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Sample records for advanced test idaho reactor

  1. Completion summary for borehole USGS 136 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2012-01-01

    In 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, cored and completed borehole USGS 136 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 1,048 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) to collect core, open-borehole water samples, and geophysical data. After these data were collected, borehole USGS 136 was cemented and backfilled between 560 and 1,048 ft BLS. The final construction of borehole USGS 136 required that the borehole be reamed to allow for installation of 6-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel casing and 5-in. diameter stainless-steel screen; the screened monitoring interval was completed between 500 and 551 ft BLS. A dedicated pump and water-level access line were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and after the completion of the monitor well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to describe borehole lithology and to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which occur in intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt. A single-well aquifer test was used to define hydraulic characteristics for borehole USGS 136 in the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. Specific-capacity, transmissivity, and hydraulic conductivity from the aquifer test were at least 975 gallons per minute per foot, 1.4 × 105 feet squared per day (ft2/d), and 254 feet per day, respectively. The amount of measureable drawdown during the aquifer test was about 0.02 ft. The transmissivity for borehole USGS 136 was in the range of values determined from previous aquifer tests conducted in other wells near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex: 9.5 × 103 to 1.9 × 105 ft2/d. Water samples were analyzed for cations, anions, metals, nutrients, total organic

  2. 2015 Annual Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This report describes conditions and information, as required by the state of Idaho, Department of Environmental Quality Reuse Permit I-161-02, for the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds located at Idaho National Laboratory from November 1, 2014–October 31, 2015. The effective date of Reuse Permit I-161-02 is November 20, 2014 with an expiration date of November 19, 2019.

  3. TEMPERATURE MONITORING OPTIONS AVAILABLE AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.E. Daw; J.L. Rempe; D.L. Knudson; T. Unruh; B.M. Chase; K.L Davis

    2012-03-01

    As part of the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) program, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed in-house capabilities to fabricate, test, and qualify new and enhanced sensors for irradiation testing. To meet recent customer requests, an array of temperature monitoring options is now available to ATR users. The method selected is determined by test requirements and budget. Melt wires are the simplest and least expensive option for monitoring temperature. INL has recently verified the melting temperature of a collection of materials with melt temperatures ranging from 100 to 1000 C with a differential scanning calorimeter installed at INL’s High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL). INL encapsulates these melt wires in quartz or metal tubes. In the case of quartz tubes, multiple wires can be encapsulated in a single 1.6 mm diameter tube. The second option available to ATR users is a silicon carbide temperature monitor. The benefit of this option is that a single small monitor (typically 1 mm x 1 mm x 10 mm or 1 mm diameter x 10 mm length) can be used to detect peak irradiation temperatures ranging from 200 to 800 C. Equipment has been installed at INL’s HTTL to complete post-irradiation resistivity measurements on SiC monitors, a technique that has been found to yield the most accurate temperatures from these monitors. For instrumented tests, thermocouples may be used. In addition to Type-K and Type-N thermocouples, a High Temperature Irradiation Resistant ThermoCouple (HTIR-TC) was developed at the HTTL that contains commercially-available doped molybdenum paired with a niobium alloy thermoelements. Long duration high temperature tests, in furnaces and in the ATR and other MTRs, demonstrate that the HTIR-TC is accurate up to 1800 C and insensitive to thermal neutron interactions. Thus, degradation observed at temperatures above 1100 C with Type K and N thermocouples and decalibration due to transmutation with tungsten

  4. Completion summary for boreholes USGS 140 and USGS 141 near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2014-01-01

    organic compounds, stable isotopes, and radionuclides. Water samples from both wells indicated that concentrations of tritium, sulfate, and chromium were affected by wastewater disposal practices at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex. Most constituents in water from wells USGS 140 and USGS 141 had concentrations similar to concentrations in well USGS 136, which is upgradient from wells USGS 140 and USGS 141.

  5. Assessment of impacts at the advanced test reactor as a result of chemical releases at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides an assessment of potential impacts at the Advanced Test Reactor Facility (ATR) resulting from accidental chemical spill at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). Spills postulated to occur at the Lincoln Blvd turnoff to ICPP were also evaluated. Peak and time weighted average concentrations were calculated for receptors at the ATR facility and the Test Reactor Area guard station at a height above ground level of 1.0 m. Calculated concentrations were then compared to the 15 minute averaged Threshold Limit Value - Short Term Exposure Limit (TLV-STEL) and the 30 minute averaged Immediately Dangerous to Life and Health (IDLH) limit. Several different methodologies were used to estimate source strength and dispersion. Fifteen minute time weighted averaged concentrations of hydrofluoric acid and anhydrous ammonia exceeded TLV-STEL values for the cases considered. The IDLH value for these chemicals was not exceeded. Calculated concentrations of ammonium hydroxide, hexone, nitric acid, propane, gasoline, chlorine and liquid nitrogen were all below the TLV-STEL value

  6. Preliminary Results of an On-Line, Multi-Spectrometer Fission Product Monitoring System to Support Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Testing and Qualification in the Advanced Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dawn M. Scates; John K. Hartwell; John B. Walter; Mark W. Drigert

    2007-10-01

    The Advanced Gas Reactor -1 (AGR-1) experiment is the first experiment in a series of eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments scheduled for placement in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The experiment began irradiation in the ATR with a cycle that reached full power on December 26, 2006 and will continue irradiation for about 2.5 years. During this time six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The goals of the irradiation experiment is to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. This paper presents the preliminary test details of the fuel performance, as measured by the control and acquisition software.

  7. Reference site selection report for the advanced liquid metal reactor at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivill, R.L.

    1990-03-01

    This Reference Site Selection Report was prepared by EG G, Idaho Inc., for General Electric (GE) to provide information for use by the Department of Energy (DOE) in selecting a Safety Test Site for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor. Similar Evaluation studies are planned to be conducted at other potential DOE sites. The Power Reactor Innovative Small Module (PRISM) Concept was developed for ALMR by GE. A ALMR Safety Test is planned to be performed on a DOE site to demonstrate features and meet Nuclear Regulatory Commission Requirements. This study considered possible locations at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory that met the ALMR Prototype Site Selection Methodology and Criteria. Four sites were identified, after further evaluation one site was eliminated. Each of the remaining three sites satisfied the criteria and was graded. The results were relatively close. Thus concluding that the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a suitable location for an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Safety Test. 23 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. Advanced test reactor. Testing capabilities and plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The physical configuration of the ATR, a 4-leaf clover shape, allows the reactor to be operated at different power levels in the corner 'lobes' to allow for different testing conditions for multiple simultaneous experiments. The combination of high flux (maximum thermal neutron fluxes of 1E15 neutrons per square centimeter per second and maximum fast [E>1.0 MeV] neutron fluxes of 5E14 neutrons per square centimeter per second) and large test volumes (up to 122 cm long and 12.7 cm diameter) provide unique testing opportunities. For future research, some ATR modifications and enhancements are currently planned. In 2007 the US Department of Energy designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper provides more details on some of the ATR capabilities, key design features, experiments, and plants for the NSUF. (author)

  9. 2012 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Lewis

    2013-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2011 through October 31, 2012. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance issues Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2012 permit year, approximately 183 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  10. 2010 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    mike lewis

    2011-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2009 through October 31, 2010. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts During the 2010 permit year, approximately 164 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  11. 2011 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Lewis

    2012-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2010 through October 31, 2011. The report contains the following information: Facility and system description Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates Groundwater monitoring data Status of compliance activities Noncompliance and other issues Discussion of the facility's environmental impacts During the 2011 permit year, approximately 166 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters were below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  12. 2014 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2013–October 31, 2014. The report contains the following information; Facility and system description; Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates; Permit required groundwater monitoring data; Status of compliance activities; Noncompliance issues; and Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2014 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater were discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the downgradient monitoring wells.

  13. 2013 Annual Industrial Wastewater Reuse Report for the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mike Lewis

    2014-02-01

    This report describes conditions, as required by the state of Idaho Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA 000161 01, Modification B), for the wastewater land application site at the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond from November 1, 2012–October 31, 2013. The report contains the following information: • Facility and system description • Permit required effluent monitoring data and loading rates • Groundwater monitoring data • Status of compliance activities • Noncompliance issues • Discussion of the facility’s environmental impacts. During the 2013 permit year, approximately 238 million gallons of wastewater was discharged to the Cold Waste Pond. This is well below the maximum annual permit limit of 375 million gallons. As shown by the groundwater sampling data, sulfate and total dissolved solids concentrations are highest near the Cold Waste Pond and decrease rapidly as the distance from the Cold Waste Pond increases. Although concentrations of sulfate and total dissolved solids are elevated near the Cold Waste Pond, both parameters are below the Ground Water Quality Rule Secondary Constituent Standards in the down gradient monitoring wells.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Jeff Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2011-08-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is a large test reactor for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water, high flux test reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material irradiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. This paper highlights the ATR NSUF research program and the associated educational initiatives.

  15. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  16. Action Memorandum for Decommissioning the Engineering Test Reactor Complex under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared and released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessel. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface

  17. Corrosion of spent Advanced Test Reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of a study of the condition of spent nuclear fuel elements from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) currently being stored underwater at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) are presented. This study was motivated by a need to estimate the corrosion behavior of dried, spent ATR fuel elements during dry storage for periods up to 50 years. The study indicated that the condition of spent ATR fuel elements currently stored underwater at the INEL is not very well known. Based on the limited data and observed corrosion behavior in the reactor and in underwater storage, it was concluded that many of the fuel elements currently stored under water in the facility called ICPP-603 FSF are in a degraded condition, and it is probable that many have breached cladding. The anticipated dehydration behavior of corroded spent ATR fuel elements was also studied, and a list of issues to be addressed by fuel element characterization before and after forced drying of the fuel elements and during dry storage is presented

  18. Paleomagnetic correlation of basalt flows in selected coreholes near the Advanced Test Reactor Complex, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, and along the southern boundary, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodges, Mary K.V.; Champion, Duane E.

    2016-10-03

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, used paleomagnetic data from 18 coreholes to construct three cross sections of subsurface basalt flows in the southern part of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These cross sections, containing descriptions of the subsurface horizontal and vertical distribution of basalt flows and sediment layers, will be used in geological studies, and to construct numerical models of groundwater flow and contaminant transport.Subsurface cross sections were used to correlate surface vents to their subsurface flows intersected by coreholes, to correlate subsurface flows between coreholes, and to identify possible subsurface vent locations of subsurface flows. Correlations were identified by average paleomagnetic inclinations of flows, and depth from land surface in coreholes, normalized to the North American Datum of 1927. Paleomagnetic data were combined, in some cases, with other data, such as radiometric ages of flows. Possible vent locations of buried basalt flows were identified by determining the location of the maximum thickness of flows penetrated by more than one corehole.Flows from the surface volcanic vents Quaking Aspen Butte, Vent 5206, Mid Butte, Lavatoo Butte, Crater Butte, Pond Butte, Vent 5350, Vent 5252, Tin Cup Butte, Vent 4959, Vent 5119, and AEC Butte are found in coreholes, and were correlated to the surface vents by matching their paleomagnetic inclinations, and in some cases, their stratigraphic positions.Some subsurface basalt flows that do not correlate to surface vents, do correlate over several coreholes, and may correlate to buried vents. Subsurface flows which correlate across several coreholes, but not to a surface vent include the D3 flow, the Big Lost flow, the CFA buried vent flow, the Early, Middle, and Late Basal Brunhes flows, the South Late Matuyama flow, the Matuyama flow, and the Jaramillo flow. The location of vents buried in the subsurface by younger basalt

  19. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Wiffen, F.W. [Dept. of Energy, Germantown, MD (United States). Office of Fusion Energy

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  20. Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2005-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight particle fuel tests in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to support development of the next generation Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature monitoring and control combined with on-line fission product monitoring of the sweep gas. The final design phase has just been completed on the first experiment (AGR-1) in this series and the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation. This paper discusses the development of the experimental hardware and support system designs and the status of the experiment.

  1. Design and Status of RERTR Irradiation Tests in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel M. Wachs; Richard G. Ambrosek; Gray Chang; Mitchell K. Meyer

    2006-10-01

    Irradiation testing of U-Mo based fuels is the central component of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program fuel qualification plan. Several RERTR tests have recently been completed or are planned for irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho Falls, ID. Four mini-plate experiments in various stages of completion are described in detail, including the irradiation test design, objectives, and irradiation conditions. Observations made during and after the in-reactor RERTR-7A experiment breach are summarized. The irradiation experiment design and planned irradiation conditions for full-size plate test are described. Progress toward element testing will be reviewed.

  2. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. E. Daw; S. C. Taylor

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  3. Instrumentation to Enhance Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR will support basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors has been completed. Based on this review, recommendations are made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR and a strategy has been developed for obtaining these sensors. Progress toward implementing this strategy is reported in this document. It is anticipated that this report will be updated on an annual basis.

  4. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR)-5/6/7 Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; David A. Petti; S. Blaine Grover

    2014-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which each consist of at least five separate capsules, are being irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gases also have on-line fission product monitoring the effluent from each capsule to track performance of the fuel during irradiation. The first two experiments (designated AGR-1 and AGR-2), have been completed. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. The design of the fuel qualification experiment, designated AGR-5/6/7, is well underway and incorporates lessons learned from the three previous experiments. Various design issues will be discussed with particular details related to selection of thermometry.

  5. Advanced burner test reactor preconceptual design report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Y. I.; Finck, P. J.; Grandy, C.; Cahalan, J.; Deitrich, L.; Dunn, F.; Fallin, D.; Farmer, M.; Fanning, T.; Kim, T.; Krajtl, L.; Lomperski, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Momozaki, Y.; Sienicki, J.; Park, Y.; Tang, Y.; Reed, C.; Tzanos, C; Wiedmeyer, S.; Yang, W.; Chikazawa, Y.; JAEA

    2008-12-16

    The goals of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) are to expand the use of nuclear energy to meet increasing global energy demand, to address nuclear waste management concerns and to promote non-proliferation. Implementation of the GNEP requires development and demonstration of three major technologies: (1) Light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel separations technologies that will recover transuranics to be recycled for fuel but not separate plutonium from other transuranics, thereby providing proliferation-resistance; (2) Advanced Burner Reactors (ABRs) based on a fast spectrum that transmute the recycled transuranics to produce energy while also reducing the long term radiotoxicity and decay heat loading in the repository; and (3) Fast reactor fuel recycling technologies to recover and refabricate the transuranics for repeated recycling in the fast reactor system. The primary mission of the ABR Program is to demonstrate the transmutation of transuranics recovered from the LWR spent fuel, and hence the benefits of the fuel cycle closure to nuclear waste management. The transmutation, or burning of the transuranics is accomplished by fissioning and this is most effectively done in a fast spectrum. In the thermal spectrum of commercial LWRs, some transuranics capture neutrons and become even heavier transuranics rather than being fissioned. Even with repeated recycling, only about 30% can be transmuted, which is an intrinsic limitation of all thermal spectrum reactors. Only in a fast spectrum can all transuranics be effectively fissioned to eliminate their long-term radiotoxicity and decay heat. The Advanced Burner Test Reactor (ABTR) is the first step in demonstrating the transmutation technologies. It directly supports development of a prototype full-scale Advanced Burner Reactor, which would be followed by commercial deployment of ABRs. The primary objectives of the ABTR are: (1) To demonstrate reactor-based transmutation of transuranics as part of an

  6. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility: Addressing advanced nuclear materials research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Jackson; Todd Allen; Frances Marshall; Jim Cole

    2013-03-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), based at the Idaho National Laboratory in the United States, is supporting Department of Energy and industry research efforts to ensure the properties of materials in light water reactors are well understood. The ATR NSUF is providing this support through three main efforts: establishing unique infrastructure necessary to conduct research on highly radioactive materials, conducting research in conjunction with industry partners on life extension relevant topics, and providing training courses to encourage more U.S. researchers to understand and address LWR materials issues. In 2010 and 2011, several advanced instruments with capability focused on resolving nuclear material performance issues through analysis on the micro (10-6 m) to atomic (10-10 m) scales were installed primarily at the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) in Idaho Falls, Idaho. These instruments included a local electrode atom probe (LEAP), a field-emission gun scanning transmission electron microscope (FEG-STEM), a focused ion beam (FIB) system, a Raman spectrometer, and an nanoindentor/atomic force microscope. Ongoing capability enhancements intended to support industry efforts include completion of two shielded, irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) test loops, the first of which will come online in early calendar year 2013, a pressurized and controlled chemistry water loop for the ATR center flux trap, and a dedicated facility intended to house post irradiation examination equipment. In addition to capability enhancements at the main site in Idaho, the ATR NSUF also welcomed two new partner facilities in 2011 and two new partner facilities in 2012; the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) and associated hot cells and the University California Berkeley capabilities in irradiated materials analysis were added in 2011. In 2012, Purdue University’s Interaction of Materials

  7. 2015 Groundwater Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Michael George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring results from groundwater wells associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Ponds Reuse Permit (I-161-02). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  8. 2014 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Mike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

  9. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Partnerships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; Jeff B. Benson; James I. Cole; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-03-01

    In 2007, the United States Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at Idaho National Laboratory, as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). This designation made test space within the ATR and post-irradiation examination (PIE) equipment at INL available for use by researchers via a proposal and peer review process. The goal of the ATR NSUF is to provide researchers with the best ideas access to the most advanced test capability, regardless of the proposer's physical location. Since 2007, the ATR NSUF has expanded its available reactor test space, and obtained access to additional PIE equipment. Recognizing that INL may not have all the desired PIE equipment, or that some equipment may become oversubscribed, the ATR NSUF established a Partnership Program. This program enables and facilitates user access to several university and national laboratories. So far, seven universities and one national laboratory have been added to the ATR NSUF with capability that includes reactor-testing space, PIE equipment, and ion beam irradiation facilities. With the addition of these universities, irradiation can occur in multiple reactors and post-irradiation exams can be performed at multiple universities. In each case, the choice of facilities is based on the user's technical needs. Universities and laboratories included in the ATR NSUF partnership program are as follows: (1) Nuclear Services Laboratories at North Carolina State University; (2) PULSTAR Reactor Facility at North Carolina State University; (3) Michigan Ion Beam Laboratory (1.7 MV Tandetron accelerator) at the University of Michigan; (4) Irradiated Materials at the University of Michigan; (5) Harry Reid Center Radiochemistry Laboratories at University of Nevada, Las Vegas; (6) Characterization Laboratory for Irradiated Materials at the University of Wisconsin-Madison; (7) Tandem Accelerator Ion Beam. (1.7 MV terminal voltage tandem ion accelerator) at the University of

  10. INITIAL IRRADIATION OF THE FIRST ADVANCED GAS REACTOR FUEL DEVELOPMENT AND QUALIFICATION EXPERIMENT IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2007-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  11. Design considerations of the irradiation test vehicle for the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    An irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being jointly developed by the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMIT) and the U.S. Fusion Program. The vehicle is intended for neutron irradiation testing of candidate structural materials, including vanadium-based alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low activation steels. It could possibly be used for U.S./Japanese collaboration in the Jupiter Program. The first test train is scheduled to be completed by September 1998. In this report, we present the functional requirements for the vehicle and a preliminary design that satisfies these requirements.

  12. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility: advancing nuclear technology education

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a Users Week, internships, faculty student team projects and faculty/staff exchanges. In addition, the ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  13. The Advanced Test Reactor as a National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been in operation since 1967 and mainly used to support U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) materials and fuels research programs. Irradiation capabilities of the ATR and post-irradiation examination capabilities of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were generally not being utilized by universities and other potential users due largely to a prohibitive pricing structure. While materials and fuels testing programs using the ATR continue to be needed for US DOE programs such as the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative and Next Generation Nuclear Plant, US DOE recognized there was a national need to make these capabilities available to a broader user base. In April 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). As a NSUF, most of the services associated with university experiment irradiation and post-irradiation examinations are provided free-of-charge. The US DOE is providing these services to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science, technology, and education and to encourage active university/industry/laboratory collaboration. The first full year of implementing the user facility concept was 2008 and it was a very successful year. The first university experiment pilot project was developed in collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and began irradiation in the ATR in 2008. Lessons learned from this pilot program will be applied to future NSUF projects. Five other university experiments were also competitively selected in March 2008 from the initial solicitation for proposals. The NSUF now has a continually open process where universities can submit proposals as they are ready. Plans are to invest in new and upgraded capabilities at the ATR, post-irradiation examination capabilities at the INL, and in a new experiment assembly facility to further support the implementation of the user facility concept. Through a newly created Partnership Program

  14. Completing the Design of the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2006-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the newly formed Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation.

  15. After Action Report: Advanced Test Reactor Complex 2015 Evaluated Drill October 6, 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, Forest Howard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-11-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex, operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted an evaluated drill on October 6, 2015, to allow the ATR Complex emergency response organization (ERO) to demonstrate the ability to respond to and mitigate an emergency by implementing the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, “Comprehensive Emergency Management System.”

  16. After Action Report: Advanced Test Reactor Complex 2015 Evaluated Drill October 6, 2015

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex, operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted an evaluated drill on October 6, 2015, to allow the ATR Complex emergency response organization (ERO) to demonstrate the ability to respond to and mitigate an emergency by implementing the requirements of DOE O 151.1C, ''Comprehensive Emergency Management System.''

  17. Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti

    2008-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. These AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control for each capsule. The swept gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The design of the first experiment (designated AGR-1) was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the test train as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that monitor and control the experiment during irradiation were completed in September 2006. The experiment was inserted in the ATR in December 2006, and is serving as a shakedown test of the multi-capsule experiment design that will be used in the subsequent irradiations as well as a test of the early variants of the fuel produced under this program. The experiment test train as well as the monitoring, control, and data collection systems are discussed and the status of the experiment is provided.

  18. Advancing nuclear technology and research. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), is one of the world's premier test reactors for providing the capability for studying the effects of intense neutron and gamma radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. Cost free access to the ATR, INL post irradiation examination facilities, and partner facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to United States Department of Energy. To increase overall research capability, ATR NSUF seeks to form strategic partnerships with university facilities that add significant nuclear research capability to the ATR NSUF and are accessible to all ATR NSUF users. (author)

  19. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frances M. Marshall; Todd R. Allen; James I. Cole; Jeff B. Benson; Mary Catherine Thelen

    2012-10-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is one of the world’s premier test reactors for studying the effects of intense neutron radiation on reactor materials and fuels. The ATR began operation in 1967, and has operated continuously since then, averaging approximately 250 operating days per year. The combination of high flux, large test volumes, and multiple experiment configuration options provide unique testing opportunities for nuclear fuels and material researchers. The ATR is a pressurized, light-water moderated and cooled, beryllium-reflected highly-enriched uranium fueled, reactor with a maximum operating power of 250 MWth. The ATR peak thermal flux can reach 1.0 x1015 n/cm2-sec, and the core configuration creates five main reactor power lobes (regions) that can be operated at different powers during the same operating cycle. In addition to these nine flux traps there are 68 irradiation positions in the reactor core reflector tank. The test positions range from 0.5” to 5.0” in diameter and are all 48” in length, the active length of the fuel. The INL also has several hot cells and other laboratories in which irradiated material can be examined to study material radiation effects. In 2007 the US Department of Energy (DOE) designated the ATR as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) to facilitate greater access to the ATR and the associated INL laboratories for material testing research by a broader user community. Goals of the ATR NSUF are to define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light water reactors, and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. The ATR NSUF has developed partnerships with other universities and national laboratories to enable ATR NSUF researchers to perform research at these other facilities, when the research objectives

  20. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover

    2009-09-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In

  1. Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Gerry L. McCormick; Shannon J. Corrigan

    2010-06-01

    2010 International Congress on Advances in Nuclear Power Plants (ICAPP’10) ANS Annual Meeting Imbedded Topical San Diego, CA June 13 – 17, 2010 Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Author: A. Joseph Palmer, Mechanical Engineer, Irradiation Test Programs, 208-526-8700, Joe.Palmer@INL.gov Affiliation: Idaho National Laboratory P.O. Box 1625, MS-3840 Idaho Falls, ID 83415 INL/CON-10-17680 ABSTRACT Most test reactors are equipped with shuttle facilities (sometimes called rabbit tubes) whereby small capsules can be inserted into the reactor and retrieved during power operations. With the installation of Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) this capability has been restored to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The general design and operating principles of this system were patterned after the hydraulic rabbit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which has operated successfully for many years. Using primary coolant as the motive medium the HSIS system is designed to simultaneously transport fourteen shuttle capsules, each 16 mm OD x 57 mm long, to and from the B-7 position of the reactor. The B-7 position is one of the higher flux positions in the reactor with typical thermal and fast (>1 Mev) fluxes of 2.8E+14 n/cm2/sec and 1.9E+14 n/cm2/sec respectively. The available space inside each shuttle is approximately 14 mm diameter x 50 mm long. The shuttle containers are made from titanium which was selected for its low neutron activation properties and durability. Shuttles can be irradiated for time periods ranging from a few minutes to several months. The Send and Receive Station (SRS) for the HSIS is located 2.5 m deep in the ATR canal which allows irradiated shuttles to be easily moved from the SRS to a wet loaded cask, or transport pig. The HSIS system first irradiated (empty) shuttles in September 2009 and has since completed

  2. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Vivek [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Human Factors, Controls, and Statistics; Smith, James A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design; Jewell, James Keith [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Dept. of Fuel Performance and Design

    2015-02-01

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  3. Monitoring and Analysis of In-Pile Phenomena in Advanced Test Reactor using Acoustic Telemetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interior of a nuclear reactor presents a particularly harsh and challenging environment for both sensors and telemetry due to high temperatures and high fluxes of energetic and ionizing particles among the radioactive decay products. A number of research programs are developing acoustic-based sensing approach to take advantage of the acoustic transmission properties of reactor cores. Idaho National Laboratory has installed vibroacoustic receivers on and around the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) containment vessel to take advantage of acoustically telemetered sensors such as thermoacoustic (TAC) transducers. The installation represents the first step in developing an acoustic telemetry infrastructure. This paper presents the theory of TAC, application of installed vibroacoustic receivers in monitoring the in-pile phenomena inside the ATR, and preliminary data processing results.

  4. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: 'contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).' This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  5. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for the Advanced Test Reactor Remote Monitoring and Management Capability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohachek, Randolph Charles [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR; TRA-670), which is located in the ATR Complex at Idaho National Laboratory, was constructed in the 1960s for the purpose of irradiating reactor fuels and materials. Other irradiation services, such as radioisotope production, are also performed at ATR. While ATR is safely fulfilling current mission requirements, assessments are continuing. These assessments intend to identify areas to provide defense–in-depth and improve safety for ATR. One of the assessments performed by an independent group of nuclear industry experts recommended that a remote accident management capability be provided. The report stated that: “contemporary practice in commercial power reactors is to provide a remote shutdown station or stations to allow shutdown of the reactor and management of long-term cooling of the reactor (i.e., management of reactivity, inventory, and cooling) should the main control room be disabled (e.g., due to a fire in the control room or affecting the control room).” This project will install remote reactor monitoring and management capabilities for ATR. Remote capabilities will allow for post scram reactor management and monitoring in the event the main Reactor Control Room (RCR) must be evacuated.

  6. IRRADIATION TESTING OF THE RERTR FUEL MINIPLATES WITH BURNABLE ABSORBERS IN THE ADVANCED TEST REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    I. Glagolenko; D. Wachs; N. Woolstenhulme; G. Chang; B. Rabin; C. Clark; T. Wiencek

    2010-10-01

    Based on the results of the reactor physics assessment, conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) can be potentially accomplished in two ways, by either using U-10Mo monolithic or U-7Mo dispersion type plates in the ATR fuel element. Both designs, however, would require incorporation of the burnable absorber in several plates of the fuel element to compensate for the excess reactivity and to flatten the radial power profile. Several different types of burnable absorbers were considered initially, but only borated compounds, such as B4C, ZrB2 and Al-B alloys, were selected for testing primarily due to the length of the ATR fuel cycle and fuel manufacturing constraints. To assess and compare irradiation performance of the U-Mo fuels with different burnable absorbers we have designed and manufactured 28 RERTR miniplates (20 fueled and 8 non-fueled) containing fore-mentioned borated compounds. These miniplates will be tested in the ATR as part of the RERTR-13 experiment, which is described in this paper. Detailed plate design, compositions and irradiations conditions are discussed.

  7. Design and Laboratory Evaluation of Future Elongation and Diameter Measurements at the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K. L. Davis; D. L. Knudson; J. L. Rempe; J. C. Crepeau; S. Solstad

    2015-07-01

    New materials are being considered for fuel, cladding, and structures in next generation and existing nuclear reactors. Such materials can undergo significant dimensional and physical changes during high temperature irradiations. In order to accurately predict these changes, real-time data must be obtained under prototypic irradiation conditions for model development and validation. To provide such data, researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) High Temperature Test Laboratory (HTTL) are developing several instrumented test rigs to obtain data real-time from specimens irradiated in well-controlled pressurized water reactor (PWR) coolant conditions in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). This paper reports the status of INL efforts to develop and evaluate prototype test rigs that rely on Linear Variable Differential Transformers (LVDTs) in laboratory settings. Although similar LVDT-based test rigs have been deployed in lower flux Materials Testing Reactors (MTRs), this effort is unique because it relies on robust LVDTs that can withstand higher temperatures and higher fluxes than often found in other MTR irradiations. Specifically, the test rigs are designed for detecting changes in length and diameter of specimens irradiated in ATR PWR loops. Once implemented, these test rigs will provide ATR users with unique capabilities that are sorely needed to obtain measurements such as elongation caused by thermal expansion and/or creep loading and diameter changes associated with fuel and cladding swelling, pellet-clad interaction, and crud buildup.

  8. Operational Philosophy for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Benson; J. Cole; J. Jackson; F. Marshall; D. Ogden; J. Rempe; M. C. Thelen

    2013-02-01

    In 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). At its core, the ATR NSUF Program combines access to a portion of the available ATR radiation capability, the associated required examination and analysis facilities at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), and INL staff expertise with novel ideas provided by external contributors (universities, laboratories, and industry). These collaborations define the cutting edge of nuclear technology research in high-temperature and radiation environments, contribute to improved industry performance of current and future light-water reactors (LWRs), and stimulate cooperative research between user groups conducting basic and applied research. To make possible the broadest access to key national capability, the ATR NSUF formed a partnership program that also makes available access to critical facilities outside of the INL. Finally, the ATR NSUF has established a sample library that allows access to pre-irradiated samples as needed by national research teams.

  9. Risk-based management system development for the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Risk-Based Management System (RBMS) is being developed to facilitate the use of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) probabilistic risk assessment to support ATR operation. Most ATR RBMS questions can best be answered using the System Analysis and Risk Assessment System (SARA) developed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. However, some applications may require employment of the other four codes used to develop and report the PRA. These four codes include the Integrated Reliability and Risk Analysis System (IRRAS), SETS, ETA-II, and the Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR). The ATR RBMS will evolve over three years, and will include the results of the Level 3 and external events analysis

  10. The decontamination, decommissioning, and demolition of loss-of-fluid test reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October 2006, CH2M-WG Idaho completed the decontamination, decommissioning and demolition of the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) facility. The 30-year-old research reactor, located at the Idaho National Laboratory site, posed significant challenges involving regulations governing the demolition of a historical facility, as well as worker safety issues associated with the removal of the reactor's domed structure. The LOFT facility was located at the west end of Test Area North (TAN), built in the 1950's to support the government's aircraft nuclear propulsion program. When President Kennedy cancelled the nuclear propulsion program in 1961, TAN began to host various other activities. The LOFT reactor became part of the new mission. The LOFT facility, constructed between 1965 and 1975, was a scaled-down version of a commercial pressurized water reactor. Its design allowed engineers, scientists, and operators to create or re-create loss-of-fluid accidents (reactor fuel meltdowns) under controlled conditions. The LOFT dome provided containment for a relatively small, mobile test reactor that was moved into and out of the facility on a railroad car. The dome was roughly 21 meters (70 feet) in diameter and 30 meters (98 feet) in height. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission received the results from the accident tests and incorporated the data into commercial reactor operating codes. The facility conducted 38 experiments, including several small loss-of-coolant experiments designed to simulate events such as the accident that occurred at Three Mile Island in Pennsylvania, before the LOFT facility was closed. Through formal survey and research, the LOFT facility was determined to be a DOE Signature Property, as defined by the 'INEEL Cultural Resource Management Plan', and thus eligible for inclusion in the National Register of Historic Places. Decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) of the facility constituted an adverse effect on the historic property that required

  11. Operating the Advanced Test Reactor in today's economic and regulatory environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), located at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, is the US Department of Energy's largest and most versatile test reactor. Base programs at ATR are planned well into the 21st century. The ATR and support facilities along with an overview of current programs will be reviewed, but the main focus of the presentation will be on the impact that today's economic and regulatory concerns have had on the operation of this test reactor. Today's economic and regulatory concerns have demanded more work be completed at lower cost while increasing the margin of safety. By the beginning of the 1990 s, federal budgets for research generally and particularly for nuclear research had decreased dramatically. Many national needs continued to require testing in the ATR; but demanded lower cost, increased efficiency, improved performance, and an increased margin of safety. At the same time budgets were decreasing, there was an increase in regulatory compliance activity. The new standards imposed higher margins of safety. The new era of greater openness and higher safety standards complemented research demands to work safer, smarter and more efficiently. Several changes were made at the ATR to meet the demands of the sponsors and public. Such changes included some workforce reductions, securing additional program sponsors, upgrading some facilities, dismantling other facilities, and implementing new safety programs. (author)

  12. Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) Recently Installed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most test reactors are equipped with shuttle facilities (sometimes called rabbit tubes) whereby small capsules can be inserted into the reactor and retrieved during power operations. With the installation of Hydraulic Shuttle Irradiation System (HSIS) this capability has been restored to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The general design and operating principles of this system were patterned after the hydraulic rabbit at Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), which has operated successfully for many years. Using primary coolant as the motive medium the HSIS system is designed to simultaneously transport fourteen shuttle capsules, each 16 mm OD x 57 mm long, to and from the B-7 position of the reactor. The B-7 position is one of the higher flux positions in the reactor with typical thermal and fast (>1 Mev) fluxes of 2.8E+14 n/cm2/sec and 1.9E+14 n/cm2/sec respectively. The available space inside each shuttle is approximately 14 mm diameter x 50 mm long. The shuttle containers are made from titanium which was selected for its low neutron activation properties and durability. Shuttles can be irradiated for time periods ranging from a few minutes to several months. The Send and Receive Station (SRS) for the HSIS is located 2.5 m deep in the ATR canal which allows irradiated shuttles to be easily moved from the SRS to a wet loaded cask, or transport pig. The HSIS system first irradiated (empty) shuttles in September 2009 and has since completed a Readiness Assessment in November 2009. The HSIS is a key component of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) operated by Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC and is available to a wide variety of university researchers for nuclear fuels and materials experiments as well as medical isotope research and production.

  13. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Rempe; D. Knudson; J. Daw; T. Unruh; B. Chase; R. Schley; J. Palmer; K. Condie

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support the growth of nuclear science and technology in the United States (US). By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to design, develop, and deploy new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this initial review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR, and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. Since 2009, annual reports have been issued to provide updates on the program strategy and the progress made on implementing the strategy. This report provides an update reflecting progress as of January 2014.

  14. Cold Crucible Induction Melter Testing at The Idaho National Laboratory for the Advanced Remediation Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay Roach; Nick Soelberg; Mike Ancho; Eric Tchemitcheff; John Richardson

    2009-03-01

    AREVA Federal Services (AFS) is performing a multi-year, multi-phase Advanced Remediation Technologies (ART) project, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), to evaluate the feasibility and benefits of replacing the existing joule-heated melter (JHM) used to treat high level waste (HLW) in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) at the Savannah River Site with a cold crucible induction melter (CCIM). The AFS ART CCIM project includes several collaborators from AREVA subsidiaries, French companies, and DOE national laboratories. The Savannah River National Laboratory and the Commissariat a l’Energie Atomique (CEA) have performed laboratory-scale studies and testing to determine a suitable, high-waste-loading glass matrix. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and CEA are performing CCIM demonstrations at two different pilot scales to assess CCIM design and operation for treating SRS sludge wastes that are currently being treated in the DWPF. SGN is performing engineering studies to validate the feasibility of retrofitting CCIM technology into the DWPF Melter Cell. The long-term project plan includes more lab-testing, pilot- and large-scale demonstrations, and engineering activities to be performed during subsequent project phases. This paper provides preliminary results of tests using the engineering-scale CCIM test system located at the INL. The CCIM test system was operated continuously over a time period of about 58 hours. As the DWPF simulant feed was continuously fed to the melter, the glass level gradually increased until a portion of the molten glass was drained from the melter. The glass drain was operated semi-continuously because the glass drain rate was higher than the glass feedrate. A cold cap of unmelted feed was controlled by adjusting the feedrate and melter power levels to obtain the target molten glass temperatures with varying cold cap levels. Three test conditions were performed per the test plan, during which the melter was

  15. Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-2 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2), which utilized the same experiment design as well as control and monitoring systems as AGR-1, started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The design of this experiment and support systems will be briefly discussed, followed by the progress and status of the experiment to date.

  16. Final Assembly and Initial Irradiation of the First Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. B. Grover

    2007-05-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) oxycarbide (UCO) tri-isotropic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The AGR fuel experiments will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing.1,2 The experiments, which will each consist of six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in 2005, and the fabrication and assembly of the first experiment test train (designated AGR-1) as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment

  17. Summary of Thermocouple Performance During Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor and Out-of-Pile Thermocouple Testing in Support of Such Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. J. Palmer; DC Haggard; J. W. Herter; M. Scervini; W. D. Swank; D. L. Knudson; R. S. Cherry

    2011-07-01

    High temperature gas reactor experiments create unique challenges for thermocouple based temperature measurements. As a result of the interaction with neutrons, the thermoelements of the thermocouples undergo transmutation, which produces a time dependent change in composition and, as a consequence, a time dependent drift of the thermocouple signal. This drift is particularly severe for high temperature platinum-rhodium thermocouples (Types S, R, and B); and tungsten-rhenium thermocouples (Types C and W). For lower temperature applications, previous experiences with type K thermocouples in nuclear reactors have shown that they are affected by neutron irradiation only to a limited extent. Similarly type N thermocouples are expected to be only slightly affected by neutron fluxes. Currently the use of these Nickel based thermocouples is limited when the temperature exceeds 1000°C due to drift related to phenomena other than nuclear irradiation. High rates of open-circuit failure are also typical. Over the past ten years, three long-term Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) experiments have been conducted with measured temperatures ranging from 700oC – 1200oC. A variety of standard Type N and specialty thermocouple designs have been used in these experiments with mixed results. A brief summary of thermocouple performance in these experiments is provided. Most recently, out of pile testing has been conducted on a variety of Type N thermocouple designs at the following (nominal) temperatures and durations: 1150oC and 1200oC for 2000 hours at each temperature, followed by 200 hours at 1250oC, and 200 hours at 1300oC. The standard Type N design utilizes high purity crushed MgO insulation and an Inconel 600 sheath. Several variations on the standard Type N design were tested, including Haynes 214 alloy sheath, spinel (MgAl2O4) insulation instead of MgO, a customized sheath developed at the University of Cambridge, and finally a loose assembly thermocouple with hard fired alumina

  18. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

    2010-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  19. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg

    2013-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  20. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jennifer Lyons; Wade R. Marcum; Mark D. DeHart; Sean R. Morrell

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  1. Reactor Physics Scoping and Characterization Study on Implementation of TRIGA Fuel in the Advanced Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), under the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) Program and the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), is conducting feasibility studies for the conversion of its fuel from a highly enriched uranium (HEU) composition to a low enriched uranium (LEU) composition. These studies have considered a wide variety of LEU plate-type fuels to replace the current HEU fuel. Continuing to investigate potential alternatives to the present HEU fuel form, this study presents a preliminary analysis of TRIGA® fuel within the current ATR fuel envelopes and compares it to the functional requirements delineated by the Naval Reactors Program, which includes: greater than 4.8E+14 fissions/s/g of 235U, a fast to thermal neutron flux ratio that is less than 5% deviation of its current value, a constant cycle power within the corner lobes, and an operational cycle length of 56 days at 120 MW. Other parameters outside those put forth by the Naval Reactors Program which are investigated herein include axial and radial power profiles, effective delayed neutron fraction, and mean neutron generation time.

  2. Reactor fault simulation at the closure of the Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor: analysis of reactor transient tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The testing of fault transient analysis methods by direct simulation of fault sequences on a commercial reactor is clearly excluded on safety and economic grounds. The closure of the Windscale prototype advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) therefore offered a unique opportunity to test fault study methods under extreme conditions relatively unfettered by economic constraints, although subject to appropriate safety regulations. One aspect of these important experiments was a series of reactor transient tests. The objective of these reactor transients was to increase confidence in the fault study computer models used for commercial AGR safety assessment by extending their range of validation to cover large amplitude and fast transients in temperature, power and flow, relevant to CAGR faults, and well beyond the conditions achievable experimentally on commercial reactors. A large number of tests have now been simulated with the fault study code KINAGRAX. Agreement with measurement is very good and sensitivity studies show that such discrepancies as exist may be due largely to input data errors. It is concluded that KINAGRAX is able to predict steady state conditions and transient amplitudes in both power and temperature to within a few percent. (author)

  3. Status of the Combined Third and Fourth NGNP Fuel Irradiations In the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Blaine Grover; David A. Petti; Michael E. Davenport

    2013-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is irradiating up to seven low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The experiments will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of several independent capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in September 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated (AGR-3/4), which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2014. Since the purpose of this combined experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  4. Reactor Accident Analysis Methodology for the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility Documented Safety Analysis Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The regulatory requirement to develop an upgraded safety basis for a DOE Nuclear Facility was realized in January 2001 by issuance of a revision to Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations Section 830 (10 CFR 830). Subpart B of 10 CFR 830, ''Safety Basis Requirements,'' requires a contractor responsible for a DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, or 3 nuclear facility to either submit by April 9, 2001 the existing safety basis which already meets the requirements of Subpart B, or to submit by April 10, 2003 an upgraded facility safety basis that meets the revised requirements. 10 CFR 830 identifies Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Regulatory Guide 1.70, ''Standard Format and Content of Safety Analysis Reports for Nuclear Power Plants'' as a safe harbor methodology for preparation of a DOE reactor documented safety analysis (DSA). The regulation also allows for use of a graded approach. This report presents the methodology that was developed for preparing the reactor accident analysis portion of the Advanced Test Reactor Critical Facility (ATRC) upgraded DSA. The methodology was approved by DOE for developing the ATRC safety basis as an appropriate application of a graded approach to the requirements of 10 CFR 830

  5. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey Phillips; Charles Barnes; John Hunn

    2010-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on

  6. Fabrication and Comparison of Fuels for Advanced Gas Reactor Irradiation Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As part of the program to demonstrate TRISO-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant, a series of irradiation tests of Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel are being performed in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory. In the first test, called 'AGR-1,' graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 until November 2009. Development of AGR-1 fuel sought to replicate the properties of German TRISO-coated particles. No particle failures were seen in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a burn up of 19%. The AGR-1 particles were coated in a two-inch diameter coater. Following fabrication of AGR-1 fuel, process improvements and changes were made in each of the fabrication processes. Changes in the kernel fabrication process included replacing the carbon black powder feed with a surface-modified carbon slurry and shortening the sintering schedule. AGR-2 TRISO particles were produced in a six-inch diameter coater using a change size about twenty-one times that of the two-inch diameter coater used to coat AGR-1 particles. Changes were also made in the compacting process, including increasing the temperature and pressure of pressing and using a different type of press. Irradiation of AGR-2 fuel began in late spring 2010. Properties of AGR-2 fuel compare favorably with AGR-1 and historic German fuel. Kernels are more homogeneous in shape, chemistry and density. TRISO-particle sphericity, layer thickness standard deviations, and defect fractions are also comparable. In a sample of 317,000 particles from deconsolidated AGR-2 compacts, 3 exposed kernels were found in a leach test. No SiC defects were found in a sample of 250,000 deconsolidated particles, and no IPyC defects in a sample of 64,000 particles. The primary difference in properties between AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacts is that AGR-2 compacts have a higher matrix density, 1.6 g/cm3 compared to about 1.3 g/cm3 for AGR-1 compacts. Based on fuel

  7. The advanced test reactor national scientific user facility advancing nuclear technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  8. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    T. R. Allen; J. B. Benson; J. A. Foster; F. M. Marshall; M. K. Meyer; M. C. Thelen

    2009-05-01

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  9. The Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility Advancing Nuclear Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help ensure the long-term viability of nuclear energy through a robust and sustained research and development effort, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor and associated post-irradiation examination facilities a National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF), allowing broader access to nuclear energy researchers. The mission of the ATR NSUF is to provide access to world-class nuclear research facilities, thereby facilitating the advancement of nuclear science and technology. The ATR NSUF seeks to create an engaged academic and industrial user community that routinely conducts reactor-based research. Cost free access to the ATR and PIE facilities is granted based on technical merit to U.S. university-led experiment teams conducting non-proprietary research. Proposals are selected via independent technical peer review and relevance to DOE mission. Extensive publication of research results is expected as a condition for access. During FY 2008, the first full year of ATR NSUF operation, five university-led experiments were awarded access to the ATR and associated post-irradiation examination facilities. The ATR NSUF has awarded four new experiments in early FY 2009, and anticipates awarding additional experiments in the fall of 2009 as the results of the second 2009 proposal call. As the ATR NSUF program mature over the next two years, the capability to perform irradiation research of increasing complexity will become available. These capabilities include instrumented irradiation experiments and post-irradiation examinations on materials previously irradiated in U.S. reactor material test programs. The ATR critical facility will also be made available to researchers. An important component of the ATR NSUF an education program focused on the reactor-based tools available for resolving nuclear science and technology issues. The ATR NSUF provides education programs including a summer short course, internships, faculty-student team

  10. Testing of an advanced thermochemical conversion reactor system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-01-01

    This report presents the results of work conducted by MTCI to verify and confirm experimentally the ability of the MTCI gasification process to effectively generate a high-quality, medium-Btu gas from a wider variety of feedstock and waste than that attainable in air-blown, direct gasification systems. The system's overall simplicity, due to the compact nature of the pulse combustor, and the high heat transfer rates attainable within the pulsating flow resonance tubes, provide a decided and near-term potential economic advantage for the MTCI indirect gasification system. The primary objective of this project was the design, construction, and testing of a Process Design Verification System for an indirectly heated, thermochemical fluid-bed reactor and a pulse combustor an an integrated system that can process alternative renewable sources of energy such as biomass, black liquor, municipal solid waste and waste hydrocarbons, including heavy oils into a useful product gas. The test objectives for the biomass portion of this program were to establish definitive performance data on biomass feedstocks covering a wide range of feedstock qualities and characteristics. The test objectives for the black liquor portion of this program were to verify the operation of the indirect gasifier on commercial black liquor containing 65 percent solids at several temperature levels and to characterize the bed carbon content, bed solids particle size and sulfur distribution as a function of gasification conditions. 6 refs., 59 figs., 29 tabs.

  11. Advanced Test Reactor Complex Facilities Radioactive Waste Management Basis and DOE Manual 435.1-1 Compliance Tables

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego; Brion Bennett

    2011-11-01

    U.S. Department of Energy Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management,' along with its associated manual and guidance, requires development and maintenance of a radioactive waste management basis for each radioactive waste management facility, operation, and activity. This document presents a radioactive waste management basis for Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor Complex facilities that manage radioactive waste. The radioactive waste management basis for a facility comprises existing laboratory-wide and facility-specific documents. U.S. Department of Energy Manual 435.1-1, 'Radioactive Waste Management Manual,' facility compliance tables also are presented for the facilities. The tables serve as a tool to develop the radioactive waste management basis.

  12. Advances in sodium technology, testing and diagnostics of fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The collection contains a selection of 29 papers from three international specialists' meetings: the CMEA conference ''Control and measuring instruments and diagnostic systems of fast reactors'' held in the GDR in April 1983; the IAEA conference on nuclear power experience held in Austria in September 1982; and the conference ''Problems of technology and corrosion in sodium coolant and protective gas'' held in the GDR in April 1977. Three papers on operating experience with Soviet fast reactors and their safety have a general character; they are followed up by three papers on sodium technology. Five papers deal with the diagnostics of fast sodium cooled reactors and nine papers are devoted to the diagnostics of steam generators. Eight papers relate to detectors for the diagnostics of fast reactors. Safety regulations for work with alkali metals are added. (A.K.)

