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Sample records for advanced sulfur control

  1. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apostolos A. Nikolopoulos; Santosh K. Gangwal; William J. McMichael; Jeffrey W. Portzer

    2003-01-01

    Conventional sulfur removal in integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants involves numerous steps: COS (carbonyl sulfide) hydrolysis, amine scrubbing/regeneration, Claus process, and tail-gas treatment. Advanced sulfur removal in IGCC systems involves typically the use of zinc oxide-based sorbents. The sulfides sorbent is regenerated using dilute air to produce a dilute SO{sub 2} (sulfur dioxide) tail gas. Under previous contracts the highly effective first generation Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) for catalytic reduction of this SO{sub 2} tail gas to elemental sulfur was developed. This process is currently undergoing field-testing. In this project, advanced concepts were evaluated to reduce the number of unit operations in sulfur removal and recovery. Substantial effort was directed towards developing sorbents that could be directly regenerated to elemental sulfur in an Advanced Hot Gas Process (AHGP). Development of this process has been described in detail in Appendices A-F. RTI began the development of the Single-step Sulfur Recovery Process (SSRP) to eliminate the use of sorbents and multiple reactors in sulfur removal and recovery. This process showed promising preliminary results and thus further process development of AHGP was abandoned in favor of SSRP. The SSRP is a direct Claus process that consists of injecting SO{sub 2} directly into the quenched coal gas from a coal gasifier, and reacting the H{sub 2}S-SO{sub 2} mixture over a selective catalyst to both remove and recover sulfur in a single step. The process is conducted at gasifier pressure and 125 to 160 C. The proposed commercial embodiment of the SSRP involves a liquid phase of molten sulfur with dispersed catalyst in a slurry bubble-column reactor (SBCR).

  2. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  3. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1998-12-31

    The objective of this project is to develop a hot-gas desulfurization process scheme for control of H{sub 2}S in HTHP coal gas that can be more simply and economically integrated with known regenerable sorbents in DOE/METC-sponsored work than current leading hot-gas desulfurization technologies. In addition to being more economical, the process scheme to be developed must yield an elemental sulfur byproduct.

  4. ADVANCED SULFUR CONTROL CONCEPTS FOR HOT-GAS DESULFURIZATION TECHNOLOGY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A. LOPEZ ORTIZ; D.P. HARRISON; F.R. GROVES; J.D. WHITE; S. ZHANG; W.-N. HUANG; Y. ZENG

    1998-10-31

    This research project examined the feasibility of a second generation high-temperature coal gas desulfurization process in which elemental sulfur is produced directly during the sorbent regeneration phase. Two concepts were evaluated experimentally. In the first, FeS was regenerated in a H2O-O2 mixture. Large fractions of the sulfur were liberated in elemental form when the H2O-O2 ratio was large. However, the mole percent of elemental sulfur in the product was always quite small (<<1%) and a process based on this concept was judged to be impractical because of the low temperature and high energy requirements associated with condensing the sulfur. The second concept involved desulfurization using CeO2 and regeneration of the sulfided sorbent, Ce2O2S, using SO2 to produce elemental sulfur directly. No significant side reactions were observed and the reaction was found to be quite rapid over the temperature range of 500°C to 700°C. Elemental sulfur concentrations (as S2) as large as 20 mol% were produced. Limitations associated with the cerium sorbent process are concentrated in the desulfurization phase. High temperature and highly reducing coal gas such as produced in the Shell gasification process are required if high sulfur removal efficiencies are to be achieved. For example, the equilibrium H2S concentration at 800°C from a Shell gas in contact with CeO2 is about 300 ppmv, well above the allowable IGCC specification. In this case, a two-stage desulfurization process using CeO2 for bulk H2S removal following by a zinc sorbent polishing step would be required. Under appropriate conditions, however, CeO2 can be reduced to non-stoichiometric CeOn (n<2) which has significantly greater affinity for H2S. Pre-breakthrough H2S concentrations in the range of 1 ppmv to 5 ppmv were measured in sulfidation tests using CeOn at 700°C in highly reducing gases, as measured by equilibrium O2 concentration, comparable to the Shell gas. Good sorbent durability was indicated in

  5. Incorporating Sulfur Inside the Pores of Carbons for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: An Electrolysis Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Bin; Li, Wen-Cui; Yang, Chao; Wang, Si-Qiong; Lu, An-Hui

    2016-01-26

    We have developed an electrolysis approach that allows effective and uniform incorporation of sulfur inside the micropores of carbon nanosheets for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries. The sulfur-carbon hybrid can be prepared with a 70 wt % sulfur loading, in which no nonconductive sulfur agglomerations are formed. Because the incorporated sulfur is electrically connected to the carbon matrix in nature, the hybrid cathode shows excellent electrochemical performance, including a high reversible capacity, good rate capability, and good cycling stability, as compared to one prepared using the popular melt-diffusion method.

  6. Sulfur Dioxide Emission Control, Blockade and Drainage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents the present status of sulfur dioxide emission from thermal plants in China, tells the main problems existing in its emission control and finally gives out suggestions to the problems, that is, to constitute complete standards and regulations and enhancesupervision accordingly.

  7. Advanced sulfur control concepts in hot-gas desulfurization technology: Phase 2. Exploratory studies on the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Topical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, A.; Huang, W.; White, J. [and others

    1997-07-01

    The topical report describes the results of Phase 2 research to determine the feasibility of the direct production of elemental sulfur during the regeneration of high temperature desulfurization sorbents. Many of the contaminants present in coal emerge from the gasification process in the product gas. Much effort has gone into the development of high temperature metal oxide sorbents for removal of H{sub 2}S from coal gas. The oxides of zinc, iron, manganese, and others have been studied. In order for high temperature desulfurization to be economical it is necessary that the sorbents be regenerated to permit multicycle operation. Current methods of sorbent regeneration involve oxidation of the metal sulfide to reform the metal oxide and free the sulfur as SO{sub 2}. An alternate regeneration process in which the sulfur is liberated in elemental form is desired. Elemental sulfur, which is the typical feed to sulfuric acid plants, may be easily separated, stored, and transported. Although research to convert SO{sub 2} produced during sorbent regeneration to elemental sulfur is on-going, additional processing steps are required and the overall process will be more complex. Clearly, the direct production of elemental sulfur is preferred. Desulfurization utilizing a cerium oxide based sorbent is discussed.

  8. Advanced Control Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Jianjun

    1999-01-01

    This book is developed as a textbook for the course Advanced Control Engineering. The book is intended for students in mechanical engineering and its aim is to provide an understanding of modern control theory as well as methodologies and applications for state space modeling and design....... For this reason, the book puts emphasis on the state-space approach. The main contents of the book includes state-space representation of dynamic systems, analysis of linear control systems, feedback control and observer design. Both continuous-time and discrete-time systems have been addressed in this book....

  9. Advanced Wavefront Control Techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olivier, S S; Brase, J M; Avicola, K; Thompson, C A; Kartz, M W; Winters, S; Hartley, R; Wihelmsen, J; Dowla, F V; Carrano, C J; Bauman, B J; Pennington, D M; Lande, D; Sawvel, R M; Silva, D A; Cooke, J B; Brown, C G

    2001-02-21

    this project, work was performed in four areas (1) advanced modeling tools for deformable mirrors (2) low-order wavefront correctors with Alvarez lenses, (3) a direct phase measuring heterdyne wavefront sensor, and (4) high-spatial-frequency wavefront control using spatial light modulators.

  10. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2001-11-06

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2001 through September 30, 2001. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Corporation is the prime contractor. During the current period, American Electric Power (AEP) joined the project as an additional co-funder and as a provider of a host site for testing. This is the fourth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During this period, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Station. These tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Station), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Station and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70 to 75% sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Station, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO

  11. FURNACE INJECTION OF ALKALINE SORBENTS FOR SULFURIC ACID CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary M. Blythe

    2003-10-01

    This document summarizes progress on Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-99FT40718, Furnace Injection of Alkaline Sorbents for Sulfuric Acid Control, during the time period April 1, 2003 through September, 2003. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the use of alkaline reagents injected into the furnace of coal-fired boilers as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions. The coincident removal of hydrochloric acid and hydrofluoric acid is also being determined, as is the removal of arsenic, a known poison for NO{sub x} selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts. EPRI, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), FirstEnergy Corporation, American Electric Power (AEP) and the Dravo Lime Company are project co-funders. URS Group is the prime contractor. This is the eighth reporting period for the subject Cooperative Agreement. During previous reporting periods, two long-term sorbent injection tests were conducted, one on Unit 3 at FirstEnergy's Bruce Mansfield Plant (BMP) and one on Unit 1 at AEP's Gavin Plant. Those tests determined the effectiveness of injecting alkaline slurries into the upper furnace of the boiler as a means of controlling sulfuric acid emissions from these units. The alkaline slurries tested included commercially available magnesium hydroxide slurry (Gavin Plant), and a byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry (both Gavin Plant and BMP). The tests showed that injecting either the commercial or the byproduct magnesium hydroxide slurry could achieve up to 70-75% overall sulfuric acid removal. At BMP, the overall removal was limited by the need to maintain acceptable electrostatic precipitator (ESP) particulate control performance. At Gavin Plant, the overall sulfuric acid removal was limited because the furnace injected sorbent was less effective at removing SO{sub 3} formed across the SCR system installed on the unit for NO{sub x} control than at removing SO{sub 3} formed in the furnace. The SO{sub 3} removal results were presented in

  12. Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines

    CERN Document Server

    Richter, Hanz

    2012-01-01

    Advanced Control of Turbofan Engines describes the operational performance requirements of turbofan (commercial)engines from a controls systems perspective, covering industry-standard methods and research-edge advances. This book allows the reader to design controllers and produce realistic simulations using public-domain software like CMAPSS: Commercial Modular Aero-Propulsion System Simulation, whose versions are released to the public by NASA. The scope of the book is centered on the design of thrust controllers for both steady flight and transient maneuvers. Classical control theory is not dwelled on, but instead an introduction to general undergraduate control techniques is provided. This book also: Develops a thorough understanding of the challenges associated with engine operability from a control systems perspective, describing performance demands and operational constraints into the framework and language of modern control theory Presents solid theoretical support for classical and advanced engine co...

  13. Advanced AC Motor Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazmierkowski, M.P. [Institute of Control and Industrial Electronics, Warsaw University of Technology, Warszawa (Poland)

    1997-12-31

    In this paper a review of control methods for high performance PWM inverter-fed induction motor drives is presented. Starting from the description of an induction motor by the help of the space vectors, three basic control strategic are discussed. As first, the most popular Field Oriented Control (FOC) is described. Secondly, the Direct Torque and Flux vector Control (DTFC) method, which - in contrast to FOC - depart from idea of coordinate transformation and analogy with DC motor, is briefly characterized. The last group is based on Feedback Linearization Control (FLC) and can be easy combined with sliding mode control. The simulation and experimental oscillograms that illustrate the performance of the discussed control strategies are shown. (orig.) 35 refs.

  14. Advances in lithium-sulfur batteries based on multifunctional cathodes and electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Quan; Liang, Xiao; Kwok, Chun Yuen; Nazar, Linda F.

    2016-09-01

    Amid burgeoning environmental concerns, electrochemical energy storage has rapidly gained momentum. Among the contenders in the ‘beyond lithium’ energy storage arena, the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery has emerged as particularly promising, owing to its potential to reversibly store considerable electrical energy at low cost. Whether or not Li-S energy storage will be able to fulfil this potential depends on simultaneously solving many aspects of its underlying conversion chemistry. Here, we review recent developments in tackling the dissolution of polysulfides — a fundamental problem in Li-S batteries — focusing on both experimental and computational approaches to tailor the chemical interactions between the sulfur host materials and polysulfides. We also discuss smart cathode architectures enabled by recent materials engineering, especially for high areal sulfur loading, as well as innovative electrolyte design to control the solubility of polysulfides. Key factors that allow long-life and high-loading Li-S batteries are summarized.

  15. Advances in the study on endogenous sulfur dioxide in the cardiovascular system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tian Hong

    2014-01-01

    Objective This review summarized the current advances in understanding the role of the novel gasotransmitter,sulfur dioxide (SO2),in the cardiovascular system.Data sources Articles on the advances in the study of the role of endogenous sulfur dioxide in the cardiovascular system were accessed from PubMed and CNKI from 2003 to 2013,using keywords such as "endogenous sulfur dioxide" and "cardiovascular system".Study selection Articles with regard to the role of SO2 in the regulation of cardiovascular system were selected.Results Recently,scientists discovered that an endogenous SO2 pathway is present in the cardiovascular system and exerts physiologically significant effects,such as regulation of the cardiac function and the pathogenesis of various cardiopulmonary diseases such as hypoxic pulmonary hypertension,hypertension,coronary atherosclerosis,and cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury,in the cardiovascular system.Conclusions Endogenous SO2 is a novel member of the gasotransmitter family in addition to the nitric oxide (NO),carbon monoxide (CO),and hydrogen sulfide (H2S).Studies indicated that it has a role in regulating the cardiovascular disease.

  16. A sulfur host based on titanium monoxide@carbon hollow spheres for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhen; Zhang, Jintao; Guan, Buyuan; Wang, Da; Liu, Li-Min; Lou, Xiong Wen (David)

    2016-10-01

    Lithium-sulfur batteries show advantages for next-generation electrical energy storage due to their high energy density and cost effectiveness. Enhancing the conductivity of the sulfur cathode and moderating the dissolution of lithium polysulfides are two key factors for the success of lithium-sulfur batteries. Here we report a sulfur host that overcomes both obstacles at once. With inherent metallic conductivity and strong adsorption capability for lithium-polysulfides, titanium monoxide@carbon hollow nanospheres can not only generate sufficient electrical contact to the insulating sulfur for high capacity, but also effectively confine lithium-polysulfides for prolonged cycle life. Additionally, the designed composite cathode further maximizes the lithium-polysulfide restriction capability by using the polar shells to prevent their outward diffusion, which avoids the need for chemically bonding all lithium-polysulfides on the surfaces of polar particles.

  17. Advances in computational modeling of catalytic systems used in Claus sulfur recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, P.D.; Lo, J. [Alberta Sulphur Research Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada). Center for Applied Catalysis and Industrial Sulfur Chemistry

    2010-01-15

    This poster session discussed advances in computation modeling of catalytic systems used in Claus sulfur recovery, focusing on the hydrogen sulphide (H{sub 2}S) and sulphur dioxide (S{sub O}2) absorption of non-alumina Claus active metal oxides, such as titanium oxide and vanadium oxide. These metal oxides were chosen because they promote carbon disulphide (CS{sub 2}) conversion and have a potential use in olefin chemistry. The redox process of H{sub 2}S dissociation on vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 2}) can take place in single-site reaction or multiple site reactions. Both mechanisms lead to the production of V{sub 2}O{sub 4}S, water (H{sub 2}O) and other species. The overall process of forming VO{sub 4}S is neutral, but kinetics is a controlling factor. The surface sulfidation to form V{sub 2}O{sub 3}S{sub 2} requires a small energy cost but possesses a huge reaction barrier. The formation of H{sub 2}S{sub 2} is energetically favorable. The silica (SiO{sub 2})-supported V{sub 2}O{sub 2} catalyst was described. A proposed mechanism of H{sub 2}S conversion to H{sub 2}O and V=S group was presented along with another reaction route in which the dissociative absorption of H{sub 2}S takes place on O-bridges instead of V=O. Two vanadia catalysts were compared: V{sub 2}O{sub 5} and V{sub 2}O{sub 5}/SiO{sub 2}. 7 figs.

  18. Advances in robust fractional control

    CERN Document Server

    Padula, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    This monograph presents design methodologies for (robust) fractional control systems. It shows the reader how to take advantage of the superior flexibility of fractional control systems compared with integer-order systems in achieving more challenging control requirements. There is a high degree of current interest in fractional systems and fractional control arising from both academia and industry and readers from both milieux are catered to in the text. Different design approaches having in common a trade-off between robustness and performance of the control system are considered explicitly. The text generalizes methodologies, techniques and theoretical results that have been successfully applied in classical (integer) control to the fractional case. The first part of Advances in Robust Fractional Control is the more industrially-oriented. It focuses on the design of fractional controllers for integer processes. In particular, it considers fractional-order proportional-integral-derivative controllers, becau...

  19. Organic anodes and sulfur/selenium cathodes for advanced Li and Na batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chao

    To address energy crisis and environmental pollution induced by fossil fuels, there is an urgent demand to develop sustainable, renewable, environmental benign, low cost and high capacity energy storage devices to power electric vehicles and enhance clean energy approaches such as solar energy, wind energy and hydroenergy. However, the commercial Li-ion batteries cannot satisfy the critical requirements for next generation rechargeable batteries. The commercial electrode materials (graphite anode and LiCoO 2 cathode) are unsustainable, unrenewable and environmental harmful. Organic materials derived from biomasses are promising candidates for next generation rechargeable battery anodes due to their sustainability, renewability, environmental benignity and low cost. Driven by the high potential of organic materials for next generation batteries, I initiated a new research direction on exploring advanced organic compounds for Li-ion and Na-ion battery anodes. In my work, I employed croconic acid disodium salt and 2,5-Dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone disodium salt as models to investigate the effects of size and carbon coating on electrochemical performance for Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. The results demonstrate that the minimization of organic particle size into nano-scale and wrapping organic materials with graphene oxide can remarkably enhance the rate capability and cycling stability of organic anodes in both Li-ion and Na-ion batteries. To match with organic anodes, high capacity sulfur and selenium cathodes were also investigated. However, sulfur and selenium cathodes suffer from low electrical conductivity and shuttle reaction, which result in capacity fading and poor lifetime. To circumvent the drawbacks of sulfur and selenium, carbon matrixes such as mesoporous carbon, carbonized polyacrylonitrile and carbonized perylene-3, 4, 9, 10-tetracarboxylic dianhydride are employed to encapsulate sulfur, selenium and selenium sulfide. The resulting composites exhibit

  20. Induced rhinovirus infection under controlled exposure to sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, I. (Aarhus, Univ., Denmark); Jensen, P.L.; Reed, S.E.; Craig, J.W.; Proctor, D.F.; Adams, G.K.

    1977-01-01

    The interaction between short-term sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) exposure and experimentally induced rhinovirus infection was studied in thirty-two volunteers divided into two groups balanced with respect to age, antibody levels, and nasal mucous flow rates. One group was exposed to SO/sub 2/ at the threshold limit value (TLV) of 5 ppM during 4 hours; the other group served as controls exposed to pollution-free air under the same conditions. The SO/sub 2/ exposure caused a 50% decrease in nasal mucous flow rate in the anterior parts of the nose, but there was no difference in the number of colds which developed in the two groups. The group exposed to SO/sub 2/ had fewer symptoms and a possibly shorter incubation period (P = .06), and virus shedding was at a lower level but more persistent than in the control group. No differences were found in antibody response. The rhinovirus infection in the control group caused a gradual decrease in nasal mucus flow rate starting 2 days after the virus instillation, and after 5 days the rate was less than half its initial value. For future experiments on the interaction between airborne pollutants and rhinovirus infections, a virus challenge by aerosol inhalation is recommended. Our study supports an earlier observation that growth of influenza virus in the nasal cavity of mice was inhibited by exposure to SO/sub 2/ concentrations of 6 or 20 ppM.

  1. Advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkpatrick, J. P.; Brennan, P. J.

    1973-01-01

    The advanced Thermal Control Flight Experiment on the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-F) will evaluate, for the first time in a space environment, the performance of a feedback-controlled variable conductance heat pipe and a heat pipe thermal diode. In addition, the temperature control aspects of a phase-change material (PCM) will be demonstrated. The methanol/stainless steel feedback-controlled heat pipe uses helium control gas that is stored in a wicked reservoir. This reservoir is electrically heated through a solid state controller that senses the temperature of the heat source directly. The ammonia/stainless steel diode heat pipe uses excess liquid to block heat transfer in the reverse direction. The PCM is octadecane. Design tradeoffs, fabrication problems, and performance during qualification and flight acceptance tests are discussed.

  2. Smart battery controller for lithium sulfur dioxide batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwater, Terrill; Bard, Arnold; Testa, Bruce; Shader, William

    1992-08-01

    Each year, the U.S. Army purchases millions of lithium sulfur dioxide batteries for use in portable electronics equipment. Because of their superior rate capability and service life over a wide variety of conditions, lithium batteries are the power source of choice for military equipment. There is no convenient method of determining the available energy remaining in partially used lithium batteries; hence, users do not take full advantage of all the available battery energy. Currently, users replace batteries before each mission, which leads to premature disposal, and results in the waste of millions of dollars in battery energy every year. Another problem of the lithium battery is that it is necessary to ensure complete discharge of the cells when the useful life of the battery has been expended, or when a hazardous condition exists; a hazardous condition may result in one or more of the cells venting. The Electronics Technology and Devices Laboratory has developed a working prototype of a smart battery controller (SBC) that addresses these problems.

  3. The demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor, with internal sulfur, nitrogen, and ash control for the conversion of a 23 MMBTU/hour oil fired boiler to pulverized coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zauderer, B.; Fleming, E.S.

    1991-08-30

    This work contains to the final report of the demonstration of an advanced cyclone coal combustor. Titles include: Chronological Description of the Clean Coal Project Tests,'' Statistical Analysis of Operating Data for the Coal Tech Combustor,'' Photographic History of the Project,'' Results of Slag Analysis by PA DER Module 1 Procedure,'' Properties of the Coals Limestone Used in the Test Effort,'' Results of the Solid Waste Sampling Performed on the Coal Tech Combustor by an Independent Contractor During the February 1990 Tests.'' (VC)

  4. Advanced controls for light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedron, S. G.; Edelen, A. L.; Milton, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    We present a summary of our team's recent efforts in developing adaptive, artificial intelligence-inspired techniques specifically to address several control challenges that arise in machines/systems including those in particle accelerator systems. These techniques can readily be adapted to other systems such as lasers, beamline optics, etc… We are not at all suggesting that we create an autonomous system, but create a system with an intelligent control system, that can continually use operational data to improve itself and combines both traditional and advanced techniques. We believe that the system performance and reliability can be increased based on our findings. Another related point is that the controls sub-system of an overall system is usually not the heart of the system architecture or design process. More bluntly, often times all of the peripheral systems are considered as secondary to the main system components in the architecture design process because it is assumed that the controls system will be able to "fix" challenges found later with the sub-systems for overall system operation. We will show that this is not always the case and that it took an intelligent control application to overcome a sub-system's challenges. We will provide a recent example of such a "fix" with a standard controller and with an artificial intelligence-inspired controller. A final related point to be covered is that of system adaptation for requirements not original to a system's original design.

  5. Diesel Emission Control -- Sulfur Effects (DECSE) Program; Phase I Interim Date Report No. 3: Diesel Fuel Sulfur Effects on Particulate Matter Emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE; ORNL; NREL; EMA; MECA

    1999-11-15

    The Diesel Emission Control-Sulfur Effects (DECSE) is a joint government/industry program to determine the impact of diesel fuel sulfur levels on emission control systems whose use could lower emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) from on-highway trucks in the 2002--2004 model years. Phase 1 of the program was developed with the following objectives in mind: (1) evaluate the effects of varying the level of sulfur content in the fuel on the emission reduction performance of four emission control technologies; and (2) measure and compare the effects of up to 250 hours of aging on selected devices for multiple levels of fuel sulfur content. This interim report covers the effects of diesel fuel sulfur level on particulate matter emissions for four technologies.

  6. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-01-01

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO[sub 2] emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  7. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  8. Advanced Light Source control system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Magyary, S.; Chin, M.; Cork, C.; Fahmie, M.; Lancaster, H.; Molinari, P.; Ritchie, A.; Robb, A.; Timossi, C.

    1989-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a third generation 1--2 GeV synchrotron radiation source designed to provide ports for 60 beamlines. It uses a 50 MeV electron linac and 1.5 GeV, 1 Hz, booster synchrotron for injection into a 1--2 GeV storage ring. Interesting control problems are created because of the need for dynamic closed beam orbit control to eliminate interaction between the ring tuning requirements and to minimize orbit shifts due to ground vibrations. The extremely signal sensitive nature of the experiments requires special attention to the sources of electrical noise. These requirements have led to a control system design which emphasizes connectivity at the accelerator equipment end and a large I/O bandwidth for closed loop system response. Not overlooked are user friendliness, operator response time, modeling, and expert system provisions. Portable consoles are used for local operation of machine equipment. Our solution is a massively parallel system with >120 Mbits/sec I/O bandwidth and >1500 Mips computing power. At the equipment level connections are made using over 600 powerful Intelligent Local Controllers (ILC-s) mounted in 3U size Eurocard slots using fiber-optic cables between rack locations. In the control room, personal computers control and display all machine variables at a 10 Hz rate including the scope signals which are collected though the control system. Commercially available software and industry standards are used extensively. Particular attention is paid to reliability, maintainability and upgradeability. 10 refs., 11 figs.

  9. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States))

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal's emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  10. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on The Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfur and Nitrogen in the Remote Atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    Charlson, Robert; Andreae, Meinrat; Rodhe, Henning

    1985-01-01

    Viewed from space, the Earth appears as a globe without a beginning or an end. Encompassing the globe is the atmosphere with its three phases-­ gaseous, liquid, and solid--moving in directions influenced by sunlight, gravity, and rotation. The chemical compositions of these phases are determined by biogeochemical cycles. Over the past hundred years, the processes governing the rates and reactions in the atmospheric biogeochemical cycles have typically been studied in regions where scientists lived. Hence, as time has gone by, the advances in our knowledge of atmospheric chemical cycles in remote areas have lagged substantially behind those for more populated areas. Not only are the data less abundant, they are also scattered. Therefore, we felt a workshop would be an excellent mechanism to assess the state­ of-knowledge of the atmospheric cycles of sulfur and nitrogen in remote areas and to make recommendations for future research. Thus, a NATO Advanced Research Workshop '~he Biogeochemical Cycling of Sulfu...

  11. Modified dry limestone process for control of sulfur dioxide emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shale, Correll C.; Cross, William G.

    1976-08-24

    A method and apparatus for removing sulfur oxides from flue gas comprise cooling and conditioning the hot flue gas to increase the degree of water vapor saturation prior to passage through a bed of substantially dry carbonate chips or lumps, e.g., crushed limestone. The reaction products form as a thick layer of sulfites and sulfates on the surface of the chips which is easily removed by agitation to restore the reactive surface of the chips.

  12. ULTRA-LOW SULFUR REDUCTION EMISSION CONTROL DEVICE/DEVELOPMENT OF AN ON-BOARD FUEL SULFUR TRAP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ron Rohrbach; Gary Zulauf; Tim Gavin

    2003-04-01

    Honeywell is actively working on a 3-year program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an ''on-vehicle'' desulfurization fuel filter for heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NO{sub x} adsorbers. The NO{sub x} adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and ''2007-Rule'' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters will also be examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. It is anticipated that the technology developed for heavy-duty applications will be applicable to light-duty as well. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consists of four phases. Phase I will focus on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II we will concentrate on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III will study life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV will focus on efficacy and life testing and component integration. The project team will include a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum

  13. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve

  14. Advances in the measurement of sulfur isotopes using laser ablation MC-ICP- MS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridley, W. I.; Pribil, M. J.; Koenig, A. E.; Fayek, M.; Slack, J. F.

    2008-05-01

    Although sulfur is poorly ionized in an argon plasma, there are many applications for sulfur isotope analysis using an ICP source. Studies using a desolvation system (DSN) and an aqueous source of sulfur, where the sulfur is complexed with a cation to form a sulfur salt, e.g., calcium or sodium to provide a stable delivery of sulfur through the sample introduction system indicate that precision (~ 0.3 per mil) and accuracy are maintained at sulfur concentrations as low as 1 mg/L. Based on this data, solid sampling of sulfides and sulfates can provide an adequate amount supply of sulfur to an ICP source, even allowing for the relatively poor transport efficiency of laser ablation systems. The main limitations on accuracy and precision are the initial sampling volume, principally a function of spot size and laser fluence and the decreased instrument sensitivity resulting from the pseudo- medium or high resolution mode of analysis required to eliminate polyatomic isobaric interferences. These factors, in turn, determine the minimal grain size necessary for analysis. There are also fit-for-purpose considerations. For instance, many base metal sulfide systems have large variations in sulfur isotope composition, so that precision as poor as one per mil can still provide useful information. Here, we describe the methodology used at the USGS for laser ablation analysis of sulfides and sulfates using a second generation MC-ICP-MS and demonstrate the accuracy of the method based upon a grain-by-grain comparison of laser ablation and ion microprobe sulfur isotope data. A laser ablation MC-ICP-MS study of base metal mineralization at Dry Creek deposit, east-central Alaska demonstrates that the range in sulfur isotope composition of pyrite, sphalerite and galena, based on analysis of individual grains, is almost twice that reported for any other individual VMS deposit. Analysis on the microscopic scale thus provides additional insights into the potential sources of sulfur for

  15. A flexible sulfur-graphene-polypropylene separator integrated electrode for advanced Li-S batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guangmin; Li, Lu; Wang, Da-Wei; Shan, Xu-Yi; Pei, Songfeng; Li, Feng; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2015-01-27

    A flexible Li-S battery based on an integrated structure of sulfur and graphene on a separator is developed. The internal graphene current collector offers a continuous conductive pathway, a modified interface with sulfur, and a good barrier to and an effective reservoir for dissolved polysulfides, consequently improving the capacity and cyclic life of the Li-S battery.

  16. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, December 1, 1994--February 28, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen (gaseous reactant); and calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate (solid reactants), will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure; and O{sub 2} as well as SO{sub 2} partial pressures on the sulfation reactions rate will be determined. During this quarter, samples of the selected limestone and dolomite, sulfided in the fluidized-bed reactor during last quarter, were analyzed. The extent of sulfidation in these samples was in the range of 20 to 50%, which represent carbonizer discharge material at different operating conditions. The high pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (BPTGA) unit has been modified and a new pressure control system was installed to eliminate pressure fluctuation during the sulfation tests.

  17. Ultra-low Sulfur Reduction Emission Control Device/Development of an On-board Fuel Sulfur Trap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrbach, Ron; Barron, Ann

    2008-07-31

    Honeywell has completed working on a multiyear program to develop and demonstrate proof-of-concept for an 'on-vehicle' desulfurization fuel filter for both light duty and heavy-duty diesel engines. Integration of the filter into the vehicle fuel system will reduce the adverse effects sulfur has on post combustion emission control devices such as NOx adsorbers. The NOx adsorber may be required to meet the proposed new EPA Tier II and '2007-Rule' emission standards. The proposed filter concept is based on Honeywell's reactive filtration technology and experience in liquids handling and conditioning. A regeneration and recycling plan for the spent filters was also examined. We have chosen to develop and demonstrate this technology based on criteria set forth for a heavy duty CIDI engine system because it represents a more challenging set of conditions of service intervals and overall fuel usage over light duty systems. In the second phase of the program a light duty diesel engine test was also demonstrated. Further, technology developed under this proposal would also have application for the use of liquid based fuels for fuel cell power generation. The program consisted of four phases. Phase I focused on developing a concept design and analysis and resolution of technical barriers concerning removal of sulfur-containing species in low sulfur fuels. In Phase II concentrated on prototype filter design and preparation followed by qualification testing of this component in a fuel line application. Phase III studied life cycle and regeneration options for the spent filter. Phase IV focused on efficacy and benefits in the desulfation steps of a NOx adsorber on both a heavy and light duty engine. The project team included a number of partners, with Honeywell International as the prime contractor. The partners include an emission control technology developer (Honeywell International), a fuel technology developer (Marathon Ashland Petroleum), a

  18. Advanced Sulfur Cathode Enabled by Highly Crumpled Nitrogen-Doped Graphene Sheets for High-Energy-Density Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jiangxuan; Yu, Zhaoxin; Gordin, Mikhail L; Wang, Donghai

    2016-02-10

    Herein, we report a synthesis of highly crumpled nitrogen-doped graphene sheets with ultrahigh pore volume (5.4 cm(3)/g) via a simple thermally induced expansion strategy in absence of any templates. The wrinkled graphene sheets are interwoven rather than stacked, enabling rich nitrogen-containing active sites. Benefiting from the unique pore structure and nitrogen-doping induced strong polysulfide adsorption ability, lithium-sulfur battery cells using these wrinkled graphene sheets as both sulfur host and interlayer achieved a high capacity of ∼1000 mAh/g and exceptional cycling stability even at high sulfur content (≥80 wt %) and sulfur loading (5 mg sulfur/cm(2)). The high specific capacity together with the high sulfur loading push the areal capacity of sulfur cathodes to ∼5 mAh/cm(2), which is outstanding compared to other recently developed sulfur cathodes and ideal for practical applications.

  19. Study on Control Strategy of Sulfur Dioxide Concentration in the Urban Area of Shijiazhuang

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李光军; 于立军; 范丽; 王宇新; 赵根喜

    2003-01-01

    Two Gaussian air quality dispersion models, the industrial source complex short-term model (ISCST3) with and without modification have been used to simulate the pollutant concentration distribution in urban areas based on the meteorological data and the emissions distribution of sulfur dioxide. The verified data show that the modified model is more accurate in the urban area of Shijiazhuang. Using the modified model predictions, the control strategies of sulfur dioxide in the urban area have been studied, and the result show that the second long-term (to 2010) strategy can mitigate air pollution significantly and maintain pollution levels within permissible limits.

  20. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. (Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States)); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States))

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on Sulfur Control'' presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT's electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  1. Mesoporous carbon spheres with controlled porosity for high-performance lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dexian; Fu, Aiping; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Yiqian; Guo, Peizhi; Liu, Jingquan; Zhao, Xiu Song

    2015-07-01

    Mesoporous carbon (MC) spheres with hierarchical pores, controlled pore volume and high specific surface areas have been prepared by a mass-producible spray drying assisted template method using sodium alginate as carbon precursor and commercial colloidal silica particles as hard template. The resulting MC spheres, possessing hierarchical pores in the range of 3-30 nm, are employed as conductive matrices for the preparation of cathode materials for lithium-sulfur batteries. A high pressure induced one-step impregnation of elemental sulfur into the pore of the MC spheres has been exploited. The electrochemical performances of sulfur-impregnated MC spheres (S-MC) derived from MC spheres with different pore volume and specific surface area but with the same sulfur loading ratio of 60 wt% (S-MC-X-60) have been investigated in details. The S-MC-4-60 composite cathode material displayed a high initial discharge capacity of 1388 mAhg-1 and a good cycling stability of 857 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C, and shows also excellent rate capability of 864 mAhg-1 at 2C. More importantly, the sulfur loading content in MC-4 spheres can reach as high as 80%, and it still can deliver a capacity of 569 mAhg-1 after 100 cycles at 0.2C.

  2. Evaluation of robotically controlled advanced endoscopic instruments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reilink, Rob; Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Stramigioli, Stefano; Misra, Sarthak

    2013-01-01

    Background Advanced flexible endoscopes and instruments with multiple degrees of freedom enable physicians to perform challenging procedures such as the removal of large sections of mucosal tissue. However, these advanced endoscopes are difficult to control and require several physicians to cooperat

  3. 40 CFR 52.1126 - Control strategy: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... are air pollution control regulations of the State, unless otherwise noted. (See § 52.1125 for... Regulation 310 CMR 7.05(1) (formerly Regulation 5.1) for the Pioneer Valley Air Pollution Control District... Company, Holyoke; Monsanto Polymer and Petrochemical Company, Building 21, Springfield; Monsanto...

  4. Advanced Coordinating Control System for Power Plant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Peng; WEI Shuangying

    2006-01-01

    The coordinating control system is popular used in power plant. This paper describes the advanced coordinating control by control methods and optimal operation, introduces their principals and features by using the examples of power plant operation. It is wealthy for automation application in optimal power plant operation.

  5. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Sastry, K.V.S.; Hanson, J.S.; Harris, G.; Sotillo, F.; Diao, J. (California Univ., Berkeley, CA (USA)); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. (Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Hu, Weibai; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. (Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Choudhry, V.; Sehgal, R.; Ghosh, A. (Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (USA))

    1990-08-15

    The primary objective of this research project is to develop advanced flotation methods for coal cleaning in order to achieve near total pyritic-sulfur removal at 90% Btu recovery, using coal samples procured from six major US coal seams. Concomitantly, the ash content of these coals is to be reduced to 6% or less. Work this quarter concentrated on the following: washability studies, which included particle size distribution of the washability samples, and chemical analysis of washability test samples; characterization studies of induction time measurements, correlation between yield, combustible-material recovery (CMR), and heating-value recovery (HVR), and QA/QC for standard flotation tests and coal analyses; surface modification and control including testing of surface-modifying reagents, restoration of hydrophobicity to lab-oxidized coals, pH effects on coal flotation, and depression of pyritic sulfur in which pyrite depression with calcium cyanide and pyrite depression with xanthated reagents was investigated; flotation optimization and circuitry included staged reagent addition, cleaning and scavenging, and scavenging and middling recycling. Weathering studies are also discussed. 19 figs., 28 tabs.

  6. Advanced motor-controller development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesster, L. E.; Zeitlin, D. B.; Hall, W. B.

    1983-06-01

    The purpose of this development program was to investigate a promising alternative technique for control of a squirrel cage induction motor for subsea propulsion or hydraulic power applications. The technique uses microprocessor based generation of the pulse width modulation waveforms, which in turn permits use of a true integral volt-second pulse width control for the generation of low harmonic content sine waves from a 3 phase Graetz transistor power bridge.

