Plasmas meet nanoparticles-where synergies can advance the frontier of medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong, M G; Keidar, M; Ostrikov, K

    2011-01-01

    Nanoparticles and low-temperature plasmas have been developed, independently and often along different routes, to tackle the same set of challenges in biomedicine. There are intriguing similarities and contrasts in their interactions with cells and living tissues, and these are reflected directly in the characteristics and scope of their intended therapeutic solutions, in particular their chemical reactivity, selectivity against pathogens and cancer cells, safety to healthy cells and tissues and targeted delivery to diseased tissues. Time has come to ask the inevitable question of possible plasma-nanoparticle synergy and the related benefits to the development of effective, selective and safe therapies for modern medicine. This perspective paper offers a detailed review of the strengths and weakenesses of nanomedicine and plasma medicine as a stand-alone technology, and then provides a critical analysis of some of the major opportunities enabled by synergizing nanotechnology and plasma technology. It is shown that the plasma-nanoparticle synergy is best captured through plasma nanotechnology and its benefits for medicine are highly promising.

  20. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBERS: W81XWH-14-1-0554 TITLE: Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...Dr. Nora M. Navone CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center 1515 Holcombe Blvd. Houston, TX 77030-4009...COVERED 09/22/2016-09/21/2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER N/A Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced

  1. Systemic therapy in younger and elderly patients with advanced biliary cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McNamara, Mairéad Geraldine; Bridgewater, John; Lopes, Andre

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Outcomes in younger (ABC) receiving palliative chemotherapy are unclear. This study assessed outcomes in those receiving monotherapy or combination therapy in thirteen prospective systemic-therapy trials. METHODS......: Multivariable analysis explored the impact of therapy on progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in two separate age cohort groups: ... = 0.58, P = 0.66) or OS (P = 0.18, P = 0.75). CONCLUSIONS: In ABC, younger patients are rare, and survival in elderly patients in receipt of systemic therapy for advanced disease, whether monotherapy or combination therapy, is similar to that of non-elderly patients, therefore age alone should...

  2. RIs used in diagnosis and therapy in nuclear medicine and new manufacturing process of RIs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Yasuki; Hashimoto, Kazuyuki

    2014-01-01

    Although various types of RIs are utilized in the field of nuclear medicine, their stable supply in the future poses anxiety worldwide. Taking up Tc-99m, which is most widely used in diagnosis in nuclear medicine, as an example, this paper introduces the condition to make RIs available in nuclear medicine as well as the worldwide challenge to their stable supply. In the following step, this paper introduces the innovative manufacturing process of RIs that is under development in Japan, in which undermentioned various types of RIs are manufactured in an identical facility (accelerator), although both nuclear reactor and accelerator have been used for manufacturing/supplying various types of RIs up to now: (1) Mo-99 as the parent nuclide of Tc-99m, (2) Cu-67, whose manufacturing process is urgently desired as the RI to enable simultaneous diagnosis and therapy, and (3) Y-90, Cu-64, and Sc-47, which are expected for use in new nuclear medicine based on the creation of new medicines. It also describes the future challenge in Japan to the construction of a prototype accelerator. (A.O.)

  3. Advanced technologies of cardiovascular nuclear medicine and their evaluation in clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murata, Hajime; Iio, Masahiro; Toyama, Hinako.

    1981-01-01

    Currently available advanced methods of cardiovascular nuclear medicine for the diagnosis of ischemic heart disease were studied. The methods included the multigate method by a large capacity gamma camera-computer (128 KW memory with multilayer disc) system which made it possible to acquire the data of either the first pass study or the equilibrium study in ''image mode''. Analyzed data were displayed on a color CRT using our moving image system (MIS) and dynamic image thus obtained serve to help for the high sensitive observation of the regional wall motion as well as the global function of the ventricles. Myocardial tomography by a 7 pinhole collimator designed by us was also reported. The myocardial tomogram obtained was proven to show more sensitivity than two dimensional myocardial scan by the conventional collimator to detect smaller lesion and the lesions at the inferior or posterior wall of the left ventricle. The cardiovascular nuclear medicine with recent advanced technologies was thought to be sensitive and useful method for the diagnosis of the ventricular performance and the myocardial ischemia. (author)

  4. Canadians' support for radical life extension resulting from advances in regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragojlovic, Nick

    2013-04-01

    This paper explores Canadian public perceptions of a hypothetical scenario in which a radical increase in life expectancy results from advances in regenerative medicine. A national sample of 1231 adults completed an online questionnaire on stem cell research and regenerative medicine, including three items relating to the possibility of Canadians' average life expectancy increasing to 120 years by 2050. Overall, Canadians are strongly supportive of the prospect of extended lifespans, with 59% of the sample indicating a desire to live to 120 if scientific advances made it possible, and 47% of respondents agreeing that such increases in life expectancy are possible by 2050. The strongest predictors of support for radical life extension are individuals' general orientation towards science and technology and their evaluation of its plausibility. These results contrast with previous research, which has suggested public ambivalence for biomedical life extension, and point to the need for more research in this area. They suggest, moreover, that efforts to increase public awareness about anti-aging research are likely to increase support for the life-extending consequences of that research program. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Case Study of Oriental Medicine Treatment with Acupotomy Therapy of the Peroneal Nerve Palsy through Ultrasound Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Sungha

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: In order to estimate clinical effects of Oriental Medicine Treatment with acupotomy therapy of Peroneal nerve Palsy. Methods: From 10th June, 2010 to 19th June, 2010, 1 female patient diagnosed as Peroneal nerve Palsy(clinical diagnosed was treated with general oriental medicine therapy (acupuncture, pharmacopuncture,moxibustion, cupping, physical therapy, herbal medication and acupotomy. Results: The patient's left foot drop was remarkably improved. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that oriental medical treatment with acuputomy therapy has notable effect in improving symptoms of peroneal nerve palsy. as though we had not wide experience in this treatment, more research is needed.

  6. Herbal therapy for advanced breast cancer. Personal experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: Between 1995 and 2001, 100 patients with adv lnced breast ... treated herbal therapy following palliative mastectorr:y. ... Referral and Teaching Hospital in Kenya between ... metastases in bone, liver and lungs were destroyed.

  7. Development of an Advanced Injectable Therapy for Ischemic Vascular Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    14. ABSTRACT Cardiovascular diseases are the most common causes of death for Americans and it is estimated that 20% of the population over 65 years of...therapies due to overall poor health or diffuse vascular disease. A promising approach to this problem is to induce the growth of new vessels using...angiogenic therapy with growth factors to restore flow to the ischemic tissues. Unfortunately, many clinical trials using growth factors for treating

  8. The use of complementary and alternative medicines among patients with locally advanced breast cancer – a descriptive study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakovitch Eileen

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complementary and alternative medicine (CAM use is common among cancer patients. This paper reviews the use of CAM in a series of patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC. Methods Women with LABC attending a specialist clinic at a single Canadian cancer centre were identified and approached. Participants completed a self-administered survey regarding CAM usage, beliefs associated with CAM usage, views of their risks of developing recurrent cancer and of dying of breast cancer. Responses were scored and compared between CAM users and non-users. Results Thirty-six patients were approached, 32 completed the questionnaire (response rate 89%. Forty-seven percent of LABC patients were identified as CAM users. CAM users were more likely to be younger, married, in a higher socioeconomic class and of Asian ethnicity than non-users. CAM users were likely to use multiple modalities simultaneously (median 4 with vitamins being the most popular (60%. Motivation for CAM therapy was described as, "assisting their body to heal" (75%, to 'boost the immune system' (56% and to "give a feeling of control with respect to their treatment" (56%. CAM therapy was used concurrently with conventional treatment in 88% of cases, however, 12% of patients felt that CAM could replace their conventional therapy. Psychological evaluation suggests CAM users perceived their risk of dying of breast cancer was similar to that of the non-Cam group (33% vs. 35%, however the CAM group had less severe anxiety and depression. Conclusion The motivation, objectives and benefits of CAM therapy in a selected population of women with LABC are similar to those reported for women diagnosed with early stage breast cancer. CAM users display less anxiety and depression and are less likely to believe they will die of their breast cancer. However the actual benefit to overall and disease free survival has yet to be demonstrated, as well as the possible interactions with

  9. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly & Cushing Disease Paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Anthony Mooney

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  10. Advancing Treatment of Pituitary Adenomas through Targeted Molecular Therapies: The Acromegaly and Cushing Disease Paradigms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, Michael A; Simon, Elias D; Little, Andrew S

    2016-01-01

    The current treatment of pituitary adenomas requires a balance of conservative management, surgical resection, and in select tumor types, molecular therapy. Acromegaly treatment is an evolving field where our understanding of molecular targets and drug therapies has improved treatment options for patients with excess growth hormone levels. We highlight the use of molecular therapies in this disease process and advances in this field, which may represent a paradigm shift for the future of pituitary adenoma treatment.

  11. Personalizing Therapy in Advanced Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villaruz, Liza C.; Burns, Timothy F.; Ramfidis, Vasilis S.; Socinski, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The recognition that non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is not a single disease entity, but rather a collection of distinct molecularly driven neoplasms, has permanently shifted the therapeutic landscape of NSCLC to a personalized approach. This personalization of NSCLC therapy is typified by the dramatic response rates seen in EGFR mutant NSCLC when treated with targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy and in ALK translocation–driven NSCLC when treated with ALK inhibitors. Targeted therapeutic approaches in NSCLC necessitate consideration of more invasive biopsy techniques aimed at providing sufficient tissue for both histological determination and molecular profiling in all patients with stage IV disease both at the time of diagnosis and at the time of disease progression. Comprehensive genotyping efforts have identified oncogenic drivers in 62% lung adenocarcinomas and an increasing proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the lung. The identification of these oncogenic drivers and the triage of patients to clinical trials evaluating novel targeted therapeutic approaches will increasingly mold a landscape of personalized lung cancer therapy where each genotype has an associated targeted therapy. This review outlines the state of personalized lung cancer therapy as it pertains to individual NSCLC genotypes. PMID:24258572

  12. Radiation therapy of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer and hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Minoru; Fujiwara, Kazuhisa; Hayakawa, Katsumi; Hida, Shuichi

    1994-01-01

    Ten patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy and hormone therapy to improve tumor control and survival. Eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer were treated with radiotherapy to improve their quality of life. Local control of the tumor was achieved in 9 of 10 patients with newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer. Five of eight patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer obtained improved quality of life. Combined radiotherapy and hormone therapy were effective in the treatment of newly diagnosed, advanced prostatic cancer, and radiotherapy was useful for improving the quality of life of patients with hormonally relapsed prostatic cancer. (author)

  13. Treatment of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: The Role of Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johung, Kimberly; Saif, Muhammad Wasif; Chang, Bryan W.

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains associated with an extremely poor prognosis. Surgical resection can be curative, but the majority of patients present with locally advanced or metastatic disease. Treatment for patients with locally advanced disease is controversial. Therapeutic options include systemic therapy alone, concurrent chemoradiation, or induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. We review the evidence to date regarding the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC), as well as evolving strategies including the emerging role of targeted therapies. We propose that if radiation is used for patients with LAPC, it should be delivered with concurrent chemotherapy and following a period of induction chemotherapy.

  14. Emerging Glycolysis Targeting and Drug Discovery from Chinese Medicine in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyu Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-targeted therapy has been developed for cancer chemoprevention and treatment. Cancer cells have different metabolic properties from normal cells. Normal cells mostly rely upon the process of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation to produce energy whereas cancer cells have developed an altered metabolism that allows them to sustain higher proliferation rates. Cancer cells could predominantly produce energy by glycolysis even in the presence of oxygen. This alternative metabolic characteristic is known as the “Warburg Effect.” Although the exact mechanisms underlying the Warburg effect are unclear, recent progress indicates that glycolytic pathway of cancer cells could be a critical target for drug discovery. With a long history in cancer treatment, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM is recognized as a valuable source for seeking bioactive anticancer compounds. A great progress has been made to identify active compounds from herbal medicine targeting on glycolysis for cancer treatment. Herein, we provide an overall picture of the current understanding of the molecular targets in the cancer glycolytic pathway and reviewed active compounds from Chinese herbal medicine with the potentials to inhibit the metabolic targets for cancer treatment. Combination of TCM with conventional therapies will provide an attractive strategy for improving clinical outcome in cancer treatment.

  15. Advances of reporter gene monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiang; Yin Hongyan; Zhang Yifan

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell therapy research has made great progress, demonstrating a broad application prospects. However, stem cell therapy as a new disease treatment, there are still many problems to be solved. Reporter gene imaging is a rapid development in recent years, a non-invasive, sensitive method of monitoring of stem cells, in particular radionuclide reporter gene imaging has high sensitivity and specificity of the advantages of strong and can carry out imaging of deep tissue and repeat imaging, is a tracer in vivo conditions, the most promising stem cell transplantation technique, showing good prospects for development. (authors)

  16. Advances of reporter gene imaging monitoring stem cell therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pei Zhijun; Zhang Yongxue

    2010-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation in the treatment of various tissue damage or degenerative diseases are research hotspots both at home and abroad. However, ignorance of the homing, differentiation and functional expression of the stem cell in vivo influence the further development of stem cell therapy. As an important component of molecular imaging technology, reporter gene imaging dynamically monitors the change of stem cell in vivo via monitoring the expression of transfected reporter gene. This paper briefly describes the latest research progress and the future development trend of the monitoring of reporter gene imaging in stem cell therapy in vivo. (authors)

  17. The Quintessence of Traditional Chinese Medicine: Syndrome and Its Distribution among Advanced Cancer Patients with Constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung-Wah Cheng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Constipation is a common problem in advanced cancer patients; however, specific clinical guidelines on traditional Chinese medicine (TCM syndrome (Zhang are not yet available. In this cross-sectional study, the TCM syndromes distribution and their common symptoms and signs among 225 constipated advanced cancer patients were determined. Results showed that 127 patients (56.4% and 7 patients (3.1% were in deficient and excessive patterns, respectively, while 91 patients (40.4% were in deficiency-excess complex. The distributions of the five syndromes were: Qi deficiency (93.3%, Qi stagnation (40.0%, blood (Yin deficiency (28.9%, Yang deficiency (22.2%, and excess heat (5.8%. Furthermore, age, functional status, and level of blood haemoglobin were factors related to the type of TCM syndrome. A TCM prescription with the functions on replenishing the Deficiency, redirecting the flow of Qi stagnation and moistening the dryness caused by the blood (Yin deficiency can be made for the treatment of advance cancer patients with constipation. Robust trials are urgently needed for further justifying its efficacy and safety in evidence-based approaches.

  18. Precision Medicine and Advancing Genetic Technologies—Disability and Human Rights Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisling de Paor

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and technological developments are propelling genetics and genetic technologies into the public sphere. Scientific and technological innovation is becoming more refined, resulting in an increase in the availability and use of genetic testing, and other cutting edge genetic technologies, including gene editing. These genetic advances not only signal a growing trend towards precision medicine, but also provoke consideration of the protection of genetic information as an emerging human rights concern. Particular ethical and legal issues arise from a disability perspective, including the potential for discrimination and privacy violations. In consideration of the intersection of genetics and disability, this article highlights the significant concerns raised as genetic science and technology advances, and the consequences for disability rights, particularly the core concepts of non-discrimination, and respect for diversity and difference. On examining international human rights perspectives, it looks particularly at the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities and how it may be used to guide best practice in this area. With an acknowledgement of historical abuses of genetic science, this article highlights the need to maintain caution as to the potential consequences of advancing genetic technologies on persons with disabilities and indeed on society as a whole.

  19. Interventional therapy of advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiliang; Fan Ye; Cao Jun; Yan Liping; Yang Ya

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical efficacy of intraarterial infusion chemotherapy in patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer. Methods: From February 2000 to March 2003, 18 patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer were treated with interaarterial chemotherapy (IAC). The Seldinger's technique was used in all patients. IAC was administered for 2-3 courses every 3-4 weeks for each patient. Results: The procedure was successfully performed in all 18 patients including one with a complete response, 12 of a partial response, none in 3, and with progression in 2. The overall response rate was 72.2%. The frequent adverse effects were fever, leukopenia, nausea, and vomiting but no severe complication occurred. Conclusion: Intraarterial infusion chemotherapy is a safe, simple, complication-free and effective in the patients with advanced and/or recurrent breast cancer. (authors)

  20. The importance of clinical mistletoe cancer therapy and korean mistletoe pharmacopuncture preparation development and application possibility for oriental medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ok-Byung Choi

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Mistletoe extracts have been in use for around 85 years, predominantly in the area of cancer therapy. Today mistletoe preparations are among the most prescribed drugs in cancer medicine, thus constituting a standard biological therapy in the area of oncology. The purpose of this study is to analyze the practical implications of mistletoe cancer therapy, their clinical status, their preparation techniques and companies. Contents : Mistletoe therapy for cancer has been developed within the context of anthroposophical medicine. One major effect of mistletoe extract is that it stimulates the immune system and cancer defences. In Germany, a total of eight different mistletoe preparations are available, five developed by Anthroposophic Medicine and three evolved from research in phytotherapy. Therapy always consists of an introductory phase in order to test the patient′s tolerance, find the right dosage and choose the most suitable preparation. This paper covers the background of mistletoe medical plant materials, mistletoe therapy for cancer, the anthroposophical medicine and clinical research, the practical regulation of treatment, preparation of mistletoe drugs. Result & suggestion : Mistletoe extracts are a complementary teratment of cancer, widely used in intergrative cancer care. The study of the integration of korean mistletoe extracts to oriental cancer medicine, its development and feasibility in Korea are urgently needed. The products, substances, compositions of european mistletoe drugs are very similar to those of oriental medicine theory. Applying the mistletoe cancer therapy and its preparation techniques to oriental medicine, the herbal acupuncture preparation should be modernized and korean mistletoe products are to be developed. To this end, government and herbal acupuncture society need to interact each other for the development of oriental mistletoe cancer medicine.

  1. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Søren Ventegodt

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM, salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference. This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy.

  2. Clinical Holistic Medicine: Avoiding the Freudian Trap of Sexual Transference and Countertransference in Psychodynamic Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventegodt, Søren; Kandel, Isack; Merrick, Joav

    2008-01-01

    Sexual transference and countertransference can make therapy slow and inefficient when libidinous gratification becomes more important for both the patient and the therapist than real therapeutic progress. Sexual transference is normal when working with a patient's repressed sexuality, but the therapeutic rule of not touching often hinders the integration of sexual traumas, as this needs physical holding. So the patient is often left with sexual, Oedipal energies projected onto the therapist as an “idealized father” figure. The strong and lasting sexual desire for the therapist without any healing taking place can prolong therapy for many years, as it often does in psychodynamic psychotherapy and psychoanalysis. We call this problem “Freud's Trap”. Freud used intimate bodywork, such as massage, in the beginning of his career, but stopped, presumably for moral and political reasons. In the tradition of psychoanalysis, touch is therefore not allowed. Recent research in clinical holistic medicine (CHM), salutogenesis, and sexual healing has shown that touch and bodywork (an integral part of medicine since Hippocrates) are as important for healing as conversational therapy. CHM allows the patient to regress spontaneously to early sexual and emotional traumas, and to heal the deep wounds on body, soul, and sexual character from arrested psychosexual development. CHM treats sexuality in therapy more as the patient’s internal affair (i.e., energy work) and less as a thing going on between the patient and the therapist (i.e., transference). This accelerates healing, and reduces sexual transference and the need for mourning at the end of therapy. PMID:18454245

  3. Ketogenic Diets: New Advances for Metabolism-Based Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossoff, Eric H.; Hartman, Adam L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review Despite myriad anticonvulsants available and in various stages of development, there are thousands of children and adults with epilepsy worldwide still refractory to treatment and not candidates for epilepsy surgery. Many of these patients will now turn to dietary therapies such as the ketogenic diet, medium-chain triglyceride (MCT) diet, modified Atkins diet, and low glycemic index treatment. Recent Findings In the past several years, neurologists are finding new indications to use these dietary treatments, perhaps even as first-line therapy, including infantile spasms, myoclonic-astatic epilepsy (Doose syndrome), Dravet syndrome, and status epilepticus (including FIRES syndrome). Adults are also one of the most rapidly growing populations being treated nowadays; a group of patients previously not typically offered these treatments. In 2009, two controlled trials of the ketogenic diet were published as well as an International Expert Consensus Statement on dietary treatment of epilepsy. Ketogenic diets are also now being increasingly studied for neurologic conditions other than epilepsy, including Alzheimer disease and cancer. Insights from basic science research have helped elucidate the mechanisms by which metabolism-based therapy may be helpful, both in terms of an anticonvulsant and possibly neuroprotective effect. Summary Dietary therapy for epilepsy continues to grow in popularity worldwide, with expanding use for adults and conditions other than epilepsy. PMID:22322415

  4. Concurrent Complementary and Alternative Medicine CAM and Conventional Rehabilitation Therapy in the Management of Children with Developmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Yeon Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the concurrent use of conventional rehabilitations and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM therapies for the long-term management of children with developmental disorders (DDs. Methods. The parents or caregivers of 533 children with DDs (age range, 1–19 years who visited the rehabilitation centers were surveyed using in depth face-to-face interviews. Results. Of the 533 patients enrolled, 520 completed the questionnaire (97% response rate. A total of 292 (56% children were receiving multiple therapies, more than two conventional rehabilitations and CAM, at the time of the interview. A total of 249 (48% children reported lifetime CAM use, 23% used CAM at the time of the interview, and 62% of the patients planned to use CAM therapy in the future. Conventional rehabilitation therapies used at the time of the interview included physical therapy (30%, speech therapy (28%, and occupational therapy (19%, and the CAM therapies included herbal medicine (5% and acupuncture or moxibustion (3%. The respondents indicated that in the future they planned to use acupuncture or moxibustion (57%, occupational therapy (18%, cognitive behavioral therapy (16%, speech therapy (10%, and physical therapy (8%. Conclusion. Concurrent management as conventional rehabilitations and CAM therapies is widely used by children with DDs.