  13. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core

  14. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

    2011-09-01

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore

  15. Design and Status of the NGNP Fuel Experiment AGR-3/4 Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaine Grover

    2012-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program will be irradiating up to seven separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next several years to demonstrate and qualify new TRISO coated particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006 and was completed in November 2009. The second experiment (AGR-2) started irradiation in June 2010 and is currently scheduled to be completed in April 2013. The third and fourth experiments have been combined into a single experiment designated AGR-3/4, which started its irradiation in December 2011 and is currently scheduled to be completed in November 2013. Since the purpose of this experiment is to provide data on fission product migration and retention in the NGNP reactor, the design of this experiment is

  16. Potential role of the Fast Flux Test Facility and the advanced test reactor in the U.S. tritium production system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy is currently engaged in a dual-track strategy to develop an accelerator and a commercial light water reactor (CLWR) as potential sources of tritium supply. New analysis of the production capabilities of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Site argues for considering its inclusion in the tritium supply,system. The use of the FFTF (alone or together with the Advanced Test Reactor [ATR] at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory) as an integral part of,a tritium production system would help (1) ensure supply by 2005, (2) provide additional time to resolve institutional and technical issues associated with the- dual-track strategy, and (3) reduce discounted total life-cycle'costs and near-tenn annual expenditures for accelerator-based systems. The FFRF would also provide a way to get an early start.on dispositioning surplus weapons-usable plutonium as well as provide a source of medical isotopes. Challenges Associated With the Dual-Track Strategy The Department's purchase of either a commercial reactor or reactor irradiation services faces challenging institutional issues associated with converting civilian reactors to defense uses. In addition, while the technical capabilities of the individual components of the accelerator have been proven, the entire system needs to be demonstrated and scaled upward to ensure that the components work together 1548 as a complete production system. These challenges create uncertainty over the ability of the du2a-track strategy to provide an assured tritium supply source by 2005. Because the earliest the accelerator could come on line is 2007, it would have to operate at maximum capacity for the first few years to regenerate the reserves lost through radioactive decay after 2005

  17. Advanced Test Reactor Safety Basis Upgrade Lessons Learned Relative to Design Basis Verification and Safety Basis Management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is a pressurized light-water reactor with a design thermal power of 250 MW. The principal function of the ATR is to provide a high neutron flux for testing reactor fuels and other materials. The reactor also provides other irradiation services such as radioisotope production. The ATR and its support facilities are located at the Test Reactor Area of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). An audit conducted by the Department of Energy's Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (DOE OA) raised concerns that design conditions at the ATR were not adequately analyzed in the safety analysis and that legacy design basis management practices had the potential to further impact safe operation of the facility.1 The concerns identified by the audit team, and issues raised during additional reviews performed by ATR safety analysts, were evaluated through the unreviewed safety question process resulting in shutdown of the ATR for more than three months while these concerns were resolved. Past management of the ATR safety basis, relative to facility design basis management and change control, led to concerns that discrepancies in the safety basis may have developed. Although not required by DOE orders or regulations, not performing design basis verification in conjunction with development of the 10 CFR 830 Subpart B upgraded safety basis allowed these potential weaknesses to be carried forward. Configuration management and a clear definition of the existing facility design basis have a direct relation to developing and maintaining a high quality safety basis which properly identifies and mitigates all hazards and postulated accident conditions. These relations and the impact of past safety basis management practices have been reviewed in order to identify lessons learned from the safety basis upgrade process and appropriate actions to resolve possible concerns with respect to the current ATR safety

  18. ICONE-4: Proceedings. Volume 2: Advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proceedings for this conference are contained in 5 volumes. This volume is divided into the following areas: advanced reactor requirements; advanced reactor design and analysis; arrangement and construction; specific reactor designs; demonstration testing; safety systems and analysis; component demonstration testing; advanced reactor containment design; licensing topics and updates; accelerator applications and spallation sources; and advanced reactor development. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume

  19. Feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment for vanadium alloys in the advanced test reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.; Strain, R.V.; Smith, D.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Matsui, H. [Tohoku Univ. (Japan)

    1996-10-01

    The feasibility of conducting a dynamic helium charging experiment (DHCE) for vanadium alloys in the water-cooled Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) is being investigated as part of the U.S./Monbusho collaboration. Preliminary findings suggest that such an experiment is feasible, with certain constraints. Creating a suitable irradiation position in the ATR, designing an effective thermal neutron filter, incorporating thermocouples for limited specimen temperature monitoring, and handling of tritium during various phases of the assembly and reactor operation all appear to be feasible. An issue that would require special attention, however, is tritium permeation loss through the capsule wall at the higher design temperatures (>{approx}600{degrees}C). If permeation is excessive, the reduced amount of tritium entering the test specimens would limit the helium generation rates in them. At the lower design temperatures (<{approx}425{degrees}C), sodium, instead of lithium, may have to be used as the bond material to overcome the tritium solubility limitation.

  20. Assessment of Feasibility of the Beneficial Use of Waste Heat from the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna P. Guillen

    2012-07-01

    This report investigates the feasibility of using waste heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). A proposed glycol waste heat recovery system was assessed for technical and economic feasibility. The system under consideration would use waste heat from the ATR secondary coolant system to preheat air for space heating of TRA-670. A tertiary coolant stream would be extracted from the secondary coolant system loop and pumped to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, where heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air in the heating and ventilation system. Historical data from Advanced Test Reactor operations over the past 10 years indicates that heat from the reactor coolant was available (when needed for heating) for 43.5% of the year on average. Potential energy cost savings by using the waste heat to preheat intake air is $242K/yr. Technical, safety, and logistics considerations of the glycol waste heat recovery system are outlined. Other opportunities for using waste heat and reducing water usage at ATR are considered.

  1. Digital modeling of radioactive and chemical waste transport in the aquifer underlying the Snake River Plain at the National Reactor Testing Station, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, J.B.

    1974-01-01

    Industrial and low-level radioactive liquid wastes at the National Reactor Testing Station (NRTS) in Idaho have been disposed to the Snake River Plain aquifer since 1952. Monitoring studies have indicated that tritium and chloride have dispersed over a 15-square mile (39-square kilometer) area of the aquifer in low but detectable concentrations and have only migrated as far as 5 miles (8 kilometers) downgradient from discharge points. The movement of cationic waste solutes, particularly 90Sr and 137Cs, has been significantly retarded due to sorption phenomena, principally ion exchange. 137Cs has shown no detectable migration in the aquifer and 90Sr has migrated only about 1.5 miles (2 kilometers) from the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) discharge well, and is detectable over an area of only 1.5 square miles ( 4 square kilometers) of the aquifer. Digital modeling techniques have been applied successfully to the analysis of the complex waste-transport system by utilizing numerical solution of the coupled equations of groundwater motion and mass transport. The model includes the effects of convective transport, flow divergence, two-dimensional hydraulic dispersion, radioactive decay, and reversible linear sorption. The hydraulic phase of the model uses the iterative, alternating direction, implicit finite-difference scheme to solve the groundwater flow equations, while the waste-transport phase uses a modified method of characteristics to solve the solute transport equations simulated by the model. The modeling results indicate that hydraulic dispersion (especially transverse) is a much more significant influence than previously suggested by earlier studies. The model has been used to estimate future waste migration patterns for varied assumed hydrological and waste conditions up through the year 2000. The hydraulic effects of recharge from the Big Lost River have an important (but not predominant) influence on the simulated future migration patterns. For the

  2. Advanced reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For many years, the NEA has been examining advanced reactor issues and disseminating information of use to regulators, designers and researchers on safety issues and research needed. Following the recommendation of participants at an NEA workshop, a Task Group on Advanced Reactor Experimental Facilities (TAREF) was initiated with the aim of providing an overview of facilities suitable for carrying out the safety research considered necessary for gas-cooled reactors (GCRs) and sodium fast reactors (SFRs), with other reactor systems possibly being considered in a subsequent phase. The TAREF was thus created in 2008 with the following participating countries: Canada, the Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Japan, Korea and the United States. In a second stage, India provided valuable information on its experimental facilities related to SFR safety research. The study method adopted entailed first identifying high-priority safety issues that require research and then categorizing the available facilities in terms of their ability to address the safety issues. For each of the technical areas, the task members agreed on a set of safety issues requiring research and established a ranking with regard to safety relevance (high, medium, low) and the status of knowledge based on the following scale relative to full knowledge: high (100%-75%), medium (75 - 25%) and low (25-0%). Only the issues identified as being of high safety relevance and for which the state of knowledge is low or medium were included in the discussion, as these issues would likely warrant further study. For each of the safety issues, the TAREF members identified appropriate facilities, providing relevant information such as operating conditions (in- or out-of reactor), operating range, description of the test section, type of testing, instrumentation, current status and availability, and uniqueness. Based on the information collected, the task members assessed prospects and priorities

  3. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw

    2011-03-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR; and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program’s strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this instrumentation development strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing instrumentation development program objectives. This document reports progress toward implementing this strategy in 2010.

  4. Status Report on Efforts to Enhance Instrumentation to Support Advanced Test Reactor Irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. By attracting new research users - universities, laboratories, and industry - the ATR NSUF facilitates basic and applied nuclear research and development, further advancing the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to prove new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. To address this need, an assessment of instrumentation available and under-development at other test reactors was completed. Based on this review, recommendations were made with respect to what instrumentation is needed at the ATR; and a strategy was developed for obtaining these sensors. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this program's strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing program objectives. In 2009, a report was issued documenting this instrumentation development strategy and initial progress toward accomplishing instrumentation development program objectives. This document reports progress toward implementing this strategy in 2010.

  5. Mixed oxide fuels testing in the advanced test reactor to support plutonium disposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intense worldwide effort is now under way to find means of reducing the stockpile of weapons-grade plutonium. One of the most attractive solutions would be to use WGPu as fuel in existing light water reactors (LWRs) in the form of mixed oxide (MOX) fuel - i.e., plutonia (PUO2) mixed with urania (UO2). Before U.S. reactors could be used for this purpose, their operating licenses would have to be amended. Numerous technical issues must be resolved before LWR operating licenses can be amended to allow the use of MOX fuel. These issues include the following: (1) MOX fuel fabrication process verification, (2) Whether and how to use burnable poisons to depress MOX fuel initial reactivity, which is higher than that of urania, (3) The effects of WGPu isotopic composition, (4) The feasibility of loading MOX fuel with plutonia content up to 7% by weight, (5) The effects of americium and gallium in WGPu, (6) Fission gas release from MOX fuel pellets made from WGPu, (7) Fuel/cladding gap closure, (8) The effects of power cycling and off-normal events on fuel integrity, (9) Development of radial distributions of burnup and fission products, (10) Power spiking near the interfaces of MOX and urania fuel assemblies, and (11) Fuel performance code validation. We have performed calculations to show that the use of hafnium shrouds can produce spectrum adjustments that will bring the flux spectrum in ATR test loops into a good approximation to the spectrum anticipated in a commercial LWR containing MOX fuel while allowing operation of the test fuel assemblies near their optimum values of linear heat generation rate. The ATR would be a nearly ideal test bed for developing data needed to support applications to license LWRs for operation with MOX fuel made from weapons-grade plutonium. The requirements for planning and implementing a test program in the ATR have been identified

  6. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  7. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition, as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance, other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B, that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  8. Criticality safety evaluation for the Advanced Test Reactor enhanced low enriched uranium fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montierth, Leland M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-07-19

    The Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) convert program is developing a high uranium density fuel based on a low enriched uranium (LEU) uranium-molybdenum alloy. Testing of prototypic GTRI fuel elements is necessary to demonstrate integrated fuel performance behavior and scale-up of fabrication techniques. GTRI Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) elements based on the ATR-Standard Size elements (all plates fueled) are to be fabricated for testing in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). While a specific ELF element design will eventually be provided for detailed analyses and in-core testing, this criticality safety evaluation (CSE) is intended to evaluate a hypothetical ELF element design for criticality safety purposes. Existing criticality analyses have analyzed Standard (HEU) ATR elements from which controls have been derived. This CSE documents analysis that determines the reactivity of the hypothetical ELF fuel elements relative to HEU ATR elements and whether the existing HEU ATR element controls bound the ELF element. The initial calculations presented in this CSE analyzed the original ELF design, now referred to as Mod 0.1. In addition as part of a fuel meat thickness optimization effort for reactor performance other designs have been evaluated. As of early 2014 the most current conceptual designs are Mk1A and Mk1B that were previously referred to as conceptual designs Mod 0.10 and Mod 0.11, respectively. Revision 1 evaluates the reactivity of the ATR HEU Mark IV elements for a comparison with the Mark VII elements.

  9. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization (RISMC) Advanced Test Reactor Demonstration Case Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; David Schwieder; Cherie Phelan; Anh Bui; Paul Bayless

    2012-08-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). Consequently, the ability to better characterize and quantify safety margin holds the key to improved decision making about LWR design, operation, and plant life extension. A systematic approach to characterization of safety margins and the subsequent margins management options represents a vital input to the licensee and regulatory analysis and decision making that will be involved. The purpose of the RISMC Pathway R&D is to support plant decisions for risk-informed margins management with the aim to improve economics, reliability, and sustain safety of current NPPs. Goals of the RISMC Pathway are twofold: (1) Develop and demonstrate a risk-assessment method coupled to safety margin quantification that can be used by NPP decision makers as part of their margin recovery strategies. (2) Create an advanced “RISMC toolkit” that enables more accurate representation of NPP safety margin. This report describes the RISMC methodology demonstration where the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was used as a test-bed for purposes of determining safety margins. As part of the demonstration, we describe how both the thermal-hydraulics and probabilistic safety calculations are integrated and used to quantify margin management strategies.

  10. Waste Heat Recovery from the Advanced Test Reactor Secondary Coolant Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2012-11-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of using a waste heat recovery system (WHRS) to recover heat from the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) secondary coolant system (SCS). This heat would be used to preheat air for space heating of the reactor building, thus reducing energy consumption, carbon footprint, and energy costs. Currently, the waste heat from the reactor is rejected to the atmosphere via a four-cell, induced-draft cooling tower. Potential energy and cost savings are 929 kW and $285K/yr. The WHRS would extract a tertiary coolant stream from the SCS loop and pump it to a new plate and frame heat exchanger, from which the heat would be transferred to a glycol loop for preheating outdoor air supplied to the heating and ventilation system. The use of glycol was proposed to avoid the freezing issues that plagued and ultimately caused the failure of a WHRS installed at the ATR in the 1980s. This study assessed the potential installation of a new WHRS for technical, logistical, and economic feasibility.

  11. Neutronics methods, models, and applications at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the advanced neutron source reactor three-element core design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A summary of the methods and models used to perform neutronics analyses on the Advanced Neutron Source reactor three-element core design is presented. The applications of the neutral particle Monte Carlo code MCNP are detailed, as well as the expansion of the static role of MCNP to analysis of fuel cycle depletion calculations. Results to date of these applications are presented also. A summary of the calculations not yet performed is also given to provide a open-quotes to-doclose quotes list if the project is resurrected

  12. Experiment Safety Assurance Package for Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation in an Average Power Position (I-24) in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. M . Ryskamp; R. C. Howard; R. C. Pedersen; S. T. Khericha

    1998-10-01

    The Fissile Material Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan details a series of test irradiations designed to investigate the use of weapons-grade plutonium in MOX fuel for light water reactors (LWR) (Cowell 1996a, Cowell 1997a, Thoms 1997a). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons-derived test fuel contains small amounts of gallium (about 2 parts per million). A concern exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel and into the clad, inducing embrittlement. For preliminary out-of-pile experiments, Wilson (1997) states that intermetallic compound formation is the principal interaction mechanism between zircaloy cladding and gallium. This interaction is very limited by the low mass of gallium, so problems are not expected with the zircaloy cladding, but an in-pile experiment is needed to confirm the out-of-pile experiments. Ryskamp (1998) provides an overview of this experiment and its documentation. The purpose of this Experiment Safety Assurance Package (ESAP) is to demonstrate the safe irradiation and handling of the mixed uranium and plutonium oxide (MOX) Fuel Average Power Test (APT) experiment as required by Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Technical Safety Requirement (TSR) 3.9.1 (LMITCO 1998). This ESAP addresses the specific operation of the MOX Fuel APT experiment with respect to the operating envelope for irradiation established by the Upgraded Final Safety Analysis Report (UFSAR) Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO 1997a). Experiment handling activities are discussed herein.

  13. Enhanced Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Element for the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pope, M. A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); DeHart, M. D. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Morrell, S. R. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Jamison, R. K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nef, E. C. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Nigg, D. W. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Under the current US Department of Energy (DOE) policy and planning scenario, the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) and its associated critical facility (ATRC) will be reconfigured to operate on low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This effort has produced a conceptual design for an Enhanced LEU Fuel (ELF) element. This fuel features monolithic U-10Mo fuel foils and aluminum cladding separated by a thin zirconium barrier. As with previous iterations of the ELF design, radial power peaking is managed using different U-10Mo foil thicknesses in different plates of the element. The lead fuel element design, ELF Mk1A, features only three fuel meat thicknesses, a reduction from the previous iterations meant to simplify manufacturing. Evaluation of the ELF Mk1A fuel design against reactor performance requirements is ongoing, as are investigations of the impact of manufacturing uncertainty on safety margins. The element design has been evaluated in what are expected to be the most demanding design basis accident scenarios and has met all initial thermal-hydraulic criteria.

  14. Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soelberg, Renae [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-11-01

    Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report November 2014 Highlights Rory Kennedy and Sarah Robertson attended the American Nuclear Society Winter Meeting and Nuclear Technology Expo in Anaheim, California, Nov. 10-13. ATR NSUF exhibited at the technology expo where hundreds of meeting participants had an opportunity to learn more about ATR NSUF. Dr. Kennedy briefed the Nuclear Engineering Department Heads Organization (NEDHO) on the workings of the ATR NSUF. • Rory Kennedy, James Cole and Dan Ogden participated in a reactor instrumentation discussion with Jean-Francois Villard and Christopher Destouches of CEA and several members of the INL staff. • ATR NSUF received approval from the NE-20 office to start planning the annual Users Meeting. The meeting will be held at INL, June 22-25. • Mike Worley, director of the Office of Innovative Nuclear Research (NE-42), visited INL Nov. 4-5. Milestones Completed • Recommendations for the Summer Rapid Turnaround Experiment awards were submitted to DOE-HQ Nov. 12 (Level 2 milestone due Nov. 30). Major Accomplishments/Activities • The University of California, Santa Barbara 2 experiment was unloaded from the GE-2000 at HFEF. The experiment specimen packs will be removed and shipped to ORNL for PIE. • The Terrani experiment, one of three FY 2014 new awards, was completed utilizing the Advanced Photon Source MRCAT beamline. The experiment investigated the chemical state of Ag and Pd in SiC shell of irradiated TRISO particles via X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. Upcoming Meetings/Events • The ATR NSUF program review meeting will be held Dec. 9-10 at L’Enfant Plaza. In addition to NSUF staff and users, NE-4, NE-5 and NE-7 representatives will attend the meeting. Awarded Research Projects Boise State University Rapid Turnaround Experiments (14-485 and 14-486) Nanoindentation and TEM work on the T91, HT9, HCM12A and 9Cr ODS specimens has been completed at

  15. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  16. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  17. Advanced Safeguards Approaches for New Fast Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durst, Philip C.; Therios, Ike; Bean, Robert; Dougan, A.; Boyer, Brian; Wallace, Rick L.; Ehinger, Michael H.; Kovacic, Don N.; Tolk, K.

    2007-12-15

    This third report in the series reviews possible safeguards approaches for new fast reactors in general, and the ABR in particular. Fast-neutron spectrum reactors have been used since the early 1960s on an experimental and developmental level, generally with fertile blanket fuels to “breed” nuclear fuel such as plutonium. Whether the reactor is designed to breed plutonium, or transmute and “burn” actinides depends mainly on the design of the reactor neutron reflector and the whether the blanket fuel is “fertile” or suitable for transmutation. However, the safeguards issues are very similar, since they pertain mainly to the receipt, shipment and storage of fresh and spent plutonium and actinide-bearing “TRU”-fuel. For these reasons, the design of existing fast reactors and details concerning how they have been safeguarded were studied in developing advanced safeguards approaches for the new fast reactors. In this regard, the design of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II “EBR-II” at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) was of interest, because it was designed as a collocated fast reactor with a pyrometallurgical reprocessing and fuel fabrication line – a design option being considered for the ABR. Similarly, the design of the Fast Flux Facility (FFTF) on the Hanford Site was studied, because it was a successful prototype fast reactor that ran for two decades to evaluate fuels and the design for commercial-scale fast reactors.

  18. Design and Test of Advanced Thermal Simulators for an Alkali Metal-Cooled Reactor Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garber, Anne E.; Dickens, Ricky E.

    2011-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has as one of its primary missions the development and testing of fission reactor simulators for space applications. A key component in these simulated reactors is the thermal simulator, designed to closely mimic the form and function of a nuclear fuel pin using electric heating. Continuing effort has been made to design simple, robust, inexpensive thermal simulators that closely match the steady-state and transient performance of a nuclear fuel pin. A series of these simulators have been designed, developed, fabricated and tested individually and in a number of simulated reactor systems at the EFF-TF. The purpose of the thermal simulators developed under the Fission Surface Power (FSP) task is to ensure that non-nuclear testing can be performed at sufficiently high fidelity to allow a cost-effective qualification and acceptance strategy to be used. Prototype thermal simulator design is founded on the baseline Fission Surface Power reactor design. Recent efforts have been focused on the design, fabrication and test of a prototype thermal simulator appropriate for use in the Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU). While designing the thermal simulators described in this paper, effort were made to improve the axial power profile matching of the thermal simulators. Simultaneously, a search was conducted for graphite materials with higher resistivities than had been employed in the past. The combination of these two efforts resulted in the creation of thermal simulators with power capacities of 2300-3300 W per unit. Six of these elements were installed in a simulated core and tested in the alkali metal-cooled Fission Surface Power Primary Test Circuit (FSP-PTC) at a variety of liquid metal flow rates and temperatures. This paper documents the design of the thermal simulators, test program, and test results.

  19. Progress in design, research and development and testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting covered the following topics: Developments in design of safety-related heat removal components and systems for advanced water cooled reactors; status of test programmes on heat removal components and systems of new designs; range of validity and extrapolation of test results for the qualification of design/licensing computer models and codes for advanced water cooled reactors; future needs and trends in testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Tests of heat removal safety systems have been conducted by various groups supporting the design, testing and certification of advanced water cooled reactors. The Technical Committee concluded that the reported test results generally confirm the predicted performance features of the advanced designs. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. In-situ Creep Testing Capability Development for Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. G. Kim; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; B. H. Sencer

    2010-08-01

    Creep is the slow, time-dependent strain that occurs in a material under a constant strees (or load) at high temperature. High temperature is a relative term, dependent on the materials being evaluated. A typical creep curve is shown in Figure 1-1. In a creep test, a constant load is applied to a tensile specimen maintained at a constant temperature. Strain is then measured over a period of time. The slope of the curve, identified in the figure below, is the strain rate of the test during Stage II or the creep rate of the material. Primary creep, Stage I, is a period of decreasing creep rate due to work hardening of the material. Primary creep is a period of primarily transient creep. During this period, deformation takes place and the resistance to creep increases until Stage II, Secondary creep. Stage II creep is a period with a roughly constant creep rate. Stage II is referred to as steady-state creep because a balance is achieved between the work hardening and annealing (thermal softening) processes. Tertiary creep, Stage III, occurs when there is a reduction in cross sectional area due to necking or effective reduction in area due to internal void formation; that is, the creep rate increases due to necking of the specimen and the associated increase in local stress.

  1. Completion Summary for Well NRF-16 near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Fisher, Jason C.; Bartholomay, Roy C.

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy's Naval Reactors Laboratory Field Office, Idaho Branch Office cored and completed well NRF-16 for monitoring the eastern Snake River Plain (SRP) aquifer. The borehole was initially cored to a depth of 425 feet below land surface and water samples and geophysical data were collected and analyzed to determine if well NRF-16 would meet criteria requested by Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) for a new upgradient well. Final construction continued after initial water samples and geophysical data indicated that NRF-16 would produce chemical concentrations representative of upgradient aquifer water not influenced by NRF facility disposal, and that the well was capable of producing sustainable discharge for ongoing monitoring. The borehole was reamed and constructed as a Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act monitoring well complete with screen and dedicated pump. Geophysical and borehole video logs were collected after coring and final completion of the monitoring well. Geophysical logs were examined in conjunction with the borehole core to identify primary flow paths for groundwater, which are believed to occur in the intervals of fractured and vesicular basalt and to describe borehole lithology in detail. Geophysical data also were examined to look for evidence of perched water and the extent of the annular seal after cement grouting the casing in place. Borehole videos were collected to confirm that no perched water was present and to examine the borehole before and after setting the screen in well NRF-16. Two consecutive single-well aquifer tests to define hydraulic characteristics for well NRF-16 were conducted in the eastern SRP aquifer. Transmissivity and hydraulic conductivity averaged from the aquifer tests were 4.8 x 103 ft2/d and 9.9 ft/d, respectively. The transmissivity for well NRF-16 was within the range of values determined from past aquifer

  2. Advanced neutron source reactor thermal-hydraulic test loop facility description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; Hardy, J.H.; King, J.F.; McFee, M.T.; Montgomery, B.H.; Pawel, R.E.; Power, B.H.; Shourbaji, A.A.; Siman-Tov, M.; Wood, R.J.; Yoder, G.L.

    1994-02-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is a facility for experiments constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The ANSR is both cooled and moderated by heavy water and uses uranium silicide fuel. The core is composed of two coaxial fuel-element annuli, each of different diameter. There are 684 parallel aluminum-clad fuel plates (252 in the inner-lower core and 432 in the outer-upper core) arranged in an involute geometry that effectively creates an array of thin rectangular flow channels. Both the fuel plates and the coolant channels are 1.27 mm thick, with a span of 87 mm (lower core), 70 mm (upper core), and 507-mm heated length. The coolant flows vertically upwards at a mass flux of 27 Mg/m{sup 2}s (inlet velocity of 25 m/s) with an inlet temperature of 45{degrees}C and inlet pressure of 3.2 MPa. The average and peak heat fluxes are approximately 6 and 12 MW/m{sup 2}, respectively. The availability of experimental data for both flow excursion (FE) and true critical heat flux (CHF) at the conditions applicable to the ANSR is very limited. The THTL was designed and built to simulate a full-length coolant subchannel of the core, allowing experimental determination of thermal limits under the expected ANSR thermal-hydraulic conditions. For these experimental studies, the involute-shaped fuel plates of the ANSR core with the narrow 1.27-mm flow gap are represented by a narrow rectangular channel. Tests in the THTL will provide both single- and two-phase thermal-hydraulic information. The specific phenomena that are to be examined are (1) single-phase heat-transfer coefficients and friction factors, (2) the point of incipient boiling, (3) nucleate boiling heat-transfer coefficients, (4) two-phase pressure-drop characteristics in the nucleate boiling regime, (5) flow instability limits, and (6) CHF limits.

  3. A thermal-hydraulic test rig for advanced fast reactor fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new design of fast reactor fuel assemblies has been proposed in which the pins are supported in grids attached to the wrapper by flexible skirts. Coolant mixing is enhanced by the skirts diverting flow into the cluster of pins at each grid. There are insufficient empirical data available for the detailed design of the skirt or for the input to computer calculations of flow and heat transfer. A test rig to provide these data has been designed and built. (author)

  4. Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor Materials Program. Reducing helium impurity depletion in HTGR materials testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moisture depletion in HTGR materials testing rigs has been empirically studied in the GE High Temperature Reactor Materials Testing Laboratory (HTRMTL). Tests have shown that increased helium flow rates and reduction in reactive (oxidizable) surface area are effective means of reducing depletion. Further, a portion of the depletion has been shown to be due to the presence of free C released by the dissociation of CH4. This depletion component can be reduced by reducing the helium residence time (increasing the helium flow rate) or by reducing the CH4 concentration in the test gas. Equipment modifications to reduce depletion have been developed, tested, and in most cases implemented in the HTRMTL to date. These include increasing the Helium Loop No. 1 pumping capacity, conversion of metallic retorts and radiation shields to alumina, isolation of thermocouple probes from the test gas by alumina thermowells, and substitution of non-reactive Mo-TZM for reactive metallic structural components

  5. Flow-induced vibration test of an advanced water reactor model. Part 1: Turbulence-induced forcing function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1/9 scale model of a proposed advanced water reactor was tested for flow-induced vibration. The main objectives of this test were to (1) derive an empirical equation for the turbulence forcing function which can be applied to the full-sized prototype; (2) study the effect of viscosity on the turbulence; (3) verify the superposition assumption widely used in dynamic analysis of weakly coupled fluid-shell systems; and (4) measure the shell responses to verify methods and computer programs used in the flow-induced vibration analysis of the prototype. This paper describes objectives (1), (2), and (3). Objective (4) will be discussed in a companion paper. The turbulence-induced fluctuating pressure was measured at 49 locations over the surface of a thick-walled, non-responsive scale model of the reactor vessel/core support cylinders. An empirical equation relating the fluctuating pressure, the frequency, and the distance from the inlet nozzle center line was derived to fit the test data. This equation involves only non-dimensional, fluid mechanical parameters that are postulated to represent the full-sized, geometrically similar prototype. While this postulate cannot be verified until similar measurements are taken on the full-sized unit, a similar approach using a 1/6 scale model of a commercial pressurized water reactor was verified in the mid-seventies by field measurements on the full-sized reactor

  6. DT and DHe3 tokamak test reactor concepts using advanced, high field superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If practical high temperature superconducting ceramic magnets can be developed, there could be a significant impact on reactor design. Potential advantages include a simpler, more robust magnet design, the possibility of demountable superconducting toroidal field coils and reduced shielding requirements. The high temperature superconductors can also have very high critical fields and could provide super high field operation. This could substantially increase eta tau/sub E/ values, reduce β requirements, and improve prospects for ohmic heating to ignition. The combination of moderately high β and super high field could make DHe3 operation possible in a JET size tokamak. In this paper we discuss possibilities for test reactor designs using high temperature high field superconductors. An illustrative design has a field at the plasma of 15 T. This reduces the required β to less than 2% for DT operation. The required plasma current is 5 MA. For a reactor size of R0 = 3.4m and a = 0.6m, the neutron wall loading is 3.3 MW/m2 at β = 1.5% for DT operation and an equal amount of fusion power is produced at β = 10% for DHe3 operation. One possible mode of operation is to use ohmic heating to ignition in a DT plasma followed by thermal runaway to DHe3 temperatures. 7 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  7. Simulator for materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A real-time simulator for both reactor and irradiation facilities of a materials testing reactor, “Simulator of Materials Testing Reactors”, was developed for understanding reactor behavior and operational training in order to utilize it for nuclear human resource development and to promote partnership with developing countries which have a plan to introduce nuclear power plant. The simulator is designed based on the JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor), and it simulates operation, irradiation tests and various kinds of anticipated operational transients and accident conditions caused by the reactor and irradiation facilities. The development of the simulator was sponsored by the Japanese government as one of the specialized projects of advanced research infrastructure in order to promote basic as well as applied researches. This report summarizes the simulation components, hardware specification and operation procedure of the simulator. (author)

  8. Two-Dimensional Mapping of the Calculated Fission Power for the Full-Size Fuel Plate Experiment Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, G. S.; Lillo, M. A.

    2009-08-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administrations (NNSA) Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program assigned to the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) the responsibility of developing and demonstrating high uranium density research reactor fuel forms to enable the use of low enriched uranium (LEU) in research and test reactors around the world. A series of full-size fuel plate experiments have been proposed for irradiation testing in the center flux trap (CFT) position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). These full-size fuel plate tests are designated as the AFIP tests. The AFIP nominal fuel zone is rectangular in shape having a designed length of 21.5-in (54.61-cm), width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), and uniform thickness of 0.014-in (0.03556-cm). This gives a nominal fuel zone volume of 0.482 in3 (7.89 cm3) per fuel plate. The AFIP test assembly has two test positions. Each test position is designed to hold 2 full-size plates, for a total of 4 full-size plates per test assembly. The AFIP test plates will be irradiated at a peak surface heat flux of about 350 W/cm2 and discharged at a peak U-235 burn-up of about 70 at.%. Based on limited irradiation testing of the monolithic (U-10Mo) fuel form, it is desirable to keep the peak fuel temperature below 250°C to achieve this, it will be necessary to keep plate heat fluxes below 500 W/cm2. Due to the heavy U-235 loading and a plate width of 1.6-in (4.064-cm), the neutron self-shielding will increase the local-to-average-ratio (L2AR) fission power near the sides of the fuel plates. To demonstrate that the AFIP experiment will meet the ATR safety requirements, a very detailed 2-dimensional (2D) Y-Z fission power profile was evaluated in order to best predict the fuel plate temperature distribution. The ability to accurately predict fuel plate power and burnup are essential to both the design of the AFIP tests as well as evaluation of the irradiated fuel performance. To support this need, a detailed MCNP Y

  9. Advanced fuels for fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: In addition to traditional fast reactor fuels that contain Uranium and Plutonium, the advanced fast reactor fuels are likely to include the minor actinides [Neptunium (Np), Americium (Am) and Curium (Cm)]. Such fuels are also referred to as transmutation fuels. The goal of transmutation fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a traditional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. Oxide, metal, nitride, and carbide fuels are candidates under consideration for this application, based on historical knowledge of fast reactor fuel development and specific fuel tests currently being conducted in international transmutation fuel development programs. Early fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high density and potential for breeder operation. The focus of pressurized water reactor development on oxide fuel and the subsequent adoption by the commercial nuclear power industry, however, along with early issues with low burnup potential of metal fuel (now resolved), led later fast reactor development programs to favor oxide fuels. Carbide and nitride fuels have also been investigated but are at a much lower state of development than metal and oxide fuels, with limited large scale reactor irradiation experience. Experience with both metal and oxide fuels has established that either fuel type will meet performance and reliability goals for a plutonium fueled fast spectrum test reactor, both demonstrating burnup capability of up to 20 at.% under normal operating conditions, when clad with modified austenitic or ferritic martensitic stainless steel alloys. Both metal and oxide fuels have been shown to exhibit sufficient margin to failure under transient conditions for successful reactor operation. Summary of selected fuel material properties taken are provided in the paper. The main challenge for the development of transmutation fast reactor

  10. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; J. E. Daw; K. G. Condie; S. Curtis Wilkins

    2009-09-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation’s energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  11. New Sensors for In-Pile Temperature Detection at the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy (DOE) designated the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) as a National Scientific User Facility (NSUF) in April 2007 to support U.S. leadership in nuclear science and technology. As a user facility, the ATR is supporting new users from universities, laboratories, and industry, as they conduct basic and applied nuclear research and development to advance the nation's energy security needs. A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the strategy for determining what instrumentation is needed and the program for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available and under development for in-pile detection of temperature at various irradiation locations in the ATR.

  12. Flow-induced vibration test of an advanced water reactor model. Part 2: Turbulence-induced structural response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 1/9-scale model flow-induced vibration test of a proposed advanced water reactor (AWR) was performed. The main objectives of the test program were: (1) to derive an empirical equation for the turbulence-induced forcing function that can be applied to the full-sized prototype; (2) to study the effect of viscosity on the turbulence forcing function generation and dissipation and to verify the superposition assumption widely used in dynamic analysis of weakly coupled fluid-shell systems; (3) to measure the shell response due to turbulence-induced excitation so that the data can be used to verify methods and computer programs used in the flow-induced vibration design analysis of the prototype. This paper describes Objective (3) of the test program

  13. New Sensors for the Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy L. Rempe; Darrell L. Knudson; Keith G. Condie; Joshua E. Daw; Heng Ban; Brandon Fox; Gordon Kohse

    2009-06-01

    A key component of the ATR NSUF effort is to develop and evaluate new in-pile instrumentation techniques that are capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiation. This paper describes the selection strategy of what instrumentation is needed, and the program generated for developing new or enhanced sensors that can address these needs. Accomplishments from this program are illustrated by describing new sensors now available to users of the ATR NSUF with data from irradiation tests using these sensors. In addition, progress is reported on current research efforts to provide users advanced methods for detecting temperature, fuel thermal conductivity, and changes in sample geometry.

  14. Multiple Irradiation Capsule Experiment (MICE)-3B Irradiation Test of Space Fuel Specimens in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) - Close Out Documentation for Naval Reactors (NR) Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M. Chen; CM Regan; D. Noe

    2006-01-09

    Few data exist for UO{sub 2} or UN within the notional design space for the Prometheus-1 reactor (low fission rate, high temperature, long duration). As such, basic testing is required to validate predictions (and in some cases determine) performance aspects of these fuels. Therefore, the MICE-3B test of UO{sub 2} pellets was designed to provide data on gas release, unrestrained swelling, and restrained swelling at the upper range of fission rates expected for a space reactor. These data would be compared with model predictions and used to determine adequacy of a space reactor design basis relative to fission gas release and swelling of UO{sub 2} fuel and to assess potential pellet-clad interactions. A primary goal of an irradiation test for UN fuel was to assess performance issues currently associated with this fuel type such as gas release, swelling and transient performance. Information learned from this effort may have enabled use of UN fuel for future applications.

  15. Reactor Physics Methods and Preconceptual Core Design Analyses for Conversion of the Advanced Test Reactor to Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David W. Nigg; Sean R. Morrell

    2012-09-01

    Under the current long-term DOE policy and planning scenario, both the ATR and the ATRC will be reconfigured at an appropriate time within the next several years to operate with low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. This will be accomplished under the auspices of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) Program, administered by the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). At a minimum, the internal design and composition of the fuel element plates and support structure will change, to accommodate the need for low enrichment in a manner that maintains total core excess reactivity at a suitable level for anticipated operational needs throughout each cycle while respecting all control and shutdown margin requirements and power distribution limits. The complete engineering design and optimization of LEU cores for the ATR and the ATRC will require significant multi-year efforts in the areas of fuel design, development and testing, as well as a complete re-analysis of the relevant reactor physics parameters for a core composed of LEU fuel, with possible control system modifications. Ultimately, revalidation of the computational physics parameters per applicable national and international standards against data from experimental measurements for prototypes of the new ATR and ATRC core designs will also be required for Safety Analysis Report (SAR) changes to support routine operations with LEU. This report is focused on reactor physics analyses conducted during Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 to support the initial development of several potential preconceptual fuel element designs that are suitable candidates for further study and refinement during FY-2013 and beyond. In a separate, but related, effort in the general area of computational support for ATR operations, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is conducting a focused multiyear effort to introduce modern high-fidelity computational reactor physics software and associated validation protocols to replace

  16. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) reactor to efficiently extract oxygen from lunar regolith. Unlike state-of-the-art carbothermal...

  17. Advanced Carbothermal Electric Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The overall objective of the Phase 1 effort was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the Advanced Carbothermal Electric (ACE) Reactor concept. Unlike...

  18. Tests of reduced-scale seismic isolation bearings for the U.S. Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper summarizes a portion of a thorough series of tests on several different designs of reduced-scale high damping rubber isolators for the U.S. Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) program. A formal procurement specification has been developed by the program participants for purchasing bearings of several different scale factors and designs. The reduced-scale bearings in the specification have geometric scale factors of 1/4 and 1/8 so that dynamic tests can be performed at realistic rates, The 1/8-scale bearings also have a range of rubber layer thicknesses so that the effects of shape factor on mechanical properties may be determined. Tests of bearings from two suppliers using one of the 1/8-scale bearing designs are summarized here. The test program includes horizontal shear tests to moderate and high shear strains at a range of axial loads and frequencies, as well as vertical tests and failure tests to quantify the margin of safety in the actual design. Load-History effects including short-term stiffness reduction and long-term stiffness recovery are also under study. The primary focus of these tests is on characterizing the behavior of the compounds proposed by the bearing suppliers

  19. Tests of reduced-scale seismic isolation bearings for the U.S. Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.W.; Aiken, I.D.; Kelly, J.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Earthquake Engineering Research Center; Gluekler, E.L. [General Electric Co., San Jose, CA (United States); Tajirian, F.F. [Bechtel National Corp., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-12-01

    This paper summarizes a portion of a thorough series of tests on several different designs of reduced-scale high damping rubber isolators for the U.S. Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR) program. A formal procurement specification has been developed by the program participants for purchasing bearings of several different scale factors and designs. The reduced-scale bearings in the specification have geometric scale factors of 1/4 and 1/8 so that dynamic tests can be performed at realistic rates, The 1/8-scale bearings also have a range of rubber layer thicknesses so that the effects of shape factor on mechanical properties may be determined. Tests of bearings from two suppliers using one of the 1/8-scale bearing designs are summarized here. The test program includes horizontal shear tests to moderate and high shear strains at a range of axial loads and frequencies, as well as vertical tests and failure tests to quantify the margin of safety in the actual design. Load-History effects including short-term stiffness reduction and long-term stiffness recovery are also under study. The primary focus of these tests is on characterizing the behavior of the compounds proposed by the bearing suppliers.

  20. Reactor Vessel Surveillance Program for Advanced Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Kyeong-Hoon; Kim, Tae-Wan; Lee, Gyu-Mahn; Kim, Jong-Wook; Park, Keun-Bae; Kim, Keung-Koo

    2008-10-15

    This report provides the design requirements of an integral type reactor vessel surveillance program for an integral type reactor in accordance with the requirements of Korean MEST (Ministry of Education, Science and Technology Development) Notice 2008-18. This report covers the requirements for the design of surveillance capsule assemblies including their test specimens, test block materials, handling tools, and monitors of the surveillance capsule neutron fluence and temperature. In addition, this report provides design requirements for the program for irradiation surveillance of reactor vessel materials, a layout of specimens and monitors in the surveillance capsule, procedures of installation and retrieval of the surveillance capsule assemblies, and the layout of the surveillance capsule assemblies in the reactor.

  1. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-01-12

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FETF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This revision reflects the 19 Oct 1999 baseline.

  2. Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BOWEN, W.W.

    1999-11-08

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) provides a cost and schedule baseline for managing the project elements within the ART Program. The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) activities are delineated through the end of FY 2000, assuming continued standby. The Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacies and Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) activities are delineated through the end of the deactivation process. This document reflects the 1 Oct 1999 baseline.

  3. Advanced Fission Reactor Program objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of an advanced fission reactor program should be to develop an economically attractive, safe, proliferation-resistant fission reactor. To achieve this objective, an aggressive and broad-based research and development program is needed. Preliminary work at Brookhaven National Laboratory shows that a reasonable goal for a research program would be a reactor combining as many as possible of the following features: (1) initial loading of uranium enriched to less than 15% uranium 235, (2) no handling of fuel for the full 30-year nominal core life, (3) inherent safety ensured by core physics, and (4) utilization of natural uranium at least 5 times as efficiently as light water reactors

  4. Specification of the Advanced Burner Test Reactor Multi-Physics Coupling Demonstration Problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shemon, E. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Grudzinski, J. J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Lee, C. H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Thomas, J. W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yu, Y. Q. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-12-21

    This document specifies the multi-physics nuclear reactor demonstration problem using the SHARP software package developed by NEAMS. The SHARP toolset simulates the key coupled physics phenomena inside a nuclear reactor. The PROTEUS neutronics code models the neutron transport within the system, the Nek5000 computational fluid dynamics code models the fluid flow and heat transfer, and the DIABLO structural mechanics code models structural and mechanical deformation. The three codes are coupled to the MOAB mesh framework which allows feedback from neutronics, fluid mechanics, and mechanical deformation in a compatible format.

  5. Test reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Reactor Development Program created a need for engineering testing of fuels and materials. The Engineering Test Reactors were developed around the world in response to this demand. The design of the test reactors proved to be different from that of power reactors, carrying the fuel elements closer to the threshold of failure, requiring more responsive instrumentation, more rapid control element action, and inherent self-limiting behavior under accident conditions. The design of the experimental facilities to exploit these reactors evolved a new, specialized, branch of engineering, requiring a very high-lvel scientific and engineering team, established a meticulous concern with reliability, the provision for recovery from their own failures, and detailed attention to possible interactions with the test reactors. This paper presents this technology commencing with the Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) through the Fast Flux Test Facility, some of the unique experimental facilities developed to exploit them, but discusses only cursorily the experiments performed, since sample preparation and sample analyses were, and to some extent still are, either classified or proprietary. The Nuclear Engineering literature is filled with this information

  6. 10 CFR 830 Major Modification Determination for Advanced Test Reactor RDAS and LPCIS Replacement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David E. Korns

    2012-05-01

    The replacement of the ATR Control Complex's obsolete computer based Reactor Data Acquisition System (RDAS) and its safety-related Lobe Power Calculation and Indication System (LPCIS) software application is vitally important to ensure the ATR remains available to support this national mission. The RDAS supports safe operation of the reactor by providing 'real-time' plant status information (indications and alarms) for use by the reactor operators via the Console Display System (CDS). The RDAS is a computer support system that acquires analog and digital information from various reactor and reactor support systems. The RDAS information is used to display quadrant and lobe powers via a display interface more user friendly than that provided by the recorders and the Control Room upright panels. RDAS provides input to the Nuclear Engineering ATR Surveillance Data System (ASUDAS) for fuel burn-up analysis and the production of cycle data for experiment sponsors and the generation of the Core Safety Assurance Package (CSAP). RDAS also archives and provides for retrieval of historical plant data which may be used for event reconstruction, data analysis, training and safety analysis. The RDAS, LPCIS and ASUDAS need to be replaced with state-of-the-art technology in order to eliminate problems of aged computer systems, and difficulty in obtaining software upgrades, spare parts, and technical support. The major modification criteria evaluation of the project design did not lead to the conclusion that the project is a major modification. The negative major modification determination is driven by the fact that the project requires a one-for-one equivalent replacement of existing systems that protects and maintains functional and operational requirements as credited in the safety basis.

  7. Directions in advanced reactor technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Successful nuclear power plant concepts must simultaneously performance in terms of both safety and economics. To be attractive to both electric utility companies and the public, such plants must produce economical electric energy consistent with a level of safety which is acceptable to both the public and the plant owner. Programs for reactor development worldwide can be classified according to whether the reactor concept pursues improved safety or improved economic performance as the primary objective. When improved safety is the primary goal, safety enters the solution of the design problem as a constraint which restricts the set of allowed solutions. Conversely, when improved economic performance is the primary goal, it is allowed to be pursued only to an extent which is compatible with stringent safety requirements. The three major reactor coolants under consideration for future advanced reactor use are water, helium and sodium. Reactor development programs focuses upon safety and upon economics using each coolant are being pursued worldwide. These programs are discussed

  8. New Sensors for Irradiation Testing at Materials and Test Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced instrumentation, capable of providing real-time measurements of parameters during fuels and material irradiations, is required to support irradiation testing requested by US nuclear research programs. For example, several research programs funded by the US Department of Energy (US DOE) are emphasizing the use of first principle models to characterize the performance of fuels and materials. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential to demonstrate the performance of these new fuels and materials during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data in US MTRs, such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), must be miniature, reliable, and able to withstand high fluxes and high temperatures. Depending on program requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these needs, INL has developed and deployed several new sensors to support irradiation testing in US DOE programs. The paper identifies the sensors currently available to support higher flux US MTR irradiations. Recent results and products from sensor research and development are highlighted. In particular, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting temperature, elongation, and thermal conductivity is emphasized. Finally, initial results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are summarized. (author)

  9. Paleomagnetic correlation and ages of basalt flow groups in coreholes at and near the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champion, Duane E.; Davis, Linda C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.; Lanphere, Marvin A.

    2013-01-01

    include the following: * The West of Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATRC) flow group is the uppermost basalt flow group in the NRF area and correlates among seven continuously cored holes in this study under surficial sediments. The West of ATRC flow group is also found in coreholes near the ATRC, the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), and in corehole USGS 129.