  7. Advanced thermal control for spacecraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardesty, Robert; Parker, Kelsey

    2015-09-01

    In optical systems just like any other space borne system, thermal control plays an important role. In fact, most advanced designs are plagued with volume constraints that further complicate the thermal control challenges for even the most experienced systems engineers. Peregrine will present advances in satellite thermal control based upon passive heat transfer technologies to dissipate large thermal loads. This will address the use of 700 W/m K and higher conducting products that are five times better than aluminum on a specific basis providing enabling thermal control while maintaining structural support.

  8. 40 CFR 80.500 - What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur control program? 80.500 Section 80.500 Protection of Environment... Motor Vehicle Diesel Fuel; Nonroad, Locomotive, and Marine Diesel Fuel; and ECA Marine Fuel General Information § 80.500 What are the implementation dates for the motor vehicle diesel fuel sulfur...

  9. Advances and applications in nonlinear control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Volos, Christos

    2016-01-01

    The book reports on the latest advances and applications of nonlinear control systems. It consists of 30 contributed chapters by subject experts who are specialized in the various topics addressed in this book. The special chapters have been brought out in the broad areas of nonlinear control systems such as robotics, nonlinear circuits, power systems, memristors, underwater vehicles, chemical processes, observer design, output regulation, backstepping control, sliding mode control, time-delayed control, variables structure control, robust adaptive control, fuzzy logic control, chaos, hyperchaos, jerk systems, hyperjerk systems, chaos control, chaos synchronization, etc. Special importance was given to chapters offering practical solutions, modeling and novel control methods for the recent research problems in nonlinear control systems. This book will serve as a reference book for graduate students and researchers with a basic knowledge of electrical and control systems engineering. The resulting design proce...

  10. Control of sulfur partitioning between primary and secondary metabolism in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav eKopriva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential nutrient for all organisms. Plants are able to take up inorganic sulfate and assimilate it into a range of bioorganic molecules either after reduction to sulfide or activation to 3’-phosphoadenosine 5’-phosphosulfate. While the regulation of the reductive part of sulfate assimilation and the synthesis of cysteine has been studied extensively in the past three decades, much less attention has been paid to the control of synthesis of sulfated compounds. Only recently the genes and enzymes activating sulfate and transferring it onto suitable acceptors have been investigated in detail with emphasis on understanding the diversity of the sulfotransferase gene family and the control of partitioning of sulfur between the two branches of sulfate assimilation. Here the recent progress in our understanding of these processes will be summarised.

  11. Controlling crystalline structure of ZnS nanocrystals only by tuning sulfur precursor addition rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Chong; Pan, Liqing; Xu, Mei; Xiao, John Q

    2010-12-01

    Unlike previous studies that emphasize the important role of thermodynamics or surface energy on the structure stabilization of ZnS nanocrystals, we successfully controlled the crystalline structure of ZnS nanocrystals simply by tuning sulfur precursor addition rate under exactly the same other conditions. We observed the structure of as prepared ZnS nanocrystals was evolved from wurtzite into zinc blende with increasing the addition rate of sulfur precursor. The method may extend to engineer other nanomaterials with desired physicochemical properties by controlling crystalline structure. On the other hand, it also makes a new approach to understand the crucial factors that determine the growth mechanism and the crystal structure of nanomaterials in theory.

  12. Advanced nonlinear engine speed control systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterholm, Thomas; Hendricks, Elbert

    1994-01-01

    Several subsidiary control problems have turned out to be important for improving driveability and fuel consumption in modern spark ignition (SI) engine cars. Among these are idle speed control and cruise control. In this paper the idle speed and cruise control problems will be treated as one......: accurately tracking of a desired engine speed in the presence of model uncertainties and severe load disturbances. This is accomplished by using advanced nonlinear control techniques such as input/output-linearization and sliding mode control. These techniques take advantage of a nonlinear model...... of the engine dynamics, a mean value engine model....

  13. Advances in chaos theory and intelligent control

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidyanathan, Sundarapandian

    2016-01-01

    The book reports on the latest advances in and applications of chaos theory and intelligent control. Written by eminent scientists and active researchers and using a clear, matter-of-fact style, it covers advanced theories, methods, and applications in a variety of research areas, and explains key concepts in modeling, analysis, and control of chaotic and hyperchaotic systems. Topics include fractional chaotic systems, chaos control, chaos synchronization, memristors, jerk circuits, chaotic systems with hidden attractors, mechanical and biological chaos, and circuit realization of chaotic systems. The book further covers fuzzy logic controllers, evolutionary algorithms, swarm intelligence, and petri nets among other topics. Not only does it provide the readers with chaos fundamentals and intelligent control-based algorithms; it also discusses key applications of chaos as well as multidisciplinary solutions developed via intelligent control. The book is a timely and comprehensive reference guide for graduate s...

  14. 3D dual-confined sulfur encapsulated in porous carbon nanosheets and wrapped with graphene aerogels as a cathode for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yang; Li, Jianyang; Gao, Xianfeng; Wen, Zhenhai; Yuan, Chris; Chen, Junhong

    2016-04-01

    Although lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have attracted much attention due to their high theoretical specific energy and low cost, their practical applications have been severely hindered by poor cycle life, inadequate sulfur utilization, and the insulating nature of sulfur. Here, we report a rationally designed Li-S cathode with a dual-confined configuration formed by confining sulfur in 2D carbon nanosheets with an abundant porous structure followed by 3D graphene aerogel wrapping. The porous carbon nanosheets act as the sulfur host and suppress the diffusion of polysulfide, while the graphene conductive networks anchor the sulfur-adsorbed carbon nanosheets, providing pathways for rapid electron/ion transport and preventing polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the hybrid electrode exhibits superior electrochemical performance, including a large reversible capacity of 1328 mA h g-1 in the first cycle, excellent cycling stability (maintaining a reversible capacity of 647 mA h g-1 at 0.2 C after 300 cycles) with nearly 100% Coulombic efficiency, and a high rate capability of 512 mA h g-1 at 8 C for 30 cycles, which is among the best reported rate capabilities.Although lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have attracted much attention due to their high theoretical specific energy and low cost, their practical applications have been severely hindered by poor cycle life, inadequate sulfur utilization, and the insulating nature of sulfur. Here, we report a rationally designed Li-S cathode with a dual-confined configuration formed by confining sulfur in 2D carbon nanosheets with an abundant porous structure followed by 3D graphene aerogel wrapping. The porous carbon nanosheets act as the sulfur host and suppress the diffusion of polysulfide, while the graphene conductive networks anchor the sulfur-adsorbed carbon nanosheets, providing pathways for rapid electron/ion transport and preventing polysulfide dissolution. As a result, the hybrid electrode exhibits superior

  15. Performance of a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator for the control of sulfuric acid mist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiayu; Wang, Hongmei; Shi, Yingjie; Zhang, Fan; Dang, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Hui; Shu, Yun; Deng, Shuang; Liu, Yu

    2016-10-01

    The use of a wet electrostatic precipitator (WESP) is often regarded as a viable option to reduce sulfuric acid mist emitted from the wet flue gas desulfurization (WFGD) tower in coal-fired power plants. In this study, a pilot-scale wet electrostatic precipitator equipped with a wall-cooled collection electrode is investigated for the control of sulfuric acid mist from a simulated WFGD system. The results show that due to partial charging effect, the removal efficiency of sulfuric acid aerosol decreases when the aerosol size decreases to several tens of nanometers. Moreover, due to the plasma-induced effect, a large number of ultrafine sulfuric acid aerosols below 50 nm formed at a voltage higher than 24 kV inside the WESP. The percentages of submicron-sized aerosols significantly increase together with the voltage. To minimize the adverse plasma-induced effect, a WESP should be operated at a high gas velocity with an optimum high voltage. Even at a high flue gas velocity of 2.3 m s(-1), the mass concentration and the total number concentration of uncaptured sulfuric acid aerosols at the WESP outlet are as low as ca. 0.6 mg m(-3) and ca. 10(4) 1 cm(-3) at 28 kV, respectively. The corresponding removal efficiencies were respectively higher than 99.4 and 99.9 % and are very similar to that at 1.1 and 1.6 m s(-1). Moreover, the condensation-induced aerosol growth enhances the removal of sulfuric acid mist inside a WESP and enables a low emission concentration of ca. 0.65 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.4 % even at a low voltage of 21 kV, and of ca. 0.35 mg m(-3) with a corresponding removal efficiency superior to 99.6 % at a higher voltage level of 26 kV.

  16. 3D Porous Graphene Aerogel Cathode with High Sulfur Loading and Embedded TiO2 Nanoparticles for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jian-Qiu; Wang, Zhenyu; Xu, Zheng-Long; Chong, Woon Gie; Qin, Xianying; Wang, Xiangyu; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2016-10-07

    Three-dimensional graphene aerogel/TiO2/sulfur (GA/TiO2/S) composites are synthesized through a facile, one-pot hydrothermal route as the cathode for lithium-sulfur batteries. With a high sulfur content of 75.1 wt%, the conductive, highly porous composite electrode delivers a high discharge capacity of 512 mAh/g after 250 cycles at a current rate of 1 C with a low capacity decay of 0.128% per cycle. The excellent capacities and cyclic stability arise from several unique functional features of the cathode. (i) The conductive graphene aerogel framework ameliorates ion/electron transfer while accommodating the volume expansion induced during discharge; and (ii) TiO2 nanoparticles play an important role in restricting the dissolution of polysulfides by chemical bonds with sulfur.

  17. Advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Markus; Dickmanns, Ernst D.

    1997-06-01

    An advanced control architecture for autonomous vehicles is presented. The hierarchical architecture consists of four levels: a vehicle level, a control level, a rule-based level and a knowledge-based level. A special focus is on forms of internal representation, which have to be chosen adequately for each level. The control scheme is applied to VaMP, a Mercedes passenger car which autonomously performs missions on German freeways. VaMP perceives the environment with its sense of vision and conventional sensors. It controls its actuators for locomotion and attention focusing. Modules for perception, cognition and action are discussed.

  18. Advanced Control Techniques with Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    AFRL-RQ-WP-TR-2014-0175 ADVANCED CONTROL TECHNIQUES WITH FUZZY LOGIC James E. Combs Structural Validation Branch Aerospace Vehicles...TECHNIQUES WITH FUZZY LOGIC 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER In-house 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 62201F 6. AUTHOR(S) James E. Combs...unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES PA Case Number: 88ABW-2014-3281; Clearance Date: 09 Jul 2014. 14. ABSTRACT Research on the Fuzzy Logic control

  19. MERCURY CONTROL WITH ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Zhuang; Stanley J. Miller

    2005-05-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addressed Technical Topical Area 4-Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team included the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Power Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and has been marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter provides ultrahigh collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter also appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas--solid contactor. The objective of the project was to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach included bench-scale batch tests, larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, and field demonstration at the 2.5-MW (9000-acfm) scale at a utility power plant to prove scale-up and demonstrate longer-term mercury control

  20. Controlling air toxics through advanced coal preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straszheim, W.E.; Buttermore, W.H.; Pollard, J.L. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This project involves the assessment of advanced coal preparation methods for removing trace elements from coal to reduce the potential for air toxic emissions upon combustion. Scanning electron microscopy-based automated image analysis (SEM-AIA) and advanced washability analyses are being applied with state-of-the-art analytical procedures to predict the removal of elements of concern by advanced column flotation and to confirm the effectiveness of preparation on the quality of quantity of clean coal produced. Specific objectives are to maintain an acceptable recovery of combustible product, while improving the rejection of mineral-associated trace elements. Current work has focused on determining conditions for controlling column flotation system across its operating range and on selection and analysis of samples for determining trace element cleanability.

  1. Advances in neuroprosthetic learning and control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Carmena

    Full Text Available Significant progress has occurred in the field of brain-machine interfaces (BMI since the first demonstrations with rodents, monkeys, and humans controlling different prosthetic devices directly with neural activity. This technology holds great potential to aid large numbers of people with neurological disorders. However, despite this initial enthusiasm and the plethora of available robotic technologies, existing neural interfaces cannot as yet master the control of prosthetic, paralyzed, or otherwise disabled limbs. Here I briefly discuss recent advances from our laboratory into the neural basis of BMIs that should lead to better prosthetic control and clinically viable solutions, as well as new insights into the neurobiology of action.

  2. INTEGRATED PLASMA CONTROL FOR ADVANCED TOKAMAKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HUMPHREYS,D.A; FERRON,J.R; JOHNSON,R.D; LEUER,J.A; PENAFLOR,B.G; WALKER,M.L; WELANDER,A.S; KHAYRUTDINOV,R.R; DOKOUKA,V; EDGELL,D.H; FRANSSON,C.M

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamaks (AT) are distinguished from conventional tokamaks by their high degree of shaping, achievement of profiles optimized for high confinement and stability characteristics, and active stabilization of MHD instabilities to attain high values of normalized beta and confinement. These high performance fusion devices thus require accurate regulation of the plasma boundary, internal profiles, pumping, fueling, and heating, as well as simultaneous and well-coordinated MHD control action to stabilize such instabilities as tearing modes and resistive wall modes. Satisfying the simultaneous demands on control accuracy, reliability, and performance for all of these subsystems requires a high degree of integration in both design and operation of the plasma control system in an advanced tokamak. The present work describes the approach, benefits, and progress made in integrated plasma control with application examples drawn from the DIII-D tokamak. The approach includes construction of plasma and system response models, validation of models against operating experiments, design of integrated controllers which operate in concert with one another as well as with supervisory modules, simulation of control action against off-line and actual machine control platforms, and iteration of the design-test loop to optimize performance.

  3. Industrial applications of advanced control techniques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国平

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses two industrial control applications using advanced control techniques. They are theoptimal-tuning nonlinear PID control of hydraulic systems and the neural predictive control of combustor acoustic ofgas turbines. For hydraulic control systems, an optimal PID controller with inverse of dead zone is introduced toovercome the dead zone and is designed to satisfy desired time-domain performance requirements. Using the adaptivemodel, an optimal-tuning PID control scheme is proposed to provide optimal PID parameters even in the case wherethe system dynamics is time variant. For combustor acoustic control of gas turbines, a neural predictive controlstrategy is presented, which consists of three parts: an output model, output predictor and feedback controller. Theoutput model of the combustor acoustic is established using neural networks to predict the output and overcome thetime delay of the system, which is often very large, compared with the sampling period. The output-feedback con-troller is introduced which uses the output of the predictor to suppress instability in the combustion process. The a-bove control strategies are implemented in the SIMULINK/dSPACE controller development environment. Theirperformance is evaluated on the industrial hydraulic test rig and the industrial combustor test rig.

  4. Controllable synthesis of α-sulfur spheres with hierarchical nanostructures for efficient visible-light-driven photocatalytic ability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Xueming; Zhang, Xiufang, E-mail: zhangxf@dlpu.edu.cn; Zhang, Weiqiang; Dong, Xiaoli; Wang, Guowen; Ma, Hongchao

    2015-08-30

    Highlights: • α-Sulfur spheres with hierarchical nanostructures are controllably produced. • Addition quantity of PVP affects photocatalytic ability of α-sulfur. • The enhanced photocatalytic ability of α-sulfur hierarchical sphere is found. - Abstract: Visible-light-active α-sulfur spheres with hierarchical nanostructures were fabricated by simple solution-phase synthesis with PVP as the template for enhanced photocatalytic ability. The α-sulfur hierarchical spheres with an ultrahigh specific surface area can controllable synthesized by changing the addition quantity of PVP. The obtained products are systematically studied by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis absorption spectroscopy (DRS), Fluorescence (FL) and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET). The photocatalytic activity of the as-prepared samples is evaluated by photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B (RhB) aqueous solution under visible light illumination. The results indicate that the morphology, specific surface area, photo absorbance ability, the separation efficiency of photogenerated carriers and the reactant adsorption performance can be controlled by varying the addition quantity of PVP. When 200 mg PVP is added, α-sulfur hierarchical spheres with uniform particle size about 1 μm and ultrahigh specific surface area of 67.1 m{sup 2}/g is obtained, and its photocatalytic activity reaches a maximum value, which can be attributed to the combined effects of photo absorbance ability, the separation efficiency of photogenerated carriers and the reactant adsorption performance.

  5. Recent Advances in Iterative Learning Control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Xin XU

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we review the recent advances in three sub-areas of iterative learning control (ILC): 1) linear ILC for linear processes, 2) linear ILC for nonlinear processes which are global Lipschitz continuous (GLC), and 3) nonlinear ILC for general nonlinear processes. For linear processes, we focus on several basic configurations of linear ILC. For nonlinear processes with linear ILC, we concentrate on the design and transient analysis which were overlooked and missing for a long period. For general classes of nonlinear processes, we demonstrate nonlinear ILC methods based on Lyapunov theory, which is evolving into a new control paradigm.

  6. Nanostructured nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbon derived from polyacrylonitrile for advanced lithium sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ying; Zhao, Xiaohui; Chauhan, Ghanshyam S.; Ahn, Jou-Hyeon

    2016-09-01

    Nitrogen doping in carbon matrix can effectively improve the wettability of electrolyte and increase electric conductivity of carbon by ensuring fast transfer of ions. We synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped mesoporous carbons (CPANs) via in situ polymerization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN) in SBA-15 template followed by carbonization at different temperatures. Carbonization results in the formation of ladder structure which enhances the stability of the matrix. In this study, CPAN-800, carbon matrix synthesized by the carbonization at 800 °C, was found to possess many desirable properties such as high specific surface area and pore volume, moderate nitrogen content, and highly ordered mesoporous structure. Therefore, it was used to prepare S/CPAN-800 composite as cathode material in lithium sulfur (Li-S) batteries. The S/CPAN-800 composite was proved to be an excellent material for Li-S cells which delivered a high initial discharge capacity of 1585 mAh g-1 and enhanced capacity retention of 862 mAh g-1 at 0.1 C after 100 cycles.

  7. Developments and advances in emission control technology. SP-1120

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Automotive emission control is an increasingly complex subject that continues to be of vital importance. Tighter emission standards as well as requirements for increased emission system performance and durability have resulted in ongoing development and continuing advances in emission control technology. A great deal of attention continues to be focused on technologies for emission control during cold-start. Detailed analyses are required to determine fundamental mechanisms which govern emission control under a wide variety of operating conditions. Effects of possible catalyst poisons as well as the mechanical durability of aftertreatment systems are being evaluated. Engine, vehicle, and aftertreatment sensors are being utilized to monitor and ensure emission control performance. Improved analytical techniques are being used to help understand emissions problems and to suggest avenues to solutions. Papers assembled in this volume touch on all of these areas. Catalyst durability papers address issues related to hot vibration testing and catalyst durability based on substrate surface area. A variety of papers related to the chemical composition of fuels address issues such as fuel hydrocarbon and NO conversion in three-way catalysts, fuel composition effects on emissions in urban traffic, and fuel sulfur effects on catalysts and on-board diagnostics (OBD-II) systems. Information useful for understanding the performance of cold-start technologies is described in papers on a numerical method for predicting warm-up characteristics of catalysts systems, axial characterization of warmup and underfloor catalytic converters, and EHC impact on extended soak times. Other approaches for reducing cold-start emissions are addressed in papers on in-cylinder catalysts and the use of intake air oxygen enrichment technology. All papers have been processed separately for inclusion on the database.

  8. Advanced CIDI Emission Control System Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambert, Christine

    2006-05-31

    Ford Motor Company, with ExxonMobil and FEV, participated in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Ultra-Clean Transportation Fuels Program with the goal to develop an innovative emission control system for light-duty diesel vehicles. The focus on diesel engine emissions was a direct result of the improved volumetric fuel economy (up to 50%) and lower CO2 emissions (up to 25%) over comparable gasoline engines shown in Europe. Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) with aqueous urea as the NOx reductant and a Catalyzed Diesel Particulate Filter (CDPF) were chosen as the primary emission control system components. The program expected to demonstrate more than 90% durable reduction in particulate matter (PM) and NOx emissions on a light-duty truck application, based on the FTP-75 drive cycle. Very low sulfur diesel fuel (<15 ppm-wt) enabled lower PM emissions, reduced fuel economy penalty due to the emission control system and improved long-term system durability. Significant progress was made toward a durable system to meet Tier 2 Bin 5 emission standards on a 6000 lbs light-duty truck. A 40% reduction in engine-out NOx emissions was achieved with a mid-size prototype diesel engine through engine recalibration and increased exhaust gas recirculation. Use of a rapid warm-up strategy and urea SCR provided over 90% further NOx reduction while the CDPF reduced tailpipe PM to gasoline vehicle levels. Development work was conducted to separately improve urea SCR and CDPF system durability, as well as improved oxidation catalyst function. Exhaust gas NOx and ammonia sensors were also developed further. While the final emission control system did not meet Tier 2 Bin 5 NOx after 120k mi of aging on the dynamometer, it did meet the standards for HC, NMOG, and PM, and an improved SCR catalyst was shown to have potential to meet the NOx standard, assuming the DOC durability could be improved further. Models of DOC and SCR function were developed to guide the study of several key

  9. ADVANCED PROCESS CONTROL DEVELOPMENT IN RESIDUA CATALYTIC CRACKER CONTROL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Process calculations and rigorous dynamic model with detailed coke combustion kine-tics for two-stage regeneration FCC process were developed and integrated into the advanced process control(APC) context. The package was implemented in 6 SINOPEC commercial RFCCUs.Typical 0.5%~0.8% improvement of target product yields was achieved. Significant energy consumption was saved with tighter control over coke burning.

  10. JPL Advanced Thermal Control Technology Roadmap - 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birur, Gaj

    2008-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the status of thermal control technology at JPL and NASA.It shows the active spacecraft that are in vairous positions in the solar syatem, and beyond the solar system and the future missions that are under development. It then describes the challenges that the past missions posed with the thermal control systems. The various solutions that were implemented duirng the decades prior to 1990 are outlined. A review of hte thermal challenges of the future misions is also included. The exploration plan for Mars is then reviewed. The thermal challenges of the Mars Rovers are then outlined. Also the challenges of systems that would be able to be used in to explore Venus, and Titan are described. The future space telescope missions will also need thermal control technological advances. Included is a review of the thermal requirements for manned missions to the Moon. Both Active and passive technologies that have been used and will be used are reviewed. Those that are described are Mechanically Pumped Fluid Loops (MPFL), Loop Heat Pipes, an M3 Passive Cooler, Heat Siwtch for Space and Mars surface applications, phase change material (PCM) technology, a Gas Gap Actuateor using ZrNiH(x), the Planck Sorption Cooler (PCS), vapor compression -- Hybrid two phase loops, advanced pumps for two phase cooling loops, and heat pumps that are lightweight and energy efficient.

  11. Advances in dynamical systems and control

    CERN Document Server

    Zgurovsky, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    Focused on recent advances, this book covers theoretical foundations as well as various applications. It presents modern mathematical modeling approaches to the qualitative and numerical analysis of solutions for complex engineering problems in physics, mechanics, biochemistry, geophysics, biology and climatology. Contributions by an international team of respected authors bridge the gap between abstract mathematical approaches, such as applied methods of modern analysis, algebra, fundamental and computational mechanics, nonautonomous and stochastic dynamical systems on the one hand, and practical applications in nonlinear mechanics, optimization, decision making theory and control theory on the other. As such, the book will be of interest to mathematicians and engineers working at the interface of these fields. .

  12. Sulfur removal in advanced two-staged pressurized fluidized-bed combustion; [Quarterly] report, September 1--November 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.; Rue, D.M.

    1994-03-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. A pressurized TGA unit has been purchased by IGT for use in this project.

  13. Sulfur removal in advanced two-stage fluidized-bed combustion. [Quarterly] technical report, December 1, 1993--February 28, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.; Wangerow, J.R.; Rue, D.M. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-06-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between, hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter, the high-pressure thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit was installed and the shakedown process was completed. Several tests were conducted in the HPTGA unit to establish the operating procedure and the repeatability of the experimental results. Sulfidation by conducting the baseline sulfidation tests. The results are currently being analyzed.

  14. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, March 1--May 31, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors. In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen, calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer unit. The sulfate tests conducted during this quarter, focused on the determination of the rate of sulfation reaction involving partially sulfided half-calcined dolomite and oxygen. The test parameters included CO{sub 2} and O{sub 2} concentrations, reaction temperature and pressure, as well as the sorbent particle size. The results obtained during this quarter suggest that the rate of sulfation reaction involving partially sulfided half-calcined dolomite and oxygen is very fast at temperatures above 850 C which rapidly increases with increasing temperature, achieving more than 85% conversion in less than a few minutes. The reaction appears to continue to completion, however, above 85% conversion, the rate of reaction appears to be low, requiring long residence time to reach complete conversion.

  15. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, September 1--November 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.; Wangerow, J.R. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates and the extent of sulfation reactions involving partially sulfided calcium-based sorbents, and oxygen as well as sulfur dioxide, at operating conditions closely simulating those prevailing in the second stage (combustor) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, calcium sulfate is produced through the reactions between SO{sub 2} and calcium carbonate as well as the reaction between calcium sulfide and oxygen. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction involving SO{sub 2} and oxygen (gaseous reactant); and calcium sulfide and calcium carbonate (solid reactants), will be determined by conducting tests in a pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA) unit. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure; and O{sub 2} as well as SO{sub 2} partial pressures on the sulfation reactions rate will be determined. During this quarter, samples of the selected limestone and dolomite were sulfided in the fluidized-bed reactor. These tests were conducted in both calcining and non-calcining operating conditions to produce partially-sulfided sorbents containing calcium oxide and calcium carbonate, respectively. These samples which represent the carbonizer discharge material, will be used as the feed material in the sulfation tests to be conducted in the HPTGA unit during the next quarter.

  16. Advanced Separators for Lithium-Ion and Lithium-Sulfur Batteries: A Review of Recent Progress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Yinyu; Li, Junsheng; Lei, Jiaheng; Liu, Dan; Xie, Zhizhong; Qu, Deyu; Li, Ke; Deng, Tengfei; Tang, Haolin

    2016-11-09

    Li-ion and Li-S batteries find enormous applications in different fields, such as electric vehicles and portable electronics. A separator is an indispensable part of the battery design, which functions as a physical barrier for the electrode as well as an electrolyte reservoir for ionic transport. The properties of the separators directly influence the performance of the batteries. Traditional polyolefin separators showed low thermal stability, poor wettability toward the electrolyte, and inadequate barrier properties to polysulfides. To improve the performance and durability of Li-ion and Li-S batteries, development of advanced separators is required. In this review, we summarize recent progress on the fabrication and application of novel separators, including the functionalized polyolefin separator, polymeric separator, and ceramic separator, for Li-ion and Li-S batteries. The characteristics, advantages, and limitations of these separators are discussed. A brief outlook for the future directions of the research in the separators is also provided.

  17. Spatial Dependence of Reduced Sulfur in Everglades Dissolved Organic Matter Controlled by Sulfate Enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Brett A; Ryan, Joseph N; Nagy, Kathryn L; Stubbins, Aron; Dittmar, Thorsten; Orem, William H; Krabbenhoft, David P; Aiken, George R

    2017-03-01

    Sulfate inputs to the Florida Everglades stimulate sulfidic conditions in freshwater wetland sediments that affect ecological and biogeochemical processes. An unexplored implication of sulfate enrichment is alteration of the content and speciation of sulfur in dissolved organic matter (DOM), which influences the reactivity of DOM with trace metals. Here, we describe the vertical and lateral spatial dependence of sulfur chemistry in the hydrophobic organic acid (HPOA) fraction of DOM from unimpacted and sulfate-impacted Everglades wetlands using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and ultrahigh-resolution mass spectrometry. Spatial variation in DOM sulfur content and speciation reflects the degree of sulfate enrichment and resulting sulfide concentrations in sediment pore waters. Sulfur is incorporated into DOM predominantly as highly reduced species in sulfidic pore waters. Sulfur-enriched DOM in sediment pore waters exchanges with overlying surface waters and the sulfur likely undergoes oxidative transformations in the water column. Across all wetland sites and depths, the total sulfur content of DOM correlated with the relative abundance of highly reduced sulfur functionality. The results identify sulfate input as a primary determinant on DOM sulfur chemistry to be considered in the context of wetland restoration and sulfur and trace metal cycling.

  18. Controlled exposure of volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to sulfur dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linn, W.S.; Fischer, D.A.; Shamoo, D.A.; Spier, C.E.; Valencia, L.M.; Anzar, U.T.; Hackney, J.D.

    1985-08-01

    Twenty-four volunteers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were exposed to sulfur dioxide (SO/sub 2/) at 0, 0.4, and 0.8 ppm in an environmental control chamber. Exposures lasted 1 hr and included two 15-min exercise periods (mean exercise ventilation rate 18 liter/min). Pulmonary mechanical function was evaluated before exposures, after initial exercise, and at the end of exposure. Blood oxygenation was measured by ear oximetry before exposure and during the second exercise period. Symptoms were recorded throughout exposure periods and for 1 week afterward. No statistically significant changes in physiology or symptoms could be attributed to SO/sub 2/ exposure. Older adults with COPD seem less reactive to a given concentration of SO/sub 2/ than heavily exercising young adult asthmatics. This may be due to lower ventilation rates (i.e., lower SO/sub 2/ dose rates) and/or to lower airway reactivity in the COPD group.

  19. Ajoene, a Sulfur-Rich Molecule from Garlic, Inhibits Genes Controlled by Quorum Sensing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim Holm; van Gennip, Maria; Phipps, Richard Kerry

    2012-01-01

    the expression of specific genes involved in pathogenicity, is a possible drug target. Previous in vitro and in vivo studies revealed a significant inhibition of P. aeruginosa QS by crude garlic extract. By bioassay-guided fractionation of garlic extracts, we determined the primary QS inhibitor present in garlic...... to be ajoene, a sulfur-containing compound with potential as an antipathogenic drug. By comprehensive in vitro and in vivo studies, the effect of synthetic ajoene toward P. aeruginosa was elucidated. DNA microarray studies of ajoene-treated P. aeruginosa cultures revealed a concentration-dependent attenuation...... model of pulmonary infection, a significant clearing of infecting P. aeruginosa was detected in ajoene-treated mice compared to a nontreated control group. This study adds to the list of examples demonstrating the potential of QS-interfering compounds in the treatment of bacterial infections....

  20. Coal surface control for advanced fine coal flotation. Final report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuerstenau, D.W.; Hanson, J.S.; Diao, J.; Harris, G.H.; De, A.; Sotillo, F. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States); Somasundaran, P.; Harris, C.C.; Vasudevan, T.; Liu, D.; Li, C. [Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States); Hu, W.; Zou, Y.; Chen, W. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Choudhry, V.; Shea, S.; Ghosh, A.; Sehgal, R. [Praxis Engineers, Inc., Milpitas, CA (United States)

    1992-03-01

    The initial goal of the research project was to develop methods of coal surface control in advanced froth flotation to achieve 90% pyritic sulfur rejection, while operating at Btu recoveries above 90% based on run-of-mine quality coal. Moreover, the technology is to concomitantly reduce the ash content significantly (to six percent or less) to provide a high-quality fuel to the boiler (ash removal also increases Btu content, which in turn decreases a coal`s emission potential in terms of lbs SO{sub 2}/million Btu). (VC)

  1. Prototyping Advanced Control Systems on FPGA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simard Stéphane

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In advanced digital control and mechatronics, FPGA-based systems on a chip (SoCs promise to supplant older technologies, such as microcontrollers and DSPs. However, the tackling of FPGA technology by control specialists is complicated by the need for skilled hardware/software partitioning and design in order to match the performance requirements of more and more complex algorithms while minimizing cost. Currently, without adequate software support to provide a straightforward design flow, the amount of time and efforts required is prohibitive. In this paper, we discuss our choice, adaptation, and use of a rapid prototyping platform and design flow suitable for the design of on-chip motion controllers and other SoCs with a need for analog interfacing. The platform consists of a customized FPGA design for the Amirix AP1000 PCI FPGA board coupled with a multichannel analog I/O daughter card. The design flow uses Xilinx System Generator in Matlab/Simulink for system design and test, and Xilinx Platform Studio for SoC integration. This approach has been applied to the analysis, design, and hardware implementation of a vector controller for 3-phase AC induction motors. It also has contributed to the development of CMC's MEMS prototyping platform, now used by several Canadian laboratories.

  2. Recent approaches for the direct use of elemental sulfur in the synthesis and processing of advanced materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Jeewoo; Pyun, Jeffrey; Char, Kookheon

    2015-03-09

    Elemental sulfur is an abundant and inexpensive material obtained as a by-product of natural-gas and petroleum refining operations. Recently, the need for the development of new energy-storage systems brought into light the potential of sulfur as a high-capacity cathode material in secondary batteries. Sulfur-containing materials were also shown to have useful IR optical properties. These developments coupled with growing environmental concerns related to the global production of excess elemental sulfur have led to a keen interest in its utilization as a feedstock in materials applications. This Minireview focuses on the recent developments on physical and chemical methods for directly processing elemental sulfur to produce functional composites and polymers.

  3. The Advanced Controls Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knee, H.E.; White, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), under sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (DOE), is conducting research that will lead to advanced, automated control of new liquid-metal-reactor (LMR) nuclear power plants. Although this program of research (entitled the Advanced Controls Program'') is focused on LMR technology, it will be capable of providing control design, test, and qualification capability for other advanced reactor designs (e.g., the advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) designs), while also benefiting existing nuclear plants. The Program will also have applicability to complex, non-nuclear process control environments (e.g., petrochemical, aerospace, etc.). The Advanced Controls Program will support capabilities throughout the entire plant design life cycle, i.e., from the initial interactive first-principle dynamic model development for the process, systems, components, and instruments through advanced control room qualification. The current program involves five principal areas of research activities: (1) demonstrations of advanced control system designs, (2) development of an advanced controls design environment, (3) development of advanced control strategies, (4) research and development (R D) in human-system integration for advanced control system designs, and (5) testing and validation of advanced control system designs. Discussion of the research in these five areas forms the basis of this paper. Also included is a description of the research directions of the program. 8 refs.

  4. Identification of control parameters for the sulfur gas storability with bag sampling methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Air samples containing sulfur compounds are often collected and stored in sample bags prior to analyses. The storage stability of six gaseous sulfur compounds (H2S, CH3SH, DMS, CS2, DMDS and SO2) was compared between two different bag materials (polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and polyester aluminum (PEA))...

  5. Sulfur removal in advanced two stage pressurized fluidized bed combustion. Technical report, 1 March--31 May 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbasian, J.; Chowdiah, P.; Hill, A.H.; Rue, D.M. [Inst. of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The objective of this study is to obtain data on the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents under operating conditions relevant to first stage (carbonizer) of Advanced Two-Stage Pressurized Fluidized-Bed Combustors (PFBC). In these systems the CO{sub 2} partial pressure in the first stage generally exceeds the equilibrium value for calcium carbonate decomposition. Therefore, removal of sulfur compounds takes place through the reaction between H{sub 2}S and calcium carbonate. To achieve this objective, the rates of reaction between hydrogen sulfide and uncalcined calcium-based sorbents will be determined by conducting tests in pressurized thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) and high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure/high-temperature fluidized-bed reactor (HPTR) units. The effects of sorbent type, sorbent particle size, reactor temperature and pressure, and CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}S partial pressures on the sulfidation reaction rate will be determined. During this quarter a series of sulfidation tests were conducted in the high-pressure high-temperature thermogravimetric analyzer (HPTGA unit) using limestone and dolomite. The results suggest that half-calcined dolomite is much more reactive than uncalcined limestone. Also, temperature in the range of 800 to 950 C did not significantly affect the sulfidation reaction rates for both limestone and dolomite.

  6. Studies on sulfur poisoning and development of advanced anodic materials for waste-to-energy fuel cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaza, Fabio; Paoletti, Claudia; LoPresti, Roberto; Simonetti, Elisabetta; Pasquali, Mauro

    Biomass is the renewable energy source with the most potential penetration in energy market for its positive environmental and socio-economic consequences: biomass live cycles for energy production is carbon neutral; energy crops promote alternative and productive utilizations of rural sites creating new economic opportunities; bioenergy productions promote local energy independence and global energy security defined as availability of energy resource supply. Different technologies are currently available for energy production from biomass, but a key role is played by fuel cells which have both low environmental impacts and high efficiencies. High temperature fuel cells, such as molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), are particularly suitable for bioenergy production because it can be directly fed with biogas: in fact, among its principal constituents, methane can be transformed to hydrogen by internal reforming; carbon dioxide is a safe diluent; carbon monoxide is not a poison, but both a fuel, because it can be discharged at the anode, and a hydrogen supplier, because it can produce hydrogen via the water-gas shift reaction. However, the utilization of biomass derived fuels in MCFC presents different problems not yet solved, such as the poisoning of the anode due to byproducts of biofuel chemical processing. The chemical compound with the major negative effects on cell performances is hydrogen sulfide. It reacts with nickel, the main anodic constituent, forming sulfides and blocking catalytic sites for electrode reactions. The aim of this work is to study the hydrogen sulfide effects on MCFC performances for defining the poisoning mechanisms of conventional nickel-based anode, recommending selection criteria of sulfur-tolerant materials, and selecting advanced anodes for MCFC fed with biogas.