  5. Advancing Drug Discovery and Development from Active Constituents of Yinchenhao Tang, a Famous Traditional Chinese Medicine Formula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aihua Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM formula has been playing a very important role in health protection and disease control for thousands of years. Guided by TCM syndrome theories, formula are designed to contain a combination of various kinds of crude drugs that, when combined, will achieve synergistic efficacy. However, the precise mechanism of synergistic action remains poorly understood. One example is a famous TCM formula Yinchenhao Tang (YCHT, whose efficacy in treating hepatic injury (HI and Jaundice syndrome, has recently been well established as a case study. We also conducted a systematic analysis of synergistic effects of the principal compound using biochemistry, pharmacokinetics and systems biology, to explore the key molecular mechanisms. We had found that the three component (6,7-dimethylesculetin (D, geniposide (G, and rhein (R combination exerts a more robust synergistic effect than any one or two of the three individual compounds by hitting multiple targets. They can regulate molecular networks through activating both intrinsic and extrinsic pathways to synergistically cause intensified therapeutic effects. This paper provides an overview of the recent and potential developments of chemical fingerprinting coupled with systems biology advancing drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies for the YCHT.

  6. Intestinal Stem Cells to Advance Drug Development, Precision, and Regenerative Medicine: A Paradigm Shift in Translational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochel, Jonathan P; Jergens, Albert E; Kingsbury, Dawn; Kim, Hyun Jung; Martín, Martín G; Allenspach, Karin

    2017-12-12

    Recent advances in our understanding of the intestinal stem cell niche and the role of key signaling pathways on cell growth and maintenance have allowed the development of fully differentiated epithelial cells in 3D organoids. Stem cell-derived organoids carry significant levels of proteins that are natively expressed in the gut and have important roles in drug transport and metabolism. They are, therefore, particularly relevant to study the gastrointestinal (GI) absorption of oral medications. In addition, organoids have the potential to serve as a robust preclinical model for demonstrating the effectiveness of new drugs more rapidly, with more certainty, and at lower costs compared with live animal studies. Importantly, because they are derived from individuals with different genotypes, environmental risk factors and drug sensitivity profiles, organoids are a highly relevant screening system for personalized therapy in both human and veterinary medicine. Lastly, and in the context of patient-specific congenital diseases, orthotopic transplantation of engineered organoids could repair and/or replace damaged epithelial tissues reported in various GI diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease, cystic fibrosis, and tuft enteropathy. Ongoing translational research on organoids derived from dogs with naturally occurring digestive disorders has the potential to improve the predictability of preclinical models used for optimizing the therapeutic management of severe chronic enteropathies in human patients.

  7. Radiation therapy using the wildlife medicine: a reasoned obtained study in cases of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vettorato, Michel de Campos; Fernandes, Marco Antonio Rodrigues; Vulcano, Luis Carlos; Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho

    2016-01-01

    The cancer is the kind of tumor that affects both humans and animals and is responsible for more deaths worldwide. In wildlife, cancer is a problem found most often in zoo animals. Thus veterinary oncologists have researched and developed therapeutic approaches to many types of cancer over the years in both curative and palliative therapies including therein the application of radiation. The basic principle of radiotherapy is the effect of ionizing radiation on the tumor cells, causing them to death. However, its application in veterinary medicine for wildlife is not much reported in the literature, especially in Brazil. This study aims to describe and compare some of radiotherapy applications in different species of wildlife looking to improve her knowledge in veterinary medicine through a brief literature review. After the descriptions and comparisons, it is concluded that despite the number of cases taken for this study, all the cases mentioned had satisfactory results using radiation therapy and all the presented cases provided relevant information that can guide future researchers in this area, thus improving knowledge of this therapy and improve the quality of life of animals. (author)

  8. Advances in Bone Marrow Stem Cell Therapy for Retinal Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Susanna S.; Moisseiev, Elad; Bauer, Gerhard; Anderson, Johnathon D.; Grant, Maria B.; Zam, Azhar; Zawadzki, Robert J.; Werner, John S.; Nolta, Jan A.

    2016-01-01

    The most common cause of untreatable vision loss is dysfunction of the retina. Conditions, such as age-related macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma remain leading causes of untreatable blindness worldwide. Various stem cell approaches are being explored for treatment of retinal regeneration. The rationale for using bone marrow stem cells to treat retinal dysfunction is based on preclinical evidence showing that bone marrow stem cells can rescue degenerating and ischemic retina. These stem cells have primarily paracrine trophic effects although some cells can directly incorporate into damaged tissue. Since the paracrine trophic effects can have regenerative effects on multiple cells in the retina, the use of this cell therapy is not limited to a particular retinal condition. Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells are being explored in early clinical trials as therapy for various retinal conditions. These bone marrow stem cells include mesenchymal stem cells, mononuclear cells and CD34+ cells. Autologous therapy requires no systemic immunosuppression or donor matching. Intravitreal delivery of CD34+ cells and mononuclear cells appears to be tolerated and is being explored since some of these cells can home into the damaged retina after intravitreal administration. The safety of intravitreal delivery of mesenchymal stem cells has not been well established. This review provides an update of the current evidence in support of the use of bone marrow stem cells as treatment for retinal dysfunction. The potential limitations and complications of using certain forms of bone marrow stem cells as therapy are discussed. Future directions of research include methods to optimize the therapeutic potential of these stem cells, non-cellular alternatives using extracellular vesicles, and in vivo high-resolution retinal imaging to detect cellular changes in the retina following cell therapy. PMID:27784628

  9. The ConNECT Framework: a model for advancing behavioral medicine science and practice to foster health equity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Kassandra I; Sly, Jamilia; Ashing, Kimlin; Fleisher, Linda; Gil-Rivas, Virginia; Ford, Sabrina; Yi, Jean C; Lu, Qian; Meade, Cathy D; Menon, Usha; Gwede, Clement K

    2017-02-01

    Health disparities persist despite ongoing efforts. Given the United States' rapidly changing demography and socio-cultural diversity, a paradigm shift in behavioral medicine is needed to advance research and interventions focused on health equity. This paper introduces the ConNECT Framework as a model to link the sciences of behavioral medicine and health equity with the goal of achieving equitable health and outcomes in the twenty-first century. We first evaluate the state of health equity efforts in behavioral medicine science and identify key opportunities to advance the field. We then discuss and present actionable recommendations related to ConNECT's five broad and synergistic principles: (1) Integrating Context; (2) Fostering a Norm of Inclusion; (3) Ensuring Equitable Diffusion of Innovations; (4) Harnessing Communication Technology; and (5) Prioritizing Specialized Training. The framework holds significant promise for furthering health equity and ushering in a new and refreshing era of behavioral medicine science and practice.

  10. The early career researcher's toolkit: translating tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell therapy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafiq, Qasim A; Ortega, Ilida; Jenkins, Stuart I; Wilson, Samantha L; Patel, Asha K; Barnes, Amanda L; Adams, Christopher F; Delcassian, Derfogail; Smith, David

    2015-11-01

    Although the importance of translation for the development of tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies is widely recognized, the process of translation is less well understood. This is particularly the case among some early career researchers who may not appreciate the intricacies of translational research or make decisions early in development which later hinders effective translation. Based on our own research and experiences as early career researchers involved in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine translation, we discuss common pitfalls associated with translational research, providing practical solutions and important considerations which will aid process and product development. Suggestions range from effective project management, consideration of key manufacturing, clinical and regulatory matters and means of exploiting research for successful commercialization.

  11. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries; Yielder, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board

  12. Establishing radiation therapy advanced practice in New Zealand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleman, Karen; Jasperse, Marieke; Herst, Patries [Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand); Yielder, Jill [University of Auckland, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Radiation Therapy, University of Otago, Wellington (New Zealand)

    2014-02-15

    Introduction: Advanced practice (AP) is of increasing interest to many radiation therapists (RTs) both nationally and internationally. In New Zealand, initial research (2005–2008) showed strong support for the development of an AP role for medical radiation technologists (MRTs). Here, we report on a nationwide survey in which RTs validated and prioritised nine AP profiles for future development. Methods: All registered RTs in New Zealand (n = 260) were invited to take part in a survey in December 2011; 73 of whom returned a complete response. Results: RTs supported the implementation of AP roles in New Zealand and the requirement of a Master's degree qualification to underpin clinical knowledge. Most RTs endorsed the criteria attributed to each of the nine proposed AP profiles. The study identified that activities may qualify as either advanced practice or standard practice depending on the department. All participants agreed that an advanced practitioner should be a leader in the field, able to initiate and facilitate future developments within as well as outside this specific role. Acceptance of the AP roles by RTs and other health professionals as well as the availability of resources for successful implementation, were concerns expressed by some RTs. Conclusion: The authors recommend (1) the development of one scope of practice titled ‘advanced practitioner’ with generic and specialist criteria for each profile as the future career pathway, (2) promotion and support for the AP pathway by the New Zealand Institute of Medical Radiation Technology and the New Zealand Medical Radiation Technologists Board.

  13. Gemcitabine concurrent with radiation therapy for locally advanced ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of advanced head and neck carcinoma is a challenging proposition. Presently concomitant chemoirradiation has become the standard of care in such patients. Many chemotherapeutic drugs have shown radio-sensitising effects when used concomitantly along with radiation. The present study ...

  14. Advances in Alzheimer's Diagnosis and Therapy : The Implications of Nanotechnology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Santoso, Michelle R.; Rezaee, Farhad; Aghaverdi, Haniyeh; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Perry, George

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a type of dementia that causes major issues for patients' memory, thinking, and behavior. Despite efforts to advance AD diagnostic and therapeutic tools, AD remains incurable due to its complex and multifactorial nature and lack of effective diagnostics/therapeutics.

  15. From old concerns to new advances and personalized medicine in lupus: The end of the tunnel is approaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doria, Andrea; Gershwin, M Eric; Selmi, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    The significant decrease in mortality rates worldwide, the increased proportion of patients achieving a durable remission, and the recent approval of a new drug after several decades are encouraging advances in the tangled history of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). However, when data are observed more closely, the research findings on disease pathogenesis and targeted treatments have been quite misleading, as illustrated by the central role of B cells but the missed endpoints in rituximab clinical trials which are burdened by the wide variability of SLE manifestations or the ethnic determinants of disease severity. Other biologic therapies, on the other hand, inhibit B cell stimulating factor BAFF but are proving to be short of revolutionary, not yet overcoming high-dose long-term glucocorticoids still largely used without an agreement on what clinical targets are to be sought in the proposed treat-to-target approach. The large amount of data from genome-wide association studies, the detailed reports on T cell epigenetics, or the numerous established and novel animal models have also proven insufficient to change our understanding of the human disease. Nonetheless, we have now tools for a better and earlier SLE diagnosis, thanks to reliable biomarkers, improved care of kidney involvement, better pregnancy outcomes, while the neuropsychiatric manifestations remain challenging. These advances are well mirrored by some proposed synthetic drugs, such as tacrolimus, or biologics, including IFNα inhibitors and other drugs capable to modulate the immune system. Ultimately, we may foresee that genetic and epigenetic data, along with the variable clinical manifestations represent the bases for SLE to become an ideal candidate for the introduction of truly personalized medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The discovery of viruses: advancing science and medicine by challenging dogma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artenstein, Andrew W

    2012-07-01

    The discovery of viruses in the final years of the nineteenth century represented the culmination of two decades of work on tobacco mosaic disease by three botanical scientists. Eventually their discovery led to a paradigm shift in scientific thought, but it took more than 20 years to appreciate its implications because it was inconsistent with the prevailing dogma of the time-Koch's postulates. Although these 'rules' were actually conceived of as guidelines upon which to establish microbial causality and their implementation resulted in many new discoveries, they also had the unintended effect of limiting the interpretation of novel findings. However, by challenging existing dogma through rigorous scientific observation and sheer persistence, the investigators advanced medicine and heralded new areas of discovery. Copyright © 2012 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advancing our understanding of religion and spirituality in the context of behavioral medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Crystal L; Masters, Kevin S; Salsman, John M; Wachholtz, Amy; Clements, Andrea D; Salmoirago-Blotcher, Elena; Trevino, Kelly; Wischenka, Danielle M

    2017-02-01

    Recognizing and understanding the potentially powerful roles that religiousness and spirituality (RS) may serve in the prevention and amelioration of disease, as well as symptom management and health related quality of life, significantly enhances research and clinical efforts across many areas of behavioral medicine. This article examines the knowledge established to date and suggests advances that remain to be made. We begin with a brief summary of the current knowledge regarding RS as related to three exemplary health conditions: (a) cardiovascular disease; (b) cancer; and, (c) substance abuse. We then focus on particular concerns for future investigations, emphasizing conceptual issues, possible mediators and moderators of relationships or effects, and methodology. Our discussion is framed by a conceptual model that may serve to guide and organize future investigations. This model highlights a number of important issues regarding the study of links between RS and health: (a) RS comprise many diverse constructs, (b) the mechanisms through which RS may influence health outcomes are quite diverse, and (c) a range of different types of health and health relevant outcomes may be influenced by RS. The multidimensional nature of RS and the complexity of related associations with different types of health relevant outcomes present formidable challenges to empirical study in behavioral medicine. These issues are referred to throughout our review and we suggest several solutions to the presented challenges in our summary. We end with a presentation of barriers to be overcome, along with strategies for doing so, and concluding thoughts.

  18. Maintaining a Twitter Feed to Advance an Internal Medicine Residency Program’s Educational Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narang, Akhil; Arora, Vineet M

    2015-01-01

    Background Residency programs face many challenges in educating learners. The millennial generation’s learning preferences also force us to reconsider how to reach physicians in training. Social media is emerging as a viable tool for advancing curricula in graduate medical education. Objective The authors sought to understand how social media enhances a residency program’s educational mission. Methods While chief residents in the 2013-2014 academic year, two of the authors (PB, AN) maintained a Twitter feed for their academic internal medicine residency program. Participants included the chief residents and categorical internal medicine house staff. Results At the year’s end, the authors surveyed residents about uses and attitudes toward this initiative. Residents generally found the chief residents’ tweets informative, and most residents (42/61, 69%) agreed that Twitter enhanced their overall education in residency. Conclusions Data from this single-site intervention corroborate that Twitter can strengthen a residency program’s educational mission. The program’s robust following on Twitter outside of the home program also suggests a need for wider adoption of social media in graduate medical education. Improved use of data analytics and dissemination of these practices to other programs would lend additional insight into social media’s role in improving residents’ educational experiences. PMID:27731845

  19. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic.Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation.Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting.

  20. Competency Assessment in Family Medicine Residency: Observations, Knowledge-Based Examinations, and Advancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainous, Arch G; Fang, Bo; Peterson, Lars E

    2017-12-01

    The Family Medicine (FM) Milestones are competency-based assessments of residents in key dimensions relevant to practice in the specialty. Residency programs use the milestones in semiannual reviews of resident performance from the time of entry into the program to graduation. Using a national sample, we investigated the relationship of FM competency-based assessments to resident progress and the complementarity of milestones with knowledge-based assessments in FM residencies. We used midyear and end-of-year milestone ratings for all FM residents in Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs during academic years 2014-2015 and 2015-2016. The milestones contain 22 items across 6 competencies. We created a summative index across the milestones. The American Board of Family Medicine database provided resident demographics and in-training examination (ITE) scores. We linked information to the milestone data. The sample encompassed 6630 FM residents. The summative milestone index increased, on average, for each cohort (postgraduate year 1 [PGY-1] to PGY-2 and PGY-2 to PGY-3) at each assessment. The correlation between the milestone index that excluded the medical knowledge milestone and ITE scores was r  = .195 ( P  ITE scores and composite milestone assessments were higher for residents who advanced than for those who did not. Competency-based assessment using the milestones for FM residents seems to be a viable multidimensional tool to assess the successful progression of residents.

  1. Comparative Evaluation of the Complementary and Alternative Medicine Therapy and Conventional Therapy Use for Musculoskeletal Disorders Management and Its Association with Job Satisfaction among Dentists of West India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devanand; Batra, Renu; Mahajan, Shveta; Bhaskar, Dara John; Jain, Ankita; Shiju, Mohammed; Yadav, Ankit; Chaturvedi, Mudita; Gill, Shruti; Verma, Renuka; Dalai, Deepak Ranjan; Gupta, Rajendra Kumar

    2014-10-01

    Musculoskeletal problems have become a significant issue in the profession of dentistry. There are currently no recommended effective disease-preventing and modifying remedies. High prevalence rates for musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) among dentists have been reported in the literature. Complementary and alternative medicine can be helpful in managing and preventing the MSDs. The purpose of this study was to determine if dentists in the western part of India are using complementary and alternative medicine therapies for MSDs, and also to find if those who use complementary and alternative medicine therapies have greater job/career satisfaction compared to conventional therapy (CT) users. Dentists of western India registered under the Dental Council of India (N = 2166) were recruited for the study. Data were analyzed using univariate and bivariate analyses and logistic regression. A response rate of 73% (n = 1581) was obtained, of which 79% (n = 1249) was suffering from MSDs. The use of complementary and alternative medicine or CT was reported by 90% (n = 1124) of dentists with MSDs. Dentists using complementary and alternative medicine reported greater health (P alternative medicine therapies may improve the quality of life and enhance job satisfaction for a dentist who suffers from MSDs.

