WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced technical ceramics

  1. Advanced Ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The First Florida-Brazil Seminar on Materials and the Second State Meeting about new materials in Rio de Janeiro State show the specific technical contribution in advanced ceramic sector. The others main topics discussed for the development of the country are the advanced ceramic programs the market, the national technic-scientific capacitation, the advanced ceramic patents, etc. (C.G.C.)

  2. Ceramic Integration Technologies for Advanced Energy Systems: Critical Needs, Technical Challenges, and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2010-01-01

    Advanced ceramic integration technologies dramatically impact the energy landscape due to wide scale application of ceramics in all aspects of alternative energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, gas turbine propulsion systems, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation and waste disposal. Ceramic integration technologies play a key role in fabrication and manufacturing of large and complex shaped parts with multifunctional properties. However, the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance requires the understanding of many thermochemical and thermomechanical factors, particularly for high temperature applications. In this presentation, various needs, challenges, and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic metal) material www.nasa.gov 45 ceramic-ceramic-systems have been discussed. Experimental results for bonding and integration of SiC based Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) LDI fuel injector and advanced ceramics and composites for gas turbine applications are presented.

  3. Advanced Ceramics Property Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the "what, how, how not, and why" for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of standards in one volume.

  4. III Advanced Ceramics and Applications Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Gadow, Rainer; Mitic, Vojislav; Obradovic, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This is the Proceedings of III Advanced Ceramics and Applications conference, held in Belgrade, Serbia in 2014. It contains 25 papers on various subjects regarding preparation, characterization and application of advanced ceramic materials.

  5. Advanced ceramics: the present and the perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Development in the Brazilian and international areas of advanced ceramics is described, emphasizing its economic perspectivas and industrial applications. Results obtained by national institutions are reviewed, mainly in the context of those that pioneered the required high technology in this ceramic field. The rapid growth of the interest for those special materials, made more evident by ample information related to the superconducting ceramics great pontential for important practical applications, is one of the most significant characteristics of the area. (author)

  6. Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-08-01

    The Ceramic Technology For Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Advanced Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DOD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The objective of the project is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic hearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  7. Ceramic technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1991-07-01

    Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and database and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. This project is managed by ORNL for the Office of Transportation Technologies, Office of Transportation Materials, and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DOD, and industry.

  8. Photon CT scanning of advanced ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ceramic materials are being developed for high temperature applications in advanced heat engines and high temperature heat recovery systems. Small size flaws (10 - 200 μm) and small nonuniformities in density distributions (0.1 -2%) present as long-range density gradients, are critical in most ceramics and their detection is of crucial importance. Computed tomographic (CT) imaging provides a means of obtaining a precise two-dimensional density map of a cross section through an object from which accurate information about small flaws and small density gradients can be obtained. With the use of high energy photon sources high contrast CT images can be obtained for both low and high density ceramics. In the present paper we illustrate the applicability of the photon CT technique to the examination of advanced ceramics. CT images of sintered alumina tiles are presented from which data on high-density inclusions, cracks and density gradients have been extracted

  9. Development of Advanced Ceramic Manufacturing Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.

    2001-04-05

    Advanced structural ceramics are enabling materials for new transportation engine systems that have the potential for significantly reducing energy consumption and pollution in automobiles and heavy vehicles. Ceramic component reliability and performance have been demonstrated in previous U.S. DOE initiatives, but high manufacturing cost was recognized as a major barrier to commercialization. Norton Advanced Ceramics (NAC), a division of Saint-Gobain Industrial Ceramics, Inc. (SGIC), was selected to perform a major Advanced Ceramics Manufacturing Technology (ACMT) Program. The overall objectives of NAC's program were to design, develop, and demonstrate advanced manufacturing technology for the production of ceramic exhaust valves for diesel engines. The specific objectives were (1) to reduce the manufacturing cost by an order of magnitude, (2) to develop and demonstrate process capability and reproducibility, and (3) to validate ceramic valve performance, durability, and reliability. The program was divided into four major tasks: Component Design and Specification, Component Manufacturing Technology Development, Inspection and Testing, and Process Demonstration. A high-power diesel engine valve for the DDC Series 149 engine was chosen as the demonstration part for this program. This was determined to be an ideal component type to demonstrate cost-effective process enhancements, the beneficial impact of advanced ceramics on transportation systems, and near-term commercialization potential. The baseline valve material was NAC's NT451 SiAION. It was replaced, later in the program, by an alternate silicon nitride composition (NT551), which utilized a lower cost raw material and a simplified powder-processing approach. The material specifications were defined based on DDC's engine requirements, and the initial and final component design tasks were completed.

  10. Advanced Ceramic Materials for Future Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Ajay

    2015-01-01

    With growing trend toward higher temperature capabilities, lightweight, and multifunctionality, significant advances in ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) will be required for future aerospace applications. The presentation will provide an overview of material requirements for future aerospace missions, and the role of ceramics and CMCs in meeting those requirements. Aerospace applications will include gas turbine engines, aircraft structure, hypersonic and access to space vehicles, space power and propulsion, and space communication.

  11. Advanced Ceramics Property and Performance Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael; Salem, Jonathan; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George; Gonczy, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties of ceramic bodies can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. The Advanced Ceramics Committee of ASTM, C-28, has developed dozens of consensus test standards and practices to measure various properties of a ceramic monolith, composite, or coating. The standards give the what, how, how not, and why for measurement of many mechanical, physical, thermal, and performance properties. Using these standards will provide accurate, reliable, and complete data for rigorous comparisons with other test results from your test lab, or another. The C-28 Committee has involved academics, producers, and users of ceramics to write and continually update more than 45 standards since the committees inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the C-28 standards and information on how to obtain individual copies with full details or the complete collection of all of the standards in one volume.

  12. Development in laser peening of advanced ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pratik; Smith, Graham C.; Waugh, David G.; Lawrence, Jonathan

    2015-07-01

    Laser peening is a well-known process applicable to surface treat metals and alloys in various industrial sectors. Research in the area of laser peening of ceramics is still scarce and a complete laser-ceramic interaction is still unreported. This paper focuses on laser peening of SiC ceramics employed for cutting tools, armor plating, dental and biomedical implants, with a view to elucidate the unreported work. A detailed investigation was conducted with 1064nm Nd:YAG ns pulse laser to first understand the surface effects, namely: the topography, hardness, KIc and the microstructure of SiC advanced ceramics. The results showed changes in surface roughness and microstructural modification after laser peening. An increase in surface hardness was found by almost 2 folds, as the diamond footprints and its flaws sizes were considerably reduced, thus, enhancing the resistance of SiC to better withstand mechanical impact. This inherently led to an enhancement in the KIc by about 42%. This is attributed to an induction of compressive residual stress and phase transformation. This work is a first-step towards the development of a 3-dimensional laser peening technique to surface treat many advanced ceramic components. This work has shown that upon tailoring the laser peening parameters may directly control ceramic topography, microstructure, hardness and the KIc. This is useful for increasing the performance of ceramics used for demanding applications particularly where it matters such as in military. Upon successful peening of bullet proof vests could result to higher ballistic strength and resistance against higher sonic velocity, which would not only prevent serious injuries, but could also help to save lives of soldiers on the battle fields.

  13. Ceramic technology for advanced heat engines project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines Project was developed by the Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Systems in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTT's automotive technology programs. This project is managed by ORNL and is closely coordinated with complementary ceramics tasks funded by other DOE offices, NASA, DoD, and industry. Research is discussed under the following topics; Turbomilling of SiC Whiskers; microwave sintering of silicon nitride; and milling characterization; processing of monolithics; silicon nitride matrix; oxide matrix; silicate matrix; thermal and wear coatings; joining; design; contact interfaces; time-dependent behavior; environmental effects; fracture mechanics; nondestructive evaluation; and technology transfer. References, figures, and tables are included with each topic.

  14. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Kuo, P.; Liu, S.; Murphy, D.; Picone, J.W.; Ramanath, S.

    2000-05-01

    This Final Report covers the Phase II Innovative Grinding Wheel (IGW) program in which Norton Company successfully developed a novel grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. In 1995, Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics using small prototype wheels. The Phase II program was initiated to scale-up the new superabrasive wheel specification to larger diameters, 305-mm to 406-mm, required for most production grinding of cylindrical ceramic parts, and to perform in-house and independent validation grinding tests.

  15. Technical advances power neuroscience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barinaga, M.

    1991-01-01

    New techniques are helping researchers study the development of nerve cells in cell cultures and in vivo. These new methods are offering insights into the brain that were not available even a couple of years ago. Among the new advances discussed are imaging technology for evaluating the thinking human brain. One area in which researchers have made recent progress is the quest for ways to create immortal cell lines from specific types of nerve cells. Other projects using genetically engineered retroviruses and tumor-inducing genes, as well as gene regulation are discussed. Recent advances in neuroscience techniques apply not only to neurons, but also to whole brains as well. One example is a high-resulution electroencephalogram (EEG). Although the EEG cannot pin down the actual sites of activity as precisely as static brain imaging methods, it complements them with real-time recording that can keep up with the very rapid pace of brain activity.

  16. Ceramics technology for advanced industrial gas turbines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent developments in the fabrication of high strength ceramic materials and in their application to automotive and aerospace gas turbine engines may lead also to significant improvements in the performance of industrial gas turbines. This paper presents a brief review of the improvements projected in a study initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy. The future costs of power generated by small gas turbines (up to 25 MW) are predicted, as well as the potential for fuel savings. Gas turbines in this size range are used extensively for gas compression and for cogeneration, as well as in a variety of more diverse applications. This paper includes results of analyses of the ways in which changes in gas turbine cost and performance are likely to affect market penetration. These results lead to predictions of future savings in U.S. fuel consumption in the industrial sector that would result. The paper also presents a brief overview of the scope of a suggested R and D program, with an appropriate schedule, which would provide a technical basis for achieving the projected results. Important parts of this program would cover ceramic design and fabrication technology, engine development and demonstration, and combustion technology

  17. Advanced ceramics in Brazil: actual stage and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of advanced ceramics in Brazil, the perspectives of the world and Brazilian markets, the raw materials, the equipments for industry and research, the human resources, and the disposable technology, are presented. The researches on advanced ceramics in Brazil initiated in the sixty decade, with the nuclear fuel development and production projets. (M.C.K.)

  18. ADVANCED SECOND GENERATION CERAMIC CANDLE FILTERS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Alvin

    2002-01-31

    Through sponsorship from the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), development and manufacture of advanced second generation candle filters was undertaken in the early 1990's. Efforts were primarily focused on the manufacture of fracture toughened, 1.5 m, continuous fiber ceramic composite (CFCC) and filament wound candle filters by 3M, McDermott, DuPont Lanxide Composites, and Techniweave. In order to demonstrate long-term thermal, chemical, and mechanical stability of the advanced second generation candle filter materials, Siemens Westinghouse initiated high temperature, bench-scale, corrosion testing of 3M's CVI-SiC and DuPont's PRD-66 mini-candles, and DuPont's CFCC SiC-SiC and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} coupons under simulated, pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) conditions. This effort was followed by an evaluation of the mechanical and filtration performance of the advanced second generation filter elements in Siemens Westinghouse's bench-scale PFBC test facility in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Arrays of 1.4-1.5 m 3M CVI-SiC, DuPont PRD-66, DuPont SiC-SiC, and IF&P Fibrosic{sup TM} candles were subjected to steady state process operating conditions, increased severity thermal transients, and accelerated pulse cycling test campaigns which represented {approx}1760 hours of equivalent filter operating life. Siemens Westinghouse subsequently participated in early material surveillance programs which marked entry of the 3M CVI-SiC and DuPont PRD-66 candle filters in Siemens Westinghouse Advanced Particulate Filtration (APF) system at the American Electric Power (AEP) Tidd Demonstration Plant in Brilliant, Ohio. Siemens Westinghouse then conducted an extended, accelerated life, qualification program, evaluating the performance of the 3M, McDermott, and Techniweave oxide-based CFCC filter elements, modified DuPont PRD-66 elements, and the Blasch, Scapa Cerafil{sup TM}, and Specific Surface monolithic

  19. Advanced ceramic cladding for water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the US Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Research Initiatives (NERI) program, continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are being developed as cladding for water reactor fuel elements. The purpose is to substantially increase the passive safety of water reactors. A development effort was initiated in 1991 to fabricate CFCC-clad tubes using commercially available fibers and a sol-gel process developed by McDermott Technologies. Two small-diameter CFCC tubes were fabricated using pure alumina and alumina-zirconia fibers in an alumina matrix. Densities of approximately 60% of theoretical were achieved. Higher densities are required to guarantee fission gas containment. This NERI work has just begun, and only preliminary results are presented herein. Should the work prove successful, further development is required to evaluate CFCC cladding and performance, including in-pile tests containing fuel and exploring a marriage of CFCC cladding materials with suitable advanced fuel and core designs. The possibility of much higher temperature core designs, possibly cooled with supercritical water, and achievement of plant efficiencies ge50% would be examined

  20. Innovative grinding wheel design for cost-effective machining of advanced ceramics. Phase I, final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, R.H.; Ramanath, S.; Simpson, M.; Lilley, E.

    1996-02-01

    Norton Company successfully completed the 16-month Phase I technical effort to define requirements, design, develop, and evaluate a next-generation grinding wheel for cost-effective cylindrical grinding of advanced ceramics. This program was a cooperative effort involving three Norton groups representing a superabrasive grinding wheel manufacturer, a diamond film manufacturing division and a ceramic research center. The program was divided into two technical tasks, Task 1, Analysis of Required Grinding Wheel Characteristics, and Task 2, Design and Prototype Development. In Task 1 we performed a parallel path approach with Superabrasive metal-bond development and the higher technical risk, CVD diamond wheel development. For the Superabrasive approach, Task 1 included bond wear and strength tests to engineer bond-wear characteristics. This task culminated in a small-wheel screening test plunge grinding sialon disks. In Task 2, an improved Superabrasive metal-bond specification for low-cost machining of ceramics in external cylindrical grinding mode was identified. The experimental wheel successfully ground three types of advanced ceramics without the need for wheel dressing. The spindle power consumed by this wheel during test grinding of NC-520 sialon is as much as to 30% lower compared to a standard resin bonded wheel with 100 diamond concentration. The wheel wear with this improved metal bond was an order of magnitude lower than the resin-bonded wheel, which would significantly reduce ceramic grinding costs through fewer wheel changes for retruing and replacements. Evaluation of ceramic specimens from both Tasks 1 and 2 tests for all three ceramic materials did not show evidence of unusual grinding damage. The novel CVD-diamond-wheel approach was incorporated in this program as part of Task 1. The important factors affecting the grinding performance of diamond wheels made by CVD coating preforms were determined.

  1. Challenges and Opportunities in Reactive Processing and Applications of Advanced Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mrityunjay

    2003-01-01

    Recently, there has been a great deal of interest in the research, development, and commercialization of innovative synthesis and processing technologies for advanced ceramics and composite materials. Reactive processing approaches have been actively considered due to their robustness, flexibility, and affordability. A wide variety of silicon carbide-based advanced ceramics and composites are currently being fabricated using the processing approaches involving reactive infiltration of liquid and gaseous species into engineered fibrous or microporous carbon performs. The microporous carbon performs have been fabricated using the temperature induced phase separation and pyrolysis of two phase organic (resin-pore former) mixtures and fiber reinforcement of carbon and ceramic particulate bodies. In addition, pyrolyzed native plant cellulose tissues also provide unique carbon templates for manufacturing of non-oxide and oxide ceramics. In spite of great interest in this technology due to their affordability and robustness, there is a lack of scientific basis for process understanding and many technical challenges still remain. The influence of perform properties and other parameters on the resulting microstructure and properties of final material is not well understood. In this presentation, mechanism of silicon-carbon reaction in various systems and the effect of perform microstructure on the mechanical properties of advanced silicon carbide based materials will be discussed. Various examples of applications of reactively processed advanced silicon carbide ceramics and composite materials will be presented.

  2. Nuclear techniques in the development of advanced ceramic technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of research, development and application of advanced materials is well understood by all developed and most developing countries. Amongst advanced materials, ceramics play a prominent role due to their specific chemical and physical properties. According to performance and importance, advanced ceramics can be classified as structural ceramics (mechanical function) and the so-called functional ceramics. In the latter class of materials, special electrical, chemical, thermal, magnetic and optical properties are of interest. The most valuable materials are multifunctional, for example, when structural ceramics combine beneficial mechanical properties with thermal and chemical sensitivity. Multifunctionality is characteristic of many composite materials (organic/inorganic composite). Additionally, properties of material can be changed by reducing its dimension (thin films, nanocrystalline ceramics). Nuclear techniques, found important applications in research and development of advanced ceramics. The use of neutron techniques has increased dramatically in recent years due to the development of advanced neutron sources, instrumentation and improved data analysis. Typical neutron techniques are neutron diffraction, neutron radiography, small angle neutron scattering and very small angle neutron scattering. Neutrons can penetrate deeply into most materials thus sampling their bulk properties. In determination of the crystal structure of HTSC, YBa2 Cu2O7, XRD located the heavy metal atoms, but failed in finding many of the oxygen atoms, while the neutron diffraction located all atoms equally well in the crystal structure. Neutron diffraction is also unique for the determination of the magnetic structure of materials since the neutrons themselves have a magnetic moment. Application of small angle neutron scattering for the determination of the size of hydrocarbon aggregates within the zeolite channels is illustrated. (author)

  3. Advances in resonance based NDT for ceramic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, L. J.; Jauriqui, L. M.; Gatewood, G. D.; Sisneros, R.

    2012-05-01

    The application of resonance based non-destructive testing methods has been providing benefit to manufacturers of metal components in the automotive and aerospace industries for many years. Recent developments in resonance based technologies are now allowing the application of resonance NDT to ceramic components including turbine engine components, armor, and hybrid bearing rolling elements. Application of higher frequencies and advanced signal interpretation are now allowing Process Compensated Resonance Testing to detect both internal material defects and surface breaking cracks in a variety of ceramic components. Resonance techniques can also be applied to determine material properties of coupons and to evaluate process capability for new manufacturing methods.

  4. Advanced ceramic materials for next-generation nuclear applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, John

    2011-10-01

    The nuclear industry is at the eye of a 'perfect storm' with fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs, worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, and increased concerns about greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions that have caused many to look negatively at long-term use of fossil fuels. This convergence of factors has led to a growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Many are surprised to learn that nuclear power provides approximately 20% of the electrical power in the US and approximately 16% of the world-wide electric power. With the above factors in mind, world-wide over 130 new reactor projects are being considered with approximately 25 new permit applications in the US. Materials have long played a very important role in the nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced reactor systems and fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Advanced metallic and ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles, advanced alloy fuels for 'deep-burn' applications, as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, a number of fuel reprocessing operations are being investigated. Advanced materials continue to provide a vital contribution in 'closing the fuel cycle' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable cements, ceramics, and glasses. Beyond this fission energy application, fusion energy will demand advanced materials capable of withstanding the extreme environments of high

  5. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project, ceramic component developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teneyck, M. O.; Macbeth, J. W.; Sweeting, T. B.

    1987-01-01

    The ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company while performing as a principal subcontractor to the Garrett Auxiliary Power Division for the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) Technology Development Project (NASA Contract DEN3-167) is summarized. The report covers the period October 1979 through July 1987, and includes information concerning ceramic technology work categorized as common and unique. The former pertains to ceramic development applicable to two parallel AGT projects established by NASA contracts DEN3-168 (AGT100) and DEN3-167 (AGT101), whereas the unique work solely pertains to Garrett directed activity under the latter contract. The AGT101 Technology Development Project is sponsored by DOE and administered by NASA-Lewis. Standard Oil directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and nondestructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This permitted engine testing to proceed without program slippage.

  6. Advanced electro-ceramics: role of nanoscience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electro-ceramics have immense technological applications in energy conversion devices such as Fuel Cells, Oxygen storage capacitors and Li ion batteries etc. There is a growing need to develop better soft chemical synthesis routes as the conventional solid state method has several limitations. Among the available chemical routes, the combustion technique is capable of producing the nanocrystalline powders of the oxide ceramics at lower calcination temperature. This process involves a combustion reaction between a fuel (e.g. glycine, citric acid, urea etc.) and an oxidizer (e.g. metal nitrates). In my group, a wide range of materials for SOFC applications have been synthesized, such as ceria, Gd or Sm doped ceria, Zr0.8Ce0.2O2, YSZ, CeO2-Y2O3 solid solution, La1-xMxCrO3 (M = Ca, Sr), Sr-doped LaCoO3 and doped LaGaO3 etc. The powder properties were tailored to achieve near theoretical density sintered pellets. A number of techniques like XRD, HT-XRD, surface area analyzer, SEM, TEM, sinterability, Raman spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, small angle X-ray/neutron scattering, dilatometer, AC Impedance analyzer etc. were used for detailed characterization of these products. A major emphasis was on the optimization of the processing parameters so as to get a highly sinteractive phase pure materials. The size and nature of agglomeration was found to be a crucial parameter affecting the sinterability. Another key issue of SOFC technology is the design of better ionic conductors. It is well known that ionic conductivity is a highly structure-driven property. Several new ionic conductors, such Nd3GaO6 and Nd2-xGd2Zr2O7 and Ba2In2-xTixO5+x/2 were prepared based on the structure-property correlation. Detailed XRD and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that an optimum degree of disorder enhances the ionic conductivity. As an offshoot, this work resulted in preparation of interesting potential oxygen storage materials such as Gd2-xCexZr2O7 (x = 0.0 to 2.0) and Ce0.5Sc0.5O

  7. Advanced Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines program plan, 1983--1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-07-01

    The purpose of the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Project is the development of an industrial technology base capable of providing reliable and cost-effective high temperature ceramic components for application in advanced heat engines. There is a deliberate emphasis on industrial'' in the purpose statement. The project is intended to support the US ceramic and engine industries by providing the needed ceramic materials technology. The heat engine programs have goals of component development and proof-of-concept. The CTAHE Project is aimed at developing generic basic ceramic technology and does not involve specific engine designs and components. The materials research and development efforts in the CTAHE Project are focused on the needs and general requirements of the advanced gas turbine and low heat rejection diesel engines. The CTAHE Project supports the DOE Office of Transportation Systems' heat engine programs, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications (ATTAP) and Heavy Duty Transport (HDT) by providing the basic technology required for development of reliable and cost-effective ceramic components. The heat engine programs provide the iterative component design, fabrication, and test development logic. 103 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  8. Integration Science and Technology of Silicon-Based Ceramics and Composites:Technical Challenges and Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2013-01-01

    Ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic and composite parts starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance for high temperature applications, detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different technical approaches are required for the integration of ceramic to ceramic and ceramic to metal systems. Active metal brazing, in particular, is a simple and cost-effective method to integrate ceramic to metallic components. Active braze alloys usually contain a reactive filler metal (e.g., Ti, Cr, V, Hf etc) that promotes wettability and spreading by inducing chemical reactions with the ceramics and composites. In this presentation, various examples of brazing of silicon nitride to themselves and to metallic systems are presented. Other examples of joining of ceramic composites (C/SiC and SiC/SiC) using ceramic interlayers and the resulting microstructures are also presented. Thermomechanical characterization of joints is presented for both types of systems. In addition, various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and integrated system testing under simulated application conditions will also be presented.

  9. Corrosion penetration monitoring of advanced ceramics in hot aqueous fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus G. Nickel

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Advanced ceramics are considered as components in energy related systems, because they are known to be strong, wear and corrosion resistant in many environments, even at temperatures well exceeding 1000 °C. However, the presence of additives or impurities in important ceramics, for example those based on Silicon Nitride (Si3N4 or Al2O3 makes them vulnerable to the corrosion by hot aqueous fluids. The temperatures in this type of corrosion range from several tens of centigrade to hydrothermal conditions above 100 °C. The corrosion processes in such media depend on both pH and temperature and include often partial leaching of the ceramics, which cannot be monitored easily by classical gravimetric or electrochemical methods. Successful corrosion penetration depth monitoring by polarized reflected light optical microscopy (color changes, Micro Raman Spectroscopy (luminescence changes and SEM (porosity changes will be outlined. The corrosion process and its kinetics are monitored best by microanalysis of cross sections, Raman spectroscopy and eluate chemistry changes in addition to mass changes. Direct cross-calibrations between corrosion penetration and mechanical strength is only possible for severe corrosion. The methods outlined should be applicable to any ceramics corrosion process with partial leaching by fluids, melts or slags.

  10. Proceedings of the national symposium on materials and processing: functional glass/glass-ceramics, advanced ceramics and high temperature materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the development of materials science it is becoming increasingly important to process some novel materials in the area of glass, advanced ceramics and high temperature metals/alloys, which play an important role in the realization of many new technologies. Such applications demand materials with tailored specifications. Glasses and glass-ceramics find exotic applications in areas like radioactive waste storage, optical communication, zero thermal expansion coefficient telescopic mirrors, human safety gadgets (radiation resistance windows, bullet proof apparels, heat resistance components etc), biomedical (implants, hyperthermia treatment, bone cement, bone grafting etc). Advanced ceramic materials have been beneficial in biomedical applications due to their strength, biocompatibility and wear resistance. Non-oxide ceramics such as carbides, borides, silicides, their composites, refractory metals and alloys are useful as structural and control rod components in high temperature fission/ fusion reactors. Over the years a number of novel processing techniques like selective laser melting, microwave heating, nano-ceramic processing etc have emerged. A detailed understanding of the various aspects of synthesis, processing and characterization of these materials provides the base for development of novel technologies for different applications. Keeping this in mind and realizing the need for taking stock of such developments a National Symposium on Materials and Processing -2012 (MAP-2012) was planned. The topics covered in the symposium are ceramics, glass/glass-ceramics and metals and materials. Papers relevant to INIS are indexed separately

  11. Slow crack growth modeling of a technical ferrite ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iron oxide ferrite ceramics are subjected to slow crack growth (SCG) and also environmentally assisted failure, similarly to what is observed for amorphous silica and alumina polycrystals The kinetics of fracture are known to be dependent on the load level with a crack velocity V that increase with KI, but also with temperature and with the Relative Humidity (RH). In addition, SCG represented by V-K diagrams is noticeably sensitive to microstructural effects as variations of the grain size, and also influenced by the presence of some porosity at the triple junctions. The ferrites under consideration exhibit a heterogeneous microstructure with a distribution on the grain size, with some regions in which pores are present at the triple junctions. Such a microstructure results in noticeable scattering in the measurements of the V-K characteristics from sample to sample, so that predictions based on these experiments for the estimate of the material's lifetime are not reliable. Thus, additional analyses based on numerical simulations of SCG are necessary to gain insight on the material's durability. We have developed a local description of SCG, at the length scale of the microstructure which is explicitly accounted for. Within a cohesive zone methodology and based on available physics and on recent atomistic results, we propose a viscoplastic cohesive model that mimics the reaction-rupture mechanism underlying the time dependent failure. The description is shown able to capture variations in the V-K predictions in agreement with the observations. From the simulations of intergranular failure under static fatigue, we observe a discontinuous crack advance in time, with different crack velocities depending on the local crack path. The crossing of the triple junction slows down crack propagation, and ultimately governs the average crack velocity. We evidence that account for the initial stresses originating from the process's cooling from the temperature at sintering down

  12. Factors Affecting Fiber Design and Selection for Advanced Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, James A.

    1998-01-01

    Structural Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) have the potential for application in the hot sections of a variety of advanced propulsion and power systems. It is therefore necessary to have a general understanding of the key properties of CMC and Reinforcing Fibers. This need is complicated by the wide variety of application conditions and structural requirements for which CMC's will be used, and the proprietary concerns of the design engineers. CMC's, to be successful, must display properties which are competitive with the currently used high temperature structural materials: (i.e., Iron and Nickel based superalloys, tough monolithic ceramics, and carbon/carbon composites.) Structural CMC offers several areas of competition: (1) performance, (i.e., strength and strength retention, creep resistance, and thermal conductivity), (2) reliability (i.e., environmental durability, and damage tolerance) and (3) processing (i.e., capability for varying sizes and shapes, and cost effective fabrication). The presentation further discusses, and illustrates with fiber and CMC data the key fiber properties and processes which strongly affect each CMC area of competition. The presentation further discusses the current knowledge of the important factors which control the key fiber properties. A design guidelines for the optimum fiber characteristics is developed, and the currently available fibers are compared against those guidelines.

  13. Potential contribution of microbial communities in technical ceramics for the improvement of rheological properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Bernardino; Miller, Ana Z.; Santos, Ricardo; Monteiro, Sílvia; Dias, Diamantino; Neves, Orquídia; Dionísio, Amélia; Saiz-Jimenez, Cesareo

    2014-05-01

    Several bacterial and fungal species naturally occurring in ceramic raw materials used in construction, such as Aspergillus, Penicillium and Aureobasidium, are known to produce exopolysaccharides (EPS). These polymers excreted by the cells are of widespread occurrence and may confer unique and potentially interesting properties with potential industrial uses, such as viscosity control, gelation, and flocculation, during ceramic manufacturing. In this study, the microbial communities present in clay raw materials were identified by both cultural methods and DNA-based molecular techniques in order to appraise their potential contribution to enhance the performance of technical ceramics through the use of EPS. Mineralogical identification by X- Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy of the clay raw materials, as well as characterization of rheological properties of ceramic slips were also performed. Microbial EPS production and its introduction into ceramic slips will be then carried out in order to evaluate their effects on the rheological properties of the ceramic slips, powders and conformed bodies. Some positive aspects related to the use of EPS are: reduction of the environmental impact caused by synthetic organic additives, reduction of production costs, as well as the costs related with operator protection systems, gaseous effluent treatments, complex landfill, among others.

  14. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) Technical Team is focused on removing technical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high-efficiency, emission-compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light-duty vehicle powertrains (i.e., passenger car, minivan, SUV, and pickup trucks).

  15. AGT 101: Ceramic component development: Advanced Gas Turbine Program: Topical report, October 1979-July 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ten Eyck, M.O.; MacBeth, J.W.; Sweeting, T.B.

    1987-11-01

    This topical report summarizes the ceramic component technology development activity conducted by Standard Oil Engineered Materials Company. Standard Oil, acting as a principal subcontractor and supplier of ceramic components, directed its efforts toward the development of ceramic materials in the silicon-carbide family. Various shape forming and fabrication methods, and non-destructive evaluation techniques were explored to produce the static structural components for the ceramic engine. This enabled engine testing to proceed without program slippage, and developed the approaches for producing low-cost, production quantity processes. Standard Oil contributed to the acceptance of ceramics as a viable approach for automotive gas turbine engines and to the advancement of this vital ceramic technology. 174 figs., 33 tabs.

  16. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced heat engines. Phase 1: Volume 1, Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuccio, J.C.; Brehm, P.; Fang, H.T. [Allied-Signal Aerospace Co., Phoenix, AZ (United States). Garrett Engine Div.] [and others

    1995-03-01

    Emphasis of this program is to develop and demonstrate ceramics life prediction methods, including fast fracture, stress rupture, creep, oxidation, and nondestructive evaluation. Significant advancements were made in these methods and their predictive capabilities successfully demonstrated.

  17. Low-Cost Innovative Hi-Temp Fiber Coating Process for Advanced Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MATECH GSM (MG) proposes 1) to demonstrate a low-cost innovative Hi-Temp Si-doped in-situ BN fiber coating process for advanced ceramic matrix composites in order...

  18. Fracture behavior of advanced ceramic hot gas filters: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, J.P.; Majumdar, S.; Sutaria, M.; Bielke, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Technology Div.

    1997-03-01

    This report presents the results of mechanical/microstructural evaluation, thermal shock/fatigue testing, and stress analyses of advanced hot-gas filters obtained from different manufacturers. These filters were fabricated from both monolithic ceramics and composites. The composite filters, made of both oxide and nonoxide materials, were in both as-fabricated and exposed conditions, whereas the monolithic filters were made only of nonoxide materials. Mechanical property measurement of composite filters included diametral compression testing with O-ring specimens and burst-testing of short filter segments with rubber plugs. In-situ strength of fibers in the composite filters was evaluated by microscopic technique. Thermal shock/fatigue resistance was estimated by measuring the strengths of filter specimens before and after thermal cycling from an air environment at elevated temperatures to a room temperature oil bath. Filter performance during mechanical and thermal shock/fatigue loadings was correlated with microstructural observations. Micromechanical models were developed to derive properties of composite filter constituents on the basis of measured mechanical properties of the filters. Subsequently, these properties were used to analytically predict the performance of composite filters during thermal shock loading.

  19. Advanced Measurements of Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farhad Farzbod; Stephen J. Reese; Zilong Hua; Marat Khafizov; David H. Hurley

    2012-08-01

    Silicon carbide (SiC) is being considered as a fuel cladding material for accident tolerant fuel under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program sponsored by the Nuclear Energy Division of the Department of Energy. Silicon carbide has many potential advantages over traditional zirconium based cladding systems. These include high melting point, low susceptibility to corrosion, and low degradation of mechanical properties under neutron irradiation. In addition, ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) made from SiC have high mechanical toughness enabling these materials to withstand thermal and mechanical shock loading. However, many of the fundamental mechanical and thermal properties of SiC CMCs depend strongly on the fabrication process. As a result, extrapolating current materials science databases for these materials to nuclear applications is not possible. The “Advanced Measurements” work package under the LWRS fuels pathway is tasked with the development of measurement techniques that can characterize fundamental thermal and mechanical properties of SiC CMCs. An emphasis is being placed on development of characterization tools that can used for examination of fresh as well as irradiated samples. The work discuss in this report can be divided into two broad categories. The first involves the development of laser ultrasonic techniques to measure the elastic and yield properties and the second involves the development of laser-based techniques to measurement thermal transport properties. Emphasis has been placed on understanding the anisotropic and heterogeneous nature of SiC CMCs in regards to thermal and mechanical properties. The material properties characterized within this work package will be used as validation of advanced materials physics models of SiC CMCs developed under the LWRS fuels pathway. In addition, it is envisioned that similar measurement techniques can be used to provide process control and quality assurance as well as measurement of

  20. Standardization Efforts for Mechanical Testing and Design of Advanced Ceramic Materials and Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Jonathan A.; Jenkins, Michael G.

    2003-01-01

    Advanced aerospace systems occasionally require the use of very brittle materials such as sapphire and ultra-high temperature ceramics. Although great progress has been made in the development of methods and standards for machining, testing and design of component from these materials, additional development and dissemination of standard practices is needed. ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics and ISO TC 206 have taken a lead role in the standardization of testing for ceramics, and recent efforts and needs in standards development by Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics will be summarized. In some cases, the engineers, etc. involved are unaware of the latest developments, and traditional approaches applicable to other material systems are applied. Two examples of flight hardware failures that might have been prevented via education and standardization will be presented.

  1. The Bigourdane technical ceramic nomad and sedentary between heritage and transactional areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence BARNECHE-MIQUEU

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available This chapter introduces the technical ceramic sector in the Hautes Pyrenees county. It aims at presenting the dynamics of recomposition of an industry historically linked to the presence of a local resource: electricity, hydroelectricity which was reconstructed around innovative small and average size industries.We first dwell on the process of decomposition, recomposition of the sector thanks to the perennial reconstitution of the sector we show, starting from the characteristics of the companies which appeared during the decomposition phase of the central actor CERAVER, the intensity of the transformation of the local productive system. The setting inherited from a century long presence of the technical ceramic in the Tarbes region – heritage area – is now linked to a transactional space built through the exchanges taking place within the framework of the pole of competitiveness of ceramic of Limoges, where new actors take part, the Ecole Superieure of the Art of Ceramics and Research Centre on the arts of Fire and Earth.

  2. Integration Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics for Energy and Environmental Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, M.

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of new and innovative materials has been known to culminate in major turning points in human history. The transformative impact and functional manifestation of new materials have been demonstrated in every historical era by their integration into new products, systems, assemblies, and devices. In modern times, the integration of new materials into usable products has a special relevance for the technological development and economic competitiveness of industrial societies. Advanced ceramic technologies dramatically impact the energy and environmental landscape due to potential wide scale applications in all aspects of energy production, storage, distribution, conservation, and efficiency. Examples include gas turbine propulsion systems, fuel cells, thermoelectrics, photovoltaics, distribution and transmission systems based on superconductors, nuclear power generation, and waste disposal. Robust ceramic integration technologies enable hierarchical design and manufacturing of intricate ceramic components starting with geometrically simpler units that are subsequently joined to themselves and/or to metals to create components with progressively higher levels of complexity and functionality. However, for the development of robust and reliable integrated systems with optimum performance under different operating conditions, the detailed understanding of various thermochemical and thermomechanical factors is critical. Different approaches are required for the integration of ceramic-metal and ceramic-ceramic systems across length scales (macro to nano). In this presentation, a few examples of integration of ceramic to metals and ceramic to ceramic systems will be presented. Various challenges and opportunities in design, fabrication, and testing of integrated similar (ceramic-ceramic) and dissimilar (ceramic-metal) material systems will be discussed. Potential opportunities and need for the development of innovative design philosophies, approaches, and

  3. Potential Early Applications of Advanced Effusion Cooled Ceramic Combustion Chambers

    OpenAIRE

    Sippel, Martin; Dietlein, Ingrid

    2010-01-01

    Technologies for porous effusion or transpiration cooled ceramic combustion chambers are under investi-gation at DLR since a couple of years. Research concentrates on applying transpiration cooling to C/C liners as a candidate technology to fulfill the requirements of future cryogenic (LOX/LH2) liquid rocket engines, taking advantage of interesting features of C/C liners such as low weight as well as potentially increased reliability and life time of the rocket engine. A fully ceramic combust...

  4. Advanced Technical Drafting (Industrial Arts) Curriculum Guide. Bulletin 1751.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Div. of Vocational Education.

    This curriculum guide contains materials for a 17-unit course in advanced technical drafting, a followup to the basic technical drafting course in the industrial arts curriculum for grades 10-12. It is intended for use by industrial arts teachers, supervisors, counselors, administrators, and teacher educators. A three-page course overview provides…

  5. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced heat engines. Phase 1: Volume 2, Appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-03-01

    This volume presents the following appendices: ceramic test specimen drawings and schematics, mixed-mode and biaxial stress fracture of structural ceramics for advanced vehicular heat engines (U. Utah), mode I/mode II fracture toughness and tension/torsion fracture strength of NT154 Si nitride (Brown U.), summary of strength test results and fractography, fractography photographs, derivations of statistical models, Weibull strength plots for fast fracture test specimens, and size functions.

  6. International Standards for Properties and Performance of Advanced Ceramics - 30 years of Excellence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Salem, Jonathan A.; Helfinstine, John; Quinn, George D.; Gonczy, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical and physical properties/performance of brittle bodies (e.g., advanced ceramics and glasses) can be difficult to measure correctly unless the proper techniques are used. For three decades, ASTM Committee C28 on Advanced Ceramics, has developed numerous full-consensus standards (e.g., test methods, practices, guides, terminology) to measure various properties and performance of a monolithic and composite ceramics and coatings that, in some cases, may be applicable to glasses. These standards give the "what, how, how not, why, why not, etc." for many mechanical, physical, thermal, properties and performance of advanced ceramics. Use of these standards provides accurate, reliable, repeatable and complete data. Involvement in ASTM Committee C28 has included users, producers, researchers, designers, academicians, etc. who write, continually update, and validate through round robin test programmes, more than 45 standards in the 30 years since the Committee's inception in 1986. Included in this poster is a pictogram of the ASTM Committee C28 standards and how to obtain them either as i) individual copies with full details or ii) a complete collection in one volume. A listing of other ASTM committees of interest is included. In addition, some examples of the tangible benefits of standards for advanced ceramics are employed to demonstrate their practical application.

  7. Fracture toughness of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites used for cutting tool edges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Szutkowska

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Specific characteristics in fracture toughness measurements of advanced alumina ceramics and alumina matrix composites with particular reference to α-Al2O3, Al2O3-ZrO2, Al2O3-ZrO2-TiC and Al2O3-Ti(C,N has been presented.Design/methodology/approach: The present study reports fracture toughness obtained by means of the conventional method and direct measurements of the Vickers crack length (DCM method of selected tool ceramics based on alumina: pure alumina, alumina-zirconia composite with unstabilized and stabilized zirconia, alumina–zirconia composite with addition of TiC and alumina–nitride-carbide titanium composite with 2wt% of zirconia. Specimens were prepared from submicro-scale trade powders. Vicker’s hardness (HV1, fracture toughness (KIC at room temperature, the indentation fracture toughness, Young’s modulus and apparent density were also evaluated. The microstructure was observed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM.Findings: The lowest value of KIC is revealed by pure alumina ceramics. The addition of (10 wt% unstabilized zirconia to alumina or a small amount (5 wt% of TiC to alumina–zirconia composite improve fracture toughness of these ceramics in comparison to alumina ceramics. Alumina ceramics and alumina-zirconia ceramics reveal the pronounced character of R-curve because of an increasing dependence on crack growth resistance with crack extension as opposed to the titanium carbide-nitride reinforced composite based on alumina. R-curve has not been observed for this composite.Practical implications: The results show the method of fracture toughness improvement of alumina tool ceramics.Originality/value: Taking into account the values of fracture toughness a rational use of existing ceramic tools should be expected.

  8. Technical evaluation panel summary report. Ceramic and glass immobilization options fissile materials disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, B. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Brummond, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Armantrout, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shaw, H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jantzen, C. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jostons, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKibben, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Strachan, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Vienna, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    1997-12-23

    This report documents the results of a technical evaluation of the merits of ceramic and glass immobilization forms for the disposition of surplus weapons-useable plutonium. The evaluation was conducted by a Technical Evaluation Panel (TEP), whose members were selected to cover a relevant range of scientific and technical expertise and represented each of the technical organizations involved in the Plutonium Immobilization Program. The TEP held a formal review at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory (LLNL) from July 2%August 1, 1997. Following this review, the TEP documented the review and its evaluation of the two immobilization technologies in this report to provide a technical basis for a recommendation by LLNL to the Department of Energy (DOE) for the preferred immobilization form. The comparison of the glass and ceramic forms and manufacturing processes was a tremendous challenge to the TEP. The two forms and their processes are similar in many ways. The TEP went to great effort to accurately assess what were, in many cases, fine details of the processes, unit operations, and the glass and ceramic forms themselves. The set of criteria used by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) in past screenings and down-selections was used to measure-the two options. One exception is that the TEP did not consider criteria that were largely nontechnical (namely international impact, public acceptance, and effects on other : DOE programs). The TEP' s measures and assessments are documented in detail. Care was taken to ensure that the data used were well documented and traceable to their source. Although no final conclusion regarding the preferred form was reached or explicitly stated in this report (this was not within the TEP' s charter), no "show stoppers" were identified for either form. Both forms appear capable of satisfying all the criteria, as interpreted by the TEP. The TEP identified a number of distinct and quantifiable differences between

  9. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951--June 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Gardner, K. (comps.)

    1989-10-01

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1989. This registry of documents is as much as possible, in the order of issue date. A complete cross-referenced listing of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division is also available.

  10. Recent advances in the field of ceramic fibers and ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslain, R.

    2005-03-01

    Progress achieved during the last decade in the field of ceramic fibers and related ceramic matrix composites is reviewed. Both SiC-based and alumina-based fine fibers have been improved in terms of thermal stability and creep resistance with temperature limit of about 1400 and 1200 ° C, respectively. Two concepts for achieving damage-tolerant ceramic matrix composites have been identified : (i) that of non-oxide composites with a dense matrix in which matrix cracks formed under load are deflected and arrested in a weak fiber coating referred to as the interphase and (ii) that of all-oxide composites with a highly porous matrix with no need of any fiber coating. The lifetime under load of non-oxide composites in oxidizing atmospheres, is improved through the use of multilayered self-healing interphases and matrices deposited from gaseous precursors by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI). Lifetime ranging from 1000 to 10,000 hours at 1200 ° C under cyclic loading in air are foreseen. Alumina-based composites although attractive for long term exposures in oxidizing atmospheres up to ≈1200 ° C, are still experimental materials.

  11. Advanced Gearless Drivetrain - Phase I Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butterfield, Sandy; Smith, Jim; Petch, Derek; Sullivan, Brian; Smith, Peter; Pierce, Kirk

    2012-08-31

    Boulder Wind Power (BWP) collaborated with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the economics of scaling an advanced gearless drivetrain technology to 6MW (and larger) turbine applications. The project goal was to show that this advanced drivetrain technology enables a cost of energy of less than $0.10/kWH in offshore applications. This drivetrain technology achieves this Cost of Energy (COE) advantage via a 70% greater torque density versus current state-of-the-art drivetrain technologies. In addition, a new dynamically compliant design strategy is required to optimize turbine system-level COE. The BWP generator is uniquely suited for this new design strategy. This project developed a concept design for a 6MW drivetrain and culminated in a plan for a system-level test of this technology at 3MW scale. The project further demonstrated the advantage of the BWP drivetrain with increasing power ratings, with conceptual designs through 10 MW.

  12. Advanced Gearless Drivetrain - Phase I Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandy Butterfield; Jim Smith; Derek Petch; Brian Sullivan; Peter Smith; Kirk Pierce

    2012-08-31

    Boulder Wind Power (“BWP”) collaborated with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, to demonstrate the economics of scaling an advanced gearless drivetrain technology to 6MW (and larger) turbine applications. The project goal was to show that this advanced drivetrain technology enables a cost of energy of less than $0.10/kWH in offshore applications. This drivetrain technology achieves this Cost of Energy (“COE”) advantage via a 70% greater torque density versus current state-of-the-art drivetrain technologies. In addition, a new dynamically compliant design strategy is required to optimize turbine system-level COE. The BWP generator is uniquely suited for this new design strategy. This project developed a concept design for a 6MW drivetrain and culminated in a plan for a system-level test of this technology at 3MW scale. The project further demonstrated the advantage of the BWP drivetrain with increasing power ratings, with conceptual designs through 10 MW.

  13. Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Karl T.; Pruski, Marek; Washton, Nancy M.; Lipton, Andrew S.

    2013-03-07

    This report recaps the "Science Drivers and Technical Challenges for Advanced Magnetic Resonance" workshop, held in late 2011. This exploratory workshop's goal was to discuss and address challenges for the next generation of magnetic resonance experimentation. During the workshop, participants from throughout the world outlined the science drivers and instrumentation demands for high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) and associated magnetic resonance techniques, discussed barriers to their advancement, and deliberated the path forward for significant and impactful advances in the field.

  14. PREFACE: Symposium 1: Advanced Structure Analysis and Characterization of Ceramic Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashima, Masatomo

    2011-05-01

    Preface to Symposium 1 (Advanced Structure Analysis and Characterization of Ceramic Materials) of the International Congress of Ceramics III, held 14-18 November 2010 in Osaka, Japan Remarkable developments have been made recently in the structural analysis and characterization of inorganic crystalline and amorphous materials, such as x-ray, neutron, synchrotron and electron diffraction, x-ray/neutron scattering, IR/Raman scattering, NMR, XAFS, first-principle calculations, computer simulations, Rietveld analysis, the maximum-entropy method, in situ measurements at high temperatures/pressures and electron/nuclear density analysis. These techniques enable scientists to study not only static and long-range periodic structures but also dynamic and short-/intermediate-range structures. Multi-scale characterization from the electron to micrometer levels is becoming increasingly important as a means of understanding phenomena at the interfaces, grain boundaries and surfaces of ceramic materials. This symposium has discussed the structures and structure/property relationships of various ceramic materials (electro, magnetic and optical ceramics; energy and environment related ceramics; bio-ceramics; ceramics for reliability secure society; traditional ceramics) through 38 oral presentations including 8 invited lectures and 49 posters. Best poster awards were given to six excellent poster presentations (Y-C Chen, Tokyo Institute of Technology; C-Y Chung, Tohoku University; T Stawski, University of Twente; Y Hirano, Nagoya Institute of Technology; B Bittova, Charles University Prague; Y Onodera, Kyoto University). I have enjoyed working with my friends in the ICC3 conference. I would like to express special thanks to other organizers: Professor Scott T Misture, Alfred University, USA, Professor Xiaolong Chen, Institute of Physics, CAS, China, Professor Takashi Ida, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Japan, Professor Isao Tanaka, Kyoto University, Japan. I also acknowledge the

  15. Ceramic membranes for gas separation in advanced fossil power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meulenberg, W.A.; Baumann, S.; Ivanova, M.; Gestel, T. van; Bram, M.; Stoever, D. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energieforschung (IEF)

    2010-07-01

    The reduction or elimination of CO{sub 2} emissions from electricity generation power plants fuelled by coal or gas is a major target in the current socio-economic, environmental and political discussion to reduce green house gas emissions such as CO{sub 2}. This mission can be achieved by introducing gas separation techniques making use of membrane technology, which is, as a rule, associated with significantly lower efficiency losses compared with the conventional separation technologies. Depending on the kind of power plant process different membrane types (ceramic, polymer, metal) can be implemented. The possible technology routes are currently investigated to achieve the emission reduction. They rely on different separation tasks. The CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation is the main target in the post-combustion process. Air separation (O{sub 2}/N{sub 2}) is the focus of the oxyfuel process. In the pre-combustion process an additional H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation is included. Although all separation concepts imply different process requirements they have in common a need in membranes with high permeability, selectivity and stability. In each case CO{sub 2} is obtained in a readily condensable form. CO{sub 2}/N{sub 2} separation membranes like microporous membranes or polymer membranes are applicable in post-combustion stages. In processes with oxyfuel combustion, where the fuel is combusted with pure oxygen, oxygen transport membranes i.e. mixed ionic electronic conducting (MIEC) membranes with mainly perovskite or fluorite structure can be integrated. In the pre-combustion stages of the power plant process, H{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} separation membranes like microporous membranes e.g. doped silica or mixed protonic electronic conductors or metal membranes can be applied. The paper gives an overview about the considered ceramic materials for the different gas separation membranes. The manufacturing of bulk materials as well as supported thin films of these membranes along

  16. 15th annual conference on composites and advanced ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baaklini, G.Y.; Bhatt, R.T.

    1991-01-01

    The room-temperature tensile testing of silicon carbide fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (SiC/RBSN) composite specimens was monitored by using in-situ x ray film radiography. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading provided data on the effect of preexisting volume flaws (high density impurities, and local density variations) on the fracture behavior of composites. Results from (0)1, (0)3, (0)5, and (0)8 composite specimens, showed that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulations during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber-matrix debonding, and fiber pullout were imaged throughout the tensile loading history of the specimens. Further, in-situ film radiography was found to be a helpful and practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the SiC fiber and the RBSN matrix by the matrix crack spacing method. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post-test radiography can provide for a greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior, a verification of related experimental procedures, and a validation and development of related analytical models.

  17. High-speed, low-damage grinding of advanced ceramics Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, J.A. [Eaton Corp., Willoughby Hills, OH (United States). Mfg. Technologies Center; Malkin, S. [Univ. of Massachusetts (United States)

    1995-03-01

    In manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. Most of these costs arise from the conventional multi-step grinding process with numerous grinding wheels and additional capital equipment, perishable dressing tools, and labor. In an attempt to reduce structural ceramic grinding costs, a feasibility investigation was undertaken to develop a single step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride ceramic parts at high material removal rates at lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding. This feasibility study employed combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of resultant material surface condition. More specifically, this Phase 1 final report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding and the conditions necessary to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. Particular issues addressed include determining effects of wheel speed and material removal rate on resulting mode of material removal (ductile or brittle fracture), limiting grinding forces, calculation of approximate grinding zone temperatures developed during HSLD grinding, and developing the experimental systems necessary for determining HSLD grinding energy partition relationships. In addition, practical considerations for production utilization of the HSLD process are also discussed.