  10. Comparison of the PLTEMP code flow instability predictions with measurements made with electrically heated channels for the advanced test reactor.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feldman, E. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-09

    When the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) was designed in the 1960s the potential for fuel element burnout by a phenomenon referred to at that time as 'autocatalytic vapor binding' was of serious concern. This type of burnout was observed to occur at power levels considerably lower than those that were known to cause critical heat flux. The conversion of the MURR from HEU fuel to LEU fuel will probably require significant design changes, such as changes in coolant channel thicknesses, that could affect the thermal-hydraulic behavior of the reactor core. Therefore, the redesign of the MURR to accommodate an LEU core must address the same issues of fuel element burnout that were of concern in the 1960s. The Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) was designed at about the same time as the MURR and had similar concerns with regard to fuel element burnout. These concerns were addressed in the ATR by two groups of thermal-hydraulic tests that employed electrically heated simulated fuel channels. The Croft (1964), Reference 1, tests were performed at ANL. The Waters (1966), Reference 2, tests were performed at Hanford Laboratories in Richland Washington. Since fuel element surface temperatures rise rapidly as burnout conditions are approached, channel surface temperatures were carefully monitored in these experiments. For self-protection, the experimental facilities were designed to cut off the electric power when rapidly increasing surface temperatures were detected. In both the ATR reactor and in the tests with electrically heated channels, the heated length of the fuel plate was 48 inches, which is about twice that of the MURR. Whittle and Forgan (1967) independently conducted tests with electrically heated rectangular channels that were similar to the tests by Croft and by Walters. In the Whittle and Forgan tests the heated length of the channel varied among the tests and was between 16 and 24 inches. Both Waters and Whittle and Forgan show that the cause

  11. Future Transient Testing of Advanced Fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Carmack

    2009-09-01

    The transient in-reactor fuels testing workshop was held on May 4–5, 2009 at Idaho National Laboratory. The purpose of this meeting was to provide a forum where technical experts in transient testing of nuclear fuels could meet directly with technical instrumentation experts and nuclear fuel modeling and simulation experts to discuss needed advancements in transient testing to support a basic understanding of nuclear fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. The workshop was attended by representatives from Commissariat à l'Énergie Atomique CEA, Japanese Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), Department of Energy (DOE), AREVA, General Electric – Global Nuclear Fuels (GE-GNF), Westinghouse, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), universities, and several DOE national laboratories. Transient testing of fuels and materials generates information required for advanced fuels in future nuclear power plants. Future nuclear power plants will rely heavily on advanced computer modeling and simulation that describes fuel behavior under off-normal conditions. TREAT is an ideal facility for this testing because of its flexibility, proven operation and material condition. The opportunity exists to develop advanced instrumentation and data collection that can support modeling and simulation needs much better than was possible in the past. In order to take advantage of these opportunities, test programs must be carefully designed to yield basic information to support modeling before conducting integral performance tests. An early start of TREAT and operation at low power would provide significant dividends in training, development of instrumentation, and checkout of reactor systems. Early start of TREAT (2015) is needed to support the requirements of potential users of TREAT and include the testing of full length fuel irradiated in the FFTF reactor. The capabilities provided by TREAT are needed for the development of nuclear power and the following benefits will be realized by

  12. Fuel for advanced CANDU reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor system has proven itself to be a world leader in terms of station availability and low total unit energy cost. In 1985 for example, four of the top ten reactor units in the world were CANDU reactors operating in South Korea and Canada. This excellent operating record requires an equivalent performance record of the low-cost, natural uranium fuel. Future CANDU reactors will be an evolution of the present design. Engineering work is under way to refine the existing CANDU 600 and to incorporate state-of-the-art technology, reducing the capital cost and construction schedule. In addition, a smaller CANDU 300 plant has been designed using proven CANDU 600 technology and components but with an innovative new plant layout that makes it cost competitive with coal fired plants. For the long term, work on advanced fuel cycles and major system improvements is underway ensuring that CANDU plants will stay competitive well into the next century

  13. Advanced fusion reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomita, Yukihiro [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan)

    2003-04-01

    The main subjects on fusion research are now on D-T fueled fusion, mainly due to its high fusion reaction rate. However, many issues are still remained on the wall loading by the 14 MeV neutrons. In the case of D-D fueled fusion, the neutron wall loading is still remained, though the technology related to tritium breeding is not needed. The p-{sup 6}Li and p-{sup 11}B fueled fusions are not estimated to be the next generation candidate until the innovated plasma confinement technologies come in useful to achieve the high performance plasma parameters. The fusion reactor of D-{sup 3}He fuels has merits on the smaller neutron wall loading and tritium handling. However, there are difficulties on achieving the high temperature plasma more than 100 keV. Furthermore the high beta plasma is needed to decrease synchrotron radiation loss. In addition, the efficiency of the direct energy conversion from protons coming out from fusion reaction is one of the key parameters in keeping overall power balance. Therefore, open magnetic filed lines should surround the plasma column. In this paper, we outlined the design of the commercial base reactor (ARTEMIS) of 1 GW electric output power configured by D-{sup 3}He fueled FRC (Field Reversed Configuration). The ARTEMIS needs 64 kg of {sup 3}He per a year. On the other hand, 1 million tons of {sup 3}He is estimated to be in the moon. The {sup 3}He of about 10{sup 23} kg are to exist in gaseous planets such as Jupiter and Saturn. (Y. Tanaka)

  14. Experimental tests and qualification of analytical methods to address thermohydraulic phenomena in advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide there is considerable experience in nuclear power technology, especially in water cooled reactor technology. Of the operating plants, in September 1998, 346 were light water reactors (LWRs) totalling 306 GW(e) and 29 were heavy water reactors (HWRs) totalling 15 GW(e). The accumulated experience and lessons learned from these plants are being incorporated into new advanced reactor designs. Utility requirements documents have been formulated to guide these design activities by incorporating this experience, and results from research and development programmes, with the aim of reducing costs and licensing uncertainties by establishing the technical bases for the new designs. Common goals for advanced designs are high availability, user-friendly features, competitive economics and compliance with internationally recognized safety objectives. Large water cooled reactors with power outputs of 1300 MW(e) and above, which possess inherent safety characteristics (e.g. negative Doppler moderator temperature coefficients, and negative moderator void coefficient) and incorporate proven, active engineered systems to accomplish safety functions are being developed. Other designs with power outputs from, for example, 220 MW(e) up to about 1300 MW(e) which also possess inherent safety characteristics and which place more emphasis on utilization of passive safety systems are being developed. Passive systems are based on natural forces and phenomena such as natural convection and gravity, making safety functions less dependent on active systems and components like pumps and diesel generators. In some cases, further experimental tests for the thermohydraulic conditions of interest in advanced designs can provide improved understanding of the phenomena. Further, analytical methods to predict reactor thermohydraulic behaviour can be qualified for use by comparison with the experimental results. These activities should ultimately result in more economical designs. The

  15. A feasibility and optimization study to determine cooling time and burnup of advanced test reactor fuels using a nondestructive technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Navarro, Jorge [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2013-12-01

    The goal of this study presented is to determine the best available non-destructive technique necessary to collect validation data as well as to determine burn-up and cooling time of the fuel elements onsite at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) canal. This study makes a recommendation of the viability of implementing a permanent fuel scanning system at the ATR canal and leads3 to the full design of a permanent fuel scan system. The study consisted at first in determining if it was possible and which equipment was necessary to collect useful spectra from ATR fuel elements at the canal adjacent to the reactor. Once it was establish that useful spectra can be obtained at the ATR canal the next step was to determine which detector and which configuration was better suited to predict burnup and cooling time of fuel elements non-destructively. Three different detectors of High Purity Germanium (HPGe), Lanthanum Bromide (LaBr3), and High Pressure Xenon (HPXe) in two system configurations of above and below the water pool were used during the study. The data collected and analyzed was used to create burnup and cooling time calibration prediction curves for ATR fuel. The next stage of the study was to determine which of the three detectors tested was better suited for the permanent system. From spectra taken and the calibration curves obtained, it was determined that although the HPGe detector yielded better results, a detector that could better withstand the harsh environment of the ATR canal was needed. The in-situ nature of the measurements required a rugged fuel scanning system, low in maintenance and easy to control system. Based on the ATR canal feasibility measurements and calibration results it was determined that the LaBr3 detector was the best alternative for canal in-situ measurements; however in order to enhance the quality of the spectra collected using this scintillator a deconvolution method was developed. Following the development of the deconvolution method

  16. Advanced research reactor fuel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fabrication technology of the U3Si fuel dispersed in aluminum for the localization of HANARO driver fuel has been launches. The increase of production yield of LEU metal, the establishment of measurement method of homogeneity, and electron beam welding process were performed. Irradiation test under normal operation condition, had been carried out and any clues of the fuel assembly breakdown was not detected. The 2nd test fuel assembly has been irradiated at HANARO reactor since 17th June 1999. The quality assurance system has been re-established and the eddy current test technique has been developed. The irradiation test for U3Si2 dispersed fuels at HANARO reactor has been carried out in order to compare the in-pile performance of between the two types of U3Si2 fuels, prepared by both the atomization and comminution processes. KAERI has also conducted all safety-related works such as the design and the fabrication of irradiation rig, the analysis of irradiation behavior, thermal hydraulic characteristics, stress analysis for irradiation rig, and thermal analysis fuel plate, for the mini-plate prepared by international research cooperation being irradiated safely at HANARO. Pressure drop test, vibration test and endurance test were performed. The characterization on powders of U-(5.4 ∼ 10 wt%) Mo alloy depending on Mo content prepared by rotating disk centrifugal atomization process was carried out in order to investigate the phase stability of the atomized U-Mo alloy system. The γ-U phase stability and the thermal compatibility of atomized U-16at.%Mo and U-14at.%Mo-2at.%X(: Ru, Os) dispersion fuel meats at an elevated temperature have been investigated. The volume increases of U-Mo compatibility specimens were almost the same as or smaller than those of U3Si2. However the atomized alloy fuel exhibited a better irradiation performance than the comminuted alloy. The RERTR-3 irradiation test of nano-plates will be conducted in the Advanced Test Reactor(ATR). 49

  17. As-Run Physics Analysis for the UCSB-1 Experiment in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Joseph Wayne [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) -1 experiment was irradiated in the A-10 position of the ATR. The experiment was irradiated during cycles 145A, 145B, 146A, and 146B. Capsule 6A was removed from the test train following Cycle 145A and replaced with Capsule 6B. This report documents the as-run physics analysis in support of Post-Irradiation Examination (PIE) of the test. This report documents the as-run fluence and displacements per atom (DPA) for each capsule of the experiment based on as-run operating history of the ATR. Average as-run heating rates for each capsule are also presented in this report to support the thermal analysis.

  18. Advances in heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Advances in Heavy Water Reactors was organized by the IAEA in the framework of the activities of the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR) and hosted by the Atomic Energy of Canada Limited. Sixty-five participants from nine countries (Canada, Czech Republic, India, German, Japan, Republic of Korea, Pakistan, Romania and USA) and the IAEA attended the TCM. Thirty-four papers were presented and discussed in five sessions. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. All recommendations which were addressed by the participants of the Technical Committee meeting to the IWGATWR have been submitted to the 5th IWGATWR meeting in September 1993. They were reviewed and used as input for the preparation of the IAEA programme in the area of advanced water cooled reactors. This TCM was mainly oriented towards advances in HWRs and on projects which are now in the design process and under discussion. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. GE's advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The excess of US electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which open-quotes are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities.close quotes Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14-point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other open-quotes enabling conditions.close quotes GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the US and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safety, reliably, and economically

  20. Program plan for decontamination and decommissioning the Materials Testing Reactor at the INEL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A discussion is presented of a program plan developed for the dismantling of the Materials Testing Reactor located in the Testing Reactor Area (TRA) of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Included are the scope of work, dismantling problems resulting from the nature of construction of the MTR, and a program plan for physically dismantling the reactor

  1. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasza, K.; Grandy, C.; Chang, Y.; Khalil, H.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-06-30

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition

  2. Argonne Liquid-Metal Advanced Burner Reactor : components and in-vessel system thermal-hydraulic research and testing experience - pathway forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This white paper provides an overview and status report of the thermal-hydraulic nuclear research and development, both experimental and computational, conducted predominantly at Argonne National Laboratory. Argonne from the early 1970s through the early 1990s was the Department of Energy's (DOE's) lead lab for thermal-hydraulic development of Liquid Metal Reactors (LMRs). During the 1970s and into the mid-1980s, Argonne conducted thermal-hydraulic studies and experiments on individual reactor components supporting the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), and the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR). From the mid-1980s and into the early 1990s, Argonne conducted studies on phenomena related to forced- and natural-convection thermal buoyancy in complete in-vessel models of the General Electric (GE) Prototype Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) and Rockwell International (RI) Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR). These two reactor initiatives involved Argonne working closely with U.S. industry and DOE. This paper describes the very important impact of thermal hydraulics dominated by thermal buoyancy forces on reactor global operation and on the behavior/performance of individual components during postulated off-normal accident events with low flow. Utilizing Argonne's LMR expertise and design knowledge is vital to the further development of safe, reliable, and high-performance LMRs. Argonne believes there remains an important need for continued research and development on thermal-hydraulic design in support of DOE's and the international community's renewed thrust for developing and demonstrating the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) reactor(s) and the associated Argonne Liquid Metal-Advanced Burner Reactor (LM-ABR). This white paper highlights that further understanding is needed regarding reactor design under coolant low-flow events. These safety-related events are associated with the transition from normal high

  3. Reactor Simulator Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.; Webster, Kenny L.; Pearson, Boise J.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator test loop (RxSim) was design & built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing was to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V since the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This paper summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump (ALIP) tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  4. Reactor Simulator Testing Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2013-01-01

    Test Objectives Summary: a) Verify operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation & control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. b) Examine cooling & heat regeneration performance of the cold trap purification. c) Test the ALIP pump at voltages beyond 120V to see if the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s can be obtained in the RxSim. Testing Highlights: a) Gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively for operations (NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain). b) Instrumentation & Control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings and ramped within prescribed constraints. It effectively interacted with reactor simulator control model and defaulted back to temperature control mode if the transient fluctuations didn't dampen. c) Cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the minimum temperature indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. d) ALIP produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  5. LIGHT WATER REACTOR ACCIDENT TOLERANT FUELS IRRADIATION TESTING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmack, William Jonathan [Idaho National Laboratory; Barrett, Kristine Eloise [Idaho National Laboratory; Chichester, Heather Jean MacLean [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of Accident Tolerant Fuels (ATF) experiments is to test novel fuel and cladding concepts designed to replace the current zirconium alloy uranium dioxide (UO2) fuel system. The objective of this Research and Development (R&D) is to develop novel ATF concepts that will be able to withstand loss of active cooling in the reactor core for a considerably longer time period than the current fuel system while maintaining or improving the fuel performance during normal operations, operational transients, design basis, and beyond design basis events. It was necessary to design, analyze, and fabricate drop-in capsules to meet the requirements for testing under prototypic LWR temperatures in Idaho National Laboratory's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). Three industry led teams and one DOE team from Oak Ridge National Laboratory provided fuel rodlet samples for their new concepts for ATR insertion in 2015. As-built projected temperature calculations were performed on the ATF capsules using the BISON fuel performance code. BISON is an application of INL’s Multi-physics Object Oriented Simulation Environment (MOOSE), which is a massively parallel finite element based framework used to solve systems of fully coupled nonlinear partial differential equations. Both 2D and 3D models were set up to examine cladding and fuel performance.

  6. The Advanced Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U. S. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program is a forward-looking program designed to produce viable nuclear generating system candidates to meet the very real, and perhaps imminent, need for new power generation capacity in the U. S. and around the world. The ALRR Program is an opportunity to move ahead with confidence, to confront problems today which must be confronted if the U. S. electrical utilities are to continue to meet their commitment to provide safe, reliable, economical electrical power to the nation in the years ahead. Light water reactor technology is today playing a vital role in the production of electricity to meet the world's needs. At present about 13% of the world's electricity is supplied by nuclear power plants, most of those light water reactors. Nevertheless, there is a clear need for expanded use of nuclear generation. Here in Korea and elsewhere in Asia, demand for electricity has continued to increase at a very high rate. In the United States demand growth has been more moderate, but a large number of existing stations will be ready for replacement in the next two decades, and all countries face the problem of dwindling fuel supplies and growing environmental impact of fossil-fired power plants. Despite the evident need for expanded nuclear generation capacity in the United States, there have been no new plants ordered in the past ten years and at present there are no immediate prospects for new plant orders. Concerns about safety, the high cost of recent nuclear stations, and the current excess of electrical generation capacity in the United States, have combined to interrupt completely the growth of this vital power supply system

  7. Proceedings of the 4th international symposium on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of the fourth International Symposium on Material Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The first symposium was held on 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA, the second, 2009, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) of United States and the third 2010, Nuclear Research Institute (NRI) in Czech Republic to exchange information for deep mutual understanding of material testing reactors. The fourth symposium was originally scheduled to be held INVAP in Argentina. However, the aftermath of volcanic explosion at Chili forced the symposium to change place. Total 111 participants attended from Argentina, Belgium, France, Germany, Indonesia, Malasia, Korea, South Africa, Switzerland, the United State and Japan. This symposium addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of material testing reactors', 'advancement of irradiation technology', 'expansion of industry use(RI)', 'facility, upgrade, aging management', 'new generation MTR', 'advancement of PIE technology', 'development of advanced driver fuel', and 'nuclear human resource development(HRD) for next generation', and 39 presentations were made. Furthermore, three topics, 'Necessity of cooperation for Mo-99 production by (n,gamma) reaction', 'Necessity of standardization of irradiation technology' and 'Conceptual design of next generation materials testing reactor by collaboration', were selected and discussed. (author)

  8. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  9. Advances in laser solenoid fusion reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The laser solenoid is an alternate fusion concept based on a laser-heated magnetically-confined plasma column. The reactor concept has evolved in several systems studies over the last five years. We describe recent advances in the plasma physics and technology of laser-plasma coupling. The technology advances include progress on first walls, inner magnet design, confinement module design, and reactor maintenance. We also describe a new generation of laser solenoid fusion and fusion-fission reactor designs

  10. Preliminary design concept of an advanced integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor on the basis of PWR technology is being conceptually developed at KAERI. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts of the reactor to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway for confirming the technical adoption of those concepts to the reactor design. The power output of the reactor will be in the range of 100MWe to 600MWe which is relatively small compared to the existing loop type reactors. The detailed analysis to assure the design concepts is in progress. (author)

  11. Functional and performance evaluation of 28 bar hot shutdown passive valve (HSPV) at integral test loop (ITL) for advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During reactor shutdown in advanced heavy water reactor (AHWR), core decay heat is removed by eight isolation condensers (IC) submerged in gravity driven water pool. Passive valves are provided on the down stream of each isolation condenser. On increase in steam drum pressure beyond a set value, these passive valves start opening and establish steam flow by natural circulation between the four steam drums and corresponding isolation condensers under hot shutdown and therefore they are termed as Hot Shut Down Passive Valves (HSPVs). The HSPV is a self acting type valve requiring no external energy, i.e. neither air nor electric supply for actuation. This feature makes the valve functioning independent of external systems such as compressed air supply or electric power supply, thereby providing inherent safety feature in line with reactor design philosophy. The high pressure and high temperature HSPV s for nuclear reactor use, are non-standard valves and therefore not manufactured by the valve industry worldwide. In the process of design and development of a prototype valve for AHWR, a 28 bar HSPV was configured and successfully tested at Integral Test Loop (ITL) at Engineering Hall No.7. During ten continuous experiments spread over 14 days, the HSPV has proved its functional capabilities and its intended use in decay heat removal system. The in-situ pressure setting and calibration aspect of HSPV has also been successfully established during these experiments. This report gives an insight into the HSPV's functional behavior and role in reactor decay heat removal system. The report not only provides the quantitative measure of performance for 28 bar HSPV in terms of valve characteristics, pressure controllability, linearity and hysteresis but also sets qualitative indicators for prototype 80 bar HSPV, being developed for AHWR. (author)

  12. Nondestructive testing of welds in steam generators for advanced gas cooled reactors at Heyshamm II and Torness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper concerns non-destructive testing (NDT) of welds in advanced gas cooled steam generators for Heysham II and Torness nuclear power stations. A description is given of the steam generator. The selection of NDT techniques is also outlined, including the factors considered to ascertain the viability of a technique. Examples are given of applied NDT methods which match particular fabrication processes; these include: microfocus radiography, ultrasonic testing of austenitic tube butt welds, gamma-ray isotope projection system, surface crack detection, and automated radiography. Finally, future trends in this field of NDT are highlighted. (UK)

  13. Thermal hydraulic R and D of Chinese advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Chinese government sponsors a program of research, development, and demonstration related to advanced reactors, both small modular reactors and larger systems. These advanced reactors encompass innovative reactor concepts, such as CAP1400 - Chinese large advanced passive pressurized water reactor, Hualong one - Chinese large advanced active and passive pressurized water reactor, ACP100 - Chinese small modular reactor, SCWR- R and D of super critical water-cooled reactor in China, CLEAR - Chinese lead-cooled fast reactor, TMSR - Chinese Thorium molten-salt reactor. The thermal hydraulic R and D of those reactors are summarised. (J.P.N.)

  14. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design--reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods

  15. Weld Tests Conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larry Zirker; Lance Lauerhass; James Dowalo

    2007-02-01

    During the fiscal year of 2006, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) performed many tests and work relating to the Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) Project components. Tests performed on the Staubli quick disconnect fittings showed promising results, but more tests were needed validate the fittings. Changes were made to the shield plug design—reduced the closure groove weld depth between the top of the canister and the top plate of the shielding plug from 0.5-in to 0.375-in deep. Other changes include a cap to cover the fitting, lifting pintle and welding code citations on the prints. Tests conducted showed stainless steel tubing, with 0.25-in, 0.375-in, and 0.5-in diameters, all with 0.035-in wall thickness, could be pinch seal welded using commercially available resistance welding equipment. Subsequent testing showed that these welds could be real-time inspected with ultrasonic inspection methods.

  16. Structural materials challenges for advanced reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yvon, P.; Carré, F.

    2009-03-01

    Key technologies for advanced nuclear systems encompass high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistant core materials, and specific reactor and power conversion technologies (intermediate heat exchanger, turbo-machinery, high temperature electrolytic or thermo-chemical water splitting processes, etc.). The main requirements for the materials to be used in these reactor systems are dimensional stability under irradiation, whether under stress (irradiation creep or relaxation) or without stress (swelling, growth), an acceptable evolution under ageing of the mechanical properties (tensile strength, ductility, creep resistance, fracture toughness, resilience) and a good behavior in corrosive environments (reactor coolant or process fluid). Other criteria for the materials are their cost to fabricate and to assemble, and their composition could be optimized in order for instance to present low-activation (or rapid desactivation) features which facilitate maintenance and disposal. These requirements have to be met under normal operating conditions, as well as in incidental and accidental conditions. These challenging requirements imply that in most cases, the use of conventional nuclear materials is excluded, even after optimization and a new range of materials has to be developed and qualified for nuclear use. This paper gives a brief overview of various materials that are essential to establish advanced systems feasibility and performance for in pile and out of pile applications, such as ferritic/martensitic steels (9-12% Cr), nickel based alloys (Haynes 230, Inconel 617, etc.), oxide dispersion strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels, and ceramics (SiC, TiC, etc.). This article gives also an insight into the various natures of R&D needed on advanced materials, including fundamental research to investigate basic physical and chemical phenomena occurring in normal and accidental operating conditions, lab-scale tests to characterize candidate materials

  17. Preliminary design concepts of an advanced integral reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integral reactor on the basis of PWR technology is being conceptually developed at KAERI. Advanced technologies such as intrinsic and passive safety features are implemented in establishing the design concepts of the reactor to enhance the safety and performance. Research and development including laboratory-scale tests are concurrently underway for confirming the technical adoption of those concepts to the rector design. The power output of the reactor will be in the range of 100MWe to 600MWe which is relatively small compared to the existing loop type reactors. The detailed analysis to assure the design concepts is in progress. (author). 3 figs, 1 tab

  18. Fabrication and Pre-irradiation Characterization of a Minor Actinide and Rare Earth Containing Fast Reactor Fuel Experiment for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timothy A. Hyde

    2012-06-01

    The United States Department of Energy, seeks to develop and demonstrate the technologies needed to transmute the long-lived transuranic actinide isotopes contained in spent nuclear fuel into shorter lived fission products, thereby decreasing the volume of material requiring disposal and reducing the long-term radiotoxicity and heat load of high-level waste sent to a geologic repository. This transmutation of the long lived actinides plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium can be accomplished by first separating them from spent Light Water Reactor fuel using a pyro-metalurgical process, then reprocessing them into new fuel with fresh uranium additions, and then transmuted to short lived nuclides in a liquid metal cooled fast reactor. An important component of the technology is developing actinide-bearing fuel forms containing plutonium, neptunium, americium and curium isotopes that meet the stringent requirements of reactor fuels and materials.

  19. Spent fuel storage cask testing and operational experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spent-fuel storage cask research, development, and demonstration activities are being performed for the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) as a part of the storage cask testing program. The cask testing program at federal sites and other locations supports the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA) and DOE objectives for cooperative demonstrations with the cask vendors and utilities for development of at-reactor dry cask storage capabilities for spent nuclear fuel assemblies. One research and development program for the storage cask performance testing of metal storage cask was initiated through a cooperative agreement between Virginia Power and DOE in 1984. The performance testing was conducted for the DOE and the Electric Power Research Institute by the Pacific Northwest laboratory, operated for DOE by Battelle Memorial Institute, and the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), operated for DOE by EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. In 1988 a cooperative agreement was entered into by DOE with Pacific Sierra Nuclear Associates (PSN) for performance testing of the PSN concrete Ventilated Storage Cask. Another closely related activity involving INEL is a transportable storage cask project identified as the Nuclear Fuel Services Spent-Fuel Shipping/Storage Cask Demonstration Project. The purpose of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility of packing, transporting, and storing commercial spent fuel in dual-purpose transport/storage casks

  20. Department of Energy's Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), July 14--18, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intent of this review was not to conduct a detailed in-depth audit, but rather to make a broad management assessment of ATR operations. The results of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon standards used for licensed reactor facility practices. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the Team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative, in that the ATR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (lower pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor. Although the Review Team found no indications or evidence that the plant is being operated in an unsafe manner, various areas were identified where improvements are either needed or should be considered to increase the safety of reactor operations

  1. Advanced Burner Reactor Preliminary NEPA Data Study.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Cahalan, J. E.; Deitrich, L. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Grandy, C.; Kellogg, R.; Kim, T. K.; Yang, W. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2007-10-15

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is a new nuclear fuel cycle paradigm with the goals of expanding the use of nuclear power both domestically and internationally, addressing nuclear waste management concerns, and promoting nonproliferation. A key aspect of this program is fast reactor transmutation, in which transuranics recovered from light water reactor spent fuel are to be recycled to create fast reactor transmutation fuels. The benefits of these fuels are to be demonstrated in an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR), which will provide a representative environment for recycle fuel testing, safety testing, and modern fast reactor design and safeguard features. Because the GNEP programs will require facilities which may have an impact upon the environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), preparation of a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) for GNEP is being undertaken by Tetra Tech, Inc. The PEIS will include a section on the ABR. In support of the PEIS, the Nuclear Engineering Division of Argonne National Laboratory has been asked to provide a description of the ABR alternative, including graphics, plus estimates of construction and operations data for an ABR plant. The compilation of this information is presented in the remainder of this report. Currently, DOE has started the process of engaging industry on the design of an Advanced Burner Reactor. Therefore, there is no specific, current, vendor-produced ABR design that could be used for this PEIS datacall package. In addition, candidate sites for the ABR vary widely as to available water, geography, etc. Therefore, ANL has based its estimates for construction and operations data largely on generalization of available information from existing plants and from the environmental report assembled for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) design [CRBRP, 1977]. The CRBRP environmental report was chosen as a resource because it thoroughly

  2. Advanced Catalytic Hydrogenation Retrofit Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinaldo M. Machado

    2002-08-15

    Industrial hydrogenation is often performed using a slurry catalyst in large stirred-tank reactors. These systems are inherently problematic in a number of areas, including industrial hygiene, process safety, environmental contamination, waste production, process operability and productivity. This program proposed the development of a practical replacement for the slurry catalysts using a novel fixed-bed monolith catalyst reactor, which could be retrofitted onto an existing stirred-tank reactor and would mitigate many of the minitations and problems associated with slurry catalysts. The full retrofit monolith system, consisting of a recirculation pump, gas/liquid ejector and monolith catalyst, is described as a monolith loop reactor or MLR. The MLR technology can reduce waste and increase raw material efficiency, which reduces the overall energy required to produce specialty and fine chemicals.

  3. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ignatiev, V. [ed.; Feinberg, O.; Morozov, A. [Russian Research Centre `Kurchatov Institute`, Moscow (Russian Federation); Devell, L. [Studsvik Eco and Safety AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1995-07-01

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary.

  4. Advanced nuclear reactor types and technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The document is a comprehensive world-wide catalogue of concepts and designs of advanced fission reactor types and fuel cycle technologies. Two parts have been prepared: Part 1 Reactors for Power Production and Part 2 Heating and Other Reactor Applications. Part 3, which will cover advanced waste management technology, reprocessing and disposal for different nuclear fission options is planned for compilation during 1995. The catalogue was prepared according to a special format which briefly presents the project title, technical approach, development status, application of the technology, reactor type, power output, and organization which developed these designs. Part 1 and 2 cover water cooled reactors, liquid metal fast reactors, gas-cooled reactors and molten salt reactors. Subcritical accelerator-driven systems are also considered. Various reactor applications as power production, heat generation, ship propulsion, space power sources and transmutation of such waste are included. Each project is described within a few pages with the main features of an actual design using a table with main technical data and figure as well as references for additional information. Each chapter starts with an introduction which briefly describes main trends and approaches in this field. Explanations of terms and abbreviations are provided in a glossary

  5. Advanced Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) Reactor and Process Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Hadley, Neal M.; Dahl, Roger W.; Abney, Morgan B.; Greenwood, Zachary; Miller, Lee; Medlen, Amber

    2012-01-01

    Design and development of a second generation Plasma Pyrolysis Assembly (PPA) reactor is currently underway as part of NASA's Atmosphere Revitalization Resource Recovery effort. By recovering up to 75% of the hydrogen currently lost as methane in the Sabatier reactor effluent, the PPA helps to minimize life support resupply costs for extended duration missions. To date, second generation PPA development has demonstrated significant technology advancements over the first generation device by doubling the methane processing rate while, at the same time, more than halving the required power. One development area of particular interest to NASA system engineers is fouling of the PPA reactor with carbonaceous products. As a mitigation plan, NASA MSFC has explored the feasibility of using an oxidative plasma based upon metabolic CO2 to regenerate the reactor window and gas inlet ports. The results and implications of this testing are addressed along with the advanced PPA reactor development.

  6. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Richins; Stephen Novascone; Cheryl O' Brien

    2009-08-01

    Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop – Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors William Richins1, Stephen Novascone1, and Cheryl O’Brien1 1Idaho National Laboratory, US Dept. of Energy, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA, e-mail: William.Richins@inl.gov The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; 1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and 2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1 The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  7. Effects of Levels of Automation for Advanced Small Modular Reactors: Impacts on Performance, Workload, and Situation Awareness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc

    2014-07-01

    The Human-Automation Collaboration (HAC) research effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The DOE AdvSMR program focuses on plant design and management, reduction of capital costs as well as plant operations and maintenance costs (O&M), and factory production costs benefits.

  8. Microstructural Characterization of a Mg Matrix U-Mo Dispersion Fuel Plate Irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor to High Fission Density: SEM Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Dennis D.; Jue, Jan-Fong; Miller, Brandon D.; Gan, Jian; Robinson, Adam B.; Medvedev, Pavel G.; Madden, James W.; Moore, Glenn A.

    2016-06-01

    Low-enriched (U-235 reactors. In most cases, fuel plates with Al or Al-Si alloy matrices have been tested in the Advanced Test Reactor to support this development. In addition, fuel plates with Mg as the matrix have also been tested. The benefit of using Mg as the matrix is that it potentially will not chemically interact with the U-Mo fuel particles during fabrication or irradiation, whereas with Al and Al-Si alloys such interactions will occur. Fuel plate R9R010 is a Mg matrix fuel plate that was aggressively irradiated in ATR. This fuel plate was irradiated as part of the RERTR-8 experiment at high temperature, high fission rate, and high power, up to high fission density. This paper describes the results of the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis of an irradiated fuel plate using polished samples and those produced with a focused ion beam. A follow-up paper will discuss the results of transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis. Using SEM, it was observed that even at very aggressive irradiation conditions, negligible chemical interaction occurred between the irradiated U-7Mo fuel particles and Mg matrix; no interconnection of fission gas bubbles from fuel particle to fuel particle was observed; the interconnected fission gas bubbles that were observed in the irradiated U-7Mo particles resulted in some transport of solid fission products to the U-7Mo/Mg interface; the presence of microstructural pathways in some U-9.1 Mo particles that could allow for transport of fission gases did not result in the apparent presence of large porosity at the U-7Mo/Mg interface; and, the Mg-Al interaction layers that were present at the Mg matrix/Al 6061 cladding interface exhibited good radiation stability, i.e. no large pores.

  9. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  10. Advanced core monitoring technology for WWER reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse BEACON online monitoring system has been developed to provide continuous core monitoring and operational support for pressurized water reactor using movable detectors (fission chamber) and core thermocouples. The basic BEACON core monitoring methodology is described. Traditional WWER reactors use rhodium fixed in-core detectors as the means to provide detailed core power distribution for surveillance purposes. An adapted version of the BEACON advanced core monitoring and support system is described which seems to be, due to the different demand/response requirements, the optimal solution (for routine surveillance and anomaly detection) for WWER reactors with existing fixed in-core detectors. (Z.S.) 4 refs

  11. Materials for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current IAEA programme in advanced nuclear power technology promotes technical information exchange between Member States with major development programmes. The International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors recommended to organize a Technical Committee Meeting for the purpose of providing an international forum for technical specialists to review and discuss aspects regarding development trends in material application for advanced water cooled reactors. The experience gained from the operation of current water cooled reactors, and results from related research and development programmes, should be the basis for future improvements of material properties and applications. This meeting enabled specialists to exchange knowledge about structural materials application in the nuclear island for the next generation of nuclear power plants. Refs, figs, tabs

  12. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    The US Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) research and development activities focus on four key areas: Developing assessment methods for evaluating advanced SMR technologies and characteristics; and Developing and testing of materials, fuels and fabrication techniques; and Resolving key regulatory issues identified by US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and industry; and Developing advanced instrumentation and controls and human-machine interfaces. This report focuses on development of assessment methods to evaluate advanced SMR technologies and characteristics. Specifically, this report describes the expansion and application of the economic modeling effort at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Analysis of the current modeling methods shows that one of the primary concerns for the modeling effort is the handling of uncertainty in cost estimates. Monte Carlo–based methods are commonly used to handle uncertainty, especially when implemented by a stand-alone script within a program such as Python or MATLAB. However, a script-based model requires each potential user to have access to a compiler and an executable capable of handling the script. Making the model accessible to multiple independent analysts is best accomplished by implementing the model in a common computing tool such as Microsoft Excel. Excel is readily available and accessible to most system analysts, but it is not designed for straightforward implementation of a Monte Carlo–based method. Using a Monte Carlo algorithm requires in-spreadsheet scripting and statistical analyses or the use of add-ons such as Crystal Ball. An alternative method uses propagation of error calculations in the existing Excel-based system to estimate system cost uncertainty. This method has the advantage of using Microsoft Excel as is, but it requires the use of simplifying assumptions. These assumptions do not necessarily bring into question the analytical results. In fact, the

  13. ENHANCED THERMAL VACUUM TEST CAPABILITY FOR RADIOISOTOPE POWER SYSTEMS AT THE IDAHO NATIONAL LABORATORY BETTER SIMULATES ENVIRONMENTAL CONDITIONS OF SPACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. C. Giglio; A. A. Jackson

    2012-03-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is preparing to fuel and test the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG), the next generation space power generator. The INL identified the thermal vacuum test chamber used to test past generators as inadequate. A second vacuum chamber was upgraded with a thermal shroud to process the unique needs and to test the full power capability of the new generator. The thermal vacuum test chamber is the first of its kind capable of testing a fueled power system to temperature that accurately simulate space. This paper outlines the new test and set up capabilities at the INL.

  14. Development of demonstration advanced thermal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of the advanced thermal demonstration reactor with 600 MWe output was started in 1975. In order to make the compact core, 648 fuel assemblies, each comprising 36 fuel rods, were used, and the mean channel output was increased by 20% as compared with the prototype reactor. The heavy water dumping mechanism for the calandria was abolished. Advanced thermal reactors are suitable to burn plutonium, since the control rod worth does not change, the void reactivity coefficient of coolant shifts to the negative side, and the harmful influence of high order plutonium is small. The void reactivity coefficient is nearly zero, the fluctuation of output in relation to pressure disturbance is small, and the local output change of fuel by the operation of control rods is small, therefore, the operation following load change is relatively easy. The coolant recirculation system is of independent loop construction dividing the core into two, and steam and water are separated in respective steam drums. At present, the rationalizing design is in progress by the leadership of the Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. The outline of the demonstration reactor, the reactor construction, the nuclear-thermal-hydraulic characteristics and the output control characteristics are reported. (Kako, I.)

  15. Series lecture on advanced fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The problems concerning fusion reactors are presented and discussed in this series lecture. At first, the D-T tokamak is explained. The breeding of tritium and the radioactive property of tritium are discussed. The hybrid reactor is explained as an example of the direct use of neutrons. Some advanced fuel reactions are proposed. It is necessary to make physics consideration for burning advanced fuel in reactors. The rate of energy production and the energy loss are important things. The bremsstrahlung radiation and impurity radiation are explained. The simple estimation of the synchrotron radiation was performed. The numerical results were compared with a more detailed calculation of Taimor, and the agreement was quite good. The calculation of ion and electron temperature was made. The idea to use the energy more efficiently is that one can take X-ray or neutrons, and pass them through a first wall of a reactor into a second region where they heat the material. A method to convert high temperature into useful energy is the third problem of this lecture. The device was invented by A. Hertzberg. The lifetime of the reactor depends on the efficiency of energy recovery. The idea of using spin polarized nuclei has come up. The spin polarization gives a chance to achieve a large multiplication factor. The advanced fuel which looks easiest to make go is D plus He-3. The idea of multipole is presented to reduce the magnetic field inside plasma, and discussed. Two other topics are explained. (Kato, T.)

  16. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1991--93

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy's Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 14 wells during 1991--93 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. One hundred sixty-one samples were collected from 10 ground-water monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twenty-one quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 2 were blank samples and 19 were replicate samples. The two blank samples contained concentrations of six inorganic constituents that were slightly greater than the laboratory reporting levels (the smallest measured concentration of a constituent that can be reported using a given analytical method). Concentrations of other constituents in the blank samples were less than their respective reporting levels. The 19 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 614 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 614 data pairs, 588 were statistically equivalent at the 95% confidence level; about 96% of the analytical results were in agreement. Two pairs of turbidity measurements were not evaluated because of insufficient information and one primary sample collected in January 1992 contained tentatively identified organic compounds when the replicate sample did not

  17. Chemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho, 1991--93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, B.J.; Knobel, L.L.; Bartholomay, R.C.

    1995-11-01

    The US Geological Survey, in response to a request from the US Department of Energy`s Pittsburgh Naval Reactors Office, Idaho Branch Office, sampled 14 wells during 1991--93 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for manmade contaminants and naturally occurring constituents. One hundred sixty-one samples were collected from 10 ground-water monitoring wells and 4 production wells. Twenty-one quality-assurance samples also were collected and analyzed; 2 were blank samples and 19 were replicate samples. The two blank samples contained concentrations of six inorganic constituents that were slightly greater than the laboratory reporting levels (the smallest measured concentration of a constituent that can be reported using a given analytical method). Concentrations of other constituents in the blank samples were less than their respective reporting levels. The 19 replicate samples and their respective primary samples generated 614 pairs of analytical results for a variety of chemical and radiochemical constituents. Of the 614 data pairs, 588 were statistically equivalent at the 95% confidence level; about 96% of the analytical results were in agreement. Two pairs of turbidity measurements were not evaluated because of insufficient information and one primary sample collected in January 1992 contained tentatively identified organic compounds when the replicate sample did not.

  18. Chemical and radiochemical constituents in water from wells in the vicinity of the naval reactors facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1997-98

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartholomay, Roy C.; Knobel, LeRoy L.; Tucker, Betty J.; Twining, Brian V.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in response to a request from the U.S. Department of Energy?s Phtsburgh Naval Reactors Ofilce, Idaho Branch Office, sampled water from 13 wells during 1997?98 as part of a long-term project to monitor water quality of the Snake River Plain aquifer in the vicinity of the Naval Reactors Facility, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho. Water samples were analyzed for naturally occurring constituents and man-made contaminants. A totalof91 samples were collected from the 13 monitoring wells. The routine samples contained detectable concentrations of total cations and dissolved anions, and nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen. Most of the samples also had detectable concentrations of gross alpha- and gross beta-particle radioactivity and tritium. Fourteen qualityassurance samples also were collected and analyze~ seven were field-blank samples, and seven were replicate samples. Most of the field blank samples contained less than detectable concentrations of target constituents; however, some blank samples did contain detectable concentrations of calcium, magnesium, barium, copper, manganese, nickel, zinc, nitrite plus nitrate, total organic halogens, tritium, and selected volatile organic compounds.

  19. PITR: Princeton Ignition Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The principal objectives of the PITR - Princeton Ignition Test Reactor - are to demonstrate the attainment of thermonuclear ignition in deuterium-tritium, and to develop optimal start-up techniques for plasma heating and current induction, in order to determine the most favorable means of reducing the size and cost of tokamak power reactors. This report describes the status of the plasma and engineering design features of the PITR. The PITR geometry is chosen to provide the highest MHD-stable values of beta in a D-shaped plasma, as well as ease of access for remote handling and neutral-beam injection.

  20. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was prepared in the context of the IAEA's Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors, which was started in 1995 with the overall goal of promoting information exchange and co-operation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships which are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. For advanced water cooled reactors, some key thermohydraulic phenomena are critical heat flux (CHF) and post CHF heat transfer, pressure drop under low flow and low pressure conditions, flow and heat transport by natural circulation, condensation of steam in the presence of non-condensables, thermal stratification and mixing in large pools, gravity driven reflooding, and potential flow instabilities. The objectives of the CRP are (1) to systematically list the requirements for thermohydraulic relationships in support of advanced water cooled reactors during normal and accident conditions, and provide details of their database where possible and (2) to recommend and document a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships for selected thermohydraulic phenomena such as CHF and post-CHF heat transfer, pressure drop, and passive cooling for advanced water cooled reactors. Chapter 1 provides a brief discussion of the background for this CRP, the CRP objectives and lists the participating institutes. Chapter 2 provides a summary of important and relevant thermohydraulic phenomena for advanced water cooled reactors on the basis of previous work by the international community. Chapter 3 provides details of the database for critical heat flux, and recommends a prediction method which has been established through international co-operation and assessed within this CRP. Chapter 4 provides details of the database for film boiling heat transfer, and presents three methods for predicting film boiling heat transfer coefficients developed by institutes

  1. Natural radioactive materials at the Arco Reactor Test Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singlevich, W; Healy, J W; Paas, H J; Carey, Z E

    1951-05-28

    At the request of the Division of Biology and Medicine of the AEC, the Biophysics Section of the Radiological Sciences Department at Hanford undertook the task of conducting a background survey for naturally occurring radioactive materials in the environs of the Arco Reactor Test Site in Central Idaho. This survey was part of an overall study which included meteorological measurements by the the Air Weather Service, Geological Studies by the USGS, and an ecological survey of plants and animals by members of the Idaho State College at Pocatello. In general, the measurements at Arco followed the pattern established for environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site with some additional measurements made for natural isotopes not normally of concern at Hanford. A number of analysis included materials such as plutonium and I-131 which were carried out for the purpose of establishing analytical backgrounds for the procedures used. 20 refs., 13 figs., 11 tabs.

  2. Advanced light water reactor plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giedraityte, Zivile [Helsinki University of Technology, Otaranta 8D-84, 02150 Espoo (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  3. Lagoon Seepage Testing Procedures for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory Butte County, Idaho April 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alan Giesbrecht

    2014-05-01

    The lagoon seepage testing procedures are documented herein as required by the Wastewater Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16.493). The Wastewater Rules and Wastewater Reuse Permit LA-000141-03 require that the procedure used for performing a seepage test be approved by IDEQ prior to conducting the seepage test. The procedures described herein are based on a seepage testing plan that was developed by J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) and has been accepted by several IDEQ offices for lagoons in Idaho.

  4. Engineering design of advanced marine reactor MRX

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    JAERI has studied the design of an advanced marine reactor (named as MRX), which meets requirements of the enhancement of economy and reliability, by reflecting results and knowledge obtained from the development of N.S. Mutsu. The MRX with a power of 100 MWt is intended to be used for ship propulsion such as an ice-breaker, container cargo ship and so on. After completion of the conceptual design, the engineering design was performed in four year plan from FY 1993 to 1996. (1) Compactness, light-weightiness and simplicity of the reactor system are realized by adopting an integral-type PWR, i.e. by installing the steam generator, the pressurizer, and the control rod drive mechanism (CRDM) inside the pressure vessel. Because of elimination of the primary coolant circulation pipes in the MRX, possibility of large-scale pipe break accidents can be eliminated. This contributes to improve the safety of the reactor system and to simplify the engineered safety systems. (2) The in-vessel type CRDM contributes not only to eliminate possibilities of rod ejection accidents, but also to make the reactor system compact. (3) The concept of water-filled containment where the reactor pressure vessel is immersed in the water is adopted. It can be of use for emergency core cooling system which maintains core flooding passively in case of a loss-of-coolant accident. The water-filled containment system also contributes essentially light-weightness of the reactor system since the water inside containment acts as a radiation shield and in consequence the secondary radiation shield can be eliminated. (4) Adoption of passive decay heat removal systems has contributed in a greater deal to simplification of the engineered safety systems and to enhancement of reliability of the systems. (5) Operability has been improved by simplification of the whole reactor system, by adoption of the passive safety systems, advanced automatic operation systems, and so on. (J.P.N.)

  5. Uncertainty quantification approaches for advanced reactor analyses.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Briggs, L. L.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-03-24

    The original approach to nuclear reactor design or safety analyses was to make very conservative modeling assumptions so as to ensure meeting the required safety margins. Traditional regulation, as established by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission required conservatisms which have subsequently been shown to be excessive. The commission has therefore moved away from excessively conservative evaluations and has determined best-estimate calculations to be an acceptable alternative to conservative models, provided the best-estimate results are accompanied by an uncertainty evaluation which can demonstrate that, when a set of analysis cases which statistically account for uncertainties of all types are generated, there is a 95% probability that at least 95% of the cases meet the safety margins. To date, nearly all published work addressing uncertainty evaluations of nuclear power plant calculations has focused on light water reactors and on large-break loss-of-coolant accident (LBLOCA) analyses. However, there is nothing in the uncertainty evaluation methodologies that is limited to a specific type of reactor or to specific types of plant scenarios. These same methodologies can be equally well applied to analyses for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors and to liquid metal reactors, and they can be applied to steady-state calculations, operational transients, or severe accident scenarios. This report reviews and compares both statistical and deterministic uncertainty evaluation approaches. Recommendations are given for selection of an uncertainty methodology and for considerations to be factored into the process of evaluating uncertainties for advanced reactor best-estimate analyses.

  6. Local AREA networks in advanced nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report assesses Local Area Network Communications with a view to their application in advanced nuclear reactor control and protection systems. Attention is focussed on commercially available techniques and systems for achieving the high reliability and availability required. A basis for evaluating network characteristics in terms of broadband or baseband type, medium, topology, node structure and access method is established. The reliability and availability of networks is then discussed. Several commercial networks are briefly assessed and a distinction made between general purpose networks and those suitable for process control. The communications requirements of nuclear reactor control and protection systems are compared with the facilities provided by current technology

  7. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected. (author)

  8. A wall-crawling robot for reactor vessel inspection in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and the Center for Engineering Systems Advanced Research of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in advanced nuclear reactors. Design efforts for the reactor vessel inspection robot (RVIR) concentrated on the Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor because it presents the most demanding environment in which such a robot must operate. The RVIR consists of a chassis containing two sets of suction cups that can alternately grasp the side of the vessel being inspected, providing both locomotion and steering functions. Sensors include three CCD cameras and a weld inspection device based on new shear-wave technology. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a non-radiation, room-temperature mockup of the robot work environment and shown to perform as expected

  9. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) final report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) has resulted in an overview of a first-generation tandem mirror reactor. The central cell fusion plasma is self-sustained by alpha heating (ignition), while electron-cyclotron resonance heating and negative ion beams maintain the electrostatic confining potentials in the end plugs. Plug injection power is reduced by the use of high-field choke coils and thermal barriers, concepts to be tested in the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) and Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

  10. Advanced reactor physics methods for heterogeneous reactor cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Steven A.

    To maintain the economic viability of nuclear power the industry has begun to emphasize maximizing the efficiency and output of existing nuclear power plants by using longer fuel cycles, stretch power uprates, shorter outage lengths, mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel and more aggressive operating strategies. In order to accommodate these changes, while still satisfying the peaking factor and power envelope requirements necessary to maintain safe operation, more complexity in commercial core designs have been implemented, such as an increase in the number of sub-batches and an increase in the use of both discrete and integral burnable poisons. A consequence of the increased complexity of core designs, as well as the use of MOX fuel, is an increase in the neutronic heterogeneity of the core. Such heterogeneous cores introduce challenges for the current methods that are used for reactor analysis. New methods must be developed to address these deficiencies while still maintaining the computational efficiency of existing reactor analysis methods. In this thesis, advanced core design methodologies are developed to be able to adequately analyze the highly heterogeneous core designs which are currently in use in commercial power reactors. These methodological improvements are being pursued with the goal of not sacrificing the computational efficiency which core designers require. More specifically, the PSU nodal code NEM is being updated to include an SP3 solution option, an advanced transverse leakage option, and a semi-analytical NEM solution option.

  11. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, C. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Belch, H. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Brunett, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Heidet, F. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hill, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hoffman, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Jin, E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Mohamed, W. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Passerini, S. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sumner, T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Vilim, R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hayes, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-02-29

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  12. FASTER test reactor preconceptual design report summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The FASTER reactor plant is a sodium-cooled fast spectrum test reactor that provides high levels of fast and thermal neutron flux for scientific research and development. The 120MWe FASTER reactor plant has a superheated steam power conversion system which provides electrical power to a local grid allowing for recovery of operating costs for the reactor plant.