  2. Advances in Alzheimer's Diagnosis and Therapy: The Implications of Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajipour, Mohammad Javad; Santoso, Michelle R; Rezaee, Farhad; Aghaverdi, Haniyeh; Mahmoudi, Morteza; Perry, George

    2017-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a type of dementia that causes major issues for patients' memory, thinking, and behavior. Despite efforts to advance AD diagnostic and therapeutic tools, AD remains incurable due to its complex and multifactorial nature and lack of effective diagnostics/therapeutics. Nanoparticles (NPs) have demonstrated the potential to overcome the challenges and limitations associated with traditional diagnostics/therapeutics. Nanotechnology is now offering new tools and insights to advance our understanding of AD and eventually may offer new hope to AD patients. Here, we review the key roles of nanotechnologies in the recent literature, in both diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of AD, and discuss how these achievements may improve patient prognosis and quality of life. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The future of replacement and restorative therapies: from organ transplantation to regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daar, A S

    2013-01-01

    As we continue to have severe shortages of organs for transplantation, we need to consider alternatives for the future. The most likely to make a real difference in the long term is regenerative medicine (RM), a field that has emerged from the conjunction of stem cell biology and cell therapies; gene therapy; biomaterials and tissue engineering; and organ transplantation. Transplantation and RM share the same essential goal: to replace or restore organ function. Herein I briefly review some major breakthroughs of RM that are relevant to the future of organ transplantation, with a focus on the needs of people in the developing world. A definition of RM is provided and the ethical, legal, and social issues are briefly highlighted. In conclusion, I provide a projection of what the future may be for RM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Radioiodine therapy in veterinary medicine: treatment of hyperthyroidism in a cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinartz, P.; Sabri, O.; Zimny, M.; Buell, U.

    1999-01-01

    A nine-year-old cat with symptoms of a distinct hyperthyroidism was presented at the University Hospital of the RWTH Aachen. The clinical symptoms as well as the diagnostic procedures performed at the hospital confirmed the diagnosis. After five weeks of thyreostatic medication a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland was established, followed by a radioiodine therapy with 70.3 MBq 131-iodine. Subsequently, the cat was hospitalized for two days before it could be released in good condition. Six weeks after treatment the former drastically reduced weight of the cat recovered to near normal. Even though the chemical analysis detected a discrete hyperthyroidism, clinical symptoms were no longer prominent. Three months after treatment, the final examination showed a regular metabolism of the thyroid gland without a specific thyroidal medication. The presented case illustrates that radioiodine therapy is a safe and efficient treatment of thyroidal dysfunctions in veterinary medicine. (orig.) [de

  5. Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy: Maximizing Investments in Radiation Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enwerem-Bromson, N.; Nitzsche-Bell, A.

    2015-01-01

    In the presentation, Ms Nelly Enwerem-Bromson will present her work as Director of the Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) and the crucial role of nuclear techniques in cancer control. She will review the key drivers for increasing demand for technical support on cancer control from low and middle income (LMI) Member States to the UN system in general, and the IAEA in particular. She will further elaborate on IAEA’s Programme of Action for Cancer Therapy (PACT) main products and services and how they are having a positive impact on assessing national capacities and needs, supporting Member States in identifying key priority interventions and translating them into action through the IAEA Technical Cooperation Programme. Ms Enwerem-Bromson will also address innovative approaches on distance learning and international collaboration to increase the quantity and quality of oncology related human resources as well as in the establishment of sustainable radiation medicines services in LMI countries. (author)

  6. Innovative Strategy in Treating Angina Pectoris with Chinese Patent Medicines by Promoting Blood Circulation and Removing Blood Stasis: Experience from Combination Therapy in Chinese Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xing-Jiang; Wang, Zhong; Wang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Moreover, angina pectoris is one of the most important types of CHD. Therefore, prevention and effective treatment of angina pectoris is of utmost importance in both China and western countries. However, undesirable effects of antianginal therapy do influence treatment adherence to a certain extent. Therefore, it's not surprising that, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), including Chinese medicine (CM), are widely welcomed among patients with CHD, hoping that it might complement western medicine. In our previous studies, blood stasis syndrome (BSS) (Xueyu Zheng) was the main syndrome (Zheng-hou) of angina pectoris. Currently, China Food and Drug Administration authoritatively recommended more than 200 Chinese patent medicines (CPMs) as complementary or adjunctive therapies for symptom management and enhancing quality of life along with mainstream care on angina pectoris management in mainland China. This paper reviewed 4 kinds of most frequently-used CPMs by promoting blood circulation and removing blood stasis in the treatment of angina pectoris. It aims to evaluate the current evidence of CPMs in combination therapy for angina pectoris. This review indicated that CPMs as adjunctive treatment to routine antianginal therapy play an active role in reducing the incidence of primary endpoint events, decreasing anginal attack rate, and improving electrocardiogram. Additionally, CPMs have been proven relatively safe. Further rigorously designed clinical trials should be conducted to confirm the results.

  7. Comprehensive Assessments of RNA-seq by the SEQC Consortium: FDA-Led Efforts Advance Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studies on gene expression in response to therapy have led to the discovery of pharmacogenomics biomarkers and advances in precision medicine. Whole transcriptome sequencing (RNA-seq is an emerging tool for profiling gene expression and has received wide adoption in the biomedical research community. However, its value in regulatory decision making requires rigorous assessment and consensus between various stakeholders, including the research community, regulatory agencies, and industry. The FDA-led SEquencing Quality Control (SEQC consortium has made considerable progress in this direction, and is the subject of this review. Specifically, three RNA-seq platforms (Illumina HiSeq, Life Technologies SOLiD, and Roche 454 were extensively evaluated at multiple sites to assess cross-site and cross-platform reproducibility. The results demonstrated that relative gene expression measurements were consistently comparable across labs and platforms, but not so for the measurement of absolute expression levels. As part of the quality evaluation several studies were included to evaluate the utility of RNA-seq in clinical settings and safety assessment. The neuroblastoma study profiled tumor samples from 498 pediatric neuroblastoma patients by both microarray and RNA-seq. RNA-seq offers more utilities than microarray in determining the transcriptomic characteristics of cancer. However, RNA-seq and microarray-based models were comparable in clinical endpoint prediction, even when including additional features unique to RNA-seq beyond gene expression. The toxicogenomics study compared microarray and RNA-seq profiles of the liver samples from rats exposed to 27 different chemicals representing multiple toxicity modes of action. Cross-platform concordance was dependent on chemical treatment and transcript abundance. Though both RNA-seq and microarray are suitable for developing gene expression based predictive models with comparable prediction performance, RNA

  8. Regulatory and Scientific Advancements in Gene Therapy: State-of-the-Art of Clinical Applications and of the Supporting European Regulatory Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Marta; Sepodes, Bruno; Martins, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) have a massive potential to address existing unmet medical needs. Specifically, gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs) may potentially provide cure for several genetic diseases. In Europe, the ATMP regulation was fully implemented in 2009 and, at this point, the Committee for Advanced Therapies was created as a dedicated group of specialists to evaluate medicinal products requiring specific expertise in this area. To date, there are three authorized GTMPs, and the first one was approved in 2012. Broad research has been conducted in this field over the last few decades and different clinical applications are being investigated worldwide, using different strategies that range from direct gene replacement or addition to more complex pathways such as specific gene editing or RNA targeting. Important safety risks, limited efficacy, manufacturing hurdles, or ethical conflicts may represent challenges in the success of a candidate GTMP. During the development process, it is fundamental to take such aspects into account and establish overcoming strategies. This article reviews the current European legal framework of ATMPs, provides an overview of the clinical applications for approved and investigational GTMPs, and discusses critical challenges in the development of GTMPs.

  9. Regulatory and Scientific Advancements in Gene Therapy: State-of-the-Art of Clinical Applications and of the Supporting European Regulatory Framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Carvalho

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs have a massive potential to address existing unmet medical needs. Specifically, gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs may potentially provide cure for several genetic diseases. In Europe, the ATMP regulation was fully implemented in 2009 and, at this point, the Committee for Advanced Therapies was created as a dedicated group of specialists to evaluate medicinal products requiring specific expertise in this area. To date, there are three authorized GTMPs, and the first one was approved in 2012. Broad research has been conducted in this field over the last few decades and different clinical applications are being investigated worldwide, using different strategies that range from direct gene replacement or addition to more complex pathways such as specific gene editing or RNA targeting. Important safety risks, limited efficacy, manufacturing hurdles, or ethical conflicts may represent challenges in the success of a candidate GTMP. During the development process, it is fundamental to take such aspects into account and establish overcoming strategies. This article reviews the current European legal framework of ATMPs, provides an overview of the clinical applications for approved and investigational GTMPs, and discusses critical challenges in the development of GTMPs.

  10. A Retrospective Analysis of Precision Medicine Outcomes in Patients With Advanced Cancer Reveals Improved Progression-Free Survival Without Increased Health Care Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslem, Derrick S; Van Norman, S Burke; Fulde, Gail; Knighton, Andrew J; Belnap, Tom; Butler, Allison M; Rhagunath, Sharanya; Newman, David; Gilbert, Heather; Tudor, Brian P; Lin, Karen; Stone, Gary R; Loughmiller, David L; Mishra, Pravin J; Srivastava, Rajendu; Ford, James M; Nadauld, Lincoln D

    2017-02-01

    The advent of genomic diagnostic technologies such as next-generation sequencing has recently enabled the use of genomic information to guide targeted treatment in patients with cancer, an approach known as precision medicine. However, clinical outcomes, including survival and the cost of health care associated with precision cancer medicine, have been challenging to measure and remain largely unreported. We conducted a matched cohort study of 72 patients with metastatic cancer of diverse subtypes in the setting of a large, integrated health care delivery system. We analyzed the outcomes of 36 patients who received genomic testing and targeted therapy (precision cancer medicine) between July 1, 2013, and January 31, 2015, compared with 36 historical control patients who received standard chemotherapy (n = 29) or best supportive care (n = 7). The average progression-free survival was 22.9 weeks for the precision medicine group and 12.0 weeks for the control group ( P = .002) with a hazard ratio of 0.47 (95% CI, 0.29 to 0.75) when matching on age, sex, histologic diagnosis, and previous lines of treatment. In a subset analysis of patients who received all care within the Intermountain Healthcare system (n = 44), per patient charges per week were $4,665 in the precision treatment group and $5,000 in the control group ( P = .126). These findings suggest that precision cancer medicine may improve survival for patients with refractory cancer without increasing health care costs. Although the results of this study warrant further validation, this precision medicine approach may be a viable option for patients with advanced cancer.

  11. Iterative Systems Biology for Medicine – time for advancing from network signature to mechanistic equations

    KAUST Repository

    Gomez-Cabrero, David

    2017-05-09

    The rise and growth of Systems Biology following the sequencing of the human genome has been astounding. Early on, an iterative wet-dry methodology was formulated which turned out as a successful approach in deciphering biological complexity. Such type of analysis effectively identified and associated molecular network signatures operative in biological processes across different systems. Yet, it has proven difficult to distinguish between causes and consequences, thus making it challenging to attack medical questions where we require precise causative drug targets and disease mechanisms beyond a web of associated markers. Here we review principal advances with regard to identification of structure, dynamics, control, and design of biological systems, following the structure in the visionary review from 2002 by Dr. Kitano. Yet, here we find that the underlying challenge of finding the governing mechanistic system equations enabling precision medicine remains open thus rendering clinical translation of systems biology arduous. However, stunning advances in raw computational power, generation of high-precision multi-faceted biological data, combined with powerful algorithms hold promise to set the stage for data-driven identification of equations implicating a fundamental understanding of living systems during health and disease.

  12. On recent advances in human engineering Provocative trends in embryology, genetics, and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anton, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Advances in embryology, genetics, and regenerative medicine regularly attract attention from scientists, scholars, journalists, and policymakers, yet implications of these advances may be broader than commonly supposed. Laboratories culturing human embryos, editing human genes, and creating human-animal chimeras have been working along lines that are now becoming intertwined. Embryogenic methods are weaving traditional in vivo and in vitro distinctions into a new "in vivitro" (in life in glass) fabric. These and other methods known to be in use or thought to be in development promise soon to bring society to startling choices and discomfiting predicaments, all in a global effort to supply reliably rejuvenating stem cells, to grow immunologically non-provocative replacement organs, and to prevent, treat, cure, or even someday eradicate diseases having genetic or epigenetic mechanisms. With humanity's human-engineering era now begun, procedural prohibitions, funding restrictions, institutional controls, and transparency rules are proving ineffective, and business incentives are migrating into the most basic life-sciences inquiries, wherein lie huge biomedical potentials and bioethical risks. Rights, health, and heritage are coming into play with bioethical presumptions and formal protections urgently needing reassessment.

  13. Combined cisplatin and radiation therapy for advanced bladder cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tajima, Masaharu; Sawamura, Yoshikatsu; Kase, Takahisa

    1991-01-01

    The combined effects of cisplatin and irradiation were investigated in 44 patients with bladder cancer accompanied by the infiltration of T 2 ∼T 4 cells, in a study commencing in September 1985. The antitumor effect and adverse reactions to the therapy were recorded. The majority of these patients had not undergone total bladder excision, for a variety of reasons. Thirty-two patients were male and 12 were female; the average age was 66.7 years, with ranging from 33∼83 years of age. Irradiation was performed using table cobalt 60 or a linear accelerator at a dose of 2 Gy per day, 5 days a week. The total radiation dose ranged from 40 to 70 Gy. Cisplatin was administered systemically at a dose of 20∼30 mg/day for 5 consecutive days during the first and fourth weeks of irradiation. At the time of final assessment of the antitumor effect, 24 out of 40 eligible patients (60%) had achieved complete remission (CR). The duration of CR averaged 18.8 months, with a range of 1∼50 months. The actual survival rates were as follows: 81% at 1 year, 69% at 2 years, and 52% at 3 and 4 years. Regarding adverse reactions, anorexia occurred in 28 patients (70%), nausea and vomiting in 21 (53%), diarrhea in 8 (20%), leukopenia in 16 (40%), mild thrombocytopenia in 5 (13%), and dermatitis in 8 (20%). All of these adverse reactions were mild and were alleviated after completion of the combined therapy. The present investigation demonstrated that combined therapy with cisplatin and irradiation is effective for the regional treatment of invasive bladder cancer. (author)

  14. The Quest for Evidence for Proton Therapy: Model-Based Approach and Precision Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widder, Joachim, E-mail: j.widder@umcg.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Schaaf, Arjen van der [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology (GROW), Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Marijnen, Corrie A.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden (Netherlands); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Erasmus Medical Center Cancer Institute, Rotterdam (Netherlands); Rasch, Coen R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Academic Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slotman, Ben J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, VU Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Verheij, Marcel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Langendijk, Johannes A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Reducing dose to normal tissues is the advantage of protons versus photons. We aimed to describe a method for translating this reduction into a clinically relevant benefit. Methods and Materials: Dutch scientific and health care governance bodies have recently issued landmark reports regarding generation of relevant evidence for new technologies in health care including proton therapy. An approach based on normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) models has been adopted to select patients who are most likely to experience fewer (serious) adverse events achievable by state-of-the-art proton treatment. Results: By analogy with biologically targeted therapies, the technology needs to be tested in enriched cohorts of patients exhibiting the decisive predictive marker: difference in normal tissue dosimetric signatures between proton and photon treatment plans. Expected clinical benefit is then estimated by virtue of multifactorial NTCP models. In this sense, high-tech radiation therapy falls under precision medicine. As a consequence, randomizing nonenriched populations between photons and protons is predictably inefficient and likely to produce confusing results. Conclusions: Validating NTCP models in appropriately composed cohorts treated with protons should be the primary research agenda leading to urgently needed evidence for proton therapy.

  15. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Personal Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine among Occupational Therapy Educators in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Michelle L

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish a baseline description of American occupational therapy educators' knowledge, attitudes, and personal use of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) as a first step in exploring the larger issue of future occupational therapy practitioners' preparedness for meeting clients' occupational needs in today's evolving healthcare environment. Results of this cross-sectional survey highlighted limitations of occupational therapy educators' knowledge of common CAM concepts and therapies across all demographic variables, varying attitudes towards CAM in general and its inclusion in occupational therapy education, and personal use of common CAM therapies. Without increased occupational therapy educator knowledge about CAM and engagement in the current healthcare practices, occupational therapy practitioners are at risk for having a limited role in integrative healthcare.

  16. Encountering Challenges with the EU Regulation on Advance Therapy Medical Products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansnérus, Juli

    2015-12-01

    This article aims at analysing how well the Advanced Therapy Medical Product Regulation (EC) No. 1394/2007 (ATMP Regulation) meets the needs of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMES), academia and public tissue establishments developing advanced therapy medical products (ATMPS). Benefits and shortcomings of the ATMP Regulation are identified, and possible amendments are proposed to accelerate the translation of research into advanced therapies and to facilitate the commercialisation of ATMPS whilst ensuring safety. It was set up as a lex specialis to ensure the free movement of ATMPS within the EU in order to facilitate their access to the internal market and to foster the competitiveness of European pharmaceutical companies, while guaranteeing the highest level protection of public health. Since the adoption of the ATMP Regulation in late 2008, only 5 ATMPS have been granted marketing authorisations thus far. Hence, there is a need to analyse whether the ATMP Regulation meets its objectives.

  17. Virtual medicine: Utilization of the advanced cardiac imaging patient avatar for procedural planning and facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinbane, Jerold S; Saxon, Leslie A

    Advances in imaging technology have led to a paradigm shift from planning of cardiovascular procedures and surgeries requiring the actual patient in a "brick and mortar" hospital to utilization of the digitalized patient in the virtual hospital. Cardiovascular computed tomographic angiography (CCTA) and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) digitalized 3-D patient representation of individual patient anatomy and physiology serves as an avatar allowing for virtual delineation of the most optimal approaches to cardiovascular procedures and surgeries prior to actual hospitalization. Pre-hospitalization reconstruction and analysis of anatomy and pathophysiology previously only accessible during the actual procedure could potentially limit the intrinsic risks related to time in the operating room, cardiac procedural laboratory and overall hospital environment. Although applications are specific to areas of cardiovascular specialty focus, there are unifying themes related to the utilization of technologies. The virtual patient avatar computer can also be used for procedural planning, computational modeling of anatomy, simulation of predicted therapeutic result, printing of 3-D models, and augmentation of real time procedural performance. Examples of the above techniques are at various stages of development for application to the spectrum of cardiovascular disease processes, including percutaneous, surgical and hybrid minimally invasive interventions. A multidisciplinary approach within medicine and engineering is necessary for creation of robust algorithms for maximal utilization of the virtual patient avatar in the digital medical center. Utilization of the virtual advanced cardiac imaging patient avatar will play an important role in the virtual health care system. Although there has been a rapid proliferation of early data, advanced imaging applications require further assessment and validation of accuracy, reproducibility, standardization, safety, efficacy, quality

  18. C-Peptides for diagnostics and therapy: a veterinary medicine point of view

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek A. Rosenfield

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Empirical studies proved that C-peptides are performing numerous intrinsic biological roles, and serve as a marker for pancreatic performance analysis. Since the last decade, C-peptide assays for differential diagnosis in veterinary diabetic patients are becoming more available, but still only for a very limited number of species. Studies on C-peptide as a diagnostic tool, therapy for associated complications, or as replacement therapies for C-peptide deficiency still showed not to be a common practice in veterinary medicine. This review was conducted to determine the potential importance of C-peptide in Veterinary Medicine, relevant in the diagnosis of diabetes and for other metabolic processes, as well as its proposed therapeutic benefits. Numerous articles were identified that reported positive results in their experimental studies, whether C-peptide as a biomarker for pancreatic performance in dogs, cats, and horses, as a non-invasive method to monitor nutritional status in primates, or to investigate its potential therapeutic benefits for diabetes-related illnesses.

  19. National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine (INCT-TM): advancing the field of translational medicine and mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallak, Jaime E C; Crippa, José Alexandre S; Quevedo, João; Roesler, Rafael; Schröder, Nadja; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Kapczinski, Flávio

    2010-03-01

    Translational medicine has been described as the integrated application of innovative pharmacology tools, biomarkers, clinical methods, clinical technologies and study designs to improve the understanding of medical disorders. In medicine, translational research offers an opportunity for applying the findings obtained from basic research to every-day clinical applications. The National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine is comprised of six member institutions (Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Universidade de São Paulo-Ribeirão Preto, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Universidade Estadual de Santa Catarina and a core facility that serves all centers). The objectives of the project are divided into four areas: Institutional, Research, Human Resources and Technology for the Community and Productive Sector. In this manuscript, we describe some of the approaches used to attain the main objectives of the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine, which include the development of 1) animal models for bipolar disorder; 2) strategies to investigate neurobehavioral function and cognitive dysfunction associated with brain disorders; 3) experimental models of brain function and behavior, neuropsychiatric disorders, cell proliferation, and cancer; 4) Simulated Public Speaking and 5) Virtual reality simulation for inducing panic disorder and agoraphobia. The main focus of the National Science and Technology Institute for Translational Medicine is the development of more useful methods that allow for a better application of basic research-based knowledge to the medical field.