  18. Phase transformation study of advanced ceramics using in-situ XRD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper describes phase transformation of some advanced ceramic materials involving alumina and zirconia. Phase transformation was studied using in-situ XRD that was heated from room temperature to elevated temperature of more than 1000 degree C. The different advanced ceramic material follows different path and involved different reaction mechanism. Alumina for example was studied from gibbs site. As the heating temperature is increase the gibbsite was transformed in a boehmite at 400 degree C by a dissolution-recrystallization mechanism. With further heating, the boehmite transforms into γ-alumina through a dehydroxylation process at 800 degree C. At 1100 degree C, the α- alumina was transfomed into a mix phase of δ and θ aluminas. Finally a α- alumina was formed at 1200 degree C. (Author)

  19. FY2015 ceramic fuels development annual highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mcclellan, Kenneth James [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-09-22

    Key challenges for the Advanced Fuels Campaign are the development of fuel technologies to enable major increases in fuel performance (safety, reliability, power and burnup) beyond current technologies, and development of characterization methods and predictive fuel performance models to enable more efficient development and licensing of advanced fuels. Ceramic fuel development activities for fiscal year 2015 fell within the areas of 1) National and International Technical Integration, 2) Advanced Accident Tolerant Ceramic Fuel Development, 3) Advanced Techniques and Reference Materials Development, and 4) Fabrication of Enriched Ceramic Fuels. High uranium density fuels were the focus of the ceramic fuels efforts. Accomplishments for FY15 primarily reflect the prioritization of identification and assessment of new ceramic fuels for light water reactors which have enhanced accident tolerance while also maintaining or improving normal operation performance, and exploration of advanced post irradiation examination techniques which will support more efficient testing and qualification of new fuel systems.

  20. Next generation grinding spindle for cost-effective manufacture of advanced ceramic components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, J.A.; Laurich, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Finish grinding of advanced structural ceramics has generally been considered an extremely slow and costly process. Recently, however, results from the High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) program have clearly demonstrated that numerous finish-process performance benefits can be realized by grinding silicon nitride at high wheel speeds. A new, single-step, roughing-process capable of producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates while dramatically reducing finishing costs has been developed.

  1. Structural Ceramics Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 30 NIST Structural Ceramics Database (Web, free access)   The NIST Structural Ceramics Database (WebSCD) provides evaluated materials property data for a wide range of advanced ceramics known variously as structural ceramics, engineering ceramics, and fine ceramics.

  2. Designing Advanced Ceramic Waste Forms for Electrochemical Processing Salt Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebert, W. L. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Snyder, C. T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Frank, Steven [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Riley, Brian [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report describes the scientific basis underlying the approach being followed to design and develop “advanced” glass-bonded sodalite ceramic waste form (ACWF) materials that can (1) accommodate higher salt waste loadings than the waste form developed in the 1990s for EBR-II waste salt and (2) provide greater flexibility for immobilizing extreme waste salt compositions. This is accomplished by using a binder glass having a much higher Na2O content than glass compositions used previously to provide enough Na+ to react with all of the Cl– in the waste salt and generate the maximum amount of sodalite. The phase compositions and degradation behaviors of prototype ACWF products that were made using five new binder glass formulations and with 11-14 mass% representative LiCl/KCl-based salt waste were evaluated and compared with results of similar tests run with CWF products made using the original binder glass with 8 mass% of the same salt to demonstrate the approach and select a composition for further studies. About twice the amount of sodalite was generated in all ACWF materials and the microstructures and degradation behaviors confirmed our understanding of the reactions occurring during waste form production and the efficacy of the approach. However, the porosities of the resulting ACWF materials were higher than is desired. These results indicate the capacity of these ACWF waste forms to accommodate LiCl/KCl-based salt wastes becomes limited by porosity due to the low glass-to-sodalite volume ratio. Three of the new binder glass compositions were acceptable and there is no benefit to further increasing the Na content as initially planned. Instead, further studies are needed to develop and evaluate alternative production methods to decrease the porosity, such as by increasing the amount of binder glass in the formulation or by processing waste forms in a hot isostatic press. Increasing the amount of binder glass to eliminate porosity will decrease the waste

  3. High speed low damage grinding of advanced ceramics - Phase II Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kovach, J.A.; Malkin, S.

    2000-02-01

    In the manufacture of structural ceramic components, grinding costs can comprise up to 80% of the entire manufacturing cost. As a result, one of the most challenging tasks faced by manufacturing process engineers is the development of a ceramic finishing process to maximize part throughput while minimizing costs and associated scrap levels. The efforts summarized in this report represent the second phase of a program whose overall objective was to develop a single-step, roughing-finishing process suitable for producing high-quality silicon nitride parts at high material removal rates and at substantially lower cost than traditional, multi-stage grinding processes. More specifically, this report provides a technical overview of High-Speed, Low-Damage (HSLD) ceramic grinding which employs elevated wheel speeds to achieve the small grain depths of cut necessary for low-damage grinding while operating at relatively high material removal rates. The study employed the combined use of laboratory grinding tests, mathematical grinding models, and characterization of the resultant surface condition. A single-step, roughing-finishing process operating at high removal rates was developed and demonstrated.

  4. PET/MRI: Technical challenges and recent advances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Jin Ho; Choi, Yong; Im, Ki Chun [Molecular Imaging Research and Education Laboratory, Dept. of Electronic Engineering, Sogang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    Integrated positron emission tomography (PET)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which can provide complementary functional and anatomical information about a specific organ or body system at the molecular level, has become a powerful imaging modality to understand the molecular biology details, disease mechanisms, and pharmacokinetics in animals and humans. Although the first experiment on the PET/MRI was performed in the early 1990s, its clinical application was accomplished in recent years because there were various technical challenges in integrating PET and MRI in a single system with minimum mutual interference between PET and MRI. This paper presents the technical challenges and recent advances in combining PET and MRI along with several approaches for improving PET image quality of the PET/MRI hybrid imaging system.

  5. ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.

    2010-09-29

    , and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

  6. Program-technical complex for sorting ceramic tiles with the method of artificial intellect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliyev, Namik; Aliyev, Elchin

    2001-08-01

    Development of areas of automated systems of management of technological processes and systems of local automation requires the resolving of a set of questions on identification of production operations, working out industrial methods of measuring and control. Program-technical complex containing the systems of artificial vision, integrating device and dynamic expert systems of ready-product quality control in the example of decorative tile are examined at this work. The problem of identification of image can not be fully formalized and solved with the usage of strict algorithmic procedures and mathematical methods. Due to the mentioned fact, the development of intellectual programming methods- expert systems of image identification should provide effectiveness of mathematical methods of processing and heuristic programming with the expert knowledge of characteristics in analyzed systems. Implementation of the proposed complex, spares the specialist from routine job, allows timely spotting of technological process, solves the problem of sorting of ceramic materials in real time frame. In the meantime, the implementation of the system in dialog mode gives suggestions and recommendations.

  7. Dynamic Fragmentation of an Advanced Ceramic during High-Speed Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogan, James; Farbaniec, Lukasz; Mallick, Debjoy; McCauley, James W.; Ramesh, K. T.; Hopkins Extreme Materials Institute Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    The development of the next generation of light-weight protection materials requires an improved understanding of impact-induced fragmentation of advanced ceramics. We investigate the impact behavior of a hot-pressed boron carbide for impact velocities between 200 and 1000 m/s, and study the response in the context of the material properties, microstructure, and boundary conditions (e.g., confinement). We use measurements of fragment size and shapes to inform us about the mechanisms that are activated during dynamic failure. The fragment measurements are linked with physical evidence of failure processes obtained using scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy.

  8. Environmental Barrier Coating Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Recent Advances and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    This presentation briefly reviews the SiC/SiC major environmental and environment-fatigue degradations encountered in simulated turbine combustion environments, and thus NASA environmental barrier coating system evolution for protecting the SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites for meeting the engine performance requirements. The presentation will review several generations of NASA EBC materials systems, EBC-CMC component system technologies for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composite combustors and turbine airfoils, highlighting the temperature capability and durability improvements in simulated engine high heat flux, high pressure, high velocity, and with mechanical creep and fatigue loading conditions. This paper will also focus on the performance requirements and design considerations of environmental barrier coatings for next generation turbine engine applications. The current development emphasis is placed on advanced NASA candidate environmental barrier coating systems for SiC/SiC CMCs, their performance benefits and design limitations in long-term operation and combustion environments. The efforts have been also directed to developing prime-reliant, self-healing 2700F EBC bond coat; and high stability, lower thermal conductivity, and durable EBC top coats. Major technical barriers in developing environmental barrier coating systems, the coating integrations with next generation CMCs having the improved environmental stability, erosion-impact resistance, and long-term fatigue-environment system durability performance will be described. The research and development opportunities for turbine engine environmental barrier coating systems by utilizing improved compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and simulated environment testing and durability modeling will be briefly discussed.

  9. Uses of Advanced Ceramic Composites in the Thermal Protection Systems of Future Space Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1994-01-01

    Current ceramic composites being developed and characterized for use in the thermal protection systems (TPS) of future space vehicles are reviewed. The composites discussed include new tough, low density ceramic insulation's, both rigid and flexible; ultra-high temperature ceramic composites; nano-ceramics; as well as new hybrid ceramic/metallic and ceramic/organic systems. Application and advantage of these new composites to the thermal protection systems of future reusable access to space vehicles and small spacecraft is reviewed.

  10. Development of an Advanced Ceramic Seal for Maintaining Continuity of Knowledge in Treaty Verification and Safeguards Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandia National Laboratories and the Savannah River National Laboratory are collaborating on research and development of technologies for an advanced capability prototype tamper-indicating device known as the Ceramic Seal. Advanced capabilities include multiple levels of tamper indication such as a frangible seal body, surface coatings, and an active detection of seal status; and unique identification via electronics as well as non-reproducible surface features. The innovation of the Ceramic Seal is the inclusion of multiple advanced capabilities in a volume comparable to the ubiquitous metal cup seal. Our advanced capability small volume seal has application in treaty verification and safeguards regimes for maintaining continuity of knowledge. Once attached to a monitored item, the seal's identity and status can be verified in-situ rather than requiring removal and analysis at an inspectorate location. The Ceramic Seal has evolved from a first generation prototype constructed of alumina to a second generation prototype manufactured from low-temperature co-fired ceramic (LTCC). LTCC allows integration of passive electronic components into the seal construction material. Vulnerability reviews have been conducted periodically throughout the project and results used to guide the design. This paper will describe the capabilities of the current generation Ceramic Seal. Keywords: Tamper-indicating devices; seals; Containment and Surveillance

  11. The Gray Lecture 2001: coming technical advances in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the current limits on the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) due to technical factors and to assess the potential for major improvements in technology. Methods and Materials: The method of this review was to assess the efficacy of current RT in general terms; strategies for improving RT; historical record of technological advances; rationale for further reductions of treatment volume; and importance of defining and excluding nontarget tissues from the target volume. The basis for the interest in proton beam RT is developed, and the relative dose distributions of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and intensity-modulated proton RT (IMPT) are discussed. The discovery of the proton and the first proposal that protons be used in RT is described. This is followed by a brief mention of the clinical outcome studies of proton RT. Likely technical advances to be integrated into advanced proton RT are considered, specifically, four-dimensional treatment planning and delivery. Finally, the increment in cost of some of these developments is presented. Results: For definitive RT, dose limits are set by the tolerance of normal tissues/structures adjacent or near to the target. Using imaging fusion of CT, MRI, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, and other studies will result in improved definition of the target margins. Proton beams are likely to replace photon beams because of their physical characteristics. Namely, for each beam path, the dose deep to the target is zero, across the target it is uniform, and proximal to the target it is less. Proton therapy can use as many beams, beam angles, noncoplanar, and dynamic, as well as static, intensity modulation, as can photon plans. The ability for much greater accuracy in defining the target position in space and then maintaining the target in a constant position in the radiation beam despite target movement between and during dose fractions will be possible. The cost of proton

  12. Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development. Technical progress report, April 1, 1993--October 31, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Solar Technologies Inc. and its subcontractors, during the period April 1, 1993 through October 31, 1994 under Phase II of the DOE Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine Development program. The objective of the program is to improve the performance of stationary gas turbines in cogeneration through the implementation of selected ceramic components.

  13. Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Matrix Composites for Shrouds and Combustor Liners of Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory Corman; Krishan Luthra; Jill Jonkowski; Joseph Mavec; Paul Bakke; Debbie Haught; Merrill Smith

    2011-01-07

    This report covers work performed under the Advanced Materials for Advanced Industrial Gas Turbines (AMAIGT) program by GE Global Research and its collaborators from 2000 through 2010. A first stage shroud for a 7FA-class gas turbine engine utilizing HiPerComp{reg_sign}* ceramic matrix composite (CMC) material was developed. The design, fabrication, rig testing and engine testing of this shroud system are described. Through two field engine tests, the latter of which is still in progress at a Jacksonville Electric Authority generating station, the robustness of the CMC material and the shroud system in general were demonstrated, with shrouds having accumulated nearly 7,000 hours of field engine testing at the conclusion of the program. During the latter test the engine performance benefits from utilizing CMC shrouds were verified. Similar development of a CMC combustor liner design for a 7FA-class engine is also described. The feasibility of using the HiPerComp{reg_sign} CMC material for combustor liner applications was demonstrated in a Solar Turbines Ceramic Stationary Gas Turbine (CSGT) engine test where the liner performed without incident for 12,822 hours. The deposition processes for applying environmental barrier coatings to the CMC components were also developed, and the performance of the coatings in the rig and engine tests is described.

  14. Dryland ecohydrology and climate change: critical issues and technical advances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.; D'Odorico, P.; Evans, J. P.; Eldridge, D. J.; McCabe, M. F.; Caylor, K. K.; King, E. G.

    2012-08-01

    Drylands cover about 40% of the terrestrial land surface and account for approximately 40% of global net primary productivity. Water is fundamental to the biophysical processes that sustain ecosystem function and food production, particularly in drylands where a tight coupling exists between ecosystem productivity, surface energy balance, biogeochemical cycles, and water resource availability. Currently, drylands support at least 2 billion people and comprise both natural and managed ecosystems. In this synthesis, we identify some current critical issues in the understanding of dryland systems and discuss how arid and semiarid environments are responding to the changes in climate and land use. The issues range from societal aspects such as rapid population growth, the resulting food and water security, and development issues, to natural aspects such as ecohydrological consequences of bush encroachment and the causes of desertification. To improve current understanding and inform upon the needed research efforts to address these critical issues, we identify some recent technical advances in terms of monitoring dryland water dynamics, water budget and vegetation water use, with a focus on the use of stable isotopes and remote sensing. These technological advances provide new tools that assist in addressing critical issues in dryland ecohydrology under climate change.

  15. Dryland ecohydrology and climate change: critical issues and technical advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Drylands cover about 40% of the terrestrial land surface and account for approximately 40% of global net primary productivity. Water is fundamental to the biophysical processes that sustain ecosystem function and food production, particularly in drylands where a tight coupling exists between ecosystem productivity, surface energy balance, biogeochemical cycles, and water resource availability. Currently, drylands support at least 2 billion people and comprise both natural and managed ecosystems. In this synthesis, we identify some current critical issues in the understanding of dryland systems and discuss how arid and semiarid environments are responding to the changes in climate and land use. The issues range from societal aspects such as rapid population growth, the resulting food and water security, and development issues, to natural aspects such as ecohydrological consequences of bush encroachment and the causes of desertification. To improve current understanding and inform upon the needed research efforts to address these critical issues, we identify some recent technical advances in terms of monitoring dryland water dynamics, water budget and vegetation water use, with a focus on the use of stable isotopes and remote sensing. These technological advances provide new tools that assist in addressing critical issues in dryland ecohydrology under climate change.

  16. Dryland ecohydrology and climate change: critical issues and technical advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Drylands cover about 40% of the terrestrial land surface and account for approximately 40% of global net primary productivity. Water is fundamental to the biophysical processes that sustain ecosystem function and food production, particularly in drylands, where a tight coupling exists between water resource availability and ecosystem productivity, surface energy balance, and biogeochemical cycles. Currently, drylands support at least 2 billion people and comprise both natural and managed ecosystems. In this synthesis, we identify some current critical issues in the understanding of dryland systems and discuss how arid and semiarid environments are responding to the changes in climate and land use. Specifically, we focus on dryland agriculture and food security, dryland population growth, desertification, shrub encroachment and dryland development issues as factors of change requiring increased understanding and management. We also review recent technical advances in the quantitative assessment of human versus climate change related drivers of desertification, evapotranspiration partitioning using field deployable stable water isotope systems and the remote sensing of key ecohydrological processes. These technological advances provide new tools that assist in addressing major critical issues in dryland ecohydrology under climate change

  17. Dental ceramics: An update

    OpenAIRE

    Shenoy Arvind; Shenoy Nina

    2010-01-01

    In the last few decades, there have been tremendous advances in the mechanical properties and methods of fabrication of ceramic materials. While porcelain-based materials are still a major component of the market, there have been moves to replace metal ceramics systems with all ceramic systems. Advances in bonding techniques have increased the range and scope for use of ceramics in dentistry. In this brief review, we will discuss advances in ceramic materials and fabrication techniques. Examp...

  18. Ceramic Processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    EWSUK,KEVIN G.

    1999-11-24

    Ceramics represent a unique class of materials that are distinguished from common metals and plastics by their: (1) high hardness, stiffness, and good wear properties (i.e., abrasion resistance); (2) ability to withstand high temperatures (i.e., refractoriness); (3) chemical durability; and (4) electrical properties that allow them to be electrical insulators, semiconductors, or ionic conductors. Ceramics can be broken down into two general categories, traditional and advanced ceramics. Traditional ceramics include common household products such as clay pots, tiles, pipe, and bricks, porcelain china, sinks, and electrical insulators, and thermally insulating refractory bricks for ovens and fireplaces. Advanced ceramics, also referred to as ''high-tech'' ceramics, include products such as spark plug bodies, piston rings, catalyst supports, and water pump seals for automobiles, thermally insulating tiles for the space shuttle, sodium vapor lamp tubes in streetlights, and the capacitors, resistors, transducers, and varistors in the solid-state electronics we use daily. The major differences between traditional and advanced ceramics are in the processing tolerances and cost. Traditional ceramics are manufactured with inexpensive raw materials, are relatively tolerant of minor process deviations, and are relatively inexpensive. Advanced ceramics are typically made with more refined raw materials and processing to optimize a given property or combination of properties (e.g., mechanical, electrical, dielectric, optical, thermal, physical, and/or magnetic) for a given application. Advanced ceramics generally have improved performance and reliability over traditional ceramics, but are typically more expensive. Additionally, advanced ceramics are typically more sensitive to the chemical and physical defects present in the starting raw materials, or those that are introduced during manufacturing.

  19. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division, 1970--1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A bibliography of the scientific information originating in the Metals and Ceramics Division of ORNL during the period 1970 through 1974 is presented. The master listing contains 925 references, for which both subject and author indexes are provided

  20. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Metals and Ceramics Division, 1970--1974

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, M.R. (comp.)

    1977-07-01

    A bibliography of the scientific information originating in the Metals and Ceramics Division of ORNL during the period 1970 through 1974 is presented. The master listing contains 925 references, for which both subject and author indexes are provided.

  1. Technical Progress Report on Single Pass Flow Through Tests of Ceramic Waste Forms for Plutonium Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, P; Roberts, S; Bourcier, W

    2000-12-01

    This report updates work on measurements of the dissolution rates of single-phase and multi-phase ceramic waste forms in flow-through reactors at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Previous results were reported in Bourcier (1999). Two types of tests are in progress: (1) tests of baseline pyrochlore-based multiphase ceramics; and (2) tests of single-phase pyrochlore, zirconolite, and brannerite (the three phases that will contain most of the actinides). Tests of the multi-phase material are all being run at 25 C. The single-phase tests are being run at 25, 50, and 75 C. All tests are being performed at ambient pressure. The as-made bulk compositions of the ceramics are given in Table 1. The single pass flow-through test procedure [Knauss, 1986 No.140] allows the powdered ceramic to react with pH buffer solutions traveling upward vertically through the powder. Gentle rocking during the course of the experiment keeps the powder suspended and avoids clumping, and allows the system to behave as a continuously stirred reactor. For each test, a cell is loaded with approximately one gram of the appropriate size fraction of powdered ceramic and reacted with a buffer solution of the desired pH. The buffer solution compositions are given in Table 2. All the ceramics tested were cold pressed and sintered at 1350 C in air, except brannerite, which was sintered at 1350 C in a CO/CO{sub 2} gas mixture. They were then crushed, sieved, rinsed repeatedly in alcohol and distilled water, and the desired particle size fraction collected for the single pass flow-through tests (SPFT). The surface area of the ceramics measured by BET ranged from 0.1-0.35 m{sup 2}/g. The measured surface area values, average particle size, and sample weights for each ceramic test are given in the Appendices.

  2. A view on organic binder effects on technical properties of ceramic Raschig rings

    OpenAIRE

    Beygi Khosrowshahi, Y.; Salem, A.

    2010-01-01

    Organic binders such as polyvinyl alcohol, carboxymethyl cellulose and Arabic gum are widely used to control the technological parameters required for green and sintered ceramic bodies. An industrial ceramic Raschig ring composed of kaolinite, illite, pyrophillite and quartz minerals was separately mixed with different content of above binders and formed by extrusion process in the shape of Raschig ring. The dried specimens were sintered at 1270°C and the physicalmechanical charac...

  3. Studio in Sculpture, Ceramics, Jewelry. Advanced Elective Courses in Art for Grades 10, 11, or 12: Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This is the second volume in a series that includes the syllabi for the advanced elective courses in the New York state art program for grades 10, 11, and 12. The first volume is described in ED 100 747. The guide consists of the following three sections: (1) Studio in Ceramics, (2) Studio in Sculpture, and (3) Studio in Jewelry and…

  4. ENERGY EFFICIENCY CHALLENGES ADDRESSED THROUGH THE USE OF ADVANCED REFRACTORY CERAMIC MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Refractory ceramics can play a critical role in improving the energy efficiency of traditional industrial processes through increased furnace efficiency brought about by the employment of novel refractory systems and techniques. Examples of advances in refractory materials related to aluminum, gasification, glass, and lime are highlighted. Energy savings are realized based on reduction of chemical reactions, elimination of mechanical degradation caused by the service environment, reduction of temperature limitations of materials, and elimination of costly installation and repair needs. Key results of projects resulting from US Department of Energy (DOE) funded research programs are discussed with emphasis on applicability of these results to high temperature furnace applications and needed research directions for the future.

  5. Technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage. Thermal energy storage application to the brick/ceramic industry. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, D.R.

    1976-10-01

    An initial project to study the technical and economic feasibility of thermal energy storage (TES) in the three major consumer markets, namely, the residential, commercial and industrial sectors is described. A major objective of the study was to identify viable TES applications from which a more concise study could be launched, leading to a conceptual design and in-depth validation of the TES energy impacts. This report documents one such program. The brick/ceramic industries commonly use periodic kilns which by their operating cycle require time-variant energy supply and consequently variable heat rejection. This application was one of the numerous TES opportunities that emerged from the first study, now available from the ERDA Technical Information Center, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, identified as Report No. COO-2558-1.

  6. Technical Advances and Pitfalls in Head and Neck Radiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upendra Parvathaneni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Intensity Modulated Radiotherapy (IMRT is the standard of care in the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC based on level 1 evidence. Technical advances in radiotherapy have revolutionized the treatment of HNSCC, with the most tangible gain being a reduction in long term morbidity. However, these benefits come with a serious and sobering price. Today, there is a greater chance of missing the target/tumor due to uncertainties in target volume definition by the clinician that is demanded by the highly conformal planning process involved with IMRT. Unless this is urgently addressed, our patients would be better served with the historically practiced non conformal radiotherapy, than IMRT which promises lesser morbidity. Image guided radiotherapy (IGRT ensures the level of set up accuracy warranted to deliver a highly conformal treatment plan and should be utilized with IMRT, where feasible. Proton therapy has a theoretical physical advantage over photon therapy due to a lack of “exit dose”. However, clinical data supporting the routine use of this technology for HNSCC are currently sparse. The purpose of this article is to review the literature, discuss the salient issues and make recommendations that address the gaps in knowledge.

  7. Technical and Economic Viability of Ceramic Multi-Layer Composite SiC Cladding for LWRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ceramic Multi-layer Composite (CMC) cladding has been under investigation at MIT for many years. Recently, increasing focus has been given to the modelling and performance of the cladding under PWR conditions for traditional and advanced fuel designs. These designs include use of annular pellets to reduce the centreline fuel temperature while including additional free volume to accommodate fission gases. Another option considered is adding a small amount of BeO to improve the thermal conductivity of the fuel. The reactor physics of both of these options were analyzed and found to have similar behaviour to a core with zircaloy cladding. These options often come at the cost of higher enrichment requirements. A third option was the replacement of the helium with liquid lead-bismuth in the fuel-cladding gap to improve its thermal conductivity. If the average fuel temperature and plenum pressure are considered as figures of merit, the BeO fuel was seen as the best option among the three designs. The economic implication of investing in CMC cladding for the current US operating reactors to improve the accident tolerance of nuclear fuel is analyzed. The CMC cladding is the only option among the proposed accident tolerant fuel concepts in the US that could result in a fuel enrichment savings, thus compatible with current enrichment infrastructure. The CMC cladding could also result in additional economic benefit by avoiding the costs that might be incurred following a severe accident. However, due to its long development period and likely higher cost of manufacturing compared to zircaloy, its economics merits are uncertain. The significant role that thermal conductivity degradation and swelling induced irradiation plays in performance of CMC cladding has already been documented. However, the impact of material properties on the performance of the neighbouring layers has been underrated and found recently to be critical for the viability of the concept. The current

  8. Military Curriculum Materials for Vocational and Technical Education. Builders School, Ceramic Tile Setting 3-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This course, for individualized or group instruction on ceramic tile setting, was developed from military sources for use in vocational education. The course provides students with skills in mortar preparation, surface preparation, tile layout planning, tile setting, tile cutting, and the grouting of tile joints. Both theory and shop assignments…

  9. Final Technical Report Advanced Solar Resource Modeling and Analysis.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The SunShot Initiative coordinates research, development, demonstration, and deployment activities aimed at dramatically reducing the total installed cost of solar power. The SunShot Initiative focuses on removing critical technical and non-technical barriers to installing and integrating solar energy into the electricity grid. Uncertainty in projected power and energy production from solar power systems contributes to these barriers by increasing financial risks to photovoltaic (PV) deployment and by exacerbating the technical challenges to integration of solar power on the electricity grid.

  10. High-resolution computed tomography for flaw detection in advanced thin-layer ceramics for fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced monolithic solid oxide fuel cells are being assembled from thin (∼50 μm) tape-cast ceramic layers with highly tailored mechanical properties. The layers need to be free of cracks and nonbonds. A high-resolution computed tomography system with a Ir-192 source was investigated as a tool for detecting cracks and nonbonds. Results suggest that channel sizes, including internal channels, can be determined but small in-plane cracks cannot be detected

  11. Technical and economic evaluation of advanced air cargo system concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    The paper reviews NASA air cargo market studies, reports on NASA and NASA-sponsored studies of advanced freighter concepts, and identifies the opportunities for the application of advanced technology. The air cargo market is studied to evaluate the timing for, and the potential market response to, advanced technology aircraft. The degree of elasticity in future air freight markets is also being investigated, since the demand for a new aircraft is most favorable in a price-sensitive environment. Aircraft design studies are considered with attention to mission and design requirements, incorporation of advanced technologies in transport aircraft, new cargo aircraft concepts, advanced freighter evaluation, and civil-military design commonality.

  12. Prototype Development of Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press (ROHUP) to Fabricate Advanced Tc-99 Bearing Ceramic Waste Forms - 13381

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alaniz, Ariana J.; Delgado, Luc R.; Werbick, Brett M. [University of Nevada - Las Vegas, Howard R. Hughes College of Engineering, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 454009, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4009 (United States); Hartmann, Thomas [University of Nevada - Las Vegas, Harry Reid Canter, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Box 454009, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4009 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this senior student project is to design and build a prototype construction of a machine that simultaneously provides the proper pressure and temperature parameters to sinter ceramic powders in-situ to create pellets of rather high densities of above 90% (theoretical). This ROHUP (Remote Operated Hot Uniaxial Press) device is designed specifically to fabricate advanced ceramic Tc-99 bearing waste forms and therefore radiological barriers have been included in the system. The HUP features electronic control and feedback systems to set and monitor pressure, load, and temperature parameters. This device operates wirelessly via portable computer using Bluetooth{sup R} technology. The HUP device is designed to fit in a standard atmosphere controlled glove box to further allow sintering under inert conditions (e.g. under Ar, He, N{sub 2}). This will further allow utilizing this HUP for other potential applications, including radioactive samples, novel ceramic waste forms, advanced oxide fuels, air-sensitive samples, metallic systems, advanced powder metallurgy, diffusion experiments and more. (authors)

  13. Multielement trace determination in high purity advanced ceramics and high purity metals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R Matschat; H-J Heinrich; M Czerwensky; S Kuxenko; H Kipphardt

    2005-07-01

    In the field of advanced ceramics two CRMs were developed in the last few years by the Federal Institute for Materials Research and Testing, one for silicon nitride and one for silicon carbide. Besides their application by industry they are appropriate to be used for the validation of special methods used for trace determination in accordance with high purity materials. This is demonstrated, for example, on ultrapure silicon carbide which was analysed by solid sampling electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (SS ET AAS). BAM is also certifying primary pure reference materials used as the National Standards for inorganic analysis in Germany. The crucial point of this project is the certification of the total purity of high purity materials, each representing one element of the periodic table. A variety of different analytical methods was necessary to determine the trace contents of metallic and non-metallic impurities from almost the whole periodic table in the high purity materials. The primary CRMs of copper, iron and molybdenum are used as examples to demonstrate the modus operandi, analytical effects observed by using high resolution ICP mass spectrometry (HR ICP–MS) and the results.

  14. Advances in Understanding of Swift Heavy-Ion Tracks in Complex Ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Maik; Devanathan, Ram; Toulemonde, Marcel; Trautmann, Christina

    2015-02-01

    Tracks produced by swift heavy ions in ceramics are of interest for fundamental science as well as for applications covering different fields such as nanotechnology or fission-track dating of minerals. In the case of pyrochlores with general formula A2B2O7, the track structure and radiation sensitivity shows a clear dependence on the composition. Ion irradiated Gd2Zr2O7, e.g., retains its crystallinity while amorphous tracks are produced in Gd2Ti2O7. Tracks in Ti-containing compositions have a complex morphology consisting of an amorphous core surrounded by a shell of a disordered, defect-fluorite phase. The size of the amorphous core decreases with decreasing energy loss and with increasing Zr content, while the shell thickness seems to be similar over a wide range of energy loss values. The large data set and the complex track structure has made pyrochlore an interesting model system for a general theoretical description of track formation including thermal spike calculations (providing the spatial and temporal evolution of temperature around the ion trajectory) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations (describing the response of the atomic system).Recent MD advances consider the sudden temperature increase by inserting data from the thermal spike. The combination allows the reproduction of the core-shell track characteristic and sheds light on the early stages of track formation including recrystallization of the molten material produced by the thermal spike.

  15. Project T.E.A.M. (Technical Education Advancement Modules). Introduction to Industrial Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whisenhunt, James E.

    This instructional guide, one of a series developed by the Technical Education Advancement Modules (TEAM) project, is a 20-hour introduction to industrial physics that explains and demonstrates to industrial maintenance mechanics the direct relationship of physics to machinery. Project TEAM is intended to upgrade basic technical competencies of…

  16. High-temperature corrosion resistance of ceramics and ceramic coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tortorelli, P.F.

    1996-06-01

    Ceramics and ceramic composites offer the potential to operate fossil energy systems at the higher temperatures necessary for improved energy efficiency and better environmental control. However, because many fossil fuel-derived processes contain sulfur, chlorine, and carbon, as well as oxygen, degradation from high-temperature corrosion and environmental effects arising from reactions of solids with gases and condensable products is a common life-determining factor in operating systems. Ceramic-based products are not immune to such degradation; adequate corrosion resistance must be assured to exploit the technical and economic potential of such materials. This is normally accomplished by using stable, sound oxides that exist in their bulk form, that naturally grow as surface layers upon exposure to an oxidizing environment, or that are deposited as a coating on a susceptible material. It is therefore important to examine the critical issues with respect to more environmental stability of ceramics that have the potential to be corrosion resistant in particular fossil environments. Key aspects include not only chemical compatibility, but the influence of the environment on the mechanical behavior of the ceramic materials. In addition, for coatings, the mechanical reliability of the ceramic is a key issue in that an otherwise corrosion-resistant surface layer must remain sound and adherent in order to provide protection to the underlying substrate. The purpose of this work is to support the development of advanced ceramics and ceramic composites for applications in fossil environments by examining critical issues related to high-temperature corrosion resistance. More specifically, the overall objective of this task is to examine the chemical compatibility and reliability of potentially corrosion-resistant ceramics being developed as protective overcoats and/or structural materials as parts of other work elements funded by the AR&TD Program.

  17. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-04

    The objectives of the program are to provide an improved TBC system with increased temperature capability and improved reliability relative to current state of the art TBC systems. The development of such a coating system is essential to the ATS engine meeting its objectives. The base program consists of three phases: Phase 1: Program Planning--Complete; Phase 2: Development; Phase 3: Selected Specimen--Bench Test. Work is currently being performed in Phase 2 of the program. In Phase 2, process improvements will be married with new bond coat and ceramic materials systems to provide improvements over currently available TBC systems. Coating reliability will be further improved with the development of an improved lifing model and NDE techniques. This will be accomplished by conducting the following program tasks: II.1 Process Modeling; II.2 Bond Coat Development; II.3 Analytical Lifing Model; II.4 Process Development; II.5 NDE, Maintenance and Repair; II.6 New TBC Concepts. A brief summary of progress made in each of these 6 areas is given.

  18. Technical review of Westinghouse`s Advanced Turbine Systems Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diakunchak, I.S.; Bannister, R.L. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) Program is an ambitious program to develop the necessary technologies, which will result in a significant increase in natural gas-fired power generation plant efficiency, a decrease in cost of electricity and a decrease in harmful emissions. In Phase 1 of the ATS Program, preliminary investigations on different gas turbine cycles demonstrated that net plant efficiency greater than 60% could be achieved. The more promising cycles were evaluated in more detail in Phase 2 in order to select the one that would achieve all of the program goals. The closed-loop cooled combined cycle was selected because it offered the best solution with the least risk for exceeding the ATS Program goals of net plant efficiency, emissions, cost of electricity, reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), and commercialization in the year 2000. The Westinghouse ATS plant is based on an advanced gas turbine design combined with an advanced steam. turbine and a high efficiency generator. To enhance achievement of the challenging performance, emissions, and RAM goals, current technologies are being extended and new technologies developed. The attainment of ATS performance goal necessitates advancements in aerodynamics, sealing, cooling, coatings, and materials technologies. To reduce emissions to the required levels, demands a development effort in the following combustion technology areas: premixed ultra low NOx combustion, catalytic combustion, combustion instabilities, and optical diagnostics. To achieve the RAM targets, requires the utilization of proven design features, with quantified risk analysis, and advanced materials, coatings, and cooling technologies. Phase 2 research and development projects currently in progress, as well as those planned for Phase 3, will result in advances in gas turbine technology and greatly contribute to ATS Program success.

  19. Technical feasibility of advanced separation; Faisabilite technique de la separation poussee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostaing, Ch

    2004-07-01

    Advanced separation aims at reducing the amount and toxicity of high-level and long lived radioactive wastes. The Purex process has been retained as a reference way for the recovery of the most radio-toxic elements: neptunium, technetium and iodine. Complementary solvent extraction processes have to be developed for the separation of americium, curium and cesium from the high activity effluent of the spent fuel reprocessing treatment. Researches have been carried out with the aim of demonstrating the scientifical and technical feasibility of advanced separation of minor actinides and long lived fission products from spent fuels. The scientifical feasibility was demonstrated at the end of 2001. The technical feasibility works started in the beginning of 2002. Many results have been obtained which are presented and summarized in this document: approach followed, processes retained for the technical feasibility (An/Ln and Am/Cm separation), processes retained for further validation at the new shielded Purex installation, technical feasibility of Purex adaptation to Np separation, technical feasibility of Diamex (first step: (An+Ln)/other fission products) separation), technical feasibility of Sanex process (second step: An(III)/Ln(III) separation), technical feasibility of Am(III)/Cm(III) separation, cesium separation, iodine separation, technical-economical evaluation, conclusions and perspectives, facilities and apparatuses used for the experiments. (J.S.)

  20. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-08-28

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  1. Technical advances in external radiotherapy for hepatocellular carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Shin-Hyung; Kim, Jae-Chul; Kang, Min Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Radiotherapy techniques have substantially improved in the last two decades. After the introduction of 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, radiotherapy has been increasingly used for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, more advanced techniques, including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), stereotactic ablative body radiotherapy (SABR), and charged particle therapy, are used for the treatment of HCC. IMRT can escalate the tumor dose while sparing the normal tissue even though the tumor is large or located near critical organs. SABR can deliver a very high radiation dose to small HCCs in a few fractions, leading to high local control rates of 84%-100%. Various advanced imaging modalities are used for radiotherapy planning and delivery to improve the precision of radiotherapy. These advanced techniques enable the delivery of high dose radiotherapy for early to advanced HCCs without increasing the radiation-induced toxicities. However, as there have been no effective tools for the prediction of the response to radiotherapy or recurrences within or outside the radiation field, future studies should focus on selecting the patients who will benefit from radiotherapy. PMID:27621577

  2. Advancing socio-technical systems thinking: a call for bravery

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, MC; Challenger, R; Jayewardene, D; Clegg, CW

    2014-01-01

    Socio-technical systems thinking has predominantly been applied to the domains of new technology and work design over the past 60 years. Whilst it has made an impact, we argue that we need to be braver, encouraging the approach to evolve and extend its reach. In particular, we need to: extend our conceptualization of what constitutes a system; apply our thinking to a much wider range of complex problems and global challenges; and engage in more predictive work. To illustrate our agenda in nov...

  3. Technical progress report during Phase 1 of the continuous fiber ceramic composites program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richerson, D.W.

    1994-03-15

    United States industry has a critical need for materials that are lightweight, strong, tough, corrosion resistant and capable of performing at high temperatures; such materials will enable substantial increase in energy efficiency and reduction in emissions of pollutants. Continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCCs) are an emerging class of materials which have the potential for the desired combination of properties to meet the industrial needs. A $10 billion annual market has been estimated for CFCC products by the year 2010, which equates to over 100,000 industrial sector jobs. The CFCC program began in the spring of 1992 as a three-phase 10-year effort to assess potential applications of CFCC materials, develop the necessary supporting technologies to design, analyze and test CFCC materials, conduct materials and process development guided by the applications assessment input, fabricate test samples and representative components to evaluate CFCC material capabilities under application conditions, and analyze scaleability and manufacturability plus demonstrate pilot-scale production engineering. DOE awarded 10 Phase I cooperative agreements to industry-lead teams plus identified generic supporting technology projects. This document highlights the broad progress and accomplishments on these contracts and support technology projects during Phase I.

  4. Recent developments in choledochoscopy: technical and clinical advances

    OpenAIRE

    Xu MM; Kahaleh M

    2016-01-01

    Ming-Ming Xu, Michel Kahaleh Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Weill Cornell Medical College, Cornell University, New York, NY, USA Abstract: Peroral cholangioscopy has become an important tool in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of biliary diseases, ranging from indeterminate biliary strictures to bile duct stones. Although the first cholangioscopy was performed in the 1970s, recent technological advances have provided us with cholangioscopes that yield high-resolution im...

  5. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  6. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  7. Technical Analyses of the Interference Effect of"Advanced Radar"

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xi-xiang ZHANG; Zhong-jie ZHANG

    2010-01-01

    The conception of"advanced radar"is introduced and put forward,while it is proved that the weakpoints of interference can still be employed.Meanwhile,the paper expands the principle how Over-The-Horizon Radar(OTHR)works,and derives the OTHR interference equation.By listing the OTHR examples,it analyzes and calculates the equivalent power of the OTHR and the sensitivity of the receiver to build up a block diagram how the interferencer is structured Hence,the effective area is achieved,and OTHR can be intereferenced effectively with not so high equivalent power.

  8. Evaluation of technical design of advanced information display

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The performance of human machine system such as nuclear power plant is highly dependent on the suitability of the interface design of the system. As the computer technology is highly developed, the mental model of computer users including NPP operators has been changed from analogue display type-based stereotype to digitalized one. Therefore, it is necessary and confident to consider the issues to evaluate system suitability of advanced information display on CRT or CBP (Computer Based Procedure). This document is intended for providing an updated and expanded set of user-interface guidelines that meet the needs of designing information display on CRT by finding the generic guidelines involving information display design issues as much as possible. The design Issues and resolutions from the finding may provide the cues for the designers and evaluators of the specific man machine interfaces of digitalized devices

  9. Evaluation of technical design of advanced information display(II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Woo Chang; Kang, Young Ju; Ji, Jung Hun; Jang, Sung Pil; Jung, Sung Hae; Park, Hyun Jin [Kumoh National Univ., Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-02-15

    As the computer technology is highly developed, the mental model of computer users including NPP operators has been changed from analogue display type-based stereotype to digitalized one. Therefore, it is necessary and confident to consider the issues to evaluate system suitability of advanced information display on visual display terminal such as CRT. This document is intended for providing an updated and expanded set of user-interface guidelines that meet the needs of designing information display on CRT by finding the generic guidelines involving information display design issues, and the relationship among the guidelines. The design issues and resolutions from the finding may provide the cues for the designers and evaluators of the specific man machine interfaces of digitalized devices.

  10. Evaluation of technical design of advanced information display

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Woo Chang; Kang, Young Ju; Ji, Jung Hun; Jang, Sung Pil; Jung, Sung Hae [Kumoh National Institute of Technology, Gumi (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-03-15

    The performance of human machine system such as nuclear power plant is highly dependent on the suitability of the interface design of the system. As the computer technology is highly developed, the mental model of computer users including NPP operators has been changed from analogue display type-based stereotype to digitalized one. Therefore, it is necessary and confident to consider the issues to evaluate system suitability of advanced information display on CRT or CBP (Computer Based Procedure). This document is intended for providing an updated and expanded set of user-interface guidelines that meet the needs of designing information display on CRT by finding the generic guidelines involving information display design issues as much as possible. The design Issues and resolutions from the finding may provide the cues for the designers and evaluators of the specific man machine interfaces of digitalized devices.

  11. Evaluation of technical design of advanced information display(II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the computer technology is highly developed, the mental model of computer users including NPP operators has been changed from analogue display type-based stereotype to digitalized one. Therefore, it is necessary and confident to consider the issues to evaluate system suitability of advanced information display on visual display terminal such as CRT. This document is intended for providing an updated and expanded set of user-interface guidelines that meet the needs of designing information display on CRT by finding the generic guidelines involving information display design issues, and the relationship among the guidelines. The design issues and resolutions from the finding may provide the cues for the designers and evaluators of the specific man machine interfaces of digitalized devices

  12. Comparison of Advanced Distillation Control Methods, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. James B. Riggs

    2000-11-30

    Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to evaluate configuration selections for single-ended and dual-composition control, as well as to compare conventional and advanced control approaches. In addition, a simulator of a main fractionator was used to compare the control performance of conventional and advanced control. For each case considered, the controllers were tuned by using setpoint changes and tested using feed composition upsets. Proportional Integral (PI) control performance was used to evaluate the configuration selection problem. For single ended control, the energy balance configuration was found to yield the best performance. For dual composition control, nine configurations were considered. It was determined that the use of dynamic simulations is required in order to identify the optimum configuration from among the nine possible choices. The optimum configurations were used to evaluate the relative control performance of conventional PI controllers, MPC (Model Predictive Control), PMBC (Process Model-Based Control), and ANN (Artificial Neural Networks) control. It was determined that MPC works best when one product is much more important than the other, while PI was superior when both products were equally important. PMBC and ANN were not found to offer significant advantages over PI and MPC. MPC was found to outperform conventional PI control for the main fractionator. MPC was applied to three industrial columns: one at Phillips Petroleum and two at Union Carbide. In each case, MPC was found to significantly outperform PI controls. The major advantage of the MPC controller is its ability to effectively handle a complex set of constraints and control objectives.

  13. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining ceramic oxides to ceramic oxides and ceramic oxides to metal for advanced heat engine applications. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, J.; Majumdar, B.; Rosenfield, A.R.; Swartz, S.L.; Cawley, J.; Park, E.; Hauser, D.; Hopper, A.T. [Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States)

    1992-04-01

    The problem of designing reliable, high strength zirconia-to-zirconia and zirconia-to-nodular cast iron joints is addressed by developing a general joint design and assessment methodology. A joint`s load carrying capability is predicted in terms of its material strength and fracture toughness characteristics. The effects of joint constituent properties and joining process variables are included. The methodology is verified in a two step process by applying it first to notched bend bars and then to a notched disk specimen loaded in compression. Key technical accomplishments in the program include the development of a joint design and assessment methodology which predicts failure based on a combination of strength and toughness, the development of a new method of hot forging magnesia partially stabilized zirconia to itself, and the development of a bimaterial disk-shaped specimen notched along the diametral bond line and compressively loaded to generate both shear and tensile loadings on the bond line. Mechanical and thermal characterization of joints, adherents, and interlayer materials were performed to provide data for input to the design methodology. Results from over 150 room temperature tests and 30 high temperature tests are reported. Extensive comparisons of experimental results are made with model predictions of failure load. The joint design and assessment model, as applied to the materials and test specimens of this program, has been programmed for a PC and is available to interested researchers.

  14. Analytical and experimental evaluation of joining ceramic oxides to ceramic oxides and ceramic oxides to metal for advanced heat engine applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, J.; Majumdar, B.; Rosenfield, A.R.; Swartz, S.L.; Cawley, J.; Park, E.; Hauser, D.; Hopper, A.T. (Battelle Columbus Labs., OH (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The problem of designing reliable, high strength zirconia-to-zirconia and zirconia-to-nodular cast iron joints is addressed by developing a general joint design and assessment methodology. A joint's load carrying capability is predicted in terms of its material strength and fracture toughness characteristics. The effects of joint constituent properties and joining process variables are included. The methodology is verified in a two step process by applying it first to notched bend bars and then to a notched disk specimen loaded in compression. Key technical accomplishments in the program include the development of a joint design and assessment methodology which predicts failure based on a combination of strength and toughness, the development of a new method of hot forging magnesia partially stabilized zirconia to itself, and the development of a bimaterial disk-shaped specimen notched along the diametral bond line and compressively loaded to generate both shear and tensile loadings on the bond line. Mechanical and thermal characterization of joints, adherents, and interlayer materials were performed to provide data for input to the design methodology. Results from over 150 room temperature tests and 30 high temperature tests are reported. Extensive comparisons of experimental results are made with model predictions of failure load. The joint design and assessment model, as applied to the materials and test specimens of this program, has been programmed for a PC and is available to interested researchers.

  15. Advanced ceramic matrix composite materials for current and future propulsion technology applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, S.; Beyer, S.; Knabe, H.; Immich, H.; Meistring, R.; Gessler, A.

    2004-08-01

    Current rocket engines, due to their method of construction, the materials used and the extreme loads to which they are subjected, feature a limited number of load cycles. Various technology programmes in Europe are concerned, besides developing reliable and rugged, low cost, throwaway equipment, with preparing for future reusable propulsion technologies. One of the key roles for realizing reusable engine components is the use of modern and innovative materials. One of the key technologies which concern various engine manufacturers worldwide is the development of fibre-reinforced ceramics—ceramic matrix composites. The advantages for the developers are obvious—the low specific weight, the high specific strength over a large temperature range, and their great damage tolerance compared to monolithic ceramics make this material class extremely interesting as a construction material. Over the past years, the Astrium company (formerly DASA) has, together with various partners, worked intensively on developing components for hypersonic engines and liquid rocket propulsion systems. In the year 2000, various hot-firing tests with subscale (scale 1:5) and full-scale nozzle extensions were conducted. In this year, a further decisive milestone was achieved in the sector of small thrusters, and long-term tests served to demonstrate the extraordinary stability of the C/SiC material. Besides developing and testing radiation-cooled nozzle components and small-thruster combustion chambers, Astrium worked on the preliminary development of actively cooled structures for future reusable propulsion systems. In order to get one step nearer to this objective, the development of a new fibre composite was commenced within the framework of a regionally sponsored programme. The objective here is to create multidirectional (3D) textile structures combined with a cost-effective infiltration process. Besides material and process development, the project also encompasses the development of

  16. High temperature corrosion of advanced ceramic materials for hot gas filters and heat exchangers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossland, C.E.; Shelleman, D.L.; Spear, K.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-08-01

    A vertical flow-through furnace has been built to study the effect of corrosion on the morphology and mechanical properties of ceramic hot gas filters. Sections of 3M Type 203 and DuPont Lanxide SiC-SiC filter tubes were sealed at one end and suspended in the furnace while being subjected to a simulated coal combustion environment at 870{degrees}C. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy is used to identify phase and morphology changes due to corrosion while burst testing determines the loss of mechanical strength after exposure to the combustion gases. Additionally, a thermodynamic database of gaseous silicon compounds is currently being established so that calculations can be made to predict important products of the reaction of the environment with the ceramics. These thermodynamic calculations provide useful information concerning the regimes where the ceramic may be degraded by material vaporization. To verify the durability and predict lifetime performance of ceramic heat exchangers in coal combustion environments, long-term exposure testing of stressed (internally pressurized) tubes must be performed in actual coal combustion environments. The authors have designed a system that will internally pressurize 2 inch OD by 48 inch long ceramic heat exchanger tubes to a maximum pressure of 200 psi while exposing the outer surface of the tubes to coal combustion gas at the Combustion and Environmental Research Facility (CERF) at the Pittsburgh Energy and Technology Center. Water-cooled, internal o-ring pressure seals were designed to accommodate the existing 6 inch by 6 inch access panels of the CERF. Tubes will be exposed for up to a maximum of 500 hours at temperatures of 2500 and 2600{degrees}F with an internal pressure of 200 psi. If the tubes survive, their retained strength will be measured using the high temperature tube burst test facility at Penn State University. Fractographic analysis will be performed to identify the failure source(s) for the tubes.

  17. Technical advances of interventional fluoroscopy and flat panel image receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Pei-Jan Paul

    2008-11-01

    In the past decade, various radiation reducing devices and control circuits have been implemented on fluoroscopic imaging equipment. Because of the potential for lengthy fluoroscopic procedures in interventional cardiovascular angiography, these devices and control circuits have been developed for the cardiac catheterization laboratories and interventional angiography suites. Additionally, fluoroscopic systems equipped with image intensifiers have benefited from technological advances in x-ray tube, x-ray generator, and spectral shaping filter technologies. The high heat capacity x-ray tube, the medium frequency inverter generator with high performance switching capability, and the patient dose reduction spectral shaping filter had already been implemented on the image intensified fluoroscopy systems. These three underlying technologies together with the automatic dose rate and image quality (ADRIQ) control logic allow patients undergoing cardiovascular angiography procedures to benefit from "lower patient dose" with "high image quality." While photoconductor (or phosphor plate) x-ray detectors and signal capture thin film transistor (TFT) and charge coupled device (CCD) arrays are analog in nature, the advent of the flat panel image receptor allowed for fluoroscopy procedures to become more streamlined. With the analog-to-digital converter built into the data lines, the flat panel image receptor appears to become a digital device. While the transition from image intensified fluoroscopy systems to flat panel image receptor fluoroscopy systems is part of the on-going "digitization of imaging," the value of a flat panel image receptor may have to be evaluated with respect to patient dose, image quality, and clinical application capabilities. The advantage of flat panel image receptors has yet to be fully explored. For instance, the flat panel image receptor has its disadvantages as compared to the image intensifiers; the cost of the equipment is probably the most

  18. Advances in heavy water reactor technology. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This IAEA meeting addressed both the status of national programmes and technical topics including advances in plant and system design and new plant features, development of pressure tube technologies, fuel and fuel cycle options, computer code development and verification, and safety and accident analysis

  19. Conceptual designs of advanced fast reactor. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Technical Committee meeting (TCM) was held on Conceptual Designs of Advanced Fast Power Reactors to review the lessons learned from the construction and operation of demonstration and near-commercial size plants. This TCM focused on design and development of advanced fast reactors and identified methodologies to evaluate the economic competitiveness and reliability of advanced projects. The Member States which participated in the TCM were at different stages of LMFR development. The Russian Federation, Japan and India had prototype and/or experimental LMFRs and continue with mature R and D programmes. China, the Republic of Korea and Brazil were at the beginning of LMFR development. Therefore the aims of the TCM were to obtain technical descriptions of different design approaches for experimental, prototype, demonstration and commercial LMFRs, and to describe the engineering judgements made in developing the design approaches. Refs, figs, tabs

  20. Advancement of Cellular Ceramics Made of Silicon Carbide for Burner Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lower emissions of CO and NOx as well as a higher power density were observed in combustion processes performed in porous media like ceramic foams. Only a few materials are applicable for porous burners. Open-celled ceramic foams made of silicon carbide are of particular interest because of their outstanding properties. Two different SiC materials have been investigated, silicon-infiltrated silicon carbide (SiSiC) and pressureless sintered silicon carbide (SSiC). The oxidation behaviour of both has been characterized by furnace oxidation and burner tests up to 500 h operating time. Up to a temperature of 1200 deg. C SiSiC exhibited a good oxidation resistance in combustion gases by forming a protective layer of silica. High inner porosity up to 30% in the ceramic struts was found in the SSiC material. Caused by inner oxidation processes the pure material SSiC allows only short time applications with a temperature limit of 1550 deg. C in combustion gases. An increase of the lifetime of the SSiC foams was obtained by development of a new SSiC with an inner porosity of less than 12%. The result was a considerable reduction of the inner oxidation processes in the SSiC struts.