  13. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design

  14. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study interim design report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The status of the design of a tenth-of-a-kind commercial tandem-mirror fusion reactor is described at the midpoint of a two-year study. When completed, the design is to serve as a strategic goal for the mirror fusion program. The main objectives of the Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS) are: (1) to design an attractive tandem-mirror fusion reactor producing electricity and synfuels (in alternate versions), (2) to identify key development and technology needs, and (3) to exploit the potential of fusion for safety, low activation, and simple disposal of radioactive waste. In the first year we have emphasized physics and engineering of the central cell and physics of the end cell. Design optimization and trade studies are continuing, and we expect additional modifications in the end cells to further improve the performance of the final design.

  15. Development of advanced nuclear reactors in Russia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several advanced reactor designs have been so far developed in Russia. The AES-91 and AES-92 plants with the VVER-1000 reactors have been developed at the beginning of 1990. However, the former design has been built in China and the latest which is certified meeting European Utility Requirements is being built in India. Moreover, the model VVER-1500 reactor with 50-60 MWd/t burn-up and an enhanced safety was being developed by Gidropress about 2005, excepting to be completed in 2007. But, this schedule has slipped in favor of development of the AES-2006 power plant incorporating a third-generation standardized VVER-1200 reactor of 1170 MWe. This is an evolutionary development of the well-proven VVER-1000 reactor in the AES-92 plant, with longer life, greater power and efficiency and its lead units are being built at Novovoronezh II, to start operation in 2012-13. Based on Atomenergoproekt declaration, the AES-2006 conforms to both Russian standards and European Utility Requirements. The most important features of the AES-2006 design are mentioned as: a design based on the passive safety systems, double containment, longer plant service life of 50 years with a capacity factor of 92%, longer irreplaceable components service life of 60 years, a 28.6% lower amount of concrete and metal, shorter construction time of 54 months, a Core Damage Frequency of 1x10-7/ year and lower liquid and solid wastes by 70% and 80% respectively. The presented paper includes a comparative analysis of technological and safety features, economic parameters and environmental impact of the AES-2006 design versus the other western advanced reactors. Since the Bushehr phase II NPP and several other NPPs are planning in Iran, such analysis would be of a great importance

  16. Advanced nuclear reactor systems - an Indian perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Indian nuclear power programme envisages use of closed nuclear fuel cycle and thorium utilisation as its mainstay for its sustainable growth. The current levels of deployment of nuclear energy in India need to be multiplied nearly hundred fold to reach levels of electricity generation that would facilitate the country to achieve energy independence as well as a developed status. The Indian thorium based nuclear energy systems are being developed to achieve sustainability in respect of fuel resource along with enhanced safety and reduced waste generation. Advanced Heavy Water Reactor and its variants have been designed to meet these objectives. The Indian High Temperature Reactor programme also envisages use of thorium-based fuel with advanced levels of passive safety features. (author)

  17. Fast reactors and advanced light water reactors for sustainable development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows: The importance of nuclear energy, as a realistic option to solve the issues of the depletion of energy resources and the global environment, has been re-acknowledged worldwide. In response to this international movement, the papers compiling the most recent findings in the fields of fast reactors (FR) and advanced light water reactors (LWR) were gathered and published in this special issue. This special issue compiles six articles, most of which are very meticulously performed studies of the multi year development of design and assessment methods for large sodium-cooled FRs (SFRs), and two are related to the fuel cycle options that are leading to a greater understanding on the efficient utilization of energy resources. The Japanese sodium-cooled fast reactor (JSFR) is addressed in two manuscripts. H. Yamano et al. reviewed the current design which adopts a number of innovative technologies in order to achieve economic competitiveness, enhanced reliability, and safety. Their safety assessments of both design basis accidents and severe accidents indicate that the devised JSFR satisfies well their risk target. T. Takeda et al. discussed the improvement of the modeling accuracy for the detailed calculation of JSFR's features in three areas: neutronics, fuel materials, and thermal hydraulics. The verification studies which partly use the measured data from the prototype FBR Monju are also described. Two of these manuscripts deal with those aspects of advanced design of SFR that have hitherto not been explored in great depth. The paper by G. Palmiotti et al. explored the possibility of using the sensitivity methodologies in the reactor physics field. A review of the methods used is provided, and several examples illustrate the success of the methodology in reactor physics. A new application as the improvement of nuclear basic parameters using integral experiments is also described. F. Baque et al. reviewed the evolution of the in

  18. Foundational development of an advanced nuclear reactor integrated safety code.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarno, Kevin (Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN); Lorber, Alfred Abraham; Pryor, Richard J.; Spotz, William F.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Belcourt, Kenneth (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Hooper, Russell Warren; Humphries, Larry LaRon

    2010-02-01

    This report describes the activities and results of a Sandia LDRD project whose objective was to develop and demonstrate foundational aspects of a next-generation nuclear reactor safety code that leverages advanced computational technology. The project scope was directed towards the systems-level modeling and simulation of an advanced, sodium cooled fast reactor, but the approach developed has a more general applicability. The major accomplishments of the LDRD are centered around the following two activities. (1) The development and testing of LIME, a Lightweight Integrating Multi-physics Environment for coupling codes that is designed to enable both 'legacy' and 'new' physics codes to be combined and strongly coupled using advanced nonlinear solution methods. (2) The development and initial demonstration of BRISC, a prototype next-generation nuclear reactor integrated safety code. BRISC leverages LIME to tightly couple the physics models in several different codes (written in a variety of languages) into one integrated package for simulating accident scenarios in a liquid sodium cooled 'burner' nuclear reactor. Other activities and accomplishments of the LDRD include (a) further development, application and demonstration of the 'non-linear elimination' strategy to enable physics codes that do not provide residuals to be incorporated into LIME, (b) significant extensions of the RIO CFD code capabilities, (c) complex 3D solid modeling and meshing of major fast reactor components and regions, and (d) an approach for multi-physics coupling across non-conformal mesh interfaces.

  19. Advanced Recycling Reactor with Minor Actinide Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) with minor actinide fuel has been studied. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR proposed by the International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) for FOA study sponsored by DOE of the United States of America (U.S.). Although the basic reactor concept is technically mature, it is not suitable for commercial use due to the need to reduce capital costs. As a result of INRA's extensive experience, it is anticipated that a non-commercial ARR1 will be viable and meet U.S. requirements by 2025. Commercial Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) operations are expected to be feasible in competition with LWRs by 2050, based on construction of ARR2 in 2035. The ARR based on the Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel that is selected because of much experience of SFRs in the world. Major features of key technology enhancements incorporated into the ARR are the following: Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop system and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The reactor core of the ARR1 is 70 cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is 31.6%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.65 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh. According to survey of more effective TRU burning core, the oxide fuel core containing high TRU (MA 15%, Pu 35% average) with moderate pins of 12% arranged driver fuel assemblies can decrease TRU conversion ratio to 0.33 and improve TRU burning capability to 67 kg/TWeh. The moderator can enhance TRU burning, while increasing the Doppler effect and reducing the positive sodium void effect. High TRU fraction promotes TRU burning by curbing plutonium production. High Am fraction and Am blanket promote Am transmutation. The ARR1 consists of a reactor building (including

  20. Thermal Hydraulic Tests for Reactor Core Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, S. K.; Baek, W. P.; Chun, S. Y. (and others)

    2007-06-15

    The main objectives of the present project are to resolve the current issues of reactor core thermal hydraulics, to develop an advanced measurement and analytical techniques, and to perform reactor core safety verification tests. 6x6 reflood experiments, various heat transfer experiments using Freon, and experiments on the spacer grids effects on the post-dryout are carried out using spacer grids developed in Korea in order to resolve the current issues of the reactor core thermal hydraulics. In order to develop a reflood heat transfer model, the detailed reflood phenomena are visualized and measured using round tube and 2x2 rod bundle. A detailed turbulent mixing phenomenon for subchannels is measured using advanced measurement techniques such as LDV and PIV. MARS and MATRA codes developed in Korea are assessed, verified and improved using the obtained experimental data. Finally, a systematic quality assurance program and experimental data generation system has been constructed in order to increase the reliability of the experimental data.

  1. Reactor Simulator Integration and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfield, M. P.; Webster, K. L.; Pearson, J. B.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Nuclear Systems Office Fission Surface Power Technology Demonstration Unit (TDU) project, a reactor simulator (RxSim) test loop was designed and built to perform integrated testing of the TDU components. In particular, the objectives of RxSim testing were to verify the operation of the core simulator, the instrumentation and control system, and the ground support gas and vacuum test equipment. In addition, it was decided to include a thermal test of a cold trap purification design and a pump performance test at pump voltages up to 150 V because the targeted mass flow rate of 1.75 kg/s was not obtained in the RxSim at the originally constrained voltage of 120 V. This Technical Memorandum summarizes RxSim testing. The gas and vacuum ground support test equipment performed effectively in NaK fill, loop pressurization, and NaK drain operations. The instrumentation and control system effectively controlled loop temperature and flow rates or pump voltage to targeted settings. The cold trap design was able to obtain the targeted cold temperature of 480 K. An outlet temperature of 636 K was obtained, which was lower than the predicted 750 K but 156 K higher than the cold temperature, indicating the design provided some heat regeneration. The annular linear induction pump tested was able to produce a maximum flow rate of 1.53 kg/s at 800 K when operated at 150 V and 53 Hz.

  2. ACR-1000TM - advanced Candu reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) has developed the Advanced CANDU ReactorTM- 1000 (ACR-1000TM) as an evolutionary advancement of the current CANDU 6TM reactor. This evolutionary advancement is based on AECL's in-depth knowledge of CANDU structures, systems, components and materials, gained during 50 years of continuous construction, engineering and commissioning, as well as on the experience and feedback received from operators of CANDU plants. The ACR design retains the proven strengths and features of CANDU reactors, while incorporating innovations and state-of-the-art technology. These innovations improve economics, inherent safety characteristics, and performance, while retaining the proven benefits of the CANDU family of nuclear power plants. The Canadian nuclear reactor design evolution that has reached today's stage represented by the ACR-1000, has a long history dating back to the early 1950's. In this regard, Canada is in a unique situation, shared only by a very few other countries, where original nuclear power technology has been invented and further developed. The ACR design has been reviewed by domestic and international regulatory bodies, and has been given a positive regulatory opinion about its licensability. The Canadian regulator, the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission (CNSC) completed the Phase 1 and Phase 2 pre-project design reviews in December 2008 and August 2009, respectively, and concluded that there are no fundamental barriers to licensing the ACR-1000 design in Canada. The final stage of the ACR-1000 design is currently underway and will be completed by fall of 2011, along with the final elements of the safety analyses and probabilistic safety analyses supporting the finalized design. The generic Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) for the ACR-1000 was completed in September 2009. The PSAR demonstrates ACR-1000 safety case and compliance with Canadian and international regulatory requirements and expectations. (authors)

  3. Advanced Small Modular Reactor Economics Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL

    2014-10-01

    This report describes the data collection work performed for an advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) economics analysis activity at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The methodology development and analytical results are described in separate, stand-alone documents as listed in the references. The economics analysis effort for the AdvSMR program combines the technical and fuel cycle aspects of advanced (non-light water reactor [LWR]) reactors with the market and production aspects of SMRs. This requires the collection, analysis, and synthesis of multiple unrelated and potentially high-uncertainty data sets from a wide range of data sources. Further, the nature of both economic and nuclear technology analysis requires at least a minor attempt at prediction and prognostication, and the far-term horizon for deployment of advanced nuclear systems introduces more uncertainty. Energy market uncertainty, especially the electricity market, is the result of the integration of commodity prices, demand fluctuation, and generation competition, as easily seen in deregulated markets. Depending on current or projected values for any of these factors, the economic attractiveness of any power plant construction project can change yearly or quarterly. For long-lead construction projects such as nuclear power plants, this uncertainty generates an implied and inherent risk for potential nuclear power plant owners and operators. The uncertainty in nuclear reactor and fuel cycle costs is in some respects better understood and quantified than the energy market uncertainty. The LWR-based fuel cycle has a long commercial history to use as its basis for cost estimation, and the current activities in LWR construction provide a reliable baseline for estimates for similar efforts. However, for advanced systems, the estimates and their associated uncertainties are based on forward-looking assumptions for performance after the system has been built and has achieved commercial operation

  4. FABRICATION PROCESS AND PRODUCT QUALITY IMPROVEMENTS IN ADVANCED GAS REACTOR UCO KERNELS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charles M Barnes

    2008-09-01

    A major element of the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program is developing fuel fabrication processes to produce high quality uranium-containing kernels, TRISO-coated particles and fuel compacts needed for planned irradiation tests. The goals of the AGR program also include developing the fabrication technology to mass produce this fuel at low cost. Kernels for the first AGR test (“AGR-1) consisted of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) microspheres that werre produced by an internal gelation process followed by high temperature steps tot convert the UO3 + C “green” microspheres to first UO2 + C and then UO2 + UCx. The high temperature steps also densified the kernels. Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) fabricated UCO kernels for the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, which went into the Advance Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory in December 2006. An evaluation of the kernel process following AGR-1 kernel production led to several recommendations to improve the fabrication process. These recommendations included testing alternative methods of dispersing carbon during broth preparation, evaluating the method of broth mixing, optimizing the broth chemistry, optimizing sintering conditions, and demonstrating fabrication of larger diameter UCO kernels needed for the second AGR irradiation test. Based on these recommendations and requirements, a test program was defined and performed. Certain portions of the test program were performed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), while tests at larger scale were performed by B&W. The tests at B&W have demonstrated improvements in both kernel properties and process operation. Changes in the form of carbon black used and the method of mixing the carbon prior to forming kernels led to improvements in the phase distribution in the sintered kernels, greater consistency in kernel properties, a reduction in forming run time, and simplifications to the forming process. Process parameter variation tests in both forming and sintering steps led

  5. Preparation of LWBR [Light Water Breeder Reactor] spent fuel for shipment to ICPP [Idaho Chemical Processing Plant] for long term storage (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After successfully operating for 29,047 effective full power hours, the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core was defueled prior to total decommissioning of the Shippingport facility. All nuclear fuel and much of the reactor internal hardware was removed from the reactor vessel. Non-fuel components were prepared for shipment to disposal sites, and the fuel assemblies were partially disassembled and shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) in Idaho. At ECF, the fuel modules underwent further disassembly to provide fuel rods for nondestructive testing to establish the core's breeding efficiency and to provide core components for examinations to assess their performance characteristics. This report presents a basic description of the processes and equipment used to prepare and to ship all LWBR nuclear fuel to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for long-term storage. Preparation processes included the underwater loading of LWBR fuel into storage liners, the sealing, dewatering and drying of the storage liners, and the final pressurization of the storage liners with inert neon gas. Shipping operations included the underwater installation of the fuel loaded storage liner into the Peach Bottom shipping cask, cask removal from the waterpit, cask preparations for shipping, and cask shipment by tractor trailer to the ICPP facility for long-term storage. The ICPP facility preparations for LWBR fuel storage and the ICPP process for discharge of the fuel into underground silos are presented. 10 refs., 42 figs

  6. Real time simulator for material testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is now developing a real time simulator for a material testing reactor based on Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). The simulator treats reactor core system, primary and secondary cooling system, electricity system and irradiation facility systems. Possible simulations are normal reactor operation, unusual transient operation and accidental operation. The developed simulator also contains tool to revise/add facility in it for the future development. (author)

  7. Next generation advanced nuclear reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Growing energy demand by technological developments and the increase of the world population and gradually diminishing energy resources made nuclear power an indispensable option. The renewable energy sources like solar, wind and geothermal may be suited to meet some local needs. Environment friendly nuclear energy which is a suitable solution to large scale demands tends to develop highly economical, advanced next generation reactors by incorporating technological developments and years of operating experience. The enhancement of safety and reliability, facilitation of maintainability, impeccable compatibility with the environment are the goals of the new generation reactors. The protection of the investment and property is considered as well as the protection of the environment and mankind. They became economically attractive compared to fossil-fired units by the use of standard designs, replacing some active systems by passive, reducing construction time and increasing the operation lifetime. The evolutionary designs were introduced at first by ameliorating the conventional plants, than revolutionary systems which are denoted as generation IV were verged to meet future needs. The investigations on the advanced, proliferation resistant fuel cycle technologies were initiated to minimize the radioactive waste burden by using new generation fast reactors and ADS transmuters.

  8. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  9. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take

  10. Design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The design study on the Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) has been conducted. This paper presents the pre-conceptual design of the ARR that is a loop-typed sodium cooled reactor with MOX fuel. International Nuclear Recycling Alliance (INRA) takes advantage of international experience and uses the design based on Japan Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) as reference for FOA studies of US DOE, because Japan has conducted R and Ds for the JSFR incorporating thirteen technology enhancements expected to improve safety, enhance economics, and increase reactor reliability. The targets of the ARR are to generate electricity while consuming fuel containing transuranics and to attain cost competitiveness with the similar sized LWRs. INRA proposes 3 evolutions of the ARR; ARR1, a 500 MWe demonstration plant, online in 2025; ARR2, a 1,000 MWe commercial plant, online in 2035; ARR3, a 1,500 MWe full-scale commercial plant, online in 2050. INRA believes the scale-up factor of two is acceptable increase from manufacturing and licensing points of view. Major features of the ARR1 are the following: The reactor core is 70cm high and the volume fraction of fuel is approximately 32%. The conversion ratio of fissile is set up less than 0.6 and the amount of burned TRU is 45-51 kg/TWeh.Decay heat can be removed by natural circulation to improve safety. The primary cooling system consists of two-loop arrangement and the integrated IHX/Pump to improve economics. The steam generator with the straight double-walled tube is used to improve reliability. The ARR1 is co-located with a recycling facility. The overall plant facility arrangement is planned assuming to be constructed and installed in an inland area. The plant consists of a reactor building (including reactor auxiliary facilities and electrical/control systems), a turbine building, and a recycling building. The volume of the reactor building will be approximately 180,000 m3. The capital cost for the ARR1 and the ARR2 are

  11. Advanced fuel in the Budapest research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargitai, T.; Vidovsky, I. [KFKI Atomic Energy Research Inst., Budapest (Hungary)

    1997-07-01

    The Budapest Research Reactor, the first nuclear facility of Hungary, started to operate in 1959. The main goal of the reactor is to serve neutron research, but applications as neutron radiography, radioisotope production, pressure vessel surveillance test, etc. are important as well. The Budapest Research Reactor is a tank type reactor, moderated and cooled by light water. After a reconstruction and upgrading in 1967 the VVR-SM type fuel elements were used in it. These fuel elements provided a thermal power of 5 MW in the period 1967-1986 and 10 MW after the reconstruction from 1992. In the late eighties the Russian vendor changed the fuel elements slightly, i.e. the main parameters of the fuel remained unchanged, however a higher uranium content was reached. This new fuel is called VVR-M2. The geometry of VVR-SM and VVR-M2 are identical, allowing the use to load old and new fuel assemblies together to the active core. The first new type fuel assemblies were loaded to the Budapest Research Reactor in 1996. The present paper describes the operational experience with the new type of fuel elements in Hungary. (author)

  12. Jules Horowitz Reactor: a high performance material testing reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iracane, Daniel; Chaix, Pascal; Alamo, Ana

    2008-04-01

    The physical modelling of materials' behaviour under severe conditions is an indispensable element for developing future fission and fusion systems: screening, design, optimisation, processing, licensing, and lifetime assessment of a new generation of structure materials and fuels, which will withstand high fast neutron flux at high in-service temperatures with the production of elements like helium and hydrogen. JANNUS and other analytical experimental tools are developed for this objective. However, a purely analytical approach is not sufficient: there is a need for flexible experiments integrating higher scales and coupled phenomena and offering high quality measurements; these experiments are performed in material testing reactors (MTR). Moreover, complementary representative experiments are usually performed in prototypes or dedicated facilities such as IFMIF for fusion. Only such a consistent set of tools operating on a wide range of scales, can provide an actual prediction capability. A program such as the development of silicon carbide composites (600-1200 °C) illustrates this multiscale strategy. Facing the long term needs of experimental irradiations and the ageing of present MTRs, it was thought necessary to implement a new generation high performance MTR in Europe for supporting existing and future nuclear reactors. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) project copes with this context. It is funded by an international consortium and will start operation in 2014. JHR will provide improved performances such as high neutron flux ( 10 n/cm/s above 0.1 MeV) in representative environments (coolant, pressure, temperature) with online monitoring of experimental parameters (including stress and strain control). Experimental devices designing, such as high dpa and small thermal gradients experiments, is now a key objective requiring a broad collaboration to put together present scientific state of art, end-users requirements and advanced instrumentation. To cite this

  13. Advanced automation concepts applied to Experimental Breeder Reactor-II startup

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The major objective of this work is to demonstrate through simulations that advanced liquid-metal reactor plants can be operated from low power by computer control. Development of an automatic control system with this objective will help resolve specific issues and provide proof through demonstration that automatic control for plant startup is feasible. This paper presents an advanced control system design for startup of the Experimental Breeder Reactor-2 (EBR-2) located at Idaho Falls, Idaho. The design incorporates recent methods in nonlinear control with advanced diagnostics techniques such as neural networks to form an integrated architecture. The preliminary evaluations are obtained in a simulated environment by a low-order, valid nonlinear model. Within the framework of phase 1 research, the design includes an inverse dynamics controller, a fuzzy controller, and an artificial neural network controller. These three nonlinear control modules are designed to follow the EBR-2 startup trajectories in a multi-input/output regime. They are coordinated by a supervisory routine to yield a fault-tolerant, parallel operation. The control system operates in three modes: manual, semiautomatic, and fully automatic control. The simulation results of the EBR-2 startup transients proved the effectiveness of the advanced concepts. The work presented in this paper is a preliminary feasibility analysis and does not constitute a final design of an automated startup control system for EBR-2. 14 refs., 43 figs

  14. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Material at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Julie B. Williams

    2013-11-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a need to test nuclear fuels under conditions that subject them to short bursts of intense, high-power radiation called ‘transient testing’ in order to gain important information necessary for licensing new nuclear fuels for use in U.S. nuclear power plants, for developing information to help improve current nuclear power plant performance and sustainability, for improving the affordability of new generation reactors, for developing recyclable nuclear fuels, and for developing fuels that inhibit any repurposing into nuclear weapons. To meet this mission need, DOE is considering alternatives for re-use and modification of existing nuclear reactor facilities to support a renewed transient testing program. One alternative under consideration involves restarting the Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) reactor located at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) site in southeastern Idaho. This report summarizes cultural resource investigations conducted by the INL Cultural Resource Management Office in 2013 to support environmental review of activities associated with restarting the TREAT reactor at the INL. These investigations were completed in order to identify and assess the significance of cultural resources within areas of potential effect associated with the proposed action and determine if the TREAT alternative would affect significant cultural resources or historic properties that are eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No archaeological resources were identified in the direct area of potential effects for the project, but four of the buildings proposed for modifications are evaluated as historic properties, potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. This includes the TREAT reactor (building #), control building (building #), guardhouse (building #), and warehouse (building #). The proposed re-use of these historic

  15. Removal heat extraction systems in advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The two main problems generally attributed to the electricity generation by nuclear power are the security of the facility and the radioactivity of the nuclear wastes, in a way that the only tasks of the European Commission on this matter are to make sure a high level of security in the facilities, as well as an adequate fuel and waste management. In this paper we discuss about the main lines in which the CIEMAT and the Polytechnic University of Valencia are working relative to the study of the passive working systems of the advanced designs reactors. (Author) 24 refs

  16. United States Department of Energy commercial reactor spent fuel programs being conducted at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1982, the Congress of the United States enacted the Nuclear Waste Policy Act (NWPA). This act stated that in exchange for one mil per kilowatt of electricity generated by nuclear power, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) would take possession of the Utilities' nuclear spent fuel and provide for permanent disposal. The act also provided for establishment of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) within the DOE to manage the NWPA programs. The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory participation in OCRWM programs includes the Spent Fuel Storage Cask Testing Program, Dry Rod Consolidation Technology Program, Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program, the Nuclear Fuel Services Project, and the Cask Systems Acquisition Program. The Dry Rod Consolidation Technology Program demonstrates dry consolidation of PWR fuel assemblies and develops and documents technology associated with the dry consolidation process. The Prototypical Consolidation Demonstration Program develops and demonstrates production-scale equipment for the dry consolidation and packaging of spent fuel rods contained in BWR and PWR spent fuel assemblies and reports the results of these activities. The Nuclear Fuel Services Project will demonstrate the feasibility of packaging, transporting, and storing commercial spent fuel in the same dry storage cask. The Cask System Acquistion Program will develop a complement of NRC certified prototype casks for shipment of spent PWR and BWR fuels and hardware from existing and proposed reactor facilities and solidified high-level waste to a repository or an MRS

  17. Development of advanced strain diagnostic techniques for reactor environments.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Miller, Timothy J.; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Urrea, David Anthony,; Parma, Edward J.,

    2013-02-01

    The following research is operated as a Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) initiative at Sandia National Laboratories. The long-term goals of the program include sophisticated diagnostics of advanced fuels testing for nuclear reactors for the Department of Energy (DOE) Gen IV program, with the future capability to provide real-time measurement of strain in fuel rod cladding during operation in situ at any research or power reactor in the United States. By quantifying the stress and strain in fuel rods, it is possible to significantly improve fuel rod design, and consequently, to improve the performance and lifetime of the cladding. During the past year of this program, two sets of experiments were performed: small-scale tests to ensure reliability of the gages, and reactor pulse experiments involving the most viable samples in the Annulated Core Research Reactor (ACRR), located onsite at Sandia. Strain measurement techniques that can provide useful data in the extreme environment of a nuclear reactor core are needed to characterize nuclear fuel rods. This report documents the progression of solutions to this issue that were explored for feasibility in FY12 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM.

  18. Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

    2011-09-01

    Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

  19. Novelties in design and construction of the advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced pressurized water reactors (APWR), advanced boiling water reactors (ABWR), advanced liquid metal reactors (ALMR), and modular high temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGR), as well as heavy water reactors (AHWR), are analyzed taking into account those characteristics which make them less complex, but safer than their current homologous ones. This fact simplifies their construction which reduces completion periods and costs, increasing safety and protection of the plants. It is demonstrated how the accumulated operational experience allows to find more standardized designs with some enhancement in the material and component technology and thus achieve also a better use of computerized systems

  20. ASME Material Challenges for Advanced Reactor Concepts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Ali Siahpush

    2013-07-01

    This study presents the material Challenges associated with Advanced Reactor Concept (ARC) such as the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR). ACR are the next generation concepts focusing on power production and providing thermal energy for industrial applications. The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The heat exchanger required for AHTR is subjected to a unique set of conditions that bring with them several design challenges not encountered in standard heat exchangers. The corrosive molten salts, especially at higher temperatures, require materials throughout the system to avoid corrosion, and adverse high-temperature effects such as creep. Given the very high steam generator pressure of the supercritical steam cycle, it is anticipated that water tube and molten salt shell steam generators heat exchanger will be used. In this paper, the ASME Section III and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section VIII requirements (acceptance criteria) are discussed. Also, the ASME material acceptance criteria (ASME Section II, Part D) for high temperature environment are presented. Finally, lack of ASME acceptance criteria for thermal design and analysis are discussed.

  1. Design of the reactor vessel inspection robot for the advanced liquid metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A consortium of four universities and Oak Ridge National Laboratory designed a prototype wall-crawling robot to perform weld inspection in an advanced nuclear reactor. The restrictions of the inspection environment presented major challenges to the team. These challenges were met in the prototype, which has been tested in a mock non-hostile environment and shown to perform as expected, as detailed in this report

  2. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high outlet temperatures and high thermal-energy conversion efficiency of modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (HTGRs) enable an efficient and cost effective integration of the reactor system with non-electricity generation applications, such as process heat and/or hydrogen production, for the many petrochemical and other industrial processes that require temperatures between 300 C and 900 C. The Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the HTGR concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project as a transformative application of nuclear energy that will demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity, process heat, and hydrogen production, thereby reducing greenhouse-gas emissions and enhancing energy security. The objective of the DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification program is to qualify tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated particle fuel for use in HTGRs. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, post-irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission-product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete, fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process and key fuel properties, the irradiation and accident safety performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. An overview of the program and recent progress is presented.

  3. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  4. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Area North, Hangar 629 -- Photographs, written historical and descriptive data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The report describes the history of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s Hangar 629. The hangar was built to test the possibility of linking jet engine technology with nuclear power. The history of the project is described along with the development and eventual abandonment of the Flight Engine Test hangar. The report contains historical photographs and architectural drawings.

  5. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors. Evaluation of GE Advanced Boiling Water Reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-05-13

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE`s 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology.

  6. Development Program of the Advanced HANARO Reactor in Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development program of an advanced HANARO (AHR) reactor started in Korea to keep abreast of the increasing future demand, from both home and abroad, for research activities. This paper provides a review of the status of research reactors in Korea, the operating experience of the HANARO, the design principles and preliminary features of an advanced HANARO reactor, and the specific strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program. The design principles were established in order to design a new multi-purpose research reactor that is safe, economically competitive and technically feasible. These include the adaptation of the HANARO design concept, its operating experience, a high ratio of flux to power, a high degree of safety, improved economic efficiency, improved operability and maintainability, increased space and expandability, and ALARA design optimization. The strategy of an advanced HANARO reactor development program considers items such as providing a digital advanced HANARO reactor in cyber space, a method for the improving the design quality and economy of research reactors by using Computer Integrated Engineering, and more effective advertising using diverse virtual reality. This development program will be useful for promoting the understanding of and interest in the operating HANARO as well as an advanced HANARO reactor under development in Korea. It will provide very useful information to a country that may need a research reactor in the near future for the promotion of public health, bio-technology, drug design, pharmacology, material processing, and the development of new materials. (author)

  7. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions

  8. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  9. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual report, 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    The INEL underwent a year of transition in 1986. Success with new business initiatives, the prospects of even better things to come, and increased national recognition provided the INEL with a glimpse of its promising and exciting future. Among the highlights were: selection of the INEL as the preferred site for the Special Isotope Separation Facility (SIS); the first shipments of core debris from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor to the INEL; dedication of three new facilities - the Fluorinel Dissolution Process, the Remote Analytical Laboratory, and the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant; groundbreaking for the Fuel Processing Restoration Facility; and the first IR-100 award won by the INEL, given for an innovative machine vision system. The INEL has been assigned project management responsibility for the SDI Office-sponsored Multimegawatt Space Reactor and the Air Force-sponsored Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power Plant Project. New Department of Defense initiatives have been realized in projects involving development of prototype defense electronics systems, materials research, and hazardous waste technology. While some of our major reactor safety research programs have been completed, the INEL continues as a leader in advanced reactor technologies development. In April, successful tests were conducted for the development of the Integral Fast Reactor. Other 1986 highlights included the INEL's increased support to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management for complying with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Major INEL activities included managing a cask procurement program, demonstrating fuel assembly consolidation, and testing spent fuel storage casks. In addition, the INEL supplied the Tennessee Valley Authority with management and personnel experienced in reactor technology, increased basic research programs at the Idaho Research Center, and made numerous outreach efforts to assist the economies of Idaho communities.

  10. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory: Annual report, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INEL underwent a year of transition in 1986. Success with new business initiatives, the prospects of even better things to come, and increased national recognition provided the INEL with a glimpse of its promising and exciting future. Among the highlights were: selection of the INEL as the preferred site for the Special Isotope Separation Facility (SIS); the first shipments of core debris from the Three Mile Island Unit 2 reactor to the INEL; dedication of three new facilities - the Fluorinel Dissolution Process, the Remote Analytical Laboratory, and the Stored Waste Experimental Pilot Plant; groundbreaking for the Fuel Processing Restoration Facility; and the first IR-100 award won by the INEL, given for an innovative machine vision system. The INEL has been assigned project management responsibility for the SDI Office-sponsored Multimegawatt Space Reactor and the Air Force-sponsored Multimegawatt Terrestrial Power Plant Project. New Department of Defense initiatives have been realized in projects involving development of prototype defense electronics systems, materials research, and hazardous waste technology. While some of our major reactor safety research programs have been completed, the INEL continues as a leader in advanced reactor technologies development. In April, successful tests were conducted for the development of the Integral Fast Reactor. Other 1986 highlights included the INEL's increased support to the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management for complying with the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982. Major INEL activities included managing a cask procurement program, demonstrating fuel assembly consolidation, and testing spent fuel storage casks. In addition, the INEL supplied the Tennessee Valley Authority with management and personnel experienced in reactor technology, increased basic research programs at the Idaho Research Center, and made numerous outreach efforts to assist the economies of Idaho communities

  11. Lagoon Seepage Testing Report for Central Facilities Area (CFA) Sewage Lagoons at Idaho National Laboratory, Butte County, Idaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bridger Morrison

    2014-09-01

    J-U-B ENGINEERS, Inc. (J-U-B) performed seepage tests on the CFA Wastewater Lagoons 1, 2, and 3 between August 26th and September 22nd, 2014. The lagoons were tested to satisfy the Idaho Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) Rules (IDAPA 58.01.16) that require all lagoons be tested at a frequency of every 10 years and the Compliance Activity CA-141-03 in the DEQ Wastewater Reuse Permit for the CFA Sewage Treatment Plant (LA-000141-03). The lagoons were tested to determine if the average seepage rates are less than 0.25 in/day, the maximum seepage rate allowed for lagoons built prior to April 15, 2007. The average seepage rates were estimated for each lagoon and are given in Table-ES1. The average seepage rates for Lagoons 1 and 2 are less than the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day. Lagoon 1 and 2 passed the seepage test and will not have to be tested again until the year 20241. However, the average seepage rate for Lagoon 3 appears to exceed the allowable seepage rate of 0.25 in/day which means the potential source for the excessive leakage should be investigated further.

  12. LBB application in the US operating and advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wichman, K.; Tsao, J.; Mayfield, M.

    1997-04-01

    The regulatory application of leak before break (LBB) for operating and advanced reactors in the U.S. is described. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has approved the application of LBB for six piping systems in operating reactors: reactor coolant system primary loop piping, pressurizer surge, safety injection accumulator, residual heat removal, safety injection, and reactor coolant loop bypass. The LBB concept has also been applied in the design of advanced light water reactors. LBB applications, and regulatory considerations, for pressurized water reactors and advanced light water reactors are summarized in this paper. Technology development for LBB performed by the NRC and the International Piping Integrity Research Group is also briefly summarized.

  13. Cermet-fueled reactors for advanced space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cermet-fueled nuclear reactors are attractive candidates for high-performance advanced space power systems. The cermet consists of a hexagonal matrix of a refractory metal and a ceramic fuel, with multiple tubular flow channels. The high performance characteristics of the fuel matrix come from its high strength at elevated temperatures and its high thermal conductivity. The cermet fuel concept evolved in the 1960s with the objective of developing a reactor design that could be used for a wide range of mobile power generating sytems, including both Brayton and Rankine power conversion cycles. High temperature thermal cycling tests for the cermet fuel were carried out by General Electric as part of the 710 Project (General Electric 1966), and by Argonne National Laboratory in the Direct Nuclear Rocket Program (1965). Development programs for cermet fuel are currently under way at Argonne National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory. The high temperature qualification tests from the 1960s have provided a base for the incorporation of cermet fuel in advanced space applications. The status of the cermet fuel development activities and descriptions of the key features of the cermet-fueled reactor design are summarized in this paper

  14. Markets for reactor-produced non-fission radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current market segments for reactor produced radioisotopes are developed and reported from a review of current literature. Specific radioisotopes studied in is report are the primarily selected from those with major medical or industrial markets, or those expected to have strongly emerging markets. Relative market sizes are indicated. Special emphasis is given to those radioisotopes that are best matched to production in high flux reactors such as the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory or the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. A general bibliography of medical and industrial radioisotope applications, trends, and historical notes is included

  15. In-Research Reactor Tests for SCWR Fuel Verifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Supercritical water cooled reactors (SCWRs) are essentially light water reactors (LWRs) operating at higher pressure and temperature. The SCWRs achieve high thermal efficiency (i.e., about 45% vs. about 35% efficiency for advanced LWRs) and are simpler plants as the need for many of the traditional LWR components is eliminated. The SCWRs build upon two proven technologies, the LWR and the supercritical coal-fired boiler. The main mission of the SCWR is production of low-cost electricity. Thus the SCWR is also suited for hydrogen generation with electrolysis, and can support the development of the hydrogen economy in the near term. In this paper, the SCWR fuel performance verification tests are reviewed. Based on this review results, in-research reactor verification tests to be performed in a fuel test loop through the international joint program are proposed. In addition, capsule tests and fuel test loop tests to be performed in HANARO are also proposed

  16. A Joint Report on PSA for New and Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report addresses the application of Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) to new and advanced nuclear reactors. As far as advanced reactors are concerned, the objectives were to characterize the ability of current PSA technology to address key questions regarding the development, acceptance and licensing of advanced reactor designs, to characterize the potential value of advanced PSA methods and tools for application to advanced reactors, and to develop recommendations for any needed developments regarding PSA for these reactors. As far as the design and commissioning of new nuclear power plants is concerned, the objectives were to identify and characterize current practices regarding the role of PSA, to identify key technical issues regarding PSA, lessons learned and issues requiring further work; to develop recommendations regarding the use of PSA, and to identify future international cooperative work on the identified issues. In order to reach these objectives, questionnaires had been sent to participating countries and organisations

  17. Material test reactor fuel research at the BR2 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of new, high performance material test reactor or the conversion of such reactors' core from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU) based fuel requires several fuel qualification steps. For the conversion of high performance reactors, high density dispersion or monolithic fuel types are being developed. The Uranium-Molybdenum fuel system has been selected as reference system for the qualification of LEU fuels. For reactors with lower performance characteristics, or as medium enriched fuel for high performance reactors, uranium silicide dispersion fuel is applied. However, on the longer term, the U-Mo based fuel types may offer a more efficient fuel alternative and-or an easier back-end solution with respect to the silicide based fuels. At the BR2 reactor of the Belgian nuclear research center, SCK-CEN in Mol, several types of fuel testing opportunities are present to contribute to such qualification process. A generic validation test for a selected fuel system is the irradiation of flat plates with representative dimensions for a fuel element. By flexible positioning and core loading, bounding irradiation conditions for fuel elements can be performed in a standard device in the BR2. For fuel element designs with curved plates, the element fabrication method compatibility of the fuel type can be addressed by incorporating a set of prototype fuel plates in a mixed driver fuel element of the BR2 reactor. These generic types of tests are performed directly in the primary coolant flow conditions of the BR2 reactor. The experiment control and interpretation is supported by detailed neutronic and thermal-hydraulic modeling of the experiments. Finally, the BR2 reactor offers the flexibility for irradiation of full size prototype fuel elements, as 200mm diameter irradiation channels are available. These channels allow the accommodation of various types of prototype fuel elements, eventually using a dedicated cooling loop to provide the

  18. Advances in Process Intensification through Multifunctional Reactor Engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hern, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center; Evans, Lindsay [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Sciences and Engineering Center; Miller, Jim [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Materials Sciences and Engineering Center; Cooper, Marcia [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Energetic Components Realization Center; Torczynski, John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Pena, Donovan [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gill, Walt [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States). Engineering Sciences Center

    2011-02-01

    This project was designed to advance the art of process intensification leading to a new generation of multifunctional chemical reactors utilizing pulse flow. Experimental testing was performed in order to fully characterize the hydrodynamic operating regimes associated with pulse flow for implementation in commercial applications. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) operated a pilot-scale multifunctional reactor experiment for operation with and investigation of pulse flow operation. Validation-quality data sets of the fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and chemical kinetics were acquired and shared with Chemical Research and Licensing (CR&L). Experiments in a two-phase air-water system examined the effects of bead diameter in the packing, and viscosity. Pressure signals were used to detect pulsing. Three-phase experiments used immiscible organic and aqueous liquids, and air or nitrogen as the gas phase. Hydrodynamic studies of flow regimes and holdup were performed for different types of packing, and mass transfer measurements were performed for a woven packing. These studies substantiated the improvements in mass transfer anticipated for pulse flow in multifunctional reactors for the acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation process. CR&L developed packings for this alkylation process, utilizing their alkylation process pilot facilities in Pasadena, TX. These packings were evaluated in the pilot-scale multifunctional reactor experiments established by Sandia to develop a more fundamental understanding of their role in process intensification. Lummus utilized the alkylation technology developed by CR&L to design and optimize the full commercial process utilizing multifunctional reactors containing the packings developed by CR&L and evaluated by Sandia. This hydrodynamic information has been developed for multifunctional chemical reactors utilizing pulse flow, for the acid-catalyzed C4 paraffin/olefin alkylation process, and is now accessible for use in

  19. Idaho National Laboratory Lead or Lead-Bismuth Eutectic (LBE) Test Facility - R&D Requirements, Design Criteria, Design Concept, and Concept Guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eric P. Loewen; Paul Demkowicz

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility will advance the state of nuclear technology relative to heavy-metal coolants (primarily Pb and Pb-Bi), thereby allowing the U.S. to maintain the pre-eminent position in overseas markets and a future domestic market. The end results will be a better qualitative understanding and quantitative measure of the thermal physics and chemistry conditions in the molten metal systems for varied flow conditions (single and multiphase), flow regime transitions, heat input methods, pumping requirements for varied conditions and geometries, and corrosion performance. Furthering INL knowledge in these areas is crucial to sustaining a competitive global position. This fundamental heavy-metal research supports the National Energy Policy Development Group’s stated need for energy systems to support electrical generation.1 The project will also assist the Department of Energy in achieving goals outlined in the Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee Long Term Nuclear Technology Research and Development Plan,2 the Generation IV Roadmap for Lead Fast Reactor development, and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative research and development. This multi-unit Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility with its flexible and reconfigurable apparatus will maintain and extend the U.S. nuclear knowledge base, while educating young scientists and engineers. The uniqueness of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility is its integrated Pool Unit and Storage Unit. This combination will support large-scale investigation of structural and fuel cladding material compatibility issues with heavy-metal coolants, oxygen chemistry control, and thermal hydraulic physics properties. Its ability to reconfigure flow conditions and piping configurations to more accurately approximate prototypical reactor designs will provide a key resource for Lead Fast Reactor research and development. The other principal elements of the Lead-Bismuth Eutectic Test Facility

  20. Heavy water moderated reactors advances and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear energy is now considered a key contributor to world electricity production, with total installed capacity nearly equal to that of hydraulic power. Nevertheless, many important challenges lie ahead. Paramount among these is gaining public acceptance: this paper makes the basic assumption that public acceptance will improve if, and only if, nuclear power plants are operated safely and economically over an extended period of time. The first task, therefore, is to ensure that these prerequisites to public acceptance are met. Other issues relate to the many aspects of economics associated with nuclear power, include capital cost, operation cost, plant performance and the risk to the owner's investment. Financing is a further challenge to the expansion of nuclear power. While the ability to finance a project is strongly dependent on meeting public acceptance and economic challenges, substantial localisation of design and manufacture is often essential to acceptance by the purchaser. The neutron efficient heavy water moderated CANDU with its unique tube reactor is considered to be particularly well qualified to respond to these market challenges. Enhanced safety can be achieved through simplification of safety systems, design of the moderator and shield water systems to mitigate severe accident events, and the increased use of passive systems. Economics are improved through reduction in both capital and operating costs, achieved through the application of state-of-the-art technologies and economy of scale. Modular features of the design enhance the potential for local manufacture. Advanced fuel cycles offer reduction in both capital costs and fuelling costs. These cycles, including slightly enriched uranium and low grade fuels from reprocessing plants can serve to increase reactor output, reduce fuelling cost and reduce waste production, while extending resource utilisation. 1 ref., 1 tab

  1. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory 15kW High Temperature Electrolysis Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl M. Stoots; Keith G. Condie; James E. O' Brien; J. Stephen Herring; Joseph J. Hartvigsen

    2009-07-01

    A 15kW high temperature electrolysis test facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory under the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. This facility is intended to study the technology readiness of using high temperature solid oxide cells for large scale nuclear powered hydrogen production. It is designed to address larger-scale issues such as thermal management (feed-stock heating, high temperature gas handling, heat recuperation), multiple-stack hot zone design, multiple-stack electrical configurations, etc. Heat recuperation and hydrogen recycle are incorporated into the design. The facility was operated for 1080 hours and successfully demonstrated the largest scale high temperature solid-oxide-based production of hydrogen to date.

  2. Thermochemical modelling of advanced CANDU reactor fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Emily Catherine

    2009-04-01

    With an aging fleet of nuclear generating facilities, the imperative to limit the use of non-renewal fossil fuels and the inevitable need for additional electricity to power Canada's economy, a renaissance in the use of nuclear technology in Canada is at hand. The experience and knowledge of over 40 years of CANDU research, development and operation in Ontario and elsewhere has been applied to a new generation of CANDU, the Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR). Improved fuel design allows for an extended burnup, which is a significant improvement, enhancing the safety and the economies of the ACR. The use of a Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) material and Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) fuel has created a need to understand better these novel materials and fuel types. This thesis documents a work to advance the scientific and technological knowledge of the ACR fuel design with respect to thermodynamic phase stability and fuel oxidation modelling. For the BNA material, a new (BNA) model is created based on the fundamental first principles of Gibbs energy minimization applied to material phase stability. For LEU fuel, the methodology used for the BNA model is applied to the oxidation of irradiated fuel. The pertinent knowledge base for uranium, oxygen and the major fission products is reviewed, updated and integrated to create a model that is applicable to current and future CANDU fuel designs. As part of this thesis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Coulombic Titration (CT) experiments are compared to the BNA and LEU models, respectively. From the analysis of the CT results, a number of improvements are proposed to enhance the LEU model and provide confidence in its application to ACR fuel. A number of applications for the potential use of these models are proposed and discussed. Keywords: CANDU Fuel, Gibbs Energy Mimimization, Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Fuel, Burnable Neutron Absorber (BNA) Material, Coulometric Titration, X-Ray Diffraction

  3. Development of a system model for advanced small modular reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Tom Goslee,; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,

    2014-01-01

    This report describes a system model that can be used to analyze three advance small modular reactor (SMR) designs through their lifetime. Neutronics of these reactor designs were evaluated using Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX/6). The system models were developed in Matlab and Simulink. A major thrust of this research was the initial scoping analysis of Sandias concept of a long-life fast reactor (LLFR). The inherent characteristic of this conceptual design is to minimize the change in reactivity over the lifetime of the reactor. This allows the reactor to operate substantially longer at full power than traditional light water reactors (LWRs) or other SMR designs (e.g. high temperature gas reactor (HTGR)). The system model has subroutines for lifetime reactor feedback and operation calculations, thermal hydraulic effects, load demand changes and a simplified SCO2 Brayton cycle for power conversion.

  4. Advanced light and heavy water reactors for improved fuel utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On 26-29 November 1984 the Agency convened at its Headquarters in Vienna the Technical Committee and Workshop on Advanced Light and Heavy Water Reactor Technology in order to provide an opportunity to review and discuss the current status and recent development in the lay-out and design of advanced water reactor and to identify areas in which additional research and development are needed. The meeting was attended by 45 participants from 16 nations and 2 international organizations presenting 25 papers. The Conference presentations were divided into sessions devoted to the following topics: Advanced light water reactor programmes (6 papers); Advanced light water design, technology and physics (12 papers); Advanced heavy water reactors (7 papers). A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers

  5. Summary of SMIRT20 Preconference Topical Workshop - Identifying Structural Issues in Advanced Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL, USA) and IASMiRT sponsored an international forum Nov 5-6, 2008 in Porvoo, Finland for nuclear industry, academic, and regulatory representatives to identify structural issues in current and future advanced reactor design, especially for extreme conditions and external threats. The purpose of this Topical Workshop was to articulate research, engineering, and regulatory Code development needs. The topics addressed by the Workshop were selected to address critical industry needs specific to advanced reactor structures that have long lead times and can be the subject of future SMiRT technical sessions. The topics were; (1) structural/materials needs for extreme conditions and external threats in contemporary (Gen. III) and future (Gen. IV and NGNP) advanced reactors and (2) calibrating simulation software and methods that address topic 1. The workshop discussions and research needs identified are presented. The Workshop successfully produced interactive discussion on the two topics resulting in a list of research and technology needs. It is recommended that IASMiRT communicate the results of the discussion to industry and researchers to encourage new ideas and projects. In addition, opportunities exist to retrieve research reports and information that currently exists, and encourage more international cooperation and collaboration. It is recommended that IASMiRT continue with an off-year workshop series on select topics.

  6. FFTF and Advanced Reactors Transition Program Resource Loaded Schedule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GANTT, D.A.