  20. [Current status and future prospect of internal medicine treatment for advanced esophageal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, F; Fan, Q X

    2016-09-23

    Esophageal cancer (EC) is one of common malignant tumors, and the incidence and mortality of EC in China rank the first place in the world. Because of the occult onset, the early atypical symptoms, and the lack of effective early diagnostic methods, most of patients are diagnosed at an advanced stage of the disease and lost the chance of surgery. Comprehensive treatment including palliative medical treatment, molecular targeted therapy, immunotherapy and so on is appropriate for these patients. How to choose the chemotherapy regimen and formulate reasonable treatment plan has become a hot spot in clinical research. Molecular targeted drugs have become a new developmental direction in cancer treatment because of their high specificity and antitumor activity, but the effects on esophageal cancer remain controversial. With the development of immune check point blockade treatment, breakthrough has been made in tumor immunotherapy, which has become an important means in cancer comprehensive treatment and shown a good prospect of treatment.

  1. Fetal gene therapy: recent advances and current challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattar, Citra N; Choolani, Mahesh; Biswas, Arijit; Waddington, Simon N; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2011-10-01

    Fetal gene therapy (FGT) can potentially be applied to perinatally lethal monogenic diseases for rescuing clinically severe phenotypes, increasing the probability of intact neurological and other key functions at birth, or inducing immune tolerance to a transgenic protein to facilitate readministration of the vector/protein postnatally. As the field is still at an experimental stage, there are several important considerations regarding the practicality and the ethics of FGT. Here, through a review of FGT studies, the authors discuss the role and applications of FGT, the progress made with animal models that simulate human development, possible adverse effects in the recipient fetus and the mother and factors that affect clinical translation. Although there are valid safety and ethical concerns, the authors argue that there may soon be enough convincing evidence from non-human primate models to take the next step towards clinical trials in the near future. © 2011 Informa UK, Ltd.

  2. Therapeutic Advances using Combinational Therapy in the Treatment of Glioblastoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staberg, Mikkel

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant brain tumor in adults. Median survival is only about 15 months despite aggressive treatment, consisting of surgery followed by radio- and chemotherapy, stressing the need for new therapies. Development of glioblastoma is thought to be a result of both genetic...... and epigenetic alterations, ultimately leading to oncogenic transformation of normal glia cells. Several features are suggested to give rise to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma including treatment resistance, a high degree of abnormal blood vessels, and high heterogeneity, both within the single tumor and from...... patient to patient. Thus, investigations are needed to identify the genetic-molecular alterations that glioblastoma tumors depend on in order to overcome treatment and regrow after initial surgery. The findings presented in this thesis illustrate the promising potential of combinational treatments...

  3. The Music Therapy assessment tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, R.

    2013-01-01

    is limited, is a challenging process. With awareness often masked by perceptual or motor impairments, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy assessment holds the potential to elicit responses despite damage to verbal or visual processing faculties, although robust empirical studies are lacking...... music conditions (live salient music & improvised music entrained to respiration), recordings of disliked music, white noise and silence. Neurophysiological and behavioral measures were recorded using a 32 channel XLTEK© video EEG system, with a piezoelectric respiratory belt, and analysed using MATLAB......, EEGLAB and BrainVision Analyzer 2 software. One way repeated measures ANOVA analysis of respiration, and power spectra analysis of EEG data indicated a range of significant responses (p≤0.05) across controls corresponding to arousal and attention in response to live music, including concurrent increases...

  4. Technological Advances in Stent Therapies: a Year in Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffoul, Jad; Nasir, Ammar; Klein, Andrew J P

    2018-04-07

    Stent technology has rapidly evolved since the first stainless steel bare metal stents with substantial developments in scaffolding, polymer, drug choice, drug delivery, and elution mechanisms. Most recently, there has been the evolution of bioabsorbable vascular scaffolds, potentially eliminating the need for long-term foreign object retention. These rapid developments have led to an ever-expanding selection of new stents, making the choice of which to use in which patient challenging. Operators must balance potential short- and long-term clinical ramifications, namely stent thrombosis, in-stent restenosis, target lesion revascularization, and target lesion failure. In this review, we hope to provide insight for interventional cardiologists on the details of stent technology and how this impacts outcomes, stent selection, and duration of dual-antiplatelet therapy duration post drug-eluting stent implantation.

  5. Approach and potentiality of low level laser therapy in veterinary medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterniani, Valentina; Grolli, Stefano

    2018-04-01

    The Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) is an innovative and increasing therapeutic technique in Veterinary Medicine. As in Human Medicine, the low power red/near-infrared laser light could be used to reduce inflammatory conditions, induce analgesia and promote damaged tissues repair, both in conventional animals like horses, dogs and cats and in unconventional ones, including reptiles, birds and exotic mammals. Since A.Eistein (1917) and E.Mester (1968) built its physical and biochemical fundamentals, a growing number of researches, over the years, have expanded the knowledge of the molecular process considered today at the basis of the macroscopic therapeutic effects. Producing a photochemical tissue interaction, laser light is absorbed by the mitochondrial respiratory chain stimulating the generation of ATP, ROS and NO; this determines a modulation in gene expression of proteins playing key roles in cellular processes as tissue repair, inflammatory response and pain control. Different animal pathological conditions could significantly benefit from this therapy, such as acute/chronic muscle-skeletal disorders, dental afflictions, dermatitis, otitis, stomatitis and different kind of skin lesions, as traumatic or post-operative ones. Furthermore, other significant applications are developing scientifically: the treatment of internal organ diseases, the regenerative effects on nervous tissue and the possibility of a beneficial cell-specific cytotoxicity, relevant for oncological cases, are some of these. A high-quality research is therefore crucial for this quickly expanding field of Veterinary Medicine, in order to find the most effective protocols and the ideal doses for each pathological conditions, aiming to always ensure the best and up-todate animal care.

  6. Anti-angiogenic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li-Tzong; Oh, Do-Youn; Ryu, Min-Hee; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Yeo, Winnie; Carlesi, Roberto; Cheng, Rebecca; Kim, Jongseok; Orlando, Mauro; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-10-01

    Despite advancements in therapy for advanced gastric and gastroesophageal junction cancers, their prognosis remains dismal. Tumor angiogenesis plays a key role in cancer growth and metastasis, and recent studies indicate that pharmacologic blockade of angiogenesis is a promising approach to therapy. In this systematic review, we summarize current literature on the clinical benefit of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric cancer. We conducted a systematic search of PubMed and conference proceedings including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the European Society for Medical Oncology, and the European Cancer Congress. Included studies aimed to prospectively evaluate the efficacy and safety of anti-angiogenic agents in advanced gastric or gastroesophageal junction cancer. Each trial investigated at least one of the following endpoints: overall survival, progression-free survival/time to progression, and/or objective response rate. Our search yielded 139 publications. Forty-two met the predefined inclusion criteria. Included studies reported outcomes with apatinib, axitinib, bevacizumab, orantinib, pazopanib, ramucirumab, regorafenib, sorafenib, sunitinib, telatinib, and vandetanib. Second-line therapy with ramucirumab and third-line therapy with apatinib are the only anti-angiogenic agents so far shown to significantly improve survival of patients with advanced gastric cancer. Overall, agents that specifically target the vascular endothelial growth factor ligand or receptor have better safety profile compared to multi-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

  7. Cellular Therapies in Trauma and Critical Care Medicine: Forging New Frontiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pati, Shibani; Pilia, Marcello; Grimsley, Juanita M; Karanikas, Alexia T; Oyeniyi, Blessing; Holcomb, John B; Cap, Andrew P; Rasmussen, Todd E

    2015-12-01

    Trauma is a leading cause of death in both military and civilian populations worldwide. Although medical advances have improved the overall morbidity and mortality often associated with trauma, additional research and innovative advancements in therapeutic interventions are needed to optimize patient outcomes. Cell-based therapies present a novel opportunity to improve trauma and critical care at both the acute and chronic phases that often follow injury. Although this field is still in its infancy, animal and human studies suggest that stem cells may hold great promise for the treatment of brain and spinal cord injuries, organ injuries, and extremity injuries such as those caused by orthopedic trauma, burns, and critical limb ischemia. However, barriers in the translation of cell therapies that include regulatory obstacles, challenges in manufacturing and clinical trial design, and a lack of funding are critical areas in need of development. In 2015, the Department of Defense Combat Casualty Care Research Program held a joint military-civilian meeting as part of its effort to inform the research community about this field and allow for effective planning and programmatic decisions regarding research and development. The objective of this article is to provide a "state of the science" review regarding cellular therapies in trauma and critical care, and to provide a foundation from which the potential of this emerging field can be harnessed to mitigate outcomes in critically ill trauma patients.

  8. Adoptive Cell Therapy with Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes in Advanced Melanoma Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mélanie Saint-Jean; Anne-Chantal Knol; Christelle Volteau; Gaëlle Quéreux; Lucie Peuvrel; Anabelle Brocard; Marie-Christine Pandolfino; Soraya Saiagh; Jean-Michel Nguyen; Christophe Bedane; Nicole Basset-Seguin; Amir Khammari; Brigitte Dréno

    2018-01-01

    Immunotherapy for melanoma includes adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). This monocenter retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the efficacy and safety of this treatment of patients with advanced melanoma. All advanced melanoma patients treated with TILs using the same TIL expansion methodology and same treatment interleukin-2 (IL-2) regimen between 2009 and 2012 were included. After sterile intralesional excision of a cutaneous or subcutaneous ...

  9. Radiation therapy in the management of locally advanced and disseminated breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, F.C.H.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation theraoy should be fully used in the management of advanced breast cancer. Locally advanced primary or recurrent carcinoma, with limited extent, should be treated aggressively, aimed at permanent control. Palliative treatment of incurable or metastatic lesions relieves symptoms and improves patient's quality of survival. Some metastatic lesions involving vital structures may create emergencies. Prompt institution of radiation therapy may reverse the serious complication and save the patient's life

  10. Advances in targeting strategies for nanoparticles in cancer imaging and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yhee, Ji Young; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Kwangmeyung

    2014-11-21

    In the last decade, nanoparticles have offered great advances in diagnostic imaging and targeted drug delivery. In particular, nanoparticles have provided remarkable progress in cancer imaging and therapy based on materials science and biochemical engineering technology. Researchers constantly attempted to develop the nanoparticles which can deliver drugs more specifically to cancer cells, and these efforts brought the advances in the targeting strategy of nanoparticles. This minireview will discuss the progress in targeting strategies for nanoparticles focused on the recent innovative work for nanomedicine.

  11. Targeting HIF-2α as therapy for advanced cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Thanabal; Rajajeyabalachandran, Gurukumari; Kumar, Swetha; Nagaraju, Shruthi; Kumar, Sooriya

    2018-05-14

    Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF-1α, -2α -3α, and -β) are key factors that control hypoxia-induced carcinogenic pathways. HIF-1α is predominantly involved in the early stages of cancer, whereas HIF-2α is actively involved in the later stages; in addition, chronic (prolonged) rather than acute (short) hypoxia is a feature of metastasis and chemoresistance that occur during the later stages of cancer. Oncometabolites, onco-miRNAs, glucose deprivation, pseudohypoxia, cytokine/chemokine secretion, and some unique upstream proteins are involved in the signaling switch from HIF-1α to HIF-2α; thus, understanding this signaling switch is critical for the treatment of advanced cancer. In this review, we highlight data relating to HIF-2α rather than HIF-1α signaling in cancer pathways and discuss prospective drugs that target this important factor. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Exclusive radiation therapy for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antognoni, P.; Bossi, A.; Molteni, M.; Richetti, A.; Tordiglione, M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyse a retrospective series of 90 consecutive patients (pts) affected with locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma (T3-4, N0-3 - TNM, UICC 1978) who were radically irradiated from November 1979 to December 1986 at the Radiotherapy Department of the General Hospital of Varese. All the patients were treated with 60 Co and two opposed parallel lateral fields and progressive shrinkage: 66 conventional fractionation (2 Gy once a day, 5 times a week), 24 with an accelerated hyperfractionated regimen (1.5 Gy twice a day, 5 times a week). The median total dose delivered to the tumor and clinically involved nodes was 64 Gy (1678 reu, CRE). Median follow-up was 21 months (range: 3-113). The 5-year overall survival (Kaplan-Meier) was 40.5%. The 5-year disease-free survival, for 47 patients in complete remission at the end of radiotherapy, was 51.9% after irradiation alone and 56.7% with salvage surgery. There were no statistically significant differences in survival according to local spread (T3 vs T4), nodal status (N0 vs N1-3) and dose fractionation regimen (conventional vs accelerated hyper-fractionated). Isoeffect (CRE) values above 1751 reu obtained a 3-year loco-regional control rate was 33.3%. Relevant late sequelae were not observed. Our findings suggest that primary radiotherapy with salvage surgery in reserve could be considered as an effective choice for locally advanced laryngeal carcinoma, at least in selected groups of patients

  13. New Advances Push Engineered Tissues Toward 3-D: Multidisciplinary Collaboration is Key to the Success of Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertz, Leslie

    2017-01-01

    Although doctors still cannot simply order new, functioning organs for patients who need replacements, researchers in labs around the world are making the important advances in tissue engineering that set the stage for regenerative medicine as well as make other biomedical technologies possible.

  14. Nuclear medicine in the monitoring of organ function and the detection of injury related to cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valdes Olmos, R.A.; Hoefnagel, C.A.; Schoot, J.B. van der

    1993-01-01

    This article emphasizes the role of nuclear medicine in the monitoring of function to prevent or limit injury in organs in which toxicity related to cancer therapy may have implications for the survival and/or the quality of life of the patient. After a brief discussion of the advantages of nuclear medicine techniques in detecting organ injury, the effect of radiation therapy and chemotherapy on normal tissue is discussed, underlining the need to characterize adverse effects of cancer therapy in long-term survivors. The use of radionuclides to document organ injury and effects from cancer therapy in heart, digestive tract, kidneys, lungs major salivary glands skeleton and brain is then reviewed. In a short section the potential applicability of positron emission tomography in documenting organ toxicity during cancer therapy is discussed. Thanks to the various available radiopharmaceuticals, the ability of the tracers to document specific functional aspects, the improved methods for visualization and quantitation of organ injury and the possibilities of physiological or pharmacological intervention, nuclear medicine gives the clinician potent tools for the monitoring of organ function at risk during cancer therapy. The trend to intensify cancer treatment by combining various treatment modalities and the increasing chances of prolonged survival in a large number of patients call for effective integration of nuclear medicine methods into the recommended guidelines for grading organ injury in clinical oncology. (orig.)

  15. Advancing Medication Reconciliation in an Outpatient Internal Medicine Clinic through a Pharmacist-Led Educational Initiative

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Westberg

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To develop and deliver an effective pharmacist-led educational initiative to clinic staff to advance medication reconciliation in the electronic medical record of an outpatient internal medicine clinic. Methods: An educational initiative designed to improve the ability of nursing staff in medication reconciliation was launched in the outpatient internal medicine clinic of a regional healthcare system. The education was provided by the pharmacist to clinic nursing staff, including registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and certified medical assistants. The impact of this training was measured through pre-initiation and post-implementation surveys, competency assessments and an audit. Results: The educational initiative was successfully designed and delivered to clinic nursing staff. Assessment of the initiative found that all nursing staff completing competency assessments successfully passed. Pre-initiation- and post-implementation- survey responses on the self-assessed ability to gather and document accurate medication lists did not show significant changes. Informal observations in the clinic indicated that this initiative changed the culture of the clinic, creating increased awareness of the importance of accurate medications and increased emphasis on medication reconciliation. Conclusions: The expertise of pharmacists can be utilized to educate nursing staff on the skills and abilities necessary to gather and document accurate medication lists. This study did not find measurable changes in the accuracy of medication lists in this clinic. Future research is needed to determine the best methods to train health professionals in medication reconciliation to ensure accurate medication lists in the outpatient setting. Type: Original Research

  16. Quantification of tomography images for dose calculation for diagnosis and therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massicano, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    The nuclear medicine area has an increasing slope in the therapy of diseases, particularly in the treatment of radiosensitive tumors. Due to the high dose levels in radionuclide therapy, it is very important the accurate quantify of the dose distribution to avoid deleterious effects on healthy tissues. In Brazil, the internal dosimetry system used is the MIRD (Medical Internal Radiation Dose) based on a reference model that does not have adequate patient data to obtain a dose accurate assessment in therapy. However, in recent years, internal radionuclide dosimetry evaluates the spatial dose distribution base ad on information obtained from CT and SPECT or PET images together with the using of Monte Carlo codes. Those systems are called patient-specific dosimetry systems. In the Nuclear Engineering Center at IPEN, this methodology is in development. When the CT images are inserted into the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 through of use of a interface software called SCMS the dosimetry can be accomplished using patient-specific data, resulting in a more accurate energy deposition in organs of interest. This work aim to contribute with the development of part of that patient-specific dosimetry for therapy. To achieve this goal we have proposed three specific objectives: (1) Development of a software to convert images from Computed Tomography (CT) in the tissue parameters (ρ, ω(ι)); (2) Development of a software to perform attenuation correction in nuclear medicine tomographic images (SPECT or PET) and to provide the map of relative activity and (3) Provide data to the SCMS code by these two software. The software developed for the rst specific objective was the Image Converter Computed Tomography (ICCT), which obtained a good accuracy to determine the density and the tissue composition; the elements that had high variation were carbon and oxygen. Fortunately, this variation for the energy range used in radionuclide therapy is not detrimental to the dose distribution. A

  17. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weinberger, Barry; Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Venosa, Alessandro; Heck, Diane E.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2016-01-01

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant.

  18. Mustard vesicant-induced lung injury: Advances in therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinberger, Barry, E-mail: bweinberger@northwell.edu [Division of Neonatal and Perinatal Medicine, Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Cohen Children' s Medical Center of New York, New Hyde Park, NY 11040 (United States); Malaviya, Rama; Sunil, Vasanthi R.; Venosa, Alessandro [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Heck, Diane E. [Department of Environmental Health Science, New York Medical College, School of Public Health, Valhalla, NY 10595 (United States); Laskin, Jeffrey D. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States); Laskin, Debra L. [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Most mortality and morbidity following exposure to vesicants such as sulfur mustard is due to pulmonary toxicity. Acute injury is characterized by epithelial detachment and necrosis in the pharynx, trachea and bronchioles, while long-term consequences include fibrosis and, in some instances, cancer. Current therapies to treat mustard poisoning are primarily palliative and do not target underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms. New knowledge about vesicant-induced pulmonary disease pathogenesis has led to the identification of potentially efficacious strategies to reduce injury by targeting inflammatory cells and mediators including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, proteases and proinflammatory/cytotoxic cytokines. Therapeutics under investigation include corticosteroids, N-acetyl cysteine, which has both mucolytic and antioxidant properties, inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors, liposomes containing superoxide dismutase, catalase, and/or tocopherols, protease inhibitors, and cytokine antagonists such as anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α antibody and pentoxifylline. Antifibrotic and fibrinolytic treatments may also prove beneficial in ameliorating airway obstruction and lung remodeling. More speculative approaches include inhibitors of transient receptor potential channels, which regulate pulmonary epithelial cell membrane permeability, non-coding RNAs and mesenchymal stem cells. As mustards represent high priority chemical threat agents, identification of effective therapeutics for mitigating toxicity is highly significant.