  7. Improved Recovery Boiler Performance Through Control of Combustion, Sulfur, and Alkali Chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baxter, Larry L.

    2008-06-09

    This project involved the following objectives: 1. Determine black liquor drying and devolatilization elemental and total mass release rates and yields. 2. Develop a public domain physical/chemical kinetic model of black liquor drop combustion, including new information on drying and devolatilization. 3. Determine mechanisms and rates of sulfur scavenging in recover boilers. 4. Develop non-ideal, public-domain thermochemistry models for alkali salts appropriate for recovery boilers 5. Develop data and a one-dimensional model of a char bed in a recovery boiler. 6. Implement all of the above in comprehensive combustion code and validate effects on boiler performance. 7. Perform gasification modeling in support of INEL and commercial customers. The major accomplishments of this project corresponding to these objectives are as follows: 1. Original data for black liquor and biomass data demonstrate dependencies of particle reactions on particle size, liquor type, gas temperature, and gas composition. A comprehensive particle submodel and corresponding data developed during this project predicts particle drying (including both free and chemisorbed moisture), devolatilization, heterogeneous char oxidation, char-smelt reactions, and smelt oxidation. Data and model predictions agree, without adjustment of parameters, within their respective errors. The work performed under these tasks substantially exceeded the original objectives. 2. A separate model for sulfur scavenging and fume formation in a recovery boiler demonstrated strong dependence on both in-boiler mixing and chemistry. In particular, accurate fume particle size predictions, as determined from both laboratory and field measurements, depend on gas mixing effects in the boilers that lead to substantial particle agglomeration. Sulfur scavenging was quantitatively predicted while particle size required one empirical mixing factor to match data. 3. Condensed-phase thermochemistry algorithms were developed for salt

  8. Manufacturing of Protected Lithium Electrodes for Advanced Lithium-Air, Lithium-Water & Lithium-Sulfur Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Steven J

    2015-11-30

    The global demand for rechargeable batteries is large and growing rapidly. Assuming the adoption of electric vehicles continues to increase, the need for smaller, lighter, and less expensive batteries will become even more pressing. In this vein, PolyPlus Battery Company has developed ultra-light high performance batteries based on its proprietary protected lithium electrode (PLE) technology. The Company’s Lithium-Air and Lithium-Seawater batteries have already demonstrated world record performance (verified by third party testing), and we are developing advanced lithium-sulfur batteries which have the potential deliver high performance at low cost. In this program PolyPlus Battery Company teamed with Corning Incorporated to transition the PLE technology from bench top fabrication using manual tooling to a pre- commercial semi-automated pilot line. At the inception of this program PolyPlus worked with a Tier 1 battery manufacturing engineering firm to design and build the first-of-its-kind pilot line for PLE production. The pilot line was shipped and installed in Berkeley, California several months after the start of the program. PolyPlus spent the next two years working with and optimizing the pilot line and now produces all of its PLEs on this line. The optimization process successfully increased the yield, throughput, and quality of PLEs produced on the pilot line. The Corning team focused on fabrication and scale-up of the ceramic membranes that are key to the PLE technology. PolyPlus next demonstrated that it could take Corning membranes through the pilot line process to produce state-of-the-art protected lithium electrodes. In the latter part of the program the Corning team developed alternative membranes targeted for the large rechargeable battery market. PolyPlus is now in discussions with several potential customers for its advanced PLE-enabled batteries, and is building relationships and infrastructure for the transition into manufacturing. It is likely

  9. Controlled Growth of Platinum Nanowire Arrays on Sulfur Doped Graphene as High Performance Electrocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rongyue; Higgins, Drew C.; Hoque, Md Ariful; Lee, DongUn; Hassan, Fathy; Chen, Zhongwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene supported Pt nanostructures have great potential to be used as catalysts in electrochemical energy conversion and storage technologies; however the simultaneous control of Pt morphology and dispersion, along with ideally tailoring the physical properties of the catalyst support properties has proven very challenging. Using sulfur doped graphene (SG) as a support material, the heterogeneous dopant atoms could serve as nucleation sites allowing for the preparation of SG supported Pt nanowire arrays with ultra-thin diameters (2–5 nm) and dense surface coverage. Detailed investigation of the preparation technique reveals that the structure of the resulting composite could be readily controlled by fine tuning the Pt nanowire nucleation and growth reaction kinetics and the Pt-support interactions, whereby a mechanistic platinum nanowire array growth model is proposed. Electrochemical characterization demonstrates that the composite materials have 2–3 times higher catalytic activities toward the oxygen reduction and methanol oxidation reaction compared with commercial Pt/C catalyst. PMID:23942256

  10. Ervaringen met Advanced Cruise Control (ACC) in een korte praktijkproef.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oei, H.-l.

    2003-01-01

    Experiences with Advanced Cruise Control in traffic; a limited experiment. Advanced Cruise Control (ACC) is an ordinary cruise control in which the desired speed is installed manually, but in which the headway time to the vehicle in front is also taken into account. If the headway time becomes less

  11. Morphology control of ordered mesoporous carbons for high capacity lithium sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Joerg David

    2011-06-07

    The focus of this thesis concerns the morphology control of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials. Ordered mesoporous carbons with diverse morphologies, that are thin films, fibers - embedded in anodic alumina membranes and free-standing - or spherical nanoparticles, have been successfully prepared by soft-templating procedures. The mechanisms of structure formation and processing were investigated with in-situ SAXS measurements and their application in high capacity lithium-sulfur batteries was successfully tested in cooperation with Guang He and Linda Nazar from the University of Waterloo in Canada. The Li-S batteries receive increasing attention due to their high theoretical energy density which is 3 to 5 times higher than from lithium-ion batteries. For this type of battery the specific pore volume is crucial for the content of the active component (sulfur) in the cathode and therefore correlates with the capacity and gravimetric energy density of the battery. At first, mesoporous thin films with 2D-hexagonal structure were obtained through organic-organic self-assembly of a preformed oligomeric resol precursor and the triblock copolymer template Pluronic P123. The formation of a condensed-wall material through thermopolymerization of the precursor oligomers resulted in mesostructured phenolic resin films. Subsequent decomposition of the surfactant and partial carbonization were achieved through thermal treatment in inert atmosphere. The films were crack-free with tunable homogenous thicknesses, and showed either 2D-hexagonal or lamellar mesostructure. An additional, yet unknown 3D-mesostructure was also found. In the second part, cubic and circular hexagonal mesoporous carbon phases in the confined environment of tubular anodic alumina membrane (AAM) pores were obtained by self-assembly of the mentioned resol precursor and the triblock copolymer templates Pluronic F127 or P123, respectively. Casting and solvent-evaporation were also followed by

  12. Control strategy for sulfur dioxide and acid rain pollution inChinaa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Several factors, namely, coal-dominated primary energy mix, extensive economic development mode, inefficient energy utilization, end the imperfect environmental regulations, result in the serious urban sulfur dioxide pollution end large-scale sulfatetype acid precipitation in China. In 1995, China's sulfur dioxide emissions reached 23.70 Mt, and the areas affected by acid rain accounted for 40% of the territory. Chinese government accords considerable importance to the sulfur dioxide end acid rain contamination. New sets of environmental friendly policies have been promulgated. But enforcement of laws and regulations on SO2 emissions need to be further improved and broadened, especially those respond to market conditions. This paper focuses particular attention on the analysis of strategy, policies, and national actions which had or should be taken against sulfur dioxide emissions nationwide to achieve the environmental targets, on the basis of which gives the technical options in future.

  13. Morphology control of ordered mesoporous carbons for high capacity lithium sulfur batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuster, Joerg David

    2011-06-07

    The focus of this thesis concerns the morphology control of ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials. Ordered mesoporous carbons with diverse morphologies, that are thin films, fibers - embedded in anodic alumina membranes and free-standing - or spherical nanoparticles, have been successfully prepared by soft-templating procedures. The mechanisms of structure formation and processing were investigated with in-situ SAXS measurements and their application in high capacity lithium-sulfur batteries was successfully tested in cooperation with Guang He and Linda Nazar from the University of Waterloo in Canada. The Li-S batteries receive increasing attention due to their high theoretical energy density which is 3 to 5 times higher than from lithium-ion batteries. For this type of battery the specific pore volume is crucial for the content of the active component (sulfur) in the cathode and therefore correlates with the capacity and gravimetric energy density of the battery. At first, mesoporous thin films with 2D-hexagonal structure were obtained through organic-organic self-assembly of a preformed oligomeric resol precursor and the triblock copolymer template Pluronic P123. The formation of a condensed-wall material through thermopolymerization of the precursor oligomers resulted in mesostructured phenolic resin films. Subsequent decomposition of the surfactant and partial carbonization were achieved through thermal treatment in inert atmosphere. The films were crack-free with tunable homogenous thicknesses, and showed either 2D-hexagonal or lamellar mesostructure. An additional, yet unknown 3D-mesostructure was also found. In the second part, cubic and circular hexagonal mesoporous carbon phases in the confined environment of tubular anodic alumina membrane (AAM) pores were obtained by self-assembly of the mentioned resol precursor and the triblock copolymer templates Pluronic F127 or P123, respectively. Casting and solvent-evaporation were also followed by

  14. Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems in clinical disease management

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brouwers, JRBJ

    1996-01-01

    Advanced and controlled drug delivery systems are important for clinical disease management. In this review the most important new systems which have reached clinical application are highlighted. Microbiologically controlled drug delivery is important for gastrointestinal diseases like ulcerative co

  15. Control and treatment of sulfur oxides emissions; Prevention et traitement des emissions d`oxydes de soufre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-01

    The conference on the control and treatment of sulfur oxides emissions has held in Le Havre the 4. and 5. december, 1997. The aim of this conference was to promote the information on the different treatment technologies and to contribute on the one hand to the supporting and revival of the environmental protection and on the other hand to the desulfurization programs. It has allowed to recall too the technical and financial support of the Ademe to the manufacturers. (O.M.)

  16. Advanced control of a water supply system: a case study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Rajewicz, T.; Kien, H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.; Rietveld, L.C.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional automatic production flow control and pump pressure control of water supply systems are robust and simple: production flow is controlled based on the level in the clear water reservoir and pump pressure is controlled on a static set-point. Recently, more advanced computer-based control

  17. Generic Model Predictive Control Framework for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wang, M.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis deals with a model predictive control framework for control design of Advanced Driver Assistance Systems, where car-following tasks are under control. The framework is applied to design several autonomous and cooperative controllers and to examine the controller properties at the microsc

  18. Advance in Sulfur Reduction and Non-Sulfur Preservation Measures of Grape Storage%葡萄降硫和非硫保鲜措施研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯志宏; 赵猛; 赵迎丽; 王亮; 陈嘉; 焦旋; 王春生

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is the most effective means of controlling gray mold infection and maintaining the quality of grape. Because of SO2 residues on grape, this paper reviewed domestic and foreign research on grape non-sulfur or sulfur reducing preservative measures in recent years, and introduced the ice temperature storage, controlled atmosphere, ozone, coating, high voltage electrostatic field, biological control, controlled/slow release sulfur producing antistaling agent, chlorine dioxide (ClO2), 1-methylcyclopropene (1-MCP) preservation principle and effect of such measures. In addition, different storage period of grape preservation measures and future research on further reducing the dose of SO2 and the grape post-harvest residues were described.%二氧化硫(SO2)是防治灰霉侵染和保持葡萄品质的最有效手段。基于SO2残留的食品安全问题,就近年来国内外对葡萄非硫或降硫保鲜措施的研究进行文献综述,介绍了冰温保鲜、气调保鲜、臭氧、涂膜、高压静电场、生物防治、控/缓释硫制保鲜剂、二氧化氯(ClO2)、1-甲基环丙烯(1-MCP)等措施的防腐保鲜原理及功效,并对不同贮藏期的葡萄保鲜措施和今后降低葡萄采后SO2使用剂量及残留量的进一步研究进行阐述和展望,为鲜食葡萄非硫或降硫贮藏保鲜技术及保鲜剂的研究提供理论参考。

  19. Combined nitrogen oxides/sulfur dioxide control in dry scrubber systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harkness, J. B.L.; Gorski, A. J.; Huang, H. S.

    1989-02-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is investigating alternative control concepts that involve modifying existing SO{sub 2}-removal processes and sorbents, with the objective of achieving simultaneous removal of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}). Laboratory-scale research conducted using a fixed-bed reactor and a spray-dryer/fabric-filter system has been paralleled by field tests at ANL's commercial-scale (20-MW electric equivalent) dry scrubber. In the fixed-bed experiments, a range of chemical reagents was surveyed, and the best-performing additives were studied in detail. Sodium chloride, sodium bisulfite, sodium hydroxide, and Fe(II)*EDTA were found to increase both NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removals; the additives did not appear to increase NO{sub x} removal directly, but they interacted strongly with the other primary variables to improve sorbent performance. The laboratory spray-dryer system was used to study the effects on combined NO{sub x}/SO{sub 2} removal of the best-performing fixed-bed additives and certain process modifications. The tests showed that sodium chloride increased NO{sub x} removal at all temperatures; sodium bisulfite was generally less effective, and calcium chloride was effective only at 65{degree}C. Up to 80{degree}C, all three additives significantly improved SO{sub 2} removal, but improvement ceased at higher temperatures. This report discusses the experimental results in terms of the effects the additives and principal process variables had on NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} removals and the mechanistic implications. 14 refs., 74 figs., 33 tabs.

  20. Dynamic behavior of the bray-liebhafsky oscillatory reaction controlled by sulfuric acid and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pejić, N.; Vujković, M.; Maksimović, J.; Ivanović, A.; Anić, S.; Čupić, Ž.; Kolar-Anić, Lj.

    2011-12-01

    The non-periodic, periodic and chaotic regimes in the Bray-Liebhafsky (BL) oscillatory reaction observed in a continuously fed well stirred tank reactor (CSTR) under isothermal conditions at various inflow concentrations of the sulfuric acid were experimentally studied. In each series (at any fixed temperature), termination of oscillatory behavior via saddle loop infinite period bifurcation (SNIPER) as well as some kind of the Andronov-Hopf bifurcation is presented. In addition, it was found that an increase of temperature, in different series of experiments resulted in the shift of bifurcation point towards higher values of sulfuric acid concentration.

  1. Advanced Control Law Tuning and Performance Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    range. The Fig. 21 shows the response of the NGMV controller and of two of the PID controllers obtained. The dynamic response of the NGMV controller...is very close to the original one, despite the significant increase in the time delay. It was not possible to obtain, for the PID controllers , both

  2. Technology Development of an Advanced Small-scale Microchannel-type Process Heat Exchanger (PHE) for Hydrogen Production in Iodine-sulfur Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, Injin; Kim, Chan Soo; Kim, Yong Wan; Park, Jae-Won; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, ongoing manufacturing processes of the components employed in an advanced small-scale microchannel-type PHE are presented. The components, such as mechanically machined microchannels and a diffusion-bonded stack are introduced. Also, preliminary studies on surface treatment techniques for improving corrosion resistance from the corrosive sulfuric environment will be covered. Ongoing manufacturing process for an advanced small-size microchannel-type PHE in KAERI is presented. Through the preliminary studies for optimizing diffusion bonding condition of Hastelloy-X, a diffusion-bonded stack, consisting of primary and secondary side layer by layer, is scheduled to be fabricated in a few months. Also, surface treatment for enhancing the corrosion resistance from the sulfuric acid environment is in progress for the plates with microchannels. A massive production of hydrogen with electricity generation is expected in a Process Heat Exchanger (PHE) in a Very High Temperature gas-cooled Reactor (VHTR) system. For the application of hydrogen production, a small-scale gas loop for feasibility testing of a laboratory-scale has constructed and operated in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) as a precursor to an experimental- and a pilot-scale gas loops.

  3. Studies on the effectiveness of various sulfur fertilizers under controlled conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijksterhuis, G.H.; Oenema, O.

    1990-01-01

    Three factorial experiments with four replications were conducted in a greenhouse to examine the effectiveness of gypsum, elemental sulfur (ES powder) and three S containing N fertilizers, viz., ammonium sulfate (AS), urea ES, and Ureas (20% AS and 80% urea). All experiments were conducted twice in

  4. 40 CFR 52.125 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...) of the Clean Air Act. (2) The approval of paragraphs A and F of regulation 7-1-4.2 as to coal fired...)and 123(a)(2) of the Clean Air Act. (g) Section 3, Regulation 3 (Sulfur from Primary Copper Smelters... section 110(a)(2)(B) of the Clean Air Act. Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting §...

  5. 40 CFR 52.2731 - Control strategy and regulations: Sulfur oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the national standards for sulfur oxides in the areas of Aguirre, Barceloneta, Trujillo Alto-Dorado... section is disapproved for the following facilities: Puerto RicoWater Resources Authority—Aguirre Complex... exception of the Puerto Rico Water Resources Authority—Aguirre Complex, are required to conform to...

  6. Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carl Richardson; Katherine Dombrowski; Douglas Orr

    2006-12-31

    This project Final Report is submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) as part of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-03NT41987, 'Sorbent Injection for Small ESP Mercury Control in Low Sulfur Eastern Bituminous Coal Flue Gas.' Sorbent injection technology is targeted as the primary mercury control process on plants burning low/medium sulfur bituminous coals equipped with ESP and ESP/FGD systems. About 70% of the ESPs used in the utility industry have SCAs less than 300 ft2/1000 acfm. Prior to this test program, previous sorbent injection tests had focused on large-SCA ESPs. This DOE-NETL program was designed to generate data to evaluate the performance and economic feasibility of sorbent injection for mercury control at power plants that fire bituminous coal and are configured with small-sized electrostatic precipitators and/or an ESP-flue gas desulfurization (FGD) configuration. EPRI and Southern Company were co-funders for the test program. Southern Company and Reliant Energy provided host sites for testing and technical input to the project. URS Group was the prime contractor to NETL. ADA-ES and Apogee Scientific Inc. were sub-contractors to URS and was responsible for all aspects of the sorbent injection systems design, installation and operation at the different host sites. Full-scale sorbent injection for mercury control was evaluated at three sites: Georgia Power's Plant Yates Units 1 and 2 [Georgia Power is a subsidiary of the Southern Company] and Reliant Energy's Shawville Unit 3. Georgia Power's Plant Yates Unit 1 has an existing small-SCA cold-side ESP followed by a Chiyoda CT-121 wet scrubber. Yates Unit 2 is also equipped with a small-SCA ESP and a dual flue gas conditioning system. Unit 2 has no SO2 control system. Shawville Unit 3 is equipped with two small-SCA cold-side ESPs operated in series. All ESP systems tested in this program had SCAs less than 250 ft2/1000 acfm. Short-term parametric tests were conducted on Yates

  7. Comparison of advanced distillation control methods. First annual report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riggs, J.B.

    1996-11-01

    A detailed dynamic simulator of a propylene/propane (C{sub 3}) splitter, which was bench-marked against industrial data, has been used to compare dual composition control performance for a diagonal PI controller and several advanced controllers. The advanced controllers considered are dynamic matrix control (DMC), nonlinear process model based control, and artificial neutral networks. Each controller was tuned based upon setpoint changes in the overhead product composition using 50% changes in the impurity levels. Overall, there was not a great deal of difference in controller performance based upon the setpoint and disturbance tests. Periodic step changes in feed composition were also used to compare controller performance. In this case, oscillatory variations of the product composition were observed and the variabilities of the DC and nonlinear process model based controllers were substantially smaller than that of the PI controller. The sensitivity of each controller to the frequency of the periodic step changes in feed composition was also investigated.

  8. Advanced Stellar Compass, SAC-C, Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Betto, Maurizio; Riis, Troels;

    Interface Control Document for the Advanced Stellar Compass for the SAC-C satellite. The SAC-C is Argentine, Danish and NASA satellite. On the SAC-C satellite there are a simplified version of the Ørsted instrumentation platform. The Advanced Stellar Compass is a improved version of the Ørsted Star...... Imager. This document descibes the interface between the Advanced Stellar Compass and OBDH, the size of the DPU and the Camera etc....

  9. Mechanics and model-based control of advanced engineering systems

    CERN Document Server

    Irschik, Hans; Krommer, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Mechanics and Model-Based Control of Advanced Engineering Systems collects 32 contributions presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines, which took place in St. Petersburg, Russia in July 2012. The workshop continued a series of international workshops, which started with a Japan-Austria Joint Workshop on Mechanics and Model Based Control of Smart Materials and Structures and a Russia-Austria Joint Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines. In the present volume, 10 full-length papers based on presentations from Russia, 9 from Austria, 8 from Japan, 3 from Italy, one from Germany and one from Taiwan are included, which represent the state of the art in the field of mechanics and model based control, with particular emphasis on the application of advanced structures and machines.

  10. Advanced Combustion and Emission Control Technical Team Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2013-06-01

    The Advanced Combustion and Emission Control (ACEC) Technical Team is focused on removing technical barriers to the commercialization of advanced, high-efficiency, emission-compliant internal combustion (IC) engines for light-duty vehicle powertrains (i.e., passenger car, minivan, SUV, and pickup trucks).

  11. Pressurized fluidized-bed hydroretorting of Eastern oil shales -- Sulfur control. Topical report for Subtask 3.1, In-bed sulfur capture tests; Subtask 3.2, Electrostatic desulfurization; Subtask 3.3, Microbial desulfurization and denitrification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roberts, M.J.; Abbasian, J.; Akin, C.; Lau, F.S.; Maka, A.; Mensinger, M.C.; Punwani, D.V.; Rue, D.M. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States); Gidaspow, D.; Gupta, R.; Wasan, D.T. [Illinois Inst. of Tech., Chicago, IL (United States); Pfister, R.M.: Krieger, E.J. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States)

    1992-05-01

    This topical report on ``Sulfur Control`` presents the results of work conducted by the Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT), and the Ohio State University (OSU) to develop three novel approaches for desulfurization that have shown good potential with coal and could be cost-effective for oil shales. These are (1) In-Bed Sulfur Capture using different sorbents (IGT), (2) Electrostatic Desulfurization (IIT), and (3) Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification (OSU and IGT). The objective of the task on In-Bed Sulfur Capture was to determine the effectiveness of different sorbents (that is, limestone, calcined limestone, dolomite, and siderite) for capturing sulfur (as H{sub 2}S) in the reactor during hydroretorting. The objective of the task on Electrostatic Desulfurization was to determine the operating conditions necessary to achieve a high degree of sulfur removal and kerogen recovery in IIT`s electrostatic separator. The objectives of the task on Microbial Desulfurization and Denitrification were to (1) isolate microbial cultures and evaluate their ability to desulfurize and denitrify shale, (2) conduct laboratory-scale batch and continuous tests to improve and enhance microbial removal of these components, and (3) determine the effects of processing parameters, such as shale slurry concentration, solids settling characteristics, agitation rate, and pH on the process.

  12. Model-free adaptive control of advanced power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, George Shu-Xing; Mulkey, Steven L.; Wang, Qiang

    2015-08-18

    A novel 3-Input-3-Output (3.times.3) Model-Free Adaptive (MFA) controller with a set of artificial neural networks as part of the controller is introduced. A 3.times.3 MFA control system using the inventive 3.times.3 MFA controller is described to control key process variables including Power, Steam Throttle Pressure, and Steam Temperature of boiler-turbine-generator (BTG) units in conventional and advanced power plants. Those advanced power plants may comprise Once-Through Supercritical (OTSC) Boilers, Circulating Fluidized-Bed (CFB) Boilers, and Once-Through Supercritical Circulating Fluidized-Bed (OTSC CFB) Boilers.

  13. ADVANCED CONTROL OF A COMPLEX CHEMICAL PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roxana Both

    Full Text Available Abstract Three phase catalytic hydrogenation reactors are important reactors with complex behavior due to the interaction among gas, solid and liquid phases with the kinetic, mass and heat transfer mechanisms. A nonlinear distributed parameter model was developed based on mass and energy conservation principles. It consists of balance equations for the gas and liquid phases, so that a system of partial differential equations is generated. Because detailed nonlinear mathematical models are not suitable for use in controller design, a simple linear mathematical model of the process, which describes its most important properties, was determined. Both developed mathematical models were validated using plant data. The control strategies proposed in this paper are a multivariable Smith Predictor PID controller and multivariable Smith Predictor structure in which the primary controllers are derived based on Internal Model Control. Set-point tracking and disturbance rejection tests are presented for both methods based on scenarios implemented in Matlab/SIMULINK.

  14. Safety Cases for Advanced Control Software: Safety Case Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-15

    Classification Argument (from [14]) The classification of software failure modes can be useful for adaptive systems. Kurd in [15] shows how HAZOPS ...Safety Cases for Advanced Control Software : Safety Case Patterns Robert Alexander, Tim Kelly, Zeshan Kurd, John...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8655-07-1-3025 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Safety Cases for Advanced Control Software 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT

  15. Coal surface control for advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report, September 19, 1988--August 31, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morsi, B.I.; Chiang, S.H.; Sharkey, A.; Blachere, J.; Klinzing, G.; Araujo, G.; Cheng, Y.S.; Gray, R.; Streeter, R.; Bi, H.; Campbell, P.; Chiarlli, P.; Ciocco, M.; Hittle, L.; Kim, S.; Kim, Y.; Perez, L.; Venkatadri, R.

    1992-12-31

    This final report presents the research work carried out on the Coal Surface Control for Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technologies project, sponsored by the US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center (DOE/PETC). The project was to support the engineering development of the selective agglomeration technology in order to reduce the sulfur content of US coals for controlling SO{sub 2} emissions (i.e., acid rain precursors). The overall effort was a part of the DOE/PETCs Acid Rain Control Initiative (ARCI). The overall objective of the project is to develop techniques for coal surface control prior to the advanced physical fine coal cleaning process of selective agglomeration in order to achieve 85% pyrite sulfur rejection at an energy recovery greater than 85% based on run-of-mine coal. The surface control is meant to encompass surface modification during grinding and laboratory beneficiation testing. The project includes the following tasks: Project planning; methods for analysis of samples; development of standard beneficiation test; grinding studies; modification of particle surface; and exploratory R&D and support. The coal samples used in this project include three base coals, Upper Freeport - Indiana County, PA, Pittsburgh NO. 8 - Belmont County, OH, and Illinois No. 6 - Randolph County, IL, and three additional coals, Upper Freeport - Grant County- WV, Kentucky No. 9 Hopkins County, KY, and Wyodak - Campbell County, WY. A total of 149 drums of coal were received.

  16. Use of nahcolite ore and bag filters for sulfur dioxide emission control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genco, J.M. (Univ. of Maine, Orono); Rosenberg, H.S.; Anastas, M.Y.; Rosar, E.C.; Dulin, J.M.

    1975-12-01

    Technical and economic aspects of the nahcolite ore injection process for the simultaneous removal of fly ash and sulfur oxides from stack gases are described. The process is capable of removing greater than 99 percent of the particulate matter and greater than 70 percent of the sulfur oxides present in such gases. The technical feasibility of the process has been demonstrated in both bench scale and pilot scale engineering studies. Economic analyses performed for the cases of plants located in the midwest and southwest indicate lower capital costs for the nahcolite injection process when compared to wet scrubbing. On an annual cost basis, the nahcolite ore injection process is comparable in cost to wet scrubbing for the case of the southwestern power plant, and somewhat more expensive for the case of the midwestern plant.

  17. Cooperative research for human factors review of advanced control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Woon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Yong Hee; Oh, In Seok; Lee, Hyun Chul

    2000-12-01

    This project has been performed as cooperative research between KAERI and USNRC. Human factors issues related to soft controls, which is one of key features of advanced HSI, are identified in this project. The issues are analyzed for the evaluation approaches in either experimental or analytical ways. Also, issues requiring additional researches for the evaluation of advanced HSI are identified in the areas of advanced information systems design, computer-based procedure systems, soft controls, human systems interface and plant modernization process, and maintainability of digital systems. The issues are analyzed to discriminate the urgency of researches on it to high, medium, and low levels in consideration of advanced HSI development status in Korea, and some of the issues that can be handled by experimental researches are identified. Additionally, an experimental study is performed to compare operator's performance on human error detection in advanced control rooms vs. in conventional control rooms. It is found that advanced control rooms have several design characteristics hindering operator's error detection performance compared to conventional control rooms.

  18. Automated Deployment of Advanced Controls and Analytics in Buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritoni, Marco

    Buildings use 40% of primary energy in the US. Recent studies show that developing energy analytics and enhancing control strategies can significantly improve their energy performance. However, the deployment of advanced control software applications has been mostly limited to academic studies. Larger-scale implementations are prevented by the significant engineering time and customization required, due to significant differences among buildings. This study demonstrates how physics-inspired data-driven models can be used to develop portable analytics and control applications for buildings. Specifically, I demonstrate application of these models in all phases of the deployment of advanced controls and analytics in buildings: in the first phase, "Site Preparation and Interface with Legacy Systems" I used models to discover or map relationships among building components, automatically gathering metadata (information about data points) necessary to run the applications. During the second phase: "Application Deployment and Commissioning", models automatically learn system parameters, used for advanced controls and analytics. In the third phase: "Continuous Monitoring and Verification" I utilized models to automatically measure the energy performance of a building that has implemented advanced control strategies. In the conclusions, I discuss future challenges and suggest potential strategies for these innovative control systems to be widely deployed in the market. This dissertation provides useful new tools in terms of procedures, algorithms, and models to facilitate the automation of deployment of advanced controls and analytics and accelerate their wide adoption in buildings.

  19. Control of Smart Building Using Advanced SCADA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuel, Vivin Thomas

    For complete control of the building, a proper SCADA implementation and the optimization strategy has to be build. For better communication and efficiency a proper channel between the Communication protocol and SCADA has to be designed. This paper concentrate mainly between the communication protocol, and the SCADA implementation, for a better optimization and energy savings is derived to large scale industrial buildings. The communication channel used in order to completely control the building remotely from a distant place. For an efficient result we consider the temperature values and the power ratings of the equipment so that while controlling the equipment, we are setting a threshold values for FDD technique implementation. Building management system became a vital source for any building to maintain it and for safety purpose. Smart buildings, refers to various distinct features, where the complete automation system, office building controls, data center controls. ELC's are used to communicate the load values of the building to the remote server from a far location with the help of an Ethernet communication channel. Based on the demand fluctuation and the peak voltage, the loads operate differently increasing the consumption rate thus results in the increase in the annual consumption bill. In modern days, saving energy and reducing the consumption bill is most essential for any building for a better and long operation. The equipment - monitored regularly and optimization strategy is implemented for cost reduction automation system. Thus results in the reduction of annual cost reduction and load lifetime increase.

  20. Advanced mobile networking, sensing, and controls.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feddema, John Todd; Kilman, Dominique Marie; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Young, Joseph G.; Lewis, Christopher L.; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Robinett, Rush D. III; Harrington, John J.

    2005-03-01

    This report describes an integrated approach for designing communication, sensing, and control systems for mobile distributed systems. Graph theoretic methods are used to analyze the input/output reachability and structural controllability and observability of a decentralized system. Embedded in each network node, this analysis will automatically reconfigure an ad hoc communication network for the sensing and control task at hand. The graph analysis can also be used to create the optimal communication flow control based upon the spatial distribution of the network nodes. Edge coloring algorithms tell us that the minimum number of time slots in a planar network is equal to either the maximum number of adjacent nodes (or degree) of the undirected graph plus some small number. Therefore, the more spread out that the nodes are, the fewer number of time slots are needed for communication, and the smaller the latency between nodes. In a coupled system, this results in a more responsive sensor network and control system. Network protocols are developed to propagate this information, and distributed algorithms are developed to automatically adjust the number of time slots available for communication. These protocols and algorithms must be extremely efficient and only updated as network nodes move. In addition, queuing theory is used to analyze the delay characteristics of Carrier Sense Multiple Access (CSMA) networks. This report documents the analysis, simulation, and implementation of these algorithms performed under this Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort.

  1. Human factors survey of advanced instrumentation and controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carter, R.J.

    1989-01-01

    A survey oriented towards identifying the human factors issues in regard to the use of advanced instrumentation and controls (I C) in the nuclear industry was conducted. A number of United States (US) and Canadian nuclear vendors and utilities were participants in the survey. Human factors items, subsumed under the categories of computer-generated displays (CGD), controls, organizational support, training, and related topics, were discussed. The survey found the industry to be concerned about the human factors issues related to the implementation of advanced I C. Fifteen potential human factors problems were identified. They include: the need for an advanced I C guideline equivalent to NUREG-0700; a role change in the control room from operator to supervisor; information overload; adequacy of existing training technology for advanced I C; and operator acceptance and trust. 11 refs., 1 tab.

  2. Synergistically Enhanced Polysulfide Chemisorption Using a Flexible Hybrid Separator with N and S Dual-Doped Mesoporous Carbon Coating for Advanced Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balach, Juan; Singh, Harish K; Gomoll, Selina; Jaumann, Tony; Klose, Markus; Oswald, Steffen; Richter, Manuel; Eckert, Jürgen; Giebeler, Lars

    2016-06-15

    Because of the outstanding high theoretical specific energy density of 2600 Wh kg(-1), the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery is regarded as a promising candidate for post lithium-ion battery systems eligible to meet the forthcoming market requirements. However, its commercialization on large scale is thwarted by fast capacity fading caused by the Achilles' heel of Li-S systems: the polysulfide shuttle. Here, we merge the physical features of carbon-coated separators and the unique chemical properties of N and S codoped mesoporous carbon to create a functional hybrid separator with superior polysulfide affinity and electrochemical benefits. DFT calculations revealed that carbon materials with N and S codoping possess a strong binding energy to high-order polysulfide species, which is essential to keep the active material in the cathode side. As a result of the synergistic effect of N, S dual-doping, an advanced Li-S cell with high specific capacity and ultralow capacity degradation of 0.041% per cycle is achieved. Pushing our simple-designed and scalable cathode to a highly increased sulfur loading of 5.4 mg cm(-2), the Li-S cell with the functional hybrid separator can deliver a remarkable areal capacity of 5.9 mAh cm(-2), which is highly favorable for practical applications.

  3. Advanced Stellar Compass, CHAMP, Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, John Leif; Betto, Maurizio;

    1999-01-01

    The German government research establishment "GeoForschungsZentrum" developed under a contract to the German government a microsatellite named "Champ". The Space Instrumentation Group has made a Interface Control Document for the CHAMP, witch describes the Star Imager, the electrical interface, t...

  4. Advanced Control Techniques for WEC Wave Dragon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tedd, James; Kofoed, Jens Peter; Jasinski, M.;

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the ongoing work on control of the Wave Dragon wave energy converter. Research is being conducted in and between several centers across Europe. This is building upon the knowledge gained in the prototype project, and will enable much better performance of the future deployment...

  5. Advanced Attitude Control af Pico Sized Satellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jesper A.; Amini, Rouzbeh; Izadi-Zamanabadi, Roozbeh

    2005-01-01

    accuracy of better than 5 degrees. Cost, size, weight and power requirements, on the other hand, impose selecting relative simple sensors and actuators which leads to an attitude control requirement of less than 1 degree. This precision is obtained by a combination of magnetorquers and momentum wheels...

  6. 芥子气所致氧化应激相关生物标志物研究进展%Advances in biomarkers of oxidative stress under sulfur mustard exposure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅逸舟; 张小锐; 周文霞; 张永祥

    2014-01-01

    芥子气[bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide, sulfur mustard, SM]是一种强效化学战剂,其作用机制复杂,尚无特效解毒剂。研究芥子气的中毒机制及病理生理学变化过程,是制定合理有效的治疗方案的关键。氧化应激作为芥子气中毒后的重要病理生理学改变,是芥子气产生毒性效应的重要原因之一,对其相应生物标志物的观察和研究能够更好地揭示氧化应激在芥子气中毒中的作用,从而对揭示芥子气中毒机制及制定具有针对性的防治措施产生重要意义。该文综述了芥子气氧化应激相关标志物的研究进展。%Sulfur mustard [bis (2-chloroethyl) sulfide, sulfur mustard, SM] is considered a powerful chemical warfare agent.There is still no specific antidote due to its complex toxicological mechanism .An intimate knowledge of the toxic mechanisms and pathophysiological changes is important to the treatment of sulfur mustard injury .Oxidative stress is one of the most important pathophysiological processes involved in the toxic effect of sulfur mustard .The study of oxidative stress biomarkers induced by sulfur mustard can help to reveal the role of oxidative stress in sulfur mustard intoxication , which may contribute to better understanding of the toxic mechanism and development of therapeutic measures after sulfur mustard exposure.The research advances in oxidative stress biomarkers in sulfur mustard intoxication are reviewed .

  7. Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems v.2

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012)

    2012-01-01

    FCCS2012 is an integrated conference concentrating its focus on Future Computer and Control Systems. “Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems” presents the proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012) held April 21-22,2012, in Changsha, China including recent research results on Future Computer and Control Systems of researchers from all around the world.

  8. Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems v.1

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Sally; 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012)

    2012-01-01

    FCCS2012 is an integrated conference concentrating its focus on Future Computer and Control Systems. “Advances in Future Computer and Control Systems” presents the proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Future Computer and Control Systems(FCCS2012) held April 21-22,2012, in Changsha, China including recent research results on Future Computer and Control Systems of researchers from all around the world.