  1. New high boron content polyborane precursors to advanced ceramic materials: New syntheses, new applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guron, Marta

    There is a need for new synthetic routes to high boron content materials for applications as polymeric precursors to ceramics, as well as in neutron shielding and potential medical applications. To this end, new ruthenium-catalyzed olefin metathesis routes have been devised to form new complex polyboranes and polymeric species. Metathesis of di-alkenyl substituted o-carboranes allowed the synthesis of ring-closed products fused to the carborane cage, many of which are new compounds and one that offers a superior synthetic method to one previously published. Acyclic diene metathesis of di-alkenyl substituted m-carboranes resulted in the formation of new main-chain carborane-containing polymers of modest molecular weights. Due to their extremely low char yields, and in order to explore other metathesis routes, ring opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) was used to generate the first examples of poly(norbornenyl- o-carboranes). Monomer synthesis was achieved via a two-step process, incorporating Ti-catalyzed hydroboration to make 6-(5-norbornenyl)-decaborane, followed by alkyne insertion in ionic liquid media to achieve 1,2-R2 -3-norbornenyl o-carborane species. The monomers were then polymerized using ROMP to afford several examples of poly(norbornenyl- o-carboranes) with relatively high molecular weights. One such polymer, [1-Ph, 3-(=CH2-C5H7-CH2=)-1,2-C 2B10H10]n, had a char yield very close to the theoretical char yield of 44%. Upon random copolymerization with poly(6-(5-norbornenyl) decaborane), char yields significantly increased to 80%, but this number was well above the theoretical value implicating the formation of a boron-carbide/carbon ceramic. Finally, applications of polyboranes were explored via polymer blends toward the synthesis of ceramic composites and the use of polymer precursors as reagents for potential ultra high temperature ceramic applications. Upon pyrolysis, polymer blends of poly(6-(5-norbornenyl)-decaborane) and poly

  2. High temperature fracture and fatigue of ceramics. Annual technical progress report No. 6, August 15, 1994--August 14, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, B.

    1996-04-01

    This report covers work done in the first year of our new contract {open_quotes}High Temperature Fracture and Fatigue of Ceramics,{close_quotes} which commenced in August, 1995 as a follow-on from our prior contract {open_quotes}Mechanisms of Mechanical Fatigue in Ceramics.{close_quotes} Our activities have consisted mainly of studies of the failure of fibrous ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) at high temperature; with a little fundamental work on the role of stress redistribution in the statistics of fracture and cracking in the presence of viscous fluids.

  3. NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Craig, D. A.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this Technical Interchange Meeting was to increase the quantity and quality of technical, cost, and programmatic data used to model the impact of investing in different technologies. The focus of this meeting was the Technology Tool Box (TTB), a database of performance, operations, and programmatic parameters provided by technologists and used by systems engineers. The TTB is the data repository used by a system of models known as the Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS). This report describes the result of the November meeting, and also provides background information on ATLAS and the TTB.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF CRYSTALLINE CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Brinkman, K.

    2011-09-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is developing crystalline ceramic waste forms to incorporate CS/LN/TM high Mo waste streams consisting of perovskite, hollandite, pyrochlore, zirconolite, and powellite phase assemblages. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase crystalline ceramics. Fiscal Year 2011 (FY11) activities included (i) expanding the compositional range by varying waste loading and fabrication of compositions rich in TiO{sub 2}, (ii) exploring the processing parameters of ceramics produced by the melt and crystallize process, (iii) synthesis and characterization of select individual phases of powellite and hollandite that are the target hosts for radionuclides of Mo, Cs, and Rb, and (iv) evaluating the durability and radiation stability of single and multi-phase ceramic waste forms. Two fabrication methods, including melting and crystallizing, and pressing and sintering, were used with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. An analysis of the XRD and SEM/EDS results indicates that the targeted crystalline phases of the FY11 compositions consisting of pyrochlore, perovskite, hollandite, zirconolite, and powellite were formed by both press and sinter and melt and crystallize processing methods. An evaluation of crystalline phase formation versus melt processing conditions revealed that hollandite, perovskite, zirconolite, and residual TiO{sub 2} phases formed regardless of cooling rate, demonstrating the robust nature of this process for crystalline phase development. The multiphase ceramic composition CSLNTM-06 demonstrated good resistance to proton beam irradiation. Electron irradiation studies on the single phase CaMoO{sub 4} (a component of the multiphase waste form) suggested that this material exhibits stability to 1000 years at anticipated self-irradiation doses (2 x 10{sup 10}-2 x 10{sup 11} Gy), but that

  5. Slow Crack Growth Analysis of Advanced Structural Ceramics Under Combined Loading Conditions: Damage Assessment in Life Prediction Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, S. R.; Gyekenyesi, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Slow crack growth analysis was performed with three different loading histories including constant stress- rate/constant stress-rate testing (Case I loading), constant stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case II loading), and cyclic stress/constant stress-rate testing (Case III loading). Strength degradation due to slow crack growth and/or damage accumulation was determined numerically as a function of percentage of interruption time between the two loading sequences for a given loading history. The numerical solutions were examined with the experimental data determined at elevated temperatures using four different advanced ceramic materials, two silicon nitrides, one silicon carbide and one alumina for the Case I loading history, and alumina for the Case II loading history. The numerical solutions were in reasonable agreement with the experimental data, indicating that notwithstanding some degree of creep deformation presented for some test materials slow crack growth was a governing mechanism associated with failure for all the rest materials.

  6. Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Technical Exchange Meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis Smith

    2013-09-01

    During FY13, the INL developed an advanced SMR PRA framework which has been described in the report Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Probabilistic Risk Assessment (PRA) Detailed Technical Framework Specification, INL/EXT-13-28974 (April 2013). In this framework, the various areas are considered: Probabilistic models to provide information specific to advanced SMRs Representation of specific SMR design issues such as having co-located modules and passive safety features Use of modern open-source and readily available analysis methods Internal and external events resulting in impacts to safety All-hazards considerations Methods to support the identification of design vulnerabilities Mechanistic and probabilistic data needs to support modeling and tools In order to describe this framework more fully and obtain feedback on the proposed approaches, the INL hosted a technical exchange meeting during August 2013. This report describes the outcomes of that meeting.

  7. Advanced Transportation System Studies. Technical Area 3: Alternate Propulsion Subsystems Concepts. Volume 3; Program Cost Estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, Daniel J. H.

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this contract was to provide definition of alternate propulsion systems for both earth-to-orbit (ETO) and in-space vehicles (upper stages and space transfer vehicles). For such propulsion systems, technical data to describe performance, weight, dimensions, etc. was provided along with programmatic information such as cost, schedule, needed facilities, etc. Advanced technology and advanced development needs were determined and provided. This volume separately presents the various program cost estimates that were generated under three tasks: the F- IA Restart Task, the J-2S Restart Task, and the SSME Upper Stage Use Task. The conclusions, technical results , and the program cost estimates are described in more detail in Volume I - Executive Summary and in individual Final Task Reports.

  8. Life prediction methodology for ceramic components of advanced vehicular heat engines: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khandelwal, P.K.; Provenzano, N.J.; Schneider, W.E. [Allison Engine Co., Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    1996-02-01

    One of the major challenges involved in the use of ceramic materials is ensuring adequate strength and durability. This activity has developed methodology which can be used during the design phase to predict the structural behavior of ceramic components. The effort involved the characterization of injection molded and hot isostatic pressed (HIPed) PY-6 silicon nitride, the development of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) technology, and the development of analytical life prediction methodology. Four failure modes are addressed: fast fracture, slow crack growth, creep, and oxidation. The techniques deal with failures initiating at the surface as well as internal to the component. The life prediction methodology for fast fracture and slow crack growth have been verified using a variety of confirmatory tests. The verification tests were conducted at room and elevated temperatures up to a maximum of 1371 {degrees}C. The tests involved (1) flat circular disks subjected to bending stresses and (2) high speed rotating spin disks. Reasonable correlation was achieved for a variety of test conditions and failure mechanisms. The predictions associated with surface failures proved to be optimistic, requiring re-evaluation of the components` initial fast fracture strengths. Correlation was achieved for the spin disks which failed in fast fracture from internal flaws. Time dependent elevated temperature slow crack growth spin disk failures were also successfully predicted.

  9. The Production of Advanced Glass Ceramic HLW Forms using Cold Crucible Induction Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge; Vince Maio

    2013-10-01

    Cold Crucible Induction Melters (CCIMs) will favorably change how High-Level radioactive Waste (from nuclear fuel recovery) is treated in the 21st century. Unlike the existing Joule-Heated Melters (JHMs) currently in operation for the glass-based immobilization of High-Level Waste (HLW), CCIMs offer unique material features that will increase melt temperatures, increase throughput, increase mixing, increase loading in the waste form, lower melter foot prints, eliminate melter corrosion and lower costs. These features not only enhance the technology for producing HLW forms, but also provide advantageous attributes to the waste form by allowing more durable alternatives to glass. This paper discusses advantageous features of the CCIM, with emphasis on features that overcome the historical issues with the JHMs presently utilized, as well as the benefits of glass ceramic waste forms over borosilicate glass waste forms. These advantages are then validated based on recent INL testing to demonstrate a first-of-a-kind formulation of a non-radioactive ceramic-based waste form utilizing a CCIM.

  10. Yttrium-90 Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma-Performance, Technical Advances, and Future Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molvar, Christopher; Lewandowski, Robert

    2015-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal tumor, claiming over half a million lives per year. Treatment of HCC is commonly performed without curative intent, and palliative options dominate, including catheter-based therapies, namely, transarterial chemoembolization and yttrium-90 ((90)Y) radioembolization. This review will showcase the performance of (90)Y radioembolization for the treatment of HCC, focusing on recent seminal data and technical advances. In particular, novel radioembolization treatment concepts are discussed and compared with conventional HCC therapy.

  11. Final Technical Report - Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sussman, Alan [University of Maryland

    2014-10-21

    This is a final technical report for the University of Maryland work in the SciDAC Center for Technology for Advanced Scientific Component Software (TASCS). The Maryland work focused on software tools for coupling parallel software components built using the Common Component Architecture (CCA) APIs. Those tools are based on the Maryland InterComm software framework that has been used in multiple computational science applications to build large-scale simulations of complex physical systems that employ multiple separately developed codes.

  12. Preparation and characteristics of porous ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongmei SHAO; Peiping ZHANG; Liyan MA; Juanjuan LIU

    2007-01-01

    Pyrophyllite is always used for making porous ceramics. In order to design the preparation technics of porous ceramics with pyrophyllite reasonably we must know the classifications, characteristics, properties and applications of porous ceramics. The classification and characteristics of porous ceramics are reviewed in this article; and several common preparations with their advantages and disadvantages are also introduced. The authors discussed the problems existing in researching and developing process for porous ceramics, and forecasted the development prospect of porous ceramics.

  13. PRELIMINARY STUDY OF CERAMICS FOR IMMOBILIZATION OF ADVANCED FUEL CYCLE REPROCESSING WASTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fox, K.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Marra, J.

    2010-09-22

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) developed a series of ceramic waste forms for the immobilization of Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) and Cesium/Lanthanide/Transition Metal (CS/LN/TM) waste streams anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, CaO, and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores, zirconolite, and other minor metal titanate phases. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. XRD and SEM/EDS results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD, and had phase assemblages that were closer to the initial targets. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms. Initial studies of radiation damage tolerance using ion beam irradiation at Los

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF CERAMIC WASTE FORMS FOR AN ADVANCED NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J.; Billings, A.; Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.

    2010-11-30

    A series of ceramic waste forms were developed and characterized for the immobilization of a Cesium/Lanthanide (CS/LN) waste stream anticipated to result from nuclear fuel reprocessing. Simple raw materials, including Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and TiO{sub 2} were combined with simulated waste components to produce multiphase ceramics containing hollandite-type phases, perovskites (particularly BaTiO{sub 3}), pyrochlores and other minor metal titanate phases. Three fabrication methodologies were used, including melting and crystallizing, pressing and sintering, and Spark Plasma Sintering (SPS), with the intent of studying phase evolution under various sintering conditions. X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) and Scanning Electron Microscopy coupled with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) results showed that the partitioning of the waste elements in the sintered materials was very similar, despite varying stoichiometry of the phases formed. Identification of excess Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via XRD and SEM/EDS in the first series of compositions led to a Phase II study, with significantly reduced Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentrations and increased waste loadings. The Phase II compositions generally contained a reduced amount of unreacted Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} as identified by XRD. Chemical composition measurements showed no significant issues with meeting the target compositions. However, volatilization of Cs and Mo was identified, particularly during melting, since sintering of the pressed pellets and SPS were performed at lower temperatures. Partitioning of some of the waste components was difficult to determine via XRD. SEM/EDS mapping showed that those elements, which were generally present in small concentrations, were well distributed throughout the waste forms.

  15. Technical, environmental, and economic assessment of deploying advanced coal power technologies in the Chinese context

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Lifeng [Energy Technology Innovation Policy, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy and Power, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, 11 Beisihuan West Road, Beijing 100190 (China)], E-mail: lifeng_zhao@ksg.harvard.edu; Xiao Yunhan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy and Power, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, 11 Beisihuan West Road, Beijing 100190 (China); Gallagher, Kelly Sims [Energy Technology Innovation Policy, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, John F. Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, 79 John F. Kennedy Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Wang Bo; Xu Xiang [Key Laboratory of Advanced Energy and Power, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of Engineering Thermophysics, 11 Beisihuan West Road, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2008-07-15

    The goal of this study is to evaluate the technical, environmental, and economic dimensions of deploying advanced coal-fired power technologies in China. In particular, we estimate the differences in capital cost and overall cost of electricity (COE) for a variety of advanced coal-power technologies based on the technological and economic levels in 2006 in China. This paper explores the economic gaps between Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) and other advanced coal power technologies, and compares 12 different power plant configurations using advanced coal power technologies. Super critical (SC) and ultra super critical (USC) pulverized coal (PC) power generation technologies coupled with pollution control technologies can meet the emission requirements. These technologies are highly efficient, technically mature, and cost-effective. From the point of view of efficiency, SC and USC units are good choices for power industry. The net plant efficiency for IGCC has reached 45%, and it has the best environmental performance overall. The cost of IGCC is much higher, however, than that of other power generation technologies, so the development of IGCC is slow throughout the world. Incentive policies are needed if IGCC is to be deployed in China.

  16. Combustion gas cleaning in the ceramic tile industry: technical guide; Nettoyage des fumees de combustion dans l'industrie ceramique: guide technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lezaun, F.J. [ENAGAS-Grupo Gas Natural (Spain); Mallol, G.; Monfort, E. [instituto de Tecnologia Ceramica, ITC (Spain); Busani, G. [Agenzia Regionale per la Prevenzione e l' Amiente, ARPA (Spain)

    2000-07-01

    This document presents a summary of a technical guide drawn up on combustion gas cleaning systems in ceramic frit and tile production. The guide describes the method to be followed for selecting the best possible solutions for reducing pollutant concentrations in different emission sources, in accordance with current regulatory requirements and the CET recommendation. There are three sources of combustion gas air emissions that need to be cleaned in ceramic tile and frit production and they are usually related to the following process stages: slip spray drying, tile firing and frit melting. The different nature of the emissions means that different substances will need to be cleaned in each emission. Thus, in spray drying and frit melting, the only species to be cleaned are suspended particles, while in tile firing, it is also necessary to reduce the fluorine concentration. The systems analysed in this guide are mainly wet cleaning systems, bag filters and electrostatic precipitators. In the study, the efficiency of these cleaning systems is compared at each emission source from a technical and economic point of view, and concrete solutions are put forward in each case, together with a list of suppliers of the technologies involved. (authors)

  17. Highly integrated hybrid process with ceramic ultrafiltration-membrane for advanced treatment of drinking water: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jianning; Wang, Lingyun; Zhu, Jia; Zhang, Jianguo; Sheng, Deyang; Zhang, Xihui

    2013-01-01

    This article presents a highly integrated hybrid process for the advanced treatment of drinking water in dealing with the micro-polluted raw water. A flat sheet ceramic membrane with the pore size of 50∼60 nm for ultrafiltration (UF) is used to integrate coagulation and ozonation together. At the same time, biological activated carbon filtration (BAC) is used to remove the ammonia and organic pollutants in raw water. A pilot study in the scale of 120 m(3)/d has been conducted in Southern China. The mainly-analyzed parameters include turbidity, particle counts, ammonia, total organic carbon (TOC), UV254, biological dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), dissolved oxygen (DO) as well as trans-membrane pressure (TMP). The experiments demonstrated that ceramic UF-membrane was able to remove most of turbidity and suspended particulate matters. The final effluent turbidity reached to 0.14 NTU on average. BAC was effective in removing ammonia and organic matters. Dissolved oxygen (DO) is necessary for the biodegradation of ammonia at high concentration. The removal efficiencies reached to 90% for ammonia with the initial concentration of 3.6 mg/L and 76% for TOC with the initial concentration of 3.8 mg/L. Ozonation can alter the molecular structure of organics in terms of UV254, reduce membrane fouling, and extend the operation circle. It is believed the hybrid treatment process developed in this article can achieve high performance with less land occupation and lower cost compared with the conventional processes. It is especially suitable for the developing countries in order to obtain high-quality drinking water in a cost-effective way.

  18. Microwave processing of ceramic oxide filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, G.J.; Katz, J.D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States)

    1995-05-01

    The objective of the microwave filament processing project is to develop microwave techniques at 2.45 GHZ to manufacture continuous ceramic oxide filaments. Microwave processing uses the volumetric absorption of microwave power in oxide filament tows to drive off process solvents, to burn out organic binders, and to sinter the dried fibers to produce flexible, high-strength ceramic filaments. The technical goal is to advance filament processing technology by microwave heating more rapidly with less energy and at a lower cost than conventional processing, but with the same quality as conventional processing. The manufacturing goal is to collaborate with the 3M Company, a US manufacturer of ceramic oxide filaments, to evaluate the technology using a prototype filament system and to transfer the microwave technology to the 3M Company.

  19. Cost effective machining and inspection of structural ceramic components for advanced high temperature application. Final CRADA report for CRADA number Y-1292-0151

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbatiello, L.A. [Lockheed Martin Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Haselkorn, M. [Caterpillar, Inc., Peoria, IL (United States)

    1996-11-29

    This Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) was a mutual research and development (R and D) effort among the participants to investigate a range of advanced manufacturing technologies for two silicon nitride (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) ceramic materials. The general objective was to identify the most cost-effective part manufacturing processes for the ceramic materials of interest. The focus was determining the relationship between material removal rates, surface quality, and the structural characteristics of each ceramic resulting from three innovative processes. These innovated machining processes were studied using silicon nitride advanced materials. The particular (Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) materials of interest were sintered GS-44 from the Norton Company, and reaction-bonded Ceraloy 147-3. The processes studied included the following activities: (1) direct laser machining; (2) rotary ultrasonic machining; and (3) diamond abrasive grinding, including both resinoid and vitreous-bonded grinding wheels. Both friable and non-friable diamond types were included within the abrasive grinding study. The task also conducted a comprehensive survey of European experience in use of ceramic materials, principally aluminum oxide. Originally, the effort of this task was to extend through a prototype manufacturing demonstration of selected engine components. During the execution of this program, however changes were made to the scope of the project, altering the goals. The Program goal became only the development of assessment of their impacts on product strength and surface condition.

  20. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O`Hara, J.M.

    1994-07-01

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator`s overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use.

  1. Advanced human-system interface design review guideline. General evaluation model, technical development, and guideline description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced control rooms will use advanced human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role in the system, the method of information presentation, and the ways in which operators interact with the system. The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the HSI aspects of control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported to protect public health and safety. The principal guidance available to the NRC, however, was developed more than ten years ago, well before these technological changes. Accordingly, the human factors guidance needs to be updated to serve as the basis for NRC review of these advanced designs. The purpose of this project was to develop a general approach to advanced HSI review and the human factors guidelines to support NRC safety reviews of advanced systems. This two-volume report provides the results of the project. Volume I describes the development of the Advanced HSI Design Review Guideline (DRG) including (1) its theoretical and technical foundation, (2) a general model for the review of advanced HSIs, (3) guideline development in both hard-copy and computer-based versions, and (4) the tests and evaluations performed to develop and validate the DRG. Volume I also includes a discussion of the gaps in available guidance and a methodology for addressing them. Volume 2 provides the guidelines to be used for advanced HSI review and the procedures for their use

  2. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951 through June 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining Group (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1987. It is a registry of about 400 documents as nearly as possible in the order in which they were issued

  3. Bibliography of the technical literature of the Materials Joining Group, Metals and Ceramics Division, 1951 through June 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David, S.A.; Goodwin, G.M.; Gardner, K. (comps.)

    1987-08-01

    This document contains a listing of the written scientific information originating in the Materials Joining Group (formerly the Welding and Brazing Group), Metals and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1951 through June 1987. It is a registry of about 400 documents as nearly as possible in the order in which they were issued.

  4. Synthesis of high performance ceramic fibers by chemical vapor deposition for advanced metallics reinforcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Vithal; Hlavacek, Vladimir

    1991-01-01

    The chemical vapor deposition (CVD) synthesis of fibers capable of effectively reinforcing intermetallic matrices at elevated temperatures which can be used for potential applications in high temperature composite materials is described. This process was used due to its advantage over other fiber synthesis processes. It is extremely important to produce these fibers with good reproducible and controlled growth rates. However, the complex interplay of mass and energy transfer, blended with the fluid dynamics makes this a formidable task. The design and development of CVD reactor assembly and system to synthesize TiB2, CrB, B4C, and TiC fibers was performed. Residual thermal analysis for estimating stresses arising form thermal expansion mismatch were determined. Various techniques to improve the mechanical properties were also performed. Various techniques for improving the fiber properties were elaborated. The crystal structure and its orientation for TiB2 fiber is discussed. An overall view of the CVD process to develop CrB2, TiB2, and other high performance ceramic fibers is presented.

  5. Integral design concepts of advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the sub-programme on non-electrical applications of advanced reactors, the International Atomic Energy Agency has been providing a worldwide forum for exchange of information on integral reactor concepts. Two Technical Committee meetings were held in 1994 and 1995 on the subject where state-of-the-art developments were presented. Efforts are continuing for the development of advanced nuclear reactors of both evolutionary and innovative design, for electricity, co-generation and heat applications. While single purpose reactors for electricity generation may require small and medium sizes under certain conditions, reactors for heat applications and co-generation would be necessary in the small and medium range and need to be located closer to the load centres. The integral design approach to the development of advanced light water reactors has received special attention over the past few years. Several designs are in the detailed design stage, some are under construction, one prototype is in operation. A need has been felt for guidance on a number of issues, ranging from design objectives to the assessment methodology needed to show how integral designs can meet these objectives, and also to identify their advantages and problem areas. The technical document addresses the current status of the design, safety and operational issues of integral reactors and recommends areas for future development

  6. The development of technical database of advanced spent fuel management process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ro, Seung Gy; Byeon, Kee Hoh; Song, Dae Yong; Park, Seong Won; Shin, Young Jun

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop the technical database system to provide useful information to researchers who study on the back end nuclear fuel cycle. Technical database of advanced spent fuel management process was developed for a prototype system in 1997. In 1998, this database system is improved into multi-user systems and appended special database which is composed of thermochemical formation data and reaction data. In this report, the detailed specification of our system design is described and the operating methods are illustrated as a user's manual. Also, expanding current system, or interfacing between this system and other system, this report is very useful as a reference. (Author). 10 refs., 18 tabs., 46 fig.

  7. The development of technical database of advanced spent fuel management process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to develop the technical database system to provide useful information to researchers who study on the back end nuclear fuel cycle. Technical database of advanced spent fuel management process was developed for a prototype system in 1997. In 1998, this database system is improved into multi-user systems and appended special database which is composed of thermochemical formation data and reaction data. In this report, the detailed specification of our system design is described and the operating methods are illustrated as a user's manual. Also, expanding current system, or interfacing between this system and other system, this report is very useful as a reference. (Author). 10 refs., 18 tabs., 46 fig

  8. DOE Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) Subcommittee Report on Scientific and Technical Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hey, Tony [eScience Institute, University of Washington; Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Borgman, Christine [University of California, Los Angeles; Cartaro, Concetta [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory; Crivelli, Silvia [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Van Dam, Kerstin Kleese [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory; Luce, Richard [University of Oklahoma; Arjun, Shankar [CADES, Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Trefethen, Anne [University of Oxford; Wade, Alex [Microsoft Research, Microsoft Corporation; Williams, Dean [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2015-09-04

    The Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee (ASCAC) was charged to form a standing subcommittee to review the Department of Energy’s Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and to begin by assessing the quality and effectiveness of OSTI’s recent and current products and services and to comment on its mission and future directions in the rapidly changing environment for scientific publication and data. The Committee met with OSTI staff and reviewed available products, services and other materials. This report summaries their initial findings and recommendations.

  9. Technical analysis of US Army Weapons Systems and related advanced technologies of military interest. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1991-06-14

    This report summarizes the activities and accomplishments of an US Army technology security project designed to identify and develop effective policy guidelines for militarily critical technologies in specific Army systems and in broad generic technology areas of military interest, Individual systems analyses are documented in separate Weapons Systems Technical Assessments (WSTAs) and the general generic technology areas are evaluated in the Advanced Technology Assessment Reports (ATARs), However, specific details of these assessments are not addressed here, only recommendations regarding aspects of the defined approach, methodology, and format are provided and discussed.

  10. Advanced Light Source. Compendium of User Abstracts and Technical Reports 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998

  11. Advanced Light Source Compendium of User Abstracts andTechnical Reports 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cross, J.; Devereaux, M.K.; Dixon, D.J.; Greiner, A.; editors

    1998-07-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility located at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California is available to researchers from academia, industry, and government laboratories. Operation of the ALS is funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences. This Compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress during 1997, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998.

  12. Second NASA Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM): Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS) Technology Tool Box (TTB)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ONeil, D. A.; Mankins, J. C.; Christensen, C. B.; Gresham, E. C.

    2005-01-01

    The Advanced Technology Lifecycle Analysis System (ATLAS), a spreadsheet analysis tool suite, applies parametric equations for sizing and lifecycle cost estimation. Performance, operation, and programmatic data used by the equations come from a Technology Tool Box (TTB) database. In this second TTB Technical Interchange Meeting (TIM), technologists, system model developers, and architecture analysts discussed methods for modeling technology decisions in spreadsheet models, identified specific technology parameters, and defined detailed development requirements. This Conference Publication captures the consensus of the discussions and provides narrative explanations of the tool suite, the database, and applications of ATLAS within NASA s changing environment.

  13. Draft Function Allocation Framework and Preliminary Technical Basis for Advanced SMR Concepts of Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; John Forester; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Heather Medema; Julius Persensky; April Whaley

    2013-08-01

    This report presents preliminary research results from the investigation into the development of new models and guidance for Concepts of Operations in advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) designs. AdvSMRs are nuclear power plants (NPPs), but unlike conventional large NPPs that are constructed on site, AdvSMRs systems and components will be fabricated in a factory and then assembled on site. AdvSMRs will also use advanced digital instrumentation and control systems, and make greater use of automation. Some AdvSMR designs also propose to be operated in a multi-unit configuration with a single central control room as a way to be more cost-competitive with existing NPPs. These differences from conventional NPPs not only pose technical and operational challenges, but they will undoubtedly also have regulatory compliance implications, especially with respect to staffing requirements and safety standards.

  14. Advanced Fast Reactor - 100 (AFR-100) Report for the Technical Review Panel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grandy, Christopher [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Sienicki, James J. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Moisseytsev, Anton [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Krajtl, Lubomir [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Farmer, Mitchell T. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Kim, Taek K. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Middleton, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2014-06-04

    This report is written to provide an overview of the Advanced Fast Reactor-100 in the requested format for a DOE technical review panel. This report was prepared with information that is responsive to the DOE Request for Information, DE-SOL-0003674 Advanced Reactor Concepts, dated February 27, 2012 from DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy, Office of Nuclear Reactor Technologies. The document consists of two main sections. The first section is a summary of the AFR-100 design including the innovations that are incorporated into the design. The second section contains a series of tables that respond to the various questions requested of the reactor design team from the subject DOE RFI.

  15. Development of advanced pump impeller fabrication technology using direct nano- ceramic dispersion casting for long time erosion durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rhee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Park, Jin Ju [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)] (and others)

    2008-09-15

    Many components of pump impeller of nuclear power plants is generally made of stainless steel and Al-bronze with superior corrosion resistance to sea water. However, they should be replaced by one- to five-year period because of material damage by a very big cavitation impact load, even though their designed durability is twenty years. Especially, in case of Young-Gwang nuclear power plant located at the west sea, damage of components of pump impeller is so critical due to the additional damage by solid particle erosion and hence their replacement period is very short as several months compared to other nuclear power plants. In addition, it is very difficult to maintain and repair the components of pump impeller since there is no database on the exact durability and damage mechanism. Therefore, in this study, fabrication technology of new advanced materials modified by dispersion of nano-carbide and -oxide ceramics into the matrix is developed first. Secondly, technology to estimate the dynamic damage by solid particle erosion is established and hence applied to the prediction of the service life of the components of pump impeller.

  16. Clinical application of bio ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, Sharma; Gayatri, Sharma

    2016-05-01

    Ceramics are the inorganic crystalline material. These are used in various field such as biomedical, electrical, electronics, aerospace, automotive and optical etc. Bio ceramics are the one of the most active areas of research. Bio ceramics are the ceramics which are biocompatible. The unique properties of bio ceramics make them an attractive option for medical applications and offer some potential advantages over other materials. During the past three decades, a number of major advances have been made in the field of bio ceramics. This review focuses on the use of these materials in variety of clinical scenarios.

  17. Advanced Fuels for LWRs: Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated and Related Concepts FY 2012 Interim Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Sonat Sen; Brian Boer; John D. Bess; Michael A. Pope; Abderrafi M. Ougouag

    2012-03-01

    This report summarizes the progress in the Deep Burn project at Idaho National Laboratory during the first half of fiscal year 2012 (FY2012). The current focus of this work is on Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel containing low-enriched uranium (LEU) uranium nitride (UN) fuel kernels. UO2 fuel kernels have not been ruled out, and will be examined as later work in FY2012. Reactor physics calculations confirmed that the FCM fuel containing 500 mm diameter kernels of UN fuel has positive MTC with a conventional fuel pellet radius of 4.1 mm. The methodology was put into place and validated against MCNP to perform whole-core calculations using DONJON, which can interpolate cross sections from a library generated using DRAGON. Comparisons to MCNP were performed on the whole core to confirm the accuracy of the DRAGON/DONJON schemes. A thermal fluid coupling scheme was also developed and implemented with DONJON. This is currently able to iterate between diffusion calculations and thermal fluid calculations in order to update fuel temperatures and cross sections in whole-core calculations. Now that the DRAGON/DONJON calculation capability is in place and has been validated against MCNP results, and a thermal-hydraulic capability has been implemented in the DONJON methodology, the work will proceed to more realistic reactor calculations. MTC calculations at the lattice level without the correct burnable poison are inadequate to guarantee zero or negative values in a realistic mode of operation. Using the DONJON calculation methodology described in this report, a startup core with enrichment zoning and burnable poisons will be designed. Larger fuel pins will be evaluated for their ability to (1) alleviate the problem of positive MTC and (2) increase reactivity-limited burnup. Once the critical boron concentration of the startup core is determined, MTC will be calculated to verify a non-positive value. If the value is positive, the design will be changed to require

  18. Advanced Fuels for LWRs: Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated and Related Concepts FY 2012 Interim Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the progress in the Deep Burn project at Idaho National Laboratory during the first half of fiscal year 2012 (FY2012). The current focus of this work is on Fully-Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuel containing low-enriched uranium (LEU) uranium nitride (UN) fuel kernels. UO2 fuel kernels have not been ruled out, and will be examined as later work in FY2012. Reactor physics calculations confirmed that the FCM fuel containing 500 mm diameter kernels of UN fuel has positive MTC with a conventional fuel pellet radius of 4.1 mm. The methodology was put into place and validated against MCNP to perform whole-core calculations using DONJON, which can interpolate cross sections from a library generated using DRAGON. Comparisons to MCNP were performed on the whole core to confirm the accuracy of the DRAGON/DONJON schemes. A thermal fluid coupling scheme was also developed and implemented with DONJON. This is currently able to iterate between diffusion calculations and thermal fluid calculations in order to update fuel temperatures and cross sections in whole-core calculations. Now that the DRAGON/DONJON calculation capability is in place and has been validated against MCNP results, and a thermal-hydraulic capability has been implemented in the DONJON methodology, the work will proceed to more realistic reactor calculations. MTC calculations at the lattice level without the correct burnable poison are inadequate to guarantee zero or negative values in a realistic mode of operation. Using the DONJON calculation methodology described in this report, a startup core with enrichment zoning and burnable poisons will be designed. Larger fuel pins will be evaluated for their ability to (1) alleviate the problem of positive MTC and (2) increase reactivity-limited burnup. Once the critical boron concentration of the startup core is determined, MTC will be calculated to verify a non-positive value. If the value is positive, the design will be changed to require

  19. Induction chemotherapy in technically unresectable locally advanced oral cavity cancers: Does it make a difference?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V M Patil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Locally advanced and unresectable oral cavity cancers have a poor prognosis. Induction might be beneficial in this setting by reducing tumor bulk and allowing definitive surgery. Aim: To analyze the impact of induction chemotherapy on locally advanced, technically unresectable oral cavity cancers. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of patients with locally advanced oral cavity cancers, who were treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT during the period between June 2009 and December 2010. Data from a prospectively filled database were analyzed for information on patient characteristics, chemotherapy received, toxicity, response rates, local treatment offered, patterns of failure, and overall survival. The statistical analysis was performed with SPSS version 16. Results: 123 patients, with a median age of 42 years were analyzed. Buccal mucosa was the most common subsite (68.30%. Three drug regimen was utilized in 26 patients (21.10% and the rest received two drug regimen. Resectability was achieved in 17 patients treated with 3 drug regimen (68.00% and 36 patients receiving 2 drug regimen. Febrile neutropenia was seen in 3 patients (3.09% receiving 2 drug regimen and in 9 patients (34.62% receiving 3 drug regimen. The estimated median OS was not reached in patients who had clinical response and underwent surgery as opposed to 8 months in patients treated with non-surgical modality post NACT (P = 0.0001. Conclusion: Induction chemotherapy was effective in converting technically unresectable oral cavity cancers to operable disease in approximately 40% of patients and was associated with significantly improved overall survival in comparison to nonsurgical treatment.

  20. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  1. Incorporation of gypsum waste in ceramic block production: Proposal for a minimal battery of tests to evaluate technical and environmental viability of this recycling process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godinho-Castro, Alcione P; Testolin, Renan C; Janke, Leandro; Corrêa, Albertina X R; Radetski, Claudemir M

    2012-01-01

    Civil engineering-related construction and demolition debris is an important source of waste disposed of in municipal solid waste landfills. After clay materials, gypsum waste is the second largest contributor to the residential construction waste stream. As demand for sustainable building practices grows, interest in recovering gypsum waste from construction and demolition debris is increasing, but there is a lack of standardized tests to evaluate the technical and environmental viability of this solid waste recycling process. By recycling gypsum waste, natural deposits of gypsum might be conserved and high amounts of the waste by-product could be reused in the civil construction industry. In this context, this paper investigates a physical property (i.e., resistance to axial compression), the chemical composition and the ecotoxicological potential of ceramic blocks constructed with different proportions of clay, cement and gypsum waste, and assesses the feasibility of using a minimal battery of tests to evaluate the viability of this recycling process. Consideration of the results for the resistance to axial compression tests together with production costs revealed that the best formulation was 35% of plastic clay, 35% of non-plastic clay, 10% of Portland cement and 20% of gypsum waste, which showed a mean resistance of 4.64MPa. Energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry showed calcium and sulfur to be the main elements, while quartz, gypsum, ettringite and nacrite were the main crystalline compounds found in this formulation. Ecotoxicity tests showed that leachate from this formulation is weakly toxic toward daphnids and bacteria (EC(20%)=69.0 and 75.0, respectively), while for algae and fish the leachate samples were not toxic at the EC(50%) level. Overall, these results show that the addition of 20% of gypsum waste to the ceramic blocks could provide a viable substitute for clay in the ceramics industry and the tests applied in this study proved to be a useful tool

  2. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS's Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS's automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  3. Technical analysis of advanced wastewater-treatment systems for coal-gasification plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-03-31

    This analysis of advanced wastewater treatment systems for coal gasification plants highlights the three coal gasification demonstration plants proposed by the US Department of Energy: The Memphis Light, Gas and Water Division Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant, the Illinois Coal Gasification Group Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant, and the CONOCO Pipeline Gas Demonstration Plant. Technical risks exist for coal gasification wastewater treatment systems, in general, and for the three DOE demonstration plants (as designed), in particular, because of key data gaps. The quantities and compositions of coal gasification wastewaters are not well known; the treatability of coal gasification wastewaters by various technologies has not been adequately studied; the dynamic interactions of sequential wastewater treatment processes and upstream wastewater sources has not been tested at demonstration scale. This report identifies key data gaps and recommends that demonstration-size and commercial-size plants be used for coal gasification wastewater treatment data base development. While certain advanced treatment technologies can benefit from additional bench-scale studies, bench-scale and pilot plant scale operations are not representative of commercial-size facility operation. It is recommended that coal gasification demonstration plants, and other commercial-size facilities that generate similar wastewaters, be used to test advanced wastewater treatment technologies during operation by using sidestreams or collected wastewater samples in addition to the plant's own primary treatment system. Advanced wastewater treatment processes are needed to degrade refractory organics and to concentrate and remove dissolved solids to allow for wastewater reuse. Further study of reverse osmosis, evaporation, electrodialysis, ozonation, activated carbon, and ultrafiltration should take place at bench-scale.

  4. OPERATION OF ENTERPRISE RESOURCE PLANNING SYSTEM IMPLEMENTATION COMPATIBILITY TOWARDS TECHNICAL ADVANCEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Venkatesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Execution of ERP systems has been perplexing factor for many firms. Many establishments have accepted that the operation of ERP system is a massive hindrance until the flow of process is organized carefully. As information technology is booming its prerequisite for organizations to realize the prominence of technical advancement and compatibility in work environment. A complete review was done to ascertain the features and strategic aids of ERP enactments using the retorts from 120 firms. The respondents were approached with orderly framed questionnaires, thereby giving them ample time to come out with their own thoughts. The effects of this learning provide assistance for the vendors, higher officials and ERP specialists to be more competent in handling the execution of ERP with their inadequate possessions there by augmenting the business. It acts a pathway for the concerns to realize their potent and extend their business platform.

  5. Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodging Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Wei; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Gowri, Krishnan; McBride, M.; Liu, Bing

    2008-09-30

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Highway Lodgings (AEDG-HL or the Guide), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in highway lodging properties over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The AEDG-HL is the fifth in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  6. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals - 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Large Hospitals: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-LH) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-LH is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in large hospitals over levels achieved by following Standard 90.1-2004. The AEDG-LH was created for a 'standard' mid- to large-size hospital, typically at least 100,000 ft2, but the strategies apply to all sizes and classifications of new construction hospital buildings. Its primary focus is new construction, but recommendations may be applicable to facilities undergoing total renovation, and in part to many other hospital renovation, addition, remodeling, and modernization projects (including changes to one or more systems in existing buildings).

  7. Technical Basis for Physical Fidelity of NRC Control Room Training Simulators for Advanced Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minsk, Brian S.; Branch, Kristi M.; Bates, Edward K.; Mitchell, Mark R.; Gore, Bryan F.; Faris, Drury K.

    2009-10-09

    The objective of this study is to determine how simulator physical fidelity influences the effectiveness of training the regulatory personnel responsible for examination and oversight of operating personnel and inspection of technical systems at nuclear power reactors. It seeks to contribute to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC’s) understanding of the physical fidelity requirements of training simulators. The goal of the study is to provide an analytic framework, data, and analyses that inform NRC decisions about the physical fidelity requirements of the simulators it will need to train its staff for assignment at advanced reactors. These staff are expected to come from increasingly diverse educational and experiential backgrounds.

  8. Technical Needs for Prototypic Prognostic Technique Demonstration for Advanced Small Modular Reactor Passive Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Ryan M.; Coble, Jamie B.; Hirt, Evelyn H.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Mitchell, Mark R.; Wootan, David W.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Henager, Charles H.

    2013-05-17

    This report identifies a number of requirements for prognostics health management of passive systems in AdvSMRs, documents technical gaps in establishing a prototypical prognostic methodology for this purpose, and describes a preliminary research plan for addressing these technical gaps. AdvSMRs span multiple concepts; therefore a technology- and design-neutral approach is taken, with the focus being on characteristics that are likely to be common to all or several AdvSMR concepts. An evaluation of available literature is used to identify proposed concepts for AdvSMRs along with likely operational characteristics. Available operating experience of advanced reactors is used in identifying passive components that may be subject to degradation, materials likely to be used for these components, and potential modes of degradation of these components. This information helps in assessing measurement needs for PHM systems, as well as defining functional requirements of PHM systems. An assessment of current state-of-the-art approaches to measurements, sensors and instrumentation, diagnostics and prognostics is also documented. This state-of-the-art evaluation, combined with the requirements, may be used to identify technical gaps and research needs in the development, evaluation, and deployment of PHM systems for AdvSMRs. A preliminary research plan to address high-priority research needs for the deployment of PHM systems to AdvSMRs is described, with the objective being the demonstration of prototypic prognostics technology for passive components in AdvSMRs. Greater efficiency in achieving this objective can be gained through judicious selection of materials and degradation modes that are relevant to proposed AdvSMR concepts, and for which significant knowledge already exists. These selections were made based on multiple constraints including the analysis performed in this document, ready access to laboratory-scale facilities for materials testing and measurement, and

  9. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eddy, T.L.; Raivo, B.D.; Soelberg, N.R.; Wiersholm, O.

    1995-02-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations.

  10. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project melter system preliminary design technical review meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project sponsored a plasma are melter technical design review meeting to evaluate high-temperature melter system configurations for processing heterogeneous alpha-contaminated low-level radioactive waste (ALLW). Thermal processing experts representing Department of Energy contractors, the Environmental Protection Agency, and private sector companies participated in the review. The participants discussed issues and evaluated alternative configurations for three areas of the melter system design: plasma torch melters and graphite arc melters, offgas treatment options, and overall system configuration considerations. The Technical Advisory Committee for the review concluded that graphite arc melters are preferred over plasma torch melters for processing ALLW. Initiating involvement of stakeholders was considered essential at this stage of the design. For the offgas treatment system, the advisory committee raised the question whether to a use wet-dry or a dry-wet system. The committee recommended that the waste stream characterization, feed preparation, and the control system are essential design tasks for the high-temperature melter treatment system. The participants strongly recommended that a complete melter treatment system be assembled to conduct tests with nonradioactive surrogate waste material. A nonradioactive test bed would allow for inexpensive design and operational changes prior to assembling a system for radioactive waste treatment operations

  11. Portfolio: Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, Jane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Describes eight art activities using ceramics. Elementary students created ceramic tiles to depict ancient Egyptian and medieval European art, made ceramic cookie stamps, traced bisque plates on sketch paper, constructed clay room-tableaus, and designed clay relief masks. Secondary students pit-fired ceramic pots and designed ceramic Victorian…

  12. Selecting Ceramics - Introduction

    OpenAIRE

    Cassidy, M.

    2002-01-01

    AIM OF PRESENTATION: To compare a number of materials for extracoronal restoration of teeth with particular reference to CAD-CAM ceramics. CASE DESCRIPTION AND TREATMENT CARRIED OUT: This paper will be illustrated using clinical examples of patients treated using different ceramic restorations to present the advantages and disadvantages and each technique. The different requirements of tooth preparation, impression taking and technical procedures of each system will be presented and compar...

  13. Induction Chemotherapy in Technically Unresectable Locally Advanced Carcinoma of Maxillary Sinus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanita Noronha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Locally advanced carcinoma of maxillary sinus has been historically reported to have poor prognosis. We evaluated the role of NACT in improving the outcome in these patients. Methods. 41 patients with locally advanced technically unresectable (stage IVa or unresectable maxillary carcinoma (stage IVb were treated with induction chemotherapy between 2008 and 2011. The demographic profile, response and toxicity of chemotherapy, definitive treatment received, progression free survival (PFS, and overall survival (OS were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate analysis were performed to determine factors associated with PFS and OS. Results. The chemotherapy included two drugs (platinum and taxane in 34 patients (82.9% and three drugs (platinum, taxane, and 5 FU in 7 (17.1%. There was no complete response seen in any of the patients, stable disease in 18 (43.9%, partial response in 16 (39%, and progression in 7 (17.1% patients. After induction, the treatment planned included surgery in 12 (29.3%, CT-RT in 24 (58.5%, radical RT in 1 (2.4%, palliative RT in 1 (2.4%, and palliative chemotherapy in 3 (7.3% patients. Overall, the median PFS was 10.0 months. The OS at 24 months and 36 months was 41% and 35%, respectively. Conclusion. In unresectable maxillary carcinoma, induction chemotherapy has clinically significant benefit with acceptable toxicity.

  14. Technical Support Document: The Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Bing; Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Winiarski, David W.; Jiang, Wei; McBride, Merle F.; Crall, C.

    2006-09-30

    The Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Retail Buildings (AEDG-SR) was developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the United States Green Buildings Council (USGBC), and the Department of Energy (DOE). The guide is intended to offer recommendations to achieve 30% energy savings and thus to encourage steady progress towards net-zero energy buildings. The baseline level energy use was set at buildings built at the turn of the millennium, which are assumed to be based on ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (refer to as the ?Standard? in this report). ASHRAE and its partners are engaged in the development of a series of guides for small commercial buildings, with the AEDG-SR being the second in the series. Previously the partnership developed the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings: Achieving 30% Energy Savings Over ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, which was published in late 2004. The technical support document prepared by PNNL details how the energy analysis performed in support of the Guide and documents development of recommendation criteria.

  15. Advanced ceramics: evaluation of the ground surface Cerâmicas avançadas: avaliação da superfície polida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Bianchi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this research is to evaluate the influence of grinding and cutting conditions on surfaces of advanced ceramics ground with diamond grinding wheels containing a binding resin bond. The quality surface was analyzed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM.O objetivo desta pesquisa é a avaliação da influência das condições de usinagem na superfície gerada de cerâmicas avançadas retificadas com rebolo diamantado com ligante resinóide. A qualidade superficial foi analisada utilizando-se a Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura (MEV

  16. [Xeroradiography and digital luminescence radiography in the study of the technics of manufacturing ancient ceramics. The advantages and limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meduri, A; Pirronti, T; Calicchio, D; Rispoli, F; Vidale, M; Marano, P

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports on the cooperative work of the Department of Radiology of the Catholic University, Rome, and of the Italian Institute for Middle and Far East. The study was aimed at using xeroradiography and digital luminescence radiography for the archeometric evaluation of ancient ceramics and at assessing the imaging potentials of the two techniques. Some manufacturing techniques are reported which were used in the ancient world and societies for pottery making--i.e., coil building (the superimposition of clay rings), paddle and anvil beating and throwing of the wheel. Such techniques leave, on the vessel's wall, clear traces which can be detected by X-ray imaging. After discussing the main semiologic features, we present 4 case studies from the project archive. Each vase underwent xeroradiography and digital luminescence radiography. The former technique was useful in detailing minor phase transitions--e.g., pores and inclusions--while the latter, thanks to both its wide dynamic range and its image processing potentials, was optimal in defining very gradual thickness transitions due to the different techniques used to join the clay parts. By combining the two techniques, the manufacturing technology of the artifacts could be defined. The interactive processing of radiographic images at the system console was seen to be of major importance: it allowed the best results to be obtained thanks to the integration of the radiologists' and archeologists' know-how during the actual analytical stages.

  17. Technical Needs for Enhancing Risk Monitors with Equipment Condition Assessment for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Coles, Garill A.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Berglin, Eric J.; Wootan, David W.; Mitchell, Mark R.

    2013-04-04

    requirements, including the need to operate in different coolant environments, higher operating temperatures, and longer operating cycles between planned refueling and maintenance outages. These features, along with the relative lack of operating experience for some of the proposed advanced designs, may limit the ability to estimate event probability and component POF with a high degree of certainty. Incorporating real-time estimates of component POF may compensate for a relative lack of established knowledge about the long-term component behavior and improve operational and maintenance planning and optimization. The particular eccentricities of advanced reactors and small modular reactors provide unique challenges and needs for advanced instrumentation, control, and human-machine interface (ICHMI) techniques such as enhanced risk monitors (ERM) in aSMRs. Several features of aSMR designs increase the need for accurate characterization of the real-time risk during operation and maintenance activities. A number of technical gaps in realizing ERM exist, and these gaps are largely independent of the specific reactor technology. As a result, the development of a framework for ERM would enable greater situational awareness regardless of the specific class of reactor technology. A set of research tasks are identified in a preliminary research plan to enable the development, testing, and demonstration of such a framework. Although some aspects of aSMRs, such as specific operational characteristics, will vary and are not now completely defined, the proposed framework is expected to be relevant regardless of such uncertainty. The development of an ERM framework will provide one of the key technical developments necessary to ensure the economic viability of aSMRs.

  18. Advanced Coal Conversion Process Demonstration Project. Final technical progress report, January 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal Process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal Process enhances low-rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,5000 to 9,000 British thermal units per pound (Btu/lb), by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. During this reporting period, the primary focus for the ACCP Demonstration Project team was to expand SynCoal market awareness and acceptability for both the products and the technology. The ACCP Project team continued to focus on improving the operation, developing commercial markets, and improving the SynCoal products as well as the product`s acceptance.

  19. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Garrett Auxiliary Power Division (GAPD), a unit of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company, during calendar year 1992, toward development and demonstration of structural ceramic technology for automotive gas turbine engines. This work was performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) under National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Contract DEN3-335, Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP). GAPD utilized the AGT101 regenerated gas turbine engine developed under the previous DOE/NASA Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) program as the ATTAP test bed for ceramic engine technology demonstration. ATTAP focussed on improving AGT101 test bed reliability, development of ceramic design methodologies, and improvement of fabrication and materials processing technology by domestic US ceramics fabricators. A series of durability tests was conducted to verify technology advancements. This is the fifth in a series of technical summary reports published annually over the course of the five-year contract.

  20. Continuous Fiber Wound Ceramic Composite (CFCC) for Commercial Water Reactor Fuel. Technical progress report for period ending April 1, 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-04-01

    Our program began on August 1, 1999. As of April 1, 2000, the progress has been in materials selection and test planning. Three subcontracts are in place (McDermott Technologies Inc. for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic tubing fabrication, Swales Aerospace for LOCA testing of tubes, and Massachusetts Institute of Technology for In Reactor testing of tubes). With regard to materials selection we visited McDermott Technologies Inc. a number of times, including on February 23, 2000 to discuss the Draft Material Selection and Fabrication Report. The changes discussed at this meeting were implemented and the final version of this report is attached (attachment 1). McDermott Technologies Inc. will produce one type of tubing: Alumina oxide (Nextel 610) fiber, a carbon coating (left in place), and alumina-yttria matrix. A potentially desirable CFCC material of silicon carbide fiber with spinel matrix was discussed. That material selection was not adopted primarily due to material availability and cost. Gamma Engineering is exploring the available tube coatings at Northwestern University as a mechanism for reducing the permeability of the tubes, and thus, will use coating as a differentiating factor in the testing of tubing in the LOCA test as well as the In-Reactor Test. The conclusion of the Material Selection and Fabrication Report lists the possible coatings under evaluation. With regard to Test Planning, the MIT and Swales Aerospace have submitted draft Test Plans. MIT is attempting to accommodate an increased number of test specimens by evaluating alternative test configurations. Swales Aerospace held a design review at their facilities on February 24, 2000 and various engineering alternatives and safety issues were addressed. The final Test Plans are not expected until just before testing begins to allow for incorporation of changes during ''dry runs.''