  19. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV: Advances in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Bishnoi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  20. Oncotargeting by Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV): Advances in Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishnoi, Suman; Tiwari, Ritudhwaj; Gupta, Sharad; Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Nayak, Debasis

    2018-02-23

    Modern oncotherapy approaches are based on inducing controlled apoptosis in tumor cells. Although a number of apoptosis-induction approaches are available, site-specific delivery of therapeutic agents still remain the biggest hurdle in achieving the desired cancer treatment benefit. Additionally, systemic treatment-induced toxicity remains a major limiting factor in chemotherapy. To specifically address drug-accessibility and chemotherapy side effects, oncolytic virotherapy (OV) has emerged as a novel cancer treatment alternative. In OV, recombinant viruses with higher replication capacity and stronger lytic properties are being considered for tumor cell-targeting and subsequent cell lysing. Successful application of OVs lies in achieving strict tumor-specific tropism called oncotropism, which is contingent upon the biophysical interactions of tumor cell surface receptors with viral receptors and subsequent replication of oncolytic viruses in cancer cells. In this direction, few viral vector platforms have been developed and some of these have entered pre-clinical/clinical trials. Among these, the Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-based platform shows high promise, as it is not pathogenic to humans. Further, modern molecular biology techniques such as reverse genetics tools have favorably advanced this field by creating efficient recombinant VSVs for OV; some have entered into clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the current status of VSV based oncotherapy, challenges, and future perspectives regarding its therapeutic applications in the cancer treatment.

  1. Palliative radiation therapy practice for advanced esophageal carcinoma in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, V; Gaye, P M; Wahab, S A; Ndlovu, N; Ngoma, T; Vanderpuye, V; Sowuhami, A; Dawotola, D A; Kigula-Mugambe, J; Jeremic, B

    2010-04-01

    While numerous surveys of pattern of practices of palliative radiotherapy (RT) in advanced esophageal cancers have been published in developed countries, there is no such survey in African countries. During and after a regional training course by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in palliative cancer care, a questionnaire was distributed to African RT centers to gather information about infrastructure and human resources available, and the pattern of practice of palliative RT for esophageal cancers. Twenty-four of the 35 centers (60%) completed the questionnaire. Twenty out of 23 (87%) centers treat patients with esophageal cancer presenting with dysphagia using external beam RT (16 centers external beam RT alone and 4 centers also use brachytherapy as a boost). Twelve (60%) centers prescribe RT doses of 30 Gy in 10 fractions and 2 centers 20 Gy in 5 fractions. Eighteen centers (78%) have low dose rate (LDR) brachytherapy, and 9 (39%) centers have high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. One center only used HDR brachytherapy alone to a dose of 16 Gy in 2 fractions over 8 days. RT remains a major component of treatment of patients with esophageal cancers in African countries. Still, there is a great variety among centers in both indications for RT and its characteristics for a treatment indication.

  2. Advances on PPARγ Research in the Emerging Era of Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Pinyi; Zhao, Zhongming

    2018-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that functions as a ligand-inducible transcription factor. It regulates glucose and lipid metabolism, immunity, and cellular growth and differentiation. Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are potent insulin sensitizers that function by activating PPARs, with a high specificity for PPARγ. Due to their ability to preserve pancreatic beta cell function and reduce insulin resistance, TZDs have become one of the most prescribed classes of medications for type 2 diabetes (T2D) since their approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and initial use in 1997. However, adverse effects, including weight gain, bone loss, fluid retention, congestive heart failure, and risk to bladder cancer, have weakened the benefits of TZDs in T2D therapies. Therefore, there is an urgent need to have a deeper understanding of regulatory mechanisms of PPARγ expression and activity so that novel classes of PPARγ-modulating therapeutics with fewer or weaker side effects can be developed. This article systematically reviews PPARγ's mechanisms of action and multilayer regulations. In addition, novel classes of therapeutics modulating PPARγ and new direction of research on genetic variants that affect PPARγ function and antidiabetic drug response are highlighted, which sheds light on PPARγ as a promising target for developing safer and precision medicine based therapeutic strategies. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. Developing the PLA critical care medicine is critical for advancing the level of battle wound treatment in the new era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-qin LI

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Critical care medicine is an emerging unique specialty developed from the later 20th century, since then, it has been enriched with theoretical and practical experiences and becomes the most active subject in the field of clinical medicine. Critical care medicine of the PLA has attained significant achievements in the treatment and research of severe trauma, sepsis, severe heat stroke, multiple organ failure and severe acute pancreatitis. Besides, it stands in the leading position in the organ function maintenance of critically ill patients, continuous hemofiltration and nutrition support in China. Furthermore, critical care medicine plays an important role in the rescue of critically ill patients, medical support and disaster relief. As the relationship between battle wound rescue system and critical care medicine has been increasingly close, transition in the form of war in the new period brings new tasks to battle wound treatment constantly. Combined with the characteristics of information-oriented war condition in the future, developing the PLA critical care medicine and advancing the level of battle wound treatment in the new period point out the direction for the future work of critical care medicine. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.02.01

  4. New advances in amblyopia therapy I: binocular therapies and pharmacologic augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Courtney L; Culican, Susan M

    2018-05-18

    Amblyopia therapy options have traditionally been limited to penalisation of the non-amblyopic eye with either patching or pharmaceutical penalisation. Solid evidence, mostly from the Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group, has validated both number of hours a day of patching and days per week of atropine use. The use of glasses alone has also been established as a good first-line therapy for both anisometropic and strabismic amblyopia. Unfortunately, visual acuity equalisation or even improvement is not always attainable with these methods. Additionally, non-compliance with prescribed therapies contributes to treatment failures, with data supporting difficulty adhering to full treatment sessions. Interest in alternative therapies for amblyopia treatment has long been a topic of interest among researchers and clinicians alike. Incorporating new technology with an understanding of the biological basis of amblyopia has led to enthusiasm for binocular treatment of amblyopia. Early work on perceptual learning as well as more recent enthusiasm for iPad-based dichoptic training have each generated interesting and promising data for vision improvement in amblyopes. Use of pharmaceutical augmentation of traditional therapies has also been investigated. Several different drugs with unique mechanisms of action are thought to be able to neurosensitise the brain and enhance responsiveness to amblyopia therapy. No new treatment has emerged from currently available evidence as superior to the traditional therapies in common practice today. But ongoing investigation into the use of both new technology and the understanding of the neural basis of amblyopia promises alternate or perhaps better cures in the future. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  5. Development of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease: A Pilot Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, Rebeka

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of people with Huntington's disease (HD) report that music therapy provides a range of benefits that may improve quality of life; however, no robust music therapy assessment tools exist for this population. Develop and conduct preliminary psychometric testing of a music therapy assessment tool for patients with advanced HD. First, we established content and face validity of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced HD (MATA-HD) through focus groups and field testing. Second, we examined psychometric properties of the resulting MATA-HD in terms of its construct validity, internal consistency, and inter-rater and intra-rater reliability over 10 group music therapy sessions with 19 patients. The resulting MATA-HD included a total of 15 items across six subscales (Arousal/Attention, Physical Presentation, Communication, Musical, Cognition, and Psychological/Behavioral). We found good construct validity (r ≥ 0.7) for Mood, Communication Level, Communication Effectiveness, Choice, Social Behavior, Arousal, and Attention items. Cronbach's α of 0.825 indicated good internal consistency across 11 items with a common focus of engagement in therapy. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) Intra-Class Coefficient (ICC) scores averaged 0.65, and a mean intra-rater ICC reliability of 0.68 was obtained. Further training and retesting provided a mean of IRR ICC of 0.7. Preliminary data indicate that the MATA-HD is a promising tool for measuring patient responses to music therapy interventions across psychological, physical, social, and communication domains of functioning in patients with advanced HD. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. [Cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway of some non-pharmacological therapies of complementary medicine: possible implications for treatment of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamus, Dorit

    2011-08-01

    Rheumatologic and autoimmune diseases are among foremost diseases for which patients seek complementary and integrative medicine options. Therefore, physicians should be informed on the advances in research of these therapies, in order to be able to discuss possible indications and contraindications for these treatment modalities with their patients. This review summarizes several therapeutic modalities of complementary medicine that may be involved in the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway. The analysis of systematic reviews of acupuncture for rheumatic conditions has concluded that the evidence is sufficiently sound to warrant positive recommendations of this therapy for osteoarthritis, low back pain and lateral elbow pain. There is relatively strong evidence to support the use of hypnosis in pain treatment, such as in cases of fibromyalgia. A recent controlled study that evaLuated tai-chi in fibromyalgia has reported reductions in pain, improvements in mood, quality of Life, self efficacy and exercise capacity. There is also cumulative evidence that acupuncture, hypnosis and tai-chi may decrease the high frequency of heart rate variability, suggesting enhancement of vagus nerve activity. Hence, it has been hypothesized that these modalities might impact the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway to modulate inflammation. Further clinical and basic research to confirm this hypothesis should be performed in order to validate integration of these therapies in comprehensive treatment for some inflammatory and autoimmune diseases.

  7. Ganciclovir Antiviral Therapy in Advanced Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: An Open Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Egan

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion. This audit outcome suggests that 2-week course of ganciclovir (iv may attenuate disease progression in a subgroup of advanced IPF patients. These observations do not suggest that anti-viral treatment is a substitute for the standard care, however, suggests the need to explore the efficacy of ganciclovir as adjunctive therapy in IPF.

  8. Systematic review of innovative ablative therapies for the treatment of locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rombouts, S. J. E.; Vogel, J. A.; van Santvoort, H. C.; van Lienden, K. P.; van Hillegersberg, R.; Busch, O. R. C.; Besselink, M. G. H.; Molenaar, I. Q.

    2015-01-01

    BackgroundLocally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) is associated with a very poor prognosis. Current palliative (radio)chemotherapy provides only a marginal survival benefit of 2-3 months. Several innovative local ablative therapies have been explored as new treatment options. This systematic

  9. Postoperative radiation therapy following laser surgery in locally advanced head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradier, O.; Schmidberger, H.; Christiansen, H.; Florez, R.; Hess, C.F.; Jackel, M.C.; Steiner, W.

    2002-01-01

    The results achieved with trans oral micro-surgery in advanced head and neck carcinoma with adjuvant radiotherapy are comparable to those with radical surgery. The haemoglobin level has an important role in the loco regional control and on survival. Split course radiation therapy regimen has not a place in the adjuvant situation. (author)

  10. Perspectives of newly diagnosed advanced cancer patients receiving dignity therapy during cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dose, Ann Marie; Rhudy, Lori M

    2018-01-01

    Dignity therapy is a psychosocial intervention that has been used primarily at the end of life to improve quality of life and other patient outcomes, but many individuals are unable to complete it due to health decline and death. The purpose of this study was to identify what individuals with advanced pancreatic or lung cancer with limited life expectancy, undergoing active cancer treatment describe during the dignity therapy intervention as important to them when not immediately facing end of life. Twenty patients undergoing chemotherapy for advanced cancer participated in a dignity therapy intervention study. Initial interviews were analyzed using descriptive content analysis. Family provided the overall context and background for emerging themes of defining events, accomplishments, and God's plan, which led to lessons learned, and resulted in messages of hope. Interviews were often autobiographical in nature and contained much reminiscence, consistent with dignity therapy's intent. Few participants spoke about their cancer diagnoses during the interview. This study adds unique insight into the use of dignity therapy for those still receiving active cancer treatment, different from work by others in which it was offered only at end of life. As part of supportive care, clinicians need to validate the importance of family to those with advanced cancer and to provide opportunities for patients to share what they have learned throughout life and to impart messages of hope to those closest to them.

  11. Use of medicinal plants as the additional therapy of viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.B. Ershova

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Dear colleagues, continuing the rubric of the journal about the treatment of infectious diseases by medicinal plants, we want to present the methods of using medicinal plants as an additional therapy for treatment of viral hepatitis in addition to the main treatment according to the generally clinical standards of antiviral therapy. Viral hepatitis compiles a large group of human infectious diseases characterized by a predominant liver damage. “Currently, viral hepatitis is recognized as a major public health problem requiring urgent action”, said Dr Margaret Chan, WHO Director-General (WHO Global hepatitis report, 2017. Treatment of viral hepatitis is a complex task and involves the use of generally clinical recommendations or standards. There are criteria for determining the need for pharmacotherapy and the most rational scheme for antiviral treatment in every case of viral hepatitis. The purpose of antiviral therapy is to achieve a stable virologic response, to prevent the progression of the disease, the development of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. However, at the present stage a stable virologic response in the general population of patients can be achieved in approximately 60 % of cases. In addition, standard antiviral drugs have side effects, are of high cost and are contraindicated in a number of clinical situations, for example, with a decrease in the number of blood elements (thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, anemia, at the stage of decompensated liver cirrhosis. Probably, all this induces to use alternative methods of therapy, which remain popular both among general practitioners and patients with this infection. The question of the treatment of viral hepatitis with medicinal herbs has been studied for a long time. According to some authors, there is no scientific evidence that hepatitis C can be cured by herbs. The only scientifically proven method of fighting the virus is antiviral therapy. However, there are other points

  12. Maintenance therapy in advanced non-small cell lung cancer: current status and future implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinchcombe, Thomas E; Socinski, Mark A

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance therapy for patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer has been an area of intense investigation. Maintenance therapy has been divided into two broad categories: continuation maintenance when the chemotherapy or targeted agent was part of a defined number of cycles of combination therapy and in the absence of disease progression is continued as a single agent or switch maintenance when a third agent is initiated after four cycles of platinum-based double-agent chemotherapy in the absence of disease progression. Two monoclonal antibodies, cetuximab and bevacizumab, are used as continuation maintenance, but the incremental benefit of the maintenance therapy with these agents is undetermined. Phase III trials have not revealed an overall survival benefit for continuation maintenance chemotherapy, and this approach should be considered investigational. Phase III trials have demonstrated an improvement in overall survival with switch maintenance therapy with pemetrexed compared with placebo in patients with nonsquamous histology and erlotinib compared with placebo. Phase III trials have not revealed an improvement in quality of life with maintenance therapy. In the trials of maintenance therapy, 30 to 40% of patients enrolled in the observation or placebo arm did not receive second-line therapy, and among the patients who did receive second-line therapy, there was significant heterogeneity in the therapy. The development of maintenance therapy has raised issues about the role of treatment-free intervals in routine clinical care, trial design issues such as the optimal endpoint, the ethics of a placebo arm, and the implications of maintenance therapy for first-line trials.

  13. Statin dose reduction with complementary diet therapy: A pilot study of personalized medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca Scolaro

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Statin intolerance, whether real or perceived, is a growing issue in clinical practice. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of reduced-dose statin therapy complemented with nutraceuticals. Methods: First phase: Initially, 53 type 2 diabetic statin-treated patients received a supplementation with fish oil (1.7 g EPA + DHA/day, chocolate containing plant sterols (2.2 g/day, and green tea (two sachets/day for 6 weeks. Second phase: “Good responders” to supplementation were identified after multivariate analysis (n = 10, and recruited for a pilot protocol of statin dose reduction. “Good responders” were then provided with supplementation for 12 weeks: standard statin therapy was kept during the first 6 weeks and reduced by 50% from weeks 6–12. Results: First phase: After 6 weeks of supplementation, plasma LDL-C (−13.7% ± 3.7, P = .002 and C-reactive protein (−35.5% ± 5.9, P = .03 were reduced. Analysis of lathosterol and campesterol in plasma suggested that intensity of LDL-C reduction was influenced by cholesterol absorption rate rather than its synthesis. Second phase: no difference was observed for plasma lipids, inflammation, cholesterol efflux capacity, or HDL particles after statin dose reduction when compared to standard therapy. Conclusions: Although limited by the small sample size, our study demonstrates the potential for a new therapeutic approach combining lower statin dose and specific dietary compounds. Further studies should elucidate “good responders” profile as a tool for personalized medicine. This may be particularly helpful in the many patients with or at risk for CVD who cannot tolerate high dose statin therapy. Trial registration: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02732223. Keywords: Atherosclerosis, Omega-3 fatty acids, Plant sterols, Polyphenols, Responders

  14. Role of radiation therapy in locally advanced thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urgesi, A.; Monetti, U.; Rossi, G.; Ricardi, U.; Casadio, C.

    1990-01-01

    The records of all patients treated for thymoma in the Department of Radiotherapy of Torino University between 1970 and 1988 were reviewed. There were 59 in stage 3 and 18 in stage 4a; 74 patients were operated before radiotherapy and 3 had a pre-operative irradiation followed by surgery and post-operative boost. Complete resection was possible in 55.9 per cent of stage 3 cases and in none with stage 4a. Subtotal resection was done in 36.6 per cent of stage 3 patients and 83.3 per cent in stage 4a. 8 patients had only biopsy: 5 in stage 3 (8.5 per cent) and 3 in stage 4a (16.6 per cent). Post-operative radiation doses ranged between 39.6 and 46 Gy to the whole mediastinum followed by a 10-16 Gy boost on smaller fields in cases presenting residual disease after surgery. The pre-operative dose was 30 Gy followed by a post-operative boost of 16-24 Gy. Conventional fraction sizes of 1.8-2 Gy were always used. The 10 years survival rate was 58.3 per cent. There was a significant difference between stage 3 (70.9 per cent) and stage 4a (26.3 per cent)(p<0.0004). Survival of patients in stage 3 was not significantly affected by the type of surgery. No significant difference in survival or recurrence rate was observed in patients with different histologies and in patients with or without myasthenia. Thoracic relapses occurred in 15. 2 per cent of stage 3 patients and in 50 per cent of stage 4a patients (p<0.01). Only 7 relapses (9.1 per cent) were within the limits of the radiation field. Radiotherapy seems to be effective in reducing the risk of local recurrence and prolonging survival in patients operated upon for locally advanced thymoma. More patients are alive and free of disease at 10 years than those who received radical surgery. (author). 26 refs.; 4 figs.; 5 tabs

  15. Blending work-integrated learning with distance education in an Australian radiation therapy advanced practice curriculum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Kristie; Wright, Caroline; Osborne, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Advanced practice for radiation therapists has been a part of the international landscape for several years; however formal implementation into the Australian health care system is yet to happen. Despite this, three short course radiation therapy advanced practitioner programs have been established by an Australian tertiary institution in response to clinical service needs at several organisations. This paper describes the rationale for curriculum design and development of the program materials, the small-scale implementation of the programs at pilot sites, and the evolution of the curriculum to be available to registered radiation therapists nationally. Each program has been designed around a specific clinical role, where flexibility of delivery to busy practitioners was central to the decision to offer them via distance education. The curriculum comprises theoretical units of study which run in parallel to and underpin clinical practice units, where advanced competence in the specific area of practice is overseen by an experienced radiation oncologist mentor. Given the nature of the disparate clinical services requiring an advanced radiation therapy practitioner, the workplace learning component of the course is individually negotiated at a local level. Outcomes suggest that the flexible clinically based training underpinned by a distance education academic curriculum is able to support the development of advanced radiation therapy practitioners responsive to local service need, and ultimately may improve the patient experience

  16. Cf-252 neutron brachytherapy: an advance for bulky localized cancer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Y.

    1984-01-01

    The physical and radiobiogical basis as well as the rationale for neutron brachytherapy, using Cf-252, in human cancer therapy is reviewed. Cf-252 brachytherapy represents an economical and effective form of neutron radiotherapy that is readily and safely applied clinically. It can be used anywhere in the world without unusual personnel, equipment or facilities, or prohibitive expenses or maintenance costs. Used on bulky head and neck, thoracic, abdominal, pelvic, brain and appendage cancers, it overcomes hypoxic radioresistance and produces remarkable rates of tumor clearance. It is easily combined with photon radiotherapy and in proper schedules and doses, it can control advanced but still localized regional cancers to produce tumor cure. It will clear the local manifestations of recurrent or metastatic tumors or advanced stages of primary tumors and therefore in conjunction with other adjuvant therapies offers much more effective tumor control and palliation than present conventional therapy. (Auth.)