  9. Advances in Computer, Communication, Control and Automation

    CERN Document Server

    011 International Conference on Computer, Communication, Control and Automation

    2012-01-01

    The volume includes a set of selected papers extended and revised from the 2011 International Conference on Computer, Communication, Control and Automation (3CA 2011). 2011 International Conference on Computer, Communication, Control and Automation (3CA 2011) has been held in Zhuhai, China, November 19-20, 2011. This volume  topics covered include signal and Image processing, speech and audio Processing, video processing and analysis, artificial intelligence, computing and intelligent systems, machine learning, sensor and neural networks, knowledge discovery and data mining, fuzzy mathematics and Applications, knowledge-based systems, hybrid systems modeling and design, risk analysis and management, system modeling and simulation. We hope that researchers, graduate students and other interested readers benefit scientifically from the proceedings and also find it stimulating in the process.

  10. Advanced Restricted Area Entry Control System (Araecs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    the standardized effect of each factor on the response. The red line in Figure 9 is the statistically significant threshold for an alpha value of 0.05...system. The red line indicates the secure area boundary. Figure 14. Overall Conceptual View of ARAECS (1) Prime Directive. Entry control and...template information is not readable from the smart card. With this technique, the smart card must be microcontroller (as opposed to just memory) based

  11. Advanced in-duct sorbent injection for SO{sub 2} control. Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stouffer, M.R.; Withium, J.A.; Rosenhoover, W.A.; Maskew, J.T.

    1994-12-01

    The objective of this research project was to develop a second generation duct sorbent injection technology as a cost-effective compliance option for the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments. Research and development work was focused on the Advanced Coolside process, which showed the potential for exceeding the original performance targets of 90% SO{sub 2} removal and 60% sorbent utilization. Process development was conducted in a 1000 acfm pilot plant. The pilot plant testing showed that the Advanced Coolside process can achieve 90% SO{sub 2} removal at sorbent utilizations up to 75%. The testing also showed that the process has the potential to achieve very high removal efficiency (90 to >99%). By conducting conceptual process design and economic evaluations periodically during the project, development work was focused on process design improvements which substantially lowered process capital and operating costs, A final process economic study projects capital costs less than one half of those for limestone forced oxidation wet FGD. Projected total SO{sub 2} control cost is about 25% lower than wet FGD for a 260 MWe plant burning a 2.5% sulfur coal. A waste management study showed the acceptability of landfill disposal; it also identified a potential avenue for by-product utilization which should be further investigated. Based on the pilot plant performance and on the above economic projections, future work to scale up the Advanced Coolside process is recommended.

  12. Development of the NSTX-U Advanced Divertor Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Patrick; Kolemen, Egemen

    2016-10-01

    Advanced magnetic divertor configurations such as the snowflake (SF) divertor are being investigated at NSTX-U for reducing the peak heat flux onto plasma-facing components. Initial efforts include development of plasma scenarios incorporating SF configurations using an upgraded set of divertor coils as well as implementation of a feedback control system for real-time detection and manipulation of two closely-spaced magnetic null points. Closed-loop plasma simulations are performed to demonstrate precise control of various SF configurations. The simulations are then used to demonstrate that the controller can be enhanced to regulate additional parameters such as strike point location and divertor flux expansion. The advanced divertor control will be used in the coming years to enable experiments investigating the physics of advanced divertors at NSTX-U. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  13. Advanced Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS) study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oglevie, R. E.; Eisenhaure, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    Integrated Power and Attitude Control System (IPACS) studies performed over a decade ago established the feasibility of simultaneously satisfying the demands of energy storage and attitude control through the use of rotating flywheels. It was demonstrated that, for a wide spectrum of applications, such a system possessed many advantages over contemporary energy storage and attitude control approaches. More recent technology advances in composite material rotors, magnetic suspension systems, and power control electronics have triggered new optimism regarding the applicability and merits of this concept. This study is undertaken to define an advanced IPACS and to evaluate its merits for a space station application. System and component designs are developed to establish the performance of this concept and system trade studies conducted to examine the viability of this approach relative to conventional candidate systems. It is clearly demonstrated that an advanced IPACS concept is not only feasible, but also offers substantial savings in mass and life-cycle cost for the space station mission.

  14. Controls on stable sulfur isotope fractionation during bacterial sulfate reduction in Arctic sediments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruchert, V.; Knoblauch, C.; Jørgensen, BB

    2001-01-01

    Sulfur isotope fractionation experiments during bacterial sulfate reduction were performed with recently isolated strains of cold-adapted sulfate-reducing bacteria from Arctic marine sediments with year-round temperatures below 2 degreesC. The bacteria represent quantitatively important members...... parts per thousand and 8 parts per thousand above 25 degreesC, respectively. In absence of significant differences in sulfate reduction rates in the high and low temperature range, respectively, we infer that different genera of sulfate-reducing bacteria dominate the sulfate-reducing bacterial community...

  15. Advanced control room evaluation: General approach and rationale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Wachtel, J. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (USA))

    1991-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRs) for future nuclear power plants (NPPs) are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale and general approach to the development of a human factors review guideline for ACRs. The factors influencing the guideline development are discussed, including the review environment, the types of advanced technologies being addressed, the human factors issues associated with advanced technology, and the current state-of-the-art of human factors guidelines for advanced human-system interfaces (HSIs). The proposed approach to ACR review would track the design and implementation process through the application of review guidelines reflecting four review modules: planning, design process analysis, human factors engineering review, and dynamic performance evaluation. 21 refs.

  16. Combinatorial control of diverse metabolic and physiological functions by transcriptional regulators of the yeast sulfur assimilation pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Allegra A; McIsaac, R Scott; Ho-Shing, Olivia; Bussemaker, Harmen J; Botstein, David

    2012-08-01

    Methionine abundance affects diverse cellular functions, including cell division, redox homeostasis, survival under starvation, and oxidative stress response. Regulation of the methionine biosynthetic pathway involves three DNA-binding proteins-Met31p, Met32p, and Cbf1p. We hypothesized that there exists a "division of labor" among these proteins that facilitates coordination of methionine biosynthesis with diverse biological processes. To explore combinatorial control in this regulatory circuit, we deleted CBF1, MET31, and MET32 individually and in combination in a strain lacking methionine synthase. We followed genome-wide gene expression as these strains were starved for methionine. Using a combination of bioinformatic methods, we found that these regulators control genes involved in biological processes downstream of sulfur assimilation; many of these processes had not previously been documented as methionine dependent. We also found that the different factors have overlapping but distinct functions. In particular, Met31p and Met32p are important in regulating methionine metabolism, whereas p functions as a "generalist" transcription factor that is not specific to methionine metabolism. In addition, Met31p and Met32p appear to regulate iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis through direct and indirect mechanisms and have distinguishable target specificities. Finally, CBF1 deletion sometimes has the opposite effect on gene expression from MET31 and MET32 deletion.

  17. [Effects of sulfur- and polymer-coated controlled release urea fertilizers on wheat yield and quality and fertilizer nitrogen use efficiency].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fu-Liang; Song, Fu-Peng; Gao, Yang; Zou, Peng

    2012-01-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of sulfur- and polymer-coated controlled release urea fertilizers on wheat yield and its quality, plow layer soil inorganic nitrogen (N) contents, and fertilizer N use efficiency. Compared with traditional urea fertilizer, both sulfur- and polymer-coated controlled release urea fertilizers increased the grain yield by 10.4%-16.5%, and the grain protein and starch contents by 5.8%-18.9% and 0.3%-1.4%, respectively. The controlled release urea fertilizers could maintain the topsoil inorganic N contents to meet the N requirement for the wheat, especially during its late growth stage. In the meantime, the fertilizer N use efficiency was improved by 58.2%-101.2%. Polymer-coated urea produced better wheat yield and higher fertilizer N use efficiency, compared with sulfur-coated controlled release urea.

  18. Analysis of the sulfur-regulated control of the cystathionine γ-lyase gene of Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reveal Brad S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystathionine γ-lyase plays a key role in the transsulfuration pathway through its primary reaction of catalyzing the formation of cysteine from cystathionine. The Neurospora crassa cystathionine γ-lyase gene (cys-16+ is of particular interest in dissecting the regulation and dynamics of transsulfuration. The aim of this study was to determine the regulatory connection of cys-16+ to the Neurospora sulfur regulatory network. In addition, the cys-16+ promoter was characterized with the goal of developing a strongly expressed and regulatable gene expression tool. Findings The cystathionine γ-lyase cys-16+ gene was cloned and characterized. The gene, which contains no introns, encodes a protein of 417 amino acids with conserved pyridoxal 5’-phosphate binding site and substrate-cofactor binding pocket. Northern blot analysis using wild type cells showed that cys-16+ transcript levels increased under sulfur limiting (derepressing conditions and were present only at a low level under sulfur sufficient (repressing conditions. In contrast, cys-16+ transcript levels in a Δcys-3 regulatory mutant were present at a low level under either derepressing or repressing conditions. Gel mobility shift analysis demonstrated the presence of four CYS3 transcriptional activator binding sites on the cys-16+ promoter, which were close matches to the CYS3 consensus binding sequence. Conclusions In this work, we confirm the control of cystathionine γ-lyase gene expression by the CYS3 transcriptional activator through the loss of cys-16+ expression in a Δcys-3 mutant and through the in vitro binding of CYS3 to the cys-16+ promoter at four sites. The highly regulated cys-16+ promoter should be a useful tool for gene expression studies in Neurospora

  19. Advances in Multi-Pollutant Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-11-01

    Pollutants, such as nitrogen oxides (nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and nitric oxide (NO)), sulphur dioxide (SO2), sulphur trioxide (SO3), carbon dioxide (CO2), mercury (Hg) and particulate matter (PM), are formed when coal is combusted in a power plant boiler. With the concern over the environmental and health consequences of these pollutants, legislation and regulations have been implemented limiting the amounts that can be emitted to the atmosphere. Emission control systems on conventional coal-fired power plants typically employ technologies designed to remove one specific pollutant.These are then combined, in series, to remove several pollutants in order to meet the emission regulations. This report discusses multi-pollutant systems which remove two or more of the principal regulated pollutants (SO2, NOx, mercury, particulate matter and CO2) in a single reactor or a single system designed for the purpose. The emphasis is on commercial or near commercial processes, and those that are under active development. Ways to improve the co-benefit removal of oxidised mercury in conventional limestone wet scrubbers, spray dry scrubbers and circulating dry scrubbers are also included. Multi-pollutant systems can have lower capital and operating costs than a series of traditional systems to remove the s ame number of pollutants. Nevertheless, many of the multi-pollutant technologies rely on by-product sales to be economically competitive. Their footprint is often smaller than conventional single pollutant counterparts treating a similar volume of flue gas, making them easier to install in retrofit applications. Some of the systems use modular designs that ensures easy scalability for larger boilers.

  20. Recent Advances in Explicit Multiparametric Nonlinear Model Predictive Control

    KAUST Repository

    Domínguez, Luis F.

    2011-01-19

    In this paper we present recent advances in multiparametric nonlinear programming (mp-NLP) algorithms for explicit nonlinear model predictive control (mp-NMPC). Three mp-NLP algorithms for NMPC are discussed, based on which novel mp-NMPC controllers are derived. The performance of the explicit controllers are then tested and compared in a simulation example involving the operation of a continuous stirred-tank reactor (CSTR). © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  1. ADVANCED COMPRESSOR ENGINE CONTROLS TO ENHANCE OPERATION, RELIABILITY AND INTEGRITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gary D. Bourn; Jess W. Gingrich; Jack A. Smith

    2004-03-01

    This document is the final report for the ''Advanced Compressor Engine Controls to Enhance Operation, Reliability, and Integrity'' project. SwRI conducted this project for DOE in conjunction with Cooper Compression, under DOE contract number DE-FC26-03NT41859. This report addresses an investigation of engine controls for integral compressor engines and the development of control strategies that implement closed-loop NOX emissions feedback.

  2. A formal structure for advanced automatic flight-control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, G.; Cicolani, L. S.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques were developed for the unified design of multimode, variable authority automatic flight-control systems for powered-lift STOL and VTOL aircraft. A structure for such systems is developed to deal with the strong nonlinearities inherent in this class of aircraft, to admit automatic coupling with advanced air traffic control, and to admit a variety of active control tasks. The aircraft being considered is the augmentor wing jet STOL research aircraft.

  3. Advanced control of piezoelectric micro-nano-positioning systems

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Qingsong

    2016-01-01

    This book explores emerging methods and algorithms that enable precise control of micro-/nano-positioning systems. The text describes three control strategies: hysteresis-model-based feedforward control and hysteresis-model-free feedback control based on and free from state observation. Each paradigm receives dedicated attention within a particular part of the text. Readers are shown how to design, validate and apply a variety of new control approaches in micromanipulation: hysteresis modelling, discrete-time sliding-mode control and model-reference adaptive control. Experimental results are provided throughout and build up to a detailed treatment of practical applications in the fourth part of the book. The applications focus on control of piezoelectric grippers. Advanced Control of Piezoelectric Micro-/Nano-Positioning Systems will assist academic researchers and practising control and mechatronics engineers interested in suppressing sources of nonlinearity such as hysteresis and drift when combining positi...

  4. Treatment of air pollution control residues with iron rich waste sulfuric acid: does it work for antimony (Sb)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okkenhaug, Gudny; Breedveld, Gijs D; Kirkeng, Terje; Lægreid, Marit; Mæhlum, Trond; Mulder, Jan

    2013-03-15

    Antimony (Sb) in air pollution control (APC) residues from municipal solid waste incineration has gained increased focus due to strict Sb leaching limits set by the EU landfill directive. Here we study the chemical speciation and solubility of Sb at the APC treatment facility NOAH Langøya (Norway), where iron (Fe)-rich sulfuric acid (∼3.6M, 2.3% Fe(II)), a waste product from the industrial extraction of ilmenite, is used for neutralization. Antimony in water extracts of untreated APC residues occurred exclusively as pentavalent antimonate, even at low pH and Eh values. The Sb solubility increased substantially at pHSb in porewater, occurring exclusively as Sb(V). Concentrations of Sb decreased from 87-918μgL(-1) (day 3) to 18-69μgL(-1) (day 600). We hypothesize that an initial sorption of Sb to Fe(II)-Fe(III) hydroxides (green rust) and eventually precipitation of Ca- and Fe-antimonates (tripuhyite; FeSbO4) occurred. We conclude that Fe-rich, sulfuric acid waste is efficient to immobilize Sb in APC residues from waste incineration.

  5. AC electric motors control advanced design techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Giri, Fouad

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of AC motor control lies in the multivariable and nonlinear nature of AC machine dynamics. Recent advancements in control theory now make it possible to deal with long-standing problems in AC motors control. This text expertly draws on these developments to apply a wide range of model-based control designmethods to a variety of AC motors. Contributions from over thirty top researchers explain how modern control design methods can be used to achieve tight speed regulation, optimal energetic efficiency, and operation reliability and safety, by considering online state var

  6. Contributions of CCLM to advances in quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmierczak, Steven C

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The discipline of laboratory medicine is relatively young when considered in the context of the history of medicine itself. The history of quality control, within the context of laboratory medicine, also enjoys a relatively brief, but rich history. Laboratory quality control continues to evolve along with advances in automation, measurement techniques and information technology. Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (CCLM) has played a key role in helping disseminate information about the proper use and utility of quality control. Publication of important advances in quality control techniques and dissemination of guidelines concerned with laboratory quality control has undoubtedly helped readers of this journal keep up to date on the most recent developments in this field.

  7. Advanced and intelligent control in power electronics and drives

    CERN Document Server

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Rodríguez, José

    2014-01-01

    Power electronics and variable frequency drives are continuously developing multidisciplinary fields in electrical engineering, and it is practically not possible to write a book covering the entire area by one individual specialist. Especially by taking account the recent fast development in the neighboring fields like control theory, computational intelligence and signal processing, which all strongly influence new solutions in control of power electronics and drives. Therefore, this book is written by individual key specialist working on the area of modern advanced control methods which penetrates current implementation of power converters and drives. Although some of the presented methods are still not adopted by industry, they create new solutions with high further research and application potential. The material of the book is presented in the following three parts: Part I: Advanced Power Electronic Control in Renewable Energy Sources (Chapters 1-4), Part II: Predictive Control of Power Converters and D...

  8. A survey on control schemes for distributed solar collector fields. Part II: Advanced control approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camacho, E.F.; Rubio, F.R. [Universidad de Sevilla, Escuela Superior de Ingenieros, Departamento de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Camino de Los Descubrimientos s/n, E-41092 Sevilla (Spain); Berenguel, M. [Universidad de Almeria, Departamento de Lenguajes y Computacion, Area de Ingenieria de Sistemas y Automatica, Carretera Sacramento s/n, E-04120 La Canada, Almeria (Spain); Valenzuela, L. [Plataforma Solar de Almeria - CIEMAT, Carretera Senes s/n, P.O. Box 22, E-04200 Tabernas (Almeria) (Spain)

    2007-10-15

    This article presents a survey of the different advanced automatic control techniques that have been applied to control the outlet temperature of solar plants with distributed collectors during the last 25 years. A classification of the modeling and control approaches described in the first part of this survey is used to explain the main features of each strategy. The treated strategies range from classical advanced control strategies to those with few industrial applications. (author)

  9. Advanced emissions control development project. Phase I, Final report, November 1, 1993--February 19, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-02-29

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESP`s), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase 1 activities were primarily aimed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emissions control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal.

  10. Advanced emissions control development project. Final report, November 1, 1993--February 29, 1996. Phase I

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farthing, G.A.

    1996-02-29

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses), and wet flue gas desulfurization. B&W`s Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) and the AECDP equipment combined to form a state-of-the-art facility for integrated evaluation of combustion and post-combustion emissions control options. Phase I activities were primarily directed at providing a reliable, representative test facility for conducting air toxic emission control development work later in the project. This report summarizes the AECDP Phase I activities which consisted of the design, installation, shakedown, verification, and air toxics benchmarking of the AECDP facility. The AECDP facility consists of an ESP, pulse-jet baghouse, and wet scrubber. All verification and air toxic tests were conducted with a high sulfur, bituminous Ohio coal. In order to successfully apply the results of the program to utility systems, the relationship between the performance of the CEDF/AECDP test equipment and commercial units had to be established. The first step in the verification process was to validate that the flue gas treatment devices - boiler/convection pass simulator, ESP, baghouse, and wet SO{sub 2} scrubber - operate in a manner representative of commercial units.

  11. Vision Based Autonomous Robotic Control for Advanced Inspection and Repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehner, Walter S.

    2014-01-01

    The advanced inspection system is an autonomous control and analysis system that improves the inspection and remediation operations for ground and surface systems. It uses optical imaging technology with intelligent computer vision algorithms to analyze physical features of the real-world environment to make decisions and learn from experience. The advanced inspection system plans to control a robotic manipulator arm, an unmanned ground vehicle and cameras remotely, automatically and autonomously. There are many computer vision, image processing and machine learning techniques available as open source for using vision as a sensory feedback in decision-making and autonomous robotic movement. My responsibilities for the advanced inspection system are to create a software architecture that integrates and provides a framework for all the different subsystem components; identify open-source algorithms and techniques; and integrate robot hardware.

  12. Improving Advanced Inverter Control Convergence in Distribution Power Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagarajan, Adarsh; Palmintier, Bryan; Ding, Fei; Mather, Barry; Baggu, Murali

    2016-11-21

    Simulation of modern distribution system powerflow increasingly requires capturing the impact of advanced PV inverter voltage regulation on powerflow. With Volt/var control, the inverter adjusts its reactive power flow as a function of the point of common coupling (PCC) voltage. Similarly, Volt/watt control curtails active power production as a function of PCC voltage. However, with larger systems and higher penetrations of PV, this active/reactive power flow itself can cause significant changes to the PCC voltage potentially introducing oscillations that slow the convergence of system simulations. Improper treatment of these advanced inverter functions could potentially lead to incorrect results. This paper explores a simple approach to speed such convergence by blending in the previous iteration's reactive power estimate to dampen these oscillations. Results with a single large (5MW) PV system and with multiple 500kW advanced inverters show dramatic improvements using this approach.

  13. Comparison of Advanced Distillation Control Methods, Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. James B. Riggs

    2000-11-30

    Detailed dynamic simulations of three industrial distillation columns (a propylene/propane splitter, a xylene/toluene column, and a depropanizer) have been used to evaluate configuration selections for single-ended and dual-composition control, as well as to compare conventional and advanced control approaches. In addition, a simulator of a main fractionator was used to compare the control performance of conventional and advanced control. For each case considered, the controllers were tuned by using setpoint changes and tested using feed composition upsets. Proportional Integral (PI) control performance was used to evaluate the configuration selection problem. For single ended control, the energy balance configuration was found to yield the best performance. For dual composition control, nine configurations were considered. It was determined that the use of dynamic simulations is required in order to identify the optimum configuration from among the nine possible choices. The optimum configurations were used to evaluate the relative control performance of conventional PI controllers, MPC (Model Predictive Control), PMBC (Process Model-Based Control), and ANN (Artificial Neural Networks) control. It was determined that MPC works best when one product is much more important than the other, while PI was superior when both products were equally important. PMBC and ANN were not found to offer significant advantages over PI and MPC. MPC was found to outperform conventional PI control for the main fractionator. MPC was applied to three industrial columns: one at Phillips Petroleum and two at Union Carbide. In each case, MPC was found to significantly outperform PI controls. The major advantage of the MPC controller is its ability to effectively handle a complex set of constraints and control objectives.

  14. Application of infinite model predictive control methodology to other advanced controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Ayyad, M; Dubay, R; Hernandez, J M

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents an application of most recent developed predictive control algorithm an infinite model predictive control (IMPC) to other advanced control schemes. The IMPC strategy was derived for systems with different degrees of nonlinearity on the process gain and time constant. Also, it was shown that IMPC structure uses nonlinear open-loop modeling which is conducted while closed-loop control is executed every sampling instant. The main objective of this work is to demonstrate that the methodology of IMPC can be applied to other advanced control strategies making the methodology generic. The IMPC strategy was implemented on several advanced controllers such as PI controller using Smith-Predictor, Dahlin controller, simplified predictive control (SPC), dynamic matrix control (DMC), and shifted dynamic matrix (m-DMC). Experimental work using these approaches combined with IMPC was conducted on both single-input-single-output (SISO) and multi-input-multi-output (MIMO) systems and compared with the original forms of these advanced controllers. Computer simulations were performed on nonlinear plants demonstrating that the IMPC strategy can be readily implemented on other advanced control schemes providing improved control performance. Practical work included real-time control applications on a DC motor, plastic injection molding machine and a MIMO three zone thermal system.

  15. The advanced main control console for next japanese PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchiya, A. [Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc., Sapporo (Japan); Ito, K. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Nuclear Energy Systems Engineering Center, Yokohama (Japan); Yokoyama, M. [Mitsubishi Electric Corporation, Energy and Industrial Systems Center, Kobe (Japan)

    2001-07-01

    The purpose of the improvement of main control room designing in a nuclear power plant is to reduce operators' workload and potential human errors by offering a better working environment where operators can maximize their abilities. In order to satisfy such requirements, the design of main control board applied to Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) type nuclear power plant has been continuously modified and improved. the Japanese Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) Utilities (Electric Power Companies) and Mitsubishi Group have developed an advanced main control board (console) reflecting on the study of human factors, as well as using a state of the art electronics technology. In this report, we would like to introduce the configuration and features of the Advanced Main Control Console for the practical application to the next generation PWR type nuclear power plants including TOMARI No.3 Unit of Hokkaido Electric Power Co., Inc. (author)

  16. Advances in developing alternative treatments for postharvest pest control

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA-ARS made two significant advances in the last 10 years in the development of alternative treatments for postharvest pest control: oxygenated phosphine fumigation and nitric oxide fumigation. Oxygenated phosphine is phosphine fumigation in an oxygen enriched atmosphere. It is significantly more...

  17. Controlling death: the false promise of advance directives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, Henry S

    2007-07-03

    Advance directives promise patients a say in their future care but actually have had little effect. Many experts blame problems with completion and implementation, but the advance directive concept itself may be fundamentally flawed. Advance directives simply presuppose more control over future care than is realistic. Medical crises cannot be predicted in detail, making most prior instructions difficult to adapt, irrelevant, or even misleading. Furthermore, many proxies either do not know patients' wishes or do not pursue those wishes effectively. Thus, unexpected problems arise often to defeat advance directives, as the case in this paper illustrates. Because advance directives offer only limited benefit, advance care planning should emphasize not the completion of directives but the emotional preparation of patients and families for future crises. The existentialist Albert Camus might suggest that physicians should warn patients and families that momentous, unforeseeable decisions lie ahead. Then, when the crisis hits, physicians should provide guidance; should help make decisions despite the inevitable uncertainties; should share responsibility for those decisions; and, above all, should courageously see patients and families through the fearsome experience of dying.

  18. Supervisory Control System Architecture for Advanced Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cetiner, Sacit M [ORNL; Cole, Daniel L [University of Pittsburgh; Fugate, David L [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Melin, Alexander M [ORNL; Muhlheim, Michael David [ORNL; Rao, Nageswara S [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2013-08-01

    This technical report was generated as a product of the Supervisory Control for Multi-Modular SMR Plants project within the Instrumentation, Control and Human-Machine Interface technology area under the Advanced Small Modular Reactor (SMR) Research and Development Program of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report documents the definition of strategies, functional elements, and the structural architecture of a supervisory control system for multi-modular advanced SMR (AdvSMR) plants. This research activity advances the state-of-the art by incorporating decision making into the supervisory control system architectural layers through the introduction of a tiered-plant system approach. The report provides a brief history of hierarchical functional architectures and the current state-of-the-art, describes a reference AdvSMR to show the dependencies between systems, presents a hierarchical structure for supervisory control, indicates the importance of understanding trip setpoints, applies a new theoretic approach for comparing architectures, identifies cyber security controls that should be addressed early in system design, and describes ongoing work to develop system requirements and hardware/software configurations.

  19. Environmental Controls on Nitrogen and Sulfur Cycles in Surficial Aquatic Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanhui eGu

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Enhanced anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen (N and sulfur (S have disturbed their biogeochemical cycling in aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. The N and S cycles interact with one another through competition for labile forms of organic carbon between nitrate-reducing and sulfate-reducing bacteria. Furthermore, the N and S cycles could interact through nitrate (NO3- reduction coupled to S oxidation, consuming NO3- and producing sulfate (SO42-. The research questions of this study were: (1 what are the environmental factors explaining variability in N and S biogeochemical reaction rates in a wide range of surficial aquatic sediments, and (2 which biogeochemical processes are involved when NO3- and/or SO42- are present. The N and S biogeochemical reaction rates were measured on intact surface sediment slices using flow-through reactors. The two terminal electron acceptors (TEA NO3- and SO42- were added either separately or simultaneously and NO3- and SO42- reduction rates as well as NO3- reduction linked to S oxidation were determined. We used redundancy analysis, to assess how environmental variables are related to these rates. Our analysis showed that overlying water pH and salinity were two dominant environmental factors that explain 58% of the variance in the N and S biogeochemical reaction rates when NO3- and SO42- were both present. When NO3- and SO42- were added separately, however, sediment N content in addition to pH and salinity accounted for 62% of total variance of the biogeochemical reaction rates. The SO42- addition had little effect on NO3- reduction; neither did the NO3- addition inhibit SO42- reduction. The presence of NO3- led to SO42- production most likely due to the oxidation of sulfur. Our observations suggest that metal-bound S, instead of free sulfide produced by SO42- reduction, was responsible the S oxidation. The subsequent release of toxic metals from this coupling might have adverse effects on aquatic ecosystems.

  20. Lunar sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuck, David L.

    Ideas introduced by Vaniman, Pettit and Heiken in their 1988 Uses of Lunar Sulfur are expanded. Particular attention is given to uses of SO2 as a mineral-dressing fluid. Also introduced is the concept of using sulfide-based concrete as an alternative to the sulfur-based concretes proposed by Leonard and Johnson. Sulfur is abundant in high-Ti mare basalts, which range from 0.16 to 0.27 pct. by weight. Terrestrial basalts with 0.15 pct. S are rare. For oxygen recovery, sulfur must be driven off with other volatiles from ilmenite concentrates, before reduction. Troilite (FeS) may be oxidized to magnetite (Fe3O4) and SO2 gas, by burning concentrates in oxygen within a magnetic field, to further oxidize ilmenite before regrinding the magnetic reconcentration. SO2 is liquid at -20 C, the mean temperature underground on the Moon, at a minimum of 0.6 atm pressure. By using liquid SO2 as a mineral dressing fluid, all the techniques of terrestrial mineral separation become available for lunar ores and concentrates. Combination of sulfur and iron in an exothermic reaction, to form iron sulfides, may be used to cement grains of other minerals into an anhydrous iron-sulfide concrete. A sulfur-iron-aggregate mixture may be heated to the ignition temperature of iron with sulfur to make a concrete shape. The best iron, sulfur, and aggregate ratios need to be experimentally established. The iron and sulfur will be by-products of oxygen production from lunar minerals.

  1. Ultra Low Sulfur Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Batey, John E. [Energy Research Center, Inc., Easton, CT (United States); McDonald, Roger [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-09-30

    This Ultra Low Sulfur (ULS) Home Heating Oil Demonstration Project was funded by the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) and has successfully quantified the environmental and economic benefits of switching to ULS (15 PPM sulfur) heating oil. It advances a prior field study of Low Sulfur (500 ppm sulfur) heating oil funded by NYSERDA and laboratory research conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and Canadian researchers. The sulfur oxide and particulate matter (PM) emissions are greatly reduced as are boiler cleaning costs through extending cleaning intervals. Both the sulfur oxide and PM emission rates are directly related to the fuel oil sulfur content. The sulfur oxide and PM emission rates approach near-zero levels by switching heating equipment to ULS fuel oil, and these emissions become comparable to heating equipment fired by natural gas. This demonstration project included an in-depth review and analysis of service records for both the ULS and control groups to determine any difference in the service needs for the two groups. The detailed service records for both groups were collected and analyzed and the results were entered into two spreadsheets that enabled a quantitative side-by-side comparison of equipment service for the entire duration of the ULS test project. The service frequency for the ULS and control group were very similar and did indicate increased service frequency for the ULS group. In fact, the service frequency with the ULS group was slightly less (7.5 percent) than the control group. The only exception was that three burner fuel pump required replacement for the ULS group and none were required for the control group.

  2. Hydrophilicity-controlled ordered mesoporous carbon for lithium-sulfur batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Suyeon; Jin, Xing; Park, Gwi Ok; Kim, Ji Man

    2014-12-01

    Ordered mesoporous carbon (OMC) materials were synthesized from a mesoporous silica KIT-6 (3-D cubic la3d meso-structure) as the hard-template via a nano-replication method. Hydrophilic and hydrophobic OMC materials were prepared using different carbon precursors including sucrose (suc-OMC) and phenanthrene (phe-OMC) at different carbonization temperatures of 700 degrees C and 1100 degrees C, respectively. The OMC materials thus obtained exhibit high surface areas, uniform mesopore sizes and highly ordered meso-structure. To investigate the hydrophilicity effect of OMC materials on the performance of lithium-sulfur battery, we prepared the samples having different ratios of the suc-OMC to phe-OMC, which were 100:0, 75:25, 50:50, 25:75 and 0:100. As a result, the mixed OMC materials (with ratios of 75:25, 50:50 and 25:75) exhibited better cycle performances, compared to those of the suc-OMC and phe-OMC.

  3. Growth of Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} films by controlled sulfurization of sputtered Pd on native oxide of Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatt, R., E-mail: rbhatt@barc.gov.in [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai–400 085 (India); Bhattacharya, S.; Basu, R.; Singh, A. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai–400 085 (India); Deshpande, U. [UGC–DAE Consortium for Scientific Research, University Campus, Khandwa Road, Indore–452017 (India); Surger, C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, Physikalisches Institut and DFG Center for Functional Nanostructures, P.O. Box 6980, D–76049 Karlsruhe (Germany); Basu, S. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400 085 (India); Aswal, D.K.; Gupta, S.K. [Technical Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Center, Mumbai–400 085 (India)

    2013-07-31

    Thin films of different Pd–S phase, namely Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2}, have been reproducibly grown by the sulfurization of Pd films deposited on native oxide of (111) Si substrates by radio frequency sputtering method. In order to achieve controlled sulfurization, a three-stage sulfurization setup consisting of evaporation chamber, activation chamber and sulfurization chamber has been developed. The sulfurization of Pd films (kept at a constant temperature of 500 °C) was carried out using sulfur vapors activated to different temperature between 550 and 700 °C. The results of X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements show that formation of Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} phases takes place for the activation temperatures of 550, 600 and 700 °C, respectively. The room temperature resistivity of Pd, Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} were found to be respectively 0.1, 15.9, 15,000 and 20,000 μΩ cm. The temperature-dependent electrical resistivity measurements showed metallic conduction for Pd and Pd{sub 4}S films. The Seebeck coefficient measured at 300 K for these Pd–S phases showed their n-type conducting behavior. - Highlights: • Multichamber sulfurization setup designed for preparing thin films of Pd–S. • S vapor activated at 550, 600 and 700 °C results in Pd{sub 4}S, PdS and PdS{sub 2} phases. • The Seebeck coefficient of Pd–S phases shows their n-type conducting behavior. • Transport properties of Pd{sub 4}S phase show that it is a metallic phase. • High resistivity and thermopower of PdS and PdS{sub 2} show semiconducting nature.

  4. The DPC-2000 advanced control system for the Dynamitron accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kestler, Bernard A.; Lisanti, Thomas F.

    1993-07-01

    The DPC-2000 is an advanced control system utilizing the latest technology in computer control circuitry and components. Its overall design is modular and technologically advanced to keep up with customer and engineering demands. The full control system is presented as four units. They are the Remote I/O (Input / Output), Local Analog and Digital I/O, Operator Interface and the Main Computer. The central processing unit, the heart of the system, executes a high level language program that communicates to the different sub-assemblies through advanced serial and parallel communication lines. All operational parameters of the accelerator are monitored, controlled and corrected at close to 20 times per second. The operator is provided with a selection of many informative screen displays. The control program handles all graphic screen displays and the updating of these screens directly; it does not have to communicate to a display terminal. This adds to the quick response and excellent operator feedback received while operating the machine. The CPU also has the ability to store and record all process variable setpoints for each product that will be treated. This allows the operator to set up the process parameters by selecting the product identification code from a menu presented on the display screen. All process parameters are printed to report at regular intervals during a process run for later analysis and record keeping.

  5. Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) Advanced Integration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Mike [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cipiti, Ben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Durkee, Jr., Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fallgren, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jarman, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Shelly [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Meier, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Osburn, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ticknor, Lawrence O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yoo, Tae-Sic [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-01-30

    The development of sustainable advanced nuclear fuel cycles is a long-term goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy’s (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies program. The Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) campaign is supporting research and development (R&D) of advanced instrumentation, analysis tools, and integration methodologies to meet this goal (Miller, 2015). This advanced R&D is intended to facilitate safeguards and security by design of fuel cycle facilities. The lab-scale demonstration of a virtual facility, distributed test bed, that connects the individual tools being developed at National Laboratories and university research establishments, is a key program milestone for 2020. These tools will consist of instrumentation and devices as well as computer software for modeling, simulation and integration.

  6. Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) Advanced Integration Roadmap

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durkee, Joe W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cipiti, Ben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Demuth, Scott Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fallgren, Andrew James [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Jarman, Ken [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Li, Shelly [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Meier, Dave [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Miller, Mike [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Osburn, Laura Ann [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Pereira, Candido [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dasari, Venkateswara Rao [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Ticknor, Lawrence O. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Yoo, Tae-Sic [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-09-30

    The development of sustainable advanced nuclear fuel cycles is a long-term goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy’s (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Technologies program. The Material Protection, Accounting, and Control Technologies (MPACT) campaign is supporting research and development (R&D) of advanced instrumentation, analysis tools, and integration methodologies to meet this goal (Miller, 2015). This advanced R&D is intended to facilitate safeguards and security by design of fuel cycle facilities. The lab-scale demonstration of a virtual facility, distributed test bed, that connects the individual tools being developed at National Laboratories and university research establishments, is a key program milestone for 2020. These tools will consist of instrumentation and devices as well as computer software for modeling, simulation and integration.

  7. MicroRNA-210 Controls Mitochondrial Metabolism during Hypoxia by Repressing the Iron-Sulfur Cluster Assembly Proteins ISCU1/2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Stephen Y.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Hemann, Craig; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Zweier, Jay L.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2009-01-01

    Summary Repression of mitochondrial respiration represents an evolutionarily ancient cellular adaptation to hypoxia and profoundly influences cell survival and function; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are incompletely understood. Primarily utilizing pulmonary arterial endothelial cells as a representative hypoxic cell type, we identify the iron-sulfur cluster assembly proteins (ISCU1/2) as direct targets for repression by the hypoxia-induced microRNA-210 (miR-210). ISCU1/2 facilitate the assembly of iron-sulfur clusters, prosthetic groups that are critical for electron transport and mitochondrial oxidation-reduction reactions. Under in vivo conditions of up-regulating miR-210 and repressing ISCU1/2, the integrity of iron-sulfur clusters is disrupted. In turn, by repressing ISCU1/2 during hypoxia, miR-210 decreases the activity of prototypical iron-sulfur proteins controlling mitochondrial metabolism, including Complex I and aconitase. Consequently, miR-210 represses mitochondrial respiration and associated downstream functions. These results identify important mechanistic connections among microRNA, iron-sulfur cluster biology, hypoxia, and mitochondrial function, with broad implications for cellular metabolism and adaptation to cellular stress. PMID:19808020

  8. Layer number controllability of transition-metal dichalcogenides and the establishment of hetero-structures by using sulfurization of thin transition metal films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chao; Chu, Tung-Wei; Wu, Chong-Rong; Lee, Si-Chen; Lin, Shih-Yen

    2017-02-01

    Large-area and uniform MoS2 films are fabricated by using sulfurization of pre-deposited molybdenum (Mo) films. One- and three-layer MoS2 films are obtained by sulfurizing 0.5 and 1.0 nm Mo films, respectively. The results have demonstrated the good layer number controllability of this growth technique down to single-layer MoS2. By sequential sulfurization of 0.5 nm W, 0.5 nm Mo and 0.5 nm W under the same condition, three layers of the WS2/MoS2/WS2 hetero-structure are established, which has demonstrated the potential of this growth technique for the establishment of 2D crystal hetero-structures.