  1. Novel, Ceramic Membrane System For Hydrogen Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elangovan, S.

    2012-12-31

    Separation of hydrogen from coal gas represents one of the most promising ways to produce alternative sources of fuel. Ceramatec, teamed with CoorsTek and Sandia National Laboratories has developed materials technology for a pressure driven, high temperature proton-electron mixed conducting membrane system to remove hydrogen from the syngas. This system separates high purity hydrogen and isolates high pressure CO{sub 2} as the retentate, which is amenable to low cost capture and transport to storage sites. The team demonstrated a highly efficient, pressure-driven hydrogen separation membrane to generate high purity hydrogen from syngas using a novel ceramic-ceramic composite membrane. Recognizing the benefits and limitations of present membrane systems, the all-ceramic system has been developed to address the key technical challenges related to materials performance under actual operating conditions, while retaining the advantages of thermal and process compatibility offered by the ceramic membranes. The feasibility of the concept has already been demonstrated at Ceramatec. This project developed advanced materials composition for potential integration with water gas shift rectors to maximize the hydrogenproduction.

  2. The APS ceramic chambers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milton, S.; Warner, D.

    1994-07-01

    Ceramics chambers are used in the Advanced Photon Source (APS) machines at the locations of the pulsed kicker and bumper magnets. The ceramic will be coated internally with a resistive paste. The resistance is chosen to allow the low frequency pulsed magnet field to penetrate but not the high frequency components of the circulating beam. Another design goal was to keep the power density experienced by the resistive coating to a minimum. These ceramics, their associated hardware, the coating process, and our recent experiences with them are described.

  3. AN UPDATED REVIEW ON TECHNICAL ADVANCES TO ENHANCE DISSOLUTION RATE OF HYDROPHOBIC DRUGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjan K. Mahapatra

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The dissolution behavior of drugs continues to be one of the challenging aspects in formulation development. The advent of combinatorial chemistry and high throughput screening increased the number of hydrophobic compounds significantly. The Biopharmaceutical classification scheme (BCS takes into account three major factors: solubility, intestinal permeability, and dissolution rate and all the three govern the rate and extent of oral absorption and hence bioavailability. Especially for BCS Class II substances the bioavailability of a poorly soluble drug may be enhanced by increasing the solubility and dissolution rate of it in the gastro-intestinal fluids. Drug substances whose highest dose is soluble in less than 250 ml of water over a range of pH from 1.0 to 7.5 are considered as highly soluble. In contrast, the drug compounds with solubility below 1mg mL-1 face significant dissolution or bioavailability problems. With the introduction of advanced technologies it could be possible to overcome the problems. The article provides an overview on the theoretical definitions and technical approaches broadly covering technologies and hydrophilic carriers or excipients used. Further part of the manuscript is committed to the formulation, analytical methods for the characterization of samples, dissolution or release kinetics and model fittings.

  4. Possibilities of rotary ultrasonic machining in order to give a boost to technical ceramics in the actual Spanish market; Posibilidades del mecanizado por ultrasonidos rotatorio para fomentar el uso de las ceramicas tecnicas en el mercado Espanol actual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arriola, I.; Gonzalo, O.; Bengoetxea, I.

    2012-11-01

    The advanced properties of engineering ceramics are suitable to meet the requirements of several engineering applications such as medical (prosthesis), automotive (bearing...), aerospace (tiles,...), optics (lasers,) and so on, where high hardness, high wear resistance and thermo chemical stability are needed. However, the processing of these materials is difficult and costly, in some cases up to 90% of the price, which leads ceramics to limited applications. Rotary Ultrasonic Machining (RUM) is presented as a non conventional environmental-friendly and cost effective process that enables to obtain complex 3D shape ceramic products. A rotating tool with metal-bonded diamond abrasives is ultrasonically vibrated (typically 20KHz) and fed toward to the fixed work piece at a constant pressure or a constant feed rate This process combines conventional grinding and ultrasonic machining, offering the possibility of increased material removal rates while keeping the machining forces low. Thus, the limitations of actually used conventional processes are overcome introducing more accurate, flexible and cost effective process capabilities. On balance, RUM is a promising process for primary machining operations on structural ceramic components. Its features will lead to enhance the use of ceramics in more industrial applications by increasing product development/design capabilities, high added value products and sustainable process. (Author) 43 refs.

  5. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  6. Technical and governance considerations for advanced metering infrastructure/smart meters: Technology, security, uncertainty, costs, benefits, and risks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fundamental role of policymakers when considering Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI), or ‘smart meters for energy and water infrastructure is to investigate a broad range of complex interrelated issues. These include alternative technical and non-technical options and deployment needs, the cost and benefits of the infrastructure (risks and mitigation measures), and the impact of a number of stakeholders: consumers, distributors, retailers, competitive market operators, competing technology companies, etc. The scale and number of potential variables in the AMI space is an almost unprecedented challenge to policymakers, with the anticipation of new ancillary products and services, associated market contestability, related regulatory and policy amendments, and the adequacy of consumer protection, education, and safety considerations requiring utmost due-diligence. Embarking on AMI investment entails significant technical, implementation, and strategic risk for governments and administering bodies, and an active effort is required to ensure AMI governance and planning maximises the potential benefits, and minimise uncertainties, costs, and risks to stakeholders. This work seeks to clarify AMI fundamentals and discusses the technical and related governance considerations from a dispassionate perspective, yet acknowledges many stakeholders tend to dichotomise debate, and obfuscate both advantages and benefits, and the converse. - Highlights: • AMI presents an almost unprecedented technical and governance policy challenge. • AMI enables vertical integration of electricity, gas, water, IT, and telco entities • AMI investments involve major technical, implementation, and strategic decisions. • Adequacy of consumer education, safety, privacy, and protection is paramount. • Policy must maximise AMI benefits and minimise uncertainties, costs, and risks

  7. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarnagin, Ronald E.; Liu, Bing; Winiarski, David W.; McBride, Merle F.; Suharli, L.; Walden, D.

    2006-11-30

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings (AEDG-SO), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in small office buildings over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The AEDG-SO is the first in a series of guides being developed by a partnership of organizations, including the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers, Inc. (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IESNA), the New Buildings Institute (NBI), and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Each of the guides in the AEDG series will provide recommendations and user-friendly design assistance to designers, developers and owners of small commercial buildings that will encourage steady progress towards net-zero energy buildings. The guides will provide prescriptive recommendation packages that are capable of reaching the energy savings target for each climate zone in order to ease the burden of the design and construction of energy-efficient small commercial buildings The AEDG-SO was developed by an ASHRAE Special Project committee (SP-102) made up of representatives of each of the partner organizations in eight months. This TSD describes the charge given to the committee in developing the office guide and outlines the schedule of the development effort. The project committee developed two prototype office buildings (5,000 ft2 frame building and 20,000 ft2 two-story mass building) to represent the class of small office buildings and performed an energy simulation scoping study to determine the preliminary levels of efficiency necessary to meet the energy savings target. The simulation approach used by the project committee is documented in this TSD along with

  8. Safety, technical and economic objectives of the electric power research institute's advanced light water reactor programme

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early 1980s, the Electric Power Research Institute entered into a programme to develop the safety, technical, operational and economic objectives of the next generation of LWRs. The programme benefited from the support and participation of US and international utilities, the United States Department of Energy, US reactor vendors and architect-engineering firms. This programme provided a foundation for the Nuclear Power Oversight Committee's comprehensive initiative for revitalizing nuclear power in the USA, as set forth in its 'Strategic Plan for Building New Nuclear Power Plants', published in November 1990 and updated annually each November. This Strategic Plan contains 14 'building blocks', each of which is considered essential to constructing a new nuclear plants. Building from the perspective that the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) should reflect lessons learned from the design, construction and operation of existing nuclear power plants, utilities were surveyed to help identify the cornerstone principles of what was subsequently called the 'ALWR Utility Requirements Document' (URD). The paper provides a review of the objectives underlying these principles, and the design targets that derive from this. Some examples are provided of how these targets are being met in the design of the four ALWR plants currently undergoing United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission licensing certification under United States Code of Federal Regulations 10CFR52. Some areas requiring further investigation are also described. The paper concludes by discussing key challenges to the URD targets and process, in particular with respect to regulatory and economic considerations, and provides brief highlights of steps being taken to respond to these challenges. (author). 2 tabs

  9. Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project: Volume 2, Project performance and economics. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-30

    The project objective is to demonstrate removal of 90--95% or more of the SO{sub 2} at approximately one-half the cost of conventional scrubbing technology; and to demonstrate significant reduction of space requirements. In this project, Pure Air has built a single SO{sub 2} absorber for a 528-MWe power plant. The absorber performs three functions in a single vessel: prequencher, absorber, and oxidation of sludge to gypsum. Additionally, the absorber is of a co- current design, in which the flue gas and scrubbing slurry move in the same direction and at a relatively high velocity compared to conventional scrubbers. These features all combine to yield a state- of-the-art SO{sub 2} absorber that is more compact and less expensive than conventional scrubbers. The project incorporated a number of technical features including the injection of pulverized limestone directly into the absorber, a device called an air rotary sparger located within the base of the absorber, and a novel wastewater evaporation system. The air rotary sparger combines the functions of agitation and air distribution into one piece of equipment to facilitate the oxidation of calcium sulfite to gypsum. Additionally, wastewater treatment is being demonstrated to minimize water disposal problems inherent in many high-chloride coals. Bituminous coals primarily from the Indiana, Illinois coal basin containing 2--4.5% sulfur were tested during the demonstration. The Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) process has demonstrated removal of 95% or more of the SO{sub 2} while providing a commercial gypsum by-product in lieu of solid waste. A portion of the commercial gypsum is being agglomerated into a product known as PowerChip{reg_sign} gypsum which exhibits improved physical properties, easier flowability and more user friendly handling characteristics to enhance its transportation and marketability to gypsum end-users.

  10. ANL-1(A) - Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This section includes the following papers: Development of Nondestructive Evaluation Methods for Structural Ceramics; Effects of Flaws on the Fracture Behavior of Structural Ceramics; Design, Fabrication, and Interface Characterization of Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites; Development of Advanced Fiber-Reinforced Ceramics; Modeling of Fibrous Preforms for CVD Infiltration; NDT of Advanced Ceramic Composite Materials; Joining of Silicon Carbide Reinforced Ceramics; Superconducting Film Fabrication Research; Short Fiber Reinforced Structural Ceramics; Structural Reliability and Damage Tolerance of Ceramic Composites for High-Temperature Applications; Fabrication of Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites by Chemical Vapor Infiltration; Characterization of Fiber-CVD Matrix interfacial Bonds; Microwave Sintering of Superconducting Ceramics; Improved Ceramic Composites Through Controlled Fiber-Matrix Interactions; Evaluation of Candidate Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells; Ceramic Catalyst Materials: Hydrous Metal Oxide Ion-Exchange Supports for Coal Liquefaction; and Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components

  11. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, Task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  12. Melt processed crystalline ceramic waste forms for advanced nuclear fuel cycles: CRP T21027 1813: Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms, task 17208: Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amoroso, J. W. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Marra, J. C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-08-26

    A multi-phase ceramic waste form is being developed at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for treatment of secondary waste streams generated by reprocessing commercial spent nuclear. The envisioned waste stream contains a mixture of transition, alkali, alkaline earth, and lanthanide metals. Ceramic waste forms are tailored (engineered) to incorporate waste components as part of their crystal structure based on knowledge from naturally found minerals containing radioactive and non-radioactive species similar to the radionuclides of concern in wastes from fuel reprocessing. The ability to tailor ceramics to mimic naturally occurring crystals substantiates the long term stability of such crystals (ceramics) over geologic timescales of interest for nuclear waste immobilization [1]. A durable multi-phase ceramic waste form tailored to incorporate all the waste components has the potential to broaden the available disposal options and thus minimize the storage and disposal costs associated with aqueous reprocessing. This report summarizes results from three years of work on the IAEA Coordinated Research Project on “Processing technologies for high level waste, formulation of matrices and characterization of waste forms” (T21027), and specific task “Melt Processed Crystalline Ceramic Waste Forms for Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles” (17208).

  13. On Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    School Arts, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents four ceramics activities for secondary-level art classes. Included are directions for primitive kiln construction and glaze making. Two ceramics design activities are described in which students make bizarrely-shaped lidded jars, feet, and footwear. (AM)

  14. Technical advances in trigger-induced RNA interference gene silencing in the parasite Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Mohamed I; Foda, Bardees M; Suresh, Susmitha; Singh, Upinder

    2016-03-01

    Entamoeba histolytica has a robust endogenous RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. There are abundant 27 nucleotide (nt) anti-sense small RNAs (AS sRNAs) that target genes for silencing and the genome encodes many genes involved in the RNAi pathway such as Argonaute proteins. Importantly, an E. histolytica gene with numerous AS sRNAs can function as a "trigger" to induce silencing of a gene that is fused to the trigger. Thus, the amebic RNAi pathway regulates gene expression relevant to amebic biology and has additionally been harnessed as a tool for genetic manipulation. In this study we have further improved the trigger-induced gene silencing method. We demonstrate that rather than using the full-length gene, a short portion of the coding region fused to a trigger is sufficient to induce silencing; the first 537 bp of the E. histolytica rhomboid gene (EhROM1) fused in-frame to the trigger was sufficient to silence EhROM1. We also demonstrated that the trigger method could silence two amebic genes concomitantly; fusion of the coding regions of EhROM1 and transcription factor, EhMyb, in-frame to a trigger gene resulted in both genes being silenced. Alternatively, two genes can be silenced sequentially: EhROM1-silenced parasites with no drug selection plasmid were transfected with trigger-EhMyb, resulting in parasites with both EhROM1 and EhMyb silenced. With all approaches tested, the trigger-mediated silencing was substantive and silencing was maintained despite loss of the G418 selectable marker. All gene silencing was associated with generation of AS sRNAs to the silenced gene. We tested the reversibility of the trigger system using inhibitors of histone modifications but found that the silencing was highly stable. This work represents a technical advance in the trigger gene silencing method in E. histolytica. Approaches that readily silence multiple genes add significantly to the genetic toolkit available to the ameba research community. PMID:26747561

  15. An approach to knowledge structuring for advanced phases of the Technical and Management Information System (TMIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goranson, H. T.

    1986-01-01

    The Technical and Management Information System (TMIS) must employ on enlightened approach to its object structure, but basic issues in conceptual structuring remain to be resolved. Sirius outlines the necessary agenda and reports on progress toward solutions.

  16. Proceedings of the 4th seminar of R and D on advanced ORIENT 'strategy and technical requirement for new resource of noble metals in advanced atomic energy science'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 4th Seminar of R and D on advanced ORIENT, 'Strategy and technical requirement for new resource of noble metals in advanced atomic energy science' was held in Swany hall, Rokkasho-Mura, on July 30th, 2010 organized by Japan Atomic Energy Agency. The first meeting of this seminar was held at Oarai, Ibaraki on May, 2007, the second seminar was held at Tokai, on November, 2008, and the third seminar was held at Sendai, on October, 2009. Spent nuclear fuel should be recognized as not only mass of radioactive elements but also potentially useful materials including platinum metals and rare earth elements. Taking the cooperation with universities related companies and research institutes, into consideration, we aimed at expanding and progressing the basic researches. In this seminar, there are many poster presentation included, and the useful discussion with many students are performed. This report records abstracts and figures submitted from the oral speakers in this seminar. (author)

  17. Advanced fuel pellet materials and designs for water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This meeting was the second IAEA meeting on this subject. The first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan. They are all part of a cooperative effort through the Technical Working Group on Water Reactor Fuel Performance and Technology (TWGFPT) of IAEA, with a series of three further meetings organized by CEA, France and co-sponsored by the IAEA and OECD/NEA. In the seven years since the first meeting took place, the demands on fuel duties have increased, with higher burnup, longer fuel cycles and higher temperatures. This places additional demands on fuel performance to comply with safety requirements. Criteria relative to fuel components, i.e. pellets and fuel rod column, require limiting of fission gas release and pellet-cladding interaction (PCI). This means that fuel components should maintain the composite of rather contradictory properties from the beginning until the end of its in-pile operation. Fabrication and design tools are available to influence, and to some extent, to ensure desirable in-pile fuel properties. Discussion of these tools was one of the objectives of the meeting. The second objective was the analysis of fuel characteristics at high burnup and the third and last objective was the discussion of specific feature of MOX and urania gadolinia fuels. Sixty specialists in the field of fuel fabrication technology attended the meeting from 18 countries. Twenty-five papers were presented in five sessions covering all relevant topics from the practices and modelling of fuel fabrication technology to its optimization. Eight papers were presented in session 'Optimization of fuel fabrication technology' which all were devoted to fuel fabrication technology. They mostly treated methods for optimizing fuel manufacturing processes, but gave also a good overview on nuclear fabrication needs and capabilities in different countries. During Session 'UO2, MOX and UO2-Gd2O3 pellets with additives', six papers were presented in this session, which dealt mainly with the

  18. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 Schools--30% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.; Long, N.

    2007-09-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for K-12 School Buildings (K-12 AEDG), a design guidance document intended to provide recommendations for achieving 30% energy savings in K-12 Schools over levels contained in ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-1999, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings. The 30% energy savings target is the first step toward achieving net-zero energy schools; schools that, on an annual basis, draw from outside sources less or equal energy than they generate on site from renewable energy sources.

  19. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications, Phase 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.K.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R.; Paille, N.I.; Pelletier, P.J.; Sales, L.C.; Wilkens, C.A.; Yeckley, R.L. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States)

    1993-08-01

    The program goals were to develop and demonstrate significant improvements in processing methods, process controls and non-destructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1,370{degrees}C. The program focused on a Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-4% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} high temperature ceramic composition and hot-isostatic-pressing as the method of densification. Stage I had as major objectives: (1) comparing injection molding and colloidal consolidation process routes, and selecting one route for subsequent optimization, (2) comparing the performance of water milled and alcohol milled powder and selecting one on the basis of performance data, and (3) adapting several NDE methods to the needs of ceramic processing. The NDE methods considered were microfocus X-ray radiography, computed tomography, ultrasonics, NMR imaging, NMR spectroscopy, fluorescent liquid dye penetrant and X-ray diffraction residual stress analysis. The colloidal consolidation process route was selected and approved as the forming technique for the remainder of the program. The material produced by the final Stage II optimized process has been given the designation NCX 5102 silicon nitride. According to plan, a large number of specimens were produced and tested during Stage III to establish a statistically robust room temperature tensile strength database for this material. Highlights of the Stage III process demonstration and resultant database are included in the main text of the report, along with a synopsis of the NCX-5102 aqueous based colloidal process. The R and D accomplishments for Stage I are discussed in Appendices 1--4, while the tensile strength-fractography database for the Stage III NCX-5102 process demonstration is provided in Appendix 5. 4 refs., 108 figs., 23 tabs.

  20. Intersociety Advanced Marine Vehicles Conference and Exhibit, Arlington, VA, June 5-7, 1989, Technical Papers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present conference on advanced marine vehicles discusses advancements in surface-effect ship (SES) technologies, small waterplane-area twin-hull (SWATH) ship operations, advanced marine vehicle concepts, ocean systems and subsurface vehicles, air-cushion vehicle (ACV) concepts, seaplane technologies, advanced hull hydrodynamics, wing-in-ground effect (WIGE) aircraft, competition-craft aerodynamics, and marine propulsion. Attention is given to military applications of the 'NES 200' SES platform, experiences over 16 years of SWATH ship operations, hydrofoil catamarans for military and civilian applications, SES passenger ferries for the N.Y.C. metropolitan area, advanced submarine concepts, parametric studies in SWATH ship design, ACV experience in Antarctica, the CL-215 seaplane, large-scale WIGE vehicles, an ocean spacecraft-launch facility, an ACV Arctic icebreaker, and 'marinizing' methods for gas turbine engines.

  1. Advanced light source: Compendium of user abstracts and technical reports,1993-1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    1997-04-01

    This compendium contains abstracts written by users summarizing research completed or in progress from 1993-1996, ALS technical reports describing ongoing efforts related to improvement in machine operations and research and development projects, and information on ALS beamlines planned through 1998. Two tables of contents organize the user abstracts by beamline and by area of research, and an author index makes abstracts accessible by author and by principal investigator. Technical details for each beamline including whom to contact for additional information can be found in the beamline information section. Separate abstracts have been indexed into the database for contributions to this compendium.

  2. Proceedings of the technical review on advances in geothermal reservoir technology---Research in progress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lippmann, M.J. (ed.)

    1988-09-01

    This proceedings contains 20 technical papers and abstracts describing most of the research activities funded by the Department of Energy (DOE's) Geothermal Reservoir Technology Program, which is under the management of Marshall Reed. The meeting was organized in response to several requests made by geothermal industry representatives who wanted to learn more about technical details of the projects supported by the DOE program. Also, this gives them an opportunity to personally discuss research topics with colleagues in the national laboratories and universities.

  3. Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report for the period July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-05-01

    This report describes the technical progress made on the Advanced Coal Conversion Process (ACCP) Demonstration Project from July 1, 1995 through September 30, 1995. The ACCP Demonstration Project is a US Department of Energy (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Project. This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high-moisture, low-rank coals to a high-quality, low-sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the cola is put through a deep-bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite-rich ash from the coal.

  4. Advanced thermal barrier coating system development. Technical progress report, August 1, 1996--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-04

    Objectives of this program are to provide an advanced thermal barrier coating system with improved reliability and temperature capability. This report describes the coating/deposition process, repair, and manufacturing.

  5. Ceramic joining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loehman, R.E. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    This paper describes the relation between reactions at ceramic-metal interfaces and the development of strong interfacial bonds in ceramic joining. Studies on a number of systems are described, including silicon nitrides, aluminium nitrides, mullite, and aluminium oxides. Joints can be weakened by stresses such as thermal expansion mismatch. Ceramic joining is used in a variety of applications such as solid oxide fuel cells.

  6. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiodt, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns.......To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns....

  7. Design measures for prevention and mitigation of severe accidents at advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience have been accumulated with the current nuclear energy systems. New generations of nuclear power plants are being developed, building upon this background of experience. During the last decade, requirements for equipment specifically intended to minimize releases of radioactive material to the environment in the event of a core melt accident have been introduced, and designs for new plants include measures for preventing and mitigating a range of severe accident scenarios. The IAEA Technical Committee Meeting on Impact of Severe Accidents on Plant Design and Layout of Advanced Water Cooled Reactors was jointly organized by the Department of Nuclear Energy and the Department of Nuclear Safety to review measures which are being incorporated into advanced water cooled reactor designs for preventing and mitigating severe accidents, the status of experimental and analytical investigations of severe accident phenomena and challenges which support design decisions and accident management procedures, and to understand the impact of explicitly addressing severe accidents on the cost of nuclear power plants. This publication is intended to provide an objective source of information on this topic. It includes 14 papers presented at the Technical Committee meeting held in Vienna between 21-25 October 1996. It also includes a Summary and Findings of the Working Groups. The papers were grouped in three sections. A separate abstract was prepared for each paper

  8. Review and comment on the advanced spent fuel management process (1): Technical aspects and non-proliferation concerns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efforts are made to analyze the project, the Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology (ASFMT), which is currently carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the technical feasibility and validity as well as on the nuclear non-proliferation concerns. The project is a part of a program under the 'Long and Midterm Nuclear Development Program'. On the technical analysis, reviewed the papers presented at the national and international meetings on the subject by KAERI staffs, and also participated to various technical discussions on the 'Mock-up Test', currently in progress. On the non-proliferation concerns, the ASFMT project was reviewed and analyzed in reference to various programs currently in progress or in a formulation stages in US, such as the DOE TOPS and ATW. Further reviewed the past JASNEC process and programs for possible application of the ASFMT project for JASNEC project. Provided a few thoughts for effectively carrying out the ASFMT project, and a plan for the next phase is presented

  9. Review and comment on the advanced spent fuel management process (1): Technical aspects and non-proliferation concerns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Yo Taik

    2001-01-01

    Efforts are made to analyze the project, the Advanced Spent Fuel Management Technology (ASFMT), which is currently carried out at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, on the technical feasibility and validity as well as on the nuclear non-proliferation concerns. The project is a part of a program under the 'Long and Midterm Nuclear Development Program'. On the technical analysis, reviewed the papers presented at the national and international meetings on the subject by KAERI staffs, and also participated to various technical discussions on the 'Mock-up Test', currently in progress. On the non-proliferation concerns, the ASFMT project was reviewed and analyzed in reference to various programs currently in progress or in a formulation stages in US, such as the DOE TOPS and ATW. Further reviewed the past JASNEC process and programs for possible application of the ASFMT project for JASNEC project. Provided a few thoughts for effectively carrying out the ASFMT project, and a plan for the next phase is presented.

  10. Review Article: recent advances in metal-ceramic brazing Artigo Revisão: avanços recentes em brasagem metal-cerâmica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. do Nascimento

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Metal-ceramic joining has slowly but steadily become an important manufacturing step. The evolution of joining processes has allowed ceramics to be used in combination with metals in a number of hybrid devices from traditional light bulbs and seals to improved cutting tools and modern monitoring and measuring electronic devices. New joining methods and newer approaches to conventional methods have been developed aiming at joints characterized by improved reliability, and interfaces capable of withstanding high-temperature resistance with minimum residual stresses. A summary of recent improvements on alternative approaches to ceramic-metal joining as well as new developments on brazing are presented herein. The present review also focuses on recent advances towards brazing metallized ceramics and the selection of filler alloys, since in a scenario that includes joining by laser and direct bonding with liquid transient phases, brazing continues to be by far the most widely used approach to joining as a result of its low-cost and possibility to join intricate geometries for large-scale production. Finally, methods to evaluate the mechanical strength and residual thermal stresses are presented in addition to alternative approaches to minimize residual stresses and, consequently, improve joint reliability.O interesse no estudo de métodos de junção-cerâmica para aplicações industriais tem crescido gradativamente ao longo dos anos. A evolução dos processos de união tem permitido a utilização de cerâmicas em conjunto com metais na fabricação de diversos componentes híbridos incluindo lâmpadas tradicionais, juntas para vácuo, ferramentas de corte de alto desempenho e modernos dispositivos eletrônicos de medição e monitoramento. Novos métodos de união e aprimoramentos de métodos convencionais têm sido estudados com o intuito de produzir-se juntas com alta confiabilidade e interfaces capazes de suportar altas temperaturas de

  11. Performance of operating and advanced light water reactor designs. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power can provide security of energy supply, stable energy costs, and can contribute to greenhouse gas reduction. To fully realize these benefits, a continued and strong focus must be maintained on means for assuring the economic competitiveness of nuclear power relative to alternatives. Over the past several years, considerable improvements have been achieved in nuclear plant performance. Worldwide, the average energy availability factor has increased from 66 per cent in 1980 to 81 per cent in 1999, with some utilities achieving significantly higher values. This is being achieved through integrated programmes including personnel training and quality assurance, improvements in plant system and component design and plant operation, by various means to reduce outage duration for maintenance and refuelling and other scheduled shutdowns, and by reducing the number of forced outages. Application of technical means for achieving high performance of nuclear power plants is an important element for assuring their economic competitiveness. For the current plants, proper management includes development and application of better technologies for inspection, maintenance and repair. For future plants, the opportunity exists during the design phase to incorporate design features and technologies for achieving high performance. This IAEA Technical Committee meeting (TCM) provided a forum for information exchange on design features and technologies incorporated into LWR plants commissioned within the last 15-20 years, and into evolutionary LWR designs still under development, for achieving performance improvements with due regard to stringent safety requirements and objectives. It also addressed on-going technology development expected to achieve further improvements and/or significant cost reductions. The TCM was attended by 32 participants from 14 Member States: Argentina, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Japan, Republic of Korea, Mexico

  12. Technical Readiness and Gaps Analysis of Commercial Optical Materials and Measurement Systems for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Andersen, Eric S.; Berglin, Eric J.; Bliss, Mary; Cannon, Bret D.; Devanathan, Ramaswami; Mendoza, Albert; Sheen, David M.

    2013-08-06

    This report intends to support Department of Energy’s Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap and industry stakeholders by evaluating optical-based instrumentation and control (I&C) concepts for advanced small modular reactor (AdvSMR) applications. These advanced designs will require innovative thinking in terms of engineering approaches, materials integration, and I&C concepts to realize their eventual viability and deployability. The primary goals of this report include: 1. Establish preliminary I&C needs, performance requirements, and possible gaps for AdvSMR designs based on best available published design data. 2. Document commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) optical sensors, components, and materials in terms of their technical readiness to support essential AdvSMR in-vessel I&C systems. 3. Identify technology gaps by comparing the in-vessel monitoring requirements and environmental constraints to COTS optical sensor and materials performance specifications. 4. Outline a future research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program plan that addresses these gaps and develops optical-based I&C systems that enhance the viability of future AdvSMR designs. The development of clean, affordable, safe, and proliferation-resistant nuclear power is a key goal that is documented in the Nuclear Energy Research and Development Roadmap. This roadmap outlines RD&D activities intended to overcome technical, economic, and other barriers, which currently limit advances in nuclear energy. These activities will ensure that nuclear energy remains a viable component to this nation’s energy security.

  13. Ceramic Technology. Art Education: 6688.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinaccio, Louis M.

    For information on the Visual Arts Education Curriculum of which this is one course, see SO 007 721. In this course students study ceramic material, form, and decoration, historically and technically, and demonstrate competencies in preparing clay bodies and ceramic glazes. Course content is outlined in those areas. Special sections of the guide…

  14. Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

    2008-09-11

    The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

  15. Technical advances in endoscopic ultrasound-guided fiducial placement for the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chavalitdhamrong, D.; DiMaio, C.J.; Siersema, P.D.; Wagh, M.S.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy has an important role in the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer and can be used alone or in conjunction with surgery and/or systemic chemotherapy. Because of the challenge of delivering an accurate and optimal radiation dose, image-guided radiation therap

  16. Creep-fatigue damage rules for advanced fast reactor design. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA, following the recommendations of the International Working Group on Fast Reactors, convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Creep-Fatigue Damage Rules to be used in Fast Reactor Design. The objective of the meeting was to review developments in design rules for creep-fatigue conditions and to identify any areas in which further work would be desirable. The meeting was hosted by AEA Technology, Risley, and held in Manchester, United Kingdom, 11-13 June 1996. It was attended by experts from the European Commission, France, India, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Russian Federation and the United Kingdom. Refs, figs, tabs

  17. Enhancing e-Infrastructures with Advanced Technical Computing Parallel MATLAB® on the Grid

    CERN Document Server

    Chakravarti, A; Laure, E; Jouvin, M; Philippon, G; Loomis, C; Floros, E

    2008-01-01

    MATLAB® is widely used within the engineering and scientific fields as the language and environment for technical computing, while collaborative Grid computing on e-Infrastructures is used by scientific communities to deliver a faster time to solution. MATLAB allows users to express parallelism in their applications, and then execute code on multiprocessor environments such as large-scale e-Infrastructures. This paper demonstrates the integration of MATLAB and Grid technology with a representative implementation that uses gLite middleware to run parallel programs. Experimental results highlight the increases in productivity and performance that users obtain with MATLAB parallel computing on Grids.

  18. NASA's Advanced Environmental Barrier Coatings Development for SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composites: Understanding Calcium Magnesium Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) Degradations and Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) systems will play a crucial role in next generation turbine engines for hot-section component applications because of their ability to significantly increase engine operating temperatures with improved efficiency, reduce engine weight and cooling requirements. The development of prime-reliant environmental barrier coatings is essential to the viability and reliability of the envisioned CMC engine component applications, ensuring integrated EBC-CMC system durability and designs are achievable for successful applications of the game-changing component technologies and lifing methodologies.This paper will emphasize recent NASA environmental barrier coating developments for SiCSiC turbine airfoil components, utilizing advanced coating compositions, state-of-the-art processing methods, and combined mechanical and environment testing and durability evaluations. The coating-CMC degradations in the engine fatigue-creep and operating environments are particularly complex; one of the important coating development aspects is to better understand engine environmental interactions and coating life debits, and we have particularly addressed the effect of Calcium-Magnesium-Alumino-Silicate (CMAS) from road sand or volcano-ash deposits on the durability of the environmental barrier coating systems, and how the temperature capability, stability and cyclic life of the candidate rare earth oxide and silicate coating systems will be impacted in the presence of the CMAS at high temperatures and under simulated heat flux conditions. Advanced environmental barrier coating systems, including HfO2-Si with rare earth dopant based bond coat systems, will be discussed for the performance improvements to achieve better temperature capability and CMAS resistance for future engine operating conditions.

  19. Final Technical Report: Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, Bruce Hardison [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Burton, Patrick D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hansen, Clifford [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Jones, Christian Birk [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-12-01

    The Advanced Measurement and Analysis of PV Derate Factors project focuses on improving the accuracy and reducing the uncertainty of PV performance model predictions by addressing a common element of all PV performance models referred to as “derates”. Widespread use of “rules of thumb”, combined with significant uncertainty regarding appropriate values for these factors contribute to uncertainty in projected energy production.

  20. Advanced composite elevator for Boeing 727 aircraft. Volume 1: Technical summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chovil, D. V.; Harvey, S. T.; Mccarty, J. E.; Desper, O. E.; Jamison, E. S.; Syder, H.

    1981-01-01

    The design, development, analysis, and testing activities and results that were required to produce five and one-half shipsets of advanced composite elevators for Boeing 727 aircraft are summarized. During the preliminary design period, alternative concepts were developed. After selection of the best design, detail design and basic configuration improvements were evaluated. Five and one-half shipsets were manufactured. All program goals (except competitive cost demonstration) were accomplished when our design met or exceeded all requirements, criteria, and objectives.

  1. 'Advancement of KHPS to DOE TRL 7/8' Project - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adonizio, Mary Ann [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Corren, Dean [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Smith, Ron [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Colby, Jonathan [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States); Hernandez, Aaron [Verdant Power Inc., New York, NY (United States)

    2016-04-08

    Final Report describing activities performed under the 'Advancement of the KHPS to DOE TRL 7/8' project, including the development of critical component test protocols, testing and analysis of the Gen5 KHPS main shaft seal, and continuing compliance work on approved operational environmental monitoring plans in anticipation of KHPS turbine installation at Verdant Power's Roosevelt Island Tidal Energy (RITE) Project site in New York, NY.

  2. Technical, economic and environmental evaluation of advanced tertiary treatments for micropollutants removal (oxidation and adsorption)

    OpenAIRE

    Besnault, S.; Martin Ruel, S.; Baig, S; Esperanza, M.; Budzinski, H.; Miege, C.; Boucher, C.; Le Menach, K.; Coquery, M.

    2014-01-01

    International audience Two pilots for tertiary treatment, an advanced oxidation processes (AOP - O3/UV/H2O2) pilot and a granular activated carbon pilot, were tested in three different wastewater treatment plants after a secondary treatment. A total of 64 micropollutants including drugs, pesticides, alkylphenols, PAHs and metals were analysed in the samples at the inlet and the outlet of the pilots. The tertiary treatments studied (ozone, AOP and activated carbon) were efficient for the re...

  3. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Leach, Matt [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pless, Shanti [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2013-06-05

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  4. Technical Support Document: Development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings - 50% Energy Savings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnema, E.; Leach, M.; Pless, S.

    2013-06-01

    This Technical Support Document describes the process and methodology for the development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium to Big Box Retail Buildings: Achieving 50% Energy Savings Toward a Net Zero Energy Building (AEDG-MBBR) ASHRAE et al. (2011b). The AEDG-MBBR is intended to provide recommendations for achieving 50% whole-building energy savings in retail stores over levels achieved by following ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings (Standard 90.1-2004) (ASHRAE 2004b). The AEDG-MBBR was developed in collaboration with the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE), the American Institute of Architects (AIA), the Illuminating Engineering Society of North America (IES), the U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC), and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  5. Studies and Properties of Ceramics with High Thermal Conductivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The sintering technology of the AlN ceramics power were discussed. It is discussed that the compound sintering aids is consistent with the enhancement of the the thermal conductivity of AlN ceramics, and sintering technics is helped to the improvement of density. It is analyzed how to sinter machinable AlN ceramics with high thermal conductivity. And the microstructure of compound ceramics based on AlN was studied.

  6. Review of design approaches of advanced pressurized LWRs. Report of a technical committee meeting and workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Committee Meeting and Workshop was devoted to review and discuss differences and commonalties in the various design approaches with the aim of increasing the understanding of the design decisions taken, and a number of general conclusions were drawn. Though many differences in design approaches were found in the presentations, a number of common features could also be identified. These included design approaches to achieve further improvements with respect to safety, design simplification, reduction in cost, incorporation of feedback from operating experience, and control room improvements regarding human factors and digitization. Design approaches to achieve further improvements in safety included consideration of severe accidents in the design process, increased thermal margins and water inventories, longer grace periods and double containments. Refs, figs and tabs

  7. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubiolo, Pablo R. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Conway, Lawarence E. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Oriani, Luca [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Lahoda, Edward J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; DeSilva, Greg [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Dept.; Hu, Min H. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Hartz, Josh [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Bachrach, Uriel [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Smith, Larry [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Dudek, Daniel F. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Nuclear Services Division; Toman, Gary J. [Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI), Palo Alto, CA (United States); Feng, Dandong [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Hejzlar, Pavel [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States); Kazimi, Mujid S. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2006-03-31

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a standard 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (~600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output.

  8. Advanced Power Ultra-Uprates of Existing Plants (APPU) Final Scientific/Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project assessed the feasibility of a Power Ultra-Uprate on an existing nuclear plant. The study determined the technical and design limitations of the current components, both inside and outside the containment. Based on the identified plant bottlenecks, the design changes for major pieces of equipment required to meet the Power Ultra-Uprate throughput were determined. Costs for modified pieces of equipment and for change-out and disposal of the replaced equipment were evaluated. These costs were then used to develop capital, fuel and operating and maintenance cost estimates for the Power Ultra-Uprate plant. The cost evaluation indicates that the largest cost components are the replacement of power (during the outage required for the uprate) and the new fuel loading. Based on these results, the study concluded that, for a ''standard'' 4-loop plant, the proposed Power Ultra-Uprate is technically feasible. However, the power uprate is likely to be more expensive than the cost (per Kw electric installed) of a new plant when large capacity uprates are considered (>25%). Nevertheless, the concept of the Power Ultra-Uprate may be an attractive option for specific nuclear power plants where a large margin exists in the steam and power conversion system or where medium power increases (∼600 MWe) are needed. The results of the study suggest that development efforts on fuel technologies for current nuclear power plants should be oriented towards improving the fuel performance (fretting-wear, corrosion, uranium load, manufacturing, safety) required to achieve higher burnup rather focusing on potential increases in the fuel thermal output

  9. Development of a Technical Basis and Guidance for Advanced SMR Function Allocation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Ronal Farris; April Whaley; Heather Medema

    2013-09-01

    This report presents the results from three key activities for FY13 that influence the definition of new concepts of operations for advanced Small Modular Reactors (AdvSMR: a) the development of a framework for the analysis of the functional environmental, and structural attributes, b) the effect that new technologies and operational concepts would have on the way functions are allocated to humans or machines or combinations of the two, and c) the relationship between new concepts of operations, new function allocations, and human performance requirements.

  10. Whole pelvic helical tomotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer: technical implementation of IMRT with helical tomothearapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To review the experience and to evaluate the treatment plan of using helical tomotherapy (HT) for the treatment of cervical cancer. Between November 1st, 2006 and May 31, 2009, 10 cervical cancer patients histologically confirmed were enrolled. All of the patients received definitive concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) with whole pelvic HT (WPHT) followed by brachytherapy. During WPHT, all patients were treated with cisplatin, 40 mg/m2 intravenously weekly. Toxicity of treatment was scored according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 (CTCAE v3.0). The mean survival was 25 months (range, 3 to 27 months). The actuarial overall survival, disease-free survival, locoregional control and distant metastasis-free rates at 2 years were 67%, 77%, 90% and 88%, respectively. The average of uniformity index and conformal index was 1.06 and 1.19, respectively. One grade 3 of acute toxicity for diarrhea, thrombocytopenia and three grade 3 leucopenia were noted during CCRT. Only one grade 3 of subacute toxicity for thrombocytopenia was noted. There were no grade 3 or 4 subacute toxicities of anemia, leucopenia, genitourinary or gastrointestinal effects. Compared with conventional whole pelvic radiation therapy (WPRT), WPHT decreases the mean dose to rectum, bladder and intestines successfully. HT provides feasible clinical outcomes in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. Long-term follow-up and enroll more locally advanced cervical carcinoma patients by limiting bone marrow radiation dose with WPHT technique is warranted

  11. Technology assessment for the advanced life detector. Final technical report, May 1987-January 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burrows, W.D.; George, D.T.

    1988-01-29

    This report summarizes an assessment of technology available to develop a noninvasive life detector for use on the battlefield. The detectors determine if casualties wearing chemical protective overgarments are alive or dead without further exposing either the casualties or the aidmen to the contaminated environment. Seven technology approaches sponsored by the Department of Defense (comprising 11 devices), four technologies identified in a market survey, and one device described in a Broad Agency Announcement proposal were examined as candidate Advanced Life Detectors. The technologies and instruments surveyed included three transmitter-receiver technologies, an electrocardiogram (ECG) technology, pacemaker-transmitter/receiver, dry electrode heart rate monitor, five microwave technologies, flash reflectance oximetry, an ultrasound technology, a streaming potential technology, a dry electrode ECG monitor coupled to a microphone, a statometric technique for determining heart rate and blood pressure, and a vital-signs monitor that determines heart rate and blood pressure using blood pressure cuff and microphones incorporated into the cuff. Analysis of the state-of-the-art of each device indicates that none of them are advanced enough to fulfill all the requirements of the draft Joint Services Operational Requirement. Three of the devices identified are recommended for further evaluation.

  12. Advanced post-irradiation examination techniques for water reactor fuel. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the meeting was to provide and overview of the status of post-irradiation examination (PIE) techniques for water cooled reactor fuel assemblies and their components with emphasis given to advanced PIE techniques applied to high burnup fuel. Papers presented at the meeting described progress obtained in non-destructive (e.g. dimensional measurements, oxide layer thickness measurements, gamma scanning and tomography, neutron and X-ray radiography, etc.) and destructive PIE techniques (e.g. microstructural studies, elemental and isotopic analysis, measurement of physical and mechanical properties, etc.) used for investigation of water reactor fuel. Recent practice in high burnup fuel investigation revealed the importance of advanced PIE techniques, such as 3-D tomography, secondary ion mass spectrometry, laser flash, high resolution transmission and scanning electron microscopy, image analysis in microstructural studies, for understanding mechanisms of fuel behaviour under irradiation. Importance and needs for in-pile irradiation of samples and rodlets in instrumented rigs were also discussed. This TECDOC contains 20 individual papers presented at the meeting; each of the papers has been indexed separately

  13. Joining and surfacing of advanced materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Andrzej Kolasa; Wladyslaw Wlosinski

    2004-01-01

    The application of advanced materials, i.e. advanced ceramics, glasses, intermetallic phases and various type of composites, not only depends on their manufacture processes including a great input of know-how, but also on their abilities for processing, among which the joining processes play an important role. The uses of advanced materials are changing rapidly, with a major emphasis on technical applications, especially the components of machines, apparatus and technical devices expected to withstand very heavy exploitation conditions. Furthermore,these materials are becoming more complex, in terms of being strengthened and toughened by transformation processes as well as by the addition of other ceramic or metallic materials including nanomaterials. The successful use of advanced materials requires the development of equally advanced joining materials, processes and technology. Some selected examples of results of joining advanced materials with the use of various procedures as well as surface modification of structural components with the use of advanced materials obtained in the Welding Engineering Department of Warsaw University of Technology, Poland, are presented.

  14. Proceedings of a technical session on rock mechanics ''Advance in laboratory sample testing''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report brings together a series of papers about rock mechanics. The meeting was divided into three sessions, which dealt with the three main types of rock formation currently considered in the CEC Programme: granite, clay and salt. Safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste involves the proper design of deep underground repositories. This necessitates an in-depth knowledge of the mechanical properties of the rock mass. The behaviour of the rock mass must be known both for the construction and the operation (heating effects) of the repository. Usually, the dominant factor for designing an underground structure is the fracturing of the rock mass. In the present case, the rock is chosen with a very low fracturing. Therefore, the mechanical properties of the formation are mainly those of the rock matrix. These properties are obtained, at least in a first exploratory step, by laboratory testing of rock samples obtained by core-drilling from surface. This aspect of rock characterization was thought to deserve a special technical meeting, in order to bring together most of the results obtained in this field by contracting partners of the CEC for the years 1980-82

  15. Engineering ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bengisu, Murat

    2001-01-01

    This is a comprehensive book applying especially to junior and senior engineering students pursuing Materials Science/ Engineering, Ceramic Engineering and Mechanical Engineering degrees. It is also a reference book for other disciplines such as Chemical Engineering, Biomedical Engineering, Nuclear Engineering and Environmental Engineering. Important properties of most engineering ceramics are given in detailed tables. Many current and possible applications of engineering ceramics are described, which can be used as a guide for materials selection and for potential future research. While covering all relevant information regarding raw materials, processing properties, characterization and applications of engineering ceramics, the book also summarizes most recent innovations and developments in this field as a result of extensive literature search.

  16. Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Design for Water Cooled Reactors. Proceedings of a Technical Committee Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The economics of current nuclear power plants have improved through increased fuel burnup and longer fuel cycles, i.e. increasing the effective time that fuel remains in the reactor core and the amount of energy it generates. Efficient consumption of fissile material in the fuel element before it is discharged from the reactor means that less fuel is required over the reactor's life cycle, which results in lower amounts of fresh fuel, lower spent fuel storage costs, and less waste for ultimate disposal. Better utilization of fissile nuclear materials, as well as more flexible power manoeuvring, place challenging operational demands on materials used in reactor components, and first of all, on fuel and cladding materials. It entails increased attention to measures ensuring desired in-pile fuel performance parameters that require adequate improvements in fuel material properties and fuel rod designs. These are the main reasons that motivated the IAEA Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (TWG-FPT) to recommend the organization of a Technical Committee Meeting on Advanced Fuel Pellet Materials and Fuel Rod Designs for Power Reactors. The proposal was supported by the IAEA TWGs on Advanced Technologies for Light and Heavy Water-Cooled Reactors (TWG-LWR and TWG-HWR), and the meeting was held at the invitation of the Government of Switzerland at the Paul Scherrer Institute in Villigen, from 23 to 26 November 2009. This was the third IAEA meeting on these subjects (the first was held in 1996 in Tokyo, Japan, and the second in 2003 in Brussels, Belgium), which reflects the continuous interest in the above issues among Member States. The purpose of the meeting was to review the current status in the development of fuel pellet materials and to explore recent improvements in fuel rod designs for light and heavy water cooled power reactors. The meeting was attended by 45 specialists representing fuel vendors, nuclear utilities, research and development

  17. Advances in radiation chemistry of polymers. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting on radiation effects on polymers was held at the Radiation Laboratory at the University of Notre Dame to review and discuss advances in the radiation processing of polymers. The trends in the basic research, research and development, and industrial applications were reported. The scope of more applied uses of irradiation involving polymers ranged from discussions of the curing of materials for dental applications, to the effects on polyolefins, the most broadly used class of polymers prevalent in industrial radiation processing, and to emerging interests in hydrogels, carbon fiber composites, heterogeneous mixtures based on material by-products (scrap plastic and wood fragments), grafted materials and materials for electronic uses. In addition, the emerging interests in the use of recently developed high power x ray systems for industrial use were presented. The document contains 12 individual papers, each of them was indexed and abstracted separately

  18. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals: (1) to ensure that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) to implement digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II&C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security.

  19. Radiotherapy Technical Considerations in the Management of Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: American-French Consensus Recommendations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huguet, Florence, E-mail: florence.huguet@tnn.aphp.fr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tenon Hospital, APHP, University Paris VI, Paris (France); Goodman, Karyn A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Azria, David [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Val d' Aurelle-Paul Lamarque, Montpellier (France); Racadot, Severine [Department of Radiation Oncology, CRLC Leon Berard, Lyon (France); Abrams, Ross A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Summary: Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose

  20. Radiotherapy technical considerations in the management of locally advanced pancreatic cancer: American-French consensus recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, Florence; Goodman, Karyn A; Azria, David; Racadot, Severine; Abrams, Ross A

    2012-08-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality. Approximately 30% of pancreatic cancer patients present with locally advanced, unresectable nonmetastatic disease. For these patients, two therapeutic options exist: systemic chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Within this context, the optimal technique for pancreatic irradiation is not clearly defined. A search to identify relevant studies was undertaken using the Medline database. All Phase III randomized trials evaluating the modalities of radiotherapy in locally advanced pancreatic cancer were included, as were some noncontrolled Phase II and retrospective studies. An expert panel convened with members of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group and GERCOR cooperative groups to review identified studies and prepare the guidelines. Each member of the working group independently evaluated five endpoints: total dose, target volume definition, radiotherapy planning technique, dose constraints to organs at risk, and quality assurance. Based on this analysis of the literature, we recommend either three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or intensity-modulated radiation therapy to a total dose of 50 to 54 Gy at 1.8 to 2 Gy per fraction. We propose gross tumor volume identification to be followed by an expansion of 1.5 to 2 cm anteriorly, posteriorly, and laterally, and 2 to 3 cm craniocaudally to generate the planning target volume. The craniocaudal margins can be reduced with the use of respiratory gating. Organs at risk are liver, kidneys, spinal cord, stomach, and small bowel. Stereotactic body radiation therapy should not be used for pancreatic cancer outside of clinical trials. Radiotherapy quality assurance is mandatory in clinical trials. These consensus recommendations are proposed for use in the development of future trials testing new chemotherapy combinations with radiotherapy. Not all of these recommendations will be appropriate for trials testing radiotherapy dose or dose intensity

  1. Tailored ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In polyphase tailored ceramic forms two distinct modes of radionuclide immobilization occur. At high waste loadings the radionuclides are distributed through most of the ceramic phases in dilute solid solution, as indicated schematically in this paper. However, in the case of low waste loadings, or a high loading of a waste with low radionuclide content, the ceramic can be designed with only selected phases containing the radionuclides. The remaining material forms nonradioactive phases which provide a degree of physical microstructural isolation. The research and development work with polyphase ceramic nuclear waste forms over the past ten years is discussed. It has demonstrated the critical attributes which suggest them as a waste form for future HLW disposal. From a safety standpoint, the crystalline phases in the ceramic waste forms offer the potential for demonstrable chemical durability in immobilizing the long-lived radionuclides in a geologic environment. With continued experimental research on pure phases, analysis of mineral analogue behavior in geochemical environments, and the study of radiation effects, realistic predictive models for waste form behavior over geologic time scales are feasible. The ceramic forms extend the degree of freedom for the economic optimization of the waste disposal system

  2. Workshop on Advancing Experimental Rock Deformation Research: Scientific and Technical Needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tullis, Terry E. [Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)

    2016-05-31

    A workshop for the experimental rock deformation community was held in Boston on August 16-19, 2012, following some similar but smaller preliminary meetings. It was sponsored primarily by the NSF, with additional support from the DOE, the SCEC, and in-kind support by the USGS. A white paper summarizing the active discussions at the workshop and the outcomes is available (https://brownbox.brown.edu/download.php?hash=0b854d11). Those attending included practitioners of experimental rock deformation, i.e., those who conduct laboratory experiments, as well as users of the data provided by practitioners, namely field geologists, seismologists, geodynamicists, earthquake modelers, and scientists from the oil and gas industry. A considerable fraction of those attending were early-career scientists. The discussion initially focused on identifying the most important unsolved scientific problems in all of the research areas represented by the users that experiments would help solve. This initial session was followed by wide-ranging discussions of the most critical problems faced by practitioners, particularly by early-career scientists. The discussion also focused on the need for designing and building the next generation of experimental rock deformation equipment required to meet the identified scientific challenges. The workshop participants concluded that creation of an experimental rock deformation community organization is needed to address many of the scientific, technical, and demographic problems faced by this community. A decision was made to hold an organizational meeting of this new organization in San Francisco on December 1-2, 2012, just prior to the Fall Meeting of the AGU. The community has decided to name this new organization “Deformation Experimentation at the Frontier Of Rock and Mineral research” or DEFORM. As of May 1, 2013, 64 institutions have asked to be members of DEFORM.