  17. Evaluation of radiation therapy for advanced well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tatsuno, Ikuo; Tada, Akira; Choto, Shuichi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi

    1987-01-01

    Eighty-two patients with advanced well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma were treated. Sixty-six patients survived for more than 10 years and 10-year-survival rate was 80.5 %. Multidisciplinary treatment, consisting of surgery, radioiodine, external irradiation and TSH suppression was studied. We emphasized that radioiodine treatment after thyroid-ectomy was unique and an ideal therapeutic model for locally advanced, distant metastatic and recurrent cases as far as radioiodine was accumulated on thyroid cancer tissue. External irradiation was sometimes effective for the remnant thyroid carcinoma and metastases. Occassionally, well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma showed good response to TSH suppression therapy using thyroid hormone. The significance of conversion of well-differentiated carcinoma of thyroid to anaplastic carcinoma was noticed. We recognized that radiation therapy was effective for advanced well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma in multidisciplinary treatment. (author)

  18. Evaluation of radiation therapy for advanced well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Ikuo; Tada, Akira; Choto, Shuichi; Takanaka, Tsuyoshi

    1987-02-01

    Eighty-two patients with advanced well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma were treated. Sixty-six patients survived for more than 10 years and 10-year-survival rate was 80.5 %. Multidisciplinary treatment, consisting of surgery, radioiodine, external irradiation and TSH suppression was studied. We emphasized that radioiodine treatment after thyroid-ectomy was unique and an ideal therapeutic model for locally advanced, distant metastatic and recurrent cases as far as radioiodine was accumulated on thyroid cancer tissue. External irradiation was sometimes effective for the remnant thyroid carcinoma and metastases. Occassionally, well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma showed good response to TSH suppression therapy using thyroid hormone. The significance of conversion of well-differentiated carcinoma of thyroid to anaplastic carcinoma was noticed. We recognized that radiation therapy was effective for advanced well-differentiated thyroid carcinoma in multidisciplinary treatment.

  19. Evaluation of multimodality treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer. Special reference to intraoperative vs. external radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakasugi, Hideyuki; Funakoshi, Akihiro; Seo, Yousuke; Iguchi, Haruo; Wada, Susumu

    1999-01-01

    Intraoperative radiation therapy (IORT)+postoperative external beam radiation therapy (ERT) with chemotherapy and ERT alone with chemotherapy have been performed in our hospital for unresectable, especially locally advanced, pancreatic cancer. We compared the former method with the latter. Chemotherapy was performed together with radiation, using 5-FU, CDDP, and MMC. IORT+ERT was successful in only half of the treated patients, while ERT alone was successful in almost all of the patients. As a result, the doses of radiation were often shorter in patients treated by the former method compared to the latter method. Both methods, when completed for locally advanced pancreatic cancer (stage IVa), produced good effects on tumor markers, tumor size and pain. Furthermore, the latter method was better than the former in improving the survival time and quality of life (QOL). Therefore, ERT is a practical and useful method for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. (author)

  20. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies Joint Committee recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narouze, Samer N; Provenzano, David; Peng, Philip; Eichenberger, Urs; Lee, Sang Chul; Nicholls, Barry; Moriggl, Bernhard

    2012-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in pain medicine for interventional axial, nonaxial, and musculoskeletal pain procedures is rapidly evolving and growing. Because of the lack of specialty-specific guidelines for ultrasonography in pain medicine, an international collaborative effort consisting of members of the Special Interest Group on Ultrasonography in Pain Medicine from the American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine, the European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy, and the Asian Australasian Federation of Pain Societies developed the following recommendations for education and training in ultrasound-guided interventional pain procedures. The purpose of these recommendations is to define the required skills for performing ultrasound-guided pain procedures, the processes for appropriate education, and training and quality improvement. Training algorithms are outlined for practice- and fellowship-based pathways. The previously published American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine and European Society of Regional Anaesthesia and Pain Therapy education and teaching recommendations for ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia served as a foundation for the pain medicine recommendations. Although the decision to grant ultrasound privileges occurs at the institutional level, the committee recommends that the training guidelines outlined in this document serve as the foundation for educational training and the advancement of the practice of ultrasonography in pain medicine.

  1. A Pilot Feasibility Study of Whole-systems Ayurvedic Medicine and Yoga Therapy for Weight Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rioux, Jennifer; Thomson, Cynthia; Howerter, Amy

    2014-01-01

    To develop and test the feasibility of a whole-systems lifestyle intervention for obesity treatment based on the practices of Ayurvedic medicine/ Yoga therapy. A pre-post weight loss intervention pilot study using conventional and Ayurvedic diagnosis inclusion criteria, tailored treatment within a standardized treatment algorithm, and standardized data collection instruments for collecting Ayurvedic outcomes. A convenience sample of overweight/obese adult community members from Tucson, Arizona interested in a "holistic weight loss program" and meeting predetermined inclusion/exclusion criteria. A comprehensive diet, activity, and lifestyle modification program based on principles of Ayurvedic medicine/yoga therapy with significant self-monitoring of lifestyle behaviors. The 3-month program was designed to change eating and activity patterns and to improve self-efficacy, quality of life, well-being, vitality, and self-awareness around food choices, stress management, and barriers to weight loss. Changes in body weight, body mass index; body fat percentage, fat/lean mass, waist/hip circumference and ratio, and blood pressure. Diet and exercise self-efficacy scales; perceived stress scale; visual analog scales (VAS) of energy, appetite, stress, quality of life, well-being, and program satisfaction at all time points. Twenty-two adults attended an in-person Ayurvedic screening; 17 initiated the intervention, and 12 completed the 3-month intervention. Twelve completed follow-up at 6 months and 11 completed follow-up at 9 months. Mean weight loss at 3 months was 3.54 kg (SD 4.76); 6 months: 4.63 kg, (SD 6.23) and 9 months: 5.9 kg (SD 8.52). Self-report of program satisfaction was more than 90% at all time points. An Ayurveda-/yoga-based lifestyle modification program is an acceptable and feasible approach to weight management. Data collection, including self-monitoring and conventional and Ayurvedic outcomes, did not unduly burden participants, with attrition similar to

  2. Platelet-rich plasma and its derivatives as promising bioactive materials for regenerative medicine: basic principles and concepts underlying recent advances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, Tomoyuki

    2015-05-01

    Over the past decade, platelet-rich plasma (PRP), a platelet-concentrated plasma fraction, has been widely investigated and applied to regenerative medicine. The clinical utility of PRP is supported by evidence that PRP contains high concentrations of platelet-related growth factors and normal concentrations of plasma-derived fibrinogen, both of which contribute synergistically to the regenerative process. Additionally, its superior cost-efficacy versus conventional therapies is attractive to many clinicians. However, current disadvantages of PRP include a relatively complicated preparation procedure and variable operator-dependent efficacy. An additional disadvantage is the use of bovine thrombin, an animal-derived biological, as a coagulant. Many of these disadvantages are overcome by recent advances in preparation procedures and devices; for example, Joseph Choukroun simplified the platelet-rich fibrin preparation procedure and improved handling efficiency without the aid of animal-derived factors. With advancements in cell processing technology, there has been a general shift in cell therapy from autologous to allogeneic treatment; however, autologous PRP therapy will not easily be replaced by allogeneic treatment in the near future. Therefore, to provide more predictable regenerative therapy outcomes using autologous PRP, further investigations should address developing a standardized procedure for PRP preparation to augment its efficacy and potency, independent of donor variability. We would then propose that operators and clinicians prepare PRP according to the standardized protocol and to carefully evaluate the clinical scenario (i.e., recipient factors comprising skeletal defects) to determine which factor(s) should be added to PRP preparations. This careful approach will lead to improved clinical outcomes for patients.

  3. Discovery Monday - Physics for medicine: the use of accelerators in therapy

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    What does research at CERN have to do with medicine? Perhaps very little at first glance. And yet particle beams are proving to be efficient weapons in the fight against certain diseases. Doctors and physicists will explain how and why at the next Discovery Monday, to be held at Microcosm on 3 May. Various technologies and instruments will be presented during the evening. You will learn, for example, how scientists use radioisotopes to destroy tumours without damaging the surrounding tissues. You will also find out about LIBO, a small linear accelerator used for treating deep-seated tumours. Before therapy can begin, it is vital to make the right diagnosis. On this subject, radiologists will be showing how to interpret a number of X-rays, as well as teaching the youngest visitors about their anatomy and explaining how useful particle physics can be in medicine. The event will take place at Microcosm on 3rd May, from 7.30 p.m. to 9.00 p.m. Entrance free. For further information see: http://www.ce...

  4. Integrative medical therapy: examination of meditation's therapeutic and global medicinal outcomes via nitric oxide (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, George B; Esch, Tobias

    2005-10-01

    Relaxation techniques are part of the integrative medicine movement that is of growing importance for mainstream medicine. Complementary medical therapies have the potential to affect many physiological systems. Repeatedly studies show the benefits of the placebo response and relaxation techniques in the treatment of hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, chronic pain, insomnia, anxiety and mild and moderate depression, premenstrual syndrome, and infertility. In itself, relaxation is characterized by a decreased metabolism, heart rate, blood pressure, and rate of breathing as well as an increase in skin temperature. Relaxation approaches, such as progressive muscle relaxation, autogenic training, meditation and biofeedback, are effective in lowering systolic and diastolic blood pressure in hypertensive patients by a significant margin. Given this association with changes in vascular tone, we have hypothesized that nitric oxide, a demonstrated vasodilator substance, contribute to physiological activity of relaxation approaches. We examined the scientific literature concerning the disorders noted earlier for their nitric oxide involvement in an attempt to provide a molecular rationale for the positive effects of relaxation approaches, which are physiological and cognitive process. We conclude that constitutive nitric oxide may crucially contribute to potentially beneficial outcomes and effects in diverse pathologies, exerting a global healing effect.

  5. Stem Cell Therapy: Repurposing Cell-Based Regenerative Medicine Beyond Cell Replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napoli, Eleonora; Lippert, Trenton; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2018-02-27

    Stem cells exhibit simple and naive cellular features, yet their exact purpose for regenerative medicine continues to elude even the most elegantly designed research paradigms from developmental biology to clinical therapeutics. Based on their capacity to divide indefinitely and their dynamic differentiation into any type of tissue, the advent of transplantable stem cells has offered a potential treatment for aging-related and injury-mediated diseases. Recent laboratory evidence has demonstrated that transplanted human neural stem cells facilitate endogenous reparative mechanisms by initiating multiple regenerative processes in the brain neurogenic areas. Within these highly proliferative niches reside a myriad of potent regenerative molecules, including anti-inflammatory cytokines, proteomes, and neurotrophic factors, altogether representing a biochemical cocktail vital for restoring brain function in the aging and diseased brain. Here, we advance the concept of therapeutically repurposing stem cells not towards cell replacement per se, but rather exploiting the cells' intrinsic properties to serve as the host brain regenerative catalysts.

  6. ECM and ECM-like materials - Biomaterials for applications in regenerative medicine and cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinderer, Svenja; Layland, Shannon Lee; Schenke-Layland, Katja

    2016-02-01

    Regenerative strategies such as stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering applications are being developed with the aim to replace, remodel, regenerate or support damaged tissues and organs. In addition to careful cell type selection, the design of appropriate three-dimensional (3D) scaffolds is essential for the generation of bio-inspired replacement tissues. Such scaffolds are usually made of degradable or non-degradable biomaterials and can serve as cell or drug carriers. The development of more effective and efficient drug carrier systems is also highly relevant for novel cancer treatment strategies. In this review, we provide a summary of current approaches that employ ECM and ECM-like materials, or ECM-synthetic polymer hybrids, as biomaterials in the field of regenerative medicine. We further discuss the utilization of such materials for cell and drug delivery, and highlight strategies for their use as vehicles for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Challenges, Solutions, and Quality Metrics of Personal Genome Assembly in Advancing Precision Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenming Xiao

    2016-04-01

    immune-response, tailoring drug therapy and detecting tumors. We believe the precision medicine would largely benefit from bioinformatics solutions, particularly for personal genome assembly.

  8. Spermatogonial stem cells: Current biotechnological advances in reproduction and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aponte, Pedro Manuel

    2015-05-26

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the germ stem cells of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis. Through the process of spermatogenesis, they produce sperm while concomitantly keeping their cellular pool constant through self-renewal. SSC biology offers important applications for animal reproduction and overcoming human disease through regenerative therapies. To this end, several techniques involving SSCs have been developed and will be covered in this article. SSCs convey genetic information to the next generation, a property that can be exploited for gene targeting. Additionally, SSCs can be induced to become embryonic stem cell-like pluripotent cells in vitro. Updates on SSC transplantation techniques with related applications, such as fertility restoration and preservation of endangered species, are also covered on this article. SSC suspensions can be transplanted to the testis of an animal and this has given the basis for SSC functional assays. This procedure has proven technically demanding in large animals and men. In parallel, testis tissue xenografting, another transplantation technique, was developed and resulted in sperm production in testis explants grafted into ectopical locations in foreign species. Since SSC culture holds a pivotal role in SSC biotechnologies, current advances are overviewed. Finally, spermatogenesis in vitro, already demonstrated in mice, offers great promises to cope with reproductive issues in the farm animal industry and human clinical applications.

  9. Palliative care in advanced gynecological cancers: Institute of palliative medicine experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sushmita Pathy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the epidemiological profile, clinical symptoms and referral patterns of patients with gynecological malignancy. To evaluate pain symptoms, response to treatment and factors affecting management in patients with advanced gynecological malignancies. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed of the gynecological malignancy cases registered at the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, Calicut, over a 12-month period between January 2006 and December 2006.Patient characteristics, symptoms and response to treatment were evaluated in detail. Results: A total of 1813 patients registered, of which 64 had gynecological malignancies. Most of the cases were referred from the Oncology Department of the Calicut Medical College. Fifty-five percent of the patients were unaware of their diagnosis. Psychosocial issues and anxiety were observed in 48%. Insomnia was seen in 52% of the cases. Pain was the most common and most distressing symptom. Adequate pain relief was achieved in only 32% of the patients. Conclusions: The number of gynecological malignancy cases attending the Pain and Palliative Care Clinic is small. Pain is the most common and distressing symptom, with only 32% of the patients achieving adequate pain relief. Poor drug compliance, incomplete assessment of pain and the lack of awareness of morphine therapy were identified as the most common causes for poor pain control.

  10. [Research advance in metabolism of effective ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines by probiotics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Cheng-En; Li, Hai-Long; He, Xiao-Ping; Zheng, Fen-Fen; Zhu, Hua-Liu; Liu, Liang-Feng; Du, Wei

    2018-01-01

    The pharmacological activity of active ingredients from Chinese medicine depends greatly on the microecological environment of probiotics in the human body. After effective ingredients from traditional Chinese medicines are metabolized or biotransformed by probiotics, their metabolites can increase pharmacological activity, and can be absorbed more easily to improve the bioavailability. Therefore, the combination of Chinese medicines with probiotics is the innovation point in R&D of functional food and Chinese medicines, and also a new thinking for the modernization of Chinese medicine.This review summarizes and analyses the research progress on metabolism effects of gut microbiota on Chinese medicines components, the regulating effect of effective ingredients from Chinese medicine on intestinal probiotics, the application status of probiotics in traditional Chinese medicines, and the main problems and prospects in the research and development of Chinese medicines products with probiotic, aiming to provide theoretical guidance and practical value for the fermentation engineering of Chinese herbal medicine. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  11. The End of Nihilism: Systemic Therapy of Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernani, Vinicius; Steuer, Conor E; Jahanzeb, Mohammad

    2017-01-14

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States and many other parts of the world. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) comprises 85-90% of lung cancers. Historically, the expected survival of patients with advanced disease has been estimated in months. In recent years, however, lung cancer has come to be seen as a treatable disease with multiple therapeutic options. Enormous advances in the understanding of its pathways and mechanisms have enabled personalized therapy in NSCLC. The evolving approach to therapy focuses on genomic profiling of the tumors to find molecular targets and develop specific agents for individualized therapy. In addition, maintenance therapy has emerged as a valid approach, and the choice of chemotherapy now varies by histology. Most recently, immunotherapy with checkpoint inhibitors has shown promising results, with impressive durations of response and a tolerable toxicity profile. Together, these discoveries have improved overall survival substantially in patient populations that have access to these advancements. We review the clinical data surrounding these impressive improvements.

  12. Outcome of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy and intensity-modulated radiation therapy for inoperable locally advanced pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Ningning; Jin Jing; Li Yexiong; Yu Zihao; Liu Xinfan; Wang Weihu; Wang Shulian; Song Yongwen; Liu Yuping

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the outcome of radiotherapy for locally advanced pancreatic cancer. Methods: From January 2000 to December 2007, 41 patients with inoperable locally advanced (stage III) pancreatic cancer were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy(3DCRT) or intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Among these patients, 30 received concurrent radio-chemo-therapy. Results: The median survival time(MST) and 1-year overall survival were 9.2 months and 23%. Patients with pretreatment KPS ≥ 80, no regional lymph nodes metastasis, and CR/PR after radiotherapy had better prognosis. The corresponding MSTs were 11.1 months vs 5.8 months (χ 2 =7.50, P=0.006), 10.8 months vs 6.5 months(χ 2 =5.67, P=0.017), and 19.5 months vs 9.1 months (χ 2 =7.28, P=0.007), respectively. Concurrent radio-chemotherapy tended to improve the overall survival(χ 2 =3.25, P=0.072). After radiotherapy, 18 patients had clinical benefit response, mainly being abdominal pain relief. Neither grade 4 hematologic nor grade 3 non-hematologic toxicities were observed. Conclusions: For patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer, both 3DCRT and IMRT are effective in alleviation of disease-related symptoms. Patients with better performance status before treatment, no regional lymph nodes metastasis, and better response to radiotherapy may have better prognosis. Concurrent radio-chemotherapy trend to improve overall survival when compared with radiotherapy alone. (authors)

  13. Advanced gastric adenocarcinoma. Influence of preoperative radiation therapy on toxicity and long-term survival rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malzoni, Carlos Eduardo

    1996-01-01

    The surgical treatment of gastric cancer has better long-term survival rates when performed in patients with early gastric cancer. Worse results are obtained in treatment of advanced gastric cancer. Most patients in west centers are treated in advanced stages. A great number of them go through a surgical treatment unable by itself to cure them. the frequent local recurrence caused by failure of the surgical treatment has been keeping poor survival rates in patients with advanced gastric cancer for decades. The desire of improving survival is the reason of the use of adjuvant therapies. This paper achieved the retrospective study of the influence of preoperative radiation therapy (2000 cGy) in long-term survival rates (120 months) of patients with advanced gastric cancer on stages IIIa, IIIb and IV. The possible injuries caused in the liver and kidney were observed also as well as first group was treated by surgical and radiation therapies and the second received surgical treatment only. There was no statistical difference between the two groups when sex, age, race, occurrence of other diseases, nutritional assessment, TNM stage, occurrence of obstruction or bleeding caused by tumor, surgical procedure and hepatic and renal function were considered. Survival rates and changes on hepatic and renal function were statistically compared. The results showed a statistic improvement on the long-term survival rates of stage IIIa patients treated by preoperative radiation therapy. No statistic difference was observed on hepatic or renal function between the groups. No adverse influence of radiation therapy method was detected by the used parameters. There was no statistical difference between the two groups when immediate surgical complications were considered. (author)

  14. NHLBI's program for VAD therapy for moderately advanced heart failure: the REVIVE-IT pilot trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, J Timothy; Mann, Douglas L

    2010-11-01

    Ventricular assist devices (VADs) are used to bridge heart failure patients to transplantation, to allow their own hearts to recover, or as permanent ("destination") therapy. To date, the use of VADs has been limited to late-stage heart failure patients because of the associated device risks. In 2008, a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) working group met to evaluate the treatment of heart failure using VADs and to advise the institute on how therapy for heart failure may be best advanced by clinical trials involving the devices. Recognizing the improvements in VAD technology and in patient care and selection over the past decade, the working group recommended that a trial be performed to assess the use of chronic VAD therapy in patients who are less ill than those currently eligible for destination therapy. The hypothesis proposed for the trial is that VAD therapy may improve both survival and quality of life in moderately advanced heart failure patients who are neither inotrope-dependent nor exercise-intolerant and have not yet developed serious consequences such as malnourishment, end-organ damage, and immobility. Based on the group's recommendations, NHLBI issued an RFP in 2009 for the REVIVE-IT Pilot Trail, which will serve to test the hypothesis and inform the pivotal trial. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Risk Factors for Pelvic Insufficiency Fractures in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer Following Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Pedersen, Erik Morre; Røhl, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    and underwent external beam radiation therapy with 45 Gy in 25 fractions (node-negative patients) or 50 Gy in 25 fractions with a simultaneous integrated boost of 60 Gy in 30 fractions (node-positive patients). Pulsed dose rate magnetic resonance imaging guided adaptive brachytherapy was given in addition......PURPOSE: To investigate the incidence of and risk factors for pelvic insufficiency fracture (PIF) after definitive chemoradiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer (LACC). METHODS AND MATERIALS: We analyzed 101 patients with LACC treated from 2008-2014. Patients received weekly cisplatin...