  9. Advanced Control Design for Wind Turbines; Part I: Control Design, Implementation, and Initial Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A. D.; Fingersh, L. J.

    2008-03-01

    The purpose of this report is to give wind turbine engineers information and examples of the design, testing through simulation, field implementation, and field testing of advanced wind turbine controls.

  10. Microeconomics of advanced process window control for 50-nm gates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monahan, Kevin M.; Chen, Xuemei; Falessi, Georges; Garvin, Craig; Hankinson, Matt; Lev, Amir; Levy, Ady; Slessor, Michael D.

    2002-07-01

    Fundamentally, advanced process control enables accelerated design-rule reduction, but simple microeconomic models that directly link the effects of advanced process control to profitability are rare or non-existent. In this work, we derive these links using a simplified model for the rate of profit generated by the semiconductor manufacturing process. We use it to explain why and how microprocessor manufacturers strive to avoid commoditization by producing only the number of dies required to satisfy the time-varying demand in each performance segment. This strategy is realized using the tactic known as speed binning, the deliberate creation of an unnatural distribution of microprocessor performance that varies according to market demand. We show that the ability of APC to achieve these economic objectives may be limited by variability in the larger manufacturing context, including measurement delays and process window variation.

  11. Practical Implementations of Advanced Process Control for Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jørgen K . H.; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    2013-01-01

    Most advanced process control systems are based on Model Predictive Control (MPC). In this paper we discuss three critical issues for the practical implementation of linear MPC for process control applications. The rst issue is related to oset free control and disturbance models; the second issue...... is related to the use of soft output constraints in MPC; and the third issue is related to the computationally ecient solution of the quadratic program in the dynamic regulator of the MPC. We have implemented MPC in .Net using C# and the MPCMath library. The implemented MPC is based on the target...... models and integration of the innovation errors. If the disturbances increases, oset-free control cannot be achieved without violation of process constraints. A target calculation function is used to calculate the optimal achievable target for the process. The use of soft constraints for process output...

  12. Fluoride and sulfur dioxide indoor pollution situation and control in coal-burning endemic area in Zhaotong, Yunnan, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yonglin; Luo, Kunli; Li, Ling; Shahid, Muhammad Zeeshaan

    2013-10-01

    traditional flue-curing barn (baking room) was also seriously polluted by fluoride and sulfur. After using the calcined dolomitic siliceous limestone instead of clay mixed with coal, gaseous fluoride and SO2 concentration in the traditional flue-curing barn air have declined markedly. The way of adding calcined dolomitic siliceous limestone instead of clay as a binder for briquette-making is an economically feasible way to control the indoor pollution of fluorine and sulfur in coal-burning endemic in Zhaotong, Yunnan.

  13. Control Systems with Saturating Inputs Analysis Tools and Advanced Design

    CERN Document Server

    Corradini, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Fabio; Orlando, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    This series aims to report new developments in the fields of control and information sciences - quickly, informally and at a high level. The type of material considered for publication includes: 1. Preliminary drafts of monographs and advanced textbooks 2. Lectures on a new field, or presenting a new angle on a classical field 3. Research reports 4. Reports of meetings, provided they are a) of exceptional interest and b) devoted to a specific topic. The timeliness of subject material is very important.

  14. Recent advances in opinion modeling: control and social influence

    CERN Document Server

    Albi, Giacomo; Toscani, Giuseppe; Zanella, Mattia

    2016-01-01

    We survey some recent developments on the mathematical modeling of opinion dynamics. After an introduction on opinion modeling through interacting multi-agent systems described by partial differential equations of kinetic type, we focus our attention on two major advancements: optimal control of opinion formation and influence of additional social aspects, like conviction and number of connections in social networks, which modify the agents' role in the opinion exchange process.

  15. Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2013-07-31

    The multi-year research study was initiated to find solutions to improve packaged equipment operating efficiency in the field. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), with funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Building Technologies Office (BTO) and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) conducted this research, development and demonstration (RD&D) study. Packaged equipment with constant speed supply fans is designed to provide ventilation at the design rate at all times when the fan is operating as required by building code. Although there are a number of hours during the day when a building may not be fully occupied or the need for ventilation is lower than designed, the ventilation rate cannot be adjusted easily with a constant speed fan. Therefore, modulating the supply fan in conjunction with demand controlled ventilation (DCV) will not only reduce the coil energy but also reduce the fan energy. The objective of this multi-year research, development and demonstration project was to determine the magnitude of energy savings achievable by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop air conditioners with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for packaged units. First, through detailed simulation analysis, it was shown that significant energy (between 24% and 35%) and cost savings (38%) from fan, cooling and heating energy consumption could be realized when packaged air conditioning units with gas furnaces are retrofitted with advanced control packages (combining multi-speed fan control, integrated economizer controls and DCV). The simulation analysis also showed significant savings for heat pumps (between 20% and 60%). The simulation analysis was followed by an extensive field test of a retrofittable advanced rooftop unit (RTU) controller.

  16. Application of advanced polymeric materials for controlled release pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, M.; Hakim, M. R.; Haris, H. M.

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this work was to study the capability of advanced polymeric material constituted by chitosan and natural rubber matrices for controlled release of pesticides (1-hydroxynaphthalene and 2-hydroxynaphthalene) in aqueous solution. The released amount of pesticides was measured spectrophotometrically from the absorbance spectra applying a standardized curve. The release of the pesticides was studied into refreshing and non-refreshing neutral aqueous media. Interestingly, formulation successfully indicated a consistent, controlled and prolonged release of pesticides over a period of 35 days.

  17. Recent Advances in the Control of Piezoelectric Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziqiang Chi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The micro/nano positioning field has made great progress towards enabling the advance of micro/nano technology. Micro/nano positioning stages actuated by piezoelectric actuators are the key devices in micro/nano manipulation. The control of piezoelectric actuators has emerged as a hot topic in recent years. Piezoelectric materials have inherent hysteresis and creep nonlinearity, which can reduce the accuracy of the manipulation, even causing the instability of the whole system. Remarkable efforts have been made to compensate for the nonlinearity of piezoelectric actuation through the mathematical modelling and control approaches. This paper provides a review of recent advances on the control of piezoelectric actuators. After a brief introduction of basic components of typical piezoelectric micro/nano positioning platforms, the working principle and modelling of piezoelectric actuators are outlined in this paper. This is followed with the major control method and recent progress is presented in detail. Finally, some open issues and future work on the control of piezoelectric actuators are extensively discussed.

  18. 基于硫平衡计算的低硫烧结原料控制标准%Control criterion of low-sulfur sintering materials based on sulfur balance calculations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘征建; 张建良; 安钢; 杨天钧

    2012-01-01

    首先根据首钢京唐钢铁公司烧结生产数据进行系统的硫平衡计算,分析各种烧结原料对废气中SO2排放量的影响权重,并在此基础上作合理假设,结合国家标准对于不同烧结机SO2排放量的统一计量方法,推导出烧结原料硫含量与SO2排放量判定指标的关系式,建立低硫烧结原料控制标准.首钢京唐钢铁公司烧结生产若要满足500mg.m-3的SO2质量浓度限值,需要将混合料中硫的质量分数降至0.032%以下;若要满足200 mg.m-3的SO2质量浓度限值,需要将混合料硫的质量分数降至0.013%以下,而这在当前的原料条件下是难以实现的.%Sulfur balance calculations were performed according to production data from Shougang Jingtang Steel Sintering Plant.The impact weight of each sintering material on SO2 concentration in sintering waste gas was analyzed,based on which some reasonable assumptions were made.In combination with the uniform measurement method of SO2 emission concentration for different sintering machines in Chinese standards,a relation formula between sulfur content in the sintering materials and judging index for SO2 emission concentration was deduced and a control criterion for low-sulfur sintering materials was established.If Shougang Jingtang Steel Sintering Plant wants to meet the SO2 emission concentration of 500 mg·m-3,the sulfur content in the sintering mixture need reduce to below 0.032%;if it wants to meet the SO2 emission concentration of 200 mg·m-3,the sulfur content in the sintering mixture need reduce to below 0.013%,but it is very difficult to realize under the current material condition.

  19. Evaluation of information display at advanced main control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Dae Hwan; Yu, Seon Jae; Choi, Eui Sun [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-03-15

    This year we plan to survey information in order to have basic understanding of digital information display and control at the advanced MCR. At first we collect different ways of presenting information at the advanced MCR. Secondly, we conduct literature survey on studies that have investigated information representation techniques and their effects. Then, we need compare differences between conventional NPPs and advanced NPPs. Thirdly, we need to check HMI styles and evaluation techniques that are used currently at foreign NPPs. Indeed, HMI at the advanced MCR is quite different from that at a conventional MCR. It is not desirable to apply the same evaluation technique that has veen used at the conventional MCR. We need to develop an evaluation technique that is valid in theory and applicable in practice. Finally, we identify the requirements for a support system for an HMI evaluator, since it is not easy to carry out an evaluation task even though one has firm background on cognitive engineering theories and practical experiences.

  20. The Advanced Photon Source Injector Test Stand Control System

    CERN Document Server

    MacLean, J F

    2001-01-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS) primary and backup injectors consist of two thermionic-cathode rf guns. These guns are being upgraded to provide improved performance, to improve ease of maintenance, and to reduce downtime required for repair or replacement of a failed injector. As part of the process, an injector test stand is being prepared. This stand is effectively independent of the APS linac and will allow for complete characterization and validation of an injector prior to its installation into the APS linac. A modular control system for the test stand has been developed using standard APS control solutions with EPICS to deliver a flexible and comprehensive control system. The modularity of the system will allow both the future expansion of test stand functionality and the evaluation of new control techniques and solutions.

  1. Integrated metrology: an enabler for advanced process control (APC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Claus; Pfitzner, Lothar; Ryssel, Heiner

    2001-04-01

    Advanced process control (APC) techniques become more and more important as short innovation cycles in microelectronics and a highly competitive market requires cost-effective solutions in semiconductor manufacturing. APC marks a paradigm shift from statistically based techniques (SPC) using monitor wafers for sampling measurement data towards product wafer control. The APC functionalities including run-to-run control, fault detection, and fault analysis allow to detect process drifts and excursions at an early stage and to minimize the number of misprocessed wafers. APC is being established as part of factory control systems through the definition of an APC framework. A precondition for APC is the availability of sensors and measurement methods providing the necessary wafer data. This paper discusses integrated metrology as an enabler for APC and demonstrates practical implementations in semiconductor manufacturing.

  2. Advances in Intelligent Control Systems and Computer Science

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    The conception of real-time control networks taking into account, as an integrating approach, both the specific aspects of information and knowledge processing and the dynamic and energetic particularities of physical processes and of communication networks is representing one of the newest scientific and technological challenges. The new paradigm of Cyber-Physical Systems (CPS) reflects this tendency and will certainly change the evolution of the technology, with major social and economic impact. This book presents significant results in the field of process control and advanced information and knowledge processing, with applications in the fields of robotics, biotechnology, environment, energy, transportation, et al.. It introduces intelligent control concepts and strategies as well as real-time implementation aspects for complex control approaches. One of the sections is dedicated to the complex problem of designing software systems for distributed information processing networks. Problems as complexity an...

  3. Refinements and Tests of an Advanced Controller to Mitigate Fatigue Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.; Fleming, P.

    2010-12-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems forced by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic loads. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a complicated 3-D turbulent wind inflow field, with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. Design of control algorithms for wind turbines must account for multiple control objectives. Future large multi-megawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, while maximizing energy capture. Active damping should be added to these dynamic structures to maintain stability for operation in a complex environment. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), we have designed, implemented, and tested advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads. These control designs are based on linear models of the turbine that are generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we present field test results of an advanced control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads in Region 3.

  4. Integration of advanced teleoperation technologies for control of space robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stagnaro, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    Teleoperated robots require one or more humans to control actuators, mechanisms, and other robot equipment given feedback from onboard sensors. To accomplish this task, the human or humans require some form of control station. Desirable features of such a control station include operation by a single human, comfort, and natural human interfaces (visual, audio, motion, tactile, etc.). These interfaces should work to maximize performance of the human/robot system by streamlining the link between human brain and robot equipment. This paper describes development of a control station testbed with the characteristics described above. Initially, this testbed will be used to control two teleoperated robots. Features of the robots include anthropomorphic mechanisms, slaving to the testbed, and delivery of sensory feedback to the testbed. The testbed will make use of technologies such as helmet mounted displays, voice recognition, and exoskeleton masters. It will allow tor integration and testing of emerging telepresence technologies along with techniques for coping with control link time delays. Systems developed from this testbed could be applied to ground control of space based robots. During man-tended operations, the Space Station Freedom may benefit from ground control of IVA or EVA robots with science or maintenance tasks. Planetary exploration may also find advanced teleoperation systems to be very useful.

  5. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wali, W A; Hassan, K H; Cullen, J D; Al-Shamma' a, A I; Shaw, A; Wylie, S R, E-mail: w.wali@2009.ljmu.ac.uk [Built Environment and Sustainable Technologies Institute (BEST), School of the Built Environment, Faculty of Technology and Environment Liverpool John Moores University, Byrom Street, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-17

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  6. Artificial Intelligent Control for a Novel Advanced Microwave Biodiesel Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wali, W. A.; Hassan, K. H.; Cullen, J. D.; Al-Shamma'a, A. I.; Shaw, A.; Wylie, S. R.

    2011-08-01

    Biodiesel, an alternative diesel fuel made from a renewable source, is produced by the transesterification of vegetable oil or fat with methanol or ethanol. In order to control and monitor the progress of this chemical reaction with complex and highly nonlinear dynamics, the controller must be able to overcome the challenges due to the difficulty in obtaining a mathematical model, as there are many uncertain factors and disturbances during the actual operation of biodiesel reactors. Classical controllers show significant difficulties when trying to control the system automatically. In this paper we propose a comparison of artificial intelligent controllers, Fuzzy logic and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System(ANFIS) for real time control of a novel advanced biodiesel microwave reactor for biodiesel production from waste cooking oil. Fuzzy logic can incorporate expert human judgment to define the system variables and their relationships which cannot be defined by mathematical relationships. The Neuro-fuzzy system consists of components of a fuzzy system except that computations at each stage are performed by a layer of hidden neurons and the neural network's learning capability is provided to enhance the system knowledge. The controllers are used to automatically and continuously adjust the applied power supplied to the microwave reactor under different perturbations. A Labview based software tool will be presented that is used for measurement and control of the full system, with real time monitoring.

  7. DSP applications in advanced, intelligent motion control: the future

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beierke, S. [Texas Instruments Deutschland GmBh, Freising (Germany); Vas, P. [Univ. of Aberdeen, Dept. of Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2000-08-01

    Recently there has been a rapid increase in the number of DSPs for various motion control applications. However, in the future, further significant increase is expected due to wider applications in existing and new areas (e.g. household appliances, automotive auxiliaries, micro-electromechanical systems, military applications, etc.). The present paper discusses the state-of-art Texas Instruments fixed point and floating point DSPs used in motion control applications and will also focus on future activities. Currently new chip technologies are being developed which involve copper interconnects, silicon-on-insulator wafers, insulators with- low dielectric constants, etc. It is expected that future single-chip DSPs for advanced intelligent motion control will have higher performance, reduced costs, simpler designs, will incorporate various sensors, different modules for optimised PWM generation, efficiency control, vector and direct torque control (sensorless and quasisensorless solutions as well), condition monitoring, selfcommissioning, artificial-intelligence-based control, etc. A manufacturer's task of implementing sensorless and/or quasisensorless torque control schemes for induction, synchronous and switched reluctance motor drives will be significantly reduced by the application of the newly developed DSPs. The paper will discuss these issues and will also show some implementation results in various sensorless (classical DTC; DTC with torque-ripple reduction schemes; vector) and quasisensorless ac drives (e.g. a vector controlled induction motor drive). (orig.)

  8. Advanced discrete-time control designs and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Abidi, Khalid

    2015-01-01

    This book covers a wide spectrum of systems such as linear and nonlinear multivariable systems as well as control problems such as disturbance, uncertainty and time-delays. The purpose of this book is to provide researchers and practitioners a manual for the design and application of advanced discrete-time controllers.  The book presents six different control approaches depending on the type of system and control problem. The first and second approaches are based on Sliding Mode control (SMC) theory and are intended for linear systems with exogenous disturbances. The third and fourth approaches are based on adaptive control theory and are aimed at linear/nonlinear systems with periodically varying parametric uncertainty or systems with input delay. The fifth approach is based on Iterative learning control (ILC) theory and is aimed at uncertain linear/nonlinear systems with repeatable tasks and the final approach is based on fuzzy logic control (FLC) and is intended for highly uncertain systems with heuristi...

  9. Sulfur Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jong, B. H.

    2007-12-01

    Variations in surface tension affect the buoyancy of objects floating in a liquid. Thus an object floating in water will sink deeper in the presence of dishwater fluid. This is a very minor but measurable effect. It causes for instance ducks to drown in aqueous solutions with added surfactant. The surface tension of liquid iron is very strongly affected by the presence of sulfur which acts as a surfactant in this system varying between 1.9 and 0.4 N/m at 10 mass percent Sulfur (Lee & Morita (2002), This last value is inferred to be the maximum value for Sulfur inferred to be present in the liquid outer core. Venting of Sulfur from the liquid core manifests itself on the Earth surface by the 105 to 106 ton of sulfur vented into the atmosphere annually (Wedepohl, 1984). Inspection of surface Sulfur emission indicates that venting is non-homogeneously distributed over the Earth's surface. The implication of such large variation in surface tension in the liquid outer core are that at locally low Sulfur concentration, the liquid outer core does not wet the predominantly MgSiO3 matrix with which it is in contact. However at a local high in Sulfur, the liquid outer core wets this matrix which in the fluid state has a surface tension of 0.4 N/m (Bansal & Doremus, 1986), couples with it, and causes it to sink. This differential and diapiric movement is transmitted through the essentially brittle mantle (1024 Pa.s, Lambeck & Johnson, 1998; the maximum value for ice being about 1030 Pa.s at 0 K, in all likely hood representing an upper bound of viscosity for all materials) and manifests itself on the surface by the roughly 20 km differentiation, about 0.1 % of the total mantle thickness, between topographical heights and lows with concomitant lateral movement in the crust and upper mantle resulting in thin skin tectonics. The brittle nature of the medium though which this movement is transmitted suggests that the extremes in topography of the D" layer are similar in range to

  10. Advanced Fuzzy Logic Based Admission Control for UMTS System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kejik

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The capacity of CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access systems is interference limited. Therefore radio resources management (RRM functions are used. They are responsible for supplying optimum coverage, ensuring efficient use of physical resources, and providing the maximum planned capacity. This paper deals with admission control techniques for UMTS (Universal Mobile Telecommunication System. A UMTS system model and four fuzzy logic based admission control algorithms are presented in this paper. Two new versions of fuzzy logic based admission control algorithms are presented there. All algorithms are mutually compared via simulations. Simulations show that the novel advanced fuzzy algorithm outperforms the other simulated algorithms (in terms of blocking probability, dropping probability and the number of active UEs in cell.

  11. Benchmarking of Advanced Control Strategies for a Simulated Hydroelectric System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotti, S.; Simani, S.; Alvisi, S.; Venturini, M.

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses and develops the design of advanced control strategies for a typical hydroelectric plant during unsteady conditions, performed in the Matlab and Simulink environments. The hydraulic system consists of a high water head and a long penstock with upstream and downstream surge tanks, and is equipped with a Francis turbine. The nonlinear characteristics of hydraulic turbine and the inelastic water hammer effects were considered to calculate and simulate the hydraulic transients. With reference to the control solutions addressed in this work, the proposed methodologies rely on data-driven and model-based approaches applied to the system under monitoring. Extensive simulations and comparisons serve to determine the best solution for the development of the most effective, robust and reliable control tool when applied to the considered hydraulic system.

  12. Advanced Control of Photovoltaic and Wind Turbines Power Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yongheng; Chen, Wenjie; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2014-01-01

    Much more efforts have been made on the integration of renewable energies into the grid in order to meet the imperative demand of a clean and reliable electricity generation. In this case, the grid stability and robustness may be violated due to the intermittency and interaction of the solar...... and wind renewables. Thus, in this chapter, advanced control strategies, which can enable the power conversion efficiently and reliably, for both photovoltaic (PV) and wind turbines power systems are addressed in order to enhance the integration of those technologies. Related grid demands have been...... power injection for both single-phase and three-phase systems. Other control strategies like constant power generation control for PV systems to further increase the penetration level, and the improvements of LVRT performance for a doubly fed induction generator based wind turbine system by means...

  13. Advances and applications in sliding mode control systems

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, Quanmin

    2015-01-01

    This book describes the advances and applications in Sliding mode control (SMC) which is widely used as a powerful method to tackle uncertain nonlinear systems. The book is organized into 21 chapters which have been organised by the editors to reflect the various themes of sliding mode control. The book provides the reader with a broad range of material from first principles up to the current state of the art in the area of SMC and observation presented in a clear, matter-of-fact style. As such it is appropriate for graduate students with a basic knowledge of classical control theory and some knowledge of state-space methods and nonlinear systems. The resulting design procedures are emphasized using Matlab/Simulink software.    

  14. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  15. Chain-branching control of the atomic structure of alkanethiol-based gold-sulfur interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Chi, Qijin; Zhang, Jingdong; Hush, Noel S; Reimers, Jeffrey R; Ulstrup, Jens

    2011-09-28

    Density functional theory structure calculations at 0 K and simulations at 300 K of observed high-resolution in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) images reveal three different atomic-interface structures for the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three isomeric butanethiols on Au(111): direct binding to the Au(111) surface without pitting, binding to adatoms above a regular surface with extensive pitting, and binding to adatoms with local surface vacancies and some pitting. Thermal motions are shown to produce some observed STM features, with a very tight energy balance controlling the observed structures. Variation of the degree of substitution on the α carbon is found to significantly change the relative energies for interaction of the different types of adatom structures with the surface, while the nature of the surface cell, controlled primarily by inter-adsorbate steric interactions, controls substrate reorganization energies and adsorbate distortion energies. Most significantly, by manipulating these features, chemical control of the adsorbate can produce stable interfaces with surface pitting eliminated, providing new perspectives for technological applications of SAMs.

  16. PREFACE: European Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Horst; Georg, Sören

    2014-12-01

    The European Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis is an annual event that has been organised since 2003 by Control Engineering departments of several European universities in Germany, France, the UK, Poland, Italy, Hungary and Denmark. The overall planning of the workshops is conducted by the Intelligent Control and Diagnosis (ICD) steering committee. This year's ACD workshop took place at HTW Berlin (University of Applied Sciences) and was organised by the Control Engineering group of School of Engineering I of HTW Berlin. 38 papers were presented at ACD 2014, with contributions spanning a variety of fields in modern control science: Discrete control, nonlinear control, model predictive control, system identification, fault diagnosis and fault-tolerant control, control applications, applications of fuzzy logic, as well as modelling and simulation, the latter two forming a basis for all tasks in modern control. Three interesting and high-quality plenary lectures were delivered. The first plenary speaker was Wolfgang Weber from Pepperl+Fuchs, a German manufacturer of state-of-the-art industrial sensors and process interfaces. The second and third plenary speakers were two internationally high-ranked researchers in their respective fields, Prof. Didier Theilliol from Université de Lorraine and Prof. Carsten Scherer from Universität Stuttgart. Taken together, the three plenary lectures sought to contribute to closing the gap between theory and applications. On behalf of the whole ACD 2014 organising committee, we would like to thank all those who submitted papers and participated in the workshop. We hope it was a fruitful and memorable event for all. Together we are looking forward to the next ACD workshop in 2015 in Pilsen, Czech Republic. Horst Schulte (General Chair), Sören Georg (Programme Chair)

  17. Advanced Controls for the Multi-pod Centipod WEC device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCall, Alan [Dehlsen Associates, LLC, Santa Barabara, CA (United States); Fleming, Alex [Dehlsen Associates, LLC, Santa Barabara, CA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) has developed a Wave Energy Converter (WEC), Centipod, which is a multiple point absorber, extracting wave energy primarily in the heave direction through a plurality of point absorber floats sharing a common stable reference structure. The objective of this project was to develop advanced control algorithms that will be used to reduce Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE). This project investigated the use of Model Predictive Control (MPC) to improve the power capture of the WEC. The MPC controller developed in this work is a state-space, “look ahead” controller approach using knowledge of past and current states to predict future states to take action with the PTO to maximize power capture while still respecting system constraints. In order to maximize power, which is the product of force and velocity, the controller must aim to create phase alignment between excitation force and velocity. This project showed a 161% improvement in the Annual Energy Production (AEP) for the Centipod WEC when utilizing MPC, compared to a baseline, fixed passive damping control strategy. This improvement in AEP was shown to provide a substantial benefit to the WEC’s overall Cost of Energy, reducing LCOE by 50% from baseline. The results of this work proved great potential for the adoption of Model Predictive Controls in Wave Energy Converters.

  18. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) control display unit software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slominski, Christopher J.; Parks, Mark A.; Debure, Kelly R.; Heaphy, William J.

    1992-01-01

    The software created for the Control Display Units (CDUs), used for the Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) project, on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle (TSRV) is described. Module descriptions are presented in a standardized format which contains module purpose, calling sequence, a detailed description, and global references. The global reference section includes subroutines, functions, and common variables referenced by a particular module. The CDUs, one for the pilot and one for the copilot, are used for flight management purposes. Operations performed with the CDU affects the aircraft's guidance, navigation, and display software.

  19. Advances in control of ectoparasites in large animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiepe, T

    1988-11-01

    In continuation of a publication on "Large-scale management systems and parasite populations: ectoparasites" in Vet. Parasitol. 11 (1982): 61-68, advances and present state of the control of ectoparasites in herds of cattle, sheep and camels are discussed. An intensified animal production necessitates permanent veterinary control of the status of ectoparasites. Strategically, control is basically directed towards achieving three aims: eradication, reduction of losses by means of dilution of ectoparasites regulations, and therapeutic measures. In the last few years, important progress has been made in effective ectoparasites control, mainly resulting from the discovery of new insecticides and acaricides, the improvement of the application techniques and the recent results in the biological control of arthropods; finally, an immunological approach will open new alternative ways of control. The control of mange and demodicosis in cattle; sarcoptic mange and sucking lice infestations in pigs; mange, biting lice infestations and nasal bots in sheep; ectoparasite infestations in camels and tick infestations are the main topics of the paper. The discovery of Ivermectin, a derivate of Streptomyces avermitilis which is now already fully integrated in to the spectrum of antiparasitic drugs, created a new generation of broad spectrum insecticides/acaricides. Current problems of the chemical control of arthropods, like the risk of residues in meat, milk and their products, the insecticide resistance and the possible environment pollution are critically outlined. But on the other hand, it can be predicted hypothetically that the amount of pest control measures in farm animals will increase in the near future to eliminate arthropods as causes of skin diseases and of damages to hides entailing negative effects on leather processing and as vectors of important infection agents. Finally, the proposal is submitted to elaborate international control programmes against ectoparasite

  20. Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery: Advanced Thermo-Adsorptive Battery Climate Control System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-12-31

    HEATS Project: MIT is developing a low-cost, compact, high-capacity, advanced thermoadsorptive battery (ATB) for effective climate control of EVs. The ATB provides both heating and cooling by taking advantage of the materials’ ability to adsorb a significant amount of water. This efficient battery system design could offer up as much as a 30% increase in driving range compared to current EV climate control technology. The ATB provides high-capacity thermal storage with little-to-no electrical power consumption. The ATB is also looking to explore the possibility of shifting peak electricity loads for cooling and heating in a variety of other applications, including commercial and residential buildings, data centers, and telecom facilities.

  1. Second Generation Advanced Reburning for High Efficiency NOx Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir M. Zamansky; Pete M. Maly; Vitali V. Lissianski

    2000-12-31

    This project is designed to develop a family of novel NO{sub x} control technologies, called Second Generation Advanced Reburning (SGAR) which has the potential to achieve 90+% NO{sub x} control in coal-fired boilers at a significantly lower cost than SCR. The thirteenth reporting period in Phase II (October 1-December 31, 2000) included SGAR tests in which coal was used as the reburning fuel. All test work was conducted at GE-EER's 1.0 MMBtu/hr Boiler Simulator Facility. Three test series were performed including AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and reburning + SNCR. Tests demonstrated that over 90% NO{sub x} reduction could be achieved with utilization of coal as a reburning fuel in SGAR. The most effective SGAR variant is reburning + SNCR followed by AR-Lean and AR-Rich.

  2. Advances in the control of mechatronic suspension systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wajdi SABOUD; Sallehuddin Mohamed HARIS; Yuzita YAACOB

    2014-01-01

    The suspension system is a key element in motor vehicles. Advancements in electronics and micropro-cessor technology have led to the realization of mechatronic suspensions. Since its introduction in some production motorcars in the 1980s, it has remained an area which sees active research and development, and this will likely continue for many years to come. With the aim of identifying current trends and future focus areas, this paper presents a review on the state-of-the-art of mechatronic suspensions. First, some commonly used classifications of mechatronic suspensions are presented. This is followed by a discussion on some of the actuating mechanisms used to provide control action. A survey is then reported on the many types of control approaches, including look-ahead preview, predictive, fuzzy logic, proportional-integral-derivative (PID), optimal, robust, adaptive, robust adaptive, and switching control. In conclusion, hydraulic actuators are most commonly used, but they impose high power requirements, limiting practical realizations of active suspensions. Electromagnetic actuators are seen to hold the promise of lower power requirements, and rigorous research and development should be conducted to make them commercially usable. Current focus on control methods that are robust to suspension parameter variations also seems to produce limited performance improvements, and future control approaches should be adaptive to the changeable driving conditions.

  3. 大蒜含硫化合物及风味研究进展%Advances in sulfur compounds and garlic flavor research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王瑜; 邢效娟; 景浩

    2014-01-01

    Garlic has been used as foods and herbal remedy, which has many biological activities such as inhi-bition of bacteria growth. Sulfur compounds are the major bioactive compounds in garlic, and also contribute to garlic pungent flavor. Alliin, precursor of these sulfur compounds, could be transformed to allicin by allinase. Allicin is very unstable and easy to be converted to other sulfur compounds. This article describes the sulfur compounds associated with garlic flavor, transformations between sulfur compounds, and biological activity of sulfur compounds. The influences of different processing technologies on sulfur compounds and garlic flavor have also been addressed, especially the processing for black garlic and associated flavor change.%大蒜是生活中必不可少的食品,也是中药材,具有抗菌等多种功能性。含硫化合物是大蒜中的主要活性成分,也是大蒜具有刺激性气味的主要原因。蒜氨酸作为这些含硫化合物的前体物质,在蒜氨酸酶的酶解催化下生成大蒜素,随后大蒜素降解为其他含硫化合物。本文介绍了大蒜中与风味相关的含硫化合物,含硫化合物转化的关系及其具有的生物活性。介绍了不同加工处理方法对大蒜中含硫化合物及风味的影响,以及黑蒜的制备及风味改变。

  4. AMBA Based Advanced DMA Controller for SoC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Aljumah

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available this paper describes the implementation of an AMBA Based Advanced DMA Controller for SoC. It uses AMBA Specifications, where two buses AHB and APB are defined and works for processor as system bus and peripheral bus respectively. The DMA controller functions between these two buses as a bridge and allow them to work concurrently. Depending on the speed of peripherals it uses buffering mechanism. Therefore an asynchronous FIFO is used for synchronizing the speed of peripherals. The proposed DMA controller can works in SoC along with processor and achieve fast data rate. The method introduced significant volume of data transfer with very low timing characteristics. Thus it is a better choice in respect of timing and volume of data. These two issues have been resolved under this research study. The results are compared with the AMD processors, like Geode GX 466, GX 500 and GX 533, and the presence and absence of DMA controller with processor is discussed and compared. The DMAC stands to be better alternative in SoC design.

  5. Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEntee, Jarlath [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Polagye, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Fabien, Brian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Thomson, Jim [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Kilcher, Levi [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Marnagh, Cian [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States); Donegan, James [Ocean Renewable Power Company, Portland, ME (United States)

    2016-03-31

    The Advanced Energy Harvesting Control Schemes for Marine Renewable Energy Devices (Project) investigated, analyzed and modeled advanced turbine control schemes with the objective of increasing the energy harvested by hydrokinetic turbines in turbulent flow. Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) implemented and validated a feedforward controller to increase power capture; and applied and tested the controls on ORPC’s RivGen® Power Systems in Igiugig, Alaska. Assessments of performance improvements were made for the RivGen® in the Igiugig environment and for ORPC’s TidGen® Power System in a reference tidal environment. Annualized Energy Production (AEP) and Levelized Cost of Energy (LCOE) improvements associated with implementation of the recommended control methodology were made for the TidGen® Power System in the DOE reference tidal environment. System Performance Advancement (SPA) goals were selected for the project. SPA targets were to improve Power to Weight Ratio (PWR) and system Availability, with the intention of reducing Levelized Cost of Electricity (LCOE). This project focused primarily reducing in PWR. Reductions in PWR of 25.5% were achieved. Reductions of 20.3% in LCOE were achieved. This project evaluated four types of controllers which were tested in simulation, emulation, a laboratory flume, and the field. The adaptive Kω2 controller performs similarly to the non-adaptive version of the same controller and may be useful in tidal channels where the mean velocity is continually evolving. Trends in simulation were largely verified through experiments, which also provided the opportunity to test assumptions about turbine responsiveness and control resilience to varying scales of turbulence. Laboratory experiments provided an essential stepping stone between simulation and implementation on a field-scale turbine. Experiments also demonstrated that using “energy loss” as a metric to differentiate between well-designed controllers operating at

  6. Advanced methods of microscope control using μManager software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur D Edelstein

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available µManager is an open-source, cross-platform desktop application, to control a wide variety of motorized microscopes, scientific cameras, stages, illuminators, and other microscope accessories. Since its inception in 2005, µManager has grown to support a wide range of microscopy hardware and is now used by thousands of researchers around the world. The application provides a mature graphical user interface and offers open programming interfaces to facilitate plugins and scripts. Here, we present a guide to using some of the recently added advanced µManager features, including hardware synchronization, simultaneous use of multiple cameras, projection of patterned light onto a specimen, live slide mapping, imaging with multi-well plates, particle localization and tracking, and high-speed imaging.

  7. HFE safety reviews of advanced nuclear power plant control rooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohara, John

    1994-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACR's) will utilize human-system interface (HSI) technologies that may have significant implications for plant safety in that they will affect the operator's overall role and means of interacting with the system. The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) reviews the human factors engineering (HFE) aspects of HSI's to ensure that they are designed to good HFE principles and support performance and reliability in order to protect public health and safety. However, the only available NRC guidance was developed more than ten years ago, and does not adequately address the human performance issues and technology changes associated with ACR's. Accordingly, a new approach to ACR safety reviews was developed based upon the concept of 'convergent validity'. This approach to ACR safety reviews is described.

  8. International conference on Advances in Intelligent Control and Innovative Computing

    CERN Document Server

    Castillo, Oscar; Huang, Xu; Intelligent Control and Innovative Computing

    2012-01-01

    In the lightning-fast world of intelligent control and cutting-edge computing, it is vitally important to stay abreast of developments that seem to follow each other without pause. This publication features the very latest and some of the very best current research in the field, with 32 revised and extended research articles written by prominent researchers in the field. Culled from contributions to the key 2011 conference Advances in Intelligent Control and Innovative Computing, held in Hong Kong, the articles deal with a wealth of relevant topics, from the most recent work in artificial intelligence and decision-supporting systems, to automated planning, modelling and simulation, signal processing, and industrial applications. Not only does this work communicate the current state of the art in intelligent control and innovative computing, it is also an illuminating guide to up-to-date topics for researchers and graduate students in the field. The quality of the contents is absolutely assured by the high pro...

  9. GPS based Advanced Vehicle Tracking and Vehicle Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashood Mukhtar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Security systems and navigators have always been a necessity of human‟s life. The developments of advanced electronics have brought revolutionary changes in these fields. In this paper, we will present a vehicle tracking system that employs a GPS module and a GSM modem to find the location of a vehicle and offers a range of control features. To complete the design successfully, a GPS unit, two relays, a GSM Modem and two MCU units are used. There are five features introduced in the project. The aim of this project is to remotely track a vehicle‟s location, remotely switch ON and OFF the vehicle‟s ignition system and remotely lock and unlock the doors of the vehicle. An SMS message is sent to the tracking system and the system responds to the users request by performing appropriate actions. Short text messages are assigned to each of these features. A webpage is specifically designed to view the vehicle‟s location on Google maps. By using relay based control concept introduced in this paper, number of control features such as turning heater on/off, radio on/off etc. can be implemented in the same fashion.