  3. Preparation and Characteristic of Glass-Ceramics with Super Low Thermal Expansion Coefficient

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    The preparation technics of glass-ceramics with super low coefficient of thermal expansion containing β-quartz solid solution as a main crystal phase based on the glass in the system Li2O-Al2O3-SiO2 was introduced. The composition of base glass, technics of melting and heat treatment effecting on characteristic of glass-ceramics was described. Specimens were prepared by melting, anneal and controlled two steps heat treatment. Crystal phase, microstructure and elementary distributing were studied by using XRD, SEM and EDS respectively. Prepared specimens show excellent transparency and super low thermal expansion coefficient of 2×10-8 ·K-1, which reaches international advanced level.

  4. Draft Function Allocation Framework and Preliminary Technical Basis for Advanced SMR Concepts of Operations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques Hugo; John Forester; David Gertman; Jeffrey Joe; Heather Medema; Julius Persensky; April Whaley

    2013-04-01

    This report presents preliminary research results from the investigation in to the development of new models and guidance for concepts of operations (ConOps) in advanced small modular reactor (aSMR) designs. In support of this objective, three important research areas were included: operating principles of multi-modular plants, functional allocation models and strategies that would affect the development of new, non-traditional concept of operations, and the requiremetns for human performance, based upon work domain analysis and current regulatory requirements. As part of the approach for this report, we outline potential functions, including the theoretical and operational foundations for the development of a new functional allocation model and the identification of specific regulatory requirements that will influence the development of future concept of operations. The report also highlights changes in research strategy prompted by confirmationof the importance of applying the work domain analysis methodology to a reference aSMR design. It is described how this methodology will enrich the findings from this phase of the project in the subsequent phases and help in identification of metrics and focused studies for the determination of human performance criteria that can be used to support the design process.

  5. Advanced growth and surface analysis system for in situ studies of interface formation. Annual technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the first annual report for developing an advanced integrated in situ UHV growth/analysis system for synchrotron radiation studies of interface and surface reactions which lead to epitaxial structures on Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex alloys. This equipment will allow one to use techniques based on synchrotron radiation, such as photoemission, x-ray standing wave (XSW), and surface x-ray absorption spectroscopy (SXAFS) to determining the electronic states and atomic configurations of surfaces in metal-silicon, metal-germanium and metal-silicon-germanium alloys. Since the award of the contract the authors have completed a detailed design of the overall system, identified commercially available equipment which fits the requirements and have purchased or ordered all of this equipment. They have also custom designed a considerable amount of equipment which is not available commercially because of the special requirements. This includes both of the UHV chambers, sample manipulators, and a mobile support stand. In this report, they will describe the design and purchase status of the system. An overview of the equipment purchase status is given in Appendix 1. The details of their custom designed growth and analytical chambers are given in Appendix 2

  6. Final Technical Report - Use of Systems Biology Approaches to Develop Advanced Biofuel-Synthesizing Cyanobacterial Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pakrasi, Himadri [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The overall objective of this project was to use a systems biology approach to evaluate the potentials of a number of cyanobacterial strains for photobiological production of advanced biofuels and/or their chemical precursors. Cyanobacteria are oxygen evolving photosynthetic prokaryotes. Among them, certain unicellular species such as Cyanothece can also fix N2, a process that is exquisitely sensitive to oxygen. To accommodate such incompatible processes in a single cell, Cyanothece produces oxygen during the day, and creates an O2-limited intracellular environment during the night to perform O2-sensitive processes such as N2-fixation. Thus, Cyanothece cells are natural bioreactors for the storage of captured solar energy with subsequent utilization at a different time during a diurnal cycle. Our studies include the identification of a novel, fast-growing, mixotrophic, transformable cyanobacterium. This strain has been sequenced and will be made available to the community. In addition, we have developed genome-scale models for a family of cyanobacteria to assess their metabolic repertoire. Furthermore, we developed a method for rapid construction of metabolic models using multiple annotation sources and a metabolic model of a related organism. This method will allow rapid annotation and screening of potential phenotypes based on the newly available genome sequences of many organisms.

  7. Utility Advanced Turbine Systems Program (ATS) Technical Readiness Testing and Pre-Commercial Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siemens Westinghouse

    2001-09-30

    The objective of the ATS program is to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior and cost competitive gas turbine systems for base load application in utility, independent power producer and industrial markets. Specific performance targets have been set using natural gas as the primary fuel: (1) System efficiency that will exceed 60% (lower heating value basis) on natural gas for large scale utility turbine systems; for industrial applications, systems that will result in a 15% improvement in heat rate compared to currently available gas turbine systems. (2) An environmentally superior system that will not require the use of post combustion emissions controls under full load operating conditions. (3) Busbar energy costs that are 10% less than current state-of-the-art turbine systems, while meeting the same environmental requirements. (4) Fuel-flexible designs that will operate on natural gas but are capable of being adapted to operate on coal-derived or biomass fuels. (5) Reliability-Availability-Maintainability (RAM) that is equivalent to the current turbine systems. (6) Water consumption minimized to levels consistent with cost and efficiency goals. (7) Commercial systems that will enter the market in the year 2000. In Phase I of the ATS program, Siemens Westinghouse found that efficiency significantly increases when the traditional combined-cycle power plant is reconfigured with closed-loop steam cooling of the hot gas path. Phase II activities involved the development of a 318MW natural gas fired turbine conceptual design with the flexibility to burn coal-derived and biomass fuels. Phases I and II of the ATS program have been completed. Phase III, the current phase, completes the research and development activities and develops hardware specifications from the Phase II conceptual design. This report summarizes Phase III Extension activities for a three month period. Additional details may be found in monthly technical progress reports covering the

  8. Insulating Structural Ceramics Program, Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrews, Mark J.; Tandon, Raj; Ott, Eric; Hind, Abi Akar; Long, Mike; Jensen, Robert; Wheat, Leonard; Cusac, Dave; Lin, H. T.; Wereszczak, Andrew A.; Ferber, Mattison K.; Lee, Sun Kun; Yoon, Hyung K.; Moreti, James; Park, Paul; Rockwood, Jill; Boyer, Carrie; Ragle, Christie; Balmer-Millar, Marilou; Aardahl, Chris; Habeger, Craig; Rappe, Ken; Tran, Diana; Koshkarian, Kent; Readey, Michael

    2005-11-22

    New materials and corresponding manufacturing processes are likely candidates for diesel engine components as society and customers demand lower emission engines without sacrificing power and fuel efficiency. Strategies for improving thermal efficiency directly compete with methodologies for reducing emissions, and so the technical challenge becomes an optimization of controlling parameters to achieve both goals. Approaches being considered to increase overall thermal efficiency are to insulate certain diesel engine components in the combustion chamber, thereby increasing the brake mean effective pressure ratings (BMEP). Achieving higher BMEP rating by insulating the combustion chamber, in turn, requires advances in material technologies for engine components such as pistons, port liners, valves, and cylinder heads. A series of characterization tests were performed to establish the material properties of ceramic powder. Mechanical chacterizations were also obtained from the selected materials as a function of temperature utilizing ASTM standards: fast fracture strength, fatique resistance, corrosion resistance, thermal shock, and fracture toughness. All ceramic materials examined showed excellent wear properties and resistance to the corrosive diesel engine environments. The study concluded that the ceramics examined did not meet all of the cylinder head insert structural design requirements. Therefore we do not recommend at this time their use for this application. The potential for increased stresses and temperatures in the hot section of the diesel engine combined with the highly corrosive combustion products and residues has driven the need for expanded materials capability for hot section engine components. Corrosion and strength requirements necessitate the examination of more advanced high temperture alloys. Alloy developments and the understanding of processing, structure, and properties of supperalloy materials have been driven, in large part, by the gas

  9. Technical Research on Safety Management and Effective Application of China Advanced Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) is a tank in pool type, light water cooled, heavy water reflected research reactor. The maximum thermal neutron flux of the reactor is 1.0x1015 cm-2s-1, and the reactor power is 60 MW. The reactor was designed and constructed completely by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). The construction project began on Aug. 26, 2002, reactor criticality was achieved on May 13, 2010, and it is scheduled to complete power increasing tests by the end of 2011. Future operation of CARR is preparing and its utilization program is considered. It is expected that CARR will greatly improve and enhance the comprehensive research capability of nuclear science and technology and push the peaceful use of nuclear technology forward. The paper briefly presents the reactor safety features, the operation organization and responsibilities, the management of operation safety, and the future utilizations. According to national safety regulations of research reactor, evaluation of operation safety of CARR shall be executed after initial operation at power level and submit the revised ''Final Safety Analysis Report'' (FSAR) to the regulatory body.Ordinary operation shall be approved and operation license shall be issued by the regulatory body after review on the ''Final Safety Analysis Report.'' Vertical and horizontal channels with associated equipment and instruments are installed in reactor core and in heavy water reflector. CARR will be used to produce variety of RIs in comprehensive fields, to meet the requirements of engineering tests and irradiation for developing NPP fuels and materials in China, to apply for NTD of mono-crystalline silicone, NAA, neutron photography and to provide high intense neutron beam for application of neutron scattering experiments in an adequate scale and others, etc. (author)

  10. Advanced coal conversion process demonstration. Technical progress report, April 1--June 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-10-01

    This project demonstrates an advanced, thermal, coal upgrading process, coupled with physical cleaning techniques, that is designed to upgrade high moisture, low rank coals to a high quality, low sulfur fuel, registered as the SynCoal{reg_sign} process. The coal is processed through three stages (two heating stages followed by an inert cooling stage) of vibrating fluidized bed reactors that remove chemically bound water, carboxyl groups, and volatile sulfur compounds. After thermal upgrading, the coal is put through a deep bed stratifier cleaning process to separate the pyrite rich ash from the coal. The SynCoal process enhances low rank, western coals, usually with a moisture content of 25 to 55 percent, sulfur content of 0.5 to 1.5 percent, and heating value of 5,500 to 9,000 Btu/lb, by producing a stable, upgraded, coal product with a moisture content as low as 1 percent, sulfur content as low as 0.3 percent, and heating value up to 12,000 Btu/lb. The 45 ton per hour unit is located adjacent to a unit train load out facility at Western Energy Company`s Rosebud coal mine near Colstrip, Montana. The demonstration plant is sized at about one-tenth the projected throughput of a multiple processing train commercial facility. During this report period the primary focus has been to continue the operation of the demonstration facility. Production has been going to area power plants. Modifications and maintenance work was also performed this quarter.

  11. Advanced wind turbine near-term product development. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1996-01-01

    In 1990 the US Department of Energy initiated the Advanced Wind Turbine (AWT) Program to assist the growth of a viable wind energy industry in the US. This program, which has been managed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, has been divided into three phases: (1) conceptual design studies, (2) near-term product development, and (3) next-generation product development. The goals of the second phase were to bring into production wind turbines which would meet the cost goal of $0.05 kWh at a site with a mean (Rayleigh) windspeed of 5.8 m/s (13 mph) and a vertical wind shear exponent of 0.14. These machines were to allow a US-based industry to compete domestically with other sources of energy and to provide internationally competitive products. Information is given in the report on design values of peak loads and of fatigue spectra and the results of the design process are summarized in a table. Measured response is compared with the results from mathematical modeling using the ADAMS code and is discussed. Detailed information is presented on the estimated costs of maintenance and on spare parts requirements. A failure modes and effects analysis was carried out and resulted in approximately 50 design changes including the identification of ten previously unidentified failure modes. The performance results of both prototypes are examined and adjusted for air density and for correlation between the anemometer site and the turbine location. The anticipated energy production at the reference site specified by NREL is used to calculate the final cost of energy using the formulas indicated in the Statement of Work. The value obtained is $0.0514/kWh in January 1994 dollars. 71 figs., 30 tabs.

  12. Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, August 1992--October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C.; Hatcher, P.G.; Walsh, P.M.; Coleman, M.M.; Bortiatynski, J.; Burgess, C.; Dutta, R.; Gergova, K.; Lai, W.C.; Li, J.; McKinney, D.; Parfitt, D.; Peng, Y.; Sanghani, P.; Yoon, E.

    1993-02-01

    The Penn State program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five borad objectives: (1) development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and miocrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; and (5) assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Pyrolysis of four isomers of butylbenzene was investigated in static microautoclave reactors at 450{degrees}C under 0.69 MPa of UHP N{sub 2}. Thee rates of disappearance of substrates were found to depend upon the bonding energy of C{alpha}-C{beta} bond in the side chain in the initial period of pyrolysis reactions. Possible catalytic effects of metal surfaces on thermal degradation and deposit formation at temperatures >400{degrees}C have been studied. Carbon deposition depends on the composition of the metal surfaces, and also depends on the chemical compositions of the reactants. Thermal stressing of JP-8 was conducted in the presence of alumina, carbonaceous deposits recovered from earlier stressing experiments, activated carbon, carbon black, and graphite. The addition of different solid carbons during thermal stressing leads to different reaction mechanisms. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, along with {sup 13}C-labeling techniques, have been used to examine the thermal stability of a jet fuel sample mixed with 5% benzyl alcohol. Several heterometallic complexes consisting of two transition metals and sulfur in a single molecule were synthesized and tested as precursors of bimetallic dispersed catalysts for liquefaction of a Montana subbituminous and Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous coals.

  13. Final Technical Report - Advanced Optical Sensors to Minimize Energy Consumption in Polymer Extrusion Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Susan J. Foulk

    2012-07-24

    Project Objective: The objectives of this study are to develop an accurate and stable on-line sensor system to monitor color and composition on-line in polymer melts, to develop a scheme for using the output to control extruders to eliminate the energy, material and operational costs of off-specification product, and to combine or eliminate some extrusion processes. Background: Polymer extrusion processes are difficult to control because the quality achieved in the final product is complexly affected by the properties of the extruder screw, speed of extrusion, temperature, polymer composition, strength and dispersion properties of additives, and feeder system properties. Extruder systems are engineered to be highly reproducible so that when the correct settings to produce a particular product are found, that product can be reliably produced time after time. However market conditions often require changes in the final product, different products or grades may be processed in the same equipment, and feed materials vary from lot to lot. All of these changes require empirical adjustment of extruder settings to produce a product meeting specifications. Optical sensor systems that can continuously monitor the composition and color of the extruded polymer could detect process upsets, drift, blending oscillations, and changes in dispersion of additives. Development of an effective control algorithm using the output of the monitor would enable rapid corrections for changes in materials and operating conditions, thereby eliminating most of the scrap and recycle of current processing. This information could be used to identify extruder systems issues, diagnose problem sources, and suggest corrective actions in real-time to help keep extruder system settings within the optimum control region. Using these advanced optical sensor systems would give extruder operators real-time feedback from their process. They could reduce the amount of off-spec product produced and

  14. Progress in design, research and development and testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting covered the following topics: Developments in design of safety-related heat removal components and systems for advanced water cooled reactors; status of test programmes on heat removal components and systems of new designs; range of validity and extrapolation of test results for the qualification of design/licensing computer models and codes for advanced water cooled reactors; future needs and trends in testing of safety systems for advanced water cooled reactors. Tests of heat removal safety systems have been conducted by various groups supporting the design, testing and certification of advanced water cooled reactors. The Technical Committee concluded that the reported test results generally confirm the predicted performance features of the advanced designs. Refs, figs, tabs

  15. Glass, Ceramics, and Composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many studies of plutonium in glass and ceramics have taken place in the thirty years covered by this book. These studies have led to a substantial understanding, arising from fundamental research of actinides in solids and research and development in three technical fields: immobilization of the high level wastes (HLW) from commercial nuclear power plants and processing of nuclear weapons materials, environmental restoration in the nuclear weapons complex and, most recently, the immobilization of weapons-grade plutonium as a result of disarmament activities

  16. Advanced transportation system studies technical area 2 (TA-2): Heavy lift launch vehicle development. volume 3; Program Cost estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurry, J. B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of the TA-2 contract was to provide advanced launch vehicle concept definition and analysis to assist NASA in the identification of future launch vehicle requirements. Contracted analysis activities included vehicle sizing and performance analysis, subsystem concept definition, propulsion subsystem definition (foreign and domestic), ground operations and facilities analysis, and life cycle cost estimation. The basic period of performance of the TA-2 contract was from May 1992 through May 1993. No-cost extensions were exercised on the contract from June 1993 through July 1995. This document is part of the final report for the TA-2 contract. The final report consists of three volumes: Volume 1 is the Executive Summary, Volume 2 is Technical Results, and Volume 3 is Program Cost Estimates. The document-at-hand, Volume 3, provides a work breakdown structure dictionary, user's guide for the parametric life cycle cost estimation tool, and final report developed by ECON, Inc., under subcontract to Lockheed Martin on TA-2 for the analysis of heavy lift launch vehicle concepts.

  17. Advances in fuel pellet technology for improved performance at high burnup. Proceedings of a Technical Committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IAEA has recently completed two co-ordinated Research Programmes (CRPs) on The Development of Computer Models for Fuel Element Behaviour in Water Reactors, and on Fuel Modelling at Extended Burnup. Through these CRPs it became evident that there was a need to obtain data on fuel behaviour at high burnup. Data related o thermal behaviour, fission gas release and pellet to clad mechanical interaction were obtained and presented at the Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Fuel Pellet Technology for Improved Performance at High Burnup which was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology (IWGFPT). The 34 papers from 10 countries are published in this proceedings and presented by a separate abstract. The papers were grouped in 6 sessions. First two sessions covered the fabrication of both UO2 fuel and additives and MOX fuel. Sessions 3 and 4 covered the thermal behaviour of both types of fuel. The remaining two sessions dealt with fission gas release and the mechanical aspects of pellet to clad interaction

  18. Advanced methods of process/quality control in nuclear reactor fuel manufacture. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    technical committee meeting. Upon invitation of the Government of Germany and Siemens AG, KWU/Advanced Nuclear Fuel GmbH the meeting was held in Lingen, Germany from 18 to 22 October 1999. In total, 19 papers from 10 countries were grouped into four sessions which covered new developments for control of process and product quality, their implementation and results obtained including new approaches to employee motivation

  19. NASA University Research Centers Technical Advances in Aeronautics, Space Sciences and Technology, Earth Systems Sciences, Global Hydrology, and Education. Volumes 2 and 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Tommy L. (Editor); White, Bettie (Editor); Goodman, Steven (Editor); Sakimoto, P. (Editor); Randolph, Lynwood (Editor); Rickman, Doug (Editor)

    1998-01-01

    This volume chronicles the proceedings of the 1998 NASA University Research Centers Technical Conference (URC-TC '98), held on February 22-25, 1998, in Huntsville, Alabama. The University Research Centers (URCS) are multidisciplinary research units established by NASA at 11 Historically Black Colleges or Universities (HBCU's) and 3 Other Minority Universities (OMU's) to conduct research work in areas of interest to NASA. The URC Technical Conferences bring together the faculty members and students from the URC's with representatives from other universities, NASA, and the aerospace industry to discuss recent advances in their fields.

  20. Modelling of Tape Casting for Ceramic Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud

    of functional ceramics research. Advances in ceramic forming have enabled low cost shaping techniques such as tape casting and extrusion to be used in some of the most challenging technologies. These advances allow the design of complex components adapted to desired specific properties and applications. However......Functional ceramics find use in many different applications of great interest, e.g. thermal barrier coatings, piezoactuators, capacitors, solid oxide fuel cells and electrolysis cells, membranes, and filters. It is often the case that the performance of a ceramic component can be increased markedly......, there is still only very limited insight into the processes determining the final properties of such components. Hence, the aim of the present PhD project is to obtain the required knowledge basis for the optimized processing of multi-material functional ceramics components. Recent efforts in the domain...

  1. A 1-year randomised controlled trial comparing zirconia versus metal-ceramic implant supported single-tooth restorations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Mandana; Worsaae, Nils; Schiødt, Morten;

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the biological, technical and aesthetic outcomes of single implant-supported all-ceramic versus metal-ceramic crowns. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirty-six patients with premolar agenesis were randomly treated with 38 all-ceramic (AC) and 37 metal-ceramic (MC) implant-supported si...

  2. Advanced methods for processing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Combustion chemical vapor deposition (combustion CVD) is being developed for the deposition of high temperature oxide coatings. The process is being evaluated as an alternative to more capital intensive conventional coating processes. The thrusts during this reporting period were the development of the combustion CVD process for depositing lanthanum monazite, the determination of the influence of aerosol size on coating morphology, the incorporation of combustion CVD coatings into thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) and related oxidation research, and continued work on the deposition of zirconia-yttria coatings.

  3. Advanced methods for processing ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, W.B. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1995-05-01

    Combustion chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) is a flame assisted, open air chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. The process is capable of producing textured, epitaxial coatings on single crystal substrates using low cost reagents. Combustion chemical vapor deposition is a relatively inexpensive, alternative thin film deposition process with potential to replace conventional coating technologies for certain applications. The goals of this project are to develop the CCVD process to the point that potential industrial applications can be identified and reliably assessed.

  4. Review of micromachining of ceramics by etching

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H.T.TING; K.A.ABOU-EL-HOSSEIN; H.B.CHUA

    2009-01-01

    In the last two decades, there has been an enormous surge in interest in ceramic materials and, as a result, there have been significant advances in their development and applications. Their inherent properties, such as capability of operating at temperatures far above metals, high level of hardness and toughness, low coefficient of thermal expansion and high thermal conductivity rendered ceramics to be one of the leading engineering materials. Many research works have been conducted in the past few years on machining of advanced ceramics using different processing methods in order to obtain a better surface roughness, higher material removal rate and improved tool life. Micromachining using chemical etching is one of those methods that do not involve the problem of tool life and direct tool-work piece contact. However, only a few research works have been done on micromachining of ceramics using chemical etching. Hence, study of chemical machining of advanced ceramics is still needed as the process has found wide application in the industry because of its relative low operating costs. In this work, we summarize the recent progresses in machining of different types of advanced ceramics, material processing methods such as wet etching and dry etching, and finally the prospects for control of material removal rate and surface quality in the process of ceramic micromachining.

  5. The Development of Nanotechnologies and Advanced Materials Industry in Science and Entrepreneurship: Socioeconomic and Technical Indicators. A Case Study of Latvia (Part One

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geipele I.

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The present scientific paper is the first part of two publications, where the authors obtain results from the scientific research presented in a series of works on the development of the nanotechnologies and advanced materials industry in science and entrepreneurship in Latvia. The study has a focus on finding proper socioeconomic and technical indicators. It provides resume on a scope of the study. The paper contains the developed structure of engineering economic indicator system, determined groups of indicators for assessment of the development of nanotechnologies and advanced materials industry in Latvia and results of the evaluation of the obtained statistics on the economic indicators.

  6. The Development of Nanotechnologies and Advanced Materials Industry in Science and Entrepreneurship: Socioeconomic and Technical Indicators. A Case Study of Latvia (Part One)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geipele, I.; Geipele, S.; Staube, T.; Ciemleja, G.; Zeltins, N.

    2016-08-01

    The present scientific paper is the first part of two publications, where the authors obtain results from the scientific research presented in a series of works on the development of the nanotechnologies and advanced materials industry in science and entrepreneurship in Latvia. The study has a focus on finding proper socioeconomic and technical indicators. It provides resume on a scope of the study. The paper contains the developed structure of engineering economic indicator system, determined groups of indicators for assessment of the development of nanotechnologies and advanced materials industry in Latvia and results of the evaluation of the obtained statistics on the economic indicators.

  7. Evaluation of some ceramic clays from Zambia

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, C J

    1993-01-01

    This reports details the technical evaluation of ceramic clays collected during visits to Zambia in 1990 and 1991 by the author (Clive Mitchell). The clay samples included: Choma kaolin (Southern Province), Twapia kaolin (Copperbelt Province), Kapiri Mposhi kaolin (Central Province), Masenche clay (Northern Province), Leula clay, Misenga clay and Chikankata clay (Southern Province). The Choma kaolin was asessed to be an excellent source of ceramic-grade kaolin. The Twapia and Kapiri Mposhi ka...

  8. Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul KT Liu

    2005-01-13

    This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

  9. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report, April 1992--September 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1993-07-01

    This project was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the DOE Office of Transportation Systems` automotive technology programs. Significant progress in fabricating ceramic components for DOE, NASA, and DOE advanced heat engine programs show that operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engines is feasible; however, addition research is needed in materials and processing, design, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base for producing reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A 5-yr project plan was developed, with focus on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines.

  10. Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) power-train system development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helms, H. E.; Johnson, R. A.; Gibson, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    Technical work on the design and component testing of a 74.5 kW (100 hp) advanced automotive gas turbine is described. Selected component ceramic component design, and procurement were tested. Compressor tests of a modified rotor showed high speed performance improvement over previous rotor designs; efficiency improved by 2.5%, corrected flow by 4.6%, and pressure ratio by 11.6% at 100% speed. The aerodynamic design is completed for both the gasifier and power turbines. Ceramic (silicon carbide) gasifier rotors were spin tested to failure. Improving strengths is indicated by burst speeds and the group of five rotors failed at speeds between 104% and 116% of engine rated speed. The emission results from combustor testing showed NOx levels to be nearly one order of magnitude lower than with previous designs. A one piece ceramic exhaust duct/regenerator seal platform is designed with acceptable low stress levels.

  11. Scientiifc Research on Ancient Ceramic Production Processes and Techniques%中国古陶瓷工艺与技术科学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    叶国珍; 叶宏明; 叶佳星

    2015-01-01

    中国古陶瓷发展史,是一个传统陶瓷工艺与传统陶瓷技术不断进步的发展过程。不同陶瓷材料的科学应用,不同地区陶瓷制作工艺和技术的改良与提升,使中国古陶瓷制作从原料自然应用发展到技术应用,从生活需求的制陶工艺发展到文化内涵的制瓷技术,这是中国陶瓷工艺技术科学应用取得的成就。中国陶瓷制作从原料科学应用上取得的成就,使陶瓷制作工艺技术得以不断精致发展,并在宋代达到了登峰造极的地步。%The history of Chinese ancient ceramics is a process in which traditional ceramic production technology steadily advanced. The scientiifc application of different ceramic materials and the improvement of ceramic making processes and techniques in different areas made possible the progress from the natural use to the technical use of ceramic materials and the transformation from the production of ceramics as life necessities to the manufacture of ceramics as cultural articles. The success in the scientiifc application of ceramic materials promoted the reifnement of ceramic production technology and brought it to its height of all time in Song Dynasty.

  12. Implementing an advanced waste separation step in an MBT plant: assessment of technical, economic and environmental impacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirhofer, Martina; Piringer, Gerhard; Rixrath, Doris; Sommer, Manuel; Ragossnig, Arne Michael

    2013-10-01

    Heavy fractions resulting from mechanical treatment stages of mechanical-biological waste treatment plants are posing very specific demands with regard to further treatment (large portions of inert and high-caloric components). Based on the current Austrian legal situation such a waste stream cannot be landfilled and must be thermally treated. The aim of this research was to evaluate if an inert fraction generated from this waste stream with advanced separation technologies, two sensor-based [near-infrared spectroscopy (NIR), X-ray transmission (XRT)] and two mechanical systems (wet and dry) is able to be disposed of. The performance of the treatment options for separation was evaluated by characterizing the resulting product streams with respect to purity and yield. Complementing the technical evaluation of the processing options, an assessment of the economic and global warming effects of the change in waste stream routing was conducted. The separated inert fraction was evaluated with regard to landfilling. The remaining high-caloric product stream was evaluated with regard to thermal utilization. The results show that, in principal, the selected treatment technologies can be used to separate high-caloric from inert components. Limitations were identified with regard to the product qualities achieved, as well as to the economic expedience of the treatment options. One of the sensor-based sorting systems (X-ray) was able to produce the highest amount of disposeable heavy fraction (44.1%), while having the lowest content of organic (2.0% C biogenic per kg waste input) components. None of the high-caloric product streams complied with the requirements for solid recovered fuels as defined in the Austrian Ordinance on Waste Incineration. The economic evaluation illustrates the highest specific treatment costs for the XRT (€ 23.15 per t), followed by the NIR-based sorting system (€ 15.67 per t), and the lowest costs for the air separation system (€ 10.79 per t

  13. Nondestructive evaluation of structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klima, S.J.; Baaklini, G.Y.; Abel, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    A review is presented on research and development of techniques for nondestructive evaluation and characterization of advanced ceramics for heat engine applications. Highlighted in this review are Lewis Research Center efforts in microfocus radiography, scanning laser acoustic microscopy (SLAM), scanning acoustic microscopy (SAM), scanning electron acoustic microscopy (SEAM), and photoacoustic microscopy (PAM). The techniques were evaluated by applying them to research samples of green and sintered silicon nitride and silicon carbide in the form of modulus-of-rupture bars containing seeded voids. Probabilities of detection of voids were determined for diameters as small as 20 microns for microfucus radiography, SLAM, and SAM. Strengths and limitations of the techniques for ceramic applications are identified. Application of ultrasonics for characterizing ceramic microstructures is also discussed.

  14. HIGHWAY INFRASTRUCTURE FOCUS AREA NEXT-GENERATION INFRASTRUCTURE MATERIALS VOLUME I - TECHNICAL PROPOSAL & MANAGEMENTENHANCEMENT OF TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE WITH IRON-BASED AMORPHOUS-METAL AND CERAMIC COATINGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farmer, J C

    2007-12-04

    . The high boron content of this particular amorphous metal made it an effective neutron absorber, and suitable for criticality control applications. These amorphous alloys appear to maintain their corrosion resistance up to the glass transition temperature. Visionary research is proposed to extend the application of corrosion-resistant iron-based amorphous metal coatings, and variants of these coatings, to protection of the Nation's transportation infrastructure. Specific objectives of the proposed work are: (1) fabrication of appropriate test samples for evaluation of concept; (2) collection of production and test data for coated steel reinforcement bars, enabling systematic comparison of various coating options, based upon performance and economic considerations; and (3) construction and testing of concrete structures with coated steel reinforcement bars, thereby demonstrating the value of amorphous-metal coatings. The benefits of ceramic coatings as thermal barriers will also be addressed.

  15. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilherme, A.; Coroado, J.; dos Santos, J. M. F.; Lühl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngießer, B.; Carvalho, M. L.

    2011-05-01

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each "layer". Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  16. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilherme, A. [Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Coroado, J. [Instituto Politecnico Tomar, Dep. Arte Conservacao and Restauro, P-2300313 Tomar (Portugal); Santos, J.M.F. dos [GIAN, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade de Coimbra, 3004-516 Coimbra (Portugal); Luehl, L.; Wolff, T.; Kanngiesser, B. [Institut fuer Optik und Atomare Physik, Technische Universitaet Berlin, Hardenbergstr. 36 D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Carvalho, M.L., E-mail: luisa@cii.fc.ul.pt [Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias, Centro de Fisica Atomica da Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal)

    2011-05-15

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with {mu}-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each 'layer'. Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  17. X-ray fluorescence (conventional and 3D) and scanning electron microscopy for the investigation of Portuguese polychrome glazed ceramics: Advances in the knowledge of the manufacturing techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work shows the first analytical results obtained by X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) (conventional and 3D) and Scanning Electron Microscopy with Energy Dispersive System (SEM-EDS) on original Portuguese ceramic pieces produced between the 16th and 18th centuries in Coimbra and Lisbon. Experts distinguished these productions based only on the color, texture and brightness, which originates mislabeling in some cases. Thanks to lateral and spatial resolution in the micrometer regime, the results obtained with μ-XRF were essential in determining the glaze and pigment thicknesses by monitoring the profile of the most abundant element in each 'layer'. Furthermore, the dissemination of these elements throughout the glaze is different depending on the glaze composition, firing temperature and on the pigment itself. Hence, the crucial point of this investigation was to analyze and understand the interfaces color/glaze and glaze/ceramic support. Together with the XRF results, images captured by SEM and the corresponding semi-quantitative EDS data revealed different manufacturing processes used by the two production centers. Different capture modes were suitable to distinguish different crystals from the minerals that confer the color of the pigments used and to enhance the fact that some of them are very well spread through the glassy matrix, sustaining the theory of an evolved and careful procedure in the manufacturing process of the glaze.

  18. Laser machining of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Dahotre, Narendra B

    2011-01-01

    Advanced materialsIntroductionApplicationsStructural ceramicsBiomaterials CompositesIntermetallicsMachining of advanced materials IntroductionFabrication techniquesMechanical machiningChemical Machining (CM)Electrical machiningRadiation machining Hybrid machiningLaser machiningIntroductionAbsorption of laser energy and multiple reflectionsThermal effectsLaser machining of structural ceramicsIntrodu

  19. Experimental tests and qualification of analytical methods to address thermohydraulic phenomena in advanced water cooled reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Worldwide there is considerable experience in nuclear power technology, especially in water cooled reactor technology. Of the operating plants, in September 1998, 346 were light water reactors (LWRs) totalling 306 GW(e) and 29 were heavy water reactors (HWRs) totalling 15 GW(e). The accumulated experience and lessons learned from these plants are being incorporated into new advanced reactor designs. Utility requirements documents have been formulated to guide these design activities by incorporating this experience, and results from research and development programmes, with the aim of reducing costs and licensing uncertainties by establishing the technical bases for the new designs. Common goals for advanced designs are high availability, user-friendly features, competitive economics and compliance with internationally recognized safety objectives. Large water cooled reactors with power outputs of 1300 MW(e) and above, which possess inherent safety characteristics (e.g. negative Doppler moderator temperature coefficients, and negative moderator void coefficient) and incorporate proven, active engineered systems to accomplish safety functions are being developed. Other designs with power outputs from, for example, 220 MW(e) up to about 1300 MW(e) which also possess inherent safety characteristics and which place more emphasis on utilization of passive safety systems are being developed. Passive systems are based on natural forces and phenomena such as natural convection and gravity, making safety functions less dependent on active systems and components like pumps and diesel generators. In some cases, further experimental tests for the thermohydraulic conditions of interest in advanced designs can provide improved understanding of the phenomena. Further, analytical methods to predict reactor thermohydraulic behaviour can be qualified for use by comparison with the experimental results. These activities should ultimately result in more economical designs. The

  20. Plasma-Spraying Ceramics Onto Smooth Metallic Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Robert A.; Brindley, William J.; Rouge, Carl J.; Leissler, George

    1992-01-01

    In fabrication process, plasma-sprayed ceramic coats bonded strongly to smooth metallic surfaces. Principal use of such coats in protecting metal parts in hot-gas paths of advanced gas turbine engines. Process consists of application of initial thin layer of ceramic on smooth surface by low-pressure-plasma spraying followed by application of layer of conventional, low-thermal-conductivity atmospheric-pressure plasma-sprayed ceramic.

  1. [Dental ceramics: its history and development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moureau, Thomas; Vanheusden, Alain

    2006-01-01

    This article presents an historical background of dental ceramics. It synthesises the evolution of such material and its technical improvements from the stone-age to our time. Focusing on the importance of dental aesthetics, it shows the investigations realised to upgrade the prosthetic results.

  2. Advanced functional materials

    CERN Document Server

    2011-01-01

    This book reviews the results of recent research on new materials arising from progress in polymer, ceramic, sensor, and fuel cell technology, including advanced inorganic-organic-hybrid polymeric materials, high functional sensor, and microbial fuel cells.

  3. Technical and Energy Performance of an Advanced, Aqueous Ammonia-Based CO2 Capture Technology for a 500 MW Coal-Fired Power Station.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kangkang; Yu, Hai; Feron, Paul; Tade, Moses; Wardhaugh, Leigh

    2015-08-18

    Using a rate-based model, we assessed the technical feasibility and energy performance of an advanced aqueous-ammonia-based postcombustion capture process integrated with a coal-fired power station. The capture process consists of three identical process trains in parallel, each containing a CO2 capture unit, an NH3 recycling unit, a water separation unit, and a CO2 compressor. A sensitivity study of important parameters, such as NH3 concentration, lean CO2 loading, and stripper pressure, was performed to minimize the energy consumption involved in the CO2 capture process. Process modifications of the rich-split process and the interheating process were investigated to further reduce the solvent regeneration energy. The integrated capture system was then evaluated in terms of the mass balance and the energy consumption of each unit. The results show that our advanced ammonia process is technically feasible and energy-competitive, with a low net power-plant efficiency penalty of 7.7%.

  4. Salt splitting with ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurath, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    The purpose of this task is to develop ceramic membrane technologies for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions. This technology has the potential to reduce the low-level waste (LLW) disposal volume, the pH and sodium hydroxide content for subsequent processing steps, the sodium content of interstitial liquid in high-level waste (HLW) sludges, and provide sodium hydroxide free of aluminum for recycle within processing plants at the DOE complex. Potential deployment sites include Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The technical approach consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON). As the name implies, sodium ions are transported rapidly through these ceramic crystals even at room temperatures.

  5. Advanced thermal-energy-storage concept-definition study for solar Brayton power plants. Final technical report, Volume I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1976-01-01

    The detailed results are presented of a technical and economic assessment of phase change and thermochemical energy storage systems in a solar power plant employing a high temperature Brayton cycle thermal engine with helium as the heat transport fluid. The assessment included an examination of the storage system operation, efficiency, power plant interaction, design, materials, safety, maintenance, environmental impact, system life, and economics. These considerations are implemented in the conceptual design of three baseline storage systems and their components for use in a solar power plant module of 50 megawatt electrical power output. Rationale is provided to support the configuration, operation and material choices. A preliminary assessment of the technology development and experimental test program requirements are also included. The report is contained in four separate volumes. This volume is the technical report.

  6. Field study of disposed wastes from advanced coal processes. Quarterly technical progress report, January--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    The Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has initiated research on the disposal of solid wastes from advanced coal processes. The objective of this research is to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for planning waste disposal practices associated with advanced coal processes. To accomplish this objective, DOE has contracted Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to design, construct, and monitor a limited number of field disposal tests with advanced coal process wastes. These field tests will be monitored over a three year period with the emphasis on collecting data on the field disposal of these wastes. This report describes leach tests and groundwater monitoring.

  7. Durable, High Thermal Conductivity Melt Infiltrated Ceramic Composites for Turbine Engine Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Durable, creep-resistant ceramic composites are necessary to meet the increased operating temperatures targeted for advanced turbine engines. Higher operating...

  8. Three-unit posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) veneered with layered and milled (CAD-on) veneering ceramics: 1-year follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial

    OpenAIRE

    Grohmann, Philipp; Bindl, Andreas; Hämmerle, Christoph; Mehl, Albert; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial was to test posterior zirconia-ceramic fixed dental prostheses (FDPs) veneered with a computer-aided design/computer- assisted manufacture (CAD/CAM) lithium disilicate veneering ceramic (CAD-on) and manually layered zirconia veneering ceramic with respect to survival of the FDPs, and technical and biologic outcomes.

  9. A Framework for Advancing Career and Technical Education: Recommendations for the Reauthorization of the Carl D. Perkins Act. Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alliance for Excellent Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    The nation's economy is only as strong as the educational foundation that supports it. Economic success in the twenty-first century requires a labor force capable of demonstrating an advanced level of both knowledge and skill. To be a true engine of growth, the nation's education system must be aligned with these demands. This is why the…

  10. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Villalobos

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers, ultrashort pulse lasers, novel materials such as sesquioxides, fluoride ceramic lasers, selenide ceramic lasers in the 2 to 3 μm region, composite ceramic lasers for better thermal management, and single crystal lasers derived from polycrystalline ceramics. This paper highlights some of these notable achievements.

  11. Fatigue of dental ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yu; Sailer, Irena; lawn, brian

    2013-01-01

    Clinical data on survival rates reveal that all-ceramic dental prostheses are susceptible to fracture from repetitive occlusal loading. The objective of this review is to examine the underlying mechanisms of fatigue in current and future dental ceramics

  12. Gas-pressure forming of superplastic ceramic sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nieh, T.G.; Wadsworth, J.

    1993-06-24

    Superplasticity in ceramics has now advanced to the stage that technologically viable superplastic deformation processing can be performed. In this paper, examples of biaxial gas-pressure forming of several ceramics are given. These include yttria stabilized, tetragonal zirconia (YTZP) a 20% alumina/YTZP composite, and silicon. In addition, the concurrent superplastic forming and diffusion bonding of a hybrid YTZP/C103 (ceramic-metal) structure are presented. These forming processes offer technological advantages of greater dimensional control and increased variety and complexity of shapes than is possible with conventional ceramic shaping technology.

  13. Ceramic Technology Project semiannual progress report for October 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-09-01

    Objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. Focus is on structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. The work is organized into the following elements: materials and processing (monolithics [SiC, SiN], ceramic composites, thermal and wear coatings, joining), materials design methodology, data base and life prediction (structural qualification, time-dependent behavior, environmental effects, fracture mechanics, NDE), and technology transfer. Individual abstracts were prepared for the individual contributions.

  14. Ceramic art in sculpture

    OpenAIRE

    Rokavec, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Diploma seminar speaks of ceramics as a field of artistic expression and not just as pottery craft. I presented short overview of developing ceramic sculpture and its changing role. Clay inspires design and touch more than other sculpture media. It starts as early as in prehistory. Although it sometimes seems that was sculptural ceramics neglected in art history overview, it was not so in actual praxis. There is a rich tradition of ceramics in the East and also in Europe during the renaissanc...

  15. Ceramic Laser Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Guillermo Villalobos; Jasbinder Sanghera; Ishwar Aggarwal; Bryan Sadowski; Jesse Frantz; Colin Baker; Brandon Shaw; Woohong Kim

    2012-01-01

    Ceramic laser materials have come a long way since the first demonstration of lasing in 1964. Improvements in powder synthesis and ceramic sintering as well as novel ideas have led to notable achievements. These include the first Nd:yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) ceramic laser in 1995, breaking the 1 KW mark in 2002 and then the remarkable demonstration of more than 100 KW output power from a YAG ceramic laser system in 2009. Additional developments have included highly doped microchip lasers,...

  16. Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support project (HVTE-TS): Final summary report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    This final technical report was prepared by Rolls-Royce Allison summarizing the multiyear activities of the Advanced Turbine Technology Applications Project (ATTAP) and the Hybrid Vehicle Turbine Engine Technology Support (HVTE-TS) project. The ATTAP program was initiated in October 1987 and continued through 1993 under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Energy Conservation and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation Technologies, Propulsion Systems, Advanced Propulsion Division. ATTAP was intended to advance the technological readiness of the automotive ceramic gas turbine engine. The target application was the prime power unit coupled to conventional transmissions and powertrains. During the early 1990s, hybrid electric powered automotive propulsion systems became the focus of development and demonstration efforts by the US auto industry and the Department of energy. Thus in 1994, the original ATTAP technology focus was redirected to meet the needs of advanced gas turbine electric generator sets. As a result, the program was restructured to provide the required hybrid vehicle turbine engine technology support and the project renamed HVTE-TS. The overall objective of the combined ATTAP and HVTE-TS projects was to develop and demonstrate structural ceramic components that have the potential for competitive automotive engine life cycle cost and for operating 3,500 hr in an advanced high temperature turbine engine environment. This report describes materials characterization and ceramic component development, ceramic components, hot gasifier rig testing, test-bed engine testing, combustion development, insulation development, and regenerator system development. 130 figs., 12 tabs.

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL CERAMIC NANOFILM-FIBER INTEGRATED OPTICAL SENSORS FOR RAPID DETECTION OF COAL DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Junhang Dong; Hai Xiao; Xiling Tang; Hongmin Jiang; Kurtis Remmel; Amardeep Kaur

    2012-09-30

    The overall goal of this project is to conduct fundamental studies on advanced ceramic materials and fiber optic devices for developing new types of high temperature (>500{degree}C) fiber optic chemical sensors (FOCS) for monitoring fossil (mainly coal) and biomass derived gases in power plants. The primary technical objective is to investigate and demonstrate the nanocrystalline doped-ceramic thin film enabled FOCS that possess desired stability, sensitivity and selectivity for in-situ, rapid gas detection in the syngas streams from gasification and combustion flue gases. This report summarizes research works of two integrated parts: (1) development of metal oxide solid thin films as sensing materials for detection and measurement of important gas components relevant to the coal- and biomass-derived syngas and combustion gas streams at high temperatures; and (2) development of fiber optic devices that are potentially useful for constructing FOCS in combination with the solid oxide thin films identified in this program.

  18. Pressurized Heavy Water Reactor Fuel: Integrity, Performance and Advanced Concepts. Proceedings of the Technical Meetings held in Bucharest, 24-27 September 2012, and in Mumbai, 8-11 May 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seven Member States have operating pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs), and some of them are also planning new reactors of this type. The current type of PHWR uses natural uranium as the fuel and has an average burnup of 7000 MWd/t (megawatt days per metric tonne). To make these reactors economically competitive with other reactor types, the discharge burnup of PHWR fuel will need to be increased without affecting the integrity of the fuel pin and bundle. A significant increase in the discharge burnup of fuel is possible with the use of advanced fuel cycles in PHWRs. The advanced fuels can be slightly enriched uranium, reprocessed uranium from light water reactors, mixed oxide or thorium based fuels. At the same time, substantial savings in natural uranium resources can also be achieved through the possible extension of the discharge burnup of advanced fuels used in PHWRs without changing reactor hardware. Following the recommendation of the Technical Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology, two technical meetings were held: Technical Meeting on Fuel Integrity during Normal Operation and Accident Conditions in PHWRs, 24–27 September 2012, Bucharest, Romania; and Technical Meeting on Advanced Fuel Cycles in PHWRs, 8–11 April 2013, Mumbai, India. Their objective was to update information on the performance of PHWR fuels, the status and trends in the use of advanced fuels in PHWRs and the technical readiness for the deployment of such fuel cycles in these types of reactor. This publication contains the proceedings of the two technical meetings, including a record of the discussions held during the various technical sessions

  19. Advances in control assembly materials for water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting held in Vienna, 29 November - 2 December 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To obtain an overall picture of the current usage of control materials, research under way on new materials and to identify areas where materials are necessary to improve the safety, reliability and/or economics of water reactors, the IAEA convened a Technical Committee Meeting on Advances in Control Materials for Water Reactors. This meeting was recommended by the International Working Group on Fuel Performance and Technology and was held in Vienna from 29 November to 2 December 1993. Twenty-seven participants from twelve different countries attended the meeting and twelve papers were presented and are reproduced in these proceedings together with a summary of the meeting. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers. Refs, figs and tabs

  20. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smit, F.J.; Hogsett, R.F.; Jha, M.C.

    1993-11-04

    This project is a major step in the Department of Energy`s program to show that ultra-clean coal-water slurry fuel (CWF) can be produced from selected coals and that this premium fuel will be a cost-effective replacement for oil and natural gas now fueling some of the industrial and utility boilers in the United States. The replacement of oil and gas with CWF can only be realized if retrofit costs are kept to a minimum and retrofit boiler emissions meet national goals for clean air. These concerns establish the specifications for maximum ash and sulfur levels and combustion properties of the CWF. This cost-share contract is a 48-month program which started on September 30, 1992. This report discusses the technical progress made during the 4th quarter of the project from July 1 to September 30, 1993.

  1. Advances in radio frequency tumor ablation therapy: technical considerations, strategies for increasing coagulation necrosis volume, and preliminary clinical results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, S. Nahum; Gazelle, G. Scott

    1998-04-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) tumor ablation has been demonstrated as a reliable method for creating thermally induced coagulation necrosis using either a percutaneous approach with image- guidance or direct surgical application of thin electrodes into treated tissues. Early clinical trials with this technology have studied the treatment of hepatic, cerebral, and bony malignancies. The extent of coagulation necrosis induced with conventional monopolar radiofrequency electrodes is dependent on overall energy deposition, the duration of RF application, and RF electrode tip length and gauge. This article will discuss these technical considerations with the goal of defining optimal parameters for RF ablation. Strategies to further increase induced coagulation necrosis including: multiprobe and bipolar arrays, and internally-cooled RF electrodes, with or without pulsed-RF or cluster technique will be presented. The development and laboratory results for many of these radiofrequency techniques, initial clinical results, and potential biophysical limitations to RF induced coagulation, such as perfusion mediated tissue cooling (vascular flow) will likewise be discussed.

  2. Thin film ceramic thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Otto (Inventor); Fralick, Gustave (Inventor); Wrbanek, John (Inventor); You, Tao (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A thin film ceramic thermocouple (10) having two ceramic thermocouple (12, 14) that are in contact with each other in at least on point to form a junction, and wherein each element was prepared in a different oxygen/nitrogen/argon plasma. Since each element is prepared under different plasma conditions, they have different electrical conductivity and different charge carrier concentration. The thin film thermocouple (10) can be transparent. A versatile ceramic sensor system having an RTD heat flux sensor can be combined with a thermocouple and a strain sensor to yield a multifunctional ceramic sensor array. The transparent ceramic temperature sensor that could ultimately be used for calibration of optical sensors.

  3. Ceramic Technology Project. Semiannual progress report, April 1991--September 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was developed by the USDOE Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the USDOE and NASA advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. These programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. A five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990 the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The objective is to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. The project approach includes determining the mechanisms controlling reliability, improving processes for fabricating existing ceramics, developing new materials with increased reliability, and testing these materials in simulated engine environments to confirm reliability. Although this is a generic materials project, the focus is on the structural ceramics for advanced gas turbine and diesel engines, ceramic bearings and attachments, and ceramic coatings for thermal barrier and wear applications in these engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to US industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities.

  4. Advanced fuel gas desulfurization (AFGD) demonstration project. Technical progress report No. 19, July 1, 1994--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The {open_quotes}Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) Demonstration Project{close_quotes} is a $150.5 million cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy and Pure Air, a general partnership of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc. The AFGD process is one of several alternatives to conventional flue gas desulfurization (FGD) being demonstrated under the Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program. The AFGD demonstration project is located at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company`s Bailly Generating Station, about 12 miles northeast of Gary, Indiana.

  5. Evaluation, engineering and development of advanced cyclone processes. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    ``Evaluation, Engineering and Development of Advanced Cyclone Processes`` is a research and development project for the reduction of pyritic sulfur in coal. Project goals are to remove 80 to 90% of the ash and pyritic sulfur while retaining 80 to 90% of the parent coal`s heating value. A number of media and media separator options are to be evaluated and tested, culminating with the implementation of the preferred combination in a 1,000 lb/hr bench-scale process optimization circuit.

  6. Advanced development of particle beam probe diagnostic systems. Technical progress report, June 1, 1982-October 31, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary objective of this program is the advanced development of sophisticated particle beam diagnostic techniques for making space and time resolved measurements on high temperature magnetically confined plasmas. The procedure is to develop and test new techniques on small-scale laboratory experiments and then transfer the technology to mainline confinement experiments. During the period covered by this progress report the major advances were: (1) demonstrated that beam probing can provide simultaneous measurements of n, phi and T/sub e/ on plasmas when T/sub e/ is less than approximately 500 eV; (2) demonstrated simultaneous measurements of n tilde and phi tilde on tokamak geometry for frequencies below 200 kHz; (3) developed the concept of multi-element energy analyzer to provide simultaneous measurements for more than one spatial location in the plasma; and (4) carried out preliminary analysis that showed that beam probes can be implemented on complex magnetic geometries such as ATF and that beam probe system could be extended into the MeV energy range

  7. Utility advanced turbine systems (ATS) technology readiness testing -- Phase 3. Technical progress report, October 1--December 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    The overall objective of the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Phase 3 Cooperative Agreement between GE and US Department of Energy (DOE) is the development of the GE 7H and 9H combined cycle power systems. The major effort will be expended on detail design. Validation of critical components and technologies will be performed including: hot gas path component testing, sub-scale compressor testing, steam purity test trials, and rotational heat transfer confirmation testing. Processes will be developed to support the manufacture of the first system, which was to have been sited and operated in Phase 4 but will now be sited and operated commercially by GE. This change has resulted from DOE`s request to GE for deletion of Phase 4 in favor of a restructured Phase 3 (as Phase 3R) to include full speed, no load (FSNL) testing of the 7H gas turbine. Technology enhancements that are not required for the first machine design but will be critical for future ATS advances in performance, reliability, and costs will be initiated. Long-term tests of materials to confirm design life predictions will continue. A schematic of the GE H machine is shown. This report summarizes work accomplished in 4Q97.