  16. Therapy of metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs). Recent insights and advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Tetsuhide; Igarashi, Hisato; Jensen, R.T.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) [carcinoids, pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs)] are becoming an increasing clinical problem because not only are they increasing in frequency, but they can frequently present with advanced disease that requires diagnostic and treatment approaches different from those used in the neoplasms that most physicians are used to seeing and treating. In the past few years there have been numerous advances in all aspects of NETs including: an understanding of their unique pathogenesis; specific classification systems developed which have prognostic value; novel methods of tumor localization developed; and novel treatment approaches described. In patients with advanced metastatic disease these include the use of newer chemotherapeutic approaches, an increased understanding of the role of surgery and cytoreductive methods, the development of methods for targeted delivery of cytotoxic agents, and the development of targeted medical therapies (everolimus, sunitinib) based on an increased understanding of the disease biology. Although pNETs and gastrointestinal NETs share many features, recent studies show they differ in pathogenesis and in many aspects of diagnosis and treatment, including their responsiveness to different therapies. Because of limited space, this review will be limited to the advances made in the management and treatment of patients with advanced metastatic pNETs over the past 5 years. (author)

  17. SEMIOTICS, DIAGNOSTICS AND THERAPY TACTICS OF DEPRESSIVE DISORDERS IN CLINICAL MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Kornetov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study objectives are dedicated to brief synthesized establishment of diagnostics general standard, management and therapy of major depressive disorders (MDD in clinical medicine to provide education in medical practice.Study methods are based on short-term, medium-term and long-term educational programs in 24 Russian and Ukraine cities, which were based on original educational programs under the direction of World Psychiatric Association (WPA and International Committee For Prevention and Treatment of Depression (PTD. There, about 1450 doctors of different occupations were acquainted with the detection, management and treatment of MDD. The Russian version of WPA/PTD programs was created. The program of education included 4 modules. The Core module included an overview of the epidemiology, impact, concepts and classification, and etiology of depressive disorders as well as their recognition, diagnosis, and management in the primary care setting. The second module focused on depressive disorders in physical illness and covered those major illnesses for which is reasonable evidence for an association with depressive disorders. The third module included the development of the depressive disorders in older persons. The forth module included training physicians in mental health skills. 39 theme improvements for 858 primary care setting physicians within the framework of faculty training program of physicians’ development were the part of other programs of physicians’ occupations.Results. A number of highlights were included in the general algorithm of the educational programs. The creation of optimum «physician-depressive patient» contact demands a number of new skills to establish effective communication. These skills involve training of meeting of depressive patient and physician, the ability to follow a certain communication style; identify emotional, cognitive, psychomotor and nonverbal patterns of behavior. Besides that, the education

  18. Catamnestic studies of radiosurgical combination therapy of advanced carcinoma of the larynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meyer-Breiting, P.

    1981-01-01

    The first part of the study summarizes the post-therapeutical course of development of 165 patients who have been treated for advanced internal and external carcinoma of the larynx with a combined, pre- or postoperative radiosurgical therapy, with particular attention being paid to the frequency of focal or lymph node recidivation, post-therapeutical apparent distant metastases and postoperative complications, and also to tumour-independent mortality. The second part of the study is concerned with the determination of survival rates of patients suffering from advanced carcinoma of the larynx or hypopharynx, following low-dose preoperative irradiation (119 patients) or postoperative irradiation (209 patients). (orig./MG) [de

  19. Advances in neutron capture therapy 2006. Proceedings of 12th international congress on neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Yoshinobu; Kobayashi, Tooru; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    The Twelfth International Congress on Neutron Capture Therapy (ICNCT-12) is being held from October 9th to 13th, 2006 at the Kagawa International Congress Hall in Takamatsu, Kagawa, Japan. The main theme of the congress is From the past to the Future'. Five symposiums were organized to accommodate all the contributions from the international scientific committees of the International Society for Neutron Capture Therapy (ISNCT), and two symposiums were added to balance the number of fields of specialties. The seven symposiums for ICNCT-12 are as follows: 1) Clinical Results of BNCT for Brain Tumors, 2) Dosimetry, 3) Treatment Planning system, 4) Drug Delivery System, 5) Biomedical and General Matters, 6) BNCT Systems using Accelerators, 7) New Applications and Protocols for BNCT. There are a total of 195 presentations in this congress: 3 special lectures, 34 symposium presentations, 10 presentations in two special sessions from the recipients of the Ralph G. Fairchild Award, 70 presentations in the oral parallel sessions and 78 presentations in the poster sessions. A compilation of 169 papers are published in this proceedings. The 165 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  20. Photodynamic Therapy in Patients with Advanced Hilar Cholangiocarcinoma: Percutaneous Cholangioscopic Versus Peroral Transpapillary Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tae Yoon; Cheon, Young Koog; Shim, Chan Sup

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to compare the clinical outcomes of patients with advanced hilar cholangiocarcinoma (CC) who underwent photodynamic therapy (PDT) with either percutaneous transhepatic cholangioscopy (PTCS) or endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP). PDT has been proposed as a promising therapy for treatment of unresectable hilar CC that is resistant to conventional standard treatment. However, few studies have compared the delivery methods of PDT in unresectable hilar CC patients. Thirty-seven adult patients with advanced hilar CC were included in this study. Twenty-four patients treated with PTCS-directed PDT and 13 patients treated with ERCP-directed PDT were analyzed retrospectively. The PTCS- and ERCP-directed PDT groups were comparable with respect to age, gender, health status, pretreatment bilirubin levels, Bismuth type, and hilar CC stage. The length of hospital stay differed significantly (p hilar CC. Lower pre-PDT bilirubin levels were associated with longer survival in all patients.

  1. Key Advances in the Systemic Therapy for Soft tissue Sarcomas: Current Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelesh Soman

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Soft tissue sarcomas (STS represent a heterogeneous group of diverse neoplasms of mesenchymal origin. Once relapsed from standard therapy, STS patients have limited treatment options especially those that present with advanced or metastatic disease. In this review article, we highlight recent clinical data that led to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA approval of pazopanib (Votrient® for STS and regorafenib (Stivarga®, BAY 73-4506 in gastrointestinal stromal tumours. We also review ongoing safety/efficacy data for trabectedin (Yondelis®, ET-743, and data from clinical studies of ridaforolimus (AP23573; MK-8669 and palifosfamide (ZIO-201. We provide a list of some promising ongoing trials in soft tissue sarcomas including first line studies of TH-302 and trabectedin. Finally, our article delves into recent advances in our understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of STS and novel therapies that might be explored as treatment options for specific STS histologies.

  2. Anti-EGFR Therapy: Mechanism and Advances in Clinical Efficacy in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Flynn

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This review will focus on recent advances in the application of antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR for the treatment of breast cancer. The choice of EGFR, a member of the ErbB tyrosine kinase receptor family, stems from evidence pinpointing its role in various anti-EGFR therapies. Therefore, an increase in our understanding of EGFR mechanism and signaling might reveal novel targets amenable to intervention in the clinic. This knowledge base might also improve existing medical treatment options and identify research gaps in the design of new therapeutic agents. While the approved use of drugs like the dual kinase inhibitor Lapatinib represents significant advances in the clinical management of breast cancer, confirmatory studies must be considered to foster the use of anti-EGFR therapies including safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy.

  3. Nuclear Medicine in Diagnosis and Therapy of Bone and Joint Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riccabona, G.

    1999-01-01

    Concerning bone and joint diseases therapy of rheumatic synovitis (radiosynoviorthesis) was introduced in 1952 before clinically relevant diagnostic procedures were developed. Radionuclides of Sr and later on 99mTc phosphonates then started the wide use of bone scintigraphy since > 30 years. The diagnostic methods have an excellent sensitivity for detection of local abnormalities of bone metabolism, the specificity of such studies, however, is low. Modifications of the technique (3-phase-bone-scintigraphy, pinhole collimators, ROI-technique), increasing knowledge of pathological scan patterns and introduction of other radionuclide studies (67Ga, 201Tl, inflammation scans with 99mTc-leukocytes or 99mTc-HIG) as well as 18FDG-PET have increased the specificity significantly in recent years and improvements of imaging systems (SPECT) also increased the accuracy of diagnostic methods in diseases of bone and joints. Therapy of such diseases has made considerable progress: inflamed, swollen joints can effectively be treated with 90Y-, 186Re, 169Er-colloids or with 165Dy-particles by radiosynoviorthesis. Severe pain due to disseminated bone metastases of cancer or polyarthritis can be controlled by radionuclide therapy with 89Sr, 153Sm-EDTMP, 186Re- or 188Re-HEDP and possibly 117mSn-DTPA with an acceptable risk of myelodepression. Possibilities, technical details and limitations of radionuclide applications for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes must be considered if optimal benefit for individual patients should be achieved. Overall Nuclear Medicine can become an essential element in management of bone and joint diseases. The relationship of Nuclear Medicine to bone and joint pathology is peculiar: In 1952 treatment of rheumatic synovitis by radiosynoviorthesis with 198Au Colloid was started by Fellinger and Schmid before diagnostic approaches to bone pathology existed. Bone scintigraphy was introduced only in 1961 using 85Sr but obviously the unfavourable radiation

  4. [Chinese medicine industry 4.0:advancing digital pharmaceutical manufacture toward intelligent pharmaceutical manufacture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yi-Yu; Qu, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Bo-Li

    2016-01-01

    A perspective analysis on the technological innovation in pharmaceutical engineering of Chinese medicine unveils a vision on "Future Factory" of Chinese medicine industry in mind. The strategy as well as the technical roadmap of "Chinese medicine industry 4.0" is proposed, with the projection of related core technology system. It is clarified that the technical development path of Chinese medicine industry from digital manufacture to intelligent manufacture. On the basis of precisely defining technical terms such as process control, on-line detection and process quality monitoring for Chinese medicine manufacture, the technical concepts and characteristics of intelligent pharmaceutical manufacture as well as digital pharmaceutical manufacture are elaborated. Promoting wide applications of digital manufacturing technology of Chinese medicine is strongly recommended. Through completely informationized manufacturing processes and multi-discipline cluster innovation, intelligent manufacturing technology of Chinese medicine should be developed, which would provide a new driving force for Chinese medicine industry in technology upgrade, product quality enhancement and efficiency improvement. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  5. Advanced cell therapies: targeting, tracking and actuation of cells with magnetic particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connell, John J; Patrick, P Stephen; Yu, Yichao; Lythgoe, Mark F; Kalber, Tammy L

    2015-01-01

    Regenerative medicine would greatly benefit from a new platform technology that enabled measurable, controllable and targeting of stem cells to a site of disease or injury in the body. Superparamagnetic iron-oxide nanoparticles offer attractive possibilities in biomedicine and can be incorporated into cells, affording a safe and reliable means of tagging. This review describes three current and emerging methods to enhance regenerative medicine using magnetic particles to guide therapeutic cells to a target organ; track the cells using MRI and assess their spatial localization with high precision and influence the behavior of the cell using magnetic actuation. This approach is complementary to the systemic injection of cell therapies, thus expanding the horizon of stem cell therapeutics.

  6. Adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic medicine with anti tubercular drugs on the therapeutic management of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debnath, P K; Chattopadhyay, Jaydeb; Mitra, Achintya; Adhikari, Anjan; Alam, Mirza Samsur; Bandopadhyay, S K; Hazra, Jayram

    2012-07-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) is an age old disease described in Vedic Medicine as 'Yakshma'. Later on, in Ayurveda it earned a prefix and found way into mythology as 'Rajayakshma'. After the discovery of streptomycin, the therapeutic management of PTB received a major breakthrough. The treatment module changed remarkably with the formulation of newer anti-tubercular drugs (ATD) with appreciable success. Recent resurgence of PTB in developed countries like United States posed a threat to the medical community due to resistant strains. Consequently, WHO looked toward traditional medicine. Literature reveals that Ayurvedic treatment of PTB was in vogue in India before the introduction of ATD with limited success. Records show that 2766 patients of PTB were treated with Ayurvedic drugs in a tertiary care hospital in Kolkata in the year 1933-1947. To evaluate the toxicity reduction and early restoration by adjunct therapy of Ayurvedic drugs by increasing the bio-availability of ATDs. In the present study, treatment response of 99 patients treated with ATD as an adjunct with Aswagandha (Withania somnifera) and a multi-herbal formulation described in Chikitsa-sthana of Charaka samhita i.e. Chyawanprash were investigated. Hematological profile, sputum bacterial load count, immunoglobulin IgA and IgM, blood sugar, liver function test, serum creatinine were the assessed parameters besides blood isoniazid and pyrazinamide, repeated after 28 days of treatment. The symptoms abated, body weight showed improvement, ESR values were normal, there was appreciable change in IgA and IgM patterns and significantly increased bioavailability of isoniazid and pyrazinamide were recorded. This innovative clinical study coupled with empowered research may turn out to be promising in finding a solution for the treatment of PTB.

  7. Long-term survival in advanced melanoma patients using repeated therapies: successive immunomodulation improving the odds?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coventry BJ

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Brendon J Coventry, Dominique Baume, Carrie Lilly Discipline of Surgery, Royal Adelaide Hospital, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia Background: Patients with advanced metastatic melanoma are often confronted with little prospect of medium- to longer-term survival by any currently available therapeutic means. However, most clinicians are aware of exceptional cases where survival defies the notion of futility. Prolonged survival from immunotherapies, including interleukin-2, vaccines and antibodies to cytotoxic lymphocyte antigen-4, and programmed death-1 receptor inhibitory monoclonal antibody, implies a role for immune system modulation. We aimed to identify cases where exceptional survival from advanced melanoma occurred prior to recent novel therapies to facilitate better understanding of this phenomenon. Methods: Cases of long-term survival of ≥3 years' duration (from diagnosis of metastatic disease were identified from the database of one clinician; these cases were treated before the availability of newer immunotherapies, and they were documented and examined. A literature search for reported outcome measures from published studies using older and recent therapies for advanced melanoma was conducted to enable the comparison of data. Results: Eighteen cases were identified that identified survival of ≥3 years' duration from metastatic disease (12 American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] Stage IV cases; six AJCC III cases diagnosis. These were assessed and reported to detail the clinical course. Standard clinical prognostication methods predicted high risk of early mortality in those patients. No identifiable differences could be detected between these and other patients with similar patterns of disease. At evaluation, 17 patients (94% had survived ≥5 years, and eleven patients (61% had survived ≥10 years (range: 3–15 years. The median survival duration with metastatic disease was 11 years; 15 remained alive and three

  8. Development of Personalized Cancer Therapy for Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    of this study is to develop a strategy to identify molecular markers of response of advanced prostate cancer to specific therapies using clinically...combination treatment strategies are urgently needed. The purpose of this study is to develop a strategy for identifying molecular markers of response of...PENDING) Level of Funding: $125,978 annual direct Project Goals: To develop a strategy for identifying molecular therapeutic response markers of

  9. TH-F-202-03: Advances in MRI for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, J. [Duke University Medical Center (United States)

    2016-06-15

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai.

  10. TH-F-202-03: Advances in MRI for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, J.

    2016-01-01

    MRI has excellent soft tissue contrast and can provide both anatomical and physiological information. It is becoming increasingly important in radiation therapy for treatment planning, image-guided radiation therapy, and treatment assessment. It is critically important at this time point to educate and update our medical physicists about MRI to prepare for the upcoming surge of MRI applications in radiation therapy. This session will review important basics of MR physics, pulse sequence designs, and current radiotherapy application, as well as showcase exciting new developments in MRI that can be potentially useful in radiation therapy. Learning Objectives: To learn basics of MR physics and understand the differences between various pulse sequences To review current applications of MRI in radiation therapy.To discuss recent MRI advances for future MRI guided radiation therapy Partly supported by NIH (1R21CA165384).; W. Miller, Research supported in part by Siemens Healthcare; G. Li, My clinical research is in part supported by NIH U54CA137788. I have a collaborative research project with Philips Healthcare.; J. Cai, jing cai

  11. Emergency surgery due to complications during molecular targeted therapy in advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutkowski, P.; Nowecki, Z. I.; Dziewirski, W.; Ruka, W.; Siedlecki, J. A.; Grzesiakowska, U.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. The aim of the study was to assess the frequency and results of disease/treatment-related emergency operations during molecular targeted therapy of advanced gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs). Methods. We analyzed emergency operations in patients with metastatic/inoperable GISTs treated with 1 st -line imatinib - IM (group I: 232 patients; median follow-up time 31 months) and 2 nd -line sunitinib - SU (group II: 43 patients; median follow-up 13 months; 35 patients in trial A6181036) enrolled into the Polish Clinical GIST Registry. Results. In group I 3 patients (1.3%) underwent emergency surgery due to disease/treatment related complications: one due to bleeding from a ruptured liver tumor (1 month after IM onset) and two due to bowel perforation on the tumor with subsequent intraperitoneal abscess (both 2 months after IM onset). IM was restarted 5-8 days after surgery and no complications in wound healing were observed. In group II 4 patients (9.5%) underwent emergency operations due to disease/treatment related complications: three due to bowel perforations on the tumor (2 days, 20 days and 10 months after SU onset; 1 subsequent death) and one due to intraperitoneal bleeding from ruptured, necrotic tumor (3.5 months after SU start). SU was restarted 12-18 days after surgery and no complications in wound healing were observed. Conclusions. Emergency operations associated with disease or therapy during imatinib treatment of advanced GISTs are rare. The frequency of emergency operations during sunitinib therapy is considered to be higher than during first line therapy with imatinib which may be associated with more advanced and more resistant disease or to the direct mechanism of sunitinib action, i.e. combining cytotoxic and antiangiogenic activity and thus leading to dramatic tumor response. Molecular targeted therapy in GISTs should always be conducted in cooperation with an experienced surgeon. (authors)

  12. Successful in vivo hyperthermal therapy toward breast cancer by Chinese medicine shikonin-loaded thermosensitive micelle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Y

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Yonghua Su,1,* Nian Huang,1,* Di Chen,2,* Li Zhang,2,* Xia Dong,2 Yun Sun,2 Xiandi Zhu,2 Fulei Zhang,2 Jie Gao,2 Ying Wang,2 Kexing Fan,2 Puichi Lo,3 Wei Li,2 Changquan Ling1 1Department of Integrative Oncology, Changhai Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine, 2International Joint Cancer Institute, The Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, 3Department of Biomedical Sciences, City University of Hong Kong, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The Chinese traditional medicine Shikonin is an ideal drug due to its multiple targets to tumor cells. But in clinics, improving its aqueous solubility and tumor accumulation is still a challenge. Herein, a copolymer with tunable poly(N-isopropylacrymaide and polylactic acid block lengths is designed, synthesized, and characterized in nuclear magnetic resonance. The corresponding thermosensitive nanomicelle (TN with well-defined core-shell structure is then assembled in an aqueous solution. For promoting the therapeutic index, the physical-chemistry properties of TNs including narrow size, low critical micellar concentration, high serum stability, tunable volume phase transition temperature (VPTT, high drug-loading capacity, and temperature-controlled drug release are systematically investigated and regulated through the fine self-assembly. The shikonin is then entrapped in a degradable inner core resulting in a shikonin-loaded thermosensitive nanomicelle (STN with a VPTT of ~40°C. Compared with small-molecular shikonin, the in vitro cellular internalization and cytotoxicity of STN against breast cancer cells (Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 are obviously enhanced. In addition, the therapeutic effect is further enhanced by the programmed cell death (PCD specifically evoked by shikonin. Interestingly, both the proliferation inhibition and PCD are synergistically promoted as T > VPTT, namely the temperature-regulated passive targeting. Consequently, as