  10. [Effects of sulfur plus resin-coated controlled release urea fertilizer on winter wheat dry matter accumulation and allocation and grain yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Jian-Guo; Zhou, Jie; Wang, Dong; Yu, Zhen-Wen; Zhang, Min; Hu, Zhi-Ying; Hou, Xiu-Tao

    2011-05-01

    A field experiment was conducted to study the effects of sulfur plus resin-coated urea fertilizer on the winter wheat dry matter accumulation and allocation and grain yield. Four treatments were installed, i.e., sulfur plus resin-coated urea (SRCU), resin-coated urea (RCU), sulfur-amended conventional urea (SU), and conventional urea (U). The coated urea fertilizers were applied as basal, and the conventional urea fertilizers were 50% applied as basal and 50% applied as topdressing. There were no significant differences in the plant dry matter accumulation and grain yield between treatments RCU and U. Under the conditions the available S content in 0-20 cm soil layer was 43.2 mg x kg(-1) and the S application rate was 91.4 kg x hm(-2), treatments SRCU and SU had no significant differences in the dry matter accumulation and allocation after anthesis and the grain yield, but the amount of the assimilates after anthesis allocated in grain, the grain-filling rate at mid grain-filling stage, the 1000-grain weight, and the grain yield in the two treatments were significantly higher than those in treatment RCU. When the available S content in 0-20 cm soil layer was 105.1 mg x kg(-1) and the S application rate was 120 kg x hm(-2), the grain yield in treatment SRCU was significantly higher than that in treatment SU, but had no significant difference with that in treatments RCU and U. These results suggested that from the viewpoints of dry matter accumulation and allocation and grain yield, the nitrogen released from SRCU had the same regulation effect as the conventional urea 50% applied as basal and 50% applied as topdressing, while the regulation effect of the sulfur released from SRCU was controlled by the available S content in 0-20 cm soil layer. When the soil available S content was 43.2 mg x kg(-1), the released sulfur could promote the dry matter accumulation after anthesis and the grain-filling, and increase the grain yield significantly; when the soil available S

  11. Process for the regeneration of an additive used to control emissions during the combustion of high sulfur fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polanco, D.R.; Bueno, C.O.; Salazar, R.; Chamorra, F.A.S

    1989-05-23

    A process is described for regenerating a sulfur capturing additive used in the preparation of a hydrocarbon in water emulsion for combustion as a fuel comprising: (a) forming a hydrocarbon in water emulsion by admixing a sulfur containing hydrocarbon and water with an emulsifier and a water soluble sulfur capturing additive wherein the sulfur capturing additive is selected from the group consisting of Na/sup +/, K/sup +/, Li/sup +/, Ca/sup ++/, Ba/sup ++/, Mg/sup ++/, Fe/sup +++/ and mixtures thereof; (b) burning the emulsion so as to form a combustion ash containing the water soluble additive as a sulfate compound; (c) leaching the combustion ash wherein the combustion ash is leached with water in a water to ash ratio in ml to grams of 1:1 to 30:1 so as to dissolve the water soluble additive sulfate compound to form a pregnant leach liquor containing the additive; (d) separating the pregnant leach liquor containing the additive; (e) adjusting the pregnant leach liquor with a basic precipitating agent wherein the base precipitating agent is selected from the group consisting of NH/sub 4/OH, NaOH, Ca(OH)/sub 2/, NaCO/sub 3/ and mixtures thereof wherein the pregnant leach liquor is adjusted with the base to a pH of greater than 7 so as to precipitate an additive compound; and (f) recovering the additive compound.

  12. Simultaneous heterotrophic and sulfur-oxidizing autotrophic denitrification process for drinking water treatment: control of sulfate production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahinkaya, Erkan; Dursun, Nesrin; Kilic, Adem; Demirel, Sevgi; Uyanik, Sinan; Cinar, Ozer

    2011-12-15

    A long-term performance of a packed-bed bioreactor containing sulfur and limestone was evaluated for the denitrification of drinking water. Autotrophic denitrification rate was limited by the slow dissolution rate of sulfur and limestone. Dissolution of limestone for alkalinity supplementation increased hardness due to release of Ca(2+). Sulfate production is the main disadvantage of the sulfur autotrophic denitrification process. The effluent sulfate concentration was reduced to values below drinking water guidelines by stimulating the simultaneous heterotrophic and autotrophic denitrification with methanol supplementation. Complete removal of 75 mg/L NO(3)-N with effluent sulfate concentration of around 225 mg/L was achieved when methanol was supplemented at methanol/NO(3)-N ratio of 1.67 (mg/mg), which was much lower than the theoretical value of 2.47 for heterotrophic denitrification. Batch studies showed that sulfur-based autotrophic NO(2)-N reduction rate was around three times lower than the reduction rate of NO(3)-N, which led to NO(2)-N accumulation at high loadings.

  13. Biologically produced sulfur

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinjan, W.E.; Keizer, de A.; Janssen, A.J.H.

    2003-01-01

    Sulfur compound oxidizing bacteria produce sulfur as an intermediate in the oxidation of hydrogen sulfide to sulfate. Sulfur produced by these microorganisms can be stored in sulfur globules, located either inside or outside the cell. Excreted sulfur globules are colloidal particles which are stabil

  14. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eighteen years (from 1988 till the beginning of 2006 are analyzed in this paper. It is very alarming data that, according to all the recorded accidents, over 1.6 million tons of sulfuric acid were exuded. Although water transport is the safest (only 16.38% of the total amount of accidents in that way 98.88% of the total amount of sulfuric acid was exuded into the environment. Human factor was the common factor in all the accidents, whether there was enough control of the production process, of reservoirs or transportation tanks or the transport was done by inadequate (old tanks, or the accidents arose from human factor (inadequate speed, lock of caution etc. The fact is that huge energy, sacrifice and courage were involved in the recovery from accidents where rescue teams and fire brigades showed great courage to prevent real environmental catastrophes and very often they lost their lives during the events. So, the phrase that sulfuric acid is a real "environmental bomb" has become clearer.

  15. Second Generation Advanced Reburning for High Efficiency NOx Control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladimir M. Zamansky; Peter M. Maly; Vitali V. Lissianski; Mark S. Sheldon; David Moyeda; Roy Payne

    2001-06-30

    This project develops a family of novel Second Generation Advanced Reburning (SGAR) NO{sub x} control technologies, which can achieve 95% NO{sub x} control in coal fired boilers at a significantly lower cost than Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR). The conventional Advanced Reburning (AR) process integrates basic reburning and N-agent injection. The SGAR systems include six AR variants: (1) AR-Lean--injection of the N-agent and promoter along with overfire air; (2) AR-Rich--injection of N-agent and promoter into the reburning zone; (3) Multiple Injection Advanced Reburning (MIAR)--injection of N-agents and promoters both into the reburning zone and with overfire air; (4) AR-Lean + Promoted SNCR--injection of N-agents and promoters with overfire air and into the temperature zone at which Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction (SNCR) is effective; (5) AR-Rich + Promoted SNCR--injection of N-agents and promoters into the reburning zone and into the SNCR zone; and (6) Promoted Reburning + Promoted SNCR--basic or promoted reburning followed by basic or promoted SNCR process. The project was conducted in two phases over a five-year period. The work included a combination of analytical and experimental studies to confirm the process mechanisms, identify optimum process configurations, and develop a design methodology for full-scale applications. Phase I was conducted from October, 1995 to September, 1997 and included both analytical studies and tests in bench and pilot-scale test rigs. Phase I moved AR technology to Maturity Level III-Major Subsystems. Phase II is conducted over a 45 month period (October, 1997-June, 2001). Phase II included evaluation of alternative promoters, development of alternative reburning fuel and N-Agent jet mixing systems, and scale up. The goal of Phase II was to move the technology to Maturity Level I-Subscale Integrated System. Tests in combustion facility ranging in firing rate from 0.1 x 10{sup 6} to 10 x 10{sup 6} Btu/hr demonstrated the

  16. MERCURY CONTROL WITH THE ADVANCED HYBRID PARTICULATE COLLECTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charlene R. Crocker; Steven A. Benson; Stanley J. Miller

    2003-11-01

    This project was awarded under U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Program Solicitation DE-PS26-00NT40769 and specifically addresses Technical Topical Area 4--Testing Novel and Less Mature Control Technologies on Actual Flue Gas at the Pilot Scale. The project team includes the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) as the main contractor; W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., as a technical and financial partner; and the Big Stone Plant operated by Otter Tail Power Company, host for the field-testing portion of the research. Since 1995, DOE has supported development of a new concept in particulate control called the advanced hybrid particulate collector (AHPC). The AHPC has been licensed to W.L. Gore & Associates, Inc., and is now marketed as the Advanced Hybrid{trademark} filter by Gore. The AHPC combines the best features of electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) and baghouses in a unique configuration, providing major synergism between the two collection methods, both in the particulate collection step and in the transfer of dust to the hopper. The AHPC provides ultra-high collection efficiency, overcoming the problem of excessive fine-particle emissions with conventional ESPs, and it solves the problem of reentrainment and re-collection of dust in conventional baghouses. The AHPC appears to have unique advantages for mercury control over baghouses or ESPs as an excellent gas-solid contactor. The objective of the original 5-task project is to demonstrate 90% total mercury control in the AHPC at a lower cost than current mercury control estimates. The approach includes bench-scale batch testing that ties the new work to previous results and links results with larger-scale pilot testing with real flue gas on a coal-fired combustion system, pilot-scale testing on a coal-fired combustion system with both a pulse-jet baghouse and an AHPC to prove or disprove the research hypotheses, and field demonstration pilot-scale testing at a

  17. Advanced emissions control development program: Phase 2 final report, February 29, 1996--August 31, 1997. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, A.P.; Holmes, M.J.; Redinger, K.E.

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the advanced emissions control development program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals [antimony, arsenic, barium, cadmium, chromium, cobalt, lead, manganese, nickel, and selenium], fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP`s and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals; (2) mercury goes through particulate control devices almost entirely uncontrolled; (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride; and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however additional work is needed to understand the relationship between the wet scrubber`s operating conditions and mercury capture.

  18. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor, Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuel performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  19. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3]. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

  20. Advanced illumination control algorithm for medical endoscopy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Ricardo M.; Wäny, Martin; Santos, Pedro; Morgado-Dias, F.

    2015-05-01

    CMOS image sensor manufacturer, AWAIBA, is providing the world's smallest digital camera modules to the world market for minimally invasive surgery and one time use endoscopic equipment. Based on the world's smallest digital camera head and the evaluation board provided to it, the aim of this paper is to demonstrate an advanced fast response dynamic control algorithm of the illumination LED source coupled to the camera head, over the LED drivers embedded on the evaluation board. Cost efficient and small size endoscopic camera modules nowadays embed minimal size image sensors capable of not only adjusting gain and exposure time but also LED illumination with adjustable illumination power. The LED illumination power has to be dynamically adjusted while navigating the endoscope over changing illumination conditions of several orders of magnitude within fractions of the second to guarantee a smooth viewing experience. The algorithm is centered on the pixel analysis of selected ROIs enabling it to dynamically adjust the illumination intensity based on the measured pixel saturation level. The control core was developed in VHDL and tested in a laboratory environment over changing light conditions. The obtained results show that it is capable of achieving correction speeds under 1 s while maintaining a static error below 3% relative to the total number of pixels on the image. The result of this work will allow the integration of millimeter sized high brightness LED sources on minimal form factor cameras enabling its use in endoscopic surgical robotic or micro invasive surgery.

  1. Advanced Branching Control and Characterization of Inorganic Semiconducting Nanocrystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, Steven Michael [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    The ability to finely tune the size and shape of inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals is an area of great interest, as the more control one has, the more applications will be possible for their use. The first two basic shapes develped in nanocrystals were the sphere and the anistropic nanorod. the II_VI materials being used such as Cadmium Selenide (CdSe) and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), exhibit polytypism, which allows them to form in either the hexagonally packed wurtzite or cubically packed zinc blende crystalline phase. The nanorods are wurtzite with the length of the rod growing along the c-axis. As this grows, stacking faults may form, which are layers of zinc blende in the otherwise wurtzite crystal. Using this polytypism, though, the first generation of branched crystals were developed in the form of the CdTe tetrapod. This is a nanocrystal that nucleates in the zincblend form, creating a tetrahedral core, on which four wurtzite arms are grown. This structure opened up the possibility of even more complex shapes and applications. This disseration investigates the advancement of branching control and further understanding the materials polytypism in the form of the stacking faults in nanorods.

  2. Elucidating microbial processes in nitrate- and sulfate-reducing systems using sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios: The example of oil reservoir souring control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, Casey; Voordouw, Gerrit; Mayer, Bernhard

    2009-07-01

    Sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are ubiquitous in anoxic environments where they couple the oxidation of organic compounds to the production of hydrogen sulfide. This can be problematic for various industries including oil production where reservoir "souring" (the generation of H 2S) requires corrective actions. Nitrate or nitrite injection into sour oil fields can promote SRB control by stimulating organotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing bacteria (O-NRB) that out-compete SRB for electron donors (biocompetitive exclusion), and/or by lithotrophic nitrate- or nitrite-reducing sulfide oxidizing bacteria (NR-SOB) that remove H 2S directly. Sulfur and oxygen isotope ratios of sulfide and sulfate were monitored in batch cultures and sulfidic bioreactors to evaluate mitigation of SRB activities by nitrate or nitrite injection. Sulfate reduction in batch cultures of Desulfovibrio sp. strain Lac15 indicated typical Rayleigh-type fractionation of sulfur isotopes during bacterial sulfate reduction (BSR) with lactate, whereas oxygen isotope ratios in unreacted sulfate remained constant. Sulfur isotope fractionation in batch cultures of the NR-SOB Thiomicrospira sp. strain CVO was minimal during the oxidation of sulfide to sulfate, which had δ18O SO4 values similar to that of the water-oxygen. Treating an up-flow bioreactor with increasing doses of nitrate to eliminate sulfide resulted in changes in sulfur isotope ratios of sulfate and sulfide but very little variation in oxygen isotope ratios of sulfate. These observations were similar to results obtained from SRB-only, but different from those of NR-SOB-only pure culture control experiments. This suggests that biocompetitive exclusion of SRB took place in the nitrate-injected bioreactor. In two replicate bioreactors treated with nitrite, less pronounced sulfur isotope fractionation and a slight decrease in δ18O SO4 were observed. This indicated that NR-SOB played a minor role during dosing with low nitrite and that

  3. Advanced modelling, monitoring, and process control of bioconversion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Elliott C.

    Production of fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass is an increasingly important area of research and industrialization throughout the world. In order to be competitive with fossil-based fuels and chemicals, maintaining cost-effectiveness is critical. Advanced process control (APC) and optimization methods could significantly reduce operating costs in the biorefining industry. Two reasons APC has previously proven challenging to implement for bioprocesses include: lack of suitable online sensor technology of key system components, and strongly nonlinear first principal models required to predict bioconversion behavior. To overcome these challenges batch fermentations with the acetogen Moorella thermoacetica were monitored with Raman spectroscopy for the conversion of real lignocellulosic hydrolysates and a kinetic model for the conversion of synthetic sugars was developed. Raman spectroscopy was shown to be effective in monitoring the fermentation of sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw hydrolysate, where univariate models predicted acetate concentrations with a root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) of 1.9 and 1.0 g L-1 for bagasse and straw, respectively. Multivariate partial least squares (PLS) models were employed to predict acetate, xylose, glucose, and total sugar concentrations for both hydrolysate fermentations. The PLS models were more robust than univariate models, and yielded a percent error of approximately 5% for both sugarcane bagasse and sugarcane straw. In addition, a screening technique was discussed for improving Raman spectra of hydrolysate samples prior to collecting fermentation data. Furthermore, a mechanistic model was developed to predict batch fermentation of synthetic glucose, xylose, and a mixture of the two sugars to acetate. The models accurately described the bioconversion process with an RMSEP of approximately 1 g L-1 for each model and provided insights into how kinetic parameters changed during dual substrate

  4. Sulfur metabolism in phototrophic sulfur bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frigaard, Niels-Ulrik; Dahl, Christiane

    2008-01-01

    Phototrophic sulfur bacteria are characterized by oxidizing various inorganic sulfur compounds for use as electron donors in carbon dioxide fixation during anoxygenic photosynthetic growth. These bacteria are divided into the purple sulfur bacteria (PSB) and the green sulfur bacteria (GSB......). They utilize various combinations of sulfide, elemental sulfur, and thiosulfate and sometimes also ferrous iron and hydrogen as electron donors. This review focuses on the dissimilatory and assimilatory metabolism of inorganic sulfur compounds in these bacteria and also briefly discusses these metabolisms...... in other types of anoxygenic phototrophic bacteria. The biochemistry and genetics of sulfur compound oxidation in PSB and GSB are described in detail. A variety of enzymes catalyzing sulfur oxidation reactions have been isolated from GSB and PSB (especially Allochromatium vinosum, a representative...

  5. Advanced h∞ control towards nonsmooth theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Orlov, Yury V

    2014-01-01

    This compact monograph is focused on disturbance attenuation in nonsmooth dynamic systems, developing an H∞ approach in the nonsmooth setting. Similar to the standard nonlinear H∞ approach, the proposed nonsmooth design guarantees both the internal asymptotic stability of a nominal closed-loop system and the dissipativity inequality, which states that the size of an error signal is uniformly bounded with respect to the worst-case size of an external disturbance signal. This guarantee is achieved by constructing an energy or storage function that satisfies the dissipativity inequality and is then utilized as a Lyapunov function to ensure the internal stability requirements.    Advanced H∞ Control is unique in the literature for its treatment of disturbance attenuation in nonsmooth systems. It synthesizes various tools, including Hamilton–Jacobi–Isaacs partial differential inequalities as well as Linear Matrix Inequalities. Along with the finite-dimensional treatment, the synthesis is exten...

  6. 3. IFAC workshop: advances in automotive control. Vol. 1. Preprints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-07-01

    As the subject indicates, the aim of this workshop will be to discuss the latest advances related to motor vehicles, but also, and more generally, to exchange ideas between academic partners, car-manufacturers and subcontractors. The programme shows that a special effort has been made in this respect. No doubt plenary lectures are of great importance and the thematic sessions in the different sectors are the essence of such workshops; however, the discussions between experts in the different fields, the meetings between people from industry, universities and public or private laboratories, as well as the resulting exchange of ideas, are at least as important. Research is often criticized for providing merely theoretical results and for the insufficient number of its applications. But the motor vehicle offers a wide field of applications in which we can validate all techniques, tools and methods. This allows us to be involved in all the areas of fundamental research, in all the different possible approaches from fundamental research to technology transfer, and to observe the actual effects of our results. The increase in road traffic was a major problem of the past XXth century. It is clear that one the challenges of the XXIst century will be improve driving safety and comfort. The different work sessions concerning more control, driveline modelling, vehicle dynamics, electronic architecture, intelligent components, engine control, engine modelling, the modelling of combustion and turbocharging, diagnostics and subsystems. The quality of the papers and the diversity of their origins clearly shows the interest that we all take in this key sector of our research and industry. (orig.)

  7. Advanced Stellar Compass - Adeos II - Interface Control Document

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betto, Maurizio; Jørgensen, John Leif; Kilsgaard, Søren;

    This document describes the Advanced Stellar Compass (ASC) and defines the interfaces between the instrument and the ADEOS II satellite. The ASC is a highly advanced and autonomous Stellar Reference Unit designed, developed and produced by the Space Instrumentation Group of the Department...

  8. Advance Noise Control Fan II: Test Rig Fan Risk Management Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, John

    2013-01-01

    Since 1995 the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) has significantly contributed to the advancement of the understanding of the physics of fan tonal noise generation. The 9'x15' WT has successfully tested multiple high speed fan designs over the last several decades. This advanced several tone noise reduction concepts to higher TRL and the validation of fan tone noise prediction codes.

  9. Surface modification of Na3V2(PO4)3 by nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon layer with advanced sodium storage property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xinghui; Ou, Xing; Zheng, Fenghua; Pan, Qichang; Xiong, Xunhui; Hu, Renzong; Yang, Chenghao; Liu, Meilin

    2017-03-27

    Nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon layer wrapped Na3V2(PO4)3 nanoparticles (NVP@NSC) have been successfully fabricated by a facile solid-state method. In this hierarchical structure, the Na3V2(PO4)3 nanoparticles are well dispersed and closely coated by nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon layer, constructing an effective and interconnected conducting network to reduce the internal resistance. Furthermore, the uniform coating layers alleviate the agglomeration of Na3V2(PO4)3, as well as mitigate the side reaction between electrode and electrolyte. Due to the excellent electron transfer mutually enhancing sodium diffusion for this extraordinary structure, the NVP@NSC composite delivers an impressive discharge capacity of 113.0 mAh g-1 at 1C, and shows a capacity retention of 82.1% after 5000 cycles at an ultrahigh rate of 50C, suggesting the remarkable rate capability and long cyclicity. Surprisingly, a reversible capacity of 91.1 mAh g-1 is maintained after 1000 cycles at 5C under the elevated temperature of 55°C. The approach of nitrogen and sulfur dual-doped carbon coated Na3V2(PO4)3 provides an effective and promising strategy to enhance the ultrahigh rate and ultralong life property of cathode, which can be used for large-scale commercial production in sodium ion batteries.

  10. Power Control Technique for Efficient Call Admission Control in Advanced Wirless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ch. Sreenivasa Rao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In 4G networks, call admission control techniques have been proposed to provide Quality of Service (QoS in a network by restricting the access to network resources. Power control is essential in call admission control in order to provide fair access to all users, improve battery lifetime and system performance. But the existing call admission control algorithms rarely consider the power controlling techniques in the handoff process for different traffic classes. In this paper, we propose to develop a power controlled call admission control scheme for handoff in the advanced wireless networks. The incoming call measures the initial interference on it and then the base station starts transmitting the packets to the new call. The new call is rejected when the interference reaches a threshold value.Whenever an existing call meets the power constraint, the transmit power is decremented based on thetraffic class and incoming call obtains this information by monitoring the interference received on it. Theconvergence of the power control algorithm is checked and the power levels of all incoming calls areadjusted. From our simulation results we prove that this power control technique provides efficienthandoff in the 4G networks by increasing the throughput and reducing the delay of the existing users.

  11. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, M. R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Haves, P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McDonald, S. C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Torcellini, P. [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Hansen, D. [U.S. Dept. of Energy, Washington, D.C. (United States); Holmberg, D. R. [National Institute of Science and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Roth, K. W. [TIAX, LLC, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-04-01

    This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies.

  12. Demonstration of SCR technology for the control of NOx emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired utility boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, W.S. [W.S. Hinton and Associates, Cantonment, FL (United States); Maxwell, J.D.; Healy, E.C.; Hardman, R.R. [Southern Company Services, Inc., Birmingham, AL (United States); Baldwin, A.L. [Dept. of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the completed Innovative Clean Coal Technology project which demonstrated SCR technology for reduction of flue gas NO{sub x} emissions from a utility boiler burning US high-sulfur coal. The project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, managed and co-funded by Southern Company Services, Inc. on behalf of the Southern Company, and also co-funded by the Electric Power Research Institute and Ontario Hydro. The project was located at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit 5 (a 75 MW tangentially-fired boiler burning US coals that had a sulfur content ranging from 2.5--2.9%), near Pensacola, Florida. The test program was conducted for approximately two years to evaluate catalyst deactivation and other SCR operational effects. The SCR test facility had nine reactors: three 2.5 MW (5,000 scfm), and operated on low-dust flue gas. The reactors operated in parallel with commercially available SCR catalysts obtained from suppliers throughout the world. Long-term performance testing began in July 1993 and was completed in July 1995. A brief test facility description and the results of the project are presented in this paper.

  13. Designing and Testing Contols to Mitigate Dynamic Loads in the Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, A.D.; Stol, K.A.

    2008-01-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory is designing, implementing, and testing advanced controls to maximize energy extraction and reduce structural dynamic loads of wind turbines. These control designs are based on a linear model of the turbine that is generated by specialized modeling software. In this paper, we show the design and simulation testing of a control algorithm to mitigate blade, tower, and drivetrain loads using advanced state-space control design methods.

  14. NASA's advanced control law program for the F-8 digital fly-by-wire aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    This paper briefly describes the NASA F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) and Langley Research Center's role in investigating and promoting advanced control laws for possible flight experimentation and also provides a brief description of the Phase II DFBW F-8 aircraft and its control system. Some of the advanced control law study objectives and guidelines are discussed, and some mathematical models which are useful in the control analysis problem are provided.

  15. Dynamic Event Tree advancements and control logic improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alfonsi, Andrea [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Mandelli, Diego [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Sen, Ramazan Sonat [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cogliati, Joshua Joseph [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The RAVEN code has been under development at the Idaho National Laboratory since 2012. Its main goal is to create a multi-purpose platform for the deploying of all the capabilities needed for Probabilistic Risk Assessment, uncertainty quantification, data mining analysis and optimization studies. RAVEN is currently equipped with three different sampling categories: Forward samplers (Monte Carlo, Latin Hyper Cube, Stratified, Grid Sampler, Factorials, etc.), Adaptive Samplers (Limit Surface search, Adaptive Polynomial Chaos, etc.) and Dynamic Event Tree (DET) samplers (Deterministic and Adaptive Dynamic Event Trees). The main subject of this document is to report the activities that have been done in order to: start the migration of the RAVEN/RELAP-7 control logic system into MOOSE, and develop advanced dynamic sampling capabilities based on the Dynamic Event Tree approach. In order to provide to all MOOSE-based applications a control logic capability, in this Fiscal Year an initial migration activity has been initiated, moving the control logic system, designed for RELAP-7 by the RAVEN team, into the MOOSE framework. In this document, a brief explanation of what has been done is going to be reported. The second and most important subject of this report is about the development of a Dynamic Event Tree (DET) sampler named “Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (HDET) and its Adaptive variant “Adaptive Hybrid Dynamic Event Tree” (AHDET). As other authors have already reported, among the different types of uncertainties, it is possible to discern two principle types: aleatory and epistemic uncertainties. The classical Dynamic Event Tree is in charge of treating the first class (aleatory) uncertainties; the dependence of the probabilistic risk assessment and analysis on the epistemic uncertainties are treated by an initial Monte Carlo sampling (MCDET). From each Monte Carlo sample, a DET analysis is run (in total, N trees). The Monte Carlo employs a pre-sampling of the

  16. COMPARATIVEANALYSIS OF ADVANCED CONTROLLERS IN A HEAT EXCHANGER

    OpenAIRE

    P. Sivakumar

    2013-01-01

    Temperature control of the shell and tube heat exchanger is characteristics of nonlinear, time varying and time lag. Since the temperature control with conventional PID controller cannot meet a wide range of precision temperature control requirement, we design temperature control system of the shell and tube heat exchanger by combining fuzzy and PID control methods in this paper. The simulation and experiments are carried out; making a comparison with conventional PID control showing that fuz...

  17. Physical control oriented model of large scale refrigerators to synthesize advanced control schemes. Design, validation, and first control results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonne, François; Alamir, Mazen; Bonnay, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a physical method to obtain control-oriented dynamical models of large scale cryogenic refrigerators is proposed, in order to synthesize model-based advanced control schemes. These schemes aim to replace classical user experience designed approaches usually based on many independent PI controllers. This is particularly useful in the case where cryoplants are submitted to large pulsed thermal loads, expected to take place in the cryogenic cooling systems of future fusion reactors such as the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) or the Japan Torus-60 Super Advanced Fusion Experiment (JT-60SA). Advanced control schemes lead to a better perturbation immunity and rejection, to offer a safer utilization of cryoplants. The paper gives details on how basic components used in the field of large scale helium refrigeration (especially those present on the 400W @1.8K helium test facility at CEA-Grenoble) are modeled and assembled to obtain the complete dynamic description of controllable subsystems of the refrigerator (controllable subsystems are namely the Joule-Thompson Cycle, the Brayton Cycle, the Liquid Nitrogen Precooling Unit and the Warm Compression Station). The complete 400W @1.8K (in the 400W @4.4K configuration) helium test facility model is then validated against experimental data and the optimal control of both the Joule-Thompson valve and the turbine valve is proposed, to stabilize the plant under highly variable thermals loads. This work is partially supported through the European Fusion Development Agreement (EFDA) Goal Oriented Training Program, task agreement WP10-GOT-GIRO.

  18. MultiController: the PLC-SCADA object for advanced regulation

    CERN Document Server

    Ortola, J

    2007-01-01

    Nowadays, industrial solutions with PLCs (Programmable Logic Controllers) have basic control loop features. The SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) system is a key point of the process control system due to an efficient HMI (Human Machine Interfaces) that provides an open method of tuning and leading possibilities. As a consequence, advanced control algorithms have to be developed and implemented for those PLC-SCADA solutions in order to provide perspectives in solving complex and critical regulation problems. The MultiController is an object integrated for a large scale project at CERN (the European Organization for Nuclear Research) named LHC-GCS (Large Hadron Collider - Gas Control System). It is developed for a Framework called CERN-UNICOS based on PLC-SCADA facilities. The MultiController object offers various advanced control loop strategies. It gives to the user advanced control algorithms like PID, Smith Predictor, PFC, GPC and RST. It is implemented as a monolithic entity (in PLC and SCA...

  19. Field Testing LIDAR Based Feed-Forward Controls on the NREL Controls Advanced Research Turbine: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scholbrock, A. K.; Fleming, P. A.; Fingersh, L. J.; Wright, A. D.; Schlipf, D.; Haizmann, F.; Belen, F.

    2013-01-01

    Wind turbines are complex, nonlinear, dynamic systems driven by aerodynamic, gravitational, centrifugal, and gyroscopic forces. The aerodynamics of wind turbines are nonlinear, unsteady, and complex. Turbine rotors are subjected to a chaotic three-dimensional (3-D) turbulent wind inflow field with imbedded coherent vortices that drive fatigue loads and reduce lifetime. In order to reduce cost of energy, future large multimegawatt turbines must be designed with lighter weight structures, using active controls to mitigate fatigue loads, maximize energy capture, and add active damping to maintain stability for these dynamically active structures operating in a complex environment. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and University of Stuttgart are designing, implementing, and testing advanced feed-back and feed-forward controls in order to reduce the cost of energy for wind turbines.

  20. Significant interaction effects from sulfate deposition and climate on sulfur concentrations constitute major controls on methylmercury production in peatlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åkerblom, Staffan; Bishop, Kevin; Björn, Erik; Lambertsson, Lars; Eriksson, Tobias; Nilsson, Mats B.

    2013-02-01

    Transformation of inorganic mercury (Hg) to methyl mercury (MeHg) in peatlands is a key process in making boreal catchments a source of MeHg to freshwater ecosystems. Due to the importance of sulfur-reducing bacteria (SRB) for this process, past atmospheric deposition of sulfate (SO42-) may have increased net terrestrial Hg methylation. A long-term (14-year) factorial design field experiment was used to investigate the effect of enhanced SO42- deposition and raised temperature using a greenhouse (GH) treatment (air temperature˜+4 °C; soil temperature 20 cm below mire surface ˜+2 °C) on sulfur (S) turnover, net Hg methylation, MeHg and total Hg concentrations in a boreal mire in northern Sweden. Of the SO42--S added during 14 years, 50% was retained in the plots without GH treatment while the combination of SO42- addition and GH treatment resulted in 15% S retention. The addition of SO42- (7-fold ambient SO42--deposition) increased (p important than the concentration of Hg for the production of MeHg in this boreal landscape. These results also show that long-term chronic SO42- deposition at rates similar to those found in polluted areas of Europe and North America increase the capacity of wetlands to methylate Hg and store MeHg, which can ultimately be released to streams and lakes. This study also, for the first time, indicates that the enhancing effect of SO42- on the production of MeHg might be counteracted by increased temperature.

  1. Polymer Electrolytes for Lithium/Sulfur Batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    The Nam Long Doan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available This review evaluates the characteristics and advantages of employing polymer electrolytes in lithium/sulfur (Li/S batteries. The main highlights of this study constitute detailed information on the advanced developments for solid polymer electrolytes and gel polymer electrolytes, used in the lithium/sulfur battery. This includes an in-depth analysis conducted on the preparation and electrochemical characteristics of the Li/S batteries based on these polymer electrolytes.

  2. Multicontroller: an object programming approach to introduce advanced control algorithms for the GCS large scale project

    CERN Document Server

    Cabaret, S; Coppier, H; Rachid, A; Barillère, R; CERN. Geneva. IT Department

    2007-01-01

    The GCS (Gas Control System) project team at CERN uses a Model Driven Approach with a Framework - UNICOS (UNified Industrial COntrol System) - based on PLC (Programming Language Controller) and SCADA (Supervisory Control And Data Acquisition) technologies. The first' UNICOS versions were able to provide a PID (Proportional Integrative Derivative) controller whereas the Gas Systems required more advanced control strategies. The MultiController is a new UNICOS object which provides the following advanced control algorithms: Smith Predictor, PFC (Predictive Function Control), RST* and GPC (Global Predictive Control). Its design is based on a monolithic entity with a global structure definition which is able to capture the desired set of parameters of any specific control algorithm supported by the object. The SCADA system -- PVSS - supervises the MultiController operation. The PVSS interface provides users with supervision faceplate, in particular it links any MultiController with recipes: the GCS experts are ab...

  3. Gas-phase advanced oxidation as an integrated air pollution control technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew A. Adnew

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gas-phase advanced oxidation (GPAO is an emerging air cleaning technology based on the natural self-cleaning processes that occur in the Earth’s atmosphere. The technology uses ozone, UV-C lamps and water vapor to generate gas-phase hydroxyl radicals that initiate oxidation of a wide range of pollutants. In this study four types of GPAO systems are presented: a laboratory scale prototype, a shipping container prototype, a modular prototype, and commercial scale GPAO installations. The GPAO systems treat volatile organic compounds, reduced sulfur compounds, amines, ozone, nitrogen oxides, particles and odor. While the method covers a wide range of pollutants, effective treatment becomes difficult when temperature is outside the range of 0 to 80 °C, for anoxic gas streams and for pollution loads exceeding ca. 1000 ppm. Air residence time in the system and the rate of reaction of a given pollutant with hydroxyl radicals determine the removal efficiency of GPAO. For gas phase compounds and odors including VOCs (e.g. C6H6 and C3H8 and reduced sulfur compounds (e.g. H2S and CH3SH, removal efficiencies exceed 80%. The method is energy efficient relative to many established technologies and is applicable to pollutants emitted from diverse sources including food processing, foundries, water treatment, biofuel generation, and petrochemical industries.

  4. Human factors design review guidelines for advanced nuclear control room technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Hara, J.; Brown, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Granda, T.; Baker, C. (Carlow Associates, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    Advanced control rooms (ACRs) for future nuclear power plants are being designed utilizing computer-based technologies. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission reviews the human engineering aspects of such control rooms to ensure that they are designed to good human factors engineering principles and that operator performance and reliability are appropriately supported in order to protect public health and safety. This paper describes the rationale, general approach, and initial development of an NRC Advanced Control Room Design Review Guideline. 20 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Practical Implementations of Advanced Process Control for Linear Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Jørgen K . H.; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted; Jørgensen, John Bagterp

    and a linearised CSTR. Advantages and disadvantages of these controllers will be discussed. All three controller types shows a set of common undesirable characteristics, which must be accounted for. At the end of the evaluation horizon the "optimal" solution has an unstable characteristics, which can be suppressed...... be selecting dierent control and evaluation horizon. Depending of the degrees of freedom, oset-free control of a number of the controlled variables can be achieved by integration of the innovation errors and introduction of noise models. If the measured or unmeasured disturbances increases, oset-free control...

  6. Review of carbon materials for advanced lithium-sulfur batteries%碳质材料在锂硫电池中的应用研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张强; 程新兵; 黄佳琦; 彭翃杰; 魏飞

    2014-01-01

    随着石墨负极的成功商用,锂离子电池在智能手机、笔记本电脑等便携式电子设备中已得到广泛的应用。经过20多年的发展,现有基于嵌锂化合物正极的锂离子电池已接近其理论容量,但仍不能满足高速发展的电子工业和新兴的电动汽车等行业的要求,寻找具有更高能量密度的电池系统迫在眉睫。锂硫电池系统具有极高的理论能量密度,在多种储能系统中是最具潜力的一种二次电池。但是锂硫电池中也存在硫的电导率极低、多硫化物溶解迁移等问题,使其在走向实用化的过程中遇到许多困难。纳米碳质材料在新型锂硫电池的开发过程中处于重要地位,通过纳米炭的引入,可以获得导电复合正极材料,控制多硫化物的穿梭,从而有望实现正极硫材料的高效利用。综述了基于纳米炭-硫复合正极材料,尤其是碳纳米管、石墨烯、多孔炭以及其杂化物等材料复合的电极,分析其结构与锂硫电池性能的关系,并展望锂硫电池的发展方向。%Lithium-ion batteries ( LIBs) are extensively used in numerous portable devices such as smart-phones and laptops. However, current LIBs based on the conventional intercalation mechanism cannot meet the requirements of the electronics industry and electric vehicles although they are approaching their theoretical capacity. Therefore, it is extremely urgent to seek for systems with higher energy densities. Among various promising candidates, lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries with a high theoretical capacity are very attractive. However, the commercial use of Li-S batteries still faces obstacles such as the low electrical conductivity of sul-fur and lithium sulfide and the dissolution of polysulfides. The introduction of nanocarbon materials into Li-S batteries sheds light on the efficient utilization of sulfur by improving the conductivity of the composites and restraining the

  7. Algorithm Design and Validation for Adaptive Nonlinear Control Enhancement (ADVANCE) Technology Development for Resilient Flight Control Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — SSCI proposes to develop and test a framework referred to as the ADVANCE (Algorithm Design and Validation for Adaptive Nonlinear Control Enhancement), within which...