    2000-10-31

    This Resource Load Schedule (RLS) addresses two missions. The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) mission, funded by DOE-EM, is to transition assigned, surplus facilities to a safe and compliant, low-cost, stable, deactivated condition (requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance) pending eventual reuse or D&D. Facilities to be transitioned include the 309 Building Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) and Nuclear Energy Legacy facilities. This mission is funded through the Environmental Management (EM) Project Baseline Summary (PBS) RL-TP11, ''Advanced Reactors Transition.'' The second mission, the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Project, is funded through budget requests submitted to the Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (DOE-NE). The FFTF Project mission is maintaining the FFTF, the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF), and affiliated 400 Area buildings in a safe and compliant standby condition. This mission is to preserve the condition of the plant hardware, software, and personnel in a manner not to preclude a plant restart. This revision of the Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS) is based upon the technical scope in the latest revision of the following project and management plans: Fast Flux Test Facility Standby Plan (Reference 1); Hanford Site Sodium Management Plan (Reference 2); and 309 Building Transition Plan (Reference 4). The technical scope, cost, and schedule baseline is also in agreement with the concurrent revision to the ART Fiscal Year (FY) 2001 Multi-Year Work Plan (MYWP), which is available in an electronic version (only) on the Hanford Local Area Network, within the ''Hanford Data Integrator (HANDI)'' application.

  7. Advanced designs of VVER reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The history of VVER reactors, current challenges and approaches to the challenges are highlighted. The VVER-1200 reactor of 3+ generation for AES-2006 units are under construction at the Leningrad 2 nuclear power plant (LNPP-2). The main parameters are listed and details are presented of the vessel, steam generator, and improved fuel. The issue of the NPP safety is discussed. Additional topics include the MIR-1200 reactor unit, VVER-600, and VVER-SCP (Generation 4). (P.A.)

  8. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO2) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  9. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications.

  10. Idaho national laboratory - a nuclear research center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is committed to providing international nuclear leadership for the 21st Century, developing and demonstrating compelling national security technologies, and delivering excellence in science and technology as one of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) multi program national laboratories. INL runs three major programs - Nuclear, Security and Science. Nuclear programs covers the Advanced test reactor, Six Generation IV technology concepts selected for Rand D, targeting tumors - Boron Neutron Capture therapy. Homeland Security establishes the Control System Security and Test Center, Critical Infrastructure Test Range evaluates technologies on a scalable basis, INL conducts high performance computing and visualization research and science. To provide leadership in the education and training, INL has established an Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (INSE) under the Center for Advanced Energy Studies (CAES) and the Idaho State University (ISU). INSE will offer a four year degree based on a newly developed curriculum - two year of basic science course work and two years of participation in project planning and development. The students enrolled in this program can continue to get a masters or a doctoral degree. This summer INSE is the host for the training of the first international group selected by the World Nuclear University (WNU) - 75 fellowship holders and their 30 instructors from 40 countries. INL has been assigned to provide future global leadership in the field of nuclear science and technology. Here, at INL, we keep safety first above all things and our logo is 'Nuclear leadership synonymous with safety leadership'. (author)

  11. Test Results From The Idaho National Laboratory Of The NASA Bi-Supported Cell Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C Stoots; J O' Brien; T Cable

    2009-11-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory has been researching the application of solid-oxide fuel cell technology for large-scale hydrogen production. As a result, the Idaho National Laboratory has been testing various cell designs to characterize electrolytic performance. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This paper presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  12. Introduction of advanced pressurized water reactors in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Designed >30 yr ago, pressurized water reactors (PWRs) have evolved well to match the current safety, operating, and economic requirements. The first advanced PWR generation, the N4 reactor, is under construction with 1992 as a target date for commercial operation. The N4 may be considered to be a technological outcome of PWR evolution, providing advances in the fields of safety, man/machine interfaces, and load flexibility. As a step beyond N4, a second advanced PWR generation is presently under definition with, as a main objective, a greater ability to cope with the possible deterioration of the natural uranium market. In 1986, Electricite de France (EdF) launched investigations into the possible characteristics of this advanced PWR, called REP-2000 (PWR-2000: the reactor for the next century). Framatome joined EdF in 1987 but had been working on a new tight-lattice reactor. Main options are due by 1988; preliminary studies will begin and, by 1990, detailed design will proceed with the intent of firm commitments for the first unit by 1995. Commissioning is planned in the early years of the next century. This reactor type should be either an improved version of the N4 reactor or a spectral shift convertible reactor (RCVS). Through research and development efforts, Framatome, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA), and EdF are investigating the physics of fuel rod tight lattices including neutronics, thermohydraulics, fuel behavior, and reactor mechanics

  13. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2011

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    2011, China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) Project finished the B stage commissioning and resolved the relative technical problems. Meanwhile, the acceptance items and the cold neutron source were carrying out.

  14. Conceptual design of the advanced marine reactor MRX

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-01

    Design studies on the advanced marine reactors have been done continuously since 1983 at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in order to develop attractive marine reactors for the next generation. At present, two marine reactor concepts are being formulated. One is 100 MWt MRX (Marine Reactor X) for an icebreaker and the other is 300 kWe DRX (Deep-sea Reactor X) for a deep-sea research vessel. They are characterized by an integral type pressurized water reactor (PWR) built-in type control rod drive mechanisms, a water-filled container and a passive decay heat removal system, which realize highly passive safe and compact reactors. This paper is a detailed report including all major results of the MRX design study.

  15. Advanced tokamak concepts and reactor designs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oomens, A. A. M.

    2000-01-01

    From a discussion of fusion reactor designs based on today's well-established experience gained in the operation of large tokamaks, it is concluded that such reactors are economically not attractive. The physics involved in the various options for concept improvement is described, some examples

  16. Advanced Reactor Safety Program – Stakeholder Interaction and Feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szilard, Ronaldo H. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis L. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-01

    In the Spring of 2013, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) began discussions with industry stakeholders on how to upgrade our safety analysis capabilities. The focus of these improvements would primarily be on advanced safety analysis capabilities that could help the nuclear industry analyze, understand, and better predict complex safety problems. The current environment in the DOE complex is such that recent successes in high performance computer modeling and simulation could lead the nuclear industry to benefit from these advances, as long as an effort to translate these advances into realistic applications is made. Upgrading the nuclear industry modeling analysis capabilities is a significant effort that would require participation and coordination from all industry segments: research, engineering, vendors, and operations. We focus here on interactions with industry stakeholders to develop sound advanced safety analysis applications propositions that could have a positive impact on industry long term operation, hence advancing the state of nuclear safety.

  17. Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Advanced Superconducting Test Accelerator (ASTA) facility will be based on upgrades to the existing NML pulsed SRF facility. ASTA is envisioned to contain 3 to...

  18. Construction of the advanced boiling water reactor in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsume, Nobuo; Noda, Hiroshi [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan). Nuclear Power Plant Construction Dept.

    1996-07-01

    The Advanced Boiling Reactor (ABWR) has been developed with international cooperation between Japan and the US as the generation of plants for the 1990s and beyond. It incorporates the best BWR technologies from the world in challengeable pursuit of improved safety and reliability, reduced construction and operating cost, reduced radiation exposure and radioactive waste. Tokyo Electric Power Company (MPCO) decided to apply the first ABWRs to unit No. 6 and 7 of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station (K-6 and 7). These units are scheduled to commence commercial operation in December 1996 and July 1997 respectively. Particular attention is given in this discussion to the construction period from rock inspection for the reactor building to commercial operation, which is to be achieved in only 52 months through innovative and challenging construction methods. To date, construction work is advancing ahead of the original schedule. This paper describes not only how to shorten the construction period by adoption of a variety of new technologies, such as all-weather construction method and large block module construction method, but also how to check and test the state of the art technologies during manufacturing and installation of new equipment for K-6 and 7.

  19. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and full nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system (Bragg-Sitton, 2005). The current paper applies the same testing methodology to a direct drive gas cooled reactor system, demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. In each testing application, core power transients were controlled by a point kinetics model with reactivity feedback based on core average temperature; the neutron generation time and the temperature feedback coefficient are provided as model inputs. Although both system designs utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility.

  20. An advanced method of heterogeneous reactor theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent approaches to heterogeneous reactor theory for numerical applications were presented in the course of 8 lectures given in JAERI. The limitations of initial theory known after the First Conference on Peacefull Uses of Atomic Energy held in Geneva in 1955 as Galanine-Feinberg heterogeneous theory:-matrix from of equations, -lack of consistent theory for heterogeneous parameters for reactor cell, -were overcome by a transformation of heterogeneous reactor equations to a difference form and by a development of a consistent theory for the characteristics of a reactor cell based on detailed space-energy calculations. General few group (G-number of groups) heterogeneous reactor equations in dipole approximation are formulated with the extension of two-dimensional problem to three-dimensions by finite Furie expansion of axial dependence of neutron fluxes. A transformation of initial matrix reactor equations to a difference form is presented. The methods for calculation of heterogeneous reactor cell characteristics giving the relation between vector-flux and vector-current on a cell boundary are based on a set of detailed space-energy neutron flux distribution calculations with zero current across cell boundary and G calculations with linearly independent currents across the cell boundary. The equations for reaction rate matrices are formulated. Specific methods were developed for description of neutron migration in axial and radial directions. The methods for resonance level's approach for numerous high-energy resonances. On the basis of these approaches the theory, methods and computer codes were developed for 3D space-time react or problems including simulation of slow processes with fuel burn-up, control rod movements, Xe poisoning and fast transients depending on prompt and delayed neutrons. As a result reactors with several thousands of channels having non-uniform axial structure can be feasibly treated. (author)

  1. Advance Liquid Metal Reactor Discrete Dynamic Event Tree/Bayesian Network Analysis and Incident Management Guidelines (Risk Management for Sodium Fast Reactors)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denman, Matthew R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Groth, Katrina M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cardoni, Jeffrey N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Accident management is an important component to maintaining risk at acceptable levels for all complex systems, such as nuclear power plants. With the introduction of self-correcting, or inherently safe, reactor designs the focus has shifted from management by operators to allowing the system's design to manage the accident. Inherently and passively safe designs are laudable, but nonetheless extreme boundary conditions can interfere with the design attributes which facilitate inherent safety, thus resulting in unanticipated and undesirable end states. This report examines an inherently safe and small sodium fast reactor experiencing a beyond design basis seismic event with the intend of exploring two issues : (1) can human intervention either improve or worsen the potential end states and (2) can a Bayesian Network be constructed to infer the state of the reactor to inform (1). ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nuclear Energy for funding this research through Work Package SR-14SN100303 under the Advanced Reactor Concepts program. The authors also acknowledge the PRA teams at Argonne National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Idaho National Laboratory for their continue d contributions to the advanced reactor PRA mission area.

  2. Conceptual design of the advanced marine reactor MRX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design studies on the advanced marine reactors have been done continuously since 1983 at JAERI in order to develop attractive marine reactors for the next generation. At present, two marine reactor concepts are being formulated. One is 100 MWt MRX (Marine Reactor X) for an icebreaker and the other is 300 kWe DRX (Deep-sea Reactor X) for a deep-sea research vessel. They are characterized by an integral type PWR, built-in type control rod drive mechanisms, a water-filled container and a passive decay heat removal system, which realize highly passive safe and compact reactors. This paper is a detailed report including all major results of the MRX design study. (author)

  3. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  4. Development of inherent core technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Keung Koo; Noh, J.M.; Hwang, D.H. [and others

    1999-03-01

    Recently, the developed countries made their effort on developing the advanced reactor which will result in significantly enhanced safety and economy. However, they will protect the advanced reactor and its design technology with patent and proprietary right. Therefore, it is very important to develop our own key core concepts and inherent core design technologies which can form a foundation of indigenous technologies for development of the domestic advanced reactor in order to keep the superiority in the nuclear plant building market among the developing countries. In order to provide the basic technology for the core design of advanced reactor, this project is for developing the inherent core design concepts with enhanced safety and economy, and associated methodologies and technologies for core analyses. The feasibility study of constructing domestic critical facilities are performed by surveying the status and utilization of foreign facilities and by investigating the demand for domestic facilities. The research results developed in this project, such as core analysis methodologies for hexagonal core, conceptual core design based on hexagonal fuel assemblies and soluble boron core design and control strategies, will provide a technical foundation in developing core design of domestic advanced reactor. Furthermore, they will strengthen the competitiveness of Korean nuclear technology. We also expect that some of the design concepts developed in this project to improve the reactor safety and economy can be applicable to the design of advanced reactor. This will significantly reduce the public anxiety on the nuclear power plant, and will contribute to the economy of construction and operation for the future domestic reactors. Even though the critical facility will not be constructed right now, the investigation of the status and utilization of foreign critical facility will contribute to the future critical facility construction. (author). 150 refs., 34 tabs., 103

  5. Operating experience of Fast Breeder Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is a 40 MWt / 13.2 MWe sodium cooled, loop type mixed carbide fuelled reactor. Its main aim is to gain experience in the design, construction and operation of fast reactors and to serve as an irradiation facility for development of fuel and structural material for future fast reactors. The reactor achieved first criticality in October 1985 with small indigenously designed and fabricated Mark I core (70% PuC-30% UC). The reactor power was subsequently raised in steps to 17.4 MWt by addition of Mark II fuel subassemblies (55% PuC-45% UC) and with the Mark I fuel operating at the designed linear heat rating of 400 W/cm. The turbo-generator was synchronized with the grid in July 1997. The achieved peak burn-up is 137 000 MWd/t so far without any fuel-clad failure. Presently the reactor is being operated at a nominal power of 15.7 MWt for irradiation of a test fuel subassembly of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor, which is coming up at Kalpakkam. It is also planned to irradiate test subassemblies made of metallic fuel for future fast reactor program. Being a small reactor, all feed back coefficients of reactivity including void coefficient are negative and hence the reactor is inherently safe. This was confirmed by carrying out physics tests. The capability to remove decay heat under various incidental conditions including natural convection was demonstrated by carrying out engineering tests. Thermo couples are provided for on-line monitoring of fuel SA outlet temperature by dedicated real time computer and processed to generate trip signals for the reactor in case of power excursion, increase in clad hot spot temperature and subassembly flow blockage. All pipelines and capacities in primary main circuit are provided with segmented outer envelope to minimize and contain radioactive sodium leak while ensuring forced cooling through reactor to remove decay heat in case of failure of primary boundary. In secondary circuit, provision is

  6. Completion summary for boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN‑2272 at Test Area North, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2016-06-30

    In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN-2272 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole TAN-2271 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole TAN-2272 was partially cored between 210 and 282 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) then drilled and constructed as a monitor well. Boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN-2272 are separated by about 63 ft and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geologic, geophysical, and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN-2272 required 10-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 9.9-in. diameter open-hole completion below the casing to total depths of 282 and 287 ft BLS, respectively. Depth to water is measured near 228 ft BLS in both boreholes. Following construction and data collection, temporary submersible pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels.Borehole TAN-2271 was cored continuously, starting at the first basalt contact (about 33 ft BLS) to a depth of 284 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole TAN-2271 was better than 98 percent. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, material examined from 33 to 211ft BLS primarily consists of two massive basalt flows that are about 78 and 50 ft in thickness and three sediment layers near 122, 197, and 201 ft BLS. Between 211 and 284 ft BLS, geophysical data and core material suggest a high occurrence of fractured and vesicular basalt. For the section of aquifer tested, there are two primary fractured aquifer intervals: the first between 235 and

  7. Development of essential system technologies for advanced reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Y. Y.; Hwang, Y. D.; Cho, B. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    Basic design of SMART adopts the new advanced technologies which were not applied in the existing 1000MWe PWR. However, the R and D experience on these advanced essential technologies is lacking in domestic nuclear industry. Recently, a research on these advanced technologies has been performed as a part of the mid-and-long term nuclear R and D program, but the research was limited only for the small scale fundamental study. The research on these essential technologies such as helically coiled tube steam generator, self pressurizer, core cooling by natural circulation required for the development of integral reactor SMART have not been conducted in full scale. This project, therefore, was performed for the development of analysis models and methodologies, system analysis and thermal hydraulic experiments on the essential technologies to be applied to the 300MWe capacity of integral reactor SMART and the advanced passive reactor expected to be developed in near future with the emphasis on experimental investigation. (author)

  8. Completion summary for boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN‑2272 at Test Area North, Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twining, Brian V.; Bartholomay, Roy C.; Hodges, Mary K.V.

    2016-06-30

    In 2015, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Energy, drilled and constructed boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN-2272 for stratigraphic framework analyses and long-term groundwater monitoring of the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Borehole TAN-2271 initially was cored to collect continuous geologic data, and then re-drilled to complete construction as a monitor well. Borehole TAN-2272 was partially cored between 210 and 282 feet (ft) below land surface (BLS) then drilled and constructed as a monitor well. Boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN-2272 are separated by about 63 ft and have similar geologic layers and hydrologic characteristics based on geologic, geophysical, and aquifer test data collected. The final construction for boreholes TAN-2271 and TAN-2272 required 10-inch (in.) diameter carbon-steel well casing and 9.9-in. diameter open-hole completion below the casing to total depths of 282 and 287 ft BLS, respectively. Depth to water is measured near 228 ft BLS in both boreholes. Following construction and data collection, temporary submersible pumps and water-level access lines were placed to allow for aquifer testing, for collecting periodic water samples, and for measuring water levels.Borehole TAN-2271 was cored continuously, starting at the first basalt contact (about 33 ft BLS) to a depth of 284 ft BLS. Excluding surface sediment, recovery of basalt and sediment core at borehole TAN-2271 was better than 98 percent. Based on visual inspection of core and geophysical data, material examined from 33 to 211ft BLS primarily consists of two massive basalt flows that are about 78 and 50 ft in thickness and three sediment layers near 122, 197, and 201 ft BLS. Between 211 and 284 ft BLS, geophysical data and core material suggest a high occurrence of fractured and vesicular basalt. For the section of aquifer tested, there are two primary fractured aquifer intervals: the first between 235 and

  9. Advanced Reactors Thermal Energy Transport for Process Industries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; S.J. Yoon; M.G. McKellar; C. Stoots; George Griffith

    2014-07-01

    The operation temperature of advanced nuclear reactors is generally higher than commercial light water reactors and thermal energy from advanced nuclear reactor can be used for various purposes such as liquid fuel production, district heating, desalination, hydrogen production, and other process heat applications, etc. Some of the major technology challenges that must be overcome before the advanced reactors could be licensed on the reactor side are qualification of next generation of nuclear fuel, materials that can withstand higher temperature, improvement in power cycle thermal efficiency by going to combined cycles, SCO2 cycles, successful demonstration of advanced compact heat exchangers in the prototypical conditions, and from the process side application the challenge is to transport the thermal energy from the reactor to the process plant with maximum efficiency (i.e., with minimum temperature drop). The main focus of this study is on doing a parametric study of efficient heat transport system, with different coolants (mainly, water, He, and molten salts) to determine maximum possible distance that can be achieved.

  10. Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garetson, Thomas [The Clarity Group, Incorporated, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2013-03-31

    The objective of the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy's (DOEs) Advanced Vehicle Testing and Evaluation (AVTE) project was to provide test and evaluation services for advanced technology vehicles, to establish a performance baseline, to determine vehicle reliability, and to evaluate vehicle operating costs in fleet operations.Vehicles tested include light and medium-duty vehicles in conventional, hybrid, and all-electric configurations using conventional and alternative fuels, including hydrogen in internal combustion engines. Vehicles were tested on closed tracks and chassis dynamometers, as well as operated on public roads, in fleet operations, and over prescribed routes. All testing was controlled by procedures developed specifically to support such testing.

  11. Reactor scram events in the updated PIUS 600 advanced reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PIUS advanced reactor is a 640-MWe pressurized water reactor concept developed by Asea Brown Boveri. A unique feature of PIUS is the absence of mechanical control and shutdown rods. Reactivity is controlled by coolant boron concentration and the temperature of the moderator coolant. Los Alamos supported the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's preapplication review of the PIUS reactor. Baseline calculations of the PIUS design were performed for active and passive reactor scrams using TRAC-PF1/MOD2. Additional sensitivity studies examined flow blockage and boron dilution events to explore the robustness of the PIUS concept for low-probability combination events following active-system scrams

  12. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  13. Present status of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) in Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooled tank type reactor with first criticality in March 1968. Owing to the connection between the JMTR and hot laboratory by a canal, easy re-irradiation tests can be conducted with safe and quick transportation of irradiated samples. The JMTR has been applied to fuel/material irradiation examinations for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. However, the JMTR operation was once stopped in August 2006, and check and review on the reoperation had been conducted by internal as well as external committees. As a result of the discussion, the JMTR reoperation was determined, and refurbishment works started from the beginning of JFY 2007. The refurbishment works have finished in March 2011 taking four years from JFY 2007. Unfortunately, at the end of the JFY 2010 on March 11, the Great-Eastern-Japan-Earthquake occurred, and functional tests before the JMTR restart, such as cooling system, reactor control system and so on, were delayed by the earthquake. Moreover, a detail inspection found some damages such as slight deformation of the truss structure at the roof of the JMTR reactor building. Consequently, the restart of the JMTR will be delayed from June to next October, 2012. Now, the safety evaluation after the earthquake disaster is being carried out aiming at the restart of the JMTR. The renewed JMTR will be started from JFY 2012 and operated for a period of about 20 years until around JFY 2030. The usability improvement of the JMTR, e.g. higher reactor availability, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussed with users as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  14. Materials qualification testing for next generation nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurst, R.; Haehner, P. (European Commission, JRC Institute for Energy, Petten (Netherlands))

    2010-05-15

    The development of next generation, innovative nuclear fission reactors, needed to replace or supplement the current designs of nuclear reactors within the next say 30 years, critically depends on the availability of advanced structural and functional materials systems which must withstand extreme conditions: intense neuron irradiation, high temperatures, and potentially strongly corrosive coolant environments, in combination with complex loading states and cyclic loading histories. The mechanical performance and reliability of those materials depends on the service and off-normal conditions in whichever of the six candidate systems for Generation IV reactors, under the global Generation IV International Forum (GIF) agreement, they will be applied. This paper gives an overview of the suite of six selected reactor systems indicating where research on materials and structural integrity is still needed. Some of these reactor systems have been under study for many years whereas others are relatively new concepts but all still require a major expenditure of effort before they can be considered as realistic contenders. In particular the materials selection and component integrity for service will play a major role in a final successful design. Specific issues include: the endurance and stability with respect to creep, fatigue and fracture mechanics loading, the need for in situ environmental testing versus pre-exposure of materials and advanced structural-functional materials systems for specific applications. Using examples taken from research projects in which the authors' laboratory has participated, the materials qualification high temperature testing for three crucial components, reactor pressure vessel and piping, gas turbines and heat exchangers is described in some detail. Finally pointers are derived as to not only the scale of the remaining research needs but also the mechanisms which are planned to be followed in Europe, not to mention globally, to obtain

  15. Dynamic Response Testing in an Electrically Heated Reactor Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Morton, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Standard testing allows one to fully assess thermal, heat transfer, and stress related attributes of a given system, but fails to demonstrate the dynamic response that would be present in an integrated, fueled reactor system. The integration of thermal hydraulic hardware tests with simulated neutronic response provides a bridge between electrically heated testing and fueled nuclear testing. By implementing a neutronic response model to simulate the dynamic response that would be expected in a fueled reactor system, one can better understand system integration issues, characterize integrated system response times and response characteristics, and assess potential design improvements at a relatively small fiscal investment. Initial system dynamic response testing was demonstrated on the integrated SAFE-100a heat pipe (HP) cooled, electrically heated reactor and heat exchanger hardware, utilizing a one-group solution to the point kinetics equations to simulate the expected neutronic response of the system. Reactivity feedback calculations were then based on a bulk reactivity feedback coefficient and measured average core temperature. This paper presents preliminary results from similar dynamic testing of a direct drive gas cooled reactor system (DDG), demonstrating the applicability of the testing methodology to any reactor type and demonstrating the variation in system response characteristics in different reactor concepts. Although the HP and DDG designs both utilize a fast spectrum reactor, the method of cooling the reactor differs significantly, leading to a variable system response that can be demonstrated and assessed in a non-nuclear test facility. Planned system upgrades to allow implementation of higher fidelity dynamic testing are also discussed. Proposed DDG

  16. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4∼2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure

  17. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  18. Advancing liquid metal reactor technology with nitride fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review of the use of nitride fuels in liquid metal fast reactors is presented. Past studies indicate that both uranium nitride and uranium/plutonium nitride possess characteristics that may offer enhanced performance, particularly in the area of passive safety. To further quantify these effects, the analysis of a mixed-nitride fuel system utilizing the geometry and power level of the US Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor as a reference is described. 18 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current BNFL reactor decommissioning projects are presented. The projects concern power reactor sites at Berkely, Trawsfynydd, Hunterstone, Bradwell, Hinkley Point; UKAEA Windscale Pile 1; Research reactors within UK Scottish Universities at East Kilbride and ICI (both complete); WAGR. The BNFL environmental role include contract management; effective dismantling strategy development; implementation and operation; sentencing, encapsulation and transportation of waste. In addition for the own sites it includes strategy development; baseline decommissioning planning; site management and regulator interface. The project objectives for the Windscale Advanced Gas-Cooled Reactor (WAGR) are 1) Safe and efficient decommissioning; 2) Building of good relationships with customer; 3) Completion of reactor decommissioning in 2005. The completed WAGR decommissioning campaigns are: Operational Waste; Hot Box; Loop Tubes; Neutron Shield; Graphite Core and Restrain System; Thermal Shield. The current campaign is Lower Structures and the remaining are: Pressure vessel and Insulation; Thermal Columns and Outer Vault Membrane. An overview of each campaign is presented

  20. Fusion reactor design towards radwaste minimum with advanced shield material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept of fusion reactor design is proposed to minimize the radioactive waste of the reactor. The main point of the concept is to clear massive structural components located outside the neutron shield from regulatory control. The concept requires some reinforcement of shielding with an advanced shield material such as a metal hydride, detriation, and tailoring of a detrimental element from the superconductor. Our assessment confirmed a large impact of the concept on radwaste reduction, in that it reduces the radwaste fraction of a fusion reactor A-SSTR2 from 92 wt.% to 17 wt.%. (author)

  1. Advanced Multiphysics Modeling of Fast Reactor Fuel Behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluation of fast reactor fuel thermo-mechanical performance using fuel performance codes is a key aspect of advanced fast reactors designs. Those fuel performance codes capture the multiphysics nature of fuel behavior during irradiation where different, mostly interdependent, phenomena are taking place. Existing fuel performance codes do not fully capture those interdependencies and present the different phenomena through de-coupled models. Recent developments in multiphysics simulation capabilities and availability of advanced computing platforms led to advancements in simulation of nuclear fuel behavior. This paper presents current experiences in applying different multiphysics simulation platforms to evaluation of fast reactors metallic fuel behavior. Full 3D finite element simulation platforms that include capabilities to fully couple key fuel behavior models are discussed. Issues associated with coupling metallic fuels phenomena, such as fission gas models and constituent distribution models, with thermo-mechanical finite element platforms, as well as different coupling schemes are also discussed. (author)

  2. Using Advanced Fuel Bundles in CANDU Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Improving the exit fuel burnup in CANDU reactors was a long-time challenge for both bundle designers and performance analysts. Therefore, the 43-element design together with several fuel compositions was studied, in the aim of assessing new reliable, economic and proliferation-resistant solutions. Recovered Uranium (RU) fuel is intended to be used in CANDU reactors, given the important amount of slightly enriched Uranium (~0.96% w/o U235) that might be provided by the spent LWR fuel recovery plants. Though this fuel has a far too small U235 enrichment to be used in LWR's, it can be still used to fuel CANDU reactors. Plutonium based mixtures are also considered, with both natural and depleted Uranium, either for peacefully using the military grade dispositioned Plutonium or for better using Plutonium from LWR reprocessing plants. The proposed Thorium-LEU mixtures are intended to reduce the Uranium consumption per produced MW. The positive void reactivity is a major concern of any CANDU safety assessment, therefore reducing it was also a task for the present analysis. Using the 43-element bundle with a certain amount of burnable poison (e.g. Dysprosium) dissolved in the 8 innermost elements may lead to significantly reducing the void reactivity. The expected outcomes of these design improvements are: higher exit burnup, smooth/uniform radial bundle power distribution and reduced void reactivity. Since the improved fuel bundles are intended to be loaded in existing CANDU reactors, we found interesting to estimate the local reactivity effects of a mechanical control absorber (MCA) on the surrounding fuel cells. Cell parameters and neutron flux distributions, as well as macroscopic cross-sections were estimated using the transport code DRAGON and a 172-group updated nuclear data library. (author)

  3. The Development of a Human Systems Simulation Laboratory at Idaho National Laoboratory: Progress, Requirements and Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David I Gertman; Katya L. LeBlanc; William phoenix; Alan R Mecham

    2010-11-01

    Next generation nuclear power plants and digital upgrades to the existing nuclear fleet introduce potential human performance issues in the control room. Safe application of new technologies calls for a thorough understanding of how those technologies affect human performance and in turn, plant safety. In support of advancing human factors for small modular reactors and light water reactor sustainability, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has developed a reconfigurable simulation laboratory capable of testing human performance in multiple nuclear power plant (NPP) control room simulations. This paper discusses the laboratory infrastructure and capabilities, the laboratory’ s staffing requirements, lessons learned, and the researcher’s approach to measuring human performance in the simulation lab.

  4. Parametric Thermal Models of the Transient Reactor Test Facility (TREAT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley K. Heath

    2014-03-01

    This work supports the restart of transient testing in the United States using the Department of Energy’s Transient Reactor Test Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory. It also supports the Global Threat Reduction Initiative by reducing proliferation risk of high enriched uranium fuel. The work involves the creation of a nuclear fuel assembly model using the fuel performance code known as BISON. The model simulates the thermal behavior of a nuclear fuel assembly during steady state and transient operational modes. Additional models of the same geometry but differing material properties are created to perform parametric studies. The results show that fuel and cladding thermal conductivity have the greatest effect on fuel temperature under the steady state operational mode. Fuel density and fuel specific heat have the greatest effect for transient operational model. When considering a new fuel type it is recommended to use materials that decrease the specific heat of the fuel and the thermal conductivity of the fuel’s cladding in order to deal with higher density fuels that accompany the LEU conversion process. Data on the latest operating conditions of TREAT need to be attained in order to validate BISON’s results. BISON’s models for TREAT (material models, boundary convection models) are modest and need additional work to ensure accuracy and confidence in results.

  5. Spectrophotometric Procedure for Fast Reactor Advanced Coolant Manufacture Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrienko, O. S.; Egorov, N. B.; Zherin, I. I.; Indyk, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes a spectrophotometric procedure for fast reactor advanced coolant manufacture control. The molar absorption coefficient of dimethyllead dibromide with dithizone was defined as equal to 68864 ± 795 l·mole-1·cm-1, limit of detection as equal to 0.583 · 10-6 g/ml. The spectrophotometric procedure application range was found to be equal to 37.88 - 196.3 g. of dimethyllead dibromide in the sample. The procedure was used within the framework of the development of the method of synthesis of the advanced coolant for fast reactors.

  6. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  7. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EG ampersand G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory's (INEL's) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG ampersand G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG ampersand G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG ampersand G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and

  8. Neutronic challenges of advanced boiling water reactor designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advancement of Boiling Water Reactor technology has been under investigation at the Center for Advance Nuclear Energy Systems at MIT. The advanced concepts under study provide economic incentives through enabling further power uprates (i.e. increasing vessel power density) or better fuel cycle uranium utilization. The challenges in modeling of three advanced concepts with focus on neutronics are presented. First, the Helical Cruciform Fuel rod has been used in some Russian reactors, and studied at MIT for uprating the power in LWRs through increased heat transfer area per unit core volume. The HCF design requires high fidelity 3D tools to assess its reactor physics behavior as well as thermal and fuel performance. Second, an advanced core design, the BWR-HD, was found to promise 65% higher power density over existing BWRs, while using current licensing tools and existing technology. Its larger assembly size requires stronger coupling between neutronics and thermal hydraulics compared to the current practice. Third is the reduced moderation BWRs, which had been proposed in Japan to enable breeding and burning of fuel as an alternative to sodium fast reactors. Such technology suffers from stronger sensitivity of its neutronics to the void fraction than the traditional BWRs, thus requiring exact modeling of the core conditions such as bypass voiding, to correctly characterize its performance. (author)

  9. Development for advanced materials and testing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hishinuma, Akimichi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1998-03-01

    Recent studies using a JMTR and research reactors of JRR-2 and JRR-3 are briefly summarized. Small specimen testing techniques (SSTT) required for an effective use of irradiation volume and also irradiated specimens have been developed focussing on tensile test, fatigue test, Charpy test and small punch test. By using the small specimens of 0.1 - several mm in size, similar values of tensile and fatigue properties to those by standard size specimens can be taken, although the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) depends strongly on Charpy specimen size. As for advanced material development, R and D about low activation ferritic steels have been done to investigate irradiation response. The low activation ferritic steel, so-called F82H jointly-developed by JAERI and NKK for fusion, has been confirmed to have good irradiation resistance within a limited dose and now selected as a standard material in the fusion material community. It is also found that TiAi intermetallic compounds, which never been considered for nuclear application in the past, have an excellent irradiation resistance under an irradiation condition. Such knowledge can bring about a large expectation for developing advanced nuclear materials. (author)

  10. Advanced sodium fast reactor accident source terms :

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Powers, Dana Auburn; Clement, Bernard; Denning, Richard; Ohno, Shuji; Zeyen, Roland

    2010-09-01

    An expert opinion elicitation has been used to evaluate phenomena that could affect releases of radionuclides during accidents at sodium-cooled fast reactors. The intent was to identify research needed to develop a mechanistic model of radionuclide release for licensing and risk assessment purposes. Experts from the USA, France, the European Union, and Japan identified phenomena that could affect the release of radionuclides under hypothesized accident conditions. They qualitatively evaluated the importance of these phenomena and the need for additional experimental research. The experts identified seven phenomena that are of high importance and have a high need for additional experimental research: High temperature release of radionuclides from fuel during an energetic event Energetic interactions between molten reactor fuel and sodium coolant and associated transfer of radionuclides from the fuel to the coolant Entrainment of fuel and sodium bond material during the depressurization of a fuel rod with breached cladding Rates of radionuclide leaching from fuel by liquid sodium Surface enrichment of sodium pools by dissolved and suspended radionuclides Thermal decomposition of sodium iodide in the containment atmosphere Reactions of iodine species in the containment to form volatile organic iodides. Other issues of high importance were identified that might merit further research as development of the mechanistic model of radionuclide release progressed.

  11. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  12. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stahl, D.

    1982-12-01

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO/sub 2/ rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H/sub 3/Si-Al dispersion and UO/sub 2/ caramel plate fuels.

  13. Fuels for research and test reactors, status review: July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thorough review is provided on nuclear fuels for steady-state thermal research and test reactors. The review was conducted to provide a documented data base in support of recent advances in research and test reactor fuel development, manufacture, and demonstration in response to current US policy on availability of enriched uranium. The review covers current fabrication practice, fabrication development efforts, irradiation performance, and properties affecting fuel utilization, including thermal conductivity, specific heat, density, thermal expansion, corrosion, phase stability, mechanical properties, and fission-product release. The emphasis is on US activities, but major work in Europe and elsewhere is included. The standard fuel types discussed are the U-Al alloy, UZrH/sub x/, and UO2 rod fuels. Among new fuels, those given major emphasis include H3Si-Al dispersion and UO2 caramel plate fuels

  14. Advanced CANDU reactor development: a customer-driven program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced CANDU Reactor (ACR) product development program is well under way. The development approach for the ACR is to ensure that all activities supporting readiness for the first ACR project are carded out in parallel, as parts of an integrated whole. In this way design engineering, licensing, development and testing, supply chain planning, construct ability and module strategy, and planning for commissioning and operations, all work in synergy with one another. Careful schedule management :ensures that program focus stays on critical path priorities.'This paper provides an overview of the program, with an emphasis on integration to ensure maximum project readiness, This program management approach is important now that AECL is participating as the reactor vendor in Dominion Energy's DOE-sponsored Combined Construction/Operating License (COL) program. Dominion Energy selected the ACR-700 as their reference reactor technology for purposes of demonstrating the COL process. AECL's development of the ACR is unique in that pre-licensing activities are being carded out parallel in the USA and Canada, via independent, but well-communicated programs. In the short term, these programs are major drivers of ACR development. The ACR design approach has been to optimize to achieve major design objectives: capital cost reduction, robust design with ample margins, proveness by using evolutionary change from existing :reference plants, design for ease :of operability. The ACR development program maintains these design objectives for each of the program elements: Design: .Carefully selected design innovations based on the SEU fuel/light water coolant:/heavy water moderator approach. Emphasis on lessons-learned review from operating experience and customer feedback Licensing: .Safety case based on strengths of existing CANDU plus benefits of optimised design Development and Test: Choice of materials, conditions to enable incremental testing building on existing CANDU and LWR

  15. Compiled reports on the applicability of selected codes and standards to advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benjamin, E.L.; Hoopingarner, K.R.; Markowski, F.J.; Mitts, T.M.; Nickolaus, J.R.; Vo, T.V.

    1994-08-01

    The following papers were prepared for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission under contract DE-AC06-76RLO-1830 NRC FIN L2207. This project, Applicability of Codes and Standards to Advance Reactors, reviewed selected mechanical and electrical codes and standards to determine their applicability to the construction, qualification, and testing of advanced reactors and to develop recommendations as to where it might be useful and practical to revise them to suit the (design certification) needs of the NRC.

  16. Assessment of Startup Fuel Options for the GNEP Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jon Carmack (062056); Kemal O. Pasamehmetoglu (103171); David Alberstein

    2008-02-01

    The Global Nuclear Energy Program (GNEP) includes a program element for the development and construction of an advanced sodium cooled fast reactor to demonstrate the burning (transmutation) of significant quantities of minor actinides obtained from a separations process and fabricated into a transuranic bearing fuel assembly. To demonstrate and qualify transuranic (TRU) fuel in a fast reactor, an Advanced Burner Reactor (ABR) prototype is needed. The ABR would necessarily be started up using conventional metal alloy or oxide (U or U, Pu) fuel. Startup fuel is needed for the ABR for the first 2 to 4 core loads of fuel in the ABR. Following start up, a series of advanced TRU bearing fuel assemblies will be irradiated in qualification lead test assemblies in the ABR. There are multiple options for this startup fuel. This report provides a description of the possible startup fuel options as well as possible fabrication alternatives available to the program in the current domestic and international facilities and infrastructure.

  17. Astronaut Kevin Chilton works with advanced cell reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Astronaut Kevin P. Chilton, pilot, works with an advanced cell reactor, which incorporated the first ever videomicroscope, on the Space Tissue Loss (STL-B) experiment on the Space Shuttle Endeavour's middeck. This experiment studied cell growth during the STS-59 mission.

  18. China Advanced Research Reactor Project Progress in 2012

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Tie-jun

    2012-01-01

    <正>In 2012, all the commissioning for the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) had been finished and the diffraction pattern had been successfully obtained on the neutron scattering spectrometer. Meanwhile, the cold neutron source project and the acceptance items of CARR project had been carrying out.

  19. Fiscal year 1998 multi-year work plan. Advanced reactors transition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Advanced Reactors Transition program is two-fold. First, the program is to maintain the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and the Fuels and Materials Examination Facility (FMEF) in Standby to support a possible future role in the tritium production strategy. Secondly, the program is to continue deactivation activities which do not conflict with the Standby directive. On-going deactivation activities include the processing of non-usable, irradiated, FFTF components for storage or disposal; deactivation of Nuclear Energy legacy test facilities; and deactivation of the Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) facility, 309 Building

  20. Advances in crack-arrest technology for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bass, B.R.; Pugh, C.E.

    1988-01-01

    The Heavy-Section Steel Technology (HSST) Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) under the sponsorship of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission is continuing to improve the understanding of conditions that govern the initiation, rapid propagation, arrest, and ductile tearing of cracks in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. This paper describes recent advances in a coordinated effort being conducted under the HSST Program by ORNL and several subcontracting groups to develop the crack-arrest data base and the analytical tools required to construct inelastic dynamic fracture models for RPV steels. Large-scale tests are being carried out to generate crack-arrest toughness data at temperatures approaching and above the onset of Charpy upper-shelf behavior. Small- and intermediate-size specimens subjected to static and dynamic loading are being developed and tested to provide additional fracture data for RPV steels. Viscoplastic effects are being included in dynamic fracture models and computer programs and their utility validated through analyses of data from carefully controlled experiments. Recent studies are described that examine convergence problems associated with energy-based fracture parameters in viscoplastic-dynamic fracture applications. Alternative techniques that have potential for achieving convergent solutions for fracture parameters in the context of viscoplastic-dynamic models are discussed. 46 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Mission Need Statement for the Idaho National Laboratory Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisa Harvego

    2009-06-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory proposes to establish replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability to meet Nuclear Energy and Naval Reactors mission-critical, remote-handled low-level waste disposal needs beyond planned cessation of existing disposal capability at the end of Fiscal Year 2015. Remote-handled low-level waste is generated from nuclear programs conducted at the Idaho National Laboratory, including spent nuclear fuel handling and operations at the Naval Reactors Facility and operations at the Advanced Test Reactor. Remote-handled low-level waste also will be generated by new programs and from segregation and treatment (as necessary) of remote-handled scrap and waste currently stored in the Radioactive Scrap and Waste Facility at the Materials and Fuels Complex. Replacement disposal capability must be in place by Fiscal Year 2016 to support uninterrupted Idaho operations. This mission need statement provides the basis for the laboratory’s recommendation to the Department of Energy to proceed with establishing the replacement remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, project assumptions and constraints, and preliminary cost and schedule information for developing the proposed capability. Without continued remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability, Department of Energy missions at the Idaho National Laboratory would be jeopardized, including operations at the Naval Reactors Facility that are critical to effective execution of the Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program and national security. Remote-handled low-level waste disposal capability is also critical to the Department of Energy’s ability to meet obligations with the State of Idaho.

  2. TRIGA reactor dynamics: Frequency response tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the results of frequency response tests conducted on ITU TRIGA Reactor are presented. To conduct the experiments, a special 'micro control rod' and its submersible stepping-motor drive mechanism was designed and constructed. The experiments cover a frequency range of 0.002 - 2 Hz., and 0.02, 4, 200 kW nominal power levels. Zero-power and at-power reactivity to % power transfer functions are presented as gain, and phase shift vs. frequency diagrams. Low power response is in close agreement with the point reactor zero-power transfer function. Response at 200 kW is studied with the help of a Nyquist diagram, and found to be stable. An elaboration on the main features of the feedback mechanism is also given. Power to reactivity feedback was measured to be just about 1.5 cent / % power change. (authors)

  3. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Perry; J. Chrzanowski; C. Gentile; R. Parsells; K. Rule; R. Strykowsky; M. Viola

    2003-10-28

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D&D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D&D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget.

  4. Decommissioning of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory was operated from 1982 until 1997. The last several years included operations with mixtures of deuterium and tritium. In September 2002, the three year Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Project for TFTR was successfully completed. The need to deal with tritium contamination as well as activated materials led to the adaptation of many techniques from the maintenance work during TFTR operations to the D and D effort. In addition, techniques from the decommissioning of fission reactors were adapted to the D and D of TFTR and several new technologies, most notably the development of a diamond wire cutting process for complex metal structures, were developed. These techniques, along with a project management system that closely linked the field crews to the engineering staff who developed the techniques and procedures via a Work Control Center, resulted in a project that was completed safely, on time, and well below budget

  5. C Reactor overbore test facility review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, P.A.; Nilson, R.

    1964-04-24

    In 1961, large-size, smooth-bore, Zircaloy process tubes were installed in C-Reactor graphite channels that had been enlarged to 2.275 inches. These tubes were installed to provide a test and demonstration facility for the concept of overboring as a means of securing significant improvement in the production capability of the reactors, After two years of facility operation, it is now appropriate to consider the extent to which original objectives have been achieved, to re-examine the original objectives, and to consider the best future use of this unique facility. This report presents the general results of such a review and re-examination in more detail.

  6. Review of Transient Fuel Test Results at Sandia National Laboratories and the Potential for Future Fast Reactor Fuel Transient Testing in the Annular Core Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, Steven A.; Pickard, Paul S.; Parma, Edward J.; Vernon, Milton E.; Kelly, John; Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Laboratories, Org 6872 MS-1146, PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    Reactor driven transient tests of fast reactor fuels may be required to support the development and certification of new fuels for Fast Reactors. The results of the transient fuel tests will likely be needed to support licensing and to provide validation data to support the safety case for a variety of proposed fast fuel types and reactors. In general reactor driven transient tests are used to identify basic phenomenology during reactor transients and to determine the fuel performance limits and margins to failure during design basis accidents such as loss of flow, loss of heat sink, and reactivity insertion accidents. This paper provides a summary description of the previous Sandia Fuel Disruption and Transient Axial Relocation tests that were performed in the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission almost 25 years ago. These tests consisted of a number of capsule tests and flowing gas tests that used fission heating to disrupt fresh and irradiated MOX fuel. The behavior of the fuel disruption, the generation of aerosols and the melting and relocation of fuel and cladding was recorded on high speed cinematography. This paper will present videos of the fuel disruption that was observed in these tests which reveal stark differences in fuel behavior between fresh and irradiated fuel. Even though these tests were performed over 25 years ago, their results are still relevant to today's reactor designs. These types of transient tests are again being considered by the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative to support the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership because of the need to perform tests on metal fuels and transuranic fuels. Because the Annular Core Research Reactor is the only transient test facility available within the US, a brief summary of Sandia's continued capability to perform these tests in the ACRR will also be provided. (authors)

  7. Identification of improvements of advanced light water reactor concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of this report is to identify the improvement of reactor developments with respect to reactor safety. This includes the collection of non-proprietary information on the description of the advanced design characteristics, especially summary design descriptions and general publications. This documentation is not intended to include a safety evaluation of the advanced concepts; however, it is structured in such a way that it can serve as a basis for a future safety evaluation. This is taken into account in the structure of the information regarding the distinction of the various concepts with respect to their 'advancement' and the classification of design characteristics according to some basic safety aspects. The overall description concentrates on those features which are relevant to safety. Other aspects, such as economy, operational features, maintenance, the construction period, etc...are not considered explicitly in this report

  8. Metal fire implications for advanced reactors. Part 1, literature review.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Radel, Ross F.; Hewson, John C.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2007-10-01

    Public safety and acceptance is extremely important for the nuclear power renaissance to get started. The Advanced Burner Reactor and other potential designs utilize liquid sodium as a primary coolant which provides distinct challenges to the nuclear power industry. Fire is a dominant contributor to total nuclear plant risk events for current generation nuclear power plants. Utilizing past experience to develop suitable safety systems and procedures will minimize the chance of sodium leaks and the associated consequences in the next generation. An advanced understanding of metal fire behavior in regards to the new designs will benefit both science and industry. This report presents an extensive literature review that captures past experiences, new advanced reactor designs, and the current state-of-knowledge related to liquid sodium combustion behavior.

  9. Straddle-packer aquifer test analyses of the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, G.S.; Frederick, D.B.

    1997-01-01

    The State of Idaho INEL Oversight Program, with the University of Idaho, Idaho State University, Boise State University, and the Idaho Geologic Survey, used a straddle-packer system to investigate vertical variations in characteristics of the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in southeast Idaho. Sixteen single-well aquifer tests were conducted on.isolated intervals in three observation wells. Each of these wells has approximately 200 feet of open borehole below the water table, penetrating the E through G and I basalt flow groups and interbedded sediments of the Snake River Plain aquifer. The success of the aquifer tests was limited by the inability to induce measurable drawdown in several zones. Time-drawdown data from aquifer tests were matched to type curves for 8 of the 16 zones tested. A single aquifer test at the water table exhibited greater curvature than those at depth. The increased degree of curvature suggests an unconfined response and resulted in an estimate of specific yield of 0.03. Aquifer tests below the water table generally yielded time-drawdown graphs with a rapid initial response followed by constant drawdown throughout the duration of the tests; up to several hours in length. The rapid initial response implies that the aquifer responds as a confined system during brief pumping periods. The nearly constant drawdown suggests a secondary source of water, probably vertical flow from overlying and underlying aquifer layers. Three analytical models were applied for comparison to the conceptual model and to provide estimates of aquifer properties. This, Hantush-Jacob leaky aquifer, and the Moench double-porosity fractured rock models were fit to time-drawdown data. The leaky aquifer type curves of Hantush and Jacob generally provided the best match to observed drawdown. A specific capacity regression equation was also used to estimate hydraulic conductivity.

  10. 77 FR 3009 - Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors..., ``Knowledge and Abilities Catalog for Nuclear Power Plant Operators: Advanced Boiling Water Reactors.''...

  11. Experimental Breeder Reactor I Preservation Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julie Braun

    2006-10-01

    Experimental Breeder Reactor I (EBR I) is a National Historic Landmark located at the Idaho National Laboratory, a Department of Energy laboratory in southeastern Idaho. The facility is significant for its association and contributions to the development of nuclear reactor testing and development. This Plan includes a structural assessment of the interior and exterior of the EBR I Reactor Building from a preservation, rather than an engineering stand point and recommendations for maintenance to ensure its continued protection.