  13. Genome network medicine: innovation to overcome huge challenges in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roukos, Dimitrios H

    2014-01-01

    The post-ENCODE era shapes now a new biomedical research direction for understanding transcriptional and signaling networks driving gene expression and core cellular processes such as cell fate, survival, and apoptosis. Over the past half century, the Francis Crick 'central dogma' of single n gene/protein-phenotype (trait/disease) has defined biology, human physiology, disease, diagnostics, and drugs discovery. However, the ENCODE project and several other genomic studies using high-throughput sequencing technologies, computational strategies, and imaging techniques to visualize regulatory networks, provide evidence that transcriptional process and gene expression are regulated by highly complex dynamic molecular and signaling networks. This Focus article describes the linear experimentation-based limitations of diagnostics and therapeutics to cure advanced cancer and the need to move on from reductionist to network-based approaches. With evident a wide genomic heterogeneity, the power and challenges of next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies to identify a patient's personal mutational landscape for tailoring the best target drugs in the individual patient are discussed. However, the available drugs are not capable of targeting aberrant signaling networks and research on functional transcriptional heterogeneity and functional genome organization is poorly understood. Therefore, the future clinical genome network medicine aiming at overcoming multiple problems in the new fields of regulatory DNA mapping, noncoding RNA, enhancer RNAs, and dynamic complexity of transcriptional circuitry are also discussed expecting in new innovation technology and strong appreciation of clinical data and evidence-based medicine. The problematic and potential solutions in the discovery of next-generation, molecular, and signaling circuitry-based biomarkers and drugs are explored. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. POLICY ON HERBAL TRADITIONAL MEDICINES THERAPY IN THREE PROVINCES IN INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Joseph Herman

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A descriptive qualitative study on the implementation of MOH Decrees related to local herbal Traditional Medicine Therapy in Bali, West Java and Central Java, had been conducted cross-sectionally in 2011. Objectives of this study were to identify local licensing policy, perception of professional organization, and supports and obstacles of their implementation. Data were collected through in-depth interviews with one herbal CAM provider, purposively taken from each district, and Head of Health Resources Department of Provincial and District Health Office, whilst RTD participants were professional organizations like Indonesian Association of Herbal Medical Doctor, Indonesian Association of Traditional Therapist, Indonesian Pharmacist Association, Indonesian Association of Midwives and Indonesian National Nurse Union. Results of the study showed that in Bali no Surat Bukti Registrasi-Tenaga Pengobat Komplementer Altenatif had been issued. In West Java it had been given to trained doctor and in Central Java given only to doctors in Puskesmas following Jamu Scientification program. MOH Decree no. 1109 of 2007 which controls CAM providers in health facilities were differently perceived by Provincial Health Offices and as a result, implementation and also local policy differed amongst provinces. There were doctors providing herbal medicine services based on MOH Regulation no. 1076 of 2003. Nonetheless, few doctors had implemented Decree on Use of CAM, because there were no provincial collegiums of herbal medicine yet and no standard of competencies had been developed. The requirements to obtain licence for doctor were more complicated than for traditional provider. Keywords: complementary alternative medicine, herbal traditional medicine, licence, policy Abstrak Telah dilakukan suatu studi kualitatif implementasi peraturan-peraturan tentang pengobatan tradisional herbal secara potong lintang di Bali, Jawa Barat dan Jawa Tengah, pada tahun

  15. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho [The Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy.

  16. Adjuvant hormone therapy in patients undergoing high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. I. Neimark

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to evaluate the efficiency and safety of using the luteinizing hormone releasing hormone leuprorelin with the Atrigel delivery system in doses of 7.5, 22.5, and 45 mg as an adjuvant regimen in high- and moderate-risk cancer patients who have received high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU therapy.Subjects and methods. Moderate- and high-risk locally advanced prostate cancer (PC patients treated with HIFU (n = 28 and HIFU in combination with hormone therapy during 6 months (n = 31 were examined.Results. The investigation has shown that leuprorelin acetate monotherapy used within 6 months after HIFU therapy can achieve the highest reduction in prostate-specific antigen levels and positively affect the symptoms of the disease. HIFU in combination with androgen deprivation substantially diminishes the clinical manifestations of the disease and improves quality of life in HIFU-treated patients with PC, by reducing the degree of infravesical obstruction (according to uroflowmetric findings and IPSS scores, and causes a decrease in prostate volume as compared to those who have undergone HIFU only. Treatment with leuprorelin having the Atrigel delivery system has demonstrated the low incidence of adverse reactions and good tolerability.

  17. Multimodal therapy for locally advanced prostate cancer: the roles of radiotherapy, androgen deprivation therapy, and their combination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sung Uk; Cho, Kwan Ho

    2017-01-01

    Locally advanced prostate cancer (LAPC) is defined as histologically proven T3–4 prostatic adenocarcinoma. In this review, we define the individual roles of radiotherapy (RT), short-term (ST-) and long-term (LT-) androgen deprivation therapy (ADT), and their combination in multimodal therapy for LAPC. Despite limitations in comparing the clinical outcomes among published papers, in the present study, a trend of 10-year clinical outcomes was roughly estimated by calculating the average rates weighted by the cohort number. With RT alone, the following rates were estimated: 87% biochemical failure, 34% local failure (LF), 48% distant metastasis (DM), 38% overall survival (OS), and 27% disease-specific mortality (DSM). Those associated with ADT alone were 74% BCF, 54% OS, and 25% DSM, which appeared to be better than those of RT alone. The addition of ADT to RT produced a notable local and systemic effect, regardless of ST- or LT-ADT. The LF rate decreased from 34% with RT alone to 21% with ST-ADT and further to 15% with LT-ADT. The DM and DSM rates also showed a similar trend among RT alone, RT+ST-ADT, and RT+LT-ADT. The combination of RT+LT-ADT resulted in the best long-term clinical outcomes, indicating that both RT and ADT are important parts of multimodal therapy

  18. Traditional Chinese medicine therapy decreases the pneumonia risk in patients with dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shun-Ku; Tsai, Yueh-Ting; Lo, Pei-Chia; Lai, Jung-Nien

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Pneumonia is a frequent complication in dementia patients and is associated with high mortality rates. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to determine whether traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) therapy can decrease pneumonia risk in dementia patients. The cohort dataset was obtained from the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2005, a sublibrary of the National Health Insurance Research Database, containing all medical data of 1 million beneficiaries, randomly selected from the all Insurers in year 2005. Newly diagnosed dementia patients (n = 9712) without pneumonia were analyzed from January 1997 to December 2003. After matching by sex, age, urban level, Charlson comorbidity index, insured amount, and comorbidities, 1376 pairs (1:1) of TCM and non-TCM users were acquired. Every dementia patient was individually recorded from 1997 to 2012 to identify pneumonia incidence (onset after 3 months of dementia diagnosis). Demographic characteristics, Charlson comorbidity index, comorbidities, behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia, and psychotropic drugs were also investigated. Cox proportional regression was used to compute hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) after adjustment for the above-mentioned variables. There were 419 (30.5%) and 762 (55.4%) pneumonia cases in the TCM and non-TCM cohorts during a mean follow-up period of 7.6 years. The adjusted hazard ratios (95% CI) for pneumonia admission was 0.62 (0.55–0.70) for the TCM group. Patients who received TCM therapy at higher cumulative doses or for longer periods experienced increased protection from pneumonia admission. Ma-Xing-Gan-Shi-Tang, Yin-Qiao-San, and Xiao-Qing-Long-Tang might represent possible formulae reducing the incidence of pneumonia. TCM might be associated with a lower risk of pneumonia in dementia patients. PMID:27631269

  19. Interactions of black cohosh, a traditional herbal medicine, with therapy for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rockwell, S.; Liu, Y.; Higgins, S.A.

    2003-01-01

    Herbal medicines based on extracts of Cimicifuga racemosa (black cohosh) are widely used by breast cancer patients, but the effects of these extracts have not been rigorously studied. We examined the effects of standardized commercial extracts of black cohosh on the cytotoxicity of radiation, Adriamycin, Taxotere, and Cisplatin to breast cancer cells in vitro. Exponentially growing cultures of EMT6 mouse mammary tumor cells were exposed to black cohosh extracts continuously for 24 h, beginning 4 hours before irradiation or the 2 h drug treatment. Full dose-response curves were determined for radiation and for each drug under three conditions: alone, in combination with black cohosh extract, and in combination with the vehicle used to prepare the extract. Cell survival was assayed using a colony formation assay. The herbal extracts alone had no significant effect on the growth or viability of these breast cancer cells. The effects of the extracts on the outcome of treatment varied with the treatment agent. Black cohosh protected cells slightly from Cisplatin, had no effect on the dose-response curve for radiation, and sensitized cells to Adriamycin and Taxotere. The vehicle had no discernable effect. These findings show that black cohosh extracts are not simply 'harmless herbs' that can be ignored by physicians treating cancer patients, but instead contain active agents which can modulate the effects of therapy with conventional therapeutic agents. Further cell culture studies are needed to determine the mechanism underlying this effect. Studies with tumors and normal tissues in mice are needed to assess whether black cohosh extracts alter the effectiveness of radiation and drugs in treating breast cancer or alter the toxicities of these therapies

  20. COMPARATIVE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF HYPOLIPIDEMIC THERAPY WITH GENERIC AND ORIGINAL MEDICINAL PRODUCTS OF SIMVASTATIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Tarlovskaya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To compare efficacy , safety and pharmacoeconomical characteristics of generic and original medicinal products of simvastatin in achievement of cholesterol and low density lipoprotein target levels. Material and methods. 38 patients with arterial hypertension accompanied by type 2 diabetes with dyslipidemia were included into the study. They had no clinically obvious ischemic heart disease and did not receive hypolipidemic pharmacotherapy for a month before the study start. The patients were randomized into group A or group B. Patients of group A (n=18 received original simvastatin, patients of group B (n=20 received generic simvastatin. Initial simvastatin dose was 20 mg daily. Lipid plasma profile, liver enzymes, creatine phosphokinase were evaluated every 4 weeks. Cost-effectiveness ratio was calculated. Results. 11 patients (61% in group A and only 5 patients (25% in group B (χ2=5.05; р<0.05 achieved cholesterol target level with simvastatin in dose of 20 mg daily in 3 months of the treatment. Creatine phosphokinase blood level did not increase significantly. Achievement of cholesterol target level cost 814 and 952 RUB per patient in groups A and B, respectively , in 1 month of simvastatin treatment. These costs were 643 and 417 RUB per patient in groups A and B, respectively , in 3 months of treatment. Conclusion. The original simvastatin in comparison with generic one has advantages in hypolipidemic effect. Safety profile is similar for both medications. Original simvastatin therapy has lower cost than this for generic simvastatin therapy in achievement of cholesterol target level in 1 month of treatment. In 3 months the cost of treatment per patient is 227 RUB higher for original medication in comparison with this for generic medication.

  1. Targeting the NF-κB Pathway as a Combination Therapy for Advanced Thyroid Cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikita Pozdeyev

    Full Text Available NF-κB signaling plays an important role in tumor cell proliferation, cell survival, angiogenesis, invasion, metastasis and drug/radiation resistance. Combination therapy involving NF-κB pathway inhibition is an attractive strategy for the treatment of advanced forms of thyroid cancer. This study was designed to test the efficacy of NF-κB pathway inhibition in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy, using docetaxel and ionizing radiation in in vitro models of thyroid cancer. We found that while both docetaxel and ionizing radiation activated NF-κB signaling in thyroid cancer cells, there was no synergistic effect on cell proliferation and/or programmed cell death with either genetic (transduction of a dominant negative mutant form of IκBα or pharmacologic (proteasome inhibitor bortezomib and IKKβ inhibitor GO-Y030 inhibition of the NF-κB pathway in thyroid cancer cell lines BCPAP, 8505C, THJ16T and SW1736. Docetaxel plus bortezomib synergistically decreased in vitro invasion of 8505C cells, but not in the other cell lines. Screening of a panel of clinically relevant targeted therapies for synergy with genetic NF-κB inhibition in a proliferation/cytotoxicity assay identified the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA as a potential candidate. However, the synergistic effect was confirmed only in the BCPAP cells. These results indicate that NF-κB inhibitors are unlikely to be beneficial as combination therapy with taxane cytotoxic chemotherapy, external radiation therapy or radioiodine therapy. There may be unique circumstances where NF-κB inhibitors may be considered in combination with docetaxel to reduce tumor invasion or in combination with HDAC inhibitors to reduce tumor growth, but this does not appear to be a combination therapy that could be broadly applied to patients with advanced thyroid cancer. Further research may identify which subsets of patients/tumors may respond to this therapeutic

  2. Assessment of extensive surgery for locally advanced lung cancer. Safety and efficacy of induction therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niwa, Hiroshi; Nakamae, Katsumi; Yamada, Takeshi; Kani, Hisanori; Maemoto, Katsutoshi; Mizuno, Takeo

    1999-01-01

    Locally advanced lung cancer has a poor prognosis, despite extensive surgery conducted in an effort to improve survival. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of induction therapy prior to extensive surgery for locally advanced lung cancer. Primary resection for lung cancer was done in 549 consecutive patients divided into three groups; 446 undergoing standard pulmonary resection (no extensive surgery), 87 undergoing extensive surgery without induction therapy, and 16 undergoing surgery after induction therapy. Morbidity was 23.5%, 28.6%, and 43.8%, respectively. The rate was significantly higher in the induction group compared with the no extensive surgery group (P<0.05). Surgical mortality was 0.67%, 3.4%, and 6.3%, respectively. The difference was statistically significant between the no extensive surgery and extensive surgery groups (P<0.02), and between the no extensive surgery and induction groups (P<0.02). Hospital mortality was 2.2%, 9.2%, and 6.3%, respectively. The rates were significantly higher in the extensive surgery (P<0.01) and induction (P<0.05) groups compared to the no extensive surgery group. Five-year survival was 50.3% for the patients who received induction therapy, and 14.7% for the patients who did not receive induction therapy. Survival differences between the induction and non induction groups were not significant, but some patients with T3 or T4 disease may benefit from induction therapy. The high morbidity of induction treatment should be recognized, and strict candidate selection and careful postoperative care used to help prevent increased mortality. (author)

  3. Long-term survival in advanced melanoma patients using repeated therapies: successive immunomodulation improving the odds?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coventry, Brendon J; Baume, Dominique; Lilly, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Patients with advanced metastatic melanoma are often confronted with little prospect of medium- to longer-term survival by any currently available therapeutic means. However, most clinicians are aware of exceptional cases where survival defies the notion of futility. Prolonged survival from immunotherapies, including interleukin-2, vaccines and antibodies to cytotoxic lymphocyte antigen-4, and programmed death-1 receptor inhibitory monoclonal antibody, implies a role for immune system modulation. We aimed to identify cases where exceptional survival from advanced melanoma occurred prior to recent novel therapies to facilitate better understanding of this phenomenon. Cases of long-term survival of ≥3 years’ duration (from diagnosis of metastatic disease) were identified from the database of one clinician; these cases were treated before the availability of newer immunotherapies, and they were documented and examined. A literature search for reported outcome measures from published studies using older and recent therapies for advanced melanoma was conducted to enable the comparison of data. Eighteen cases were identified that identified survival of ≥3 years’ duration from metastatic disease (12 American Joint Committee on Cancer [AJCC] Stage IV cases; six AJCC III cases) diagnosis. These were assessed and reported to detail the clinical course. Standard clinical prognostication methods predicted high risk of early mortality in those patients. No identifiable differences could be detected between these and other patients with similar patterns of disease. At evaluation, 17 patients (94%) had survived ≥5 years, and eleven patients (61%) had survived ≥10 years (range: 3–15 years). The median survival duration with metastatic disease was 11 years; 15 remained alive and three had died. Published studies of melanoma therapies were tabled for comparison. The fact that 18 cases of exceptional survival in advanced melanoma were identified is remarkable in itself

  4. The Hippo Pathway as Drug Targets in Cancer Therapy and Regenerative Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagashima, Shunta; Bao, Yijun; Hata, Yutaka

    2017-01-01

    Yes-associated protein 1 (YAP1) and transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) co-operate with numerous transcription factors to regulate gene transcriptions. YAP1 and TAZ are negatively regulated by the tumor suppressive Hippo pathway. In human cancers, the Hippo pathway is frequently deregulated and YAP1 and TAZ escape the inhibition by the Hippo pathway. The upregulation of YAP1 and TAZ induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition and increases drug resistance in cancer cells. TAZ is implicated in cancer stemness. In consequence cancers with hyperactive YAP1 and TAZ are associated with poor clinical prognosis. Inhibitors of YAP1 and TAZ are reasoned to be beneficial in cancer therapy. On the other hand, since YAP1 and TAZ play important roles in the regulation of various tissue stem cells and in tissue repair, activators of YAP1 and TAZ are useful in the regenerative medicine. We discuss the potential application of inhibitors and activators of YAP1 and TAZ in human diseases and review the progress of drug screenings to search for them. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Finding Inhibitors of Mutant Superoxide Dismutase-1 for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Therapy from Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hung-Jin Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Superoxide dismutase type 1 (SOD1 mutations cause protein aggregation and decrease protein stability, which are linked to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS disease. This research utilizes the world’s largest traditional Chinese medicine (TCM database to search novel inhibitors of mutant SOD1, and molecular dynamics (MD simulations were used to analyze the stability of protein that interacted with docked ligands. Docking results show that hesperidin and 2,3,5,4′-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucoside (THSG have high affinity to mutant SOD1 and then dopamine. For MD simulation analysis, hesperidin and THSG displayed similar value of RMSD with dopamine, and the migration analysis reveals stable fluctuation at the end of MD simulation time. Interestingly, distance between the protein and ligand has distinct difference, and hesperidin changes the position from initial binding site to the other place. In flexibility of residues analysis, the secondary structure among all complexes does not change, indicating that the structure are not affect ligand binding. The binding poses of hesperidin and THSG are similar to dopamine after molecular simulation. Our result indicated that hesperidin and THSG might be potential lead compound to design inhibitors of mutant SOD1 for ALS therapy.

  6. Three-Dimensional Printing of Medicinal Products and the Challenge of Personalized Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zema, Lucia; Melocchi, Alice; Maroni, Alessandra; Gazzaniga, Andrea

    2017-07-01

    By 3-dimensional (3D) printing, solid objects of any shape are fabricated through layer-by-layer addition of materials based on a digital model. At present, such a technique is broadly exploited in many industrial fields because of major advantages in terms of reduced times and costs of development and production. In the biomedical and pharmaceutical domains, the interest in 3D printing is growing in step with the needs of personalized medicine. Printed scaffolds and prostheses have partly replaced medical devices produced by more established techniques, and more recently, 3D printing has been proposed for the manufacturing of drug products. Notably, the availability of patient-tailored pharmaceuticals would be of utmost importance for children, elderly subjects, poor and high metabolizers, and individuals undergoing multiple drug treatments. 3D printing encompasses a range of differing techniques, each involving advantages and open issues. Particularly, solidification of powder, extrusion, and stereolithography have been applied to the manufacturing of drug products. The main challenge to their exploitation for personalized pharmacologic therapy is likely to be related to the regulatory issues involved and to implementation of production models that may allow to efficiently turn the therapeutic needs of individual patients into small batches of appropriate drug products meeting preset quality requirements. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Catalytic Therapy of Cancer with Ascorbate and Extracts of Medicinal Herbs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadejda Rozanova (Torshina

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Catalytic therapy (CT is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS using a combination of substrate molecules and a catalyst. The most frequently used substrate/catalyst pair is ascorbate/Co phthalocyanine (PcCo. In the present work, herb extracts containing pigments have been studied as a catalyst in place of PcCo. Extracts from herbs are expected to have efficiency comparable with that of phthalocyanines but as natural