  8. PREFACE: 3rd International Congress on Ceramics (ICC3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niihara, Koichi; Ohji, Tatsuki; Sakka, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Early in 2005, the American Ceramic Society, the European Ceramic Society and the Ceramic Society of Japan announced a collaborative effort to provide leadership for the global ceramics community that would facilitate the use of ceramic and glass materials. That effort resulted in an agreement to organize a new biennial series of the International Congress on Ceramics, convened by the International Ceramic Federation (ICF). In order to share ideas and visions of the future for ceramic and glass materials, the 1st International Congress on Ceramics (ICC1) was held in Canada, 2006, under the organization of the American Ceramic Society, and the 2nd Congress (ICC2) was held in Italy, 2008, hosted by the European Ceramic Society. Organized by the Ceramic Society of Japan, the 3rd Congress (ICC3) was held in Osaka, Japan, 14-18 November 2010. Incorporating the 23rd Fall Meeting of the Ceramic Society of Japan and the 20th Iketani Conference, ICC3 was also co-organized by the Iketani Science and Technology Foundation, and was endorsed and supported by ICF, Asia-Oceania Ceramic Federation (AOCF) as well as many other organizations. Following the style of the previous two successful Congresses, the program was designed to advance ceramic and glass technologies to the next generation through discussion of the most recent advances and future perspectives, and to engage the worldwide ceramics community in a collective effort to expand the use of these materials in both conventional as well as new and exciting applications. ICC3 consisted of 22 voluntarily organized symposia in the most topical and essential themes of ceramic and glass materials, including Characterization, design and processing technologies Electro, magnetic and optical ceramics and devices Energy and environment related ceramics and systems Bio-ceramics and bio-technologies Ceramics for advanced industry and safety society Innovation in traditional ceramics It also contained the Plenary Session and the

  9. Ceramic Fabric Coated With Silicon Carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccitiello, S. R.; Smith, M.; Goldstein, H.; Zimmerman, N.

    1988-01-01

    Material used as high-temperature shell. Ceramic fabric coated with silicon carbide (SiC) serves as tough, heat-resistant covering for other refractory materials. Developed to protect reusable insulating tiles on advanced space transportation systems. New covering makes protective glaze unnecessary. Used on furnace bricks or on insulation for engines.

  10. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., AL (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

    1992-08-26

    Research in this project centers upon developing a new approach to the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrates all aspects of the coal liquefaction process including coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, coal liquefaction experimentation, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. The project is being carried out under contract to the United States Department of Energy. On May 28, 1992, the Department of Energy authorized starting the experimental aspects of this projects; therefore, experimentation at Amoco started late in this quarterly report period. Research contracts with Auburn University, Pennsylvania State University, and Foster Wheeler Development Corporation were signed during June, 1992, so their work was just getting underway. Their work will be summarized in future quarterly reports. A set of coal samples were sent to Hazen Research for beneficiation. The samples were received and have been analyzed. The literature search covering coal swelling has been up-dated, and preliminary coal swelling experiments were carried out. Further swelling experimentation is underway. An up-date of the literature on the liquefaction of coal using dispersed catalysts is nearing completion; it will be included in the next quarterly report.

  11. Technical advances and energy substitutions in the transportation sector; Progres techniques et substitutions energetiques dans le secteur des transports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromenschlager-Philippe, F.

    2002-11-01

    Alternative motorization technologies have been proposed in order to achieve energy diversification and a reduction in pollutant emissions. Fuel cell vehicles are, among others, at the centre of research carried out by car manufacturers and oil companies. The use of fuel cell vehicles could contribute, first to a less stringent long-term energy dependence of oil importing countries and, second, to pollutant reduction in the transport sector. First of all, we propose the definition of 'innovation' and its treatment in the frame of mainstream economic theories. Then we proceed to a retrospective analysis of diesel motorization of the car market. In the second part of our work, we conduct a survey among French households aiming to obtain up-to-date information about their degree of acceptance of fuel cell technology. We are concerned about highlighting the determining factors of fuel cell vehicle adoption by consumers. For this, we set up a discrete choice model linking the individual decision to the whole group of technical or socio-economical factors and characteristics. Finally, we develop patterns of fuel cell equipment of passenger cars which differ according to type of vehicle and possible purchase assistance. These patterns lead us to the analysis of long-term fuel cell vehicle development on the French car market. (authors)

  12. Advanced liquefaction using coal swelling and catalyst dispersion techniques. Volume 1, Final technical report, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtis, C.W. [Auburn Univ., (United States); Gutterman, C. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Chander, S. [Pennsylvania State Univ., (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The overall objective of this project was to develop a new approach for the direct liquefaction of coal to produce an all-distillate product slate at a sizable cost reduction over current technology. The approach integrated coal selection, pretreatment, coal swelling with catalyst impregnation, liquefaction, product recovery with characterization, alternate bottoms processing, and a technical assessment including an economic evaluation. Heterofunctional solvents were the most effective in swelling coals. Also solvent blends such as isopropanol/water were more effective than pure solvents alone. Impregnating slurry catalysts simultaneously during coal swelling showed that better uptake was achieved with nonswelling solvent and higher impregnation temperature. Some enhancement in initial coal conversion was seen liquefying SO{sub 2}-treated Black Thunder coal with slurry catalysts, and also when hydrogen donor liquefaction solvents were used. Noncatalytic reactions showed no benefit from SO{sub 2} treatment. Coupling coal swelling and SO{sub 2} treatment with slurry catalysts was also not beneficial, although high conversion was seen with continuous operation and long residence time, however, similar high conversion was observed with untreated coal. SO{sub 2} treatment is not economically attractive unless it provides about 17% increase in coal reactivity. In most cases, the best results were obtained when the coal was untreated and the slurry catalyst was added directly into the reactor. Foster Wheeler`s ASCOT process had better average liquid yields than either Wilsonville`s vacuum tower/ROSE combination or delayed coking process. This liquid product also had good quality.

  13. [Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems]. Technical progress report, October--December 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesnor, J.D.; Bakke, E. [ABB Environmental Systems, Birmingham, AL (United States); Bender, D.J.; Kaminski, R.S. [Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emisssion boiler systems. The primary objectives are: NO{sub x} emissions, lb/million Btu; SO{sub 2} emissions, lb/million Btu; particulate emissions, lb/million Btu; and net plant efficiency, not less than 42%. The secondary objectives are: improved ash disposability; reduced waste generation; and reduced air toxics emissions. Accomplishments to date are summarized for the following tasks: task 1, project planning and management; task 7, component development and optimization; task 8, preliminary POC test facility design; task 9, subsystem test design and plan; task 10, subsystem test unit construction; and task 11, subsystem test operation and evaluation.

  14. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low emission boiler systems. Fourth quarterly technical progress report, July 1993--September 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    The LEBS plant design will be based on a high-sulfur Illinois No. 6 coal. This coal meets program selection requirements of extensive reserves and production, sulfur content, and representativeness. Two alternate test coals have been selected to examine fuel effects, and to broaden the range of application of the technology being developed. The alternate coals are a medium sulfur, Pittsburgh No. 8 bituminous, and a Wyoming subbituminous coal. The efficiency goals for the LEBS are challenging, particularly with the demands environmental controls are likely to place on auxiliary power. Table 1 shows estimates of overall plant efficiencies for three steam cycles: (1) a 2400 psi subcritical single reheat cycle typical of current plants; (2) a 3500 psi supercritical single reheat cycle; and (3) an advanced 4500 psi double reheat cycle. The plant heat rates are based on maximum boiler efficiency and minimum auxiliary power requirements consistent with conventional plant design for the design and alternate coals. The aggressive efficiency goals clearly require advanced steam conditions, as well as careful management of any added auxiliary power requirements for environmental controls. The EPRI SOAPP (State-of-the-Art Power Plant) project has selected the 4500 psi cycle as maximizing plant efficiency while minimizing generating costs for a commercial plant to be constructed by the year 2000. This program will incorporate the SOAPP base case cycle. The LESS design will incorporate a high-efficiency, once-through boiler design known as the Benson. Significant improvements in availability and operating flexibility have made this boiler design the system of choice for European power generation over the last fifteen years.

  15. NASA/CARES dual-use ceramic technology spinoff applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Lynn M.; Janosik, Lesley A.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Nemeth, Noel N.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has developed software that enables American industry to establish the reliability and life of ceramic structures in a wide variety of 21st Century applications. Designing ceramic components to survive at higher temperatures than the capability of most metals and in severe loading environments involves the disciplines of statistics and fracture mechanics. Successful application of advanced ceramics material properties and the use of a probabilistic brittle material design methodology. The NASA program, known as CARES (Ceramics Analysis and Reliability Evaluation of Structures), is a comprehensive general purpose design tool that predicts the probability of failure of a ceramic component as a function of its time in service. The latest version of this software, CARESALIFE, is coupled to several commercially available finite element analysis programs (ANSYS, MSC/NASTRAN, ABAQUS, COSMOS/N4, MARC), resulting in an advanced integrated design tool which is adapted to the computing environment of the user. The NASA-developed CARES software has been successfully used by industrial, government, and academic organizations to design and optimize ceramic components for many demanding applications. Industrial sectors impacted by this program include aerospace, automotive, electronic, medical, and energy applications. Dual-use applications include engine components, graphite and ceramic high temperature valves, TV picture tubes, ceramic bearings, electronic chips, glass building panels, infrared windows, radiant heater tubes, heat exchangers, and artificial hips, knee caps, and teeth.

  16. Technical support for the EPRI [Electric Power Research Institute] debris coolability requirement for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) advanced light water reactor (ALWR) design requirement for cavity sizing to promote long-term core debris coolability specifies that the reactor containment be arranged to afford a floor area for potential core debris spreading of at least 0.02 square meters per thermal megawatt of reactor power. This requirement has substantial experimental and analytical support as a sufficient basis to ensure long-term debris coolability. A logical framework and presentation of such support is provided in this document. The evidence as presented demonstrates that, following vessel failure, core debris in the cavity would consist of a mixture of fragments and a relatively continuous, but porous and cracked, phase that would be distributed relatively uniformly over the area that would be available per the requirement. Considering pertinent operative heat transfer phenomena, it is also demonstrated that the heat removal rate from core debris in this configuration would be sufficient to ensure debris coolability in the reactor cavity, even when the cavity is flooded after vessel failure. 29 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs

  17. Properties of ceramic candle filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pontius, D.H.

    1995-06-01

    The mechanical integrity of ceramic filter elements is a key issue for hot gas cleanup systems. To meet the demands of the advanced power systems, the filter components must sustain the thermal stresses of normal operations (pulse cleaning), of start-up and shut-down conditions, and of unanticipated process upsets such as excessive ash accumulation without catastrophic failure. They must also survive the various mechanical loads associated with handling and assembly, normal operation, and process upsets. For near-term filter systems, these elements must survive at operating temperatures of 1650{degrees}F for three years.

  18. Ceramic tamper-revealing seals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kupperman, David S.; Raptis, Apostolos C.; Sheen, Shuh-Haw

    1992-01-01

    A flexible metal or ceramic cable with composite ceramic ends, or a u-shaped ceramic connecting element attached to a binding element plate or block cast from alumina or zirconium, and connected to the connecting element by shrink fitting.

  19. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics

  20. Analyses of fine paste ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabloff, J A [ed.

    1980-01-01

    Four chapters are included: history of Brookhaven fine paste ceramics project, chemical and mathematical procedures employed in Mayan fine paste ceramics project, and compositional and archaeological perspectives on the Mayan fine paste ceramics. (DLC)

  1. The Role of Ceramics in a Resurgent Nuclear Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marra, J

    2006-02-28

    With fuel oil and natural gas prices near record highs and worldwide energy demands increasing at an alarming rate, there is growing interest in revitalization of the nuclear power industry within the United States and across the globe. Ceramic materials have long played a very important part in the commercial nuclear industry with applications throughout the entire fuel cycle; from fuel fabrication to waste stabilization. As the international community begins to look at advanced fuel cycles that minimize waste and increase proliferation resistance, ceramic materials will play an even larger role. Many of the advanced reactor concepts being evaluated operate at high-temperature requiring the use of durable, heat-resistant materials. Ceramic fuels are being investigated for a variety of Generation IV reactor concepts. These include the traditional TRISO-coated particles as well as advanced inert-matrix fuels. In order to minimize wastes and legacy materials, ceramic processes are also being applied to fuel reprocessing operations. Ceramic materials continue to provide a vital contribution in ''closing the fuel cycle'' by stabilization of associated low-level and high-level wastes in highly durable grout, ceramics, and glass. In the next five years, programs that are currently in the conceptual phase will begin laboratory- and engineering-scale demonstrations. This will require production-scale demonstrations of several ceramic technologies from fuel form development to advanced stabilization methods. Within the next five to ten years, these demonstrations will move to even larger scales and will also include radioactive demonstrations of these advanced technologies. These radioactive demonstrations are critical to program success and will require advances in ceramic materials associated with nuclear energy applications.

  2. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  3. Measuring Fracture Times Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlichta, Paul J.; Bister, Leo; Bickler, Donald G.

    1989-01-01

    Electrical measurements complement or replace fast cinematography. Electronic system measures microsecond time intervals between impacts of projectiles on ceramic tiles and fracture tiles. Used in research on ceramics and ceramic-based composite materials such as armor. Hardness and low density of ceramics enable them to disintegrate projectiles more efficiently than metals. Projectile approaches ceramic tile specimen. Penetrating foil squares of triggering device activate display and recording instruments. As ceramic and resistive film break oscilloscope plots increase in electrical resistance of film.

  4. Natural circulation data and methods for advanced water cooled nuclear power plant designs. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complex set of physical phenomena that occur in a gravity environment when a geometrically distinct heat sink and heat source are connected by a fluid flow path can be identified as natural circulation (NC). No external sources of mechanical energy for the fluid motion are involved when NC is established. Within the present context, natural convection is used to identify the phenomena that occur when a heat source is put in contact with a fluid. Therefore, natural convection characterizes a heat transfer regime that constitutes a subset of NC phenomena. This report provides the presented papers and summarizes the discussions at an IAEA Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Natural Circulation Data and Methods for innovative Nuclear Power Plant Design. While the planned scope of the TCM involved all types of reactor designs (light water reactors, heavy water reactors, gas-cooled reactors and liquid metal-cooled reactors), the meeting participants and papers addressed only light water reactors (LWRs) and heavy water reactors (HWRs). Furthermore, the papers and discussion addressed both evolutionary and innovative water cooled reactors, as defined by the IAEA. The accomplishment of the objectives of achieving a high safety level and reducing the cost through the reliance on NC mechanisms, requires a thorough understanding of those mechanisms. Natural circulation systems are usually characterized by smaller driving forces with respect to the systems that use an external source of energy for the fluid motion. For instance, pressure drops caused by vertical bends and siphons in a given piping system, or heat losses to environment are a secondary design consideration when a pump is installed and drives the flow. On the contrary, a significant influence upon the overall system performance may be expected due to the same pressure drops and thermal power release to the environment when natural circulation produces the coolant flow. Therefore, the level of knowledge for

  5. Defect production in ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zinkle, S.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kinoshita, C. [Kyushu Univ. (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A review is given of several important defect production and accumulation parameters for irradiated ceramics. Materials covered in this review include alumina, magnesia, spinel silicon carbide, silicon nitride, aluminum nitride and diamond. Whereas threshold displacement energies for many ceramics are known within a reasonable level of uncertainty (with notable exceptions being AIN and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}), relatively little information exists on the equally important parameters of surviving defect fraction (defect production efficiency) and point defect migration energies for most ceramics. Very little fundamental displacement damage information is available for nitride ceramics. The role of subthreshold irradiation on defect migration and microstructural evolution is also briefly discussed.

  6. Development of improved processing and evaluation methods for high reliability structural ceramics for advanced heat engine applications Phase II. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pujari, V.J.; Tracey, D.M.; Foley, M.R. [and others

    1996-02-01

    The research program had as goals the development and demonstration of significant improvements in processing methods, process controls, and nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which can be commercially implemented to produce high reliability silicon nitride components for advanced heat engine applications at temperatures to 1370{degrees}C. In Phase I of the program a process was developed that resulted in a silicon nitride - 4 w% yttria HIP`ed material (NCX 5102) that displayed unprecedented strength and reliability. An average tensile strength of 1 GPa and a strength distribution following a 3-parameter Weibull distribution were demonstrated by testing several hundred buttonhead tensile specimens. The Phase II program focused on the development of methodology for colloidal consolidation producing green microstructure which minimizes downstream process problems such as drying, shrinkage, cracking, and part distortion during densification. Furthermore, the program focused on the extension of the process to gas pressure sinterable (GPS) compositions. Excellent results were obtained for the HIP composition processed for minimal density gradients, both with respect to room-temperature strength and high-temperature creep resistance. Complex component fabricability of this material was demonstrated by producing engine-vane prototypes. Strength data for the GPS material (NCX-5400) suggest that it ranks very high relative to other silicon nitride materials in terms of tensile/flexure strength ratio, a measure of volume quality. This high quality was derived from the closed-loop colloidal process employed in the program.

  7. Metallic and intermetallic-bonded ceramic composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plucknett, K.P.; Tiegs, T.N.; Alexander, K.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN (United States)] [and others

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this task is to establish a framework for the development and fabrication of metallic-phase-reinforced ceramic matrix composites with improved fracture toughness and damage resistance. The incorporation of metallic phases that plastically deform in the crack tip region, and thus dissipate strain energy, will result in an increase in the fracture toughness of the composite as compared to the monolithic ceramic. It is intended that these reinforced ceramic matrix composites will be used over a temperature range from 20{degrees}C to 800-1200{degrees}C for advanced applications in the industrial sector. In order to systematically develop these materials, a combination of experimental and theoretical studies must be undertaken.

  8. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinchcomb, W.W.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Dunyak, T.J. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Engineering Science and Mechanics)

    1992-06-15

    The objective of the work reported herein is to develop an understanding of the mechanical behavior of advanced ceramic composites subjected to elevated temperature and dynamic (cyclic) loading, to develop a test system and test methods to obtain the properties and performance information required to design engineering components made from ceramic composite materials, and to provide critical and comprehensive evaluations of such materials to material synthesizers and developers to support and enhance progress in ceramic composite material development. The accomplishments of the investigation include the design, development, and demonstration of a high temperature, biaxial mechanical test facility for ceramic composite tubes and the development and validation of a performance simulation model (MRLife) for ceramic composites.

  9. Verification of ceramic structures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Behar-Lafenetre, S.; Cornillon, L.; Rancurel, M.; Graaf, D. de; Hartmann, P.; Coe, G.; Laine, B.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the "Mechanical Design and Verification Methodologies for Ceramic Structures" contract [1] awarded by ESA, Thales Alenia Space has investigated literature and practices in affiliated industries to propose a methodological guideline for verification of ceramic spacecraft and instr

  10. Ceramics As Materials Of Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Zaki, A.; Eteiba, M. B.; Abdelmonem, N.M.

    1988-01-01

    This paper attempts to review the limitations for using the important ceramics in contact with corrosive media. Different types of ceramics are included. Corrosion properties of ceramics and their electrical properties are mentioned. Recommendations are suggested for using ceramics in different media.

  11. Recent advances in CIM technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatkov B.S.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the PIM (Powder Injection Moulding technology is described in brief. After that the benefits and advantages were analyzed and summarized. Ceramic injection moulding (CIM process was analyzed in more detail: CIM- alumina, CIM-zirconia and CIM ferrites as the most common technical ceramics in CIM ceramic parts production, medical applications and accessories in chemical laboratories, and cores in electronic inductive components. After that our results for CIM barium hexaferrite and piezo ceramics (barium titanate are given. The main powder characteristics, the shrinkage and density and the main electrical characteristics of the sintered samples were compared for the isostatically pressed PM (powder metallurgy and CIM formed samples. SEM fractographs of CIM and PM samples are given for CIM green parts, debinded (white parts and sintered parts, and PM green parts and sintered parts. The results obtained were compared to literature data before they were applied in ceramic components production.

  12. Tribology of ceramics and composites materials science perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Basu, Bikramjit

    2011-01-01

    This book helps students and practicing scientists alike understand that a comprehensive knowledge about the friction and wear properties of advanced materials is essential to further design and development of new materials. With important introductory chapters on the fundamentals, processing, and applications of tribology, the book then examines in detail the nature and properties of materials, the friction and wear of structural ceramics, bioceramics, biocomposites, and nanoceramics, as well as lightweight composites and the friction and wear of ceramics in a cryogenic environment.

  13. High pressure ceramic joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Michael E.; Harkins, Bruce D.

    1993-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present joint when used with recuperators increases the use of ceramic components which do not react to highly corrosive gases. Thus, the present joint used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present joint is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a mechanical locking device having a groove defined in one of the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The joint and the mechanical locking device is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in the groove and contacting the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The present joint mechanically provides a high strength load bearing joint having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  14. Investigation of properties and performance of ceramic composite components. Final report on Phase 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, W.A.; Reifsnider, K.L.; Oleksuk, L.L.S.; Stinchcomb, W.W. [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    1994-10-31

    The purpose of Phase 2 of the Investigation of Properties and Performance of Ceramic Composite Components has been to build on and extend the work completed during Phase 1 to further advance the transition from properties of ceramic composite materials to performance of ceramic composite components used in fossil energy environments. The specific tasks of Phase 2 were: (1) develop and validate reliable and accurate high temperature, biaxial mechanical tests methods for structural ceramic composite components; (2) test and evaluate ceramic composite components, specifically tubes; (3) characterize long-term, mechanical performance of ceramic composite tubes at high temperatures; (4) develop a fundamental understanding of the mechanical degradation and performance limitations of ceramic composite components under service conditions; (5) develop predictive models for damage tolerance and reliability; and (6) relate component performance to microstructure and, thereby, provide feedback to the associated process-development effort, to improve performance. Accomplishments for each task are given.

  15. Materials Development Program: Ceramic Technology Project bibliography, 1984--1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    The Ceramic Technology [for Advanced Heat Engines] Project was begun in 1983 to meet the ceramic materials needs of the companion DOE automotive engine program, the Advanced Gas Turbine (AGT) project, and the Heavy Duty Transport (low-heat-rejection, heavy-duty diesel) project. Goal is to develop an industry technology base for reliable and cost effective ceramics for applications in advanced automotive gas turbine and diesel engines. Research areas were identified following extensive input from industry and academia. Majority of research is done by industry (60%); work is also done at colleges and universities, in-house, and at other national laboratories and government agencies. In the beginning, reliability of ceramic components was the key issue. The reliability issues have largely been met and, at the present time, cost is the driving issue, especially in light of the highly cost-sensitive automotive market. Emphasis of the program has now been shifted toward developing cost-effective ceramic components for high-performance engines in the near-term. This bibliography is a compilation of publications done in conjunction with the Ceramic Technology Project since its beginning. Citations were obtained from reports done by participants in the project. We have tried to limit citations to those published and easily located. The end date of 1992 was selected.

  16. Cummins/Tacom advanced adiabatic engine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamo, R.; Bryzik, W.

    1984-01-01

    Cummins Engine Company, Inc. and the U.S. Army have been jointly developing an adiabatic turbocompound engine during the last nine years. Although progress in the early years was slow, recent developments in the field of advanced ceramics have made it possible to make steady progress. It is now possible to reconsider the temperature limitation imposed on current heat engines and its subsequent influence on higher engine efficiency when using an exhaust energy utilization system. This paper presents an adiabatic turbocompound diesel engine concept in which high-performance ceramics are used in its design. The adiabatic turbocompound engine will enable higher operating temperatures, reduced heat loss, and higher exhaust energy recovery, resulting in higher thermal engine efficiency. This paper indicates that the careful selection of ceramics in engine design is essential. Adiabatic engine materials requirements are defined and the possible ceramic materials which will satisfy these requirements are identified. Examples in design considerations of engine components are illustrated. In addition to these important points, the use of ceramic coatings in the design of engine components. The first generation adiabatic engine with ceramic coatings is described. The advanced adiabatic engine with minimum friction features utilizaing ceramics is also presented. The advanced ceramic turbocharger turbine rotor as well as the oilless ceramic bearing design is described. Finally, the current status of the advanced adiabatic engine program culminating in the AA750 V-8 adiabatic engine is presented.

  17. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Switzerland (please sp...

  18. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Tuesday 30 March TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR From 9:00 to 12:00 and from 13:00 to 16:00 hrs - Council Chamber, Salle B, Salle des Pas Perdus National Instruments (NI) on Tour 2004 Claudia Jüngel, Evrem Yarkin, Joel Clerc, Hervé Baour / NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS The special event NI on Tour 2004, run in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, will be at CERN on March 30. Technical seminars and free introductory courses will be offered all day long in the Council Chamber, Salle B, and Salle des Pas Perdus (buildings 61 and 503). Technical conferences: 09:00 - 12:00 Data acquisition systems on PCs. Industrial measurement and control techniques. 13:00 - 16:00 Advanced LabVIEW software and PXI instrumentation. Measuring instruments and system components for teststand automation. Introductory courses: 09:00 - 12:00 DIAdem: Data analysis and presentation 13:00 - 16:00 Data acquisition with LabVIEW Language: English and French Free special seminar. Registration is recommended with National Instruments Swi...

  19. Ceramic Solar Receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, C., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Solar receiver uses ceramic honeycomb matrix to absorb heat from Sun and transfer it to working fluid at temperatures of 1,095 degrees and 1,650 degrees C. Drives gas turbine engine or provides heat for industrial processes.

  20. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  1. Making Ceramic Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squibb, Matt

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how to make a clay camera. This idea of creating functional cameras from clay allows students to experience ceramics, photography, and painting all in one unit. (Contains 1 resource and 3 online resources.)

  2. Helium mobility in advanced nuclear ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this work is to improve our knowledge on the mechanisms able to drive the helium behaviour in transition metal carbides and nitrides submitted to thermal annealing or ion irradiation. TiC, TiN and ZrC polycrystals were implanted with 3 MeV 3He ions at room temperature in the fluence range 2 * 1015 et 6 * 1016 cm-2. Some of them have been pre-irradiated with self-ions (14 MeV Ti or Zr). Fully controlled thermal annealing tests were subsequently carried out in the temperature range 1000 - 1600 C for two hours. The evolution of the helium depth distribution in function of implantation dose, temperature and pre-irradiation dose was measured thanks to the deuteron-induced nuclear reaction 3He(d, p0)4He between 900 keV and 1.8 MeV. The microstructure of implanted and annealed samples was investigated by transmission electron microscopy on thin foils prepared using the FIB technique. Additional characterization tools, as X-ray diffraction and Raman microspectrometry, have been also applied in order to obtain complementary information. Among the most relevant results obtained, the following have to be outlined: - double-peak helium depth profile was measured on as implanted sample for the three compounds. The first peak is located near the end of range and includes the major part of helium, a second peak located close to the surface corresponds to the helium atoms trapped by the native vacancies; - the helium retention capacity in transition metal carbides and nitrides submitted to fully controlled thermal treatments varies according to ZrC0.92 ≤ TiC0.96 ≤ TiN0.96; - whatever the investigated material, a self-ion-induced pre-damaging does not modify the initial helium profile extent. The influence of the post-implantation thermal treatment remains preponderant in any case; - the apparent diffusion coefficient of helium is in the range 4 * 10-18 - 2 * 10-17 m2 s-1 in TiC0.96 and 3.5 * 10-19 - 5.3 * 10-18 m2 s-1 in TiN0.96 between 1100 and 1600 C. The values of the corresponding thermal activation energy are in the range 1 - 2.5 eV; - surface blistering only occurs for ZrC0.92; - whatever the helium implantation dose, helium bubbles are formed near the ion end of range. Nevertheless, for as implanted samples, the bubble size remains less than the lateral resolution of TEM (≤ 1 nm); - when the annealing temperature increases, the average bubble size increases due to vacancy absorption while the density does not seem to vary. The activation energy corresponding to this mechanism has been evaluated around 0.40 eV; - after a high temperature thermal annealing (T ≥ 1500 C), the internal pressure of helium bubbles tends to reach the equilibrium value given by the classical law P = 2 γ/r with γ the surface energy and r the bubble radius; - near grain boundaries, the average helium bubble size tends to be larger and their density lower than within the grains; - when the helium implantation fluence decreases from 5 * 1016 to 2.3 * 1015 ions/cm2, helium release is quasi negligible for TiN0.96 even after a 1600 C annealing treatment. Moreover, helium was shown to diffuse on a larger range. (author)

  3. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division's activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing 99Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  4. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    Highlights of the Chemical Technology (CMT) Division`s activities during 1994 are presented. In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste and mixed hazardous/radioactive waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from waste streams, concentrating radioactive waste streams with advanced evaporator technology, and producing {sup 99}Mo from low-enriched uranium for medical applications; (6) electrometallurgical treatment of the many different types of spent nuclear fuel in storage at Department of Energy sites; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, molecular sieve structures, and impurities in scrap copper and steel; and the geochemical processes involved in mineral/fluid interfaces and water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  5. Technical Meeting (Research Coordination Meeting) of the Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on 'Studies of advanced reactor technology options for effective incineration of radioactive waste'. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical Meeting held at the Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (ASIPP) in Hefei was the second Research Coordination Meeting (RCM) of the CRP on 'Studies of Innovative Reactor Technology Options for Effective Incineration of Radioactive Waste'. All but one Member States participating in the CRP were attending: in all, 26 participants from 13 Member States and three international organizations. The overall objective of the CRP is to increase the capability of Member States in developing and applying advanced nuclear technologies in the area of long-lived radioactive waste utilization and transmutation. The final goal of the CRP is to deepen the understanding of the dynamics of transmutation systems, e.g., the accelerator driven system, especially of systems with deteriorated safety parameters, to qualify the available methods, specify the range of validity of these methods, and formulate requirements for future theoretical developments. Should transient experiments be available, the CRP will pursue experimental benchmarking work. Based on the results, the CRP will conclude on the potential need of transient experiments and make appropriate proposals for experimental programs. The scope of the second RCM was to review the progress achieved with regard on the technical work of the CRP. In particular, the main objectives of the RCM were to (a) analyse and inter-compare the individual results; (b) identify of eventual changes/improvements to the tasks and/or work plans; (c) plan the next stage(s); and (d) start preparation of the final CRP report. The participants were given a brief overview of the Institute's mission and accomplishments. ASIPP (Academia Sinica, Institute of Plasma Physics) was founded in 1978 as the leading centre for high temperature plasma physics, magnetically confined fusion technology, as well as R and D in related technological areas. ASIPP employs nearly 500 staff, of which more than 70% are scientists or engineers

  6. Ceramic electrolyte coating and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seabaugh, Matthew M.; Swartz, Scott L.; Dawson, William J.; McCormick, Buddy E.

    2007-08-28

    Aqueous coating slurries useful in depositing a dense coating of a ceramic electrolyte material (e.g., yttrium-stabilized zirconia) onto a porous substrate of a ceramic electrode material (e.g., lanthanum strontium manganite or nickel/zirconia) and processes for preparing an aqueous suspension of a ceramic electrolyte material and an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material. The invention also includes processes for depositing an aqueous spray coating slurry including a ceramic electrolyte material onto pre-sintered, partially sintered, and unsintered ceramic substrates and products made by this process.

  7. Cost-effective method for determining the grindability of ceramics. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, C.; Chand, R.H. [Chand Kare Technical Ceramics, Worcester, MA (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this program was to develop a cost-effective method to determine the grindability of ceramics leading to cost-effective methods for machining such ceramics. In this first phase of activity, Chand Kare Technical Ceramics directed its efforts towards development of a definition for ceramic grindability, design of grindability-test experiments, and development of a ceramics-grindability test system (CGTS). The grindability study also included the establishment of the correlation between the grindability and conventional grinding practices. The above goals were achieved. A definition based on material removal rate under controlled force grinding was developed. Three prototypes CGTSs were developed and tested; suitable design was identified. Based on this, a fully automatic CGTS was developed and is ready for delivery to Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Comprehensive grindability tests for various commercially available engineering ceramics were conducted. Experimental results indicated that ceramics have significantly different grindabilities even though their mechanical properties were not significantly different. This implies that grindability of ceramics can be greatly improved. Further study is needed to establish correlations between microstructure and grindability. Therefore, grindability should be evaluated during the development of new ceramics or improvement of existing ones. In this report, the development of the ceramic-grindability definition, the development of CGTS, extensive grindability results, and the preliminary correlation between grindability and mechanical properties (such as flexural strength, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness) were summarized.

  8. Current Issues with Environmental Barrier Coatings for Ceramics and Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kang N.

    2004-01-01

    The environmental barrier coating (EBC) for SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites and Si3N4 ceramics is an emerging field as the application of silicon-based ceramics in the gas turbine engine hot section is on the horizon, both for aero and industrial gas turbines. EBC is an enabling technology for silicon-based ceramics because these materials without an EBC cannot be used in combustion environments due to rapid surface recession. Significant progress in EBC development has been made during the last decade through various government-sponsored programs. Current EBCs are based on silicon, mullite (3Al2O3-2SiO2) and BSAS (barium strontium aluminum silicate with celsian structure). Volatility of BSAS, BSAS-silica chemical reaction, and low melting point of silicon limit temperature capability of current EBCs to about 1350 C for long-term applications. There is a need for higher temperature EBCs as the temperature capability of silicon-based ceramics continue to increase. Therefore, research is underway to develop EBCs with improved temperature capability compared to current EBCs. The current status and issues with the advanced EBC development efforts will be discussed.

  9. Continuous fiber ceramic matrix composites for heat engine components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripp, David E.

    1988-01-01

    High strength at elevated temperatures, low density, resistance to wear, and abundance of nonstrategic raw materials make structural ceramics attractive for advanced heat engine applications. Unfortunately, ceramics have a low fracture toughness and fail catastrophically because of overload, impact, and contact stresses. Ceramic matrix composites provide the means to achieve improved fracture toughness while retaining desirable characteristics, such as high strength and low density. Materials scientists and engineers are trying to develop the ideal fibers and matrices to achieve the optimum ceramic matrix composite properties. A need exists for the development of failure models for the design of ceramic matrix composite heat engine components. Phenomenological failure models are currently the most frequently used in industry, but they are deterministic and do not adequately describe ceramic matrix composite behavior. Semi-empirical models were proposed, which relate the failure of notched composite laminates to the stress a characteristic distance away from the notch. Shear lag models describe composite failure modes at the micromechanics level. The enhanced matrix cracking stress occurs at the same applied stress level predicted by the two models of steady state cracking. Finally, statistical models take into consideration the distribution in composite failure strength. The intent is to develop these models into computer algorithms for the failure analysis of ceramic matrix composites under monotonically increasing loads. The algorithms will be included in a postprocessor to general purpose finite element programs.

  10. Interfacing design and making of Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2014-01-01

    This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. Thus the research refers to the overall theme Materiality and Aesthe......This research investigates the relationship between crafting materiality and digital representation, and how experiential knowledge of crafts rooted in ceramics can be transformed and utilized in the use of digital technologies. Thus the research refers to the overall theme Materiality...... and Aesthetics in the conference. Digital technology as 3D printing with ceramic allows to bridge from the digital design environment to fabrication. At the same time novel digital means can create new interfaces between the human, space and the material. Here advances in 3d motion capture technology and sensors...... investigates the idea of an interactive digital design tool for designing wall like composition with 3d ceramics and is working on two levels. One which has to do with a digital interactive system that responds on the movement of the hands; at a certain distance the user’s hands appear on a monitor screen...

  11. In-process EDM truing to generate complex contours on metal-bond, superabrasive grinding wheels for precision grinding structural ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piscotty, M.A.; Davis, P.J.; Saito, T.T.; Blaedel, K.L.; Griffith, L.

    1997-08-01

    The demand and use of precision grinding of structural ceramics continue to increase as the worldwide advanced ceramic industry surpasses $20 billion is sales. Included in this industry are engineering structural ceramics, electronic ceramics, bioceramics and others. These materials are used in applications such as engine components, casting and extrusion dies, bearings, medical implants, nozzles, thermal insulators, and more. Along with the variety of ceramic applications comes a broad range of precision requirements, which in turn leads to various required processes to accommodate a spectrum of specifications. A process for grinding ceramic components to micrometer tolerances was employed and further developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for two separate grinding projects.

  12. International Engineering Foundation Conference on the Plastic Deformation of Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Brookes, Chris; Routbort, Jules

    1995-01-01

    This proceedings volume, "Plastic Deformation of Ceramics," constitutes the papers of an international symposium held at Snowbird, Utah from August 7-12, 1994. It was attended by nearly 100 scientists and engineers from more than a dozen countries representing academia, national laboratories, and industry. Two previous conferences on this topic were held at The Pennsylvania State University in 1974 and 1983. Therefore, the last major international conference focusing on the deformation of ceramic materials was held more than a decade ago. Since the early 1980s, ceramic materials have progressed through an evolutionary period of development and advancement. They are now under consideration for applications in engineering structures. The contents of the previous conferences indicate that considerable effort was directed towards a basic understanding of deformation processes in covalently bonded or simple oxide ceramics. However, now, more than a decade later, the focus has completely shifted. In particular, the...

  13. Low-voltage Electromagnetic Compaction of Metal and Ceramic Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Low-voltage electromagnetic compaction (EMC) was used to compact metal powders(Cu) and ceramic powders (TiO2) in the indirect way. It was found that the density of the metal powder parts compacted by low-voltage EMC varied linearly with the discharging voltage in the range investigated. But for ceramic powders, the discharging voltage has an optimal value. Under the value, the density increases as discharging voltage rises, but beyond the value the trend is reverse. The experimental results show that the density of the metal parts decreases gradually along press direction. And the density of the ceramic parts decreases with the advancement of the aspect ratio h/d (height/diameter). In addition, repetitive compaction can improve the density of both metal and ceramic parts and reduce the effects of aspect ratio on the density.

  14. Piezoelectric Ceramics and Their Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flinn, I.

    1975-01-01

    Describes the piezoelectric effect in ceramics and presents a quantitative representation of this effect. Explains the processes involved in the manufacture of piezoelectric ceramics, the materials used, and the situations in which they are applied. (GS)

  15. Cooled Ceramic Turbine Vane Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — N&R Engineering will investigate the feasibility of cooled ceramics, such as ceramic matrix composite (CMC) turbine blade concepts that can decrease specific...

  16. Experimental investigation on shrinkage and surface replication of injection moulded ceramic parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Islam, Aminul; Giannekas, Nikolaos; Marhöfer, David Maximilian;

    2014-01-01

    Ceramic moulded parts are increasingly being used in advanced components and devices due to their unprecedented material and performance attributes. The surface finish, replication quality and material shrinkage are of immense importance for moulded ceramic parts intended for precision applications....... The current paper presents a thorough investigation on the process of ceramic moulding where it systematically characterizes the surface replication and shrinkage behaviours of precision moulded ceramic components. The test parts are moulded from Catamold TZP-A which is Y2O3-stabilised ZrO2 having...

  17. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste. PMID:25188783

  18. Ceramic ware waste as coarse aggregate for structural concrete production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-González, Julia; Rodríguez-Robles, Desirée; Juan-Valdés, Andrés; Morán-Del Pozo, Julia M; Guerra-Romero, M Ignacio

    2015-01-01

    The manufacture of any kind of product inevitably entails the production of waste. The quantity of waste generated by the ceramic industry, a very important sector in Spain, is between 5% and 8% of the final output and it is therefore necessary to find an effective waste recovery method. The aim of the study reported in the present article was to seek a sustainable means of managing waste from the ceramic industry through the incorporation of this type of waste in the total replacement of conventional aggregate (gravel) used in structural concrete. Having verified that the recycled ceramic aggregates met all the technical requirements imposed by current Spanish legislation, established in the Code on Structural Concrete (EHE-08), then it is prepared a control concrete mix and the recycled concrete mix using 100% recycled ceramic aggregate instead of coarse natural aggregate. The concretes obtained were subjected to the appropriate tests in order to conduct a comparison of their mechanical properties. The results show that the concretes made using ceramic sanitary ware aggregate possessed the same mechanical properties as those made with conventional aggregate. It is therefore possible to conclude that the reuse of recycled ceramic aggregate to produce recycled concrete is a feasible alternative for the sustainable management of this waste.

  19. Mechanical properties of ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This book discusses the mechanical properties of ceramics and aims to provide both a solid background for undergraduate students, as well as serving as a text to bring practicing engineers up to date with the latest developments in this topic so they can use and apply these to their actual engineering work.  Generally, ceramics are made by moistening a mixture of clays, casting it into desired shapes and then firing it to a high temperature, a process known as 'vitrification'. The relatively late development of metallurgy was contingent on the availability of ceramics and the know-how to mold them into the appropriate forms. Because of the characteristics of ceramics, they offer great advantages over metals in specific applications in which hardness, wear resistance and chemical stability at high temperatures are essential. Clearly, modern ceramics manufacturing has come a long way from the early clay-processing fabrication method, and the last two decades have seen the development of sophisticated technique...

  20. OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

    2000-10-01

    This is the third quarterly report on oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes. In the following, the report describes the progress made by our university partners in Tasks 1 through 6, experimental apparatus that was designed and built for various tasks of this project, thermodynamic calculations, where applicable and work planned for the future. (Task 1) Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints. (Task 2) Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability. (Task 3) Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres. (Task 4) Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures. (Task 5) Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability. (Task 6) Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

  1. Diffusion in ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Pelleg, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    This textbook provides an introduction to changes that occur in solids such as ceramics, mainly at high temperatures, which are diffusion controlled, as well as presenting research data. Such changes are related to the kinetics of various reactions such as precipitation, oxidation and phase transformations, but are also related to some mechanical changes, such as creep. The book is composed of two parts, beginning with a look at the basics of diffusion according to Fick's Laws. Solutions of Fick’s second law for constant D, diffusion in grain boundaries and dislocations are presented along with a look at the atomistic approach for the random motion of atoms. In the second part, the author discusses diffusion in several technologically important ceramics. The ceramics selected are monolithic single phase ones, including: A12O3, SiC, MgO, ZrO2 and Si3N4. Of these, three refer to oxide ceramics (alumina, magnesia and zirconia). Carbide based ceramics are represented by the technologically very important Si-ca...

  2. Joining of advanced materials

    CERN Document Server

    Messler, Robert W

    1993-01-01

    Provides an unusually complete and readable compilation of the primary and secondary options for joining conventional materials in non-conventional ways. Provides unique coverage of adhesive bonding using both organic and inorganic adhesives, cements and mortars. Focuses on materials issues without ignoring issues related to joint design, production processing, quality assurance, process economics, and joining performance in service.Joining of advanced materials is a unique treatment of joining of both conventional and advanced metals andalloys, intermetallics, ceramics, glasses, polymers, a

  3. Assessment of ceramic membrane filters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.; Im, K.H. [and others

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this project include the development of analytical models for evaluating the fluid mechanics of membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters, and to determine the effects of thermal and thermo-chemical aging on the material properties of emerging ceramic hot gas filters. A honeycomb cordierite monolith with a thin ceramic coating and a rigid candle filter were evaluated.

  4. Alternative technical summary report for immobilized disposition in deep boreholes: Immobilized disposal of plutonium in coated ceramic pellets in grout without canisters, Version 4.0. Fissile materials disposition program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wijesinghe, A.M.

    1996-08-23

    This paper summarizes and compares the immobilized and direct borehole disposition alternatives previously presented in the alternative technical summary. The important design concepts, facility features and operational procedures are first briefly described. This is followed by a discussion of the issues that affect the evaluation of each alternative against the programmatic assessment criteria that have been established for selecting the preferred alternatives for plutonium disposition.

  5. Ceramic vane drive joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smale, Charles H. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A variable geometry gas turbine has an array of ceramic composition vanes positioned by an actuating ring coupled through a plurality of circumferentially spaced turbine vane levers to the outer end of a metallic vane drive shaft at each of the ceramic vanes. Each of the ceramic vanes has an end slot of bow tie configuration including flared end segments and a center slot therebetween. Each of the vane drive shafts has a cross head with ends thereof spaced with respect to the sides of the end slot to define clearance for free expansion of the cross head with respect to the vane and the cross head being configured to uniformly distribute drive loads across bearing surfaces of the vane slot.

  6. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 3D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  7. Improved Foreign Object Damage Performance for 2D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — As the power density of advanced engines increases, the need for new materials that are capable of higher operating temperatures, such as ceramic matrix composites...

  8. Supported microporous ceramic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

    1993-12-14

    A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

  9. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M Mohan; Gorin, Alexander [School of Engineering and Science, Curtin University of Technology, Sarawak (Malaysia); Abou-El-Hossein, K A, E-mail: mohan.m@curtin.edu.my [Mechanical and Aeronautical Department, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elegebeth, 6031 (South Africa)

    2011-02-15

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  10. Predictive Surface Roughness Model for End Milling of Machinable Glass Ceramic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ceramics of Machinable glass ceramic is attractive material to produce high accuracy miniaturized components for many applications in various industries such as aerospace, electronics, biomedical, automotive and environmental communications due to their wear resistance, high hardness, high compressive strength, good corrosion resistance and excellent high temperature properties. Many research works have been conducted in the last few years to investigate the performance of different machining operations when processing various advanced ceramics. Micro end-milling is one of the machining methods to meet the demand of micro parts. Selecting proper machining parameters are important to obtain good surface finish during machining of Machinable glass ceramic. Therefore, this paper describes the development of predictive model for the surface roughness of Machinable glass ceramic in terms of speed, feed rate by using micro end-milling operation.

  11. 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, second quarter 1994, April 1994--June 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NOx combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NOx reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NOx burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NOx reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters. Results are described.

  12. Development and characterization of Textron continuous fiber ceramic composite hot gas filter materials. Final report, September 30, 1994--October 31, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPietro, S.G.; Alvin, M.A.

    1997-12-31

    Uncertainties about the long-term ability of monolithic ceramics to survive in the IGCC or PFBC hot gas filter environment led DOE/METC to consider the merits of using continuous fiber reinforced ceramic composites (CFCCs) as potential next-generation high temperature filter elements. This seems to be a logical strategy to pursue in light of the fact that properly-engineered CFCC materials have shown much-improved damage tolerance and thermal shock behavior as compared to existing monolithic ceramic materials. Textron`s Advanced Hot Gas Filter Development Program was intended to be a two year, two phase program which transitioned developmental materials R and D into prototype filter element fabrication. The first phase was to demonstrate the technical feasibility of fabricating CFCC hot gas filter elements which could meet the pressure drop specifications of less than ten inches of water (iwg) at a face velocity of ten feet per minute (fpm), while showing sufficient integrity to survive normal mechanical loads and adequate environmental resistance to steam/alkali corrosion conditions at a temperature of approximately 870 C (1600 F). The primary objective of the second phase of the program was to scale up fabrication methods developed in Phase 1 to produce full-scale CFCC candle filters for validation testing. Textron encountered significant process-related and technical difficulties in merely meeting the program permeability specifications, and much effort was expended in showing that this could indeed be achieved. Thus, by the time the Phase 1 program was completed, expenditure of program funds precluded continuing on with Phase 2, and Textron elected to terminate their program after Phase 1. This allowed Textron to be able to focus technical and commercialization efforts on their largely successful DOE CFCC Program.

  13. Statistic><Ceramics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Flemming Tvede

    2008-01-01

    Co-organizer for and participant at the exhibition: Statistic><Ceramics The Röhsska Museum of Design and Decorative Arts; Gothenborg 5/2-16/3 2008 Museum fur Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg 3/4-27/4 2008...

  14. Proposal for an advanced heat source assembly for the Isotope Brayton Power System. Volume 1. Technical program and statement of work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-12-09

    The technical program plan for evaluating the performance and safety of a radioisotope-fueled Brayton power system for space vehicles is presented with schedules for evaluating heat source design and safety, for specifying power system requirements, and for the development and operation of a ground demonstration system. (LCL)

  15. Letter report on PCT/Monolith glass ceramic corrosion tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crawford, Charles L. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-09-24

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is collaborating with personnel from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to study advanced waste form glass ceramics for immobilization of waste from Used Nuclear Fuel (UNF) separations processes. The glass ceramic waste forms take advantage of both crystalline and glassy phases where ‘troublesome’ elements (e.g., low solubility in glass or very long-lived) partition to highly durable ceramic phases with the remainder of elements residing in the glassy phase. The ceramic phases are tailored to create certain minerals or unique crystalline structures that can host the radionuclides by binding them in their specific crystalline network while not adversely impacting the residual glass network (Crum et al., 2011). Glass ceramics have been demonstrated using a scaled melter test performed in a pilot scale (1/4 scale) cold crucible induction melter (CCIM) (Crum et al., 2014; Maio et al., 2015). This report summarizes recent results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving crucible fabrication and corrosion testing of glass ceramics using the Product Consistency Test (PCT). Preliminary results from both Phase I and Phase II bench scale tests involving statistically designed matrices have previously been reported (Crawford, 2013; Crawford, 2014).

  16. Testing and Characterizing of Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowden, Richard M.; Moore, Karren L.; Tortorelli, Pete F.; Lara-Curzio, Edgar

    1996-01-01

    Understanding interfacial microstructural evolution during environmental testing and use is critical to the development of stable continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC's) for their use in 'corrosive' environments. The use of advanced characterization techniques is required to track subtle microstructural changes. These techniques must be coordinated with other CFCC tasks to completely evaluate their interfacial behavior.

  17. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-06-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  18. Fluorescent Lamp Glass Waste Incorporation into Clay Ceramic: A Perfect Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Alline Sardinha Cordeiro; Vieira, Carlos Maurício Fontes; Rodriguez, Rubén Jesus Sanchez; Monteiro, Sergio Neves; Candido, Veronica Scarpini; Ferreira, Carlos Luiz

    2016-09-01

    The mandatory use of fluorescent lamps as part of a Brazilian energy-saving program generates a huge number of spent fluorescent lamps (SFLs). After operational life, SFLs cannot be disposed as common garbage owing to mercury and lead contamination. Recycling methods separate contaminated glass tubes and promote cleaning for reuse. In this work, glass from decontaminated SFLs was incorporated into clay ceramics, not only as an environmental solution for such glass wastes and clay mining reduction but also due to technical and economical advantages. Up to 30 wt.% of incorporation, a significant improvement in fired ceramic flexural strength and a decrease in water absorption was observed. A prospective analysis showed clay ceramic incorporation as an environmentally correct and technical alternative for recycling the enormous amount of SFLs disposed of in Brazil. This could also be a solution for other world clay ceramic producers, such as US, China and some European countries.

  19. Ceramic tubesheet design analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallett, R.H.; Swindeman, R.W.

    1996-06-01

    A transport combustor is being commissioned at the Southern Services facility in Wilsonville, Alabama to provide a gaseous product for the assessment of hot-gas filtering systems. One of the barrier filters incorporates a ceramic tubesheet to support candle filters. The ceramic tubesheet, designed and manufactured by Industrial Filter and Pump Manufacturing Company (EF&PM), is unique and offers distinct advantages over metallic systems in terms of density, resistance to corrosion, and resistance to creep at operating temperatures above 815{degrees}C (1500{degrees}F). Nevertheless, the operational requirements of the ceramic tubesheet are severe. The tubesheet is almost 1.5 m in (55 in.) in diameter, has many penetrations, and must support the weight of the ceramic filters, coal ash accumulation, and a pressure drop (one atmosphere). Further, thermal stresses related to steady state and transient conditions will occur. To gain a better understanding of the structural performance limitations, a contract was placed with Mallett Technology, Inc. to perform a thermal and structural analysis of the tubesheet design. The design analysis specification and a preliminary design analysis were completed in the early part of 1995. The analyses indicated that modifications to the design were necessary to reduce thermal stress, and it was necessary to complete the redesign before the final thermal/mechanical analysis could be undertaken. The preliminary analysis identified the need to confirm that the physical and mechanical properties data used in the design were representative of the material in the tubesheet. Subsequently, few exploratory tests were performed at ORNL to evaluate the ceramic structural material.