  12. Advanced reactors transition fiscal year 1995 multi-year program plan WBS 7.3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document describes in detail the work to be accomplished in FY-1995 and the out years for the Advanced Reactors Transition (WBS 7.3). This document describes specific milestones and funding profiles. Based upon the Fiscal Year 1995 Multi-Year Program Plan, DOE will provide authorization to perform the work outlined in the FY 1995 MYPP. Following direction given by the US Department of Energy (DOE) on December 15, 1993, Advanced Reactors Transition (ART), previously known as Advanced Reactors, will provide the planning and perform the necessary activities for placing the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) in a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition. The DOE goal is to accomplish the shutdown in approximately five years. The Advanced Reactors Transition Multi-Year Program Plan, and the supporting documents; i.e., the FFTF Shutdown Program Plan and the FFTF Shutdown Project Resource Loaded Schedule (RLS), are defined for the life of the Program. During the transition period to achieve the Shutdown end-state, the facilities and systems will continue to be maintained in a safe and environmentally sound condition. Additionally, facilities that were associated with the Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) Programs, and are no longer required to support the Liquid Metal Reactor Program will be deactivated and transferred to an alternate sponsor or the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) Program for final disposition, as appropriate

  13. Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton, C.L.,Jr.; Roberts, M.; Bull, N.D.; Holcomb, D.E.; Wood, R.T.

    2012-09-15

    Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor’s physical condition. In and near the core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of the current ORNL-led project, conducted under the Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) research pathway of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Advanced SMR Research and Development (R&D) program, is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

  14. Non-Nuclear Testing of Compact Reactor Technologies at NASA MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houts, Michael G.; Pearson, J. Boise; Godfroy, Thomas J.

    2011-01-01

    Safe, reliable, compact, autonomous, long-life fission systems have numerous potential applications, both terrestrially and in space. Technologies and facilities developed in support of these systems could be useful to a variety of concepts. At moderate power levels, fission systems can be designed to operate for decades without the need for refueling. In addition, fast neutron damage to cladding and structural materials can be maintained at an acceptable level. Nuclear design codes have advanced to the stage where high confidence in the behavior and performance of a system can be achieved prior to initial testing. To help ensure reactor affordability, an optimal strategy must be devised for development and qualification. That strategy typically involves a combination of non-nuclear and nuclear testing. Non-nuclear testing is particularly useful for concepts in which nuclear operating characteristics are well understood and nuclear effects such as burnup and radiation damage are not likely to be significant. To be mass efficient, a SFPS must operate at higher coolant temperatures and use different types of power conversion than typical terrestrial reactors. The primary reason is the difficulty in rejecting excess heat to space. Although many options exist, NASA s current reference SFPS uses a fast spectrum, pumped-NaK cooled reactor coupled to a Stirling power conversion subsystem. The reference system uses technology with significant terrestrial heritage while still providing excellent performance. In addition, technologies from the SFPS system could be applicable to compact terrestrial systems. Recent non-nuclear testing at NASA s Early Flight Fission Test Facility (EFF-TF) has helped assess the viability of the reference SFPS and evaluate methods for system integration. In July, 2011 an Annular Linear Induction Pump (ALIP) provided by Idaho National Laboratory was tested at the EFF-TF to assess performance and verify suitability for use in a10 kWe technology

  15. Description of the advanced gas cooled type of reactor (AGR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report comprises a technical description of the Advanced Gas cooled Reactor (AGR), a reactor type which has only been built in Great Britain. 14 AGR reactors have been built, located at 6 different sites and each station is supplied with twin-reactors. The Torness AGR plant on the Lothian coastline of Scotland, 60 km east of Edinburgh, has been chosen as the reference plant and is described in some detail. Data on the other 6 stations, Dungeness B, Hinkely Point B, Hunterston G, Hartlepool, Heysham I and Heysham II, are given only in tables with a summary of design data. Where specific data for Torness AGR has not been available, corresponding data from other AGR plans has been used, primarily from Heysham II, which belongs to the same generation of AGR reactors. The information presented is based on the open literature. The report is written as a part of the NKS/RAK-2 subproject 3: 'Reactors in Nordic Surroundings', which comprises a description of nuclear power plants neighbouring the Nordic countries. (au) 11 refs

  16. Economics of advanced light water reactors - Recent update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper includes recently updated analyses of the economic prospects of advanced light water reactors (ALWRs) during the decade of the 1990s. United Engineers and Constructors (UE and C) has performed engineering economic analyses related to ALWRs over the last 5 yr using both target economics and detailed cost-estimating methodologies. It has been found through such cost comparisons that properly designed and constructed ALWRs should cost less than the target cost figures listed above and significantly less than the pressurized water reactor better experience reference LWR plant cost

  17. Fuel irradiation test plan at the Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development of high performance fuels, which enables burnup extension and high duty uses of light water reactors (LWRs) by means of power up rates and flexible operating cycles, is one of key technical issues for extending the uses for longer periods. Introduction of new design fuel rods with new cladding alloys and wider utilization of mixed oxide fuels is expected in Japan. Fuel irradiation tests for development and safety demonstration are quite important, in order to realize theses progress. Operational management on water chemistry, minimizing the long term degradation of reactor components, could have unfavorable influence on the integrity of the fuel rods. Japanese government and the Japan Atomic Energy Agency have decided to re new the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) and to install new test rigs, in order to play an active role solving the issues on the development and the safety of the fuel and the plant aging. Fuel integrity under abnormal transient conditions will be investigated using a special capsule type test rig, which has its own power control system under simulated LWR cooling conditions. Water loops for simulation of high duty operation, e.g. high power, high burnup and high rod internal pressure conditions, are proposed for the development and safety examination of the high performance fuels. Combination of the JMTR tests with simulated reactivity initiated accident tests in the Nuclear Safety Research Reactor and loss of coolant accident tests in hot laboratories would provide a comprehensive data for safety evaluation and design progress of the high performance fuels at extended burnups, covering from the normal to the accident conditions, including abnormal transients

  18. Advanced reactor instrumentation and control reliability and risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.; Gunther, W.; Valente, J.; Azarm, M.A.

    1991-12-31

    Advanced nuclear power reactors will used different approaches to achieving a higher level of safety than the first generation. One approach used the technological developments in computation and electronics in the form of digital instrumentation and control (I&C) to enhance the reliability, and accuracy of information for plant control, responding to the information, and controlling the plant and its systems under normal and upset environments in various states of degradation. Evaluating the reliability and safety of advanced I&C systems requires determining the reliability of the I&C used in the advanced reactors which involves distributed processing, data pile-up, interactive systems, the man-machine interface, various forms of automatic control, and systems interactions. From these analyses will come an understanding of the potential of the new I&C, and protection from its vulnerabilities to enhance the safe operation of the new plants. Technological, safety, reliability, and regulatory issues associated with advanced I&C for the new reactors are discussed herein. The issues are presented followed by suggested approaches to their resolution.

  19. Advanced reactor instrumentation and control reliability and risk assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fullwood, R.; Gunther, W.; Valente, J.; Azarm, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced nuclear power reactors will used different approaches to achieving a higher level of safety than the first generation. One approach used the technological developments in computation and electronics in the form of digital instrumentation and control (I C) to enhance the reliability, and accuracy of information for plant control, responding to the information, and controlling the plant and its systems under normal and upset environments in various states of degradation. Evaluating the reliability and safety of advanced I C systems requires determining the reliability of the I C used in the advanced reactors which involves distributed processing, data pile-up, interactive systems, the man-machine interface, various forms of automatic control, and systems interactions. From these analyses will come an understanding of the potential of the new I C, and protection from its vulnerabilities to enhance the safe operation of the new plants. Technological, safety, reliability, and regulatory issues associated with advanced I C for the new reactors are discussed herein. The issues are presented followed by suggested approaches to their resolution.

  20. Recovery of Information from the Fast Flux Test Facility for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielsen, Deborah L.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.

    2009-09-30

    The Fast Flux Test Facility is the most recent Liquid Metal Reactor to operate in the United States. Information from the design, construction, and operation of this reactor was at risk as the facilities associated with the reactor are being shut down. The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative is a program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy of the U.S. Department of Energy with a mission to develop new fuel cycle technologies to support both current and advanced reactors. Securing and preserving the knowledge gained from operation and testing in the Fast Flux Test Facility is an important part of the Knowledge Preservation activity in this program.

  1. 76 FR 3540 - U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design Certification Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-20

    ... COMMISSION 10 CFR Part 52 RIN 3150-AI84 U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Aircraft Impact Design... the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) standard plant design to comply with the NRC's aircraft...--Design Certification Rule for the U.S. Advanced Boiling Water Reactor IV. Section-by-Section Analysis...

  2. Technology Development Roadmap for the Advanced High Temperature Reactor Secondary Heat Exchanger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    P. Sabharwall; M. McCllar; A. Siahpush; D. Clark; M. Patterson; J. Collins

    2012-09-01

    This Technology Development Roadmap (TDRM) presents the path forward for deploying large-scale molten salt secondary heat exchangers (MS-SHX) and recognizing the benefits of using molten salt as the heat transport medium for advanced high temperature reactors (AHTR). This TDRM will aid in the development and selection of the required heat exchanger for: power production (the first anticipated process heat application), hydrogen production, steam methane reforming, methanol to gasoline production, or ammonia production. This TDRM (a) establishes the current state of molten salt SHX technology readiness, (b) defines a path forward that systematically and effectively tests this technology to overcome areas of uncertainty, (c) demonstrates the achievement of an appropriate level of maturity prior to construction and plant operation, and (d) identifies issues and prioritizes future work for maturing the state of SHX technology. This study discusses the results of a preliminary design analysis of the SHX and explains the evaluation and selection methodology. An important engineering challenge will be to prevent the molten salt from freezing during normal and off-normal operations because of its high melting temperature (390°C for KF ZrF4). The efficient transfer of energy for industrial applications depends on the ability to incorporate cost-effective heat exchangers between the nuclear heat transport system and industrial process heat transport system. The need for efficiency, compactness, and safety challenge the capabilities of existing heat exchanger technology. The description of potential heat exchanger configurations or designs (such as printed circuit, spiral or helical coiled, ceramic, plate and fin, and plate type) were covered in an earlier report (Sabharwall et al. 2011). Significant future work, much of which is suggested in this report, is needed before the benefits and full potential of the AHTR can be realized. The execution of this TDRM will focuses

  3. Advanced Reactor Technology -- Regulatory Technology Development Plan (RTDP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moe, Wayne Leland [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    This DOE-NE Advanced Small Modular Reactor (AdvSMR) regulatory technology development plan (RTDP) will link critical DOE nuclear reactor technology development programs to important regulatory and policy-related issues likely to impact a “critical path” for establishing a viable commercial AdvSMR presence in the domestic energy market. Accordingly, the regulatory considerations that are set forth in the AdvSMR RTDP will not be limited to any one particular type or subset of advanced reactor technology(s) but rather broadly consider potential regulatory approaches and the licensing implications that accompany all DOE-sponsored research and technology development activity that deal with commercial non-light water reactors. However, it is also important to remember that certain “minimum” levels of design and safety approach knowledge concerning these technology(s) must be defined and available to an extent that supports appropriate pre-licensing regulatory analysis within the RTDP. Final resolution to advanced reactor licensing issues is most often predicated on the detailed design information and specific safety approach as documented in a facility license application and submitted for licensing review. Because the AdvSMR RTDP is focused on identifying and assessing the potential regulatory implications of DOE-sponsored reactor technology research very early in the pre-license application development phase, the information necessary to support a comprehensive regulatory analysis of a new reactor technology, and the resolution of resulting issues, will generally not be available. As such, the regulatory considerations documented in the RTDP should be considered an initial “first step” in the licensing process which will continue until a license is issued to build and operate the said nuclear facility. Because a facility license application relies heavily on the data and information generated by technology development studies, the anticipated regulatory

  4. Deterministic Modeling of the High Temperature Test Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortensi, J.; Cogliati, J. J.; Pope, M. A.; Ferrer, R. M.; Ougouag, A. M.

    2010-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is tasked with the development of reactor physics analysis capability of the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) project. In order to examine INL’s current prismatic reactor deterministic analysis tools, the project is conducting a benchmark exercise based on modeling the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR). This exercise entails the development of a model for the initial criticality, a 19 column thin annular core, and the fully loaded core critical condition with 30 columns. Special emphasis is devoted to the annular core modeling, which shares more characteristics with the NGNP base design. The DRAGON code is used in this study because it offers significant ease and versatility in modeling prismatic designs. Despite some geometric limitations, the code performs quite well compared to other lattice physics codes. DRAGON can generate transport solutions via collision probability (CP), method of characteristics (MOC), and discrete ordinates (Sn). A fine group cross section library based on the SHEM 281 energy structure is used in the DRAGON calculations. HEXPEDITE is the hexagonal z full core solver used in this study and is based on the Green’s Function solution of the transverse integrated equations. In addition, two Monte Carlo (MC) based codes, MCNP5 and PSG2/SERPENT, provide benchmarking capability for the DRAGON and the nodal diffusion solver codes. The results from this study show a consistent bias of 2–3% for the core multiplication factor. This systematic error has also been observed in other HTTR benchmark efforts and is well documented in the literature. The ENDF/B VII graphite and U235 cross sections appear to be the main source of the error. The isothermal temperature coefficients calculated with the fully loaded core configuration agree well with other benchmark participants but are 40% higher than the experimental values. This discrepancy with the measurement stems from the fact that during the experiments the

  5. Johnson Noise Thermometry for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britton Jr, Charles L [ORNL; Roberts, Michael [ORNL; Bull, Nora D [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    Temperature is a key process variable at any nuclear power plant (NPP). The harsh reactor environment causes all sensor properties to drift over time. At the higher temperatures of advanced NPPs the drift occurs more rapidly. The allowable reactor operating temperature must be reduced by the amount of the potential measurement error to assure adequate margin to material damage. Johnson noise is a fundamental expression of temperature and as such is immune to drift in a sensor s physical condition. In and near core, only Johnson noise thermometry (JNT) and radiation pyrometry offer the possibility for long-term, high-accuracy temperature measurement due to their fundamental natures. Small, Modular Reactors (SMRs) place a higher value on long-term stability in their temperature measurements in that they produce less power per reactor core and thus cannot afford as much instrument recalibration labor as their larger brethren. The purpose of this project is to develop and demonstrate a drift free Johnson noise-based thermometer suitable for deployment near core in advanced SMR plants.

  6. SRS reactor stack plume marking tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petry, S.F.

    1992-03-01

    Tests performed in 105-K in 1987 and 1988 demonstrated that the stack plume can successfully be made visible (i.e., marked) by introducing smoke into the stack breech. The ultimate objective of these tests is to provide a means during an emergency evacuation so that an evacuee can readily identify the stack plume and evacuate in the opposite direction, thus minimizing the potential of severe radiation exposure. The EPA has also requested DOE to arrange for more tests to settle a technical question involving the correct calculation of stack downwash. New test canisters were received in 1988 designed to produce more smoke per unit time; however, these canisters have not been evaluated, because normal ventilation conditions have not been reestablished in K Area. Meanwhile, both the authorization and procedure to conduct the tests have expired. The tests can be performed during normal reactor operation. It is recommended that appropriate authorization and procedure approval be obtained to resume testing after K Area restart.

  7. Dielectric Heaters for Testing Spacecraft Nuclear Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, William Herbert; Bitteker, Leo; Godfroy, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    A document proposes the development of radio-frequency-(RF)-driven dielectric heaters for non-nuclear thermal testing of the cores of nuclear-fission reactors for spacecraft. Like the electrical-resistance heaters used heretofore for such testing, the dielectric heaters would be inserted in the reactors in place of nuclear fuel rods. A typical heater according to the proposal would consist of a rod of lossy dielectric material sized and shaped like a fuel rod and containing an electrically conductive rod along its center line. Exploiting the dielectric loss mechanism that is usually considered a nuisance in other applications, an RF signal, typically at a frequency .50 MHz and an amplitude between 2 and 5 kV, would be applied to the central conductor to heat the dielectric material. The main advantage of the proposal is that the wiring needed for the RF dielectric heating would be simpler and easier to fabricate than is the wiring needed for resistance heating. In some applications, it might be possible to eliminate all heater wiring and, instead, beam the RF heating power into the dielectric rods from external antennas.

  8. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of the meeting was to review and discuss the status of national programmes, the progress achieved since the last meeting held in June 1988 in the field of advanced technologies and design trends for existing and future water cooled reactors. 24 specialists from 14 countries and the IAEA took part in the meeting and 12 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  9. Natural Circulation Phenomena and Modelling for Advanced Water Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of natural circulation in advanced water cooled reactor design has been extended with the adoption of passive safety systems. Some designs utilize natural circulation to remove core heat during normal operation. Most passive safety systems used in evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactor designs are driven by natural circulation. The use of passive systems based on natural circulation can eliminate the costs associated with the installation, maintenance and operation of active systems that require multiple pumps with independent and redundant electric power supplies. However, considering the weak driving forces of passive systems based on natural circulation, careful design and analysis methods must be employed to ensure that the systems perform their intended functions. Several IAEA Member States with advanced reactor development programmes are actively conducting investigations of natural circulation to support the development of advanced water cooled reactor designs with passive safety systems. To foster international collaboration on the enabling technology of passive systems that utilize natural circulation, in 2004 the IAEA initiated a coordinated research project (CRP) on Natural Circulation Phenomena, Modelling and Reliability of Passive Systems that Utilize Natural Circulation. Three reports were published within the framework of this CRP. The first report (IAEA-TECDOC-1474) contains the material developed for the first IAEA training course on natural circulation in water cooled nuclear power plants. The second report (IAEA-TECDOC-1624) describes passive safety systems in a wide range of advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs, with the goal of gaining insights into system design, operation and reliability. This third, and last, report summarizes the research studies completed by participating institutes during the CRP period.

  10. Advanced technologies for water cooled reactors 1990. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting was attended by 20 participants from 12 countries who reviewed and discussed the status and progress of national programmes on advanced water-cooled reactors and recommended to the Scientific Secretary a comprehensive programme for 1991/1992 which would support technology development programmes in IWGATWR Member States. This summary report outlines the activities of IWGATWR since its Second Meeting in June 1988 and main results of the Third Meeting

  11. Status of the advanced boiling water reactor and simplified boiling water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that the excess of U.S. electrical generating capacity which has existed for the past 15 years is coming to an end as we enter the 1990s. Environmental and energy security issues associated with fossil fuels are kindling renewed interest in the nuclear option. The importance of these issues are underscored by the National Energy Strategy (NES) which calls for actions which are designed to ensure that the nuclear power option is available to utilities. Utilities, utility associations, and nuclear suppliers, under the leadership of the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee (NPOC), have jointly developed a 14 point strategic plan aimed at establishing a predictable regulatory environment, standardized and pre-licensed Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) nuclear plants, resolving the long-term waste management issue, and other enabling conditions. GE is participating in this national effort and GE's family of advanced nuclear power plants feature two new reactor designs, developed on a common technology base, aimed at providing a new generation of nuclear plants to provide safe, clean, economical electricity to the world's utilities in the 1990s and beyond. Together, the large-size (1300 MWe) Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) and the small-size (600 MWe) Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) are innovative, near-term candidates for expanding electrical generating capacity in the U.S. and worldwide. Both possess the features necessary to do so safely, reliably, and economically

  12. Seismic hazard study for the TREAT Reactor facility at the INEL, Idaho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TREAT Reactor is founded on a thick unfaulted sequence of Plio-Pleistocene basalt on the Snake River Plain. The plain is presently aseismic; however, seismic activity occurs in the mountains around the plain. The Howe Scarp is located 19 miles from TREAT and contains a known capable fault. Evaluation of this and other faults in the region indicate the Howe Scarp is the most significant earthquake fault for TREAT. A maximum credible earthquake on this fault could produce a maximum ground motion of about .22 g at TREAT. A study of three range front fault systems north of the Snake River Plain indicates the fault systems have not ruptured as a unit in the past; and, cross range faults, mountain spurs and reentrants generally bound the definable fault sets in the range front systems. This study indicates future surface fault rupture and earthquake events will follow a similar pattern of contiguous faulting; each individual surface rupture event should only involve a single fault set of the range front fault system. Surface faulting on contiguous fault sets should be separated by significant intervals of geologic time. Certain volcanic hazards have been examined and discussed

  13. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  14. ADAPTATION OF CRACK GROWTH DETECTION TECHNIQUES TO US MATERIAL TEST REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. Joseph Palmer; Sebastien P. Teysseyre; Kurt L. Davis; Gordon Kohse; Yakov Ostrovsky; David M. Carpenter; Joy L. Rempe

    2015-04-01

    A key component in evaluating the ability of Light Water Reactors to operate beyond 60 years is characterizing the degradation of materials exposed to radiation and various water chemistries. Of particular concern is the response of reactor materials to Irradiation Assisted Stress Corrosion Cracking (IASCC). Some test reactors outside the United States, such as the Halden Boiling Water Reactor (HBWR), have developed techniques to measure crack growth propagation during irradiation. The basic approach is to use a custom-designed compact loading mechanism to stress the specimen during irradiation, while the crack in the specimen is monitored in-situ using the Direct Current Potential Drop (DCPD) method. In 2012 the US Department of Energy commissioned the Idaho National Laboratory and the MIT Nuclear Reactor Laboratory (MIT NRL) to take the basic concepts developed at the HBWR and adapt them to a test rig capable of conducting in-pile IASCC tests in US Material Test Reactors. The first two and half years of the project consisted of designing and testing the loader mechanism, testing individual components of the in-pile rig and electronic support equipment, and autoclave testing of the rig design prior to insertion in the MIT Reactor. The load was applied to the specimen by means of a scissor like mechanism, actuated by a miniature metal bellows driven by pneumatic pressure and sized to fit within the small in-core irradiation volume. In addition to the loader design, technical challenges included developing robust connections to the specimen for the applied current and voltage measurements, appropriate ceramic insulating materials that can endure the LWR environment, dealing with the high electromagnetic noise environment of a reactor core at full power, and accommodating material property changes in the specimen, due primarily to fast neutron damage, which change the specimen resistance without additional crack growth. The project culminated with an in

  15. Advanced Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sean Emerson; Thomas Vanderspurt; Susanne Opalka; Rakesh Radhakrishnan; Rhonda Willigan

    2009-01-07

    The overall objectives for this project were: (1) to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane with high stability and commercially relevant hydrogen permeation in the presence of trace amounts of carbon monoxide and sulfur; and (2) to identify and synthesize a water gas shift catalyst with a high operating life that is sulfur and chlorine tolerant at low concentrations of these impurities. This work successfully achieved the first project objective to identify a suitable PdCu tri-metallic alloy membrane composition, Pd{sub 0.47}Cu{sub 0.52}G5{sub 0.01}, that was selected based on atomistic and thermodynamic modeling alone. The second objective was partially successful in that catalysts were identified and evaluated that can withstand sulfur in high concentrations and at high pressures, but a long operating life was not achieved at the end of the project. From the limited durability testing it appears that the best catalyst, Pt-Re/Ce{sub 0.333}Zr{sub 0.333}E4{sub 0.333}O{sub 2}, is unable to maintain a long operating life at space velocities of 200,000 h{sup -1}. The reasons for the low durability do not appear to be related to the high concentrations of H{sub 2}S, but rather due to the high operating pressure and the influence the pressure has on the WGS reaction at this space velocity.

  16. Numerical study on seismic response of the reactor coolant pump in Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De, Cheng, E-mail: 0100209064@sjtu.edu.cn; Zhen-Qiang, Yao, E-mail: zqyaosjtu@gmail.com; Ya-bo, Xue; Hong, Shen

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • An artificial accelerogram of the specified SSE is generated. • A dynamic FE model of the RCP in AP1000 (with gyroscopic and FSI effects) is developed. • The displacement, force, moment and stress in the RCP during the earthquake are summarized. - Abstract: The reactor coolant pump in the Advanced Passive Pressurized Water Reactor is a kind of nuclear canned-motor pump. The pump is classified as Seismic Category I, which must function normally during the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. When the nuclear power plant is located in seismically active region, the seismic response of the reactor coolant pump may become very important for the safety assessment of the whole nuclear power plant. In this article, an artificial accelerogram is generated. The response spectrum of the artificial accelerogram fits well with the design acceleration spectrum of the Safe Shutdown Earthquake. By applying the finite element modeling method, the dynamic finite element models of the rotor and stator in the reactor coolant pump are created separately. The rotor and stator are coupled by the journal bearings and the annular flow between the rotor and stator. Then the whole dynamic model of the reactor coolant pump is developed. Time domain analysis which uses the improved state-space Newmark method of a direct time integration scheme is carried out to investigate the response of the reactor coolant pump under the horizontal seismic load. The results show that the reactor coolant pump responds differently in the direction of the seismic load and in the perpendicular direction. During the Safe Shutdown Earthquake, the displacement response, the shear force, the moment and the journal bearing reaction forces in the reactor coolant pump are analyzed.

  17. Recent Advances in Contextuality Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jayne; Kurzyński, Paweł; Lee, Su-Yong; Soeda, Akihito; Kaszlikowski, Dagomir

    2016-07-01

    Our everyday experiences support the hypothesis that physical systems exist independently of the act of observation. Concordant theories are characterized by the objective realism assumption whereby the act of measurement simply reveals preexisting well-defined elements of reality. In stark contrast quantum mechanics portrays a world in which reality loses its objectivity and is in fact created by observation. Quantum contextuality as first discovered by Bell [1] and Kochen-Specker [2] captures aspects of this philosophical clash between classical and quantum descriptions of the world. Here we briefly summarize some of the more recent advances in the field of quantum contextuality. We approach quantum contextuality through its close relation to Bell type nonlocal scenarios and highlight some of the rapidly developing tests and experimental implementations.

  18. Code qualification of structural materials for AFCI advanced recycling reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natesan, K.; Li, M.; Majumdar, S.; Nanstad, R.K.; Sham, T.-L. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (ORNL)

    2012-05-31

    This report summarizes the further findings from the assessments of current status and future needs in code qualification and licensing of reference structural materials and new advanced alloys for advanced recycling reactors (ARRs) in support of Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI). The work is a combined effort between Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with ANL as the technical lead, as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for AFCI Reactor Campaign. The report is the second deliverable in FY08 (M505011401) under the work package 'Advanced Materials Code Qualification'. The overall objective of the Advanced Materials Code Qualification project is to evaluate key requirements for the ASME Code qualification and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approval of structural materials in support of the design and licensing of the ARR. Advanced materials are a critical element in the development of sodium reactor technologies. Enhanced materials performance not only improves safety margins and provides design flexibility, but also is essential for the economics of future advanced sodium reactors. Code qualification and licensing of advanced materials are prominent needs for developing and implementing advanced sodium reactor technologies. Nuclear structural component design in the U.S. must comply with the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code Section III (Rules for Construction of Nuclear Facility Components) and the NRC grants the operational license. As the ARR will operate at higher temperatures than the current light water reactors (LWRs), the design of elevated-temperature components must comply with ASME Subsection NH (Class 1 Components in Elevated Temperature Service). However, the NRC has not approved the use of Subsection NH for reactor components, and this puts additional burdens on materials qualification of the ARR. In the past licensing review for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project (CRBRP

  19. Guideline for Performing Systematic Approach to Evaluate and Qualify Legacy Documents that Support Advanced Reactor Technology Activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honma, George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The establishment of a systematic process for the evaluation of historic technology information for use in advanced reactor licensing is described. Efforts are underway to recover and preserve Experimental Breeder Reactor II and Fast Flux Test Facility historical data. These efforts have generally emphasized preserving information from data-acquisition systems and hard-copy reports and entering it into modern electronic formats suitable for data retrieval and examination. The guidance contained in this document has been developed to facilitate consistent and systematic evaluation processes relating to quality attributes of historic technical information (with focus on sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) technology) that will be used to eventually support licensing of advanced reactor designs. The historical information may include, but is not limited to, design documents for SFRs, research-and-development (R&D) data and associated documents, test plans and associated protocols, operations and test data, international research data, technical reports, and information associated with past U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews of SFR designs. The evaluation process is prescribed in terms of SFR technology, but the process can be used to evaluate historical information for any type of advanced reactor technology. An appendix provides a discussion of typical issues that should be considered when evaluating and qualifying historical information for advanced reactor technology fuel and source terms, based on current light water reactor (LWR) requirements and recent experience gained from Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP).

  20. Design Concept of Advanced Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor and Related R&D in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeong-il Kim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Korea imports about 97% of its energy resources due to a lack of available energy resources. In this status, the role of nuclear power in electricity generation is expected to become more important in future years. In particular, a fast reactor system is one of the most promising reactor types for electricity generation, because it can utilize efficiently uranium resources and reduce radioactive waste. Acknowledging the importance of a fast reactor in a future energy policy, the long-term advanced SFR development plan was authorized by KAEC in 2008 and updated in 2011 which will be carried out toward the construction of an advanced SFR prototype plant by 2028. Based upon the experiences gained during the development of the conceptual designs for KALIMER, KAERI recently developed advanced sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR design concepts of TRU burner that can better meet the generation IV technology goals. The current status of nuclear power and SFR design technology development program in Korea will be discussed. The developments of design concepts including core, fuel, fluid system, mechanical structure, and safety evaluation have been performed. In addition, the advanced SFR technologies necessary for its commercialization and the basic key technologies have been developed including a large-scale sodium thermal-hydraulic test facility, super-critical Brayton cycle system, under-sodium viewing techniques, metal fuel development, and developments of codes, and validations are described as R&D activities.

  1. TREAT [Transient Reactor Test Facility] reactor control rod scram system simulations and testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air cylinders moving heavy components (100 to 300 lbs) at high speeds (above 300 in/sec) present a formidable end-cushion-shock problem. With no speed control, the moving components can reach over 600 in/sec if the air cylinder has a 5 ft stroke. This paper presents an overview of a successful upgrade modification to an existing reactor control rod drive design using a computer model to simulate the modified system performance for system design analysis. This design uses a high speed air cylinder to rapidly insert control rods (278 lb moved 5 ft in less than 300 msec) to scram an air-cooled test reactor. Included is information about the computer models developed to simulate high-speed air cylinder operation and a unique new speed control and end cushion design. A patent application is pending with the US Patent ampersand Trade Mark Office for this system (DOE case number S-68,622). The evolution of the design, from computer simulations thru operational testing in a test stand (simulating in-reactor operating conditions) to installation and use in the reactor, is also described. 6 figs

  2. Proposal of world network on material testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Establishment of an international cooperation system of worldwide testing reactor network (world network) is proposed in order to achieve efficient facility utilization and provide high quality irradiation data by role sharing of irradiation tests with materials testing reactors in the world. As for the first step, mutual understanding among materials testing reactors is thought to be necessary. From this point, an international symposium on materials testing reactors (ISMTR) was held to construct the world network from 2008, and a common understanding of world network has begun to be shared. (author)

  3. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Options Status Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary scoping calculations are being performed for a 100 MWt gas-cooled test reactor. The initial design uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to identify some reactor design features to investigate further. Current status of the effort is described.

  4. Technical Research on Safety Management and Effective Application of China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) is a tank in pool type, light water cooled, heavy water reflected research reactor. The maximum thermal neutron flux of the reactor is 1.0x1015 cm-2s-1, and the reactor power is 60 MW. The reactor was designed and constructed completely by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The construction project began on Aug. 26, 2002, reactor criticality was achieved on May 13, 2010, and it is scheduled to complete power increasing tests by the end of 2011. Future operation of CARR is preparing and its utilization program is considered. It is expected that CARR will greatly improve and enhance the comprehensive research capability of nuclear science and technology and push the peaceful use of nuclear technology forward. The paper briefly presents the reactor safety features, the operation organization and responsibilities, the management of operation safety, and the future utilizations. According to national safety regulations of research reactor, evaluation of operation safety of CARR shall be executed after initial operation at power level and submit the revised ''Final Safety Analysis Report'' (FSAR) to the regulatory body.Ordinary operation shall be approved and operation license shall be issued by the regulatory body after review on the ''Final Safety Analysis Report.'' Vertical and horizontal channels with associated equipment and instruments are installed in reactor core and in heavy water reflector. CARR will be used to produce variety of RIs in comprehensive fields, to meet the requirements of engineering tests and irradiation for developing NPP fuels and materials in China, to apply for NTD of mono-crystalline silicone, NAA, neutron photography and to provide high intense neutron beam for application of neutron scattering experiments in an adequate scale and others, etc. (author)

  5. Laboratory testing of glasses for Lockheed Idaho Technology Company: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tests have been conducted at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) in support of the efforts of Lockheed Idaho Technology Company (LITCO) to vitrify high-level waste calcines. Tests were conducted with three classes of LITCO glass formulations: Formula 127 (fluorine-bearing), Formula 532 (fluorine-free), and 630 series (both single- and mixed-alkali) glasses. The test matrices included, as appropriate, the Product Consistency Test Method B (PCT-B), the Materials Characterization Center Test 1 (MCC-1), and the Argonne vapor hydration test (VHT). Test durations ranged from 7 to 183 d. In 7-d PCT-Bs, normalized mass losses of major glass-forming elements for the LITCO glasses are similar to, or lower than, normalized mass losses obtained for other domestic candidate waste glasses. Formula 532 glasses form zeolite alteration phases relatively early in their reaction with water. The formation of those phases increased the dissolution rate. In contrast, the Formula 127 glass is highly durable and forms alteration phases only after prolonged exposure to water in tests with very high surface area to volume ratios; these alteration phases have a relatively small effect on the rate of glass corrosion. No alteration phases formed within the maximum test duration of 183 d in PCT-Bs with the 630 series glasses. The corrosion behavior of the mixed-alkali 630 series glasses is similar to that of 630 series glasses containing sodium alone. In VHTs, both single- and mixed-alkali glasses form zeolite phases that increase the rate of glass reaction. The original 630 series glasses and those based on a revised surrogate calcine formulation react at the same rate in PCT-Bs and form the same major alteration phases in VHTs

  6. Prognostics Health Management for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Coble, Jamie B.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-10-18

    In the United States, sustainable nuclear power to promote energy security is a key national energy priority. Advanced small modular reactors (AdvSMR), which are based on modularization of advanced reactor concepts using non-light-water reactor (LWR) coolants such as liquid metal, helium, or liquid salt may provide a longer-term alternative to more conventional LWR-based concepts. The economics of AdvSMRs will be impacted by the reduced economy-of-scale savings when compared to traditional LWRs and the controllable day-to-day costs of AdvSMRs are expected to be dominated by operations and maintenance costs. Therefore, achieving the full benefits of AdvSMR deployment requires a new paradigm for plant design and management. In this context, prognostic health management of passive components in AdvSMRs can play a key role in enabling the economic deployment of AdvSMRs. In this paper, the background of AdvSMRs is discussed from which requirements for PHM systems are derived. The particle filter technique is proposed as a prognostics framework for AdvSMR passive components and the suitability of the particle filter technique is illustrated by using it to forecast thermal creep degradation using a physics-of-failure model and based on a combination of types of measurements conceived for passive AdvSMR components.

  7. Requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemicalseparation plants.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmiotti, G.; Cahalan, J.; Pfeiffer, P.; Sofu, T.; Taiwo, T.; Wei,T.; Yacout, A.; Yang, W.; Siegel, A.; Insepov, Z.; Anitescu, M.; Hovland,P.; Pereira, C.; Regalbuto, M.; Copple, J.; Willamson, M.

    2006-12-11

    This report presents requirements for advanced simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants that are of interest to the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) initiative. Justification for advanced simulation and some examples of grand challenges that will benefit from it are provided. An integrated software tool that has its main components, whenever possible based on first principles, is proposed as possible future approach for dealing with the complex problems linked to the simulation of nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants. The main benefits that are associated with a better integrated simulation have been identified as: a reduction of design margins, a decrease of the number of experiments in support of the design process, a shortening of the developmental design cycle, and a better understanding of the physical phenomena and the related underlying fundamental processes. For each component of the proposed integrated software tool, background information, functional requirements, current tools and approach, and proposed future approaches have been provided. Whenever possible, current uncertainties have been quoted and existing limitations have been presented. Desired target accuracies with associated benefits to the different aspects of the nuclear reactor and chemical processing plants were also given. In many cases the possible gains associated with a better simulation have been identified, quantified, and translated into economical benefits.

  8. Feasibility study of advanced fuel burning nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation has been conducted to determine both physics, engineering and economic aspects of fusion power reactors based on magnetic confinement and on burning advanced fuels (AFs). DT burning Tokamaks are taken as reference concept. We show that the attractive features of advanced fuels, in particular of neutronlean proton-based AFs, can be combined, in appropriately designed AF reactors (high beta), with power densities comparable to or even higher than those achievable in DT Tokamaks. Moreover we identify physical requirements which would assure Q values well above unity. As an example a semi-open confinement scheme is analyzed based on a self-consistent plasma calculation. We find that a mirror, even if only ''semi-open'' as a result of strong diamagnetism, can barely be expected to achieve high Q values. Therefore confinement schemes such as compact tori, multipole surmacs etc. may be required to burn AFs. We conclude that the economics of AF reactors, as determined by the nuclear boiler power density, may be superior to that of DT-rectors if low recirculating power fractions can be obtained by appropriate plasma tayloring (high fractional transfer of fusion power to ions required). A more detailed investigation is suggested for proton-based fuel cycles. (orig.)

  9. The advanced liquid metal reactor actinide recycle system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The current U.S. National Energy Strategy includes four key goals for nuclear policy: enhance safety and design standards, reduce economic risk, reduce regulatory risk, and establish an effective high-level nuclear waste program. The U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor Actinide Recycle System is consistent with these objectives. The system has the ability to fulfill multiple missions with the same basic design concept. In addition to providing an option for long-term energy security, the system can be effectively utilized for recycling of actinides in light water reactor (LWR) spent fuel, provide waste management flexibility, including the reduction in the waste quantity and storage time and utilization of the available energy potential of LWR spent fuel. The actinide recycle system is comprised of (1) a compact liquid metal (sodium) cooled reactor system with optimized passive safety characteristics, and (2) pyrometallurgical metal fuel cycle presently under development of Argonne National Laboratory. The waste reduction of LWR spent fuel is accomplished by transmutation or fissioning of the longer-lived transuranic isotopes to shorter-lived fission products in the reactor. In this presentation the economical and environmental incentive of the actinide recycle system is addressed and the status of development including licensing aspects is described. 3 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  10. The search for advanced remote technology in fast reactor reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research and development in fast reactor reprocessing has been under way ∼ 20 yr in several countries. During the past decade, France and the United Kingdom have developed active programs in breeder reprocessing. Actual fuels from their demonstration reactors have been reprocessed in small-scale facilities. Early US work in breeder reprocessing was carried out at the Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) facilities with the early metal fuels, and interest has renewed recently in metal fuels. A major, comprehensive program, focused on oxide fuels, has been carried out in the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program (CFRP) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) since 1974. The Federal Republic of Germany (FRG) and Japan have also carried out development programs in breeder reprocessing, and Japan appears committed to major demonstration of breeder reactors and their fuel cycles. While much of the effort in these programs addressed process chemistry and process hardware, a significant element of many of these programs, particularly the CFRP, has been on advancements in facility concepts and remote maintenance features. This paper focuses on the search for improved facility concepts and better maintenance systems in the CFRP, and, in turn, on how developments at ORNL have influenced the technology elsewhere

  11. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellarators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transport behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  12. Studies of a modular advanced stellarator reactor ASRA6C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is directed towards the clarification of critical issues of advanced modular stellerator reactors exploiting the inherent potential of steady state operation, and is not a point design study of a reactor. Critical technology issues arise from the three-dimensional magnetic field structure. The first wall, blanket and shield are more complex than those of axi-symmetric systems, but this is eased at moderate to large aspect ratio typical of stellerators. Several blanket options have been studied and a thin blanket (21 cm) was the first choice for the design. Superconducting modular coils were investigated with respect to the conductor and mechanical supports. From the analysis of forces and stresses caused by the electromagnetic loads the coils are considered to be feasible, although shear stresses might pose a critical issue. Demountable intermagnetic support elements were designed for use at separation areas between the cryostat modules. A scheme for remote reactor maintenance was also developed. The plasma physics issues of different configurations were studied using extrapolations of transort behaviour and equilibrium from theory and present experiments. These studies indicate that the confinement and equilibrium behaviour is adequate for ignited operation at an average value of 5% beta. Impurities may pose a critical issue. Several impurity control operations were investigated; a pumped limiter configuration utilizing the 'ergodic layer' at the plasma edge was chosen for edge plasma and impurity control. A general conclusion of the study is that the modular stellerator configuration offers interesting prospects regarding the development towards steady-state reactors. (orig.)

  13. Balanced Design of Safety Systems of CAREM Advanced Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Power Plants must meet the performance that the market and the population demand in order to be part of the electricity supply industry.It is related mainly with the results of reactor's economy and safety.New advances in the methodology developed for reactor economic optimization analyzing its safety at an early engineering stage, aiming at balancing these important features of the design, are presented in this work.In particular, the coupling that appears when dimensioning the Emergency Injection System, the Residual Heat Removal System and the containment height of CAREM reactor is described.The new models appended to the computer code that embodies the methodology to balance de designs are shown.Finally the results obtained with the optimizations when applying it are presented.Furthermore, a criterion to establish the maximal diameter for acceptable breaks in RPV's penetrations arises from this work.The application of the methodology and the computer code developed turns out to prove the advantages they provide to reactor design so that the plants are properly balanced and optimized

  14. Radiation exposure: Cytogenetic tests. Chernobyl reactor accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forty test subjects who, either during or after the reactor accident of Chernobyl (26th April 1986), stayed at a building site at Shlobin 150 km away, were examined for spontaneously occurring as well as mitomycin C-induced Sister Chromatid Exchanges (SCE). The building site staff, who underwent a whole-body radionuclide count upon their return to Austria (June through September 1986), were used for the cytogenetic tests. The demonstration of the SCE was made from whole-blood cultures by the fluorescence/Giemse technique. At last 20 Metaphases of the 2nd mitotic cycle were evaluated per person. The radiation doses of the test subjects were calculated by adding the external exposure determined on the building site, the estimated thyroid dose through I-131, and the measured incorporation of Cs-134 and Cs-137. The subjects were divided into two groups for statistical analysis: One was a more exposed group (proven stay at Shlobin between 26th April and 31st May 1986, mostly working in the open air) and the other a less exposed group for comparison (staying at Shlobin from 1st Juni 1986 and working mainly indoors). (orig.)

  15. Advanced Space Nuclear Reactors from Fiction to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa-Simil, L.

    The advanced nuclear power sources are used in a large variety of science fiction movies and novels, but their practical development is, still, in its early conceptual stages, some of the ideas being confirmed by collateral experiments. The novel reactor concept uses the direct conversion of nuclear energy into electricity, has electronic control of reactivity, being surrounded by a transmutation blanket and very thin shielding being small and light that at its very limit may be suitable to power an autonomously flying car. It also provides an improved fuel cycle producing minimal negative impact to environment. The key elements started to lose the fiction attributes, becoming viable actual concepts and goals for the developments to come, and on the possibility to achieve these objectives started to become more real because the theory shows that using the novel nano-technologies this novel reactor might be achievable in less than a century.

  16. Joining of Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels for Advanced Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B. W.; Brewer, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    The design, manufacture, and experimental analysis of structural materials capable of operation in the high temperatures, corrosive environments, and radiation damage spectra of future reactor designs remain one of the key pacing items for advanced reactor designs. The most promising candidate structural materials are vanadium-based refractory alloys, silicon carbide composites and oxide dispersion strengthened steels. Of these, oxide dispersion strengthened steels are a likely near-term candidate to meet required demands. This paper reviews different variants of oxide dispersion strengthened steels and discusses their capability with regard to high-temperature strength, corrosion resistance, and radiation damage resistance. Additionally, joining of oxide dispersion strengthened steels, which has been cited as a limiting factor preventing their use, is addressed and reviewed. Specifically, friction stir welding of these steels is reviewed as a promising joining method for oxide dispersion strengthened steels.

  17. Design requirement for electrical system of an advanced research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Hoan Sung; Kim, H. K.; Kim, Y. K.; Wu, J. S.; Ryu, J. S

    2004-12-01

    An advanced research reactor is being designed since 2002 and the conceptual design has been completed this year for the several types of core. Also the fuel was designed for the potential cores. But the process system, the I and C system, and the electrical system design are under pre-conceptual stage. The conceptual design for those systems will be developed in the next year. Design requirements for the electrical system set up to develop conceptual design. The same goals as reactor design - enhance safety, reliability, economy, were applied for the development of the requirements. Also the experience of HANARO design and operation was based on. The design requirements for the power distribution, standby power supply, and raceway system will be used for the conceptual design of electrical system.

  18. Evolutionary/advanced light water reactor data report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-09

    The US DOE Office of Fissile Material Disposition is examining options for placing fissile materials that were produced for fabrication of weapons, and now are deemed to be surplus, into a condition that is substantially irreversible and makes its use in weapons inherently more difficult. The principal fissile materials subject to this disposition activity are plutonium and uranium containing substantial fractions of plutonium-239 uranium-235. The data in this report, prepared as technical input to the fissile material disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) deal only with the disposition of plutonium that contains well over 80% plutonium-239. In fact, the data were developed on the basis of weapon-grade plutonium which contains, typically, 93.6% plutonium-239 and 5.9% plutonium-240 as the principal isotopes. One of the options for disposition of weapon-grade plutonium being considered is the power reactor alternative. Plutonium would be fabricated into mixed oxide (MOX) fuel and fissioned (``burned``) in a reactor to produce electric power. The MOX fuel will contain dioxides of uranium and plutonium with less than 7% weapon-grade plutonium and uranium that has about 0.2% uranium-235. The disposition mission could, for example, be carried out in existing power reactors, of which there are over 100 in the United States. Alternatively, new LWRs could be constructed especially for disposition of plutonium. These would be of the latest US design(s) incorporating numerous design simplifications and safety enhancements. These ``evolutionary`` or ``advanced`` designs would offer not only technological advances, but also flexibility in siting and the option of either government or private (e.g., utility) ownership. The new reactor designs can accommodate somewhat higher plutonium throughputs. This data report deals solely with the ``evolutionary`` LWR alternative.

  19. Analysis and Down Select of Flow Passages for Thermal Hydraulic Testing of a SNAP Derived Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Sadasivan, P.; Masterson, S.

    2007-01-01

    As past of the Vision for Space Exploration, man will return to the moon. To enable safe and productive time on the lunar surface will require adequate power resources. To provide the needed power and to give mission planners all landing site possibilities, including a permanently dark crater, a nuclear reactor provides the most options. Designed to be l00kWt providing approx. 25kWe this power plants would be very effective in delivering dependable, site non-specific power to crews or robotic missions on the lunar surface. An affordable reference reactor based upon the successful SNAP program of the 1960's and early 1970's has been designed by Los Alamos National Laboratory that will meet such a requirement. Considering current funding, environmental, and schedule limitations this lunar surface power reactor will be tested using non-nuclear simulators to simulate the heat from fission reactions. Currently a 25kWe surface power SNAP derivative reactor is in the early process of design and testing with collaboration between Los Alamos National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Glenn Research Center, Marshall Space Flight Center, and Sandia National Laboratory to ensure that this new design is affordable and can be tested using non-nuclear methods as have proven so effective in the past. This paper will discuss the study and down selection of a flow passage concept for a approx. 25kWe lunar surface power reactor. Several different flow passages designs were evaluated using computational fluid dynamics to determine pressure drop and a structural assessment to consider thermal and stress of the passage walls. The reactor design basis conditions are discussed followed by passage problem setup and results for each concept. A recommendation for passage design is made with rationale for selection.