  8. Modeling and Advanced Control for Sustainable Process Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    This book chapter introduces a novel process systems engineering framework that integrates process control with sustainability assessment tools for the simultaneous evaluation and optimization of process operations. The implemented control strategy consists of a biologically-insp...

  9. Advances in microbial insect control in horticultural ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    The use of microbial organisms as biological control agents has progressed significantly since Metschnikoff launched the first attempt at microbial insect control with Metarhizium anisopliae in 1879. Following the lead of Metschnikoff, entomopathogenic nematodes, fungi, bacteria and viruses have b...

  10. Recent Advances in Bidirectional Modeling and Structural Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satyam Paul

    2016-01-01

    estimation of velocity and position from acceleration signals, and optimal placement of the sensors and control devices. The importance of control devices and its applications to minimize bidirectional vibrations has been illustrated. Finally, the applications of structural control systems in real buildings and their performance have been reviewed.

  11. Applications of advanced control methods in spacecrafts:progress, challenges, and future prospects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-chun XIE; Huang HUANG; Yong HU; Guo-qi ZHANG

    2016-01-01

    We aim at examining the current status of advanced control methods in spacecrafts from an engineer’s perspective. Instead of reviewing all the fancy theoretical results in advanced control for aerospace vehicles, the focus is on the advanced control methods that have been practically applied to spacecrafts during flight tests, or have been tested in real time on ground facilities and general testbeds/simulators built with actual flight data. The aim is to provide engineers with all the possible control laws that are readily available rather than those that are tested only in the laboratory at the moment. It turns out that despite the blooming developments of modern control theories, most of them have various limitations, which stop them from being practically applied to spacecrafts. There are a limited number of spacecrafts that are controlled by advanced control methods, among which H2/H∞ robust control is the most popular method to deal with flexible structures, adaptive control is commonly used to deal with model/parameter uncertainty, and the linear quadratic regulator (LQR) is the most frequently used method in case of optimal control. It is hoped that this review paper will enlighten aerospace engineers who hold an open mind about advanced control methods, as well as scholars who are enthusiastic about engineering-oriented problems.

  12. Advances in the control of markov jump linear systems with no mode observation

    CERN Document Server

    Vargas, Alessandro N; do Val, João B R

    2016-01-01

    This brief broadens readers’ understanding of stochastic control by highlighting recent advances in the design of optimal control for Markov jump linear systems (MJLS). It also presents an algorithm that attempts to solve this open stochastic control problem, and provides a real-time application for controlling the speed of direct current motors, illustrating the practical usefulness of MJLS. Particularly, it offers novel insights into the control of systems when the controller does not have access to the Markovian mode.

  13. Recent advances in electrical engineering and control applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bououden, Sofiane; Zelinka, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    This book of proceedings includes papers presenting the state of art in electrical engineering and control theory as well as their applications. The topics focus on classical as well as modern methods for modeling, control, identification and simulation of complex systems with applications in science and engineering. The papers were selected from the hottest topic areas, such as control and systems engineering, renewable energy, faults diagnosis—faults tolerant control, large-scale systems, fractional order systems, unconventional algorithms in control engineering, signals and communications. The control and design of complex systems dynamics, analysis and modeling of its behavior and structure is vitally important in engineering, economics and in science generally science today. Examples of such systems can be seen in the world around us and are a part of our everyday life. Application of modern methods for control, electronics, signal processing and more can be found in our mobile phones, car engines, hom...

  14. Formation and Control of Sulfur Oxides in Sour Gas Oxy-Combustion: Prediction Using a Reactor Network Model

    KAUST Repository

    Bongartz, Dominik

    2015-11-19

    © 2015 American Chemical Society. Sour natural gas currently requires expensive gas cleanup before it can be used in power generation because it contains large amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and carbon dioxide (CO2) that entail a low heating value and highly corrosive combustion products. A potential alternative is to use the gas directly in a gas turbine process employing oxy-fuel combustion, which could eliminate the need for gas cleanup while also enabling the application of carbon capture and sequestration, possibly combined with enhanced oil recovery (EOR). However, the exact influence of an oxy-fuel environment on the combustion products of sour gas has not been quantified yet. In this work, we used a reactor network model for the combustor and the gas turbine together with our recently assembled and validated detailed chemical reaction mechanism for sour gas combustion to investigate the influence of some basic design parameters on the combustion products of natural gas and sour gas in CO2 or H2O diluted oxy-fuel combustion as well as in conventional air combustion. Our calculations show that oxy-fuel combustion produces up to 2 orders of magnitude less of the highly corrosive product sulfur trioxide (SO3) than air combustion, which clearly demonstrates its potential in handling sulfur containing fuels. Unlike in air combustion, in oxy-fuel combustion, SO3 is mainly formed in the flame zone of the combustor and is then consumed as the combustion products are cooled in the dilution zone of the combustor and the turbine. In oxy-fuel combustion, H2O dilution leads to a higher combustion efficiency than CO2 dilution. However, if the process is to be combined with EOR, CO2 dilution makes it easier to comply with the very low levels of oxygen (O2) required in the EOR stream. Our calculations also show that it might even be beneficial to operate slightly fuel-rich because this simultaneously decreases the O2 and SO3 concentration further. The flame zone

  15. Sulfur Mustard

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Specific Hazards Bioterrorism A-Z Anthrax (Bacillus anthracis) Arenaviruses Treatment & Infection Control Specimen Submission & Lab Testing Education & ... hemorrhagic fevers (filoviruses [e.g., Ebola, Marburg] and arenaviruses [e.g., Lassa, Machupo]) Yersinia pestis (plague) Fact ...

  16. 77 FR 53199 - California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Advanced Clean Car Program; Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-31

    ... AGENCY California State Motor Vehicle Pollution Control Standards; Advanced Clean Car Program; Request... California Air Resources Board (CARB) has notified EPA that it has developed an Advanced Clean Car program... into a single coordinated package of requirements for passenger cars, light-duty trucks and...

  17. Effect of sulfur content in a sulfur-activated carbon composite on the electrochemical properties of a lithium/sulfur battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jin-Woo; Kim, Changhyeon; Ryu, Ho-Suk; Cho, Gyu-Bong; Cho, Kwon-Koo; Kim, Ki-Won [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Jou-Hyeon [Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of); Wang, Guoxiu [School of Chemistry and Forensic Science, University of Technology Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2007 (Australia); Ahn, Jae-Pyeung [Advanced Analysis Center, Research Planning & Coordination Division, KIST, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hyo-Jun, E-mail: ahj@gnu.ac.kr [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The content of sulfur in activated carbon was controlled by solution process. • The sulfur electrode with low sulfur content shows the best performance. • The Li/S battery has capacity of 1360 mAh/g at 1 C and 702 mAh/g at 10 C. - Abstract: The content of sulfur in sulfur/activated carbon composite is controlled from 32.37 wt.% to 55.33 wt.% by a one-step solution-based process. When the sulfur content is limited to 41.21 wt.%, it can be loaded into the pores of an activated carbon matrix in a highly dispersed state. On the contrary, when the sulfur content is 55.33 wt.%, crystalline sulfur can be detected on the surface of the activated carbon matrix. The best electrochemical performance can be obtained for a sulfur electrode with the lowest sulfur content. The sulfur/activated carbon composite with 32.37 wt.% sulfur afforded the highest first discharge capacity of 1360 mAh g{sup −1} at 1 C rate and a large reversible capacity of 702 mAh g{sup −1} at 10 C (16.75 A/g)

  18. Advances in analysis and control of timedelayed dynamical systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sun, Jianqiao

    2013-01-01

    Analysis and control of timedelayed systems have been applied in a wide range of applications, ranging from mechanical, control, economic, to biological systems. Over the years, there has been a steady stream of interest in timedelayed dynamic systems, this book takes a snap shot of recent research from the world leading experts in analysis and control of dynamic systems with time delay to provide a bird's eye view of its development. The topics covered in this book include solution methods, stability analysis and control of periodic dynamic systems with time delay, bifurcations, stochastic dy

  19. Advanced Polymer Composite Molding Through Intelligent Process Analysis and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-11-30

    In this project. process analysis of Resin Transfer Molding (RTM) was carried out and adaptive process control models were developed. In addition, a...aforementioned work in three separate sections: (1) process analysis and adaptive control modeling, (2) manufacturing of non-invasive sensor, end (3) list of publications resulting from this project.

  20. Benchmarking Advanced Control Algorithms for a Laser Scanner System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Ordys, A.W.; Smillie, I.

    1996-01-01

    The paper describes tests performed on the laser scanner system toassess feasibility of modern control techniques in achieving a requiredperformance in the trajectory following problem. The two methods tested areQTR H-infinity and Predictive Control. The results are ilustated ona simulation example....

  1. Guest Editorial Advanced Distributed Control of Energy Conversion Devices and Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davoudi, Ali; Guerrero, Josep M.; Lewis, Frank;

    2014-01-01

    The papers in this special issue on advanced distributed control of energy conversion devices and systems are loosely grouped into three categories: 1) ac energy conversion systems; 2) dc energy conversion systems; and 3) optimization and standards....

  2. Research advances in control methods of wearable walking assist robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia ZHANG

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available As the proportion of the elderly in China increases, the need for robotic assist walking is growing. The assisted-as-needed (AAN property of a wearable walking assist robot matches a user’s biological need and improves the flexibility, appetency and friendliness of a mechanical system. To realize AAN walking and aiming at realizing master/slave flexible assist, a new hybrid control method consisting of hip joint control based on central pattern generators and knee joint impedance structured control is proposed. The adaptation of a robot's master/slave motion mode to a user's physical function, the continuous switching method for knee joint impedance structured control and its stability, and the AAN effect of the Hybrid control theory are studied, which provides a new thought for the development of wearable walking assist robots.

  3. Application of CyboCon Advanced Adjustment and Control Software Package in Delayed Coking Unit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo Hua

    2002-01-01

    This article refers to application of the CyboCon software package based upon the model-free adaptive control (MFA) in the 800-kt/a delayed coking unit to realize an advanced adjustment and control strategy for the temperature control of the heater. Operation tests have revealed the convenience in operating system and simplicity in maintenance, leading to good economic benefits.

  4. A Novel Percutaneous Electrode Implant for Improving Robustness in Advanced Myoelectric Control

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Despite several decades of research, electrically powered hand and arm prostheses are still controlled with very simple algorithms that process the surface electromyogram (EMG) of remnant muscles to achieve control of one prosthetic function at a time. More advanced machine learning methods have shown promising results under laboratory conditions. However, limited robustness has largely prevented the transfer of these laboratory advances to clinical applications. In this paper, we introduce a...

  5. Neural networks for advanced control of robot manipulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, H D; Carelli, R; Kuchen, B R

    2002-01-01

    Presents an approach and a systematic design methodology to adaptive motion control based on neural networks (NNs) for high-performance robot manipulators, for which stability conditions and performance evaluation are given. The neurocontroller includes a linear combination of a set of off-line trained NNs, and an update law of the linear combination coefficients to adjust robot dynamics and payload uncertain parameters. A procedure is presented to select the learning conditions for each NN in the bank. The proposed scheme, based on fixed NNs, is computationally more efficient than the case of using the learning capabilities of the neural network to be adapted, as that used in feedback architectures that need to propagate back control errors through the model to adjust the neurocontroller. A practical stability result for the neurocontrol system is given. That is, we prove that the control error converges asymptotically to a neighborhood of zero, whose size is evaluated and depends on the approximation error of the NN bank and the design parameters of the controller. In addition, a robust adaptive controller to NN learning errors is proposed, using a sign or saturation switching function in the control law, which leads to global asymptotic stability and zero convergence of control errors. Simulation results showing the practical feasibility and performance of the proposed approach to robotics are given.

  6. Microgrid Controller and Advanced Distribution Management System Survey Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Starke, Michael R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Herron, Andrew N. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-07-01

    A microgrid controller, which serves as the heart of a microgrid, is responsible for optimally managing the distributed energy resources, energy storage systems, and responsive demand and for ensuring the microgrid is being operated in an efficient, reliable, and resilient way. As the market for microgrids has blossomed in recently years, many vendors have released their own microgrid controllers to meet the various needs of different microgrid clients. However, due to the absence of a recognized standard for such controllers, vendor-supported microgrid controllers have a range of functionalities that are significantly different from each other in many respects. As a result the current state of the industry has been difficult to assess. To remedy this situation the authors conducted a survey of the functions of microgrid controllers developed by vendors and national laboratories. This report presents a clear indication of the state of the microgrid-controller industry based on analysis of the survey results. The results demonstrate that US Department of Energy funded research in microgrid controllers is unique and not competing with that of industry.

  7. Advances in automation and control research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHENG DaiZhan

    2009-01-01

    Automation is the utilization of control techniques together with other Information technology to control industrial processes,reducing the need for human intervention.It plays a highly important role in social and economy as well as In daily life.Control theory is the theory of automation,and is an interdisciplinary branch of engineering and mathematics,examining the behavior of dynamical systems.China has a long history of manufacturing automatic devices.In recent years,some rapid progresses in control theory have been made in China.Many new theories and new methodologies have been developed to meet the increasing demands in industry,agriculture,defense,and other social sectors.Contemporary sciences such as complexity,systems biology,quantum technologies,have also found their close links to control theories and technologies.On the other hand,control theory itself has many unsolved fundamental problems requiring further studies and investigation.This paper is to review the development and progress that have been made in all these aspects in China.Some remarks on the future development of control theory are also presented.

  8. Advanced Electric Distribution, Switching, and Conversion Technology for Power Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltis, James V.

    1998-01-01

    The Electrical Power Control Unit currently under development by Sundstrand Aerospace for use on the Fluids Combustion Facility of the International Space Station is the precursor of modular power distribution and conversion concepts for future spacecraft and aircraft applications. This unit combines modular current-limiting flexible remote power controllers and paralleled power converters into one package. Each unit includes three 1-kW, current-limiting power converter modules designed for a variable-ratio load sharing capability. The flexible remote power controllers can be used in parallel to match load requirements and can be programmed for an initial ON or OFF state on powerup. The unit contains an integral cold plate. The modularity and hybridization of the Electrical Power Control Unit sets the course for future spacecraft electrical power systems, both large and small. In such systems, the basic hybridized converter and flexible remote power controller building blocks could be configured to match power distribution and conversion capabilities to load requirements. In addition, the flexible remote power controllers could be configured in assemblies to feed multiple individual loads and could be used in parallel to meet the specific current requirements of each of those loads. Ultimately, the Electrical Power Control Unit design concept could evolve to a common switch module hybrid, or family of hybrids, for both converter and switchgear applications. By assembling hybrids of a common current rating and voltage class in parallel, researchers could readily adapt these units for multiple applications. The Electrical Power Control Unit concept has the potential to be scaled to larger and smaller ratings for both small and large spacecraft and for aircraft where high-power density, remote power controllers or power converters are required and a common replacement part is desired for multiples of a base current rating.

  9. SCHEME (Soft Control Human error Evaluation MEthod) for advanced MCR HRA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Inseok; Jung, Wondea [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    The Technique for Human Error Rate Prediction (THERP), Korean Human Reliability Analysis (K-HRA), Human Error Assessment and Reduction Technique (HEART), A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA), Cognitive Reliability and Error Analysis Method (CREAM), and Simplified Plant Analysis Risk Human Reliability Assessment (SPAR-H) in relation to NPP maintenance and operation. Most of these methods were developed considering the conventional type of Main Control Rooms (MCRs). They are still used for HRA in advanced MCRs even though the operating environment of advanced MCRs in NPPs has been considerably changed by the adoption of new human-system interfaces such as computer-based soft controls. Among the many features in advanced MCRs, soft controls are an important feature because the operation action in NPP advanced MCRs is performed by soft controls. Consequently, those conventional methods may not sufficiently consider the features of soft control execution human errors. To this end, a new framework of a HRA method for evaluating soft control execution human error is suggested by performing the soft control task analysis and the literature reviews regarding widely accepted human error taxonomies. In this study, the framework of a HRA method for evaluating soft control execution human error in advanced MCRs is developed. First, the factors which HRA method in advanced MCRs should encompass are derived based on the literature review, and soft control task analysis. Based on the derived factors, execution HRA framework in advanced MCRs is developed mainly focusing on the features of soft control. Moreover, since most current HRA database deal with operation in conventional type of MCRs and are not explicitly designed to deal with digital HSI, HRA database are developed under lab scale simulation.

  10. Advanced WEC Dynamics & Controls FY16 Testing Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coe, Ryan Geoffrey [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bacelli, Giorgio [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, David G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Patterson, David Charles [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-10-01

    A model-scale wave tank test was conducted in the interest of improving control systems design of wave energy converters (WECs). The success of most control strategies is based directly upon the availability of a reduced-order model with the ability to capture the dynamics of the system with sufficient accuracy. For this reason, the test described in this report, which is the first in a series of planned tests on WEC controls, focused on system identification (system ID) and model validation.

  11. Advances in control system technology for aerospace applications

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to Control System Technology applied to aerospace and covers the four disciplines Cognitive Engineering, Computer Science, Operations Research, and Servo-Mechanisms. This edited book follows a workshop held at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 2012, where the today's most important aerospace challenges, including aerospace autonomy, safety-critical embedded software engineering, and modern air transportation were discussed over the course of two days of intense interactions among leading aerospace engineers and scientists. Its content provide a snapshot of today's aerospace control research and its future, including Autonomy in space applications, Control in space applications, Autonomy in aeronautical applications, Air transportation, and Safety-critical software engineering.

  12. Advanced Control System Design for Hypersonic Vehicles Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Guidance and control system design for hypersonic vehicles is more challenging than their subsonic and supersonic counterparts. Some of these challenges are (i)...

  13. Advanced nonlinear control of three phase series active power filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abouelmahjoub Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of controlling three-phase series active power filter (TPSAPF is addressed in this paper in presence of the perturbations in the voltages of the electrical supply network. The control objective of the TPSAPF is twofold: (i compensation of all voltage perturbations (voltage harmonics, voltage unbalance and voltage sags, (ii regulation of the DC bus voltage of the inverter. A controller formed by two nonlinear regulators is designed, using the Backstepping technique, to provide the above compensation. The regulation of the DC bus voltage of the inverter is ensured by the use of a diode bridge rectifier which its output is in parallel with the DC bus capacitor. The Analysis of controller performances is illustrated by numerical simulation in Matlab/Simulink environment.

  14. Advanced Stellar Compass, Electrical Interface Control Document for Grace

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Peter Buch; Jørgensen, Finn E; Jørgensen, John Leif;

    1999-01-01

    The Space Instrumentation Group has made an Electrical Interface Control Document for the GRACE (Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Mission) satellite, witch describes the electrical interface between the Star Imager and the Computer (IPU) on the GRACE Satellite....

  15. Morphing Flight Control Surface for Advanced Flight Performance Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In this SBIR project, a new Morphing Flight Control Surface (MFCS) will be developed. The distinction of the research effort is that the SenAnTech team will employ...

  16. Advances in sliding mode control concept, theory and implementation

    CERN Document Server

    Janardhanan, S; Spurgeon, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The sliding mode control paradigm has become a mature technique for the design of robust controllers for a wide class of systems including nonlinear, uncertain and time-delayed systems. This book is a collection of plenary and invited talks delivered at the 12th IEEE International Workshop on Variable Structure System held at the Indian Institute of Technology, Mumbai, India in January 2012. After the workshop, these researchers were invited to develop book chapters for this edited collection in order to reflect the latest results and open research questions in the area. The contributed chapters have been organized by the editors to reflect the various themes of sliding mode control which are the current areas of theoretical research and applications focus; namely articulation of the fundamental underpinning theory of the sliding mode design paradigm, sliding modes for decentralized system representations, control of time-delay systems, the higher order sliding mode concept, results applicable to nonlinear an...

  17. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruce Hallbert

    2012-09-01

    Reliable instrumentation, information, and control (II&C) systems technologies are essential to ensuring safe and efficient operation of the U.S. light water reactor (LWR) fleet. These technologies affect every aspect of nuclear power plant (NPP) and balance-of-plant operations. In 1997, the National Research Council conducted a study concerning the challenges involved in modernization of digital instrumentation and control systems in NPPs. Their findings identified the need for new II&C technology integration.

  18. To control and to be controlled – understanding the Arabidopsis SLIM1 function in sulfur deficiency through comprehensive investigation of the EIL protein family.

    OpenAIRE

    Anna eWawrzyńska; Agnieszka eSirko

    2014-01-01

    SSLIM1, a member of the EIN3-like (EIL) family of transcription factors in Arabidopsis, is the regulator of many sulfur-deficiency responsive genes. Among the five other proteins of the family, three regulate ethylene responses and two have unassigned functions. Contrary to the well-defined ethylene signaling, the pathway leading from sensing sulfate status to the activation of its acquisition via SLIM1 is completely unknown. SLIM1 binds to the 20 nt-long specific UPE-box sequence; however, i...

  19. Antimicrobial Materials for Advanced Microbial Control in Spacecraft Water Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele; Caro, Janicce; Newsham, Gerard; Roberts, Michael; Morford, Megan; Wheeler, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Microbial detection, identification, and control are essential for the maintenance and preservation of spacecraft water systems. Requirements set by NASA put limitations on the energy, mass, materials, noise, cost, and crew time that can be devoted to microbial control. Efforts are being made to attain real-time detection and identification of microbial contamination in microgravity environments. Research for evaluating technologies for capability enhancement on-orbit is currently focused on the use of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) analysis for detection purposes and polymerase chain reaction (peR) for microbial identification. Additional research is being conducted on how to control for microbial contamination on a continual basis. Existing microbial control methods in spacecraft utilize iodine or ionic silver biocides, physical disinfection, and point-of-use sterilization filters. Although these methods are effective, they require re-dosing due to loss of efficacy, have low human toxicity thresholds, produce poor taste, and consume valuable mass and crew time. Thus, alternative methods for microbial control are needed. This project also explores ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), surface passivation methods for maintaining residual biocide levels, and several antimicrobial materials aimed at improving current microbial control techniques, as well as addressing other materials presently under analysis and future directions to be pursued.

  20. Advanced dc motor controller for battery-powered electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsterling, C. A.

    1981-01-01

    A motor generation set is connected to run from the dc source and generate a voltage in the traction motor armature circuit that normally opposes the source voltage. The functional feasibility of the concept is demonstrated with tests on a Proof of Principle System. An analog computer simulation is developed, validated with the results of the tests, applied to predict the performance of a full scale Functional Model dc Controller. The results indicate high efficiencies over wide operating ranges and exceptional recovery of regenerated energy. The new machine integrates both motor and generator on a single two bearing shaft. The control strategy produces a controlled bidirectional plus or minus 48 volts dc output from the generator permitting full control of a 96 volt dc traction motor from a 48 volt battery, was designed to control a 20 hp traction motor. The controller weighs 63.5 kg (140 lb.) and has a peak efficiency of 90% in random driving modes and 96% during the SAE J 227a/D driving cycle.

  1. Efficacy of omeprazole on cough, pulmonary function and quality of life of patients with sulfur mustard lung injury: A placebo-control, cross-over clinical trial study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Emami

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD is prevalent and related to more severe disease in patients with respiratory problems. We evaluated the effects of antireflux therapy in warfare victims of exposure to Mustard gas with chronic cough. Materials and Methods: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study was conducted on 45 cases of sulfur mustard injury with chronic cough (≥8 weeks and GERD. Patients were randomized into two groups, receiving either 20 mg twice daily omeprazole-placebo (OP or matching placebo (placebo-omeprazole [PO] for 4 months, followed by a 1-month washout period and the alternative treatment for 4 months. Assessments included GERD and cough, quality of life, and pulmonary function using spirometry. Leicester Cough Questionnaire and SF-36 were used for measuring quality of life. Results: Patients in the OP group experienced a more decrease than those in the PO group in severity of Leicester cough scores during the first 4-month of trial. After crossing the groups, the OP group experienced an increase (P = 0.036 and the PO group experienced a nonsignificant decrease (P = 0.104 in the severity of scores. The OP group also experienced improvement in GERD symptoms and quality of life at the end of the trial, but changes in the PO group was not significant. There was no significant change in respiratory function indices in any groups. Conclusion: Long-term treatment with high-dose omeprazole improved GERD as well as cough, and quality of life, but not changed respiratory function indices in sulfur mustard injured cases with respiratory symptoms.

  2. Development of an implantable myoelectric sensor for advanced prosthesis control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Daniel R; Lockhart, Joseph; Troyk, Phil R; Weir, Richard F; Hankin, David L

    2011-03-01

    Modern hand and wrist prostheses afford a high level of mechanical sophistication, but the ability to control them in an intuitive and repeatable manner lags. Commercially available systems using surface electromyographic (EMG) or myoelectric control can supply at best two degrees of freedom (DOF), most often sequentially controlled. This limitation is partially due to the nature of surface-recorded EMG, for which the signal contains components from multiple muscle sources. We report here on the development of an implantable myoelectric sensor using EMG sensors that can be chronically implanted into an amputee's residual muscles. Because sensing occurs at the source of muscle contraction, a single principal component of EMG is detected by each sensor, corresponding to intent to move a particular effector. This system can potentially provide independent signal sources for control of individual effectors within a limb prosthesis. The use of implanted devices supports inter-day signal repeatability. We report on efforts in preparation for human clinical trials, including animal testing, and a first-in-human proof of principle demonstration where the subject was able to intuitively and simultaneously control two DOF in a hand and wrist prosthesis.

  3. Advanced, Integrated Control for Building Operations to Achieve 40% Energy Saving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Yan; Song, Zhen; Loftness, Vivian; Ji, Kun; Zheng, Sam; Lasternas, Bertrand; Marion, Flore; Yuebin, Yu

    2012-10-15

    We developed and demonstrated a software based integrated advanced building control platform called Smart Energy Box (SEB), which can coordinate building subsystem controls, integrate variety of energy optimization algorithms and provide proactive and collaborative energy management and control for building operations using weather and occupancy information. The integrated control system is a low cost solution and also features: Scalable component based architecture allows to build a solution for different building control system configurations with needed components; Open Architecture with a central data repository for data exchange among runtime components; Extendible to accommodate variety of communication protocols. Optimal building control for central loads, distributed loads and onsite energy resource; uses web server as a loosely coupled way to engage both building operators and building occupants in collaboration for energy conservation. Based on the open platform of SEB, we have investigated and evaluated a variety of operation and energy saving control strategies on Carnegie Mellon University Intelligent Work place which is equipped with alternative cooling/heating/ventilation/lighting methods, including radiant mullions, radiant cooling/heating ceiling panels, cool waves, dedicated ventilation unit, motorized window and blinds, and external louvers. Based on the validation results of these control strategies, they were integrated in SEB in a collaborative and dynamic way. This advanced control system was programmed and computer tested with a model of the Intelligent Workplace's northern section (IWn). The advanced control program was then installed in the IWn control system; the performance was measured and compared with that of the state of the art control system to verify the overall energy savings great than 40%. In addition advanced human machine interfaces (HMI's) were developed to communicate both with building

  4. Advances in soft computing, intelligent robotics and control

    CERN Document Server

    Fullér, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Soft computing, intelligent robotics and control are in the core interest of contemporary engineering. Essential characteristics of soft computing methods are the ability to handle vague information, to apply human-like reasoning, their learning capability, and ease of application. Soft computing techniques are widely applied in the control of dynamic systems, including mobile robots. The present volume is a collection of 20 chapters written by respectable experts of the fields, addressing various theoretical and practical aspects in soft computing, intelligent robotics and control. The first part of the book concerns with issues of intelligent robotics, including robust xed point transformation design, experimental verification of the input-output feedback linearization of differentially driven mobile robot and applying kinematic synthesis to micro electro-mechanical systems design. The second part of the book is devoted to fundamental aspects of soft computing. This includes practical aspects of fuzzy rule ...

  5. Advanced Control Architectures for Intelligent Microgrids—Part II

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerrero, Josep M.; Chiang Loh, Poh; Lee, Tzung-Lin;

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the main problems and solutions of power quality in microgrids, distributed-energy-storage systems, and ac/dc hybrid microgrids. First, the power quality enhancement of grid-interactive microgrids is presented. Then, the cooperative control for enhance voltage harmonics...... and unbalances in microgrids is reviewed. Afterward, the use of static synchronous compensator (STATCOM) in grid-connected microgrids is introduced in order to improve voltage sags/swells and unbalances. Finally, the coordinated control of distributed storage systems and ac/dc hybrid microgrids is explained....

  6. Advanced and intelligent computations in diagnosis and control

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book is devoted to the demands of research and industrial centers for diagnostics, monitoring and decision making systems that result from the increasing complexity of automation and systems, the need to ensure the highest level of reliability and safety, and continuing research and the development of innovative approaches to fault diagnosis. The contributions combine domains of engineering knowledge for diagnosis, including detection, isolation, localization, identification, reconfiguration and fault-tolerant control. The book is divided into six parts:  (I) Fault Detection and Isolation; (II) Estimation and Identification; (III) Robust and Fault Tolerant Control; (IV) Industrial and Medical Diagnostics; (V) Artificial Intelligence; (VI) Expert and Computer Systems.

  7. Advances in Inertial Measurement Technology for Marine Motion Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Håndlykken

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the function of an inertial "strap down" attitude sensor based on solid state Coriolis force rate gyros, accelerometers and magnetic sensor. Performance is analyzed taking into account the typical excitations in attitude and linear motion seen in marine applications. The use is for control of fast crafts, ROV and AUV heading, roll, pitch and heave control. The influence on performance given by utilization of external information from velocity log and more accurate heading devices is also analyzed. Typical performance of this low cost type of technology is shown.

  8. Prospects for advancing tuberculosis control efforts through novel therapies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.A. Salomon; J.O. Lloyd-Smith; W.M. Getz; S. Resch; M.S. Sanchez; T.C. Porco; M.W. Borgdorff

    2006-01-01

    Background Development of new, effective, and affordable tuberculosis ( TB) therapies has been identified as a critical priority for global TB control. As new candidates emerge from the global TB drug pipeline, the potential impacts of novel, shorter regimens on TB incidence and mortality have not y

  9. Advanced Control and Protection system Design Methods for Modular HTGRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Wilson Jr, Thomas L [ORNL; Wood, Richard Thomas [ORNL

    2012-06-01

    The project supported the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in identifying and evaluating the regulatory implications concerning the control and protection systems proposed for use in the Department of Energy's (DOE) Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The NGNP, using modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology, is to provide commercial industries with electricity and high-temperature process heat for industrial processes such as hydrogen production. Process heat temperatures range from 700 to 950 C, and for the upper range of these operation temperatures, the modular HTGR is sometimes referred to as the Very High Temperature Reactor or VHTR. Initial NGNP designs are for operation in the lower temperature range. The defining safety characteristic of the modular HTGR is that its primary defense against serious accidents is to be achieved through its inherent properties of the fuel and core. Because of its strong negative temperature coefficient of reactivity and the capability of the fuel to withstand high temperatures, fast-acting active safety systems or prompt operator actions should not be required to prevent significant fuel failure and fission product release. The plant is designed such that its inherent features should provide adequate protection despite operational errors or equipment failure. Figure 1 shows an example modular HTGR layout (prismatic core version), where its inlet coolant enters the reactor vessel at the bottom, traversing up the sides to the top plenum, down-flow through an annular core, and exiting from the lower plenum (hot duct). This research provided NRC staff with (a) insights and knowledge about the control and protection systems for the NGNP and VHTR, (b) information on the technologies/approaches under consideration for use in the reactor and process heat applications, (c) guidelines for the design of highly integrated control rooms, (d) consideration for modeling of control and protection system designs

  10. Advanced transport operating system software upgrade: Flight management/flight controls software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinedinst, Winston C.; Debure, Kelly R.; Dickson, Richard W.; Heaphy, William J.; Parks, Mark A.; Slominski, Christopher J.; Wolverton, David A.

    1988-01-01

    The Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software for the Norden 2 (PDP-11/70M) computer installed on the NASA 737 aircraft is described. The software computes the navigation position estimates, guidance commands, those commands to be issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight based on the modes selected on the Advanced Guidance Control System (AGSC) mode panel, and the flight path selected via the Navigation Control/Display Unit (NCDU).

  11. Evaluation of information display at advanced main control room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min, Dai Hwan; Jo, Heon Jin; Jeon, Byung Ho [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2001-03-15

    The purpose of this research is first to establish an evaluation method for CBPs(Computer-Based Procedures) at the advanced MCR as a part of regulation technology for the safety of KNGR. The second purpose is to design a prototype of a support system for the evaluation. We have selected the guideline method for the evaluation, since currently there is not any better alternative. Several guidelines have been published for the design of CBPs. The guidelines include both guidance for CBP design process review and guidance for CBP design product review. Although CBPs have many advantages over PBPs(Pater-Based Procedures), they have some drawbacks since CBPs show the information on display screens instead of papers, and generate some new issues that have not been raised with PBPs. For the new issues, we need to be cautious because it is hard to generalize the effects of CBPs and there is no conclusive answer yet. A support system is necessary for the evaluation of CBPs, since it is not easy to carry out an evaluation task even though an evaluator has firm background on cognitive engineering theories and practical experiences. The support system is going to have web-style interface and databases of evaluation items, guidelines for each evaluation item, and technical bases from which a guideline is derived. Evaluation items include those for desirable feature of CBPs and those for a subjective evaluation by the operating crew. The support system will facilitate the task of evaluators by linking evaluation items with technical basis and by providing features for recording and tracing the evaluation result and efforts for resolving the issues identified.

  12. Advancement in modern approaches to mineral production quality control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freidina, EV; Botvinnik, AA; Dvornikova, AN

    2017-02-01

    The natural resource potential of mineral deposits is represented by three categories: upside, attainable and investment. A modern methodology is proposed in this paper for production quality control, and its tools aimed at ensuring agreement between the product quality and the market requirements are described. The definitions of the costs of the product quality compliance and incompliance with the consumer requirements are introduced; the latter is suggested to use in evaluating resource potential of mineral deposits at a certain degree of probability.

  13. Strategy for Advanced Sensing and Control of Combustion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-06

    leads to a stable closed-loop system A satisfactory stability criterion might be the off-axis circle criterion [Hedrick and Paynter. 1980]. This...shown in Figure 2 to the system shown in Figure 3. Figure 3 represents a system with simple proportional control. The off-axis circle criterion requires...Application of the off-axis circle criterion to the Nyquist curves in Figure 4 suggests that the gain, k , that can be tolerated by the system of Figure

  14. System design and control integration for advanced manufacturing

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Han-Xiong

    2014-01-01

    Most existing robust design books address design for static systems, or achieve robust design from experimental data via the Taguchi method. Little work considers model information for robust design particularly for the dynamic system. This book covers robust design for both static and dynamic systems using the nominal model information or the hybrid model/data information, and also integrates design with control under a large operating region. This design can handle strong nonlinearity and more uncertainties from model and parameters.

  15. Recent advances in sliding modes from control to intelligent mechatronics

    CERN Document Server

    Efe, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    This volume is dedicated to Professor Okyay Kaynak to commemorate his life time impactful research and scholarly achievements and outstanding services to profession. The 21 invited chapters have been written by leading researchers who, in the past, have had association with Professor Kaynak as either his students and associates or colleagues and collaborators. The focal theme of the volume is the Sliding Modes covering a broad scope of topics from theoretical investigations to their significant applications from Control to Intelligent Mechatronics.  

  16. ADVANCES IN ESTIMATION AND CONTROL FOR FLOTATION COLUMNS

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Flotation is multivariable process exhibiting uncertain and nonlinear dynamics as well as being perturbed by unmeasured disturbances. Optimization of this process is therefore a complex undertaking. Although real-time optimization (RTO) techniques for maximizing an objective function are aailable, steady-state assumptions in processes being frequently acted upon by unmeasured distrubances, strongly limit the optimization frequency, hierachical control systems allow to efficiently dealing with...

  17. An Advanced Control System for Fine Coal Floatation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luttrell, G H; Adel, G T

    1998-06-01

    A model-based flotation control scheme is being implemented to achieve optimal performance in the handling and treatment of fine coal. The control scheme monitors flotation performance through on-line analysis of ash content. Then, based on the economic and metallurgical performance of the circuit, variables such as collector dosage, frother dosage, and pulp level are adjusted using model-based control algorithms to compensate for feed variations and other process disturbances. Recent developments in sensor technology are being applied for on-line determination of slurry ash content. During the eighth quarter of this project, the analysis of data collected during Task 2 (Sampling and Data Analysis) was completed, and significant progress was made on Task 3 (Model Building and Computer Simulation). Previously, a plant sampling campaign had been conducted at Pittston's Moss No. 3 preparation plant to provide data for the development of a mathematical process model and a model-based control system. During this campaign, a one-half factorial design experiment, blocked into low and high feed rates, was conducted to investigate the effects of collector, frother, and pulp level on model parameters. In addition, samples were collected during the transient period following each change in the manipulated variables to provide data for confirmation of the dynamic process simulator. A residence time distribution (RTD) test was also conducted to estimate the mean residence time. This is a critical piece of information since no feed flowrate measurement is available, and the mean residence time can be used to estimate the feed flowrate. Feed samples were taken at timed intervals and floated in a laboratory flotation cell to investigate the magnitude of feed property disturbances and their duration.