  20. Ceramic Laser Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soules, T F; Clapsaddle, B J; Landingham, R L; Schaffers, K I

    2005-02-15

    Transparent ceramic materials have several major advantages over single crystals in laser applications, not the least of which is the ability to make large aperture parts in a robust manufacturing process. After more than a decade of working on making transparent YAG:Nd, Japanese workers have recently succeeded in demonstrating samples that performed as laser gain media as well as their single crystal counterparts. Since then several laser materials have been made and evaluated. For these reasons, developing ceramic laser materials is the most exciting and futuristic materials topic in today's major solid-state laser conferences. We have established a good working relationship with Konoshima Ltd., the Japanese producer of the best ceramic laser materials, and have procured and evaluated slabs designed by us for use in our high-powered SSHCL. Our measurements indicate that these materials will work in the SSHCL, and we have nearly completed retrofitting the SSHCL with four of the largest transparent ceramic YAG:Nd slabs in existence. We have also begun our own effort to make this material and have produced samples with various degrees of transparency/translucency. We are in the process of carrying out an extensive design-of-experiments to establish the significant process variables for making transparent YAG. Finally because transparent ceramics afford much greater flexibility in the design of lasers, we have been exploring the potential for much larger apertures, new materials, for example for the Mercury laser, other designs for SSHL, such as, edge pumping designs, slabs with built in ASE suppression, etc. This work has just beginning.

  1. Advanced Design of a Novel Stellarator Using the Free Boundary VMEC Magnetic Equilibrium Code. Final Technical Report for period March 1, 1999 - February 28, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the goals and accomplishments of a 3-year EPSCoR Laboratory Partnership award to design an advanced stellarator device for magnetic confinement of toroidal plasmas for fusion research

  2. (Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center): Quarterly technical progress report for the period ending June 30, 1987. [Advanced Coal Research and Technology Development Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1988-02-01

    Research programs on coal and coal liquefaction are presented. Topics discussed are: coal science, combustion, kinetics, surface science; advanced technology projects in liquefaction; two stage liquefaction and direct liquefaction; catalysts of liquefaction; Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and thermodynamics; alternative fuels utilization; coal preparation; biodegradation; advanced combustion technology; flue gas cleanup; environmental coordination, and technology transfer. Individual projects are processed separately for the data base. (CBS)

  3. Evolution to photovoltaic ceramics; Evolucion hacia la ceramica fotovoltaica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Munoz, L.

    2011-07-01

    Nowadays there are two types of ceramic materials, i.e. traditional and advanced. The origin and development of the first one occurred before the revolutionary changes in Science and Technology of the nineteenth century, while the second one is its direct consequence. The traditional ceramics, which are related primarily to elementary human needs, in particular its constructions, is very homogeneous with respect to their formulations, being their diversity mainly linked to the decorative aspects of one surface. Advanced ceramics are characterized by a wide variety of materials with specific physical and chemical responses to radiation and electromagnetic fields, where major economic benefits are mainly related to secondary human needs such as telecommunications. As a result of the current global crisis, traditional buildings could be rehabilitated and/or replaced by energy efficient buildings, also called zero-energy buildings. In them there is a balance between energy consumed and produced in situ, and also using environmentally friendly materials. The direct consequence of this trend will be the evolution of ceramics by partial hybridization of its two ancestors, with special importance of semiconductor compounds, to the production of electrical energy as the basic objective, in this work called photovoltaic ceramics. (Author) 45 refs.

  4. CATV Technical Papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Cable Television Association, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Complete technical papers of the 1977 National Cable Television Association Convention are included in this report. Twenty-two of 32 papers and two abstracts cover the topics of advanced cable television techniques, human reactions to television picture impairment, special displays and services, protection from theft of service, everyday…

  5. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battles, J.E.; Myles, K.M.; Laidler, J.J.; Green, D.W.

    1993-06-01

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO{sub 2} in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel` ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL).

  6. Chemical Technology Division annual technical report, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this period, CMT conducted research and development in the following areas: (1) electrochemical technology, including advanced batteries and fuel cells; (2) technology for fluidized-bed combustion and coal-fired magnetohydrodynamics; (3) methods for treatment of hazardous waste, mixed hazardous/radioactive waste, and municipal solid waste; (4) the reaction of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel under conditions expected for an unsaturated repository; (5) processes for separating and recovering transuranic elements from nuclear waste streams, treating water contaminated with volatile organics, and concentrating radioactive waste streams; (6) recovery processes for discharged fuel and the uranium blanket in the Integral Fast Reactor (EFR); (7) processes for removal of actinides in spent fuel from commercial water-cooled nuclear reactors and burnup in IFRs; and (8) physical chemistry of selected materials (corium; Fe-U-Zr, tritium in LiAlO2 in environments simulating those of fission and fusion energy systems. The Division also conducts basic research in catalytic chemistry associated with molecular energy resources and novel' ceramic precursors; materials chemistry of superconducting oxides, electrified metal/solution interfaces, and molecular sieve structures; and the geochemical processes involved in water-rock interactions occurring in active hydrothermal systems. In addition, the Analytical Chemistry Laboratory in CMT provides a broad range of analytical chemistry support services to the technical programs at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

  7. Integrally cored ceramic investment casting mold fabricated by ceramic stereolithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Chang-Jun

    Superalloy airfoils are produced by investment casting (IC), which uses ceramic cores and wax patterns with ceramic shell molds. Hollow cored superalloy airfoils in a gas turbine engine are an example of complex IC parts. The complex internal hollow cavities of the airfoil are designed to conduct cooling air through one or more passageways. These complex internal passageways have been fabricated by a lost wax process requiring several processing steps; core preparation, injection molding for wax pattern, and dipping process for ceramic shell molds. Several steps generate problems such as high cost and decreased accuracy of the ceramic mold. For example, costly tooling and production delay are required to produce mold dies for complex cores and wax patterns used in injection molding, resulting in a big obstacle for prototypes and smaller production runs. Rather than using separate cores, patterns, and shell molds, it would be advantageous to directly produce a mold that has the casting cavity and the ceramic core by one process. Ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA) can be used to directly fabricate the integrally cored ceramic casting mold (ICCM). CerSLA builds ceramic green objects from CAD files from many thin liquid layers of powder in monomer, which are solidified by polymerization with a UV laser, thereby "writing" the design for each slice. This dissertation addresses the integrally cored casting ceramic mold (ICCM), the ceramic core with a ceramic mold shell in a single patternless construction, fabricated by ceramic stereolithography (CerSLA). CerSLA is considered as an alternative method to replace lost wax processes, for small production runs or designs too complex for conventional cores and patterns. The main topic is the development of methods to successfully fabricate an ICCM by CerSLA from refractory silica, as well as related issues. The related issues are the segregation of coarse fused silica powders in a layer, the degree of segregation parameter to

  8. Grain boundaries in ceramics and ceramic-metal interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clarke, D.R.; Wolf, D.

    1986-01-01

    Three interfaces exist: the crystal-crystal grain boundary in very pure single-phase ceramics, the crystal-glass-crystal grain boundary in most single-phase and polyphase ceramics, and the ceramic-metal interface. It is needed to correlate their structure and adhesion/failure. Methods for studying the bonding, interfacial structure, and fracture and adhesion are discussed, and recommendations are given. 42 refs. (DLC)

  9. Ceramic Stereolithography: Additive Manufacturing for Ceramics by Photopolymerization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halloran, John W.

    2016-07-01

    Ceramic stereolithography and related additive manufacturing methods involving photopolymerization of ceramic powder suspensions are reviewed in terms of the capabilities of current devices. The practical fundamentals of the cure depth, cure width, and cure profile are related to the optical properties of the monomer, ceramic, and photo-active components. Postpolymerization steps, including harvesting and cleaning the objects, binder burnout, and sintering, are discussed and compared with conventional methods. The prospects for practical manufacturing are discussed.

  10. Technical advances with newer aortic endografts provide additional support to withhold the early endovascular repair of small abdominal aortic aneurysms until it is really needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakarakos, Efstratios; Georgiadis, George S; Nikolopoulos, Evagelos; Trellopoulos, George; Kapoulas, Konstantinos; Lazarides, Miltos

    2012-07-01

    The idea of early endovascular aortic repair (EVAR) of "small" abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) has gained attention over "watchful waiting," mostly due to the concern for losing the anatomic suitability for endovascular repair over time. Generally, small AAAs have longer, smaller, less angulated necks, and less tortuous iliac arteries than larger ones. Though the borderline anatomic characteristics were assumed to be contraindications for older generation endografts, the modifications of modern devices seem promising to overcome those limitations, in order to treat the small AAAs when reaching the 5.5 cm threshold. Moreover, early endovascular intervention has been proven neither cost effective nor beneficial for the patients' quality of life. This article evaluates the technical progress that could overcome the difficulties of those small AAAs that present technically demanding anatomies, thus advocating endovascular intervention when they reach the diameter threshold. PMID:22589239

  11. Technical Shibboleths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, John S.

    1998-01-01

    Focuses on technical sub-languages to reveal sociological functions of language that transcend mere transfer of substantive information. Finds one sociological feature, the shibboleth, acting widely throughout technical fields. (PA)

  12. Status of plutonium ceramic immobilization processes and immobilization forms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ebbinghaus, B.B.; Van Konynenburg, R.A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Vance, E.R.; Jostsons, A. [Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization, Menai (Australia)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Immobilization in a ceramic followed by permanent emplacement in a repository or borehole is one of the alternatives currently being considered by the Fissile Materials Disposition Program for the ultimate disposal of excess weapons-grade plutonium. To make Pu recovery more difficult, radioactive cesium may also be incorporated into the immobilization form. Valuable data are already available for ceramics form R&D efforts to immobilize high-level and mixed wastes. Ceramics have a high capacity for actinides, cesium, and some neutron absorbers. A unique characteristic of ceramics is the existence of mineral analogues found in nature that have demonstrated actinide immobilization over geologic time periods. The ceramic form currently being considered for plutonium disposition is a synthetic rock (SYNROC) material composed primarily of zirconolite (CaZrTi{sub 2}O{sub 7}), the desired actinide host phase, with lesser amounts of hollandite (BaAl{sub 2}Ti{sub 6}O{sub 16}) and rutile (TiO{sub 2}). Alternative actinide host phases are also being considered. These include pyrochlore (Gd{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7}), zircon (ZrSiO{sub 4}), and monazite (CePO{sub 4}), to name a few of the most promising. R&D activities to address important technical issues are discussed. Primarily these include moderate scale hot press fabrications with plutonium, direct loading of PuO{sub 2} powder, cold press and sinter fabrication methods, and immobilization form formulation issues.

  13. Using rice straw to manufacture ceramic bricks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorbunov German Ivanovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the co-authors offer their advanced and efficient methodologies for the recycling of the rice straw, as well as the novel approaches to the ceramic brick quality improvement through the application of the rice straw as the combustible additive and through the formation of amorphous silica in the course of the rice straw combustion. The co-authors provide characteristics of the raw materials, production techniques used to manufacture ceramic bricks, and their basic properties in the article. The co-authors describe the simulated process of formation of amorphous silica. The process in question has two independent steps (or options: 1 rice straw combustion and ash formation outside the oven (in the oxidizing medium, and further application of ash as the additive in the process of burning clay mixtures; 2 adding pre-treated rice straw as the combustible additive into the clay mixture, and its further burning in compliance with the pre-set temperature mode. The findings have proven that the most rational pre-requisite of the rice straw application in the manufacturing of ceramic bricks consists in feeding milled straw into the clay mixture to be followed by molding, drying and burning. Brick samples are highly porous, and they also demonstrate sufficient compressive strength. The co-authors have also identified optimal values of rice straw and ash content in the mixtures under research.

  14. CRYSTALLINE CERAMIC WASTE FORMS: REFERENCE FORMULATION REPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, K.; Fox, K.; Marra, J.

    2012-05-15

    The research conducted in this work package is aimed at taking advantage of the long term thermodynamic stability of crystalline ceramics to create more durable waste forms (as compared to high level waste glass) in order to reduce the reliance on engineered and natural barrier systems. Durable ceramic waste forms that incorporate a wide range of radionuclides have the potential to broaden the available disposal options and to lower the storage and disposal costs associated with advanced fuel cycles. Assemblages of several titanate phases have been successfully demonstrated to incorporate radioactive waste elements, and the multiphase nature of these materials allows them to accommodate variation in the waste composition. Recent work has shown that they can be successfully produced from a melting and crystallization process. The objective of this report is to explain the design of ceramic host systems culminating in a reference ceramic formulation for use in subsequent studies on process optimization and melt property data assessment in support of FY13 melter demonstration testing. The waste stream used as the basis for the development and testing is a combination of the projected Cs/Sr separated stream, the Trivalent Actinide - Lanthanide Separation by Phosphorous reagent Extraction from Aqueous Komplexes (TALSPEAK) waste stream consisting of lanthanide fission products, the transition metal fission product waste stream resulting from the transuranic extraction (TRUEX) process, and a high molybdenum concentration with relatively low noble metal concentrations. In addition to the combined CS/LN/TM High Mo waste stream, variants without Mo and without Mo and Zr were also evaluated. Based on the results of fabricating and characterizing several simulated ceramic waste forms, two reference ceramic waste form compositions are recommended in this report. The first composition targets the CS/LN/TM combined waste stream with and without Mo. The second composition targets

  15. Ceramic Technology Project, semiannual progress report for October 1993 through March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1994-09-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Conservation and Renewable Energy. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. An assessment of needs was completed, and a five-year project plan was developed with extensive input from private industry. In July 1990, the original plan was updated through the estimated completion of development in 1993. The original objective of the project was to develop the industrial technology base required for reliable ceramics for application in advanced automotive heat engines. During the course of the Ceramic Technology Project, remarkable progress has been made in the development of reliable structural ceramics. The direction of the Ceramic Technology Project is now shifting toward reducing the cost of ceramics to facilitate commercial introduction of ceramic components for near-term engine applications. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned.

  16. 粉末表面涂层陶瓷的硬质合金刀具材料%Advanced Cutting Tool Material by Hot-Pressing Ceramic Coated Carbide Powders

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈元春; 黄传真; 艾兴; 王宝友

    2000-01-01

    Carbide powders were coated with very thin alumina films by the sol-gel process. The coated powders were then hot-pressed as a novel cutting tool material. This material possessed relatively high hardness, which led to similar wear resistant ability with ceramics. At the same time, its bending strength and toughness were higher than that of the ceramic cutting tool materials with similar composition. As a result, these tools show good performance in cutting high-hardness materials. SEM and TEM photographs of coated powders and fracture surface were presented as an aid to illustrate the strengthen mechanism.%使用溶胶-凝胶法在硬质合金粉末表面涂覆了一层氧化铝陶瓷,涂层粉末经热压烧结后, 制得一种新型的涂层刀具材料. 这种刀具材料的耐磨性与陶瓷材料接近,并且具有较高的强度和韧性,在切削高硬度材料时表现出良好性能,具有广阔的应用前景.

  17. Ceramic Composite Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoff, Rodney S. (Inventor); Stankovich, Sasha (Inventor); Dikin, Dmitriy A. (Inventor); Nguyen, SonBinh T. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A ceramic composite thin film or layer includes individual graphene oxide and/or electrically conductive graphene sheets dispersed in a ceramic (e.g. silica) matrix. The thin film or layer can be electrically conductive film or layer depending the amount of graphene sheets present. The composite films or layers are transparent, chemically inert and compatible with both glass and hydrophilic SiOx/silicon substrates. The composite film or layer can be produced by making a suspension of graphene oxide sheet fragments, introducing a silica-precursor or silica to the suspension to form a sol, depositing the sol on a substrate as thin film or layer, at least partially reducing the graphene oxide sheets to conductive graphene sheets, and thermally consolidating the thin film or layer to form a silica matrix in which the graphene oxide and/or graphene sheets are dispersed.

  18. Tailored Ceramics for Laser Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollingsworth, Joel [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2007-12-10

    Transparent ceramics match or exceed the performance of single-crystal materials in laser applications, with a more-robust fabrication process. Controlling the distribution of optical dopants in transparent ceramics would allow qualitative improvements in amplifier slab design by allowing gain and loss to be varied within the material. My work aims to achieve a controlled pattern or gradient of dopant prior to sintering, in order to produce tailored ceramics.

  19. Ceramic cooling tower packings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Honekamp, H.; Katzmann, A.

    1986-05-01

    No material for cooling tower packings demonstrates all the characteristics desired by the designer. The choice of a specific material must therefore always be oriented towards the limiting conditions of a specific project. Resistance to frost, combustibility and resistance to ageing may, for example, be determining requirements. Ceramic stones will find further possibilities of application in the near future due to their almost unlimited durability.

  20. Rheology of Superplastic Ceramics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Constitutive equation of rheglogy describing a phenomenological level of superplastic deformation as functional correlation between tensor components of stress and strain rate has been analyzed for the case of superplastic ceramic flow. Rheological properties of material are taken into account by means of scalar rheological coefficients of shear and volume viscosity, which are functions of temperature, effective stress (or strain rate) and density of material.

  1. Laser Micromachining of Ceramics

    OpenAIRE

    Sciti, Diletta; Bellosi, Alida

    2011-01-01

    Laser surface processing of ceramics is an area of considerable technological importance for several structural, tribological, optical and electronic applications. The laser beam behaves as a heat source that induces a temperature rise on the surface and within the bulk of the material. Depending on laser parameters and material characteristics, lasers can be used for fabricating microholes at designated locations, for cutting, scribing, for surface modifications In this work different types ...

  2. Ceramic stationary gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roode, M. van [Solar Turbines Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The performance of current industrial gas turbines is limited by the temperature and strength capabilities of the metallic structural materials in the engine hot section. Because of their superior high-temperature strength and durability, ceramics can be used as structural materials for hot section components (blades, nozzles, combustor liners) in innovative designs at increased turbine firing temperatures. The benefits include the ability to increase the turbine inlet temperature (TIT) to about 1200{degrees}C ({approx}2200{degrees}F) or more with uncooled ceramics. It has been projected that fully optimized stationary gas turbines would have a {approx}20 percent gain in thermal efficiency and {approx}40 percent gain in output power in simple cycle compared to all metal-engines with air-cooled components. Annual fuel savings in cogeneration in the U.S. would be on the order of 0.2 Quad by 2010. Emissions reductions to under 10 ppmv NO{sub x} are also forecast. This paper describes the progress on a three-phase, 6-year program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, to achieve significant performance improvements and emissions reductions in stationary gas turbines by replacing metallic hot section components with ceramic parts. Progress is being reported for the period September 1, 1994, through September 30, 1995.

  3. Preparation of glass-ceramic materials from granitic rocks waste

    OpenAIRE

    Gamal A. Khater

    2012-01-01

    Crystallisation of glasses based on the diopside-anorthite eutectic system, containing increased amount (10–50 wt.%) of wollastonite based on granite quarries waste, was investigated for the preparation of cheap technical glass-ceramic materials. Granite quarries waste consisted of about 52 wt.% of the batch constituents depending on composition. The granite quarries waste composition was sometimes modified by adding other ingredients such as dolomite, limestone and Al2O3. Batches were melted...

  4. The technical feasibility of an image-guided intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) to perform a hypofractionated schedule in terms of toxicity and local control for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the technical feasibility of an image-guided intensity modulated radiotherapy (IG-IMRT) using involved-field technique to perform a hypofractionated schedule for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer. From May 2009 to November 2011, 12 patients with locally advanced or locally recurrent pancreatic cancer received hypofractionated CCRT using TomoTherapy Hi-Art with concurrent and sequential chemotherapy at Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, the Catholic University of Korea. The total dose delivered was 45 Gy in 15 fractions or 50 Gy in 20 fractions. The target volume did not include the uninvolved regional lymph nodes. Treatment planning and delivery were performed using the IG-IMRT technique. The follow-up duration was a median of 31.1 months (range: 5.7-36.3 months). Grade 2 or worse acute toxicities developed in 7 patients (58%). Grade 3 or worse gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicity occurred in 0% and 17% of patients, respectively. In the response evaluation, the rates of partial response and stable disease were 58% and 42%, respectively. The rate of local failure was 8% and no regional failure was observed. Distant failure was the main cause of treatment failure. The progression-free survival and overall survival durations were 7.6 and 12.1 months, respectively. The involved-field technique and IG-IMRT delivered via a hypofractionated schedule are feasible for patients with locally advanced or recurrent pancreatic cancer

  5. Ceramic membrane separation technique for washing nano-sized ceramic powder precursors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Dong; Xingqin Liu; Tianshu Zhang

    2011-01-01

    Washing using ceramic micro-filtration membranes was studied in the preparation of nano-sized TiO2 and Al203 powder precursors obtained by wet chemical methods.The key parameters for the washing process,such as operation pressure,cross-flow velocity,and slurry concentration,were examined and optimized.The shape and size of particles influenced the structure of the filter cake,leading to different permeation flux for different systems.The results demonstrated that washing using ceramic membranes is superior to the traditional plate-and-frame filtration and could be considered an advanced technique for ultra-fine powder preparation by wet-chemical method.

  6. Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filippone, Antonino

    1999-01-01

    "Advanced Topics in Aerodynamics" is a comprehensive electronic guide to aerodynamics,computational fluid dynamics, aeronautics, aerospace propulsion systems, design and relatedtechnology. We report data, tables, graphics, sketches,examples, results, photos, technical andscientific literature, for...

  7. Dose Evaluation of Pyroprocess Ceramic Waste disposal system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kook, Dong Hak; Cho, Dong Keun; Lee, Jong Youl; Lee, Min Soo; Choi, Heui Joo [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    As the management problem of PWR spent fuel is becoming an hot issue, recycling of PWR spent fuel with Pyroprocess has been researched actively. After Pyroprocess is finished, new types of wastes should be produced inevitably which have very unique characteristics distinguishable from spent fuel. This report has performed the dose calculation in order to investigate the radiological safety of ceramic waste disposal system preliminarily which is one of the radioactive waste produced by Pyroprocess. This research performed the modeling of ceramic waste block, waste can, disposal canister, and disposal system in detail. Dose calculations for each system components has been fulfilled and finally absorbed dose for engineering barrier, bentonite buffer, has been evaluated. Calculation result showed the absorbed dose value is very lower than the standard limits which advanced countries for disposal research have suggested. Eventually, radiological safety for Pyroprocess ceramic waste disposal system is very high

  8. Simulation of Droplet Formation, Ejection, Spread, and Preliminary Designof Nozzle for Direct Ceramic Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Venumadhav Reddy

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in drop-on-demand (DOD-type inkjet printing techniques have increasedresearch activities in the area of direct ceramic inkjet printing. In an attempt to develop a ceramicinkjet printer for the manufacture of ceramic components with their sizes in micro scale, theformation of ceramic ink droplet (ethyl alcohol loaded with different volume fractions of aluminaparticles and its spread from a reservoir using piezoelectric actuation are simulated. The propertiesof the ceramic ink are taken from the data reported in literature. The simulations were performedwith computational fluid dynamics software (CFD-ACE+, CFDRC. This study gives details ofthe interaction among different physical phenomena that contribute to the droplet formation andejection process. The results from this study are being used for a preliminary design of nozzleand for the preparation of ceramic inks to achieve the desired droplet characteristics.

  9. Biomechanical behavior of a cemented ceramic knee replacement under worst case scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluess, D.; Mittelmeier, W.; Bader, R.

    2010-03-01

    In connection with technological advances in the manufacturing of medical ceramics, a newly developed ceramic femoral component was introduced in total knee arthroplasty (TKA). The motivation to consider ceramics in TKA is based on the allergological and tribological benefits as proven in total hip arthroplasty. Owing to the brittleness and reduced fracture toughness of ceramic materials, the biomechanical performance has to be examined intensely. Apart from standard testing, we calculated the implant performance under different worst case scenarios including malposition, bone defects and stumbling. A finite-element-model was developed to calculate the implant performance in situ. The worst case conditions revealed principal stresses 12.6 times higher during stumbling than during normal gait. Nevertheless, none of the calculated principal stress amounts were above the critical strength of the ceramic material used. The analysis of malposition showed the necessity of exact alignment of the implant components.

  10. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 15, April 15 1996--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-19

    The Pittsburgh Energy Technology center of the US Department of Energy (DOE) has contracted with Combustion Engineering; Inc. (ABB CE) to perform work on the {open_quotes}Engineering Development of Advanced Coal-Fired Low-Emission Boiler Systems{close_quote} Project and has authorized ABB CE to complete Phase I on a cost-reimbursable basis and Phases II and III on a cost-share basis.

  11. Improved Tensile Test for Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osiecki, R. A.

    1982-01-01

    For almost-nondestructive tensile testing of ceramics, steel rod is bonded to sample of ceramic. Assembly is then pulled apart in conventional tensile-test machine. Test destroys only shallow surface layer which can be machined away making specimen ready for other uses. Method should be useful as manufacturing inspection procedure for low-strength brittle materials.

  12. Ceramics in nuclear waste management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikalla, T D; Mendel, J E [eds.

    1979-05-01

    Seventy-three papers are included, arranged under the following section headings: national programs for the disposal of radioactive wastes, waste from stability and characterization, glass processing, ceramic processing, ceramic and glass processing, leaching of waste materials, properties of nuclear waste forms, and immobilization of special radioactive wastes. Separate abstracts were prepared for all the papers. (DLC)

  13. Lightweight high performance ceramic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Stephen D [Knoxville, TN

    2008-09-02

    A sintered ceramic composition includes at least 50 wt. % boron carbide and at least 0.01 wt. % of at least one element selected from the group consisting of Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, and Lu, the sintered ceramic composition being characterized by a density of at least 90% of theoretical density.

  14. Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of All-Ceramic Single Tooth Implant Reconstructions Using Modified Zirconia Abutments: Radiographic and Prosthetic Results at 1 Year of Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Thoma, Daniel S.; Brandenberg, Francine; Fehmer, Vincent; Büchi, Dominik L.E.; Hämmerle, Christoph H.F.; Sailer, Irena

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to test whether or not veneering of the submucosal part of zirconia abutments with pink dental ceramic affects radiographic and technical outcomes of implant-supported single crowns (ISSC).

  15. Proof test of hybrid shrink fits with ceramic hub

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced ceramic machine components are required in many applications because of their specific material properties like high hardness, resistance to chemicals, corrosion and wear, low specific weight etc. The most suitable shaft-hub connection to ceramics is an interference fit assembly because it is free of geometrical notches and transmission of forces takes place in a large area. Such a shrink fit is rated for endurance strength when the stress intensity factor is below the specific value KI0 where no crack growth occurs. The total component suddenly fails, when the stress intensity factor exceeds the KIC value. The load to the press fit during the joining process, caused by the interference of the assembly, could be regulated by ambient conditions. In case of undetected material defects or microcracks in the ceramic and if the stress intensity is below KIC, the ceramic will not fail but a crack could grow. Thus, the joining process only seems to be a proof test. When the load during operation leads to a stress intensity that remains higher than KI0 the crack grows until the whole ceramic component fails. This effect was verified in tests at the Institute for Engineering Design and Industrial Design.

  16. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an air to cloth ratio'') for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  17. Ceramic filters for removal of particulates from hot gas streams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldsmith, R.L.

    1992-11-01

    The primary goal is to demonstrate the performance of a new ceramic filter in removing particulate matter from hot gas streams produced in advanced coal conversion processes. The specific objectives are threefold: (1) Development of full size ceramic filters suitable for hot gas filtration; (2) Demonstration of ceramic filters in long term (ca. 1000 hrs) field trials; and (3) Development of full-scale hot gas filter system designs and costs. To date, field tests of the ceramic filter for particulate removal have been conducted at seven sites on a variety of gas streams and under a variety of test conditions. In general, the following performance characteristics have been observed: 1. Filtration face velocity (equivalent to an ``air to cloth ratio``) for flue gas tests is comparable to that for pulse jet bags operating at the same pressure drop. In hot gas tests, flow-pressure drop characteristics have been observed to be comparable to those for other ceramic filters. 2. Complete regeneration by a simple backpulse technique is achieved; i.e., no increase in clean filter resistance over repetitive cycles is observed. 3. No plugging of the filter passageways by badly caking particulates is observed. 4. Essentially complete particulate removal, including submicron particulate matter, is achieved.

  18. Proof test of hybrid shrink fits with ceramic hub

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, M.; Binz, H.

    2011-10-01

    Advanced ceramic machine components are required in many applications because of their specific material properties like high hardness, resistance to chemicals, corrosion and wear, low specific weight etc. The most suitable shaft-hub connection to ceramics is an interference fit assembly because it is free of geometrical notches and transmission of forces takes place in a large area. Such a shrink fit is rated for endurance strength when the stress intensity factor is below the specific value KI0 where no crack growth occurs. The total component suddenly fails, when the stress intensity factor exceeds the KIC value. The load to the press fit during the joining process, caused by the interference of the assembly, could be regulated by ambient conditions. In case of undetected material defects or microcracks in the ceramic and if the stress intensity is below KIC, the ceramic will not fail but a crack could grow. Thus, the joining process only seems to be a proof test. When the load during operation leads to a stress intensity that remains higher than KI0 the crack grows until the whole ceramic component fails. This effect was verified in tests at the Institute for Engineering Design and Industrial Design.

  19. Proof test of hybrid shrink fits with ceramic hub

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M; Binz, H, E-mail: markus.wagner@iktd.uni-stuttgart.de [Institute for Engineering Design and Industrial Design, University of Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-10-29

    Advanced ceramic machine components are required in many applications because of their specific material properties like high hardness, resistance to chemicals, corrosion and wear, low specific weight etc. The most suitable shaft-hub connection to ceramics is an interference fit assembly because it is free of geometrical notches and transmission of forces takes place in a large area. Such a shrink fit is rated for endurance strength when the stress intensity factor is below the specific value K{sub I0} where no crack growth occurs. The total component suddenly fails, when the stress intensity factor exceeds the K{sub IC} value. The load to the press fit during the joining process, caused by the interference of the assembly, could be regulated by ambient conditions. In case of undetected material defects or microcracks in the ceramic and if the stress intensity is below K{sub IC}, the ceramic will not fail but a crack could grow. Thus, the joining process only seems to be a proof test. When the load during operation leads to a stress intensity that remains higher than K{sub I0} the crack grows until the whole ceramic component fails. This effect was verified in tests at the Institute for Engineering Design and Industrial Design.

  20. FILTER COMPONENT ASSESSMENT--CERAMIC CANDLES--

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.A. Alvin

    2004-04-23

    Efforts at Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SWPC) have been focused on development of hot gas filter systems as an enabling technology for advanced coal and biomass-based gas turbine power generation applications. SWPC has been actively involved in the development of advanced filter materials and component configuration, has participated in numerous surveillance programs characterizing the material properties and microstructure of field tested filter elements, and has undertaken extended, accelerated filter life testing programs. This report summarizes the results of SWPC's filter component assessment efforts, identifying the performance and stability of porous monolithic, fiber reinforced, and filament wound ceramic hot gas candle filters, potentially for {ge}3 years of viable pressurized fluidized-bed combustion (PFBC) service operating life.

  1. Absorber materials, control rods and designs of shutdown systems for advanced liquid metal fast reactors. Proceeding of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirty-five specialists from France, Germany, India, Japan, the Republic of Kazakhsan, the Russian Federation and the Republic of Georgia (observer) attended the meeting. The meeting had seven sessions. The main topics of discussions were: Status of control rod designs for fast reactors and experience with operation; properties and behaviour of absorber materials for control rods; results of post-irradiation examination of absorber materials, and mechanisms affecting their properties and behaviour; design of a backup reactivity shutdown system utilizing passive mechanisms: Curie point electromagnetic mechanism; enhancement of thermal expansion of absorber rdo drive lines; hydraulically suspended control rods; gas expansion modules in the core; and the possibility of optimizing the reactivity coefficients and the efficiency of Pu burning by using absorber and moderator materials in the core. A total of 23 papers were presented, and a technical tour of the IPPE also took place. Refs, figs, tabs

  2. Advanced development of fine coal desulfurization and recovery technology. Quarterly technical progress report, October 1, 1976--December 31, 1976. [53 references

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, R.W.; Wheelock, T.D.

    1977-02-01

    The improvement and technical development of promising methods for desulfurizing and recovering fine coal underway includes froth flotation, selective oil agglomeration, pelletization, and a chemical desulfurization process which involves leaching fine coal with a hot dilute solution of sodium carbonate containing dissolved oxygen under pressure. A preliminary assessment of the state of the art and review of the technical literature has been made. Equipment and apparatus have been assembled for small-scale laboratory experiments in froth flotation, oil agglomeration and chemical desulfurization. Preliminary froth flotation tests have been carried out on an Iowa coal to establish baseline data. Quite unexpectedly these tests indicated that aluminum nitrate may be an activator for coal because it served to increase the recovery of coal. Several potential flotation depressants for pyrite have been screened by measurement at the zeta potential and floatability of pyrite or coal in aqueous suspensions containing the potential depressants. The following reagents show some promise as pyrite depressants: ferric chloride, sodium cyanide, ammonium thiocyanate, and the disodium salt of ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Preliminary plans have been prepared for a continuous flow bench-scale system to demonstrate the process. This system will include equipment for grinding and pretreating the coal as well as equipment for demonstrating froth flotation, selective oil agglomeration and pelletization. An investigation of coal microstructure as it relates to coal beneficiation methods has also been initiated. The distribution of various forms of pyrite by size and crystal structure has been determined for two cannel samples of coal through application of scanning electron microscope techniques.

  3. Low thermal expansion glass ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    1995-01-01

    This book is one of a series reporting on international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies With the series, Schott aims to provide an overview of its activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide where glasses and glass ceramics are of interest Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated This volume describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization Thus glass ceramics with thermal c...

  4. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Quarterly technical status report, January--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-14

    The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

  5. Fast Measurements Of Thermal Diffusivities Of Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marnell; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature rises of samples compared with reference sample. Apparatus quickly measures thermal diffusivities of ceramics at high temperatures. Produces data on relative thermal diffusivities of as many as six ceramic specimens per hour. Thermal-diffusivity tester makes it easy to determine thermal diffusivities of ceramics. Pronounced effects of processing parameters on thermal properties of ceramics evaluated quickly.

  6. Cooperative Research and Development for Advanced Microturbines Program on Advanced Integrated Microturbine System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael J. Bowman

    2007-05-30

    The Advanced Integrated Microturbine Systems (AIMS) project was kicked off in October of 2000 to develop the next generation microturbine system. The overall objective of the project was to develop a design for a 40% electrical efficiency microturbine system and demonstrate many of the enabling technologies. The project was initiated as a collaborative effort between several units of GE, Elliott Energy Systems, Turbo Genset, Oak Ridge National Lab and Kyocera. Since the inception of the project the partners have changed but the overall direction of the project has stayed consistent. The project began as a systems study to identify design options to achieve the ultimate goal of 40% electrical efficiency. Once the optimized analytical design was identified for the 40% system, it was determined that a 35% efficient machine would be capable of demonstrating many of the advanced technologies within the given budget and timeframe. The items that would not be experimentally demonstrated were fully produced ceramic parts. However, to understand the requirements of these ceramics, an effort was included in the project to experimentally evaluate candidate materials in representative conditions. The results from this effort would clearly identify the challenges and improvement required of these materials for the full design. Following the analytical effort, the project was dedicated to component development and testing. Each component and subsystem was designed with the overall system requirements in mind and each tested to the fullest extent possible prior to being integrated together. This method of component development and evaluation helps to minimize the technical risk of the project. Once all of the components were completed, they were assembled into the full system and experimentally evaluated.

  7. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems: Technical progress report No. 16, July-September 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcikowski, G.F.; Borio, R.W.; Bozzuto, C.R.; Burr, D.H.; Cellilli, L.; Fox, J.D.; Gibbons, T.B.; Hargrove, M.J.; Jukkola, G.D.; King, A.M.

    1996-11-27

    The overall objective of the Project is the expedited commercialization of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. The Project is under budget and generally on schedule. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Status Report included as Appendix A. Under Task 7--Component development and optimization, the CeraMem filter testing was completed. Due to an unacceptably high flue gas draft loss, which will not be resolved in the POCTF timeframe, a decision was made to change the design of the flue gas cleaning system from Hot SNO{sub x}{sup {trademark}} to an advanced dry scrubber called New Integrated Desulfurization (NID). However, it is recognized that the CeraMem filter still has the potential to be viable in pulverized coal systems. In Task 8-- Preliminary POCTF design, integrating and optimizing the performance and design of the boiler, turbine/generator and heat exchangers of the Kalina cycle as well as the balance of plant design were completed. Licensing activities continued. A NID system was substituted for the SNO{sub x} Hot Process.

  8. Strength and corrosion behavior of SiC - based ceramics in hot coal combustion environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breder, K.; Parten, R.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-08-01

    As part of an effort to evaluate the use of advanced ceramics in a new generation of coal-fired power plants, four SiC-based ceramics have been exposed to corrosive coal slag in a laboratory furnace and two pilot scale combustors. Initial results indicate that the laboratory experiments are valuable additions to more expensive pilot plant experiments. The results show increased corrosive attack with increased temperature, and that only slight changes in temperature may significantly alter the degree of strength degradation due to corrosive attack. The present results are part of a larger experimental matrix evaluating the behavior of ceramics in the coal combustion environment.

  9. Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program: Annual progress report FY 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-04-01

    In many ways, the Advanced Industrial Materials (AIM) Program underwent a major transformation in Fiscal Year 1995 and these changes have continued to the present. When the Program was established in 1990 as the Advanced Industrial Concepts (AIC) Materials Program, the mission was to conduct applied research and development to bring materials and processing technologies from the knowledge derived from basic research to the maturity required for the end use sectors for commercialization. In 1995, the Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) made radical changes in structure and procedures. All technology development was directed toward the seven ``Vision Industries`` that use about 80% of industrial energy and generated about 90% of industrial wastes. The mission of AIM has, therefore, changed to ``Support development and commercialization of new or improved materials to improve productivity, product quality, and energy efficiency in the major process industries.`` Though AIM remains essentially a National Laboratory Program, it is essential that each project have industrial partners, including suppliers to, and customers of, the seven industries. Now, well into FY 1996, the transition is nearly complete and the AIM Program remains reasonably healthy and productive, thanks to the superb investigators and Laboratory Program Managers. This Annual Report for FY 1995 contains the technical details of some very remarkable work by the best materials scientists and engineers in the world. Areas covered here are: advanced metals and composites; advanced ceramics and composites; polymers and biobased materials; and new materials and processes.

  10. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, fourth quarter 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-04-21

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. The project is being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency.

  11. Quality in Online Courses: Technical Production Regarding Clinical Biochemistry Online Course Performed by Students in Advanced Learning in Scientific Education Discipline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W.B. Maia

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available It is important to consider quality and efficacy concerning online courses. This study was accomplished with Master’s students in order to promote technical production regardingClinical Biochemistry online course. In web, www.bioq.educacao.biz, it was accessible strategic and organizational management training in distance learning course. Enrolled students(7, monitors (3 and the manager (1 have made use of thevirtual environment asa channel of communication as well as to construct the extension course (80 hours. Some strategies were discussed and planned for the purpose of a significant apprenticeship. In all, there were 173 standard contents available, which were 4 audiovisual presentations, 13 debating forums, 1 chat, 10 classes,77 scientific articles, 30 tests, 3 glossaries, 1 mini-library, 18 links, 3 texts and 13 folders. Although the managerwas not responsible for the construction ofthe contents, system reports have shown that the manager’s attendance and permanence online were three times superior to other users. It once more revealed that new Information and Communication Technologies(ICTs requires from the manager to plan an efficient pedagogical orientation.

  12. A method for creating interactive content for the iPod, and its potential use as a learning tool: Technical Advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmer Edward J

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Podcasting is currently a popular means of delivery of information with a large number of podcasts specifically tailored for educational purposes. It can be argued that the passive nature of this teaching methodology limits the educational benefit that can be derived from podcasts. This paper describes the development and construction of interactive material for the iPod, and a survey of student attitudes towards this type of learning material. Methods The development of interactive material for an iPod is described in detail. This material was developed and demonstrated to 50 medical students. These students completed a paper-based survey on the potential uses of this technology, before and after a 20 minute presentation in class of an interactive case-study on an iPod. Results A technical description of how to develop interactive content for the iPod was created. The results of the student survey indicate a favourable shift in student attitudes after viewing the interactive case. Despite only 15% of the students owning an iPod, 57% of the students were positive about having access to interactive iPod content and 59% believed they would use it whilst travelling. The percentage of students who felt podcasting was a useful means of learning increased from 9% to 41%. Conclusion The development of interactive content for the iPod is feasible. There are indications that students view interactive iPod cases as having value as an additional learning resource.

  13. High pressure ceramic heat exchanger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harkins, Bruce D.; Ward, Michael E.

    1998-01-01

    Many recuperators have components which react to corrosive gases and are used in applications where the donor fluid includes highly corrosive gases. These recuperators have suffered reduced life, increased service or maintenance, and resulted in increased cost. The present header assembly when used with recuperators reduces the brittle effect of a portion of the ceramic components. Thus, the present header assembly used with the present recuperator increases the life, reduces the service and maintenance, and reduces the increased cost associated with corrosive action of components used to manufacture recuperators. The present header assembly is comprised of a first ceramic member, a second ceramic member, a strengthening reinforcing member being in spaced relationship to the first ceramic member and the second ceramic member. The header assembly is further comprised of a refractory material disposed in contacting relationship with the first ceramic member, the second ceramic member and the strengthening reinforcing member. The present header assembly provides a high strength load bearing header assembly having good thermal cycling characteristics, good resistance to a corrosive environment and good steady state strength at elevated temperatures.

  14. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 15, April--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1996-07-25

    Goal is engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. Scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on 6 coals to optimize these processes, followed by design/construction/operation of a 2-t/hr PDU. During this quarter, parametric testing of the 30-in. Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn plant was completed and clean coal samples submitted for briquetting. A study of a novel hydrophobic dewatering process continued at Virginia Tech. Benefits of slurry PSD (particle size distribution) modification and pH adjustment were evaluated for the Taggart and Hiawatha coals; they were found to be small. Agglomeration bench-scale test results were positive, meeting product ash specifications. PDU Flotation Module operations continued; work was performed with Taggart coal to determine scaleup similitude between the 12-in. and 6-ft Microcel{trademark} columns. Construction of the PDU selective agglomeration module continued.

  15. Utilization of kaolin processing waste for the production of porous ceramic bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes, Romualdo R; Brasileiro, Maria I; Santana, Lisiane N L; Neves, Gelmires A; Lira, Helio L; Ferreira, Heber C

    2008-08-01

    The kaolin processing industry generates large amounts of waste in producing countries such as Brazil. The aim of this study was to characterize kaolin processing waste and evaluate its suitability as an alternative ceramic raw material for the production of porous technical ceramic bodies. The waste material was physically and chemically characterized and its thermal behaviour is described. Several formulations were prepared and sintered at different temperatures. The sintered samples were characterized to determine their porosity, water absorption, firing shrinkage and mechanical strength. Fired samples were microstructurally analysed by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The results indicated that the waste consisted of quartz, kaolinite, and mica, and that ceramic formulations containing up to 66% of waste can be used for the production of ceramics with porosities higher than 40% and strength of about 70 MPa. PMID:18727328

  16. Assessment of technical strengths and information flow of energy conservation research in Japan. Volume 2. Background document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hane, G.J.; Lewis, P.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Rubinger, B.; Willis, A.

    1985-06-01

    Purpose of this study is to explore the status of R and D in Japan and the ability of US researchers to keep abreast of Japanese technical advances. US researchers familiar with R and D activities in Japan were interviewed in ten fields that are relevant to the more efficient use of energy: amorphous metals, biotechnology, ceramics, combustion, electrochemical energy storage, heat engines, heat transfer, high-temperature sensors, thermal and chemical energy storage, and tribology. The researchers were questioned about their perceptions of the strengths of R and D in Japan, comparative aspects of US work, and the quality of available information sources describing R and D in Japan. Of the ten related fields, the researchers expressed a strong perception that significant R and D is under way in amorphous metals, biotechnology, and ceramics, and that the US competitive position in these technologies will be significantly challenged. Researchers also identified alternative emphases in Japanese R and D programs in these areas that provide Japan with stronger technical capabilities. For example, in biotechnology, researchers noted the significant Japanese emphasis on industrial-scale bioprocess engineering, which contrasts with a more meager effort in the US. In tribology, researchers also noted the strength of the chemical tribology research in Japan and commented on the effective mix of chemical and mechanical tribology research. This approach contrasts with the emphasis on mechanical tribology in the US.

  17. Self-Assembling, Flexible, Pre-Ceramic Composite Preforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eckel, Andrew J.; Gorican, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    surrounding structures can be avoided in the collapsed state. The larger exit plane leads to an increase in expansion area ratio, which has the potential to increase thrust and overall rocket performance. In general, the use of advanced ceramic materials can lead to improved engine and vehicle performance. The ceramics can run hotter, so less cooling is required. Fuel to coolant ratios can be balanced more readily to reduce weight. Engine efficiency can also be increased with hotter combustion and exhaust temperatures. In addition, the ceramic composites themselves can reduce the component weight by as much as 50 percent, which can translate into greater payload for the vehicle

  18. Engineering development of advanced coal-fired low-emission boiler systems. Technical progress report No. 10, January 1995--March 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-05-17

    The project is on schedule and under budget. The current status is shown in the Milestone Schedule Report included as Appendix A. All Project Plans were updated based on the revised finding level authorized for FY95 and anticipated for FY96. Technology Transfer activities included {open_quotes}supplying{close_quotes} three executives and several team members to the LEBS Workshop, delivering a technical paper at a conference, and working on a Combustion 2000 Session for another conference. ABBES and CeraMem reached agreement concerning Task 7 work, including ownership and disposition of project-purchased equipment to be used during Task 7 and also during Task 11. A test plan was prepared. Task 7 activities for the Low-NO{sub x} Firing System included computational modeling of the firing arrangement. Reasonable comparisons to experimental data previously obtained in the Boiler Simulation Facility were achieved. A kinetic evaluation for both baseline and low NO{sub x} firing arrangements was also performed, with results indicating that the final reducing zone within the main windbox has a dominant effect on NO{sub x} reduction, with higher temperatures being more favorable for lower NO{sub x}. A week of combustion testing was completed in the Fundamental Scale Burner Facility to examine the impact of integrated fuel staging (NO{sub x} reduction via the reburn mechanism), and to explore preliminary vertical staging concepts within the main windbox region. Preliminary results from this testing demonstrated the potential of vertical air staging within the main windbox to augment overfire air. Testing was performed to quantify the coal size distribution and power requirements for one (1) conventional static and four (4) dynamic classifier designs. Results from this testing show the dynamic classifier capable of producing finer grinds of coal at lower relative power requirements.

  19. Report on the planning workshop on cost-effective ceramic machining. Ceramic Technology Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blau, P.J.

    1991-11-01

    A workshop on ``Cost Effective Ceramic Machining`` (CECM) was held at Oak Ridge Associated Universities Pollard Auditorium, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, May 1991. The purpose of this workshop was to present a preliminary project plan for industry critique and to identify specific components and cost-reduction targets for a new project on Cost Effective Ceramic Machining. The CECM project is an extension of the work on the Ceramic Technology for Advanced Heat Engines (CTAHE) Program sponsored by the Department of Energy, Office of Transportation Materials. The workshop consisted of fifteen invited papers, discussions, a survey of the attendee`s opinions, and a tour of the High Temperature Materials Laboratory at ORNL. The total number of registrants was sixty-seven, including thirty-three from industry or private sector organizations, seven from universities, three from industry groups, fourteen from DOE laboratories (including ORNL, Y-12, and Lawrence Livermore Laboratory), three from trade associations, and three from other government organizations. Forty- one survey forms, which critiqued the proposed project plan, were completed by attendees, and the results are presented in this report. Valves, cam roller followers, water pump seals, and diesel engine head plates were rated highest fro application of ceramic machining concepts to reduce cost. Coarse grinding, abrasives and wheel technology, and fine grinding were most highly rated as regards their impact on cost reduction. Specific cost-reduction targets for given parts varied greatly in the survey results and were not felt to be useful for the purposes for the CECM plan development. A range of individual comments were obtained and are listed in an appendix. As a result of the workshop and subsequent discussions, a modified project plan, different in certain aspects from the original CECM plan, has been developed.

  20. Ceramics in Environmental Catalysis:Applications and Possibilities%Ceramics in Environmental Catalysis: Applications and Possibilities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nitin LABHSETWAR; P.DOGGALI; S.RAYALU; R.YADAV; T.MISTUHASHI; H.HANEDA

    2012-01-01

    Environmental catalysis has been steadily growing because of the advances in its scientific and engineering aspects,as well as due to the new environmental challenges in the industrial era.The development of new catalysts and materials is essential for new technologies for various environmental applications.Ceramics play important roles in various environmental applications including the identification,monitoring,and quantification of pollutants and their control.Ceramics have important applications as sensors and photocatalysts,and they are extensively used as catalyst carriers and supports.Many ceramics are being explored as catalysts for pollution control applications.Their low cost,thermal and chemical stability,and capability of being tailored make them especially attractive for pollution control applications.Although a wide variety of materials have been developed as catalyst supports,this area is still of interest with new or modified catalyst supports being frequently reported.It is of equal importance to develop new or modified processes for the loading of catalysts on specific supports.Applications like chemical looping combustion (CLC) and other catalytic combustion processes are raising the demands to a new scale.We have been working on the development of both new and modified support materials,including mesoporous materials without structural order for possible applications in CLC and other catalytic reactions.Successful attempts have been made in the modification of conventional γ-Al2O3 and improved synthesis processes for supporting perovskite type catalysts.Our research on environmental catalysis applications of ceramic materials and processes are also briefly discussed.

  1. Development of nondestructive evaluation methods for structural ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced nondestructive evaluation methods are being developed to characterize ceramic materials and allow improvement of process technology. If one can spatially determine porosity, map organic binder/plasticizer distributions, measure average through-volume and in-plane density, as well as detect inclusions, process and machining operations may be modified to enhance the reliability of ceramics. Two modes of X-ray tomographic imaging -- advanced film (analog) tomography and computed tomography -- are being developed to provide flaw detection and density profile mapping capability. Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging is being developed to determine porosity and map the distribution of organic binder/plasticizer. Ultrasonic backscatter and through-transmission are being developed to measure average through-thickness densities and detect surface inclusions

  2. Recycling of the reduction sludge of manganese in the production of ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the use of manganese reduction residues, from the electric arc furnaces for the production of manganese ferro-alloys, as raw materials for construction bricks, different ceramic compositions were formulated with contents of 0, 2.5, 5 and 10wt% of waste addition to the clay used commercially, and sintered at different temperatures, 850, 950 and 1050°C. After firing, the ceramic samples were studied by optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray diffraction and by spectrophotometry. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by flexural strength, apparent porosity and specific mass, water absorption, linear shrinkage and loss on ignition. With the help of technics and experiment planning programs, the effects of the variables: temperature, composition and interaction between them over the results were discussed. This work proved that the addition of manganese reduction sludge to the clay, for the production of ceramic construction bricks, is highly feasible, from a technical standpoint. (author)

  3. Ceramic Membrane Enabling Technology for Improved IGCC Efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John Sirman; Bart vanHassel

    2005-06-01

    This final report summarizes work accomplished in the program from October 1, 1999 through December 31,2004. While many of the key technical objectives for this program were achieved, after a thorough economic and OTM (Oxygen Transport Membrane) reliability analysis were completed, a decision was made to terminate the project prior to construction of a second pilot reactor. In the program, oxygen with purity greater than 99% was produced in both single tube tests and multi-tube pilot plant tests for over 1000 hours. This demonstrated the technical viability of using ceramic OTM devices for producing oxygen from a high pressure air stream. The oxygen fluxes that were achieved in single tube tests exceeded the original target flux for commercial operation. However, extended testing showed that the mean time to failure of the ceramics was insufficient to enable a commercially viable system. In addition, manufacturing and material strength constraints led to size limitations of the OTM tubes that could be tested. This has a severe impact on the cost of both the ceramic devices, but also the cost of assembling the OTM tubes in a large reactor. As such and combined with significant progress in cost reduction of large cryogenic oxygen separation devices, an economic gain that justifies continued development could not be derived.