  20. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E. Blanford; E. Keldrauk; M. Laufer; M. Mieler; J. Wei; B. Stojadinovic; P.F. Peterson

    2010-09-20

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  1. ADVANCED SEISMIC BASE ISOLATION METHODS FOR MODULAR REACTORS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced technologies for structural design and construction have the potential for major impact not only on nuclear power plant construction time and cost, but also on the design process and on the safety, security and reliability of next generation of nuclear power plants. In future Generation IV (Gen IV) reactors, structural and seismic design should be much more closely integrated with the design of nuclear and industrial safety systems, physical security systems, and international safeguards systems. Overall reliability will be increased, through the use of replaceable and modular equipment, and through design to facilitate on-line monitoring, in-service inspection, maintenance, replacement, and decommissioning. Economics will also receive high design priority, through integrated engineering efforts to optimize building arrangements to minimize building heights and footprints. Finally, the licensing approach will be transformed by becoming increasingly performance based and technology neutral, using best-estimate simulation methods with uncertainty and margin quantification. In this context, two structural engineering technologies, seismic base isolation and modular steel-plate/concrete composite structural walls, are investigated. These technologies have major potential to (1) enable standardized reactor designs to be deployed across a wider range of sites, (2) reduce the impact of uncertainties related to site-specific seismic conditions, and (3) alleviate reactor equipment qualification requirements. For Gen IV reactors the potential for deliberate crashes of large aircraft must also be considered in design. This report concludes that base-isolated structures should be decoupled from the reactor external event exclusion system. As an example, a scoping analysis is performed for a rectangular, decoupled external event shell designed as a grillage. This report also reviews modular construction technology, particularly steel-plate/concrete construction using

  2. Metal fires and their implications for advanced reactors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowlen, Steven Patrick; Figueroa, Victor G.; Olivier, Tara Jean; Hewson, John C.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2010-10-01

    This report details the primary results of the Laboratory Directed Research and Development project (LDRD 08-0857) Metal Fires and Their Implications for Advance Reactors. Advanced reactors may employ liquid metal coolants, typically sodium, because of their many desirable qualities. This project addressed some of the significant challenges associated with the use of liquid metal coolants, primary among these being the extremely rapid oxidation (combustion) that occurs at the high operating temperatures in reactors. The project has identified a number of areas for which gaps existed in knowledge pertinent to reactor safety analyses. Experimental and analysis capabilities were developed in these areas to varying degrees. In conjunction with team participation in a DOE gap analysis panel, focus was on the oxidation of spilled sodium on thermally massive surfaces. These are spills onto surfaces that substantially cool the sodium during the oxidation process, and they are relevant because standard risk mitigation procedures seek to move spill environments into this regime through rapid draining of spilled sodium. While the spilled sodium is not quenched, the burning mode is different in that there is a transition to a smoldering mode that has not been comprehensively described previously. Prior work has described spilled sodium as a pool fire, but there is a crucial, experimentally-observed transition to a smoldering mode of oxidation. A series of experimental measurements have comprehensively described the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. A new physics-based model has been developed that also predicts the thermal evolution of this type of sodium fire for the first time. The model introduces smoldering oxidation through porous oxide layers to go beyond traditional pool fire analyses that have been carried out previously in order to predict experimentally observed trends. Combined, these developments add significantly to the safety

  3. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  4. The electromagnetic integrated demonstration at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cold test pit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electromagnetic integrated demonstration (EMID) is a baseline study in electromagnetic (EM) exploration of the shallow subsurface (< 10 m). Eleven distinct EM systems, covering the geophysical spectrum, acquired data on a grid over the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Cold Test Pit (CTP). The systems are investigated and evaluated for the purpose of identifying and reviewing existing geophysical characterization instrumentation (commercial and experimental), integrating those technologies with multi-dimensional interpretational algorithms, and identifying gaps in shallow subsurface EM imaging technology. The EMID data, are valuable for testing and evaluating new interpretational software, and developing techniques for integrating multiple datasets. The experimental field techniques shows how the acquisition of data in a variety of array configurations can considerably enhance interpretation. All data are available on the world wide web. Educators and students are encouraged to use the data for both classroom and graduate studies. The purpose of this paper is to explain why, where, how and what kind of data were collected. It is left to the reader to assess the value of a given system for their particular application. Information about the EMID is organized into two general categories: survey description and system evaluation

  5. Strategic Need for Multi-Purpose Thermal Hydraulic Loop for Support of Advanced Reactor Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James E. O' Brien; Piyush Sabharwall; Su-Jong Yoon; Gregory K. Housley

    2014-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design for a new high-temperature multi fluid, multi loop test facility for the INL to support thermal hydraulic, materials, and thermal energy storage research for nuclear and nuclear-hybrid applications. In its initial configuration, the facility will include a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed with this facility include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions, flow and heat transfer issues related to core thermal hydraulics in advanced helium-cooled and salt-cooled reactors, and evaluation of corrosion behavior of new cladding materials and accident-tolerant fuels for LWRs at prototypical conditions. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) facility. Research performed in this facility will advance the state of the art and technology readiness level of high temperature intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) for nuclear applications while establishing the INL as a center of excellence for the development and certification of this technology. The thermal energy storage capability will support research and demonstration activities related to process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will assist in development of reliable predictive models for thermal hydraulic design and safety codes over the range of expected advanced reactor operating conditions. Proposed/existing IHX heat transfer and friction correlations and criteria will be assessed with information on materials compatibility and instrumentation

  6. Strategic need for a multi-purpose thermal hydraulic loop for support of advanced reactor technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, James E. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Yoon, Su -Jong [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Housley, Gregory K. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report presents a conceptual design for a new high-temperature multi fluid, multi loop test facility for the INL to support thermal hydraulic, materials, and thermal energy storage research for nuclear and nuclear-hybrid applications. In its initial configuration, the facility will include a high-temperature helium loop, a liquid salt loop, and a hot water/steam loop. The three loops will be thermally coupled through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and a secondary heat exchanger (SHX). Research topics to be addressed with this facility include the characterization and performance evaluation of candidate compact heat exchangers such as printed circuit heat exchangers (PCHEs) at prototypical operating conditions, flow and heat transfer issues related to core thermal hydraulics in advanced helium-cooled and salt-cooled reactors, and evaluation of corrosion behavior of new cladding materials and accident-tolerant fuels for LWRs at prototypical conditions. Based on its relevance to advanced reactor systems, the new facility has been named the Advanced Reactor Technology Integral System Test (ARTIST) facility. Research performed in this facility will advance the state of the art and technology readiness level of high temperature intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) for nuclear applications while establishing the INL as a center of excellence for the development and certification of this technology. The thermal energy storage capability will support research and demonstration activities related to process heat delivery for a variety of hybrid energy systems and grid stabilization strategies. Experimental results obtained from this research will assist in development of reliable predictive models for thermal hydraulic design and safety codes over the range of expected advanced reactor operating conditions. Proposed/existing IHX heat transfer and friction correlations and criteria will be assessed with information on materials compatibility and instrumentation

  7. Advanced fuels for plutonium management in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several fuel concepts are under investigation at CEA with the aim of manage plutonium inventories in pressurized water reactors. This options range from the use of mature technologies like MOX adapted in the case of MOX-EUS (enriched uranium support) and COmbustible Recyclage A ILot (CORAIL) assemblies to more innovative technologies using IMF like DUPLEX and advanced plutonium assembly (APA). The plutonium burning performances reported to the electrical production go from 7 to 60 kg (TW h)-1. More detailed analysis covering economic, sustainability, reliability and safety aspects and their integration in the whole fuel cycle would allow identifying the best candidate

  8. Advanced High Temperature Reactor Systems and Economic Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    The Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) is a design concept for a large-output [3400 MW(t)] fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR). FHRs, by definition, feature low-pressure liquid fluoride salt cooling, coated-particle fuel, a high-temperature power cycle, and fully passive decay heat rejection. The AHTR's large thermal output enables direct comparison of its performance and requirements with other high output reactor concepts. As high-temperature plants, FHRs can support either high-efficiency electricity generation or industrial process heat production. The AHTR analysis presented in this report is limited to the electricity generation mission. FHRs, in principle, have the potential to be low-cost electricity producers while maintaining full passive safety. However, no FHR has been built, and no FHR design has reached the stage of maturity where realistic economic analysis can be performed. The system design effort described in this report represents early steps along the design path toward being able to predict the cost and performance characteristics of the AHTR as well as toward being able to identify the technology developments necessary to build an FHR power plant. While FHRs represent a distinct reactor class, they inherit desirable attributes from other thermal power plants whose characteristics can be studied to provide general guidance on plant configuration, anticipated performance, and costs. Molten salt reactors provide experience on the materials, procedures, and components necessary to use liquid fluoride salts. Liquid metal reactors provide design experience on using low-pressure liquid coolants, passive decay heat removal, and hot refueling. High temperature gas-cooled reactors provide experience with coated particle fuel and graphite components. Light water reactors (LWRs) show the potentials of transparent, high-heat capacity coolants with low chemical reactivity. Modern coal-fired power plants provide design experience

  9. 76 FR 61118 - Meeting of the ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-03

    ... Boiling Water Reactor; Notice of Meeting The ACRS Subcommittee on Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR... published in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, (75 FR 65038-65039). Detailed meeting agendas...

  10. Requirements, needs, and concepts for a new broad-application test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For a variety of reasons, including (a) the increasing demands of the 1990s regulatory environment, (b) limited existing test capactiy and capability to satisfy projected future testing missions, and (c) an expected increasing need for nuclear information to support development of advanced reactors, there is a need for requirements and preliminary concepts for a new broad-application test reactor (BATR). These requirements must include consideration not only for a broad range of projected testing missions but also for current and projected regulatory compliance and safety requirements. The requirements will form the basis for development and assessment of preconceptual reactor designs and lead to the identification of key technologies to support the government's long-term strategic and programmatic planning. This paper outlines the need for a new BATR and suggests a few preliminary reactor concepts that can meet that need

  11. Preapplication safety evaluation report for the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) liquid-metal reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This safety evaluation report (SER) presents the final results of a preapplication design review for the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) liquid metal reactor (Project 673). The SAFR conceptual design was submitted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) in accordance with the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) ''Statement of Policy for the Regulation of Advanced Nuclear Power Plants'' (51 FR 24643 which provides for the early Commission review and interaction). The standard SAFR plant design consists of four identical reactor modules, referred to as ''paks,'' each with a thermal output rating of 900 MWt, coupled with four steam turbine-generator sets. The total electrical output was held to be 1400 MWe. This SER represents the NRC staff's preliminary technical evaluation of the safety features in the SAFR design. It must be recognized that final conclusions in all matters discussed in this SER require approval by the Commission. During the NRC staff review of the SAFR conceptual design, DOE terminated work on this design in September 1988. This SER documents the work done to that date and no additional work is planned for the SAFR

  12. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  13. Idaho National Laboratory - Nuclear Research Center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Idaho National Laboratory is committed to the providing international nuclear leadership for the 21st Century, developing and demonstrating compiling national security technologies, and delivering excellence in science and technology as one of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE) multiprogram national laboratories. INL runs three major programs - Nuclear, Security and Science. nuclear programs covers the Advanced test reactor, Six Generation technology concepts selected for R and D, Targeting tumors - Boron Neutron capture therapy. Homeland security - Homeland Security establishes the Control System Security and Test Center, Critical Infrastructure Test Range evaluates technologies on a scalable basis, INL conducts high performance computing and visualization research and science - INL facility established for Geocentrifuge Research, Idaho Laboratory, a Utah company achieved major milestone in hydrogen research and INL uses extremophile bacteria to ease bleaching's environmental cost. To provide leadership in the education and training, INL has established an Institute of Nuclear Science and Engineering (Inset). The institute will offer a four year degree based on a newly developed curriculum - two year of basic science course work and two years of participation in project planning and development. The students enrolled in this program can continue to get a masters or a doctoral degree. This summer Inset is the host for the training of the first international group selected by the World Nuclear University (WNU) - 75 fellowship holders and their 30 instructors from 40 countries. INL has been assigned to provide future global leadership in the field of nuclear science and technology. Here, at INL, we keep safety first above all things and our logo is 'Nuclear leadership synonymous with safety leadership'

  14. Facility Configuration Study of the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. L. Austad; L. E. Guillen; D. S. Ferguson; B. L. Blakely; D. M. Pace; D. Lopez; J. D. Zolynski; B. L. Cowley; V. J. Balls; E.A. Harvego, P.E.; C.W. McKnight, P.E.; R.S. Stewart; B.D. Christensen

    2008-04-01

    A test facility, referred to as the High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Component Test Facility or CTF, will be sited at Idaho National Laboratory for the purposes of supporting development of high temperature gas thermal-hydraulic technologies (helium, helium-Nitrogen, CO2, etc.) as applied in heat transport and heat transfer applications in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors. Such applications include, but are not limited to: primary coolant; secondary coolant; intermediate, secondary, and tertiary heat transfer; and demonstration of processes requiring high temperatures such as hydrogen production. The facility will initially support completion of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant. It will secondarily be open for use by the full range of suppliers, end-users, facilitators, government laboratories, and others in the domestic and international community supporting the development and application of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor technology. This pre-conceptual facility configuration study, which forms the basis for a cost estimate to support CTF scoping and planning, accomplishes the following objectives: • Identifies pre-conceptual design requirements • Develops test loop equipment schematics and layout • Identifies space allocations for each of the facility functions, as required • Develops a pre-conceptual site layout including transportation, parking and support structures, and railway systems • Identifies pre-conceptual utility and support system needs • Establishes pre-conceptual electrical one-line drawings and schedule for development of power needs.

  15. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, W. A.; Hassan, K. H.; Cullen, J. D.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Shaw, A.; Wylie, S. R.

    2011-08-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  16. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  17. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wali, W A; Hassan, K H; Cullen, J D; Al-Shamma' a, A I; Shaw, A; Wylie, S R, E-mail: w.wali@2009.ljmu.ac.uk [Built Environment and Sustainable Technologies Institute (BEST), School of the Built Environment, Faculty of Technology and Environment Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-17

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  18. Economics of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited natural uranium resources together with their low utilization in current lightwater reactors (LWR) on the one hand and the high capital investments for a LWR and fast breeder reactor system resulting in a high fuel utilization are the most important reasons for research and development (R+D) work related to a high converting APWR system. It is the main task of this analysis to study the economic behaviour of an APWR combining its technical and physical parameters with an economic data base. After introductional remarks chapter II presents the potential improvements of the uranium utilization and their importance for a whole national economy. Chapter III shows the micro-economic aspects for an electricity producing utility using such an APWR plant. The chapter is restricted to the fuel cycle costs and their dependence on various parameters. The corresponding costs of other nuclear power plants are described in chapter IV and compared to those of the APWR in chapter V. Finally a cost comparison on the basis of the electricity generating costs will complete the economic picture of an advanced pressurized water reactor. (orig./UA)

  19. The RERTR [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor] program:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactor (RERTR) program is described. After a brief summary of the results which the RERTR program, in collaboration with its many international partners, had achieved by the end of 1986, the activities, results and new developments which ocurred in 1987 are reviewed. Irradiation of the second miniplate series, concentrating on U3Si2-Al and U3Si-Al fuels was completed and postirradiation examinations were performed on many of its miniplates. The whole-core ORR demonstration with U3Si2-Al fuel at 4.8 g U/cm3 was completed at the end of March with excellent results and with 29 elements estimated to have reached at least 40 % average burnup. Good progress was made in the area of LEU usage for the production of fission 99Mo, and in the coordination of safety evaluations related to LEU conversions of U.S. university reactors. Planned activities include testing and demonstrating advanced fuels intended to allow use of reduced enrichment uranium in very-high-performance reactors. Two candidate fuels are U3Si-Al with 19.75 % enrichment and U3Si2-Al with 45 % enrichment. Demonstration of these fuels will include irradiation of full-size elements and, possibly, a full-core demonstration. Achievement of the final program goals is still projected for 1990. This progress could not have been possible without the close international cooperation which has existed from the beginning, and which is essential to the ultimate success of the RERTR program. (Author)

  20. Grout testing and characterization for shallow-land burial trenches at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An investigation was conducted to develop grout formulations suitable for in situ stabilization of low-level and transuranic (TRU) waste in shallow-land burial trenches at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The acceptabilities of soil, ordinary particulate, and fine particulate grouts were evaluated based on phase separation, compressive strength, freeze/thaw, penetration resistance, rheological, water permeability, column, and other tests. Soil grouts with soil-to-cement weight ratios from 0.91 to 1.60 were found to be suitable for open trench or drum disposal. Ordinary particulate grouts containing type I,II Portland cement, class C fly ash, bentonite, water, and a fluidizer were formulated to fill large voids within the soil/waste matrix of a closed shallow-land burial trench. Fine particulate grouts containing fine (mean particle size, 9.6 m) cement and water were formulated to fill smaller voids and to establish a grout-soil barrier to prevent water intrusion into the grouted waste trench. Solution, or chemical grouts, were evaluated as possible substitutes for the fine particulate grouts

  1. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  2. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  3. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallmann, F.W.; Wang, J.A.; Kam, F.B.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1994-01-01

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results.

  4. TR-EDB: Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base, Version 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Test Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (TR-EDB) is a collection of results from irradiation in materials test reactors. It complements the Power Reactor Embrittlement Data Base (PR-EDB), whose data are restricted to the results from the analysis of surveillance capsules in commercial power reactors. The rationale behind their restriction was the assumption that the results of test reactor experiments may not be applicable to power reactors and could, therefore, be challenged if such data were included. For this very reason the embrittlement predictions in the Reg. Guide 1.99, Rev. 2, were based exclusively on power reactor data. However, test reactor experiments are able to cover a much wider range of materials and irradiation conditions that are needed to explore more fully a variety of models for the prediction of irradiation embrittlement. These data are also needed for the study of effects of annealing for life extension of reactor pressure vessels that are difficult to obtain from surveillance capsule results

  5. Advanced Gas Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. Progress report, January 1, 1980-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-25

    Results are presented of work performed on the Advanced Gas-Cooled Nuclear Reactor Materials Evaluation and Development Program. The objectives of this program are to evaluate candidate alloys for Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Nuclear Process Heat (NPH) and Direct Cycle Helium Turbine (DCHT) applications, in terms of the effect of simulated reactor primary coolant (helium containing small amounts of various other gases), high temperatures, and long time exposures, on the mechanical properties and structural and surface stability of selected candidate alloys. A second objective is to select and recommend materials for future test facilities and more extensive qualification programs. Included are the activities associated with the status of the simulated reactor helium supply system, testing equipment and gas chemistry analysis instrumentation and equipment. The progress in the screening test program is described, including screening creep results and metallographic analysis for materials thermally exposed or tested at 750, 850, and 950/sup 0/C.

  6. In-vessel Retention Strategy for High Power Reactors - K-INERI Final Report (includes SBLB Test Results for Task 3 on External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) Boiling Data and CHF Enhancement Correlations)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    F. B. Cheung; J. Yang; M. B. Dizon; J. Rempe

    2005-01-01

    In-vessel retention (IVR) of core melt is a key severe accident management strategy adopted by some operating nuclear power plants and proposed for some advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). If there were inadequate cooling during a reactor accident, a significant amount of core material could become molten and relocate to the lower head of the reactor vessel, as happened in the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. If it is possible to ensure that the vessel head remains intact so that relocated core materials are retained within the vessel, the enhanced safety associated with these plants can reduce concerns about containment failure and associated risk. For example, the enhanced safety of the Westinghouse Advanced 600 MWe PWR (AP600), which relied upon External Reactor Vessel Cooling (ERVC) for IVR, resulted in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (US NRC) approving the design without requiring certain conventional features common to existing LWRs. However, it is not clear that currently proposed external reactor vessel cooling (ERVC) without additional enhancements could provide sufficient heat removal for higher-power reactors (up to 1500 MWe). Hence, a collaborative, three-year, U.S. - Korean International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (INERI) project was completed in which the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), Seoul National University (SNU), Pennsylvania State University (PSU), and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) investigated the performance of ERVC and an in-vessel core catcher (IVCC) to determine if IVR is feasible for reactors up to 1500 MWe.

  7. Proceedings of the international symposium on materials testing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of the International Symposium on Materials Testing Reactors hosted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). The symposium was held on July 16 to 17, 2008, at the Oarai Research and Development Center of JAEA. This symposium was also held for the 40th anniversary ceremony of Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) from achieving its first criticality. The objective of the symposium is to exchange the information on current status, future plan and so on among each testing reactors for the purpose of mutual understanding. There were 138 participants from Argentina, Belgium, France, Indonesia, Kazakhstan, Korea, the Russian Federation, Sweden, the United State, Vietnam and Japan. The symposium was divided into four technical sessions and three topical sessions. Technical sessions addressed the general topics of 'status and future plan of materials testing reactors', 'material development for research and testing reactors', irradiation technology (including PIE technology)' and 'utilization with materials testing reactors', and 21 presentations were made. Also the topical sessions addressed 'establishment of strategic partnership', 'management on re-operation work at reactor trouble' and 'basic technology for neutron irradiation tests in MTRs', and panel discussion was made. The 21 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  8. Development, utilization, and future prospects of materials test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor radiation affects the chemical and physical properties of materials. These changes can be very drastic in certain cases. Special test reactors have therefore been built since the 1950's and specific skills were developed to expose materials specimens to the precise irradiation conditions required. Materials testing reactors are those research reactor facilities which are designed and operated predominantly for studies into radiation damage. About a dozen plants in European communities (EC) Member States and in the US can be identified in this category, with 5 to 100 MW fission power and neutron fluxes between 5 x 1013 and 1015 cm-2s-1. The paper elaborates common aspects of development, utilization, and future prospects of US and EC materials testing reactors, and indicates the most significant differences

  9. Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith; Steven Prescott; Tony Koonce

    2014-04-01

    A key area of the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) strategy is the development of methodologies and tools that will be used to predict the safety, security, safeguards, performance, and deployment viability of SMRs. The goal of the SMR PRA activity will be to develop quantitative methods and tools and the associated analysis framework for assessing a variety of risks. Development and implementation of SMR-focused safety assessment methods may require new analytic methods or adaptation of traditional methods to the advanced design and operational features of SMRs. We will need to move beyond the current limitations such as static, logic-based models in order to provide more integrated, scenario-based models based upon predictive modeling which are tied to causal factors. The development of SMR-specific safety models for margin determination will provide a safety case that describes potential accidents, design options (including postulated controls), and supports licensing activities by providing a technical basis for the safety envelope. This report documents the progress that was made to implement the PRA framework, specifically by way of demonstration of an advanced 3D approach to representing, quantifying and understanding flooding risks to a nuclear power plant.

  10. Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Cole, Daniel L [University of Pittsburgh; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

  11. Overview of the US program of controls for advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An automated control system can incorporate control goals and strategies, assessment of present and future plant status, diagnostic evaluation and maintenance planning, and signal and command validation. It has not been feasible to employ these capabilities in conventional hard-wired, analog, control systems. Recent advances in computer-based digital data acquisition systems, process controllers, fiber-optic signal transmission artificial intelligence tools and methods, and small inexpensive, fast, large-capacity computers---with both numeric and symbolic capabilities---have provided many of the necessary ingredients for developing large, practical automated control systems. Furthermore, recent reactor designs which provide strong passive responses to operational upsets or accidents afford good opportunities to apply these advances in control technology. This paper presents an overall US national perspective for advanced controls research and development. The goals of high reliability, low operating cost and simple operation are described. The staged approach from conceptualization through implementation is discussed. Then the paper describes the work being done by ORNL, ANL and GE. The relationship of this work to the US commercial industry is also discussed

  12. Fiscal year 1999 multi-year work plan, advanced reactors transition program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Reactors Transition (ART) has two missions. One, funded by DOE-EM is to transition assigned, surplus facilities to a safe and compliant, low-cost stable, deactivated condition (requiring minimal surveillance and maintenance) pending eventual reuse or D and D. Facilities to be transitioned include the 309 Building/Plutonium Recycle Test Reactor (PRTR) and Nuclear Energy (NE) Legacy Facilities. The second mission, funded by DOE-NE, is to maintain the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and affiliated 400 Area buildings in a safe and compliant standby condition. The condition of the plant hardware, software and personnel is to be preserved in a manner not to preclude a plant restart

  13. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Division. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agrawal, A.K.; Cerbone, R.J.; Sastre, C.

    1980-06-01

    The Advanced Reactor Safety Research Programs quarterly progress report describes current activities and technical progress in the programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory sponsored by the USNRC Division of Reactor Safety Research. The projects reported each quarter are the following: HTGR Safety Evaluation, SSC Code Development, LMFBR Safety Experiments, and Fast Reactor Safety Code Validation.

  14. The neutron texture diffractometer at the China Advanced Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Juan; Liu, Xiao-Long; Liu, Yun-Tao; Tian, Geng-Fang; Gao, Jian-Bo; Yu, Zhou-Xiang; Li, Yu-Qing; Wu, Li-Qi; Yang, Lin-Feng; Sun, Kai; Wang, Hong-Li; Santisteban, J. r.; Chen, Dong-Feng

    2016-03-01

    The first neutron texture diffractometer in China has been built at the China Advanced Research Reactor, due to strong demand for texture measurement with neutrons from the domestic user community. This neutron texture diffractometer has high neutron intensity, moderate resolution and is mainly applied to study texture in commonly used industrial materials and engineering components. In this paper, the design and characteristics of this instrument are described. The results for calibration with neutrons and quantitative texture analysis of zirconium alloy plate are presented. The comparison of texture measurements with the results obtained in HIPPO at LANSCE and Kowari at ANSTO illustrates the reliability of the texture diffractometer. Supported by National Nature Science Foundation of China (11105231, 11205248, 51327902) and International Atomic Energy Agency-TC program (CPR0012)

  15. Advanced nuclear reactor public opinion project. Interim report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, B.

    1991-07-25

    This Interim Report summarizes the findings of our first twenty in-depth interviews in the Advanced Nuclear Reactor Public Opinion Project. We interviewed 6 industry trade association officials, 3 industry attorneys, 6 environmentalists/nuclear critics, 3 state officials, and 3 independent analysts. In addition, we have had numerous shorter discussions with various individuals concerned about nuclear power. The report is organized into the four categories proposed at our April, 1991, Advisory Group meeting: safety, cost-benefit analysis, science education, and communications. Within each category, some change of focus from that of the Advisory Group has been required, to reflect the findings of our interviews. This report limits itself to describing our findings. An accompanying memo draws some tentative conclusions.

  16. Evaluation of Advanced Thermohydraulic System Codes for Design and Safety Analysis of Integral Type Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The integral pressurized water reactor (PWR) concept, which incorporates the nuclear steam supply systems within the reactor vessel, is one of the innovative reactor types with high potential for near term deployment. An International Collaborative Standard Problem (ICSP) on Integral PWR Design, Natural Circulation Flow Stability and Thermohydraulic Coupling of Primary System and Containment during Accidents was established in 2010. Oregon State University, which made available the use of its experimental facility built to demonstrate the feasibility of the Multi-application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) design, and sixteen institutes from seven Member States participated in this ICSP. The objective of the ICSP is to assess computer codes for reactor system design and safety analysis. This objective is achieved through the production of experimental data and computer code simulation of experiments. A loss of feedwater transient with subsequent automatic depressurization system blowdown and long term cooling was selected as the reference event since many different modes of natural circulation phenomena, including the coupling of primary system, high pressure containment and cooling pool are expected to occur during this transient. The power maneuvering transient is also tested to examine the stability of natural circulation during the single and two phase conditions. The ICSP was conducted in three phases: pre-test (with designed initial and boundary conditions established before the experiment was conducted), blind (with real initial and boundary conditions after the experiment was conducted) and open simulation (after the observation of real experimental data). Most advanced thermohydraulic system analysis codes such as TRACE, RELAPS and MARS have been assessed against experiments conducted at the MASLWR test facility. The ICSP has provided all participants with the opportunity to evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their system codes in the transient

  17. Status and future plan of Japan materials testing reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR) of Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) is a light water cooling tank typed reactor. JMTR has been used for fuel and material irradiation studies for LWRs, HTGR, fusion reactor and RI production. Since the JMTR is connected with hot laboratory through the canal, re-irradiation tests can conduct easily by safety and quick transportation of irradiation samples. First criticality was achieved in March 1968, and operation was stopped from August, 2006 for the refurbishment. The reactor facilities are refurbished during four years from the beginning of FY 2007, and necessary examination and work are carrying out on schedule. The renewed and upgraded JMTR will start from FY 2011 and operate for a period of about 20 years (until around FY 2030). The usability improvement of the JMTR, such as higher reactor available factor, shortening turnaround time to get irradiation results, attractive irradiation cost, business confidence, is also discussing as the preparations for re-operation. (author)

  18. A modern control room for Indian Advanced Heavy Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Heavy Water Reactor (AHWR) is a next generation nuclear power plant being developed by Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India. AHWR is a vertical, pressure tube type, heavy-water-moderated, boiling light-water-cooled, innovative reactor, relying on natural circulation for core cooling in all operating and accident conditions. In addition, it incorporates various passive systems for decay heat removal, containment cooling and isolation. In addition to the many passive safety features, AHWR has state of the art I and C architecture based on extensive use of computers and networking. In tune with the many advanced features of the reactor, a centralized modern control room has been conceived for operation and monitoring of the plant. The I and C architecture enables the implementation of a fully computerised operator friendly control room with soft Human Machine Interfaces (HMI). While doing so, safety has been given due consideration. The control and monitoring of AHWR systems are carried out from the fully computer-based operator interfaces, except safety systems, for which only monitoring is provided from soft HMI. The control of the safety systems is performed from dedicated hardwired safety system panels. Soft HMI reduces the number of individual control devices and improves their reliability. The paper briefly describes the I and C architecture adopted for the AHWR plant along with the interfaces to the main and backup control rooms. There are many issues involved while introducing soft HMI based operator interfaces for Nuclear Power Plants (NPP) compared to the conventional plants. Besides discussing the implementation issues, the paper elaborates the design considerations that have undergone in the design of various components in the main control room especially operator workstations, shift supervisor console, safety system panels and large display panels. Mainly task based displays have been adopted for the routine operator interactions of the plant

  19. Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe

    2008-01-01

    Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

  20. Enhanced In-pile Instrumentation for Material Testing Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy Rempe; Darrell Knudson; Joshua Daw; Troy Unruh; Benjamin Chase; Kurt Davis; Robert Schley

    2012-07-01

    An increasing number of U.S. nuclear research programs are requesting enhanced in-pile instrumentation capable of providing real-time measurements of key parameters during irradiations. For example, fuel research and development funded by the U.S. Department of Energy now emphasize approaches that rely on first principle models to develop optimized fuel designs that offer significant improvements over current fuels. To facilitate this approach, high fidelity, real-time data are essential for characterizing the performance of new fuels during irradiation testing. Furthermore, sensors that obtain such data must be miniature, reliable and able to withstand high flux/high temperature conditions. Depending on user requirements, sensors may need to obtain data in inert gas, pressurized water, or liquid metal environments. To address these user needs, in-pile instrumentation development efforts have been initiated as part of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) National Scientific User Facility (NSUF), the Fuel Cycle Research & Development (FCR&D), and the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology (NEET) programs. This paper reports on recent INL achievements to support these programs. Specifically, an overview of the types of sensors currently available to support in-pile irradiations and those sensors currently available to MTR users are identified. In addition, recent results and products available from sensor research and development are detailed. Specifically, progress in deploying enhanced in-pile sensors for detecting elongation and thermal conductivity are reported. Results from research to evaluate the viability of ultrasonic and fiber optic technologies for irradiation testing are also summarized.

  1. Overview of the Consortium for the Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL)

    OpenAIRE

    Kulesza Joel A.; Franceschini Fausto; Evans Thomas M.; Gehin Jess C.

    2016-01-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) was established in July 2010 for the purpose of providing advanced modeling and simulation solutions for commercial nuclear reactors. The primary goal is to provide coupled, higher-fidelity, usable modeling and simulation capabilities than are currently available. These are needed to address light water reactor (LWR) operational and safety performance-defining phenomena that are not yet able to be fully modeled taking a fir...

  2. Proceedings of the 1992 topical meeting on advances in reactor physics. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-01

    This document, Volume 2, presents proceedings of the 1992 Topical Meeting on Advances in Reactor Physics on March 8--11, 1992 at Charleston, SC. Session topics were as follows: Transport Theory; Fast Reactors; Plant Analyzers; Integral Experiments/Measurements & Analysis; Core Computational Systems; Reactor Physics; Monte Carlo; Safety Aspects of Heavy Water Reactors; and Space-Time Core Kinetics. The individual reports have been cataloged separately. (FI)

  3. Improving the proliferation resistance of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination, or substantial reduction, of the trade in highly enriched fuel elements for research and test reactors would significantly reduce the proliferation risk associated with the current potential for diversion of these materials. To this end, it is the long-term goal of U.S. policy to fuel all new and existing research and test reactors with uranium of less than 20% enrichment (but substantially greater than natural) excepting, perhaps, only a small number of high-power, high-performance, reactors. The U.S. development program for enrichment reduction in research and test reactor designs currently using 90-93% enriched uranium is based on the practical criterion that enrichment reduction should not cause significant flux performance (flux per unit power) or burnup performance degradation relative to the unmodified reactor design. A program is now beginning in the U.S. to develop the necessary fuel technology, but several years of work will be needed. Accordingly, as an immediate interim step, the U.S. is proposing to convert existing research and test reactors (and new designs) from the use of 90-93% enriched fuel to the use of 30-45% enriched fuel wherever this can be done without unacceptable reactor performance degradation

  4. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samaras, M.; Hoffelner, W.; Victoria, M.

    2007-09-01

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors.

  5. Modelling of advanced structural materials for GEN IV reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The choice of suitable materials and the assessment of long-term materials damage are key issues that need to be addressed for the safe and reliable performance of nuclear power plants. Operating conditions such as high temperatures, irradiation and a corrosive environment degrade materials properties, posing the risk of very expensive or even catastrophic plant damage. Materials scientists are faced with the scientific challenge to determine the long-term damage evolution of materials under service exposure in advanced plants. A higher confidence in life-time assessments of these materials requires an understanding of the related physical phenomena on a range of scales from the microscopic level of single defect damage effects all the way up to macroscopic effects. To overcome lengthy and expensive trial-and-error experiments, the multiscale modelling of materials behaviour is a promising tool, bringing new insights into the fundamental understanding of basic mechanisms. This paper presents the multiscale modelling methodology which is taking root internationally to address the issues of advanced structural materials for Gen IV reactors

  6. Advanced Mesh-Enabled Monte carlo capability for Multi-Physics Reactor Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Paul; Evans, Thomas; Tautges, Tim

    2012-12-24

    This project will accumulate high-precision fluxes throughout reactor geometry on a non- orthogonal grid of cells to support multi-physics coupling, in order to more accurately calculate parameters such as reactivity coefficients and to generate multi-group cross sections. This work will be based upon recent developments to incorporate advanced geometry and mesh capability in a modular Monte Carlo toolkit with computational science technology that is in use in related reactor simulation software development. Coupling this capability with production-scale Monte Carlo radiation transport codes can provide advanced and extensible test-beds for these developments. Continuous energy Monte Carlo methods are generally considered to be the most accurate computational tool for simulating radiation transport in complex geometries, particularly neutron transport in reactors. Nevertheless, there are several limitations for their use in reactor analysis. Most significantly, there is a trade-off between the fidelity of results in phase space, statistical accuracy, and the amount of computer time required for simulation. Consequently, to achieve an acceptable level of statistical convergence in high-fidelity results required for modern coupled multi-physics analysis, the required computer time makes Monte Carlo methods prohibitive for design iterations and detailed whole-core analysis. More subtly, the statistical uncertainty is typically not uniform throughout the domain, and the simulation quality is limited by the regions with the largest statistical uncertainty. In addition, the formulation of neutron scattering laws in continuous energy Monte Carlo methods makes it difficult to calculate adjoint neutron fluxes required to properly determine important reactivity parameters. Finally, most Monte Carlo codes available for reactor analysis have relied on orthogonal hexahedral grids for tallies that do not conform to the geometric boundaries and are thus generally not well

  7. The scaling of economic and performance parameters of DT and advanced fuel fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the plasma stability index beta and the fusion power density in the plasma were treated as independent variables to determine how they influenced three economic performance parameters of fusion reactors burning the DT and four advanced fusion fuel cycles. The economic/performance parameters included the total power produced per unit length of reactor; the mass per unit length, and the specific mass in kilograms/kilowatt. The scaling of these parameters with beta and fusion power density was examined for a common set of engineering assumptions on the allowable wall loading limits, the maximum magnetic field existing in the plasma, average blanket mass density, etc. It was found that the power per unit length decreased as the plasma power density and beta increased. This is a consequence of the fact that the first wall is a bottleneck in the energy flow from the plasma to the generating equipment, and the wall power flux will exceed wall loading limits if the plasma radius exceeds a critical value. If one wished to build an engineering test reactor which produced a burning plasma at the lowest possible initial cost, and without regard to whether such a reactor would ultimately produce the cheapest power, then one would minimize the mass per unit length. The mass per unit length decreases with increasing plasma power density and beta, with the DT reaction being the most expensive at a fixed plasma power density (because of its thicker blanket), and the least expensive at a fixed value of beta, at least up to values of beta of 50%. The specific mass, in kg/kw, which is a rough measure of the cost of the power generated by the reactor, shows an opposite trend. It increases with increasing plasma power density and beta. At a given plasma power density and low beta, the DT reaction gives the lowest specific mass, but at a fixed beta above 10%, the advanced fuel cycles have the lowest specific mass

  8. Progress in the Development of the Modular Pebble-Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This review article summarizes recent progress by students and faculty at U.C. Berkeley working on the development of the Pebble-Bed Advanced High Temperature Reactor (PB-AHTR). The 410-MWe PBAHTR is a liquid salt cooled reactor that operates at near atmospheric pressure and high power density (20 to 30 MW/m3, compared to 4.8 MW/m3 for helium cooled reactors). Operating with a core inlet temperature of 600 deg. C and outlet temperature of 704 deg. C, the PB-AHTR uses well understood materials of construction including Alloy 800H with Hastelloy N cladding for the reactor vessel and primary loop components, and graphite for core and reflector structures. Recent work by the NE 170 senior design class has developed physical arrangements for the major reactor and power conversion components, along with the structural design for the reactor building and turbine hall featuring seismic base isolation, design for aircraft crash protection, shielding analysis, and design of a multiple-zone ventilation and containment system to provide effective control of radioactive and chemical contamination. The resulting total building volume is 260 m3/MWe, compared to 343 m3/MWe to 486 m3/MWe for current large (1150 to 1600 MWe) LWR designs. These results suggest the potential for significant reductions in construction time and cost. Neutronics studies have verified the capability to design the PB-AHTR with negative fuel and coolant temperature reactivity coefficients, for both LEU and deep-burn TRU fuels. Depletion analysis was also performed to identify optimal core designs to maximize fuel utilization. The additional moderation provided by the coolant simplifies design to achieve optimal moderation, and the spent fuel volume is approximately half that of helium cooled reactors. In collaboration with the Czech Nuclear Research Institute, initial zero-power critical tests were performed to validate PB-AHTR neutronics models. Liquid salts are unique among candidate reactor coolants due

  9. Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

    2011-05-31

    Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus

  10. In situ vitrification application to buried waste: Final report of intermediate field tests at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes two in situ vitrification field tests conducted on simulated buried waste pits during June and July 1990 at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In situ vitrification, an emerging technology for in place conversion of contaminated soils into a durable glass and crystalline waste form, is being investigated as a potential remediation technology for buried waste. The overall objective of the two tests was to access the general suitability of the process to remediate waste structures representative of buried waste found at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. In particular, these tests, as part of a treatability study, were designed to provide essential information on the field performance of the process under conditions of significant combustible and metal wastes and to test a newly developed electrode feed technology. The tests were successfully completed, and the electrode feed technology successfully processed the high metal content waste. Test results indicate the process is a feasible technology for application to buried waste. 33 refs., 109 figs., 39 tabs

  11. Radiological transportation risk assessment of the shipment of sodium-bonded fuel from the Fast Flux Test Facility to the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document was written in support of Environmental Assessment: Shutdown of the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. It analyzes the potential radiological risks associated with the transportation of sodium-bonded metal alloy and mixed carbide fuel from the FFTF on the Hanford Site in Washington State to the Idaho Engineering Laboratory in Idaho in the T-3 Cask. RADTRAN 4 is used for the analysis which addresses potential risk from normal transportation and hypothetical accident scenarios

  12. Irradiation testing of miniature fuel plates for the RERTR program. [Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senn, R.L.; Martin, M.M.

    1981-07-01

    An irradiation test facility, which provides a test bed for irradiating a variety of miniature fuel plates (miniplates) for the Reduced Enrichment Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) program, has been placed into operation. These tests screen various candidate fuel materials on their suitability for replacing the highly enriched uranium fuel materials currently used by the world's test and research reactors with a lower enrichment fuel material, without significantly degrading reactor operating characteristics and power levels. The use of low uranium enrichment of about 20% /sup 235/U in place of highly enriched fuel for these reactors would reduce the potential for /sup 235/U diversion. The irradiation test facility, designated as HFED, is operating in core position E-7 in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor (ORR), a 30-MW water-moderated reactor. The miniplates will achieve burnups of up to approx. 2.2 x 10/sup 27/ fissions/m/sup 3/ of fuel.

  13. BN800: The advanced sodium cooled fast reactor plant based on close fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As one of the advanced countries with actually fastest reactor technology, Russia has always taken a leading role in the forefront of the development of fast reactor technology. After successful operation of BN600 fast reactor nuclear power station with a capacity of six hundred thousand kilowatts of electric power for nearly 30 years, and after a few decades of several design optimization improved and completed on its basis, it is finally decided to build Unit 4 of Beloyarsk nuclear power station (BN800 fast reactor power station). The BN800 fast reactor nuclear power station is considered to be the project of the world's most advanced fast reactor nuclear power being put into implementation. The fast reactor technology in China has been developed for decades. With the Chinese pilot fast reactor to be put into operation soon, the Chinese model fast reactor power station has been put on the agenda. Meanwhile, the closed fuel cycle development strategy with fast reactor as key aspect has given rise to the concern of experts and decision-making level in relevant areas. Based on the experiences accumulated in many years in dealing the Sino-Russian cooperation in fast reactor technology, with reference to the latest Russian published and authoritative literatures regarding BN800 fast reactor nuclear power station, the author compiled this article into a comprehensive introduction for reference by leaders and experts dealing in the related fields of nuclear fuel cycle strategy and fast reactor technology development researches, etc. (authors)

  14. Advanced nuclear fuel for VVER reactors. Status and operation experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper discusses the major VVER fuel trends, aimed at the enhancement of FAs' effectiveness and reliability, flexibility of their operating performances and fuel cycle efficiency, specifically: (i) Fuel burnup increasing is one of the major objectives during the development of improved nuclear fuel and fuel cycles. At present, the achieved fuel rod burn up is 65 MWdays/kgU. The tasks are set and the activities are carried out to achieve fuel rod burnup up to 70 MWdays/kgU and burnup of discharged batch of FAs - up to 60 MWdays/kgU. (ii) Improvement of FA rigidity enables to increase operating reliability of fuel due to gaps reducing between FAs and, as a result, the fall of peak load coefficients. FA geometric stability enables to optimize the speed of handling procedures with fuel. (iii) Increasing of uranium content of FA is aimed at extension of fuel cycles' duration. Fuel weight increase in FA is achieved both due to fuel column height extension and to changes of pellet geometrical size. (iv) Extension of FA service live satisfies the up-to-date NPP requirements for fuel cycles of various duration from 4x320 eff. days to 5x320 eff. days and 3x480 eff. days. (v) The development of new-generation FAs with increased strength characteristics has required the zirconium alloys' improvement. Advanced zirconium alloys shall provide safety and effectiveness of FA and fuel rods during long-life operation up to 40 000 eff. hours. (vi) Utilization of reprocessed uranium enables to use spent nuclear fuel in cycle and to create the partly complete fuel cycle for VVER reactors. This paper summarizes the major operating results of LTAs, which meet the modern and prospective requirements for VVER fuel, at Russian NPPs with VVER-440 and VVER-1000 reactors. (author)

  15. Development and Application of Subchannel Analysis Code Technology for Advanced Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Dae Hyun; Seo, K. W

    2006-01-15

    A study has been performed for the development and assessment of a subchannel analysis code which is purposed to be used for the analysis of advanced reactor conditions with various configurations of reactor core and several kinds of reactor coolant fluids. The subchannel analysis code was developed on the basis of MATRA code which is being developed at KAERI. A GUI (Graphic User Interface) system was adopted in order to reduce input error and to enhance user convenience. The subchannel code was complemented in the property calculation modules by including various fluids such as heavy liquid metal, gas, refrigerant,and supercritical water. The subchannel code was applied to calculate the local thermal hydraulic conditions inside the non-square test bundles which was employed for the analysis of CHF. The applicability of the subchannel code was evaluated for a high temperature gas cooled reactor condition and supercritical pressure conditions with water and Freon. A subchannel analysis has been conducted for European ADS(Accelerator-Driven subcritical System) with Pb-Bi coolant through the international cooperation work between KAERI and FZK, Germany. In addition, the prediction capability of the subchannel code was evaluated for the subchannel void distribution data by participating an international code benchmark program which was organized by OECD/NRC.

  16. LOFT advanced densitometer L1-4 test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, D.B.

    1978-06-28

    The report covers the PC-2, C-beam chordal average density measurement made on the loss-of-fluid test (LOFT) primary coolant system hot leg during the L1-4 nonnuclear loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) test conducted May 3, 1977. The P-2, C-beam, or LOFT advanced densitometer, used was of the pulse height analysis/energy discrimination, or nuclear hardened type to be used for LOFT nuclear tests. The L1-4 test verified the applicability of pulse height analysis/energy discrimination techniques of the nuclear hardened gamma densitometer. Test results show that the reactor coolant fluid chordal average density can be calculated from gamma radiation source signal measured count rate data.

  17. Advanced nondestructive examination of the reactor vessel head penetration tube welds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beside a referent code examination requirements, appearance of the service induced flaws on the Reactor Vessel Head (RVH) penetration tube welds forced development of remotely operated examination tools and techniques. Several systems were developed for examination of RVH PWR type while only one system for examination of VVER - 440 type RVH has been developed by Inetec. In this article the most advanced RVH VVER - 440 type examination techniques such as ultrasonic, eddy current and visual testing techniques as well as remotely operated tool are described. (author)

  18. SMORN-III benchmark test on reactor noise analysis methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A computational benchmark test was performed in conjunction with the Third Specialists Meeting on Reactor Noise (SMORN-III) which was held in Tokyo, Japan in October 1981. This report summarizes the results of the test as well as the works made for preparation of the test. (author)

  19. HFR irradiation testing of light water reactor (LWR) fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information with emphasis on LWR fuel rod testing capabilities and hot cell investigation is presented. Additionally a summary of LWR fuel irradiation programmes performed and forthcoming programmes are described. Project management information and a list of publications pertaining to LWR fuel rod test programmes is given

  20. Post-Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the efforts to ensure nuclear energy remains a viable option for the United States of America. A significant portion of these efforts are related to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of highly activated fuel and materials that are subject to the extreme environment inside a nuclear reactor. As the lead national laboratory for nuclear energy, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a rich history, experience, workforce, and capabilities for performing PIE. However, new advances in tools and techniques for performing PIE now enable understanding the performance of fuels and materials at the nano-scale and smaller level. Examination at this level is critical since this is the scale at which irradiation damage occurs. The INL is on course to adopt advanced tools and techniques to develop a comprehensive nuclear fuels and materials characterization capability that is unique in the world. Because INL has extensive PIE capabilities currently in place, a strong foundation exist to build upon as new capabilities are implemented and workload increases. In the recent past, INL has adopted significant capability to perform advanced PIE characterization. Looking forward, INL is planning for the addition of two facilities that will be built to meet the stringent demands of advanced tools and techniques for highly activated fuels and materials characterization. Dubbed the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) and advanced post- irradiation examination capability, these facilities are next generation PIE laboratories designed to perform the PIE work that cannot be performed in current DOE facilities. In addition to physical capabilities, INL has recently added two significant contributors to the Advanced Test Reactor-National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF), Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of California Berkeley. (author)

  1. Post Irradiation Capabilities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. L. Schulthess; K. E. Rosenberg

    2011-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) oversees the efforts to ensure nuclear energy remains a viable option for the United States. A significant portion of these efforts are related to post-irradiation examinations (PIE) of highly activated fuel and materials that are subject to the extreme environment inside a nuclear reactor. As the lead national laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a rich history, experience, workforce and capabilities for performing PIE. However, new advances in tools and techniques for performing PIE now enable understanding the performance of fuels and materials at the nano-scale and smaller level. Examination at this level is critical since this is the scale at which irradiation damage occurs. The INL is on course to adopt these advanced tools and techniques to develop a comprehensive nuclear fuels and materials characterization capability that is unique in the world. Because INL has extensive PIE capabilities currently in place, a strong foundation exist to build upon as new capabilities are implemented and work load increases. In the recent past, INL has adopted significant capability to perform advanced PIE characterization. Looking forward, INL is planning for the addition of two facilities that will be built to meet the stringent demands of advanced tools and techniques for highly activated fuels and materials characterization. Dubbed the Irradiated Materials Characterization Laboratory (IMCL) and Advanced Post Irradiation Examination Capability , these facilities are next generation PIE laboratories designed to perform the work of PIE that cannot be performed in current DOE facilities. In addition to physical capabilities, INL has recently added two significant contributors to the Advanced Test Reactor-National Scientific User Facility (ATR-NSUF), Oak Ridge National Laboratory and University of California, Berkeley.

  2. BOR-60 reactor as an instrument for experimental substantiation of fuel rods for advanced NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The BOR-60 fast test reactor is actually the only facility of this type in the world that has been in reliable and continuous operation for about 35 years. One of the principle reactor tasks is irradiation of advanced fuel and structural materials in different conditions. Inside the reactor the materials can be irradiated in any core and reflector cell except seven cells used for control rods. The number of fuel assemblies loaded into the reactor can vary from 85 to 124 depending on the burnup, core configuration and fuel properties. Due to the reactor design, the core dimensions can be widely changed allowing accommodation of no less than 20 experimental assemblies in different reactor cells. The neutron flux value in individual cells can vary more than 3 times at the maximum value of 3.7·1015 n/cm2s. Thus various fuel compositions can be loaded into the reactor and practically any burnups can achieve. Based on the long-term investigation of the reactor characteristics, we studied the reactor behavior in different conditions, developed a set of the verified codes and different procedures for the on-line reactor maintenance and performance of the wide scope of experiments. A set of specialized testing facilities consisting of capsule units and dismountable assemblies are used for irradiation of the wide range of materials and items at different conditions. The advantages of these facilities are their simplicity and possibility of installation in any core and reflector cell. In addition to the precision calculations of the irradiation conditions there is also a possibility for monitoring the neutron flux and temperature. A special thermometric channel available in the core allows accommodation of the experimental facilities and output of information of the irradiation conditions by 30-50 communication lines. It was required to develop a series of independent instrumented capsule-loops, special instrumented fuel assemblies etc. to be used in the channel

  3. Development of essential system technologies for advanced reactor - Development of natural circulation analysis code for integral reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Goon Cherl; Park, Ik Gyu; Kim, Jae Hak; Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Tae Wan [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this study is to understand the natural circulation characteristics of integral type reactors and to develope the natural circulation analysis code for integral type reactors. This study is focused on the asymmetric 3-dimensional flow during natural circulation such as 1/4 steam generator section isolation and the inclination of the reactor systems. Natural circulation experiments were done using small-scale facilities of integral reactor SMART (System-Integrated Modular Advanced ReacTor). CFX4 code was used to investigate the flow patterns and thermal mixing phenomena in upper pressure header and downcomer. Differences between normal operation of all steam generators and the 1/4 section isolation conditions were observed and the results were used as the data 1/4 section isolation conditions were observed and the results were used as the data for RETRAN-03/INT code validation. RETRAN-03 code was modified for the development of natural circulation analysis code for integral type reactors, which was development of natural circulation analysis code for integral type reactors, which was named as RETRAN-03/INT. 3-dimensional analysis models for asymmetric flow in integral type reactors were developed using vector momentum equations in RETRAN-03. Analysis results using RETRAN-03/INT were compared with experimental and CFX4 analysis results and showed good agreements. The natural circulation characteristics obtained in this study will provide the important and fundamental design features for the future small and medium integral reactors. (author). 29 refs., 75 figs., 18 tabs.

  4. Cultural Resource Investigations for the Remote Handled Low Level Waste Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenda R. Pace; Hollie Gilbert; Julie Braun Williams; Clayton Marler; Dino Lowrey; Cameron Brizzee

    2010-06-01

    The U. S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office is considering options for construction of a facility for disposal of Idaho National Laboratory (INL) generated remote-handled low-level waste. Initial screening has resulted in the identification of two recommended alternative locations for this new facility: one near the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Complex and one near the Idaho Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act Disposal Facility (ICDF). In April and May of 2010, the INL Cultural Resource Management Office conducted archival searches, intensive archaeological field surveys, and initial coordination with the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes to identify cultural resources that may be adversely affected by new construction within either one of these candidate locations. This investigation showed that construction within the location near the ATR Complex may impact one historic homestead and several historic canals and ditches that are potentially eligible for nomination to the National Register of Historic Places. No resources judged to be of National Register significance were identified in the candidate location near the ICDF. Generalized tribal concerns regarding protection of natural resources were also documented in both locations. This report outlines recommendations for protective measures to help ensure that the impacts of construction on the identified resources are not adverse.

  5. Reactor numerical simulation and hydraulic test research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, L. S. [Nuclear Power Institute of China, Beijing (China)

    2009-07-01

    In recent years, the computer hardware was improved on the numerical simulation on flow field in the reactor. In our laboratory, we usually use the Pro/e or UG commercial software. After completed topology geometry, ICEM-CFD is used to get mesh for computation. Exact geometrical similarity is maintained between the main flow paths of the model and the prototype, with the exception of the core simulation design of the fuel assemblies. The drive line system is composed of drive mechanism, guide bush assembly, fuel assembly and control rod assembly, and fitted with the rod level indicator and drive mechanism power device.

  6. The reactor core analysis code CITATION-1000VP for High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor core analysis with full core model has been necessary for the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) design. The CITATION-1000VP code has been developed to enable reactor core analysis of HTTR with full core model through extending the number of zones and meshes, and enhancing the calculation speed of CITATION code. This report describes the program changes for extending the number of zones and meshes, and for vectorization. The maximum number of zones and meshes becomes 999 and 500, respectively. The calculation speed is enhanced up to 21 times. (author)

  7. Startup of the FFTF sodium cooled reactor. [Acceptance Test Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redekopp, R.D.; Umek, A.M.

    1981-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), located on the Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Reservation near Richland, Washington, is a 3 Loop 400 MW(t) sodium cooled fast reactor with a primary mission to test fuels and materials for development of the Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR). Bringing FFTF to a condition to accomplish this mission is the goal of the Acceptance Test Program (ATP). This program was the mechanism for achieving startup of the FFTF. Highlights of the ATP involving the system inerting, liquid metal and inerted cell testing and initial ascent to full power are discussed.

  8. Advances in shielding calculations for the PEC reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper calculations of neutron and gamma streaming through various penetrations in the plug and neutron shield of the sodium cooled fast reactor PEC, currently under construction, are described. The object of the calculations has been to verify the accessibility, 3 days after reactor shut-down, of the area directly above the reactor. (author)

  9. A study of the advancement of a reactor core design environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: During the years from 2002 to 2004 a joint project has been performed by IFE, Halden and Yonden Engineering Corporation, Japan, to develop an advanced reactor core design environment based on a communication method for controlling a reactor core code system efficiently from PCs in a distributed network. The advanced reactor core design environment is realized by using Microsoft Visual Basic and communication software based on the IFE product SoftwareBus. The project has been carried out based on the fact that a computer-aided design system has been under development at Yonden Engineering Corporation in order to perform efficiently fuel replacement calculation by Yonden's reactor design code system. In this system, the structure is such that the physics calculation code system runs on UNIX workstations (in parallel) performing the calculations, while the Man-Machine Interface for controlling the calculation programs run on PCs in a distributed network. It has been emphasised to develop a reliable, flexible, adaptable and user-friendly system, which is easy to maintain. Therefore, a rather general communication tool (IFE's SoftwareBus) has been used for realizing communication of the n-pair n-node between the reactor core design code system and the PC applications. Further, a method of improvement in the speed of the optimal pattern calculation has been implemented by assigning each examination pattern to two or more computers distributed in the network and assigning the next pattern calculation to the computer, where the calculation has ended or has the lowest workload. The high-speed technology of the pattern survey by network distributed processing is based on SoftwareBus. The reactor core design code system is developed in FORTRAN running on a UNIX workstation (Solaris). The PC applications have been developed by using Microsoft Visual Basic on Windows 2000 platform. The first step of the verification and validation process was carried out in March

  10. The ''CAMERA'' test facility in the OSIRIS reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CAMERA is an irradiation installation conceived to measure under neutronic flux and continuously the dimension variations of a fuel pencil of PWR reactors. The device, set in the periphery of the OSIRIS reactor, can receive new, preirradiated or reconstituted pencils. The principles of measurements is explained. Then, a brief description of the installation is given: in-pile part; out-of-pile part; connections. The technical characteristics of the installation are presented. A first qualification test of the installation under flux has been carried out at the end of the first semester 1984 in the OSIRIS reactor

  11. Numerical Evaluation of Fluid Mixing Phenomena in Boiling Water Reactor Using Advanced Interface Tracking Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Takase, Kazuyuki

    Thermal-hydraulic design of the current boiling water reactor (BWR) is performed with the subchannel analysis codes which incorporated the correlations based on empirical results including actual-size tests. Then, for the Innovative Water Reactor for Flexible Fuel Cycle (FLWR) core, an actual size test of an embodiment of its design is required to confirm or modify such correlations. In this situation, development of a method that enables the thermal-hydraulic design of nuclear reactors without these actual size tests is desired, because these tests take a long time and entail great cost. For this reason, we developed an advanced thermal-hydraulic design method for FLWRs using innovative two-phase flow simulation technology. In this study, a detailed Two-Phase Flow simulation code using advanced Interface Tracking method: TPFIT is developed to calculate the detailed information of the two-phase flow. In this paper, firstly, we tried to verify the TPFIT code by comparing it with the existing 2-channel air-water mixing experimental results. Secondary, the TPFIT code was applied to simulation of steam-water two-phase flow in a model of two subchannels of a current BWRs and FLWRs rod bundle. The fluid mixing was observed at a gap between the subchannels. The existing two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing is evaluated using detailed numerical simulation data. This data indicates that pressure difference between fluid channels is responsible for the fluid mixing, and thus the effects of the time average pressure difference and fluctuations must be incorporated in the two-phase flow correlation for fluid mixing. When inlet quality ratio of subchannels is relatively large, it is understood that evaluation precision of the existing two-phase flow correlations for fluid mixing are relatively low.

  12. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ... COMMISSION Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors... Treatment of Non-Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' The NRC seeks public...- Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' This area includes a revised......

  13. Advanced Mechanical Testing of Sandwich Materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayman, Brian; Berggreen, Christian; Jenstrup, Claus;

    2008-01-01

    An advanced digital optical system has been used to measure surface strains on sandwich face and core specimens tested in a project concerned with improved criteria for designing sandwich X-joints. The face sheet specimens were of glass reinforced polyester and were tested in tension. The core sp...

  14. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Test Reactor Point Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterbentz, James William [Idaho National Laboratory; Bayless, Paul David [Idaho National Laboratory; Nelson, Lee Orville [Idaho National Laboratory; Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Laboratory; Kinsey, James Carl [Idaho National Laboratory; Strydom, Gerhard [Idaho National Laboratory; Kumar, Akansha [Idaho National Laboratory

    2016-04-01

    A point design has been developed for a 200 MW high-temperature gas-cooled test reactor. The point design concept uses standard prismatic blocks and 15.5% enriched UCO fuel. Reactor physics and thermal-hydraulics simulations have been performed to characterize the capabilities of the design. In addition to the technical data, overviews are provided on the technological readiness level, licensing approach and costs.

  15. Entrained Flow Reactor Test of Potassium Capture by Kaolin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Guoliang; Jensen, Peter Arendt; Wu, Hao;

    2015-01-01

    In the present study a method to simulate the reaction between gaseous KCl and kaolin at suspension fired condition was developed using a pilot-scale entrained flow reactor (EFR). Kaolin was injected into the EFR for primary test of this method. By adding kaolin, KCl can effectively be captured......-bed reactor. The method using the EFR developed in this study will be applied for further systematic investigation of different additives....

  16. Overview of human factors issues associated with advanced passive reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power plant operators in current plants do just that, they operate the plant. They monitor the state of the process, observe trends, react to system changes and take action to maintain the plant in a safe condition. In order to accomplish these activities, they (1) rely on information available to them from the various instruments and displays in the control room, (2) use hard copy procedures to direct their actions and (3) perform their control actions through the various switches, keyboards and knobs available. Proposals from vendors and observations of activities in other countries indicate that the control room for advanced passive reactors is likely to be quite different from control rooms one would seen in current power plants. These differences will go beyond the immediate appearances, e.g., smaller, more cockpit-like, to issues of automation, function-allocation, the changing role of the operators and their training and qualifications, and software verification and validation. This research paper discusses some of these planned efforts and how they relate to the human factors issues and regulatory user needs

  17. Utility Leadership in Defining Requirements for Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is appropriate, based on twenty five years of operating experience, that utilities take a position of leadership in developing the technical design and performance requirements for the next generations of nuclear electric generating plants. The U. S. utilities, through the Electric Power Research Institute, began an initiative in 1985 to develop such Utility requirements. Many international Utility organizations, including Korea Electric Power Corporation, have joined as full participants in this important Utility industry initiative. In light of the closer linkage among countries of the world due to rapid travel and telecommunications, it is also appropriate that there be international dialogue and agreement on the principal standards for nuclear power plant acceptability and performance. The Utility/EPRI Advanced Light Water Reactor Program guided by the ALRR Utility Steering Committee has been very successful in developing these Utility requirements. This paper will summarize the state of development of the ALRR Utility Requirements for Evolutionary Plants, recent developments in their review by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, resolution of open issues, and the extension of this effort to develop a companion set of ALRR Utility Requirements for plants employing passive safety features

  18. On-Line NDE for Advanced Reactor Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, N.; Inanc, F.; Thompson, R. B.; Junker, W. R.; Ruddy, F. H.; Beatty, J. M.; Arlia, N. G.

    2003-03-01

    This expository paper introduces the concept of on-line sensor methodologies for monitoring the integrity of components in next generation power systems, and explains general benefits of the approach, while describing early conceptual developments of suitable NDE methodologies. The paper first explains the philosophy behind this approach (i.e. the design-for-inspectability concept). Specifically, we describe where and how decades of accumulated knowledge and experience in nuclear power system maintenance are utilized in Generation IV power system designs, as the designs are being actively developed, in order to advance their safety and economy. Second, we explain that Generation IV reactor design features call for the replacement of the current outage-based maintenance by on-line inspection and monitoring. Third, the model-based approach toward design and performance optimization of on-line sensor systems, using electromagnetic, ultrasonic, and radiation detectors, will be explained. Fourth, general types of NDE inspections that are considered amenable to on-line health monitoring will be listed. Fifth, we will describe specific modeling developments to be used for radiography, EMAT UT, and EC detector design studies.

  19. Method of advancing research and development of fast breeder reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the long term plan of atomic energy development and utilization, fast breeder reactors are to be developed as the main of the future nuclear power generation in Japan, and when their development is advanced, it has been decided to positively aim at building up the plutonium utilization system using FBRs superior to the uranium utilization system using LWRs. Also it has been decided that the development of FBRs requires to exert incessant efforts for a considerable long period under the proper cooperation system of government and people, and as for its concrete development, hereafter the deliberation is to be carried out in succession by the expert subcommittee on FBR development projects of the Atomic Energy Commission. The subcommittee was founded in May, 1986, to deliberate on the long term promotion measures for FBR development, the measures for promoting the research and development, the examination of the basic specification of a demonstration FBR, the measures for promoting international cooperation, and other important matters. As the results of investigation, the situation around the development of FBRs, the fundamentals at the time of promoting the research and development, the subjects of the research and development and so on are reported. (Kako, I.)

  20. HISTORICAL AMERICAN ENGINEERING RECORD - IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING AND ENVIRONMENTAL LABORATORY, TEST AREA NORTH, HAER NO. ID-33-E

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan Stacy; Hollie K. Gilbert

    2005-02-01

    Test Area North (TAN) was a site of the Aircraft Nuclear Propulsion (ANP) Project of the U.S. Air Force and the Atomic Energy Commission. Its Cold War mission was to develop a turbojet bomber propelled by nuclear power. The project was part of an arms race. Test activities took place in five areas at TAN. The Assembly & Maintenance area was a shop and hot cell complex. Nuclear tests ran at the Initial Engine Test area. Low-power test reactors operated at a third cluster. The fourth area was for Administration. A Flight Engine Test facility (hangar) was built to house the anticipated nuclear-powered aircraft. Experiments between 1955-1961 proved that a nuclear reactor could power a jet engine, but President John F. Kennedy canceled the project in March 1961. ANP facilities were adapted for new reactor projects, the most important of which were Loss of Fluid Tests (LOFT), part of an international safety program for commercial power reactors. Other projects included NASA's Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power and storage of Three Mile Island meltdown debris. National missions for TAN in reactor research and safety research have expired; demolition of historic TAN buildings is underway.

  1. Thermohydraulic relationships for advanced water cooled reactors, and the role of IAEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) a Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on Thermohydraulic Relationships for Advanced Water-Cooled Reactors was carried out from 1995-1999. It was included into the IAEA's Programme following endorsement in 1995 by the IAEA's International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water Cooled Reactors. The overall goal was to promote international information exchange and cooperation in establishing a consistent set of thermohydraulic relationships that are appropriate for use in analyzing the performance and safety of advanced water cooled reactors. (authors)

  2. Fuel, Structural Material and Coolant for an Advanced Fast Micro-Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Nascimento, J. A.; Duimarães, L. N. F.; Ono, S.

    The use of nuclear reactors in space, seabed or other Earth hostile environment in the future is a vision that some Brazilian nuclear researchers share. Currently, the USA, a leader in space exploration, has as long-term objectives the establishment of a permanent Moon base and to launch a manned mission to Mars. A nuclear micro-reactor is the power source chosen to provide energy for life support, electricity for systems, in these missions. A strategy to develop an advanced micro-reactor technologies may consider the current fast reactor technologies as back-up and the development of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials. The next generation reactors (GEN-IV) for terrestrial applications will operate with high output temperature to allow advanced conversion cycle, such as Brayton, and hydrogen production, among others. The development of an advanced fast micro-reactor may create a synergy between the GEN-IV and space reactor technologies. Considering a set of basic requirements and materials properties this paper discusses the choice of advanced fuel, structural and coolant materials for a fast micro-reactor. The chosen candidate materials are: nitride, oxide as back-up, for fuel, lead, tin and gallium for coolant, ferritic MA-ODS and Mo alloys for core structures. The next step will be the neutronic and burnup evaluation of core concepts with this set of materials.

  3. High field, low current operation of engineering test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steady state engineering test reactors with high field, low current operation are investigated and compared to high current, lower field concepts. Illustrative high field ETR parameters are R = 3 m, α ∼ 0.5 m, B ∼ 10 T, β = 2.2% and I = 4 MA. For similar wall loading the fusion power of an illustrative high field, low current concept could be about 50% that of a lower field device like TIBER II. This reduction could lead to a 50% decrease in tritium consumption, resulting in a substantial decrease in operating cost. Furthermore, high field operation could lead to substantially reduced current drive requirements and cost. A reduction in current drive source power on the order of 40 to 50 MW may be attainable relative to a lower field, high current design like TIBER II implying a possible cost savings on the order of $200 M. If current drive is less efficient than assumed, the savings could be even greater. Through larger β/sub p/ and aspect ratio, greater prospects for bootstrap current operation also exist. Further savings would be obtained from the reduced size of the first wall/blanket/shield system. The effects of high fields on magnet costs are very dependent on technological assumptions. Further improvements in the future may lie with advances in superconducting and structural materials

  4. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-07-01

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris{o} National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  5. Reduced enrichment for research and test reactors: Proceedings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 15th annual Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors (RERTR) international meeting was organized by Ris oe National Laboratory in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency and Argonne National Laboratory. The topics of the meeting were the following: National Programs, Fuel Fabrication, Licensing Aspects, States of Conversion, Fuel Testing, and Fuel Cycle. Individual papers have been cataloged separately

  6. The IRIS consortium: international cooperation in advanced reactor development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besides its many outstanding technical innovations in the design and safety, the most innovative feature of the International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS), is perhaps the international cooperation which carries on its development. IRIS is designed by an international consortium which currently numbers 21 organizations from ten countries across four continents. It includes reactor, fuel and fuel cycle vendors, component manufacturers, laboratories, academia, architect engineers and power producers. The defining organizational characteristics of IRIS is that while Westinghouse has overall lead and responsibility, this lead is of the type of 'primus inter pares' (first among equals) rather than the traditional owner versus suppliers/contractors relationship. All members of the IRIS consortium contribute and expect to have a return, should IRIS be successfully deployed, commensurate to their investment. The nature of such return will be tailored to the type of each organization, because it will of course be of a different nature for say a component manufacturer, university, or architect engineer. One fundamental tenet of the consortium is that all members, regardless of their amount of contribution, have equal access to all information developed within the project. Technical work is thus being coordinated by integrated subgroups and the whole team meets twice a year to perform an overall review of the work, discuss policy and strategy and plan future activities. Personnel from consortium members have performed internships, mostly at Westinghouse locations in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Windsor, Connecticut, but also at other members, as it has been the case for several graduate students. In fact, more than one hundred students at the various universities have been working on IRIS, most of them conducting graduate theses at the master or doctoral level. The IRIS experience has proved very helpful to the students in successfully landing their employment choice

  7. Design and present status of high-temperature engineering test reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy commission (JAEC) decided to construct the high-Temperature engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) in 1987 for establishing and upgrading the basic technologies for advanced HTGRs and serving an irradiation test facility for research in high temperature technologies. The HTTR is a graphite-moderated and helium-gas-cooled test reactor with thermal output of 30MW and inlet and maximum outlet coolant temperature of 395 C and 950 C respectively. Construction started in March 1991 at Oarai site of the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI), with its first criticality at the end of 1997 to be followed after a series of functional tests of half a year. Fabrication of reactor pressure vessel, an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX), gas circulators and other main cooling components has been finished in their factories and installed to the site in 1994. At present, the construction of HTTR reactor building and installation of containment vessel, main and auxiliary cooling systems, etc. are almost completed. This paper describes design of the HTTR reactor cooling system, control system and present status of the HTTR construction

  8. Developing a Comprehensive Software Suite for Advanced Reactor Performance and Safety Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an introduction to the reactor analysis capabilities of the nuclear power reactor simulation tools that are being developed as part of the US Department of Energy’s Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) Toolkit. The NEAMS Toolkit is an integrated suite of multiphysics simulation tools that leverage high performance computing to reduce uncertainty in the prediction of the performance and safety of advanced reactor and fuel designs. The toolkit effort is composed of two major components, the fuels product line, which provides tools for fuel performance analysis, and the reactor product line, which provides tools for reactor performance and safety analysis. This paper presents an overview of the NEAMS reactor product line development effort. (author)

  9. Deterministic and risk-informed approaches for safety analysis of advanced reactors: Part I, deterministic approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Sang Kyu [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Inn Seock, E-mail: innseockkim@gmail.co [ISSA Technology, 21318 Seneca Crossing Drive, Germantown, MD 20876 (United States); Oh, Kyu Myung [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, 19 Kusong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    The objective of this paper and a companion paper in this issue (part II, risk-informed approaches) is to derive technical insights from a critical review of deterministic and risk-informed safety analysis approaches that have been applied to develop licensing requirements for water-cooled reactors, or proposed for safety verification of the advanced reactor design. To this end, a review was made of a number of safety analysis approaches including those specified in regulatory guides and industry standards, as well as novel methodologies proposed for licensing of advanced reactors. This paper and the companion paper present the review insights on the deterministic and risk-informed safety analysis approaches, respectively. These insights could be used in making a safety case or developing a new licensing review infrastructure for advanced reactors including Generation IV reactors.

  10. Inductive testing of reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Service Inspection of Reactor Pressure Vessels is mostly done with ultrasonics. Using special 2 crystal-probes good detectability is achieved for near surface defects. The problem is to detect closely spaced cracks, to decide if the defects are surface braking and, if not, to decide the remaining ligament. The purpose of this study is to investigate to what extent Eddy Current can solve these problems. Detecting surfacebreaking cracks and fields of cracks can be done using conventional Eddy Current techniques. Mapping of closely spaced cracks requires a small probe and a high frequency. Measurement of depths a larger probe, a lower frequency and knowledge of the crackfield since 2 closely spaced shallow cracks might be mistaken for one deep crack. Depths of singel cracks can be measured down to 7-8 mm. In closely spaced crackfields the depths can not be measured. The measurement is mostly based on amplitude. For not surface breaking defects the problem is to decide the ligament, i.e. the distance between surface and cracktip. To achieve good penetration a large probe, low frequency and high energy or pulsed energy is used. Ligament up to 4 mm can be measured with good accuracy. The measurements is mostly based on phase. Noise, which originates from rough surface, varied material structure and lift off, can be reduced using multi frequency mix, probe design and scanning pattern. (author)

  11. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (2), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li17Pb83) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (10000C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter

  12. Mirror Advanced Reactor Study (MARS): executive summary and overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Logan, B.G.; Perkins, L.J.; Gordon, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Two self-consistent MARS configurations are discussed - a 1200-MWe commercial electricity-generating plant and a synguels-generating plant that produces hydrogen with an energy equivalent to 26,000 barrels of oil per day. The MARS machine emphasizes the attractive features of the tandem mirror concept, including steady-state operation, a small-diameter high-beta plasma, a linear central cell with simple low-maintenance blankets, low first-wall heat fluxes (<10 W/cm/sup 2/), no driven plasma currents or associated disruptions, natural halo impurity diversion, and direct conversion of end-loss charged-particle power. The MARS electric plant produces 2600 MW of fusion power in a 130-m-long central cell. Advanced tandem-mirror plasma-engineering concepts, a high-efficiency liquid lithium-lead (Li/sub 17/Pb/sub 83/) blanket, and efficient direct electrical conversion of end loss power combine to produce a high net plant efficiency of 36%. With a total capital cost of $2.9 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the MARS electric plant produces busbar electricity at approx. 7 cents/kW-hour. The MARS synfuels plant produces 3500 MW of fusion power in a 150-m-long central cell. A helium-gas-cooled silicon carbide pebble-bed blanket provides high-temperature (1000/sup 0/C) heat to a thermochemical water-splitting cycle and the resulting hydrogen is catalytically converted to methanol for distribution. With a total capital cost of $3.6 billion (constant 1983 dollars), the synfuels plant produces methanol fuel at about $1.7/gal. The major features of the MARS reactor include sloshing-ion thermal barrier plugs for efficient plasma confinement, a high efficiency blanket, high-field (24-T) choke cells, drift pumping for trapped plasma species, quasi-optical electron-cyclotron resonant heating (ECRH) systems, and a component gridless direct converter.

  13. Design features of Advanced Power Reactor (APR) 1400 steam generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced Power Reactor 1400 (APR 1400) which is to achieve the improvement of the safety and economical efficiency has been developed by Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) with the support from industries and research institutes. The steam generator for APR 1400 is an evolutionary type from System 80+, which is the recirculating U-tube heat exchanger with integral economizer. Compared to the System 80+ steam generator, it is focused on the improved design features, operating and design conditions of APR 1400 steam generator. Especially, from the operation experience of Korean Standard Nuclear Power Plant (KSNP) steam generator, the lessons-learned measures are incorporated to prevent the tube wear caused by flow-induced vibration (FIV). The concepts for the preventive design features against FIV are categorized to two fields; flow distribution and dynamic response characteristics. From the standpoint of flow distribution characteristics, the egg-crate flow distribution plate (EFDP) is installed to prevent the local excessive flow loaded on the most susceptible tube to wear. The parametric study is performed to select the optimum design with the efficient mitigation of local excessive flow. ATHOS3 Mod-01 is used and partly modified to analyze the flow field of the APR 1400 steam generator. In addition, the upper tube bundle support is designed to eliminate the presence of tube with a low natural frequency. Based on the improved upper tube bundle support, the modal analysis is performed and compared with that of System 80+. Using the results of flow distribution and modal analysis, the two mechanisms of flow-induced vibration are investigated; fluid-elastic instability (FEI) and random turbulence excitation (RTE). (authors)

  14. Research and development on the application of advanced control technologies to advanced nuclear reactor systems: A US national perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control system designs for nuclear power plants are becoming more advanced through the use of digital technology and automation. This evolution is taking place because of: (1) the limitations in analog based control system performance and maintenance and availability and (2) the promise of significant improvement in plant operation and availability due to advances in digital and other control technologies. Digital retrofits of control systems in US nuclear plants are occurring now. Designs of control and protection systems for advanced LWRs are based on digital technology. The use of small inexpensive, fast, large-capacity computers in these designs is the first step of an evolutionary process described in this paper. Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Argonne National Laboratory, GE Nuclear Energy and several universities are performing research and development in the application of advances in control theory, software engineering, advanced computer architectures, artificial intelligence, and man-machine interface analysis to control system design. The target plant concept for the work described in this paper is the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module reactor (PRISM), an advanced modular liquid metal reactor concept. This and other reactor designs which provide strong passive responses to operational upsets or accidents afford good opportunities to apply these advances in control technology. 18 refs., 5 figs

  15. Vibration tests on some models of PEC reactor core elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the aims of the experimental tests carried out at ISMES, within an agreement with the Department of Fast Reactors of ENEA, on some models of the elements of PEC Fast Nuclear Reactor Core in the frame of the activities for the seismic verification of the PEC core. The seismic verification is briefly described with particular attention to the problems arising from the shocks among the various elements during an earthquake, as well as the computer code used, the purpose and the techniques used to perform tests, some results and the first comparison between the theory and the experimental data

  16. Design of GA thermochemical water-splitting process for the Mirror Advanced Reactor System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    GA interfaced the sulfur-iodine thermochemical water-splitting cycle to the Mirror Advanced Reactor System (MARS). The results of this effort follow as one section and part of a second section to be included in the MARS final report. This section describes the process and its interface to the reactor. The capital and operating costs for the hydrogen plant are described

  17. Advanced Reactor Safety Research Program quarterly report, April--June 1977. [LMFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1977-11-01

    Information is presented concerning accident energetics; core debris behavior; sodium containment and structural integrity; research for elevated temperature design criteria; fuel motion detection; ACPR fuel motion system; and advanced reactor safety research assessment.

  18. Advanced Fuels Campaign Light Water Reactor Accident Tolerant Fuel Performance Metrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brad Merrill; Melissa Teague; Robert Youngblood; Larry Ott; Kevin Robb; Michael Todosow; Chris Stanek; Mitchell Farmer; Michael Billone; Robert Montgomery; Nicholas Brown; Shannon Bragg-Sitton

    2014-02-01

    The safe, reliable and economic operation of the nation’s nuclear power reactor fleet has always been a top priority for the United States’ nuclear industry. As a result, continual improvement of technology, including advanced materials and nuclear fuels, remains central to industry’s success. Decades of research combined with continual operation have produced steady advancements in technology and yielded an extensive base of data, experience, and knowledge on light water reactor (LWR) fuel performance under both normal and accident conditions. In 2011, following the Great East Japan Earthquake, resulting tsunami, and subsequent damage to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant complex, enhancing the accident tolerance of LWRs became a topic of serious discussion. As a result of direction from the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) initiated an Accident Tolerant Fuel (ATF) Development program. The complex multiphysics behavior of LWR nuclear fuel makes defining specific material or design improvements difficult; as such, establishing qualitative attributes is critical to guide the design and development of fuels and cladding with enhanced accident tolerance. This report summarizes a common set of technical evaluation metrics to aid in the optimization and down selection of candidate designs. As used herein, “metrics” describe a set of technical bases by which multiple concepts can be fairly evaluated against a common baseline and against one another. Furthermore, this report describes a proposed technical evaluation methodology that can be applied to assess the ability of each concept to meet performance and safety goals relative to the current UO2 – zirconium alloy system and relative to one another. The resultant ranked evaluation can then inform concept down-selection, such that the most promising accident tolerant fuel design option(s) can continue to be developed for lead test rod or lead test assembly

  19. Development of a computer code for dynamic analysis of the primary circuit of advanced reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, advanced reactors are being developed, seeking for enhanced safety, better performance and low environmental impacts. Reactor designs must follow several steps and numerous tests before a conceptual project could be certified. In this sense, computational tools become indispensable in the preparation of such projects. Thus, this study aimed at the development of a computational tool for thermal-hydraulic analysis by coupling two computer codes to evaluate the influence of transients caused by pressure variations and flow surges in the region of the primary circuit of IRIS reactor between the core and the pressurizer. For the simulation, it was used a situation of 'insurge', characterized by the entry of water in the pressurizer, due to the expansion of the refrigerant in the primary circuit. This expansion was represented by a pressure disturbance in step form, through the block 'step' of SIMULINK, thus enabling the transient startup. The results showed that the dynamic tool, obtained through the coupling of the codes, generated very satisfactory responses within model limitations, preserving the most important phenomena in the process. (author)

  20. Development of a computer code for dynamic analysis of the primary circuit of advanced reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Jussie Soares da; Lira, Carlos A.B.O.; Magalhaes, Mardson A. de Sa, E-mail: cabol@ufpe.b [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (DEN/UFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Energia Nuclear

    2011-07-01

    Currently, advanced reactors are being developed, seeking for enhanced safety, better performance and low environmental impacts. Reactor designs must follow several steps and numerous tests before a conceptual project could be certified. In this sense, computational tools become indispensable in the preparation of such projects. Thus, this study aimed at the development of a computational tool for thermal-hydraulic analysis by coupling two computer codes to evaluate the influence of transients caused by pressure variations and flow surges in the region of the primary circuit of IRIS reactor between the core and the pressurizer. For the simulation, it was used a situation of 'insurge', characterized by the entry of water in the pressurizer, due to the expansion of the refrigerant in the primary circuit. This expansion was represented by a pressure disturbance in step form, through the block 'step' of SIMULINK, thus enabling the transient startup. The results showed that the dynamic tool, obtained through the coupling of the codes, generated very satisfactory responses within model limitations, preserving the most important phenomena in the process. (author)

  1. Preliminary Study for Conceptual Design of Advanced Long Life Small Modular Fast Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tak, Taewoo; Choe, Jiwon; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, T. K. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2015-05-15

    As one of the non-water coolant Small-Modular Reactor (SMR) core concepts for use in the mid- to long-term, ANL has proposed a 100 MWe Advanced sodium-cooled Fast Reactor core concept (AFR-100) targeting a small grid, transportable from pre-licensed factories to the remote plant site for affordable supply. Various breed-and-burn core concepts have been proposed to extend the reactor cycle length, which includes CANDLE with a cigar-type depletion strategy, TerraPower reactors with fuel shuffling for effective breeding, et al. UNIST has also proposed an ultra-long cycle fast reactor (UCFR) core concept having the power rating of 1000 MWe. By adopting the breed-and-burn strategies, the UCFR core can maintain criticality for a targeting reactor lifetime of 60 years without refueling. The objective of this project is to develop an advanced long-life SMR core concept by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. A conceptual design of long life small modular fast reactor is under development by adopting both the small modular design features of the AFR-100 and the long-life breed-and-burn concept of the UCFR. The feasibility of the long-life fast reactor concepts was reviewed to obtain the core design guidelines and the reactor design requirements of long life small modular fast reactor were proposed in this study.

  2. Assessment of the Technical Maturity of Generation IV Concepts for Test or Demonstration Reactor Applications, Revision 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gougar, Hans David [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) commissioned a study the suitability of different advanced reactor concepts to support materials irradiations (i.e. a test reactor) or to demonstrate an advanced power plant/fuel cycle concept (demonstration reactor). As part of the study, an assessment of the technical maturity of the individual concepts was undertaken to see which, if any, can support near-term deployment. A Working Group composed of the authors of this document performed the maturity assessment using the Technical Readiness Levels as defined in DOE’s Technology Readiness Guide . One representative design was selected for assessment from of each of the six Generation-IV reactor types: gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR), lead-cooled fast reactor (LFR), molten salt reactor (MSR), supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR), sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR), and very high temperature reactor (VHTR). Background information was obtained from previous detailed evaluations such as the Generation-IV Roadmap but other technical references were also used including consultations with concept proponents and subject matter experts. Outside of Generation IV activity in which the US is a party, non-U.S. experience or data sources were generally not factored into the evaluations as one cannot assume that this data is easily available or of sufficient quality to be used for licensing a US facility. The Working Group established the scope of the assessment (which systems and subsystems needed to be considered), adapted a specific technology readiness scale, and scored each system through discussions designed to achieve internal consistency across concepts. In general, the Working Group sought to determine which of the reactor options have sufficient maturity to serve either the test or demonstration reactor missions.

  3. Test Plan for Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company (LITCO), ARROW-PAK Packaging, Docket 95-40-7A, Type A Container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the U.S. Department of Transportation Specification 7A Type A (DOT-7A) compliance testing to be followed for qualification of the Lockheed Idaho Technologies Company, ARROW-PAK, for use as a Type A Packaging. The packaging configuration being tested is intended for transportation of radioactive solids, Form No. 1, Form No. 2, and Form No. 3

  4. Improving the proliferation resistance of research and test reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elimination, or substantial reduction, of the trade in unirradiated highly-enriched fuel elements for research and test reactors would significantly reduce the proliferation risk associated with the current potential for diversion of these materials. To this end, it is the long-term goal of U.S. policy to fuel all new and existing research and test reactors with uranium of less-than-20% enrichment (but substantially greater than natural) excepting, perhaps, only a small number of high-power, high-performance, reactors. The U.S. development program for enrichment reduction in research and test reactor designs currently using 90-93% enriched uranium is based on the practical criterion that enrichment reduction should not cause significant flux performance (flux per unit power) or burnup performance degradation relative to the unmodified reactor design. To first order, this implies the requirement that the 235U loading in the reduced-enrichment fuel elements be the same as the 235U loading in the 90-93% enriched fuel elements. This can be accomplished by substitution of higher uranium density fuel technology for currently-used fuel technology in the fuel meat volume of the current fuel element design and/or by increasing the usable fuel meat volume. For research and test reactors of power greater than 5-10 megawatts, fuel technology does not currently exist that would permit enrichment reductions to below 20% utilizing this criterion. A program is now beginning in the U.S. to develop the necessary fuel technology. Currently-proven fuel technology is capable, however, of accommodating enrichment reductions to the 30-45% range (from 90-93%) for many reactors in the 5-50MW range. Accordingly the U.S. is proposing to convert existing reactors (and new designs) in the 5-50MW range from the use of highly-enriched fuel to the use of 30-45% enriched fuel, and reactors of less that about 5MW to less-than-20% enrichment, wherever this can be done without significant performance

  5. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  6. Nuclear developments: the DMAX advanced reactor control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Framatome has recently developed a new system for controlling the rod cluster control assemblies of pressurized water reactors, called the DMAX. The associated reactor control method is called 'mode X'. The DMAX system will be installed in all 'N4' model Framatome nuclear steam supply systems, the first two of which are presently under construction on the Chooz site in France. It will enable fine controlling of the reactor coolant temperature and the axial power offset, entirely automatically, due to double closed-loop regulation. The new DMAX system allows temperature control and continuous maintenance of a stable reactor core power distribution, because of an original method for controlling the movements of the control rods within the reactor. The disturbing xenon oscillations are practically eliminated and the operator is freed from the need of constantly monitoring the axial power offset, which is necessary in the commonly used 'A' or 'G' control modes. The probability of penalizing initial conditions in case an incident or accident occurs is considerably reduced in mode X, with the DMAX system, and the reactor's load-following performances are improved. In addition, the reactivity variations that must necessarily be compensated for in mode G by changing the boric acid concentration of the reactor coolant can be simply compensated for by control rod movements in mode X. This possibility yields a major reduction in the volume of liquid effluents that must subsequently be created. The system is outlined and its operation explained. (author)

  7. The technology development for surveillance test of reactor vessel materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee Ok; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lee, Sam Lai; Choi, Sun Phil; Park, Day Young; Choi, Kwen Jai

    1997-12-01

    Benchmark test was performed in accordance with the requirement of US NRC Reg. Guide DG-1053 for Kori unit-1 in order to determine best-estimated fast neutron fluence irradiated into reactor vessel. Since the uncertainty of radiation analysis comes from the calculation error due to neutron cross-section data, reactor core geometrical dimension, core source, mesh density, angular expansion and convergence criteria, evaluation of calculational uncertainty due to analytical method was performed in accordance with the regulatory guide and the proof was performed for entire analysis by comparing the measurement value obtained by neutron dosimetry located in surveillance capsule. Best-estimated neutron fluence in reactor vessel was calculated by bias factor, neutron flux measurement value/calculational value, from reanalysis result from previous 1st through 4th surveillance testing and finally fluence prediction was performed for the end of reactor life and the entire period of plant life extension. Pressurized thermal shock analysis was performed in accordance with 10 CFR 50.61 using the result of neutron fluence analysis in order to predict the life of reactor vessel material and the criteria of safe operation for Kori unit 1 was reestablished. (author). 55 refs., 55 figs.

  8. Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

    2008-09-11

    The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

  9. A Compilation of Boiling Water Reactor Operational Experience for the United Kingdom's Office for Nuclear Regulation's Advanced Boiling Water Reactor Generic Design Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Liao, Huafei [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-12-01

    United States nuclear power plant Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under law as required by 10 CFR 50.72 and 50.73 were evaluated for reliance to the United Kingdom’s Health and Safety Executive – Office for Nuclear Regulation’s (ONR) general design assessment of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design. An NRC compendium of LERs, compiled by Idaho National Laboratory over the time period January 1, 2000 through March 31, 2014, were sorted by BWR safety system and sorted into two categories: those events leading to a SCRAM, and those events which constituted a safety system failure. The LERs were then evaluated as to the relevance of the operational experience to the ABWR design.

  10. A compilation of boiling water reactor operational experience for the United Kingdom's Office for Nuclear Regulations Advanced Boiling Water Reactor generic design assessment.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wheeler, Timothy A.; Liao, Huafei

    2014-12-01

    United States nuclear power plant Licensee Event Reports (LERs), submitted to the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) under law as required by 10 CFR 50.72 and 50.73 were evaluated for reliance to the United Kingdoms Health and Safety Executive Office for Nuclear Regulations (ONR) general design assessment of the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) design. An NRC compendium of LERs, compiled by Idaho National Laboratory over the time period January 1, 2000 through March 31, 2014, were sorted by BWR safety system and sorted into two categories: those events leading to a SCRAM, and those events which constituted a safety system failure. The LERs were then evaluated as to the relevance of the operational experience to the ABWR design.

  11. A concept of an advanced inertia fusion reactor; TAKANAWA-I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept of an advanced inertia fusion reactor: TAKANAWA-I is proposed. A pellet with DT ignitor and DD major fuel, Pb wet walls, C or SiC blocks for shielding, and SiC vessels in the water pool are employed. This reactor does not need blanckets for T breeding, since T is supplied through DD reaction, and has low induced radioactivities. These and a simple structure might give a hopeful prediction of economical and safe advantages and mitigate difficulties of reactor technologies, especially remote maintenance of the reactor. (author)

  12. Inherent safety of advanced nuclear engineering based on BN-800 - type fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considerations based on the prolonged experience of fast reactor operations exhibiting outlook application of reactors on a basis of BN-800 with sodium coolant are given. Reliability and safety of the block are supported by the probability analysis of safety in the content of engineering project. Conversion on the reactor core with nitride fuel will significantly raise a possibility to conform to safety and nonproliferation of fission materials needs. The suggested optimum variant for reactor core on a basis of nitride fuel is advanced

  13. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field in Flow-guide Tank of China Advanced Research Reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The flow-guide tank of China advanced research reactor (CARR) is located at the top of the reactor vessel and connected with the inlet coolant pipe. It acts as a reactor inlet coolant distributor and plays an important role in reducing the flow-induced vibration of the internal components of the reactor core. Several designs of the flow-guide tank have been proposed, however, the final design option has to be made after detailed investigation of the velocity profile within the flow-guide tank for each configuration.

  14. Idaho National Laboratory Experimental Program to Measure the Flow Phenomena in a Scaled Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor Lower Plenum for Validation of CFD Codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hugh M. McIlroy Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2008-09-01

    The experimental program that is being conducted at the Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to obtain benchmark data on measurements of flow phenomena in a scaled model of a prismatic gas-cooled reactor lower plenum using 3-D Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) is presented. A description of the scaling analysis, experimental facility, 3-D PIV system, measurement uncertainties and analysis, experimental procedures and samples of the data sets that have been obtained are included. Samples of the data set that will be presented include mean-velocity-field and turbulence data in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the mineral oil working fluid. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits high-quality measurements to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL MIR system is its large size which allows improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean average flow rate) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. The measurements

  15. In situ tests on the PEC fast reactor building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes forced excitation tests carried out at the PEC reactor building, to determine seismic motion amplifications produced in the building itself. Experimental results are used to gauge numerical methodologies capable of assessing the margins existing in the design analysis. (orig./HP)

  16. Natural convection test in Phenix reactor and associated CATHARE calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Phenix sodium cooled fast reactor started operation in 1973 and was stopped in 2009. Before the reactor was definitively stopped, final tests were performed, including a natural convection test in the primary circuit. One objective of this natural convection test in Phenix reactor is the qualification of plant dynamic codes as CATHARE code for future safety studies. The paper firstly describes the Phenix reactor primary circuit. The initial test conditions and the detailed transient scenario are presented. Then, the CATHARE modelling of the Phenix primary circuit is described. The whole transient scenario is calculated, including the nominal state, the steam generators dry out, the scram, the onset of natural convection in the primary circuit and the natural convection phases. The CATHARE calculations are compared to the Phenix measurements. A particular attention is paid to the significant decrease of the core power before the scram. Then, the evolution of main components inlet and outlet temperatures is compared. The need of coupling a system code with a CFD code to model the 3D behaviour of large pools is pointed out. This work is in progress. (author)

  17. Worldwide advanced nuclear power reactors with passive and inherent safety: What, why, how, and who

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The political controversy over nuclear power, the accidents at Three Mile Island (TMI) and Chernobyl, international competition, concerns about the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect and technical breakthroughs have resulted in a segment of the nuclear industry examining power reactor concepts with PRIME safety characteristics. PRIME is an acronym for Passive safety, Resilience, Inherent safety, Malevolence resistance, and Extended time after initiation of an accident for external help. The basic ideal of PRIME is to develop power reactors in which operator error, internal sabotage, or external assault do not cause a significant release of radioactivity to the environment. Several PRIME reactor concepts are being considered. In each case, an existing, proven power reactor technology is combined with radical innovations in selected plant components and in the safety philosophy. The Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor is a modified pressurized-water reactor, the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is a modified gas-cooled reactor, and the Advanced CANDU Project is a modified heavy-water reactor. In addition to the reactor concepts, there is parallel work on super containments. The objective is the development of a passive ''box'' that can contain radioactivity in the event of any type of accident. This report briefly examines: why a segment of the nuclear power community is taking this new direction, how it differs from earlier directions, and what technical options are being considered. A more detailed description of which countries and reactor vendors have undertaken activities follows. 41 refs

  18. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval

  19. Study of Pu consumption in advanced light water reactors: Evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants - compilation of Phase 1B task reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-09-15

    This report contains an extensive evaluation of GE advanced boiling water reactor plants prepared for United State Department of Energy. The general areas covered in this report are: core and system performance; fuel cycle; infrastructure and deployment; and safety and environmental approval.

  20. Development of an advanced antineutrino detector for reactor monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Classen, T., E-mail: classen2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Bernstein, A.; Bowden, N.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Cabrera-Palmer, B. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Ho, A.; Jonkmans, G. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada); Kogler, L.; Reyna, D. [Sandia Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Sur, B. [Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, ON (Canada)

    2015-01-21

    Here we present the development of a compact antineutrino detector for the purpose of nuclear reactor monitoring, improving upon a previously successful design. This paper will describe the design improvements of the detector which increases the antineutrino detection efficiency threefold over the previous effort. There are two main design improvements over previous generations of detectors for nuclear reactor monitoring: dual-ended optical readout and single volume detection mass. The dual-ended optical readout eliminates the need for fiducialization and increases the uniformity of the detector's optical response. The containment of the detection mass in a single active volume provides more target mass per detector footprint, a key design criteria for operating within a nuclear power plant. This technology could allow for real-time monitoring of the evolution of a nuclear reactor core, independent of reactor operator declarations of fuel inventories, and may be of interest to the safeguards community.

  1. The DOE Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David Petti; Hans Gougar; Gary Bell

    2005-05-01

    The Department of Energy has established the Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program to address the following overall goals: Provide a baseline fuel qualification data set in support of the licensing and operation of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). Gas-reactor fuel performance demonstration and qualification comprise the longest duration research and development (R&D) task for the NGNP feasibility. The baseline fuel form is to be demonstrated and qualified for a peak fuel centerline temperature of 1250°C. Support near-term deployment of an NGNP by reducing market entry risks posed by technical uncertainties associated with fuel production and qualification. Utilize international collaboration mechanisms to extend the value of DOE resources. The Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Development and Qualification Program consists of five elements: fuel manufacture, fuel and materials irradiations, postirradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term evaluation. An underlying theme for the fuel development work is the need to develop a more complete fundamental understanding of the relationship between the fuel fabrication process, key fuel properties, the irradiation performance of the fuel, and the release and transport of fission products in the NGNP primary coolant system. Fuel performance modeling and analysis of the fission product behavior in the primary circuit are important aspects of this work. The performance models are considered essential for several reasons, including guidance for the plant designer in establishing the core design and operating limits, and demonstration to the licensing authority that the applicant has a thorough understanding of the in-service behavior of the fuel system. The fission product behavior task will also provide primary source term data needed for licensing. An overview of the program and recent progress will be presented.

  2. Advanced CANDU reactors fuel analysis through optimal fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The analysis of alternate CANDU fuels along with natural uranium-based fuel was carried out from the view point of optimal in-core fuel management at approach to refuelling equilibrium. The alternate fuels considered in the present work include thorium containing oxide mixtures (MOX), plutonium-based MOX, and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) spent fuel recycled in CANDU reactors (Direct Use of spent PWR fuel in CANDU (DUPIC)); these are compared with the usual natural UO2 fuel. The focus of the study is on the 'Approach to Refuelling Equilibrium' period which immediately follows the initial commissioning of the reactor. The in-core fuel management problem for this period is treated as an optimization problem in which the objective function is the refuelling frequency to be minimized by adjusting the following decision variables: the channel to be refuelled next, the time of the refuelling and the number of fresh fuel bundles to be inserted in the channel. Several constraints are also included in the optimisation problem which is solved using Perturbation Theory. Both the present 37-rod CANDU fuel bundle and the proposed CANFLEX bundle designs are part of this study. The results include the time to reach refuelling equilibrium from initial start-up of the reactor, the average discharge burnup, the average refuelling frequency and the average channel and bundle powers relative to natural UO2. The model was initially tested and the average discharge burnup for natural UO2 came within 2% of the industry accepted 199 MWh/kgHE. For this type of fuel, the optimization exercise predicted the savings of 43 bundles per full power year. In addition to producing average discharge burnups and other parameters for the advanced fuels investigated, the optimisation model also evidenced some problem areas like high power densities for fuels such as the DUPIC. Perturbation Theory has proven itself to be an accurate and valu