  4. Wear prediction of ceramic-on-ceramic hip artificial joints

    OpenAIRE

    Askari, E; Flores, Paulo; Dabirrahmani, D.; Appleyard, R.

    2015-01-01

    Wear can influence the lifetime and performance of implants and has been found to be a key factor in primary failure of artificial hip joints. The present study aims to present a spatial multibody dynamic model to predict wear in ceramic-on-ceramic hip implants. The problem was formulated by developing a spatial multibody dynamic model of a hip prosthesis taking three-dimensional physiological loading and motion of the human body into account. Then, the Archard wear model was inte...

  5. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimize the management of the Technical Network (TN), to ease the understanding and purpose of devices connected to the TN, and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive email notifications from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database. Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  6. Technical Network

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    In order to optimise the management of the Technical Network (TN), to facilitate understanding of the purpose of devices connected to the TN and to improve security incident handling, the Technical Network Administrators and the CNIC WG have asked IT/CS to verify the "description" and "tag" fields of devices connected to the TN. Therefore, persons responsible for systems connected to the TN will receive e-mails from IT/CS asking them to add the corresponding information in the network database at "network-cern-ch". Thank you very much for your cooperation. The Technical Network Administrators & the CNIC WG

  7. Advanced mathematics

    CERN Document Server

    Gupta, CB; Kumar, V

    2009-01-01

    About the Book: This book `Advanced Mathematics` is primarily designed for B.Tech., IV Semester (EE and EC branch) students of Rajasthan Technical University. The subject matter is discussed in a lucid manner. The discussion is covered in five units: Unit I: deals with Numerical Analysis, Unit-II: gives different aspects of Numerical Analysis, Unit-III: Special Function, Unit-IV:Statistics and Probability, Calculus of Variation and Transforms are discussed in Unit V. All the theoretical concepts are explained through solved examples. Besides, a large number of unsolved problems on each top

  8. Extended pelvic resections for the treatment of locally advanced and recurrent anal canal and colorectal cancer: technical aspects and morbimortality predictors aftet 24 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilson Benevides de Mesquita Neto

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to evaluate the profile of morbidity and mortality and its predictors related to extensive pelvic resections, including pelvic exenteration, to optimize the selection of patients and achieve better surgical results. Methods: we performed 24 major resections for anorectal pelvic malignancy from 2008 to 2015 in the Instituto do Câncer do Ceará. The factors analyzed included age, weight loss, resected organs, total versus posterior exenteration, angiolymphatic and perineural invasion, lymph node metastasis and overall and disease-free survival. Results: the median age was 57 years and the mean follow-up was ten months. Overall morbidity was 45.8%, with five (20.8% serious complications. There were no deaths in the first 30 postoperative days. The median overall survival was 39.5 months, and disease-free survival, 30.7 months. Concomitant resection of the bladder was an isolated prognostic factor for higher risk of complications (87.5% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.009. Angiolymphatic invasion and lymph node metastasis did not reach significance with respect to disease-free survival. Conclusion: treatment of advanced anorectal tumors is challenging, often requiring combined resections, such as cystectomy and sacrectomy, and complex reconstructions. The magnitude of the operation still carries a high morbidity rate, but is a procedure considered safe and feasible, with a low mortality and adequate locoregional tumor control when performed in referral centers.

  9. Creep in electronic ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Routbort, J. L.; Goretta, K. C.; Arellano-Lopez, A. R.

    2000-04-27

    High-temperature creep measurements combined with microstructural investigations can be used to elucidate deformation mechanisms that can be related to the diffusion kinetics and defect chemistry of the minority species. This paper will review the theoretical basis for this correlation and illustrate it with examples from some important electronic ceramics having a perovskite structure. Recent results on BaTiO{sub 3}, (La{sub 1{minus}x}Sr){sub 1{minus}y}MnO{sub 3+{delta}}, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub x}, (Bi,Pb){sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} and Sr(Fe,Co){sub 1.5}O{sub x} will be presented.

  10. Ceramics for fusion devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceramics are required for a number of applications in fusion devices, among the most critical of which are magnetic coil insulators, windows for RF heating systems, and structural uses. Radiation effects dominate consideration of candidate materials, although good pre-irradiation properties are a requisite. Materials and components can be optimized by careful control of chemical and microstructural content, and application of brittle material design and testing techniques. Future directions for research and development should include further extension of the data base in the areas of electrical, structural, and thermal properties; establishment of a fission neutron/fusion neutron correlation including transmutation gas effects; and development of new materials tailored to meet the specific needs of fusion reactors

  11. Ceramic Cerami Turbine Nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Gary L.

    1997-04-01

    A turbine nozzle vane assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes an outer shroud and an inner shroud having a plurality of horizontally segmented vanes therebetween being positioned by a connecting member positioning segmented vanes in functional relationship one to another. The turbine nozzle vane assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  12. Ceramic turbine nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, James E.; Norton, Paul F.

    1996-01-01

    A turbine nozzle and shroud assembly having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion is positioned in a gas turbine engine and being attached to conventional metallic components. The metallic components having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being greater than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the turbine nozzle vane assembly. The turbine nozzle vane assembly includes a plurality of segmented vane defining a first vane segment and a second vane segment. Each of the first and second vane segments having a vertical portion. Each of the first vane segments and the second vane segments being positioned in functional relationship one to another within a recess formed within an outer shroud and an inner shroud. The turbine nozzle and shroud assembly provides an economical, reliable and effective ceramic component having a preestablished rate of thermal expansion being less than the preestablished rate of thermal expansion of the other component.

  13. Calcium phosphate-based ceramic and composite materials for medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The topical problems in chemistry and technology of materials based on calcium phosphates aimed at both the replacement of damaged bone tissue and its regeneration are discussed. Specific features of the synthesis of nanocrystalline powders and the fabrication of ceramic implants are described. Advances in the development of porous scaffolds from resorbable and osteoconductive calcium phosphates and of hybrid composites that form the basis of bone tissue engineering are considered.

  14. Final Technical Report Advanced Anchoring Technology DOE Award Number DE-EE0003632 Project Period 09/10 - 09/12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meggitt, Dallas J

    2012-11-09

    anchor systems and the associated drilling and grouting systems to demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of micropile anchors. This report presents several conceptual system designs for different applications. This project has concluded that grouted marine micropile anchor technology is practical and very attractive technically and financially for marine renewable energy applications. This technology is considered to be at a Technology Readiness Level 5.

  15. 耐火陶瓷纤维流行病学和毒理学研究进展%Research Advance in Toxicology and Epidemiology of Refractory Ceramic Fibers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张敏; 张幸

    2013-01-01

    Refractory ceramic fibers (RCF), a substitute for asbestos, are often used as high-temperature insulation applications, but can be inhaled during production and using. However, epidemiological studies in Europe and the United States have not shown that occupational RCF exposure has association with the occurance of lung diseases. The tolerance of RCF is less than amphibole asbestos, but more than other man-made mineral fibers (MMMF). Toxicology studies with various exposure methods have shown that RCF can cause pulmonary fibrosis, lung cancer, and mesothelioma. This article provided a comprehensive and integrated review of the epidemiology toxicology of RCF, and illustrated perspectives for the further research.%石棉的主要替代品——耐火陶瓷纤维(refractory ceramicfibers,RCF),常被用作高温绝缘材料,在其生产或使用过程中,一些RCF是可吸入的,然而在欧洲和美国职业接触人群的流行病学研究中未证明其可致肺部疾病的发生.RCF比闪石石棉生物耐受性短,但比其他人造矿物纤维(man-made mineral fibers,MMMF)生物耐受性长.因此,使用不同毒理学方法研究的结果均表明,RCF可导致肺纤维化、肺癌和间皮瘤.本文综述报道RCF的流行病学研究和毒理学研究的进展,并对相关研究的前景加以展望.

  16. Cordierite Bricks for Ceramic Burner of Hot Blast Stove YB/T 4128-2005

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Xiaohui; Chai Junlan

    2009-01-01

    @@ 1 Scope This standard specifies the classification,brand,technical requirements,shape and dimension,test method,quality appraisal procedure,packing,marking,transportation,storage and quality certificate of cordierite bricks for ceramic burner of blast furnace and hot blast stove.

  17. Low Thermal Expansion Glass Ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Bach, Hans

    2005-01-01

    This book appears in the authoritative series reporting the international research and development activities conducted by the Schott group of companies. This series provides an overview of Schott's activities for scientists, engineers, and managers from all branches of industry worldwide in which glasses and glass ceramics are of interest. Each volume begins with a chapter providing a general idea of the current problems, results, and trends relating to the subjects treated. This new extended edition describes the fundamental principles, the manufacturing process, and applications of low thermal expansion glass ceramics. The composition, structure, and stability of polycrystalline materials having a low thermal expansion are described, and it is shown how low thermal expansion glass ceramics can be manufactured from appropriately chosen glass compositions. Examples illustrate the formation of this type of glass ceramic by utilizing normal production processes together with controlled crystallization. Thus g...

  18. The ceramic gas electron multiplier

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosson, Amir; Fleck, Ivor [Siegen University, Siegen (Germany); Collaboration: LCTPC-Deutschland-Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    The Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) has been proven to fulfill the demands of high energy physics experiments. Effective gain and resistance to the electrical sparks are significant issues to be investigated. A new type of GEM, made out of ceramic, has been produced and results from measurements with this type of GEM are presented. Advantages of ceramic material are its very good stability versus change in temperature and its electrical properties. Using Ar-CO{sub 2}(80-20 %) gas mixture and a X-ray source, the gain of the ceramic GEMs is measured and compared with the one for CERN GEMs. These results assure the possibility of using the ceramic GEMs for high-luminosity experiments.

  19. Biaxial flexural strength of Turkom-Cera core compared to two other all-ceramic systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bandar Mohammed Abdullah Al-Makramani

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in all-ceramic systems have established predictable means of providing metal-free aesthetic and biocompatible materials. These materials must have sufficient strength to be a practical treatment alternative for the fabrication of crowns and fixed partial dentures. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to compare the biaxial flexural strength of three core ceramic materials. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Three groups of 10 disc-shaped specimens (16 mm diameter x 1.2 mm thickness - in accordance with ISO-6872, 1995 were made from the following ceramic materials: Turkom-Cera Fused Alumina [(Turkom-Ceramic (M Sdn Bhd, Puchong, Selangor, Malaysia], In-Ceram (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany and Vitadur-N (Vita Zahnfabrik, Bad Säckingen, Baden-Württemberg, Germany, which were sintered according to the manufacturer's recommendations. The specimens were subjected to biaxial flexural strength test in an universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The definitive fracture load was recorded for each specimen and the biaxial flexural strength was calculated from an equation in accordance with ISO-6872. RESULTS: The mean biaxial flexural strength values were: Turkom-Cera: 506.8±87.01 MPa, In-Ceram: 347.4±28.83 MPa and Vitadur-N: 128.7±12.72 MPa. The results were analyzed by the Levene's test and Dunnett's T3 post-hoc test (SPSS software V11.5.0 for Windows, SPSS, Chicago, IL, USA at a preset significance level of 5% because of unequal group variances (P<0.001. There was statistically significant difference between the three core ceramics (P<0.05. Turkom-Cera showed the highest biaxial flexural strength, followed by In-Ceram and Vitadur-N. CONCLUSIONS: Turkom-Cera core had significantly higher flexural strength than In-Ceram and Vitadur-N ceramic core materials.

  20. The physical chemistry of nucleation of sub-micrometer non-oxide ceramic powders via sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fine ceramic powders (< 500 nm) exhibit exceptional physical and mechanical properties in engineered structural ceramics. The production of fine powders, in particular the non-oxide ceramics, via a cheaper route than the organic solvent route has been rather elusive. This paper examines the physical chemistry of sub-oxide vapor-phase reduction reaction for the nucleation of non-oxide ceramic phase. Well known vapor species eg SiO and BO in the production of technical ceramic powders (SiC, BN) are particularly discussed for understanding the nucleation process of SiC and BN ceramic phases respectively. The regimes of partial pressures and temperatures are particularly identified. The calculated nucleation rate as a function of the temperature is compared with the experimental results on powder morphology. The production of amorphous and nanocrystalline h-BN powders is discussed in the context of substrate structure and thermodynamic parameters

  1. Nano-Ceramic Coated Plastics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Junghyun

    2013-01-01

    Plastic products, due to their durability, safety, and low manufacturing cost, are now rapidly replacing cookware items traditionally made of glass and ceramics. Despite this trend, some still prefer relatively expensive and more fragile ceramic/glassware because plastics can deteriorate over time after exposure to foods, which can generate odors, bad appearance, and/or color change. Nano-ceramic coatings can eliminate these drawbacks while still retaining the advantages of the plastic, since the coating only alters the surface of the plastic. The surface coating adds functionality to the plastics such as self-cleaning and disinfectant capabilities that result from a photocatalytic effect of certain ceramic systems. These ceramic coatings can also provide non-stick surfaces and higher temperature capabilities for the base plastics without resorting to ceramic or glass materials. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) are the candidates for a nano-ceramic coating to deposit on the plastics or plastic films used in cookware and kitchenware. Both are wide-bandgap semiconductors (3.0 to 3.2 eV for TiO2 and 3.2 to 3.3 eV for ZnO), so they exhibit a photocatalytic property under ultraviolet (UV) light. This will lead to decomposition of organic compounds. Decomposed products can be easily washed off by water, so the use of detergents will be minimal. High-crystalline film with large surface area for the reaction is essential to guarantee good photocatalytic performance of these oxides. Low-temperature processing (nano-ceramic coatings (TiO2, ZnO) on plastic materials (silicone, Teflon, PET, etc.) that can possess both photocatalytic oxide properties and flexible plastic properties. Processing cost is low and it does not require any expensive equipment investment. Processing can be scalable to current manufacturing infrastructure.

  2. Novel Synthesis of Ceramic Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K.L.Choy

    2007-01-01

    1 Results There is an increasing demand for producing high performance ceramic films at a reduced cost. This paper describes an innovative and cost-effective method of producing nanostructured ceramic films based on Electrostatic Spray Assisted Vapour Deposition (ESAVD). ESAVD is a variant of chemical vapour deposition process which involves spraying atomised charged precursor droplets across an electric field where the precursor undergo decomposition and heterogeneous chemical reaction near the heat...

  3. Technical Process in Advanced Treatment of Taihu Lake Source Water%太湖水源水深度处理直饮的技术工艺

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡孟春; 张永春; 唐晓燕; 沈海风; 王文林

    2013-01-01

    To address the problem of organic compound pollution in the Taihu Lake drinking water source, a combined process composed mainly of bio-filter and reverse osmosis membrane was developed. The process included pretreatment with BAF, the combined treatment system with ultrafiltration (UF) , micro-filtration (MF) and reverse osmosis (RO) membrane, and the product water system with ultraviolet sterilization. The design focused on key parts such as the pretreatment system with BAF, combined membranes treatment optimization, washing and backwashing system. The operation results showed that the combined process was suitable for advanced treatment of the organically polluted and eutrophicated source water of Taihu Lake. The product water met the standard for direct drinking quality.%针对太湖有机复合污染饮用水源的主要问题,设计了以生物过滤、反渗透膜为主的组合技术工艺,包括:曝气生物滤池前处理系统;超滤、微滤、反渗透膜组合处理系统;紫外消毒产品水出水系统.在设计中着重解决了关键部分的设计:生物滤池前处理系统;膜组合处理系统优化;清洗系统.设备运行结果表明,该工艺适合太湖有机污染富营养化水源水的深度净化处理,产品水可达到高品质直饮水水质标准.试验研究为太湖水源水的深度净化找到了一条可行的技术途径.

  4. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning for premium fuel applications. Quarterly technical progress report 11, April--June, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moro, N.; Shields, G.L.; Smit, F.J.; Jha, M.C.

    1995-07-31

    The primary goal of this project is the engineering development of two advanced physical fine coal cleaning processes, column flotation and selective agglomeration, for premium fuel applications. The project scope includes laboratory research and bench-scale testing on six coals to optimize these processes, followed by design, and construction of a 2-t/hr process development unit (PDU). The PDU will then be operated to generate 200 tons of each of three project coals, by each process. During Quarter 11 (April--June, 1995), work continued on the Subtask 3.2 in-plant testing of the Microcel{trademark} flotation column at the Lady Dunn Preparation Plant with the installation and calibration of a refurbished 30-inch diameter column. The evaluation of toxic trace element data for column flotation samples continued, with preliminary analysis indicating that reasonably good mass balances were achieved for most elements, and that significant reductions in the concentration of many elements were observed from raw coal, to flotation feed, to flotation product samples. Significant progress was made on Subtask 6.5 selective agglomeration bench-scale testing. Data from this work indicates that project ash specifications can be met for all coals evaluated, and that the bulk of the bridging liquid (heptane) can be removed from the product for recycle to the process. The detailed design of the 2 t/hr selective agglomeration module progressed this quarter with the completion of several revisions of both the process flow, and the process piping and instrument diagrams. Procurement of coal for PDU operation began with the purchase of 800 tons of Taggart coal. Construction of the 2 t/hr PDU continued through this reporting quarter and is currently approximately 60% complete.

  5. Ceramic materials and growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohgushi, H.; Yoshikawa, T.; Okumura, M.; Nakajima, H.; Takakura, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Orhtopaedic Surgery; Dohi, Y. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Public Health; Noshi, T.; Ikeuchi, M. [Nara Medical Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery

    2001-07-01

    Recently, many types of growth factors have been purified and used for promoting cell differentiation cascade. The activity of growth factors can be detected in vitro such as culture condition. However, the activity is difficult to detect when these factors are locally administered in vivo, because these dissipate soon after the administration. In order to retain growth factors in local milieu, these can be incorporated with biocompatible porous ceramic materials. Such ceramic/factors composites when implanted in vivo, can trigger certain types of cell differentiation cascade resulted in new tissue formation and tissue regeneration. The paper describes the ceramic / growth factors composites especially hydroxyapatite ceramic (HA) / bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) composite to induce osteoblastic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. The HA/BMP composite supported the osteoblastic differentiation on the HA surface and finally resulted in bone bonding to the HA. When the marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were impregnated in pore areas of HA ceramics, the composites showed more and rapid bone formation than the HA/BMP and HA/MSCs composite, indicating the synergistic effect of BMP and MSCs. These findings indicate the importance of ceramic surface to evoke osteoblastic differentiation as well as to capture the molecules of growth factors for the cell differentiation. (orig.)

  6. 浅论拱桥的技术进步与挑战%On Technical Advancement and Challenge of Arch Bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李亚东; 姚昌荣; 梁艳

    2012-01-01

    The basic characteristics of span length development of some arch bridges (including the steel, reinforced concrete and concrete-filled steel tube arch bridges) having been built in the world in the rcccnt one century are surveyed and with reference to the thc basic characteristics of the techniques having been applied to construction of the different types of the bridges, the construction methods for the bridges arc summrized into three major kinds, that is, the scaffolding method, cantilever method and large component shifting method. On the basis of the techniques for the construction of the bridges, several technical issues on the structures and durability of the arch bridges in China in their development process are studied. To clarify the relationship between the structures and architectural style of the bridges and the relationship between the mechanics and aesthetics, the determination of a bridge type scheme is divided into two aspects of the bridge type selection and bridge configuration and the related basic principles are put forward, that is, for the bridge type selection, the principle is that of the "clear force conditions and simple structure" , for the bridge configuration, the principle is the "simple configuration and integral coordination" , for the construction investment, the principle is the "easy construction and rational cost" while for thc features of the bridge itself, the principle is the "harmony with environment and distinguished features" and further all these principles mentioned herewith are elaborated and analyzed by way of case study of practical bridges.%通过分析百年来拱桥(包括钢拱桥、钢筋混凝土拱桥、钢管混凝土拱桥)跨度发展的基本特点,并根据各种拱桥施工技术的基本特征,把拱桥施工方法分为3大类,即支架法、悬臂法和大件转移法.基于拱桥施工技术,探讨了中国拱桥发展历程中的构造、耐久性等技术问题.为厘清桥梁结构与建筑的关

  7. Advanced powder processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janney, M.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Gelcasting is an advanced powder forming process. It is most commonly used to form ceramic or metal powders into complex, near-net shapes. Turbine rotors, gears, nozzles, and crucibles have been successfully gelcast in silicon nitride, alumina, nickel-based superalloy, and several steels. Gelcasting can also be used to make blanks that can be green machined to near-net shape and then high fired. Green machining has been successfully applied to both ceramic and metal gelcast blanks. Recently, the authors have used gelcasting to make tooling for metal casting applications. Most of the work has centered on H13 tool steel. They have demonstrated an ability to gelcast and sinter H13 to near net shape for metal casting tooling. Also, blanks of H13 have been cast, green machined into complex shape, and fired. Issues associated with forming, binder burnout, and sintering are addressed.

  8. Advancement Research of Foreign Centrifugal Pump Technical Standards%国外离心泵技术标准先进性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    丁俊刚

    2014-01-01

    In order to decrease failure rate and maintenance cost of centrifugal pumps, domestic and international operation and maintenance standards for centrifugal pumps were roundly classified. In allusion to design and installation and operation and management and maintenance and repair of centrifugal pumps, difference between domestic and international technology standards of centrifugal pumps were studied in detail. The advancement of Russia standards and American standards and ISO standards were systematacially expounded, including connection requirements of pumps and inlet/outlet pipeline, and logical control relationship for pumps house vent systems, and pumps base sinking inspection, and pumps emergency shutdown conditions, and pumps inspection and maintenance periods, and vibration and speed for bearing box and pumps shaft. Finally, by means of learning foreign standards, recommendations are made to raise the level of centrifugal pumps operation and management standards and strength the work of standards revision and development.%为了减少离心泵故障率,降低维护成本,全面梳理了国内外离心泵运行管理标准。从离心泵设计安装、运行管理和维护修理等三个方面,深入研究了国内外离心泵技术标准国的差异。系统阐述了俄罗斯标准、美国标准和ISO标准的先进性,包括泵与出入口管道的连接要求、泵房通风系统控制逻辑关系、泵基础下陷情况监测、泵紧急停车的情形、泵检测维修周期以及泵轴承箱和泵轴的振动幅度和速度限制等。最后,针对借鉴国外标准先进理念,提高我国离心泵运行管理标准水平,以及加强标准制修订工作,提出了建议。

  9. NERI FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, DE-FC07-O5ID14647. OPTIMIZATION OF OXIDE COMPOUNDS FOR ADVANCED INERT MATRIX MATERIALS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to reduce the current excesses of plutonium (both weapon grade and reactor grade) and other transuranium elements, a concept of inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been proposed for an uranium free transmutation of fissile actinides which excludes continuous uranium-plutonium conversion in thermal reactors and advanced systems. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising candidate for inert matrix (IM) materials due to its high melting point (2827 C), high thermal conductivity (13 W/K · m at 1000 C), good neutronic properties, and irradiation stability However, MgO reacts with water and hydrates easily, which prevents it from being used in light water reactors (LWRs) as an IM. To improve the hydration resistance of MgO-based inert matrix materials, Medvedev and coworkers have recently investigated the introduction of a secondary phase that acts as a hydration barrier. An MgO-ZrO2 composite was specifically studied and the results showed that the composite exhibited improved hydration resistance than pure MgO. However, ZrO2 is insoluble in most acids except HF, which is undesirable for fuel reprocessing. Moreover, the thermal conductivity of ZrO2 is low and typically less than 3 W · m-1 · K-1 at 1000 C. In search for an alternative composite strategy, Nd2Zr2O7, an oxide compound with pyrochlore structure, has been proposed recently as a corrosion resistant phase, and MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composites have been investigated as potential IM materials. An adequate thermal conductivity of 6 W · m- 1 · K-1 at 1000 C for the MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composite with 90 vol% MgO was recently calculated and reported. Other simulations proposed that the MgO-pyrochlore composites could exhibit higher radiation stability than previously reported. Final optimization of the composite microstructure was performed on the 70 vol% MgO-Nd2Zr2O7 composite that burnup calculations had shown to have the closest profile to that of MOX fuel. Theoretical calculations also indicated that a homogeneous 70 vol% Mg

  10. NERI FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT, DE-FC07-O5ID14647, OPTIMIZATION OF OXIDE COMPOUNDS FOR ADVANCED INERT MATRIX MATERIALS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    PI: JUAN C. NINO, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

    2009-01-11

    In order to reduce the current excesses of plutonium (both weapon grade and reactor grade) and other transuranium elements, a concept of inert matrix fuel (IMF) has been proposed for an uranium free transmutation of fissile actinides which excludes continuous uranium-plutonium conversion in thermal reactors and advanced systems. Magnesium oxide (MgO) is a promising candidate for inert matrix (IM) materials due to its high melting point (2827 C), high thermal conductivity (13 W/K {center_dot} m at 1000 C), good neutronic properties, and irradiation stability However, MgO reacts with water and hydrates easily, which prevents it from being used in light water reactors (LWRs) as an IM. To improve the hydration resistance of MgO-based inert matrix materials, Medvedev and coworkers have recently investigated the introduction of a secondary phase that acts as a hydration barrier. An MgO-ZrO{sub 2} composite was specifically studied and the results showed that the composite exhibited improved hydration resistance than pure MgO. However, ZrO{sub 2} is insoluble in most acids except HF, which is undesirable for fuel reprocessing. Moreover, the thermal conductivity of ZrO{sub 2} is low and typically less than 3 W {center_dot} m{sup -1} {center_dot} K{sup -1} at 1000 C. In search for an alternative composite strategy, Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7}, an oxide compound with pyrochlore structure, has been proposed recently as a corrosion resistant phase, and MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composites have been investigated as potential IM materials. An adequate thermal conductivity of 6 W {center_dot} m{sup -} 1 {center_dot} K{sup -1} at 1000 C for the MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composite with 90 vol% MgO was recently calculated and reported. Other simulations proposed that the MgO-pyrochlore composites could exhibit higher radiation stability than previously reported. Final optimization of the composite microstructure was performed on the 70 vol% MgO-Nd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7

  11. Ferroelectric ceramics in a pyroelectric accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shchagin, A. V., E-mail: shchagin@kipt.kharkov.ua [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation); Miroshnik, V. S.; Volkov, V. I. [Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology, Kharkov 61108 (Ukraine); Oleinik, A. N. [Belgorod State University, Belgorod 308015 (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-07

    The applicability of polarized ferroelectric ceramics as a pyroelectric in a pyroelectric accelerator is shown by experiments. The spectra of X-ray radiation of energy up to tens of keV, generated by accelerated electrons, have been measured on heating and cooling of the ceramics in vacuum. It is suggested that curved layers of polarized ferroelectric ceramics be used as elements of ceramic pyroelectric accelerators. Besides, nanotubes and nanowires manufactured from ferroelectric ceramics are proposed for the use in nanometer-scale ceramic pyroelectric nanoaccelerators for future applications in nanotechnologies.

  12. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  13. Needs assessment for manufacturing ceramic gas turbine components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.; McSpadden, S.B.; Morris, T.O.; Pasto, A.E.

    1995-11-01

    An assessment of needs for the manufacturing of ceramic gas turbine components was undertaken to provide a technical basis for planning R&D activities to support DOE`s gas turbine programs. The manufacturing processes for ceramic turbine engine components were examined from design through final inspection and testing. The following technology needs were identified: Concurrent engineering early in the design phase to develop ceramic components that are more readily manufacturable. Additional effort in determining the boundaries of acceptable design dimensions and tolerances through experimental and/or analytical means. Provision, by the designer, of a CAD based model of the component early in the design cycle. Standardization in the way turbine components are dimensioned and toleranced, and in the way component datum features are defined. Rapid means of fabricating hard tooling, including intelligent systems for design of tooling and rapid prototyping of tooling. Determination of process capabilities by manufacturing significant numbers of parts. Development of more robust ceramic manufacturing processes which are tolerant of process variations. Development of intelligent processing as a means of controlling yield and quality of components. Development of computer models of key manufacturing steps, such as green forming to reduce the number of iterations required to manufacture intolerance components. Development of creep feed or other low-damage precision grinding for finish machining of components. Improved means of fixturing components for finish machining. Fewer and lower-cost final inspection requirements. Standard procedures, including consistent terminology and analytical software for dimensional inspection of components. Uniform data requirements from the US turbine engine companies. An agreed-upon system of naming ceramic materials and updating the name when changes have been made.

  14. Potassium Sodium Niobate-Based Lead-Free Piezoelectric Multilayer Ceramics Co-Fired with Nickel Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichiro Kawada

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although lead-free piezoelectric ceramics have been extensively studied, many problems must still be overcome before they are suitable for practical use. One of the main problems is fabricating a multilayer structure, and one solution attracting growing interest is the use of lead-free multilayer piezoelectric ceramics. The paper reviews work that has been done by the authors on lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer piezoelectric ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. Nickel inner electrodes have many advantages, such as high electromigration resistance, high interfacial strength with ceramics, and greater cost effectiveness than silver palladium inner electrodes. However, widely used lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics cannot be co-fired with nickel inner electrodes, and silver palladium inner electrodes are usually used for lead zirconate titanate-based piezoelectric ceramics. A possible alternative is lead-free ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. We have thus been developing lead-free alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramics co-fired with nickel inner electrodes. The normalized electric-field-induced thickness strain (Smax/Emax of a representative alkali niobate-based multilayer ceramic structure with nickel inner electrodes was 360 pm/V, where Smax denotes the maximum strain and Emax denotes the maximum electric field. This value is about half that for the lead zirconate titanate-based ceramics that are widely used. However, a comparable value can be obtained by stacking more ceramic layers with smaller thicknesses. In the paper, the compositional design and process used to co-fire lead-free ceramics with nickel inner electrodes are introduced, and their piezoelectric properties and reliabilities are shown. Recent advances are introduced, and future development is discussed.

  15. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): 500 MW demonstration of advanced wall-fired combustion techniques for the reduction of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report: First quarter 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-12-31

    This quarterly report discusses the technical progress of an Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT) demonstration being conducted at Georgia Power Company`s Plant Hammond Unit 4 located near Rome, Georgia. The primary goal of this project is the characterization of the low NO{sub x} combustion equipment through the collection and analysis of long-term emissions data. A target of achieving fifty percent NO{sub x} reduction using combustion modifications has been established for the project. The project provides a stepwise retrofit of an advanced overfire air (AOFA) system followed by low NO{sub x} burners (LNB). During each test phase of the project, diagnostic, performance, long-term, and verification testing will be performed. These tests are used to quantify the NO{sub x} reductions of each technology and evaluate the effects of those reductions on other combustion parameters such as particulate characteristics and boiler efficiency. During this quarter, long-term testing of the LNB + AOFA configuration continued and no parametric testing was performed. Further full-load optimization of the LNB + AOFA system began on March 30, 1993. Following completion of this optimization, comprehensive testing in this configuration will be performed including diagnostic, performance, verification, long-term, and chemical emissions testing. These tests are scheduled to start in May 1993 and continue through August 1993. Preliminary engineering and procurement are progressing on the Advanced Low NOx Digital Controls scope addition to the wall-fired project. The primary activities during this quarter include (1) refinement of the input/output lists, (2) procurement of the distributed digital control system, (3) configuration training, and (4) revision of schedule to accommodate project approval cycle and change in unit outage dates.

  16. Rheological Behaviour of Ceramic Inks for Direct Ceramic Inkjet Printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ponnambalam

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, studies were made on the preparation of ceramic inks with: (i alumina powderin ethyl alcohol and (ii zirconia powder in ethyl alcohol at different volume fractions of ceramic.Different amounts (0.75-3.00 vol % of an organic dispersant (oleic acid were added to ceramicink containing 5 per cent of ceramic by volume in ethyl alcohol. The viscosities of the suspensionswere determined with Brookefield viscometer (model: DV-E, which is suitable for measuringthe viscosities of suspensions accurately. These inks were deposited on a substrate to see theirspread. The sediment packing densities ( m of the resulting suspensions were calculated usingtheoretical models which can be related to the density that can be achieved in the final product.The highest sediment packing density was arrived at low viscosity values of the ink and occurredwhen 1 per cent of dispersant by volume was used for 5 per cent alumina content. For 5 percent zirconia content, 2 per cent of dispersant by volume gave a similar result. Experimentswere also conducted to find the value of m for different solid loadings (5-25 vol % of ceramicwith 1 per cent dispersant. It was observed that the sediment packing density and the apparentviscosities were increasing when solid loading concentrations were increased for both aluminaand zirconia-based inks. The optimum value of m and viscosity have been determined from thisstudy. The results of this preliminary study will be useful for further investigations on therheological behaviour of ceramic inks for direct ceramic inkjet printing.

  17. Proceedings of the fifteenth international workshop on ceramic breeder blanket interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Proceedings of 'the Fifteenth International Workshop on Ceramic Breeder Blanket Interactions' which was held as a workshop on ceramic breeders Under the IEA Implementing Agreement on the Nuclear Technology of Fusion Reactors. This workshop was held in Sapporo, Japan on 3-4, Sept. 2009. Twenty six participants from EU, Japan, India, Russia and USA attended the workshop. The scope of the workshop included 1) evolutions in ceramic breeder blanket design, 2) progress in ceramic breeder material development, 3) irradiation testing, 4) breeder material properties, 5) out-of-pile pebble bed experiment, 6) modeling of the thermal, mechanical and tritium transfer behavior of pebble beds and 7) interfacing issues of solid breeder blanket development. By this workshop, advance of key technologies for solid breeder blanket development was shared among the participants. Also, desired direction of further investigation and development was recognized. The 20 of the presented papers are indexed individually. (J.P.N.)

  18. The investigation of the matrix structure of ceramic brick made from carbonaceous mudstone tailings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolboushkin, A.; Fomina, O.; Fomin, A.

    2016-04-01

    The study of the matrix structure of ceramic brick made from carbonaceous mudstone tailings of Korkinsky coal opened pit mine is presented in the current paper. This study includes a thin sections analysis by the polarizing microscope, X-ray, SEM and infrared spectra investigations. It has been discovered that processes of solid- and liquid-phase sintering with the formation of new mineral phases occur inside and on the surfaces of granules during firing. It is shown that a liquid phase is formed in the matrix. It fills inter-grain gaps and connects mineral particles between themselves. It has been found that the advanced physical and mechanical properties of ceramic bricks obtained by creation of the matrix ceramic crock structure, intensive forming of a glass phase on the boundary of the section medium of ceramic composite and temperature reduction of the processes of solid-phase sintering.

  19. Bar piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jiří; Pulpan, Půlpán; Rusin, Luboš

    2013-07-01

    Bar-shaped piezoelectric ceramic transformers (PTs) working in the longitudinal vibration mode (k31 mode) were studied. Two types of the transformer were designed--one with the electrode divided into two segments of different length, and one with the electrodes divided into three symmetrical segments. Parameters of studied transformers such as efficiency, transformation ratio, and input and output impedances were measured. An analytical model was developed for PT parameter calculation for both two- and three-segment PTs. Neither type of bar PT exhibited very high efficiency (maximum 72% for three-segment PT design) at a relatively high transformation ratio (it is 4 for two-segment PT and 2 for three-segment PT at the fundamental resonance mode). The optimum resistive loads were 20 and 10 kΩ for two- and three-segment PT designs for the fundamental resonance, respectively, and about one order of magnitude smaller for the higher overtone (i.e., 2 kΩ and 500 Ω, respectively). The no-load transformation ratio was less than 27 (maximum for two-segment electrode PT design). The optimum input electrode aspect ratios (0.48 for three-segment PT and 0.63 for two-segment PT) were calculated numerically under no-load conditions.

  20. Disc piezoelectric ceramic transformers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhart, Jirií; Půlpán, Petr; Doleček, Roman; Psota, Pavel; Lédl, Vít

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, we present our study on disc-shaped and homogeneously poled piezoelectric ceramic transformers working in planar-extensional vibration modes. Transformers are designed with electrodes divided into wedge, axisymmetrical ring-dot, moonie, smile, or yin-yang segments. Transformation ratio, efficiency, and input and output impedances were measured for low-power signals. Transformer efficiency and transformation ratio were measured as a function of frequency and impedance load in the secondary circuit. Optimum impedance for the maximum efficiency has been found. Maximum efficiency and no-load transformation ratio can reach almost 100% and 52 for the fundamental resonance of ring-dot transformers and 98% and 67 for the second resonance of 2-segment wedge transformers. Maximum efficiency was reached at optimum impedance, which is in the range from 500 Ω to 10 kΩ, depending on the electrode pattern and size. Fundamental vibration mode and its overtones were further studied using frequency-modulated digital holographic interferometry and by the finite element method. Complementary information has been obtained by the infrared camera visualization of surface temperature profiles at higher driving power.

  1. Ordered ceramic membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, M.A.; Hill, C.G. Jr.; Zeltner, W.A.

    1991-10-01

    Ceramic membranes have been formed from colloidal sols coated on porous clay supports. These supported membranes have been characterized in terms of their permeabilities and permselectivities to various aqueous test solutions. The thermal stabilities and pore structures of these membranes have been characterized by preparing unsupported membranes of the correpsonding material and performing N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and X-ray diffraction studies on these membranes. To date, membranes have been prepared from a variety of oxides, including TiO{sub 2}, SiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}, and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, as well as Zr-, Fe-, and Nb-doped TiO{sub 2}. In many of these membranes pore diameters are less than 2 nm, while in others the pore diameters are between 3 and 5 nm. Procedures for fabricating porous clay supports with reproducible permeabilities for pure water are also discussed. 30 refs., 59 figs., 22 tabs.

  2. Ceramic HEPA Filter Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, M A; Bergman, W; Haslam, J; Brown, E P; Sawyer, S; Beaulieu, R; Althouse, P; Meike, A

    2012-04-30

    Potential benefits of ceramic filters in nuclear facilities: (1) Short term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) CalPoly HTTU provides unique testing capability to answer questions for DOE - High temperature testing of materials, components, filter, (b) Several DNFSB correspondences and presentations by DNFSB members have highlighted the need for HEPA filter R and D - DNFSB Recommendation 2009-2 highlighted a nuclear facility response to an evaluation basis earthquake followed by a fire (aka shake-n-bake) and CalPoly has capability for a shake-n-bake test; (2) Intermediate term benefit for DOE and industry - (a) Filtration for specialty applications, e.g., explosive applications at Nevada, (b) Spin-off technologies applicable to other commercial industries; and (3) Long term benefit for DOE, NRC, and industry - (a) Across industry, strong desire for better performance filter, (b) Engineering solution to safety problem will improve facility safety and decrease dependence on associated support systems, (c) Large potential life-cycle cost savings, and (d) Facilitates development and deployment of LLNL process innovations to allow continuous ventilation system operation during a fire.

  3. Antiferroelectric Shape Memory Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Uchino

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Antiferroelectrics (AFE can exhibit a “shape memory function controllable by electric field”, with huge isotropic volumetric expansion (0.26% associated with the AFE to Ferroelectric (FE phase transformation. Small inverse electric field application can realize the original AFE phase. The response speed is quick (2.5 ms. In the Pb0.99Nb0.02[(Zr0.6Sn0.41-yTiy]0.98O3 (PNZST system, the shape memory function is observed in the intermediate range between high temperature AFE and low temperature FE, or low Ti-concentration AFE and high Ti-concentration FE in the composition. In the AFE multilayer actuators (MLAs, the crack is initiated in the center of a pair of internal electrodes under cyclic electric field, rather than the edge area of the internal electrodes in normal piezoelectric MLAs. The two-sublattice polarization coupling model is proposed to explain: (1 isotropic volume expansion during the AFE-FE transformation; and (2 piezoelectric anisotropy. We introduce latching relays and mechanical clampers as possible unique applications of shape memory ceramics.

  4. Ceramic technology report. Semi-annual progress report, April 1994--September 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, D.R.

    1995-06-01

    The Ceramic Technology Project was originally developed by the Department of Energy`s Office of Transportation Systems (OTS) in Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. This project, part of the OTS`s Materials Development Program, was developed to meet the ceramic technology requirements of the OTS`s automotive technology programs. Significant accomplishments in fabricating ceramic components for the Department of Energy (DOE), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and Department of Defense (DoD) advanced heat engine programs have provided evidence that the operation of ceramic parts in high-temperature engine environments is feasible. However, these programs have also demonstrated that additional research is needed in materials and processing development, design methodology, and data base and life prediction before industry will have a sufficient technology base from which to produce reliable cost-effective ceramic engine components commercially. In response to extensive input from industry, the plan is to extend the engine types which were previously supported (advanced gas turbine and low-heat-rejection diesel engines) to include near-term (5-10 years) applications in conventional automobile and diesel truck engines. To facilitate the rapid transfer of this technology to U.S. industry, the major portion of the work is being done in the ceramic industry, with technological support from government laboratories, other industrial laboratories, and universities. A systematic approach to reducing the cost of components is envisioned. The work elements are as follows: economic cost modeling, ceramic machining, powder synthesis, alternative forming and densification processes, yield improvement, system design studies, standards development, low-expansion ceramics, and testing and data base development.

  5. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J. R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appr...

  6. Emerging Ceramic-based Materials for Dentistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denry, I.; Kelly, J.R.

    2014-01-01

    Our goal is to give an overview of a selection of emerging ceramics and issues for dental or biomedical applications, with emphasis on specific challenges associated with full-contour zirconia ceramics, and a brief synopsis on new machinable glass-ceramics and ceramic-based interpenetrating phase composites. Selected fabrication techniques relevant to dental or biomedical applications such as microwave sintering, spark plasma sintering, and additive manufacturing are also reviewed. Where appropriate, the authors have added their opinions and guidance. PMID:25274751

  7. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience Since the closure of the detector in February, the technical operation of CMS has been quite smooth and reliable. Some minor interventions in UXC were required to cure failures of power supplies, fans, readout boards and rack cooling connections, but all these failures were repaired in scheduled technical stops or parasitically during access dedicated to fixing LHC technical problems. The only occasion when CMS had to request an access between fills was to search for the source of an alarm from the leak-detection cables mounted in the DT racks. After a few minutes of diagnostic search, a leaking air-purge was found. Replacement was complete within 2 hours. This incident demonstrated once more the value of these leak detection cables; the system will be further extended (during the end of year technical stop) to cover more racks in UXC and the floor beneath the detector. The magnet has also been operating reliably and reacted correctly to the 14s power cut on 29 May (see below). In or...

  8. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    The actors of the building industry have access to a range of Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs), and are constantly presented with new software and new communications platforms. Through case studies, and inspired by sociotechnical approaches to the study of emerging technologies, ...... in cooperation and development of ICTs seems to pass unnoticed. However, since they are aligned into ICTs, technicities impact innovation....

  9. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    2010-01-01

    Operational Experience At the end of the first full-year running period of LHC, CMS is established as a reliable, robust and mature experiment. In particular common systems and infrastructure faults accounted for <0.6 % CMS downtime during LHC pp physics. Technical operation throughout the entire year was rather smooth, the main faults requiring UXC access being sub-detector power systems and rack-cooling turbines. All such problems were corrected during scheduled technical stops, in the shadow of tunnel access needed by the LHC, or in negotiated accesses or access extensions. Nevertheless, the number of necessary accesses to the UXC averaged more than one per week and the technical stops were inevitably packed with work packages, typically 30 being executed within a few days, placing a high load on the coordination and area management teams. It is an appropriate moment for CMS Technical Coordination to thank all those in many CERN departments and in the Collaboration, who were involved in CMS techni...

  10. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  11. Preparation of β-silicon carbide sintered ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current status of research and problems involving β-SiC ceramics in Japan is summarized, focusing on microstructural changes during sintering. SiC has been studied extensively for the past three decades for technical purposes, but generalized research such as on the detailed mechanism of the sintering process has not yet been fully discussed. This paper describes research on SiC for structural materials, and in addition, the issues related to activating SiC industries are discussed based on experimental results. (orig.)

  12. Insights on Ceramics as Dental Materials. Part I: Ceramic Material Types in Dentistry

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, GW; Matinlinna, JP

    2011-01-01

    Ceramics are widely used biomaterials in prosthetic dentistry due to their attractive clinical properties. They are aesthetically pleasing with their color, shade and luster, and they are chemically stable. The main constituents of dental ceramic are Si-based inorganic materials, such as feldspar, quartz, and silica. Traditional feldspar-based ceramics are also referred to as "Porcelain". The crucial difference between a regular ceramic and a dental ceramic is the proportion of feldspar, quar...

  13. Dynamic properties of ceramic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study offers new data and analysis on the transient shock strength and equation-of-state properties of ceramics. Various dynamic data on nine high strength ceramics are provided with wave profile measurements, through velocity interferometry techniques, the principal observable. Compressive failure in the shock wave front, with emphasis on brittle versus ductile mechanisms of deformation, is examined in some detail. Extensive spall strength data are provided and related to the theoretical spall strength, and to energy-based theories of the spall process. Failure waves, as a mechanism of deformation in the transient shock process, are examined. Strength and equation-of-state analysis of shock data on silicon carbide, boron carbide, tungsten carbide, silicon dioxide and aluminum nitride is presented with particular emphasis on phase transition properties for the latter two. Wave profile measurements on selected ceramics are investigated for evidence of rate sensitive elastic precursor decay in the shock front failure process

  14. Advanced Techniques in Biophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Arrondo, José Luis R

    2006-01-01

    Technical advancements are basic elements in our life. In biophysical studies, new applications and improvements in well-established techniques are being implemented every day. This book deals with advancements produced not only from a technical point of view, but also from new approaches that are being taken in the study of biophysical samples, such as nanotechniques or single-cell measurements. This book constitutes a privileged observatory for reviewing novel applications of biophysical techniques that can help the reader enter an area where the technology is progressing quickly and where a comprehensive explanation is not always to be found.

  15. Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

    2005-08-01

    The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

  16. Proton conducting cerate ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coffey, G.W.; Pederson, L.R.; Armstrong, T.R.; Bates, J.L.; Weber, W.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Cerate perovskites of the general formula AM{sub x}Ce{sub 1-x}O{sub 3-{delta}}, where A = Sr or Ba and where M = Gd, Nd, Y, Yb or other rare earth dopant, are known to conduct a protonic current. Such materials may be useful as the electrolyte in a solid oxide fuel cell operating at intermediate temperatures, as an electrochemical hydrogen separation membrane, or as a hydrogen sensor. Conduction mechanisms in these materials were evaluated using dc cyclic voltammetry and mass spectrometry, allowing currents and activation energies for proton, electron, and oxygen ion contributions to the total current to be determined. For SrYb{sub 0.05}Ce{sub 0.95}O{sub 3-{delta}}, one of the best and most environmentally stable compositions, proton conduction followed two different mechanisms: a low temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 0.42{+-}0.04 eV, and a high temperature process, characterized by an activation energy of 1.38{+-}0.13 eV. It is believed that the low temperature process is dominated by grain boundary conduction while bulk conduction is responsible for the high temperature process. The activation energy for oxygen ion conduction (0.97{+-}0.10 eV) agrees well with other oxygen conductors, while that for electronic conduction, 0.90{+-}0.09 eV, is affected by a temperature-dependent electron carrier concentration. Evaluated by direct measurement of mass flux through a dense ceramic with an applied dc field, oxygen ions were determined to be the majority charge carrier except at the lowest temperatures, followed by electrons and then protons.

  17. Ceramic catalyst materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sault, A.G.; Gardner, T.J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanprasopwattanna, A.; Reardon, J.; Datye, A.K. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Hydrous titanium oxide (HTO) ion-exchange materials show great potential as ceramic catalyst supports due to an inherently high ion-exchange capacity which allows facile loading of catalytically active transition metal ions, and an ability to be cast as thin films on virtually any substrate. By coating titania and HTO materials onto inexpensive, high surface area substrates such as silica and alumina, the economics of using these materials is greatly improved, particularly for the HTO materials, which are substantially more expensive in the bulk form than other oxide supports. In addition, the development of thin film forms of these materials allows the catalytic and mechanical properties of the final catalyst formulation to be separately engineered. In order to fully realize the potential of thin film forms of titania and HTO, improved methods for the deposition and characterization of titania and HTO films on high surface area substrates are being developed. By varying deposition procedures, titania film thickness and substrate coverage can be varied from the submonolayer range to multilayer thicknesses on both silica and alumina. HTO films can also be formed, but the quality and reproducibility of these films is not nearly as good as for pure titania films. The films are characterized using a combination of isopropanol dehydration rate measurements, point of zero charge (PZC) measurements, BET surface area, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and elemental analysis. In order to assess the effects of changes in film morphology on catalytic activity, the films are being loaded with MoO{sub 3} using either incipient wetness impregnation or ion-exchange of heptamolybdate anions followed by calcining. The MoO{sub 3} is then sulfided to form MOS{sub 2}, and tested for catalytic activity using pyrene hydrogenation and dibenzothiophene (DBT) desulfurization, model reactions that simulate reactions occurring during coal liquefaction.

  18. Chemical characterization of marajoara ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the elemental concentration of Ce, Co, Cr, Cs, Eu, Fe, Hf, K, La, Lu, Na, Nd, Rb, Sc, Sm, Ta, Tb, Th, U, Yb and Zn were determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) in 204 fragments of Marajoara archaeological ceramics, of which 156 were provided by the Archaeology and Ethnology Museum of Sao Paulo University (MAE) and 48 were provided by Dr. Denise Pahl Schaan, Marajo Museum curator. Also, 9 contemporary ceramics produced and marketed at Marajo Island were analyzed. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) analyses were performed in 8 archaeological samples and 1 contemporary sample in order to identify the burning temperature of the samples. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses were performed in 13 archaeological samples and 2 contemporary samples for the investigation of their mineralogical composition. Mahalanobis distance was used for the study of outlier while modified filter was used for the study of the temper added to the ceramic paste. Result interpretation was performed using cluster analysis, principal components analysis and discriminant analysis. Procrustes analysis was used for variable selection and it showed that the Ce, Fe, Eu, Hf, K and Th variables are adequate for the characterization of the analyzed samples. The comparative study among the archaeological and contemporary ceramics showed the arrangement of two well-defined and close groups for the archaeological samples and a third, distant group for the contemporary ones. This result indicates that the archaeological and contemporary ceramics differ in their composition. EPR and XRD analysis were inconclusive for the differentiation of archaeological and contemporary ceramics. (author)

  19. Support Services for Ceramic Fiber-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hurley, J.P.

    2000-06-06

    Structural and functional materials used in solid- and liquid-fueled energy systems are subject to gas- and condensed-phase corrosion and erosion by entrained particles. For a given material, its temperature and the composition of the corrodents determine the corrosion rates, while gas flow conditions and particle aerodynamic diameters determine erosion rates. Because there are several mechanisms by which corrodents deposit on a surface, the corrodent composition depends not only on the composition of the fuel, but also on the temperature of the material and the size range of the particles being deposited. In general, it is difficult to simulate under controlled laboratory conditions all of the possible corrosion and erosion mechanisms to which a material may be exposed in an energy system. Therefore, with funding from the Advanced Research Materials Program, the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) is coordinating with NCC Engineering and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to provide researchers with no-cost opportunities to expose materials in pilot-scale systems to conditions of corrosion and erosion similar to those occurring in commercial power systems. The EERC has two pilot-scale solid-fuel systems available for exposure of materials coupons. The slagging furnace system (SFS) was built under the DOE Combustion 2000 Program as a testing facility for advanced heat exchanger subsystems. It is a 2.5-MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr) solid-fuel combustion system with exit temperatures of 2700 to 2900 F to ensure that the ash in the main combustor is molten and flowing. Sample coupons may be exposed in the system either within the slagging zone or near the convective air heater at 1800 F (980 C). In addition, a pilot-scale entrained-bed gasifier system known as the transport reactor development unit (TRDU) is available. Also operating at approximately 2.5 MMBtu/hr (2.6 x 10{sup 6} kJ/hr), it is a pressurized unit

  20. Ceramic components for MHD electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchant, D.D.

    A ceramic component which exhibits electrical conductivity down to near room temperatures has the formula: Hf/sub x/In/sub y/A/sub z/O/sub 2/ where x = 0.1 to 0.4, y = 0.3 to 0.6, z = 0.1 to 0.4 and A is a lanthanide rare earth or yttrium. The component is suitable for use in the fabrication of MHD electrodes or as the current leadout portion of a composite electrode with other ceramic components.