  18. Grid Monitoring and Advanced Control of Distributed Power Generation Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Timbus, Adrian Vasile

    2007-01-01

    The movement towards a clean technology for energy production and the constraints in reducing the CO2 emissions are some factors facilitating the growth of distributed power generation systems based on renewable energy resources. Consequently, large penetration of distributed generators has been reported in some countries creating concerns about power system stability. This leads to a continuous evolution of grid interconnection requirements towards a better controllability of generated power...

  19. Advanced Controls for Residential Whole-House Ventilation Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, William [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Walker, Iain [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Sherman, Max [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Whole-house ventilation systems are becoming commonplace in new construction, remodeling/renovation, and weatherization projects, driven by combinations of specific requirements for indoor air quality (IAQ), health and compliance with standards, such as ASHRAE 62.2. Ventilation systems incur an energy penalty on the home via fan power used to drive the airflow, and the additional space-conditioning load associated with heating or cooling the ventilation air. Finding a balance between IAQ and energy use is important if homes are to be adequately ventilated while not increasing the energy burden. This study used computer simulations to examine RIVEC the Residential Integrated Ventilation Controller - a prototype ventilation controller that aims to deliver whole-house ventilation rates that comply with ventilation standards, for the minimum use of energy. Four different whole-house ventilation systems were simulated, both with and without RIVEC, so that the energy and IAQ results could be compared. Simulations were conducted for 13 US climate zones, three house designs, and three envelope leakage values. The results showed that the RIVEC controller could typically return ventilation energy savings greater than 40percent without compromising long-term chronic or short-term acute exposures to relevant indoor contaminants. Critical and average peak power loads were also reduced as a consequence of using RIVEC.

  20. Towards energy efficient operation of Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning systems via advanced supervisory control design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswiecinska, A.; Hibbs, J.; Zajic, I.; Burnham, K. J.

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents conceptual control solution for reliable and energy efficient operation of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems used in large volume building applications, e.g. warehouse facilities or exhibition centres. Advanced two-level scalable control solution, designed to extend capabilities of the existing low-level control strategies via remote internet connection, is presented. The high-level, supervisory controller is based on Model Predictive Control (MPC) architecture, which is the state-of-the-art for indoor climate control systems. The innovative approach benefits from using passive heating and cooling control strategies for reducing the HVAC system operational costs, while ensuring that required environmental conditions are met.

  1. Resíduos de calda sulfocálcica sobre a eficiência de acaricidas no controle de Brevipalpus phoenicis Lime sulfur residue on acaricide efficiency in the control of Brevipalpus phoenicis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Junior de Andrade

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do trabalho foi verificar a influência dos resíduos de calda sulfocálcica sobre a eficiência de acaricidas empregados no controle de Brevipalpus phoenicis. Inicialmente, o experimento foi instalado em um pomar de citros, em que foram selecionadas 10 plantas que continham frutos com verrugose. Realizou-se a aplicação de calda sulfocálcica (8g i.a. L-1 de água em cinco plantas e as outras cinco plantas permaneceram sem aplicação de produto fitossanitário. Protegeram-se, com copos de plástico transparente de 500mL, 64 frutos nas plantas tratadas com calda e 64 frutos nas plantas não-tratadas, totalizando 128 frutos protegidos. Decorridos 30 dias da aplicação, os frutos foram colhidos e levados para o laboratório. Estes frutos foram parcialmente parafinados, deixando-se em cada fruto uma arena de 2,5cm de diâmetro com verrugose e sem parafina, delimitada com cola entomológica. Em seguida, procedeu-se à aplicação sobre os frutos em Torre de Potter dos seguintes acaricidas nas concentrações expressas em mg de ingrediente ativo por litro de água: propargite a 720mg, óxido de fenbutatina a 400mg, cyhexatin a 250mg, azocyclotin a 250mg, fenpyroximate a 50mg, dicofol a 960mg e dinocap a 738mg e a testemunha sem aplicação de acaricida. Após 1, 7 e 16 dias da aplicação, transferiram-se para cada fruto 10 ácaros B. phoenicis para avaliar a mortalidade. Constatou-se que os resíduos de calda sulfocálcica não prejudicaram a eficiência dos acaricidas avaliados no controle de B. phoenicis.The objective was to assess the influence of lime sulfur residues on the acaricidal efficiency against Brevipalpus phoenicis mite. Initially, the experiment was conducted in a citrus orchard where 10 plants presenting scab fruits were selected. Secondly, the application of lime sulfur (8mg a.i. L-1 of water was performed in five plants, and the other five plants remained without application. Next lime sulfur application, 64 fruits in

  2. Control and dynamic systems v.42 advances in theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Leonides, CT

    1991-01-01

    Control and Dynamic Systems: Advances in Theory and Applications, Volume 42: Analysis and Control System Techniques for Electric Power Systems, Part 2 of 4 covers the research studies on the significant advances in areas including economic operation of power systems and voltage and power control techniques.This book is composed of eight chapters and begins with a survey of the application of parallel processing to power system analysis as motivated by the requirement for faster computation. The next chapters deal with the issues of power system protection from a system point of view, t

  3. International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines

    CERN Document Server

    Belyaev, Alexander; Krommer, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The papers in this volume present and discuss the frontiers in the mechanics of controlled machines and structures. They are based on papers presented at the International Workshop on Advanced Dynamics and Model Based Control of Structures and Machines held in Vienna in September 2015. The workshop continues a series of international workshops held in Linz (2008) and St. Petersburg (2010).

  4. CFD evaluation of an advanced thrust vector control concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiarn, Weihnurng; Cavalleri, Robert

    1990-01-01

    A potential concept that can offer an alternate method for thrust vector control of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster is the use of a cylindrical probe that is inserted (on demand) through the wall of the rocket nozzle. This Probe Thrust Vector Control (PTVC) concept is an alternate to that of a gimbaled nozzle or a Liquid Injection Thrust Vector (LITVC) system. The viability of the PTVC concept can be assessed either experimentally and/or with the use of CFD. A purely experimental assessment can be time consuming and expensive, whereas a CFD assessment can be very time- and cost-effective. Two key requirements of the proposed concept are PTVC vectoring performance and the active cooling requirements for the probe to maintain its thermal and structural integrity. An active thermal cooling method is the injection of coolant around the pheriphery of the probe. How much coolant is required and how this coolant distributes itself in the flow field is of major concern. The objective of the work reported here is the use of CFD to answer these question and in the design of test hardware to substantiate the results of the CFD predictions.

  5. Advanced Communication and Control Solutions of Distributed Energy Resources (DER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asgeirsson, Haukur; Seguin, Richard; Sherding, Cameron; de Bruet, Andre, G.; Broadwater, Robert; Dilek, Murat

    2007-01-10

    This report covers work performed in Phase II of a two phase project whose objective was to demonstrate the aggregation of multiple Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) and to offer them into the energy market. The Phase I work (DE-FC36-03CH11161) created an integrated, but distributed, system and procedures to monitor and control multiple DERs from numerous manufacturers connected to the electric distribution system. Procedures were created which protect the distribution network and personnel that may be working on the network. Using the web as the communication medium for control and monitoring of the DERs, the integration of information and security was accomplished through the use of industry standard protocols such as secure SSL,VPN and ICCP. The primary objective of Phase II was to develop the procedures for marketing the power of the Phase I aggregated DERs in the energy market, increase the number of DER units, and implement the marketing procedures (interface with ISOs) for the DER generated power. The team partnered with the Midwest Independent System Operator (MISO), the local ISO, to address the energy market and demonstrate the economic dispatch of DERs in response to market signals. The selection of standards-based communication technologies offers the ability of the system to be deployed and integrated with other utilities’ resources. With the use of a data historian technology to facilitate the aggregation, the developed algorithms and procedures can be verified, audited, and modified. The team has demonstrated monitoring and control of multiple DERs as outlined in phase I report including procedures to perform these operations in a secure and safe manner. In Phase II, additional DER units were added. We also expanded on our phase I work to enhance communication security and to develop the market model of having DERs, both customer and utility owned, participate in the energy market. We are proposing a two-part DER energy market model--a utility

  6. Advanced induction motor drive control with single current sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adžić Evgenije M.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes induction motor drive control method which uses minimal number of sensors, providing only DC-link current as a feedback signal. Improved DC-link current sampling scheme and modified asymmetrical switching pattern cancels characteristic waveform errors which exist in all three reconstructed motor line-currents. Motor linecurrent harmonic content is reduced to an acceptable level, eliminating torque and speed oscillations which were inherent for conventional single sensor drives. Consequently, use of single current sensor and line-current reconstruction technique is no longer acceptable only for low and medium performance drives, but also for drives where priority is obtaining a highly accurate, stable and fast response. Proposed control algorithm is validated using induction motor drive hardware prototype based on TMS320F2812 digital signal processor. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. III 042004 and by the Provincial Secretariat for Science and Technological Development of AP Vojvodina under contract No. 114-451-3508/2013-04

  7. Advanced Control of Active Bearings - Modelling, Design and Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Theisen, Lukas Roy Svane

    In all rotating machines relative movements between the stationary parts and the rotating parts imply energy loss and, in many critical cases, vibration problems. This energy loss leads to higher overall energy consumption of the system. Research activities towards the reduction of friction......, the enhancement of damping, the extension of operating range and the minimisation of critical vibrations in machine elements are of fundamental importance. The main component to tackle the energy-loss-related problems is the bearing. The area of design of active bearings, while very promising, is still in its...... the critical speeds. The feedback control law is preferably designed from a simple model, which captures the dominant dynamics of the machine in the frequency range of interest. This thesis offers two main original contributions in the field of active bearings. First, an experimental technique is proposed...

  8. Advanced underground Vehicle Power and Control: The locomotive Research Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vehicle Projects LLC

    2003-01-28

    Develop a fuelcell mine locomotive with metal-hydride hydrogen storage. Test the locomotive for fundamental limitations preventing successful commercialization of hydride fuelcells in underground mining. During Phase 1 of the DOE-EERE sponsored project, FPI and its partner SNL, completed work on the development of a 14.4 kW fuelcell power plant and metal-hydride energy storage. An existing battery-electric locomotive with similar power requirements, minus the battery module, was used as the base vehicle. In March 2001, Atlas Copco Wagner of Portland, OR, installed the fuelcell power plant into the base vehicle and initiated integration of the system into the vehicle. The entire vehicle returned to Sandia in May 2001 for further development and integration. Initial system power-up took place in December 2001. A revision to the original contract, Phase 2, at the request of DOE Golden Field Office, established Vehicle Projects LLC as the new prime contractor,. Phase 2 allowed industry partners to conduct surface tests, incorporate enhancements to the original design by SNL, perform an extensive risk and safety analysis, and test the fuelcell locomotive underground under representative production mine conditions. During the surface tests one of the fuelcell stacks exhibited reduced power output resulting in having to replace both fuelcell stacks. The new stacks were manufactured with new and improved technology resulting in an increase of the gross power output from 14.4 kW to 17 kW. Further work by CANMET and Hatch Associates, an engineering consulting firm specializing in safety analysis for the mining industry, both under subcontract to Vehicle Projects LLC, established minimum requirements for underground testing. CANMET upgraded the Programmable Logic Control (PLC) software used to monitor and control the fuelcell power plant, taking into account locomotive operator's needs. Battery Electric, a South Africa manufacturer, designed and manufactured (at no cost

  9. Guest Editorial Special Issue on Recent Advances and New Directions in Switched Control Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ As guest editors, it is our great honor to bring this special issue of the Journal of Control Theory and Applications devoted to Recent Advances and New Directions in Switched Control Systems. Recently, switched control systems have attracted much attention in the control systems community. Problems in this area are not only academically challenging for the inherent mathematical complexity, but also are derived or motivated from advanced applications in natural sciences, engineering, and social sciences. For survival, natural biological systems switch their survival strategies in accordance with environmental changes. For improved performance, switching has been extensively utilized/exploited in engineering systems such as automotive drive train control, electronic devices, control of power systems, etc.

  10. Advanced topics in control and estimation of state-multiplicative noisy systems

    CERN Document Server

    Gershon, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Topics in Control and Estimation of State-Multiplicative Noisy Systems begins with an introduction and extensive literature survey. The text proceeds to cover solutions of measurement-feedback control and state problems and the formulation of the Bounded Real Lemma for both continuous- and discrete-time systems. The continuous-time reduced-order and stochastic-tracking control problems for delayed systems are then treated. Ideas of nonlinear stability are introduced for infinite-horizon systems, again, in both the continuous- and discrete-time cases. The reader is introduced to six practical examples of noisy state-multiplicative control and filtering associated with various fields of control engineering. The book is rounded out by a three-part appendix containing stochastic tools necessary for a proper appreciation of the text: a basic introduction to nonlinear stochastic differential equations and aspects of switched systems and peak to peak  optimal control and filtering. Advanced Topics in Contr...

  11. Prospects for advancing tuberculosis control efforts through novel therapies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua A Salomon

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of new, effective, and affordable tuberculosis (TB therapies has been identified as a critical priority for global TB control. As new candidates emerge from the global TB drug pipeline, the potential impacts of novel, shorter regimens on TB incidence and mortality have not yet been examined. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We used a mathematical model of TB to evaluate the expected benefits of shortening the duration of effective chemotherapy for active pulmonary TB. First, we considered general relationships between treatment duration and TB dynamics. Next, as a specific example, we calibrated the model to reflect the current situation in the South-East Asia region. We found that even with continued and rapid progress in scaling up the World Health Organization's DOTS strategy of directly observed, short-course chemotherapy, the benefits of reducing treatment duration would be substantial. Compared to a baseline of continuing DOTS coverage at current levels, and with currently available tools, a 2-mo regimen introduced by 2012 could prevent around 20% (range 13%-28% of new cases and 25% (range 19%-29% of TB deaths in South-East Asia between 2012 and 2030. If effective treatment with existing drugs expands rapidly, overall incremental benefits of shorter regimens would be lower, but would remain considerable (13% [range 8%-19%] and 19% [range 15%-23%] reductions in incidence and mortality, respectively, between 2012 and 2030. A ten-year delay in the introduction of new drugs would erase nearly three-fourths of the total expected benefits in this region through 2030. CONCLUSIONS: The introduction of new, shorter treatment regimens could dramatically accelerate the reductions in TB incidence and mortality that are expected under current regimens-with up to 2- or 3-fold increases in rates of decline if shorter regimens are accompanied by enhanced case detection. Continued progress in reducing the global TB burden will require a

  12. Advances in understanding and utilising ELM control in JET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, I. T.; de la Luna, E.; Lang, P. T.; Liang, Y.; Alper, B.; Denner, P.; Frigione, D.; Garzotti, L.; Ham, C. J.; Huijsmans, G. T. A.; Jachmich, S.; Kocsis, G.; Lennholm, M.; Lupelli, I.; Rimini, F. G.; Sips, A. C. C.; Contributors, JET

    2016-01-01

    Edge localised mode (ELM) control may be essential to develop ITER scenarios with a reasonable lifetime of divertor components, whilst ELM pacing may be essential to develop stationary ITER scenarios with a tungsten divertor. Resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) have mitigated ELMs in high collisionality plasmas in JET. The efficacy of RMPs in mitigating the ELMs is found to depend on plasma shaping, with the change in magnetic boundary achieved when non-axisymmetric fields are applied facilitating access to small ELM regimes. The understanding of ELM pacing by vertical kicks or pellets has also been improved in a range of pedestal conditions in JET ({{T}\\text{ped}}=0.7 -1.3 keV) encompassing the ITER-expected domain ({β\\text{N}}=1.4 -2.4, H 98(y, 2)  =  0.8-1.2, {{f}\\text{GW}}˜ 0.7 ). ELM triggering is reliable provided the perturbation is above a threshold which depends on pedestal parameters. ELM triggering is achieved even in the first 10% of the natural ELM cycle suggesting no inherent maximum frequency. At high normalised pressure, the peeling-ballooning modes are stabilised as predicted by ELITE, necessitating a larger perturbation from either kicks or pellets in order to trigger ELMs. Both kicks and pellets have been used to pace ELMs for tungsten flushing. This has allowed stationary plasma conditions with low gas injection in plasmas where the natural ELM frequency is such that it would normally preclude stationary conditions.

  13. Contribution to the study and design of advanced controllers : application to smelting furnaces

    OpenAIRE

    Ojeda Sarmiento, Juan Manuel

    2013-01-01

    In this doctoral thesis, contributions to the study and design of advanced controllers and their application to metallurgical smelting furnaces are discussed. For this purpose, this kind of plants has been described in detail. The case of study is an Isasmelt plant in south Peru, which yearly processes 1.200.000 tons of copper concentrate. The current control system is implemented on a distributed control system. The main structure includes a cascade strategy to regulate the molten bath tempe...

  14. Advanced Control Scenario of High-Performance Steady-State Operation for JT-60 Superconducting Tokamak

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    H. Tamai; Y. Kamada; A. Sakasai; S. Ishida; G. Kurita; M. Matsukawa; K. Urata; S. Sakurai; K. Tsuchiya; A. Morioka; Y. M. Miura; K. Kizu

    2004-01-01

    Plasma control on high-βN steady-state operation for JT-60 superconducting modification is discussed. Accessibility to high-βN exceeding the free-boundary limit is investigated with the stabilising wall of reduced-activated ferritic steel and the active feedback control of the in-vessel non-axisymmetric field coils. Taking the merit of superconducting magnet, advanced plasma control for steady-state high performance operation could be expected.

  15. Theoretical and algorithmic advances in multi-parametric programming and control

    KAUST Repository

    Pistikopoulos, Efstratios N.

    2012-04-21

    This paper presents an overview of recent theoretical and algorithmic advances, and applications in the areas of multi-parametric programming and explicit/multi-parametric model predictive control (mp-MPC). In multi-parametric programming, advances include areas such as nonlinear multi-parametric programming (mp-NLP), bi-level programming, dynamic programming and global optimization for multi-parametric mixed-integer linear programming problems (mp-MILPs). In multi-parametric/explicit MPC (mp-MPC), advances include areas such as robust multi-parametric control, multi-parametric nonlinear MPC (mp-NMPC) and model reduction in mp-MPC. A comprehensive framework for multi-parametric programming and control is also presented. Recent applications include a hydrogen storage device, a fuel cell power generation system, an unmanned autonomous vehicle (UAV) and a hybrid pressure swing adsorption (PSA) system. © 2012 Springer-Verlag.

  16. National Level Co-Control Study of the Targets for Energy Intensity and Sulfur Dioxide in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Nan; Price, Lynn; Zheng, Nina; Ke, Jing; Hasanbeigi, Ali

    2011-10-15

    Since 2006, China has set goals of reducing energy intensity, emissions, and pollutants in multiple guidelines and in the Five Year Plans. Various strategies and measures have then been taken to improve the energy efficiency in all sectors and to reduce pollutants. Since controlling energy, CO{sub 2} emissions, and pollutants falls under the jurisdiction of different government agencies in China, many strategies are being implemented to fulfill only one of these objectives. Co-controls or integrated measures could simultaneously reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and criteria air pollutant emissions. The targets could be met in a more cost effective manner if the integrated measures can be identified and prioritized. This report provides analysis and insights regarding how these targets could be met via co-control measures focusing on both CO{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} emissions in the cement, iron &steel, and power sectors to 2030 in China. An integrated national energy and emission model was developed in order to establish a baseline scenario that was used to assess the impact of actions already taken by the Chinese government as well as planned and expected actions. In addition, CO{sub 2} mitigation scenarios and SO{sub 2} control scenarios were also established to evaluate the impact of each of the measures and the combined effects. In the power sector, although the end of pipe SO{sub 2} control technology such as flue gas desulfurization (FGD) has the largest reduction potential for SO{sub 2} emissions, other CO{sub 2} control options have important co-benefits in reducing SO{sub 2} emissions of 52.6 Mt of SO{sub 2} accumulatively. Coal efficiency improvements along with hydropower, renewable and nuclear capacity expansion will result in more than half of the SO{sub 2} emission reductions as the SO{sub 2} control technology through 2016. In comparison, the reduction from carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) is much less and has negative SO{sub 2} reductions

  17. ADVANCED GASIFICATION MERCURY/TRACE METAL CONTROL WITH MONOLITH TRAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mark A. Musich; Michael L. Swanson; Grant E. Dunham; Joshua J. Stanislowski

    2010-07-31

    Two Corning monoliths and a non-carbon-based material have been identified as potential additives for mercury capture in syngas at temperatures above 400°F and pressure of 600 psig. A new Corning monolith formulation, GR-F1-2189, described as an active sample appeared to be the best monolith tested to date. The Corning SR Liquid monolith concept continues to be a strong candidate for mercury capture. Both monolith types allowed mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb), a current U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal for trace metal control. Preparation methods for formulating the SR Liquid monolith impacted the ability of the monolith to capture mercury. The Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC)-prepared Noncarbon Sorbents 1 and 2 appeared to offer potential for sustained and significant reduction of mercury concentration in the simulated fuel gas. The Noncarbon Sorbent 1 allowed sustained mercury reduction to below 5-μg/m3 (~5 ppb). The non-carbon-based sorbent appeared to offer the potential for regeneration, that is, desorption of mercury by temperature swing (using nitrogen and steam at temperatures above where adsorption takes place). A Corning cordierite monolith treated with a Group IB metal offered limited potential as a mercury sorbent. However, a Corning carbon-based monolith containing prereduced metallic species similar to those found on the noncarbon sorbents did not exhibit significant or sustained mercury reduction. EERC sorbents prepared with Group IB and IIB selenide appeared to have some promise for mercury capture. Unfortunately, these sorbents also released Se, as was evidenced by the measurement of H2Se in the effluent gas. All sorbents tested with arsine or hydrogen selenide, including Corning monoliths and the Group IB and IIB metal-based materials, showed an ability to capture arsine or hydrogen selenide at 400°F and 600 psig. Based on current testing, the noncarbon metal-based sorbents appear to be the most effective arsine

  18. Interior noise control ground test studies for advanced turboprop aircraft applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Myles A.; Cannon, Mark R.; Burge, Paul L.; Boyd, Robert P.

    1989-01-01

    The measurement and analysis procedures are documented, and the results of interior noise control ground tests conducted on a DC-9 aircraft test section are summarized. The objectives of these tests were to study the fuselage response characteristics of treated and untreated aircraft with aft-mount advanced turboprop engines and to analyze the effectiveness of selected noise control treatments in reducing passenger cabin noise on these aircraft. The results of fuselage structural mode surveys, cabin cavity surveys and sound intensity surveys are presented. The performance of various structural and cabin sidewall treatments is assessed, based on measurements of the resulting interior noise levels under simulated advanced turboprop excitation.

  19. Effects of sulfur bath on hip osteoarthritis: a randomized, controlled, single-blind, follow-up trial: a pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovács, Csaba; Bozsik, Ágnes; Pecze, Mariann; Borbély, Ildikó; Fogarasi, Andrea; Kovács, Lajos; Tefner, Ildikó Katalin; Bender, Tamás

    2016-11-01

    The effects of balneotherapy were evaluated in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip. This randomized, controlled, investigator-blinded study enrolled outpatients with hip osteoarthritis according to ACR criteria. In addition to home exercise therapy, one patient group received balneotherapy for 3 weeks on 15 occasions. The mineral water used in this study is one of the mineral waters with the highest sulfide ion content (13.2 mg/L) in Hungary. The control group received exercise therapy alone. The WOMAC Likert 3.1 index and the EQ-5D quality of life self-administered questionnaire were completed three times during the study: prior to first treatment, at the end of the 3-week treatment course, and 12 weeks later. The main endpoint was achievement of Minimal Clinically Important Improvement (MCII) at 12 weeks, defined as ≥7.9 points in a normalized WOMAC function score. The intention to treat analysis included 20 controls and 21 balneotherapy patients. At 12 weeks, 17 (81 %) balneotherapy group patients had Minimal Clinically Important Improvement and 6 (30 %) of controls ( p = 0.001). Comparing the results of the two groups at the end of treatment, there was a significant difference in the WOMAC stiffness score only, whereas after 12 weeks, the WOMAC pain, stiffness, function, and total scores also showed a significant difference in favor of the balneotherapy group. The difference between the two groups was significant after 12 weeks in point of EQVAS score, too. The results of our study suggest that the combination of balneotherapy and exercise therapy achieves more sustained improvement of joint function and decreases in pain than exercise therapy alone.

  20. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Chalcopyrite Dissolution at Controlled Redox Potential of 750 mV in Sulfuric Acid Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yubiao Li

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand chalcopyrite leach mechanisms and kinetics, for improved Cu extraction during hydrometallurgical processing, chalcopyrite leaching has been conducted at solution redox potential 750 mV, 35–75 °C, and pH 1.0 with and without aqueous iron addition, and pH 1.5 and 2.0 without aqueous iron addition. The activation energy (Ea values derived indicate chalcopyrite dissolution is initially surface chemical reaction controlled, which is associated with the activities of Fe3+ and H+ with reaction orders of 0.12 and −0.28, respectively. A surface diffusion controlled mechanism is proposed for the later leaching stage with correspondingly low Ea values. Surface analyses indicate surface products (predominantly Sn2− and S0 did not inhibit chalcopyrite dissolution, consistent with the increased surface area normalised leach rate during the later stage. The addition of aqueous iron plays an important role in accelerating Cu leaching rates, especially at lower temperature, primarily by reducing the length of time of the initial surface chemical reaction controlled stage.

  1. Advanced Control Strategy of DFIG Wind Turbines for Power System Fault Ride Through

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Lihui; Xu, Zhao; Ostergaard, Jacob;

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an advanced control strategy for the rotor and grid side converters of the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) based wind turbine (WT) to enhance the low-voltage ride-through (LVRT) capability according to the grid connection requirement. Within the new control strategy...... the oscillations in the stator and rotor currents and the DC bus voltage. The effectiveness of the proposed control strategy has been demonstrated through various simulation cases. Compared with conventional crowbar protection, the proposed control method can not only improve the LVRT capability of the DFIG WT......, but also help maintaining continuous active and reactive power control of the DFIG during the grid faults....

  2. Sulfur recovery further improved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borsboom, J.; Grinsven, M. van; Warners, A. van [Jacobs Nederland B.V., (Netherlands); Nisselrooy, P. van [Gastec N.V., (Netherlands)

    2002-04-01

    The original 100-year-old Claus process for producing sulfur from hydrogen sulfide in acid gas is described together with improvements which have been made over the years. The most recent modification, EUROCLAUS, achieves sulfur recoveries of 99-99.9 per cent. Five commercial units are being designed.

  3. Childhood physical abnormalities following paternal exposure to sulfur mustard gas in Iran: a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khademolhosseini Seyyed M

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mustard gas, a known chemical weapon, was used during the Iran-Iraq war of 1980-1988. We aimed to determine if exposure to mustard gas among men was significantly associated with abnormalities and disorders among progenies. Methods Using a case-control design, we identified all progenies of Sardasht men (exposed group, n = 498, who were born at least nine months after the exposure, compared to age-matched controls in Rabat, a nearby city (non-exposed group, n = 689. We conducted a thorough medical history, physical examination, and appropriate paraclinical studies to detect any physical abnormality and/or disorder. Given the presence of correlated data, we applied Generalized Estimating Equation (GEE multivariable models to determine associations. Results The overall frequency of detected physical abnormalities and disorders was significantly higher in the exposed group (19% vs. 11%, Odds Ratio [OR] 1.93, 95% Confidence Interval [CI], 1.37-2.72, P = 0.0002. This was consistent across sexes. Congenital anomalies (OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.58-7.93, P = 0.002 and asthma (OR, 3.12, 95% CI, 1.43-6.80, P = 0.004 were most commonly associated with exposure. No single abnormality was associated with paternal exposure to mustard gas. Conclusion Our study demonstrates a generational effect of exposure to mustard gas. The lasting effects of mustard gas exposure in parents effects fertility and may impact child health and development in the long-term.

  4. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  5. PREFACE: 12th European Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis (ACD 2015)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straka, Ondřej; Punčochář, Ivo; Duník, Jindřich

    2015-11-01

    The 12th European Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis (ACD 2015) took place at the Research Centre NTIS - New Technologies for the Information Society, Faculty of Applied Sciences, University of West Bohemia, Pilsen, Czech Republic, on November 19 - 20, 2015. The annual European Workshop on Advanced Control and Diagnosis has been organized since 2003 by Control Engineering departments of several European universities in Germany, France, the UK, Poland, Italy, Hungary, and Denmark to bring together senior and junior academics and engineers from diverse fields of automatic control, fault detection, and signal processing. The workshop provides an opportunity for researchers and developers to present their recent theoretical developments, practical applications, or even open problems. It also offers a great opportunity for industrial partners to express their needs and priorities and to review the current activities in the fields. A total of 74 papers have been submitted for ACD 2015. Based on the peer reviews 48 papers were accepted for the oral presentation and 10 papers for the poster presentation. The accepted papers covered areas of control theory and applications, identification, estimation, signal processing, and fault detection. In addition, four excellent plenary lectures were delivered by Prof. Fredrik Gustafsson (Automotive Sensor Mining for Tire Pressure Monitoring), Prof. Vladimír Havlena (Advanced Process Control for Energy Efficiency), Prof. Silvio Simani (Advanced Issues on Wind Turbine Modelling and Control), and Prof. Robert Babuška (Learning Control in Robotics). The ACD 2015 was for the first time in the workshop history co-sponsored by the International Federation of Automatic Control (IFAC). On behalf of the ACD 2015 organising committee, we would like to thank all those who prepared and submitted papers, participated in the peer review process, supported, and attended the workshop.

  6. Field evaluation of advanced controls for the retrofit of packaged air conditioners and heat pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Weimin; Katipamula, Srinivas; Ngo, Hung; Underhill, Ronald M.; Taasevigen, Danny J.; Lutes, Robert G.

    2015-09-01

    This paper documents the magnitude of energy savings achievable in the field by retrofitting existing packaged rooftop units (RTUs) with advanced control strategies not ordinarily used for RTUs. A total of 66 RTUs on 8 different buildings were retrofitted with a commercially available advanced controller for improving RTU operational efficiency. The controller features enhanced air-side economizer control, multi-speed fan control, and demand controlled ventilation. Of the 66 RTUs, 18 are packaged heat pumps and the rest are packaged air conditioners with gas heat. The eight buildings cover four building types and four climate conditions. Based on the data collected for about a whole year, the advanced controller reduced the normalized annual RTU energy consumption between 22% and 90%, with an average of 57% for all RTUs. The average fractional savings uncertainty was 12% at 95% confidence level. Normalized annual electricity savings were in the range between 0.47 kWh/h (kWh per hour of RTU operation) and 7.21 kWh/h, with an average of 2.39 kWh/h. RTUs greater than 53 kW and runtime greater than 14 hours per day had payback periods less than 3 years even at $0.05/kWh.

  7. Development of Computational Approaches for Simulation and Advanced Controls for Hybrid Combustion-Gasification Chemical Looping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Abhinaya; Lou, Xinsheng; Neuschaefer, Carl; Chaudry, Majid; Quinn, Joseph

    2012-07-31

    This document provides the results of the project through September 2009. The Phase I project has recently been extended from September 2009 to March 2011. The project extension will begin work on Chemical Looping (CL) Prototype modeling and advanced control design exploration in preparation for a scale-up phase. The results to date include: successful development of dual loop chemical looping process models and dynamic simulation software tools, development and test of several advanced control concepts and applications for Chemical Looping transport control and investigation of several sensor concepts and establishment of two feasible sensor candidates recommended for further prototype development and controls integration. There are three sections in this summary and conclusions. Section 1 presents the project scope and objectives. Section 2 highlights the detailed accomplishments by project task area. Section 3 provides conclusions to date and recommendations for future work.

  8. Characteristics and recent trends of sulfur dioxide at urban, rural, and background sites in North China: Effectiveness of control measures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Weili Lin; Xiaobin Xu; Zhiqiang Ma; Huarong Zhao; Xiwen Liu; Ying Wang

    2012-01-01

    SO2 measurements made in recent years at sites in Beijing and its surrounding areas are performed to study the variations and trends of surface SO2 at different types of sites in Northern China.The overall average concentrations of SO2 are (16.8 ± 13.1) ppb,(14.8 ±9.4) ppb,and (7.5 ± 4.0) ppb at China Meteorological Administration (CMA,Beijing urban area),Gucheng (GCH,relatively polluted rural area,110 km to the southwest of Beijing urban area),and Shangdianzi (SDZ,clean background area,100 km to the northeast of Beijing urban area),respectively.The SO2 levels in winter (heating season) are 4-6 folds higher than those in summer.There are highly significant correlations among the daily means of SO2 at different sites,indicating regional characteristics of SO2 pollution.Diurnal patterns of surface SO2 at all sites have a common feature with a daytime peak,which is probably caused by the downward mixing and/or the advection transport of SO2-richer air over the North China Plain.The concentrations of SO2 at CMA and GCH show highly significant downward trends (-4.4 ppb/yr for CMA and -2.4 ppb/yr for GCH),while a less significant trend (-0.3 ppb/yr) is identified in the data from SDZ,reflecting the character of SDZ as a regional atmospheric background site in North China.The SO2 concentrations of all three sites show a significant decrease from period before to after the control measures for the 2008 Olympic Games,suggesting that the SO2 pollution control has long-term effectiveness and benefits.In the post-Olympics period,the mean concentrations of SO2 at CMA,GCH,and SDZ are (14.3 ± 11.0) ppb,(12.1 ± 7.7) ppb,and (7.5 ± 4.0) ppb,respectively,with reductions of 26%,36%,and 13%,respectively,compared to the levels before.Detailed analysis shows that the differences of temperature,relative humidity,wind speed,and wind direction were not the dominant factors for the significant differences of SO2 between the pre-Olympics and post-Olympics periods.By extracting the data

  9. Application of Advanced Process Control techniques to a pusher type reheating furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoli, S. M.; Pepe, C.; Barboni, L.

    2015-11-01

    In this paper an Advanced Process Control system aimed at controlling and optimizing a pusher type reheating furnace located in an Italian steel plant is proposed. The designed controller replaced the previous control system, based on PID controllers manually conducted by process operators. A two-layer Model Predictive Control architecture has been adopted that, exploiting a chemical, physical and economic modelling of the process, overcomes the limitations of plant operators’ mental model and knowledge. In addition, an ad hoc decoupling strategy has been implemented, allowing the selection of the manipulated variables to be used for the control of each single process variable. Finally, in order to improve the system flexibility and resilience, the controller has been equipped with a supervision module. A profitable trade-off between conflicting specifications, e.g. safety, quality and production constraints, energy saving and pollution impact, has been guaranteed. Simulation tests and real plant results demonstrated the soundness and the reliability of the proposed system.

  10. Innovations in building regulation and control for advancing sustainability in buildings (I)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, B.; Visscher, H.J.; Meijer, F.M.; Chan, C.; Chan, E.; Laubscher, J.; Neng Kwei Sung, J.; Dodds, B.; Serra, J.; Tenorio, J.A.; Echeverria, J.B.; Sanches-Ostiz, A.

    2014-01-01

    This session brings together policy-makers, government officials, researchers and others to present perspectives on how innovation in building regulation and control, such as performancebased approaches, are currently being used to advance sustainability concepts in buildings, and where and how we m

  11. Fieldcrest Cannon, Inc. Advanced Technical Preparation. Statistical Process Control (SPC). PRE-SPC I. Instructor Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averitt, Sallie D.

    This instructor guide, which was developed for use in a manufacturing firm's advanced technical preparation program, contains the materials required to present a learning module that is designed to prepare trainees for the program's statistical process control module by improving their basic math skills and instructing them in basic calculator…

  12. On the Controllability of a Differential Equation with Delayed and Advanced Arguments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Manzanilla

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A semigroup theory for a differential equation with delayed and advanced arguments is developed, with a detailed description of the infinitesimal generator. This in turn allows to study the exact controllability of the equation, by rewriting it as a classical Cauchy problem.

  13. Test Platform for Advanced Digital Control of Brushless DC Motors (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwaltney, D. A.

    2002-01-01

    A FY 2001 Center Director's Discretionary Fund task to develop a test platform for the development, implementation. and evaluation of adaptive and other advanced control techniques for brushless DC (BLDC) motor-driven mechanisms is described. Important applications for BLDC motor-driven mechanisms are the translation of specimens in microgravity experiments and electromechanical actuation of nozzle and fuel valves in propulsion systems. Motor-driven aerocontrol surfaces are also being utilized in developmental X vehicles. The experimental test platform employs a linear translation stage that is mounted vertically and driven by a BLDC motor. Control approaches are implemented on a digital signal processor-based controller for real-time, closed-loop control of the stage carriage position. The goal of the effort is to explore the application of advanced control approaches that can enhance the performance of a motor-driven actuator over the performance obtained using linear control approaches with fixed gains. Adaptive controllers utilizing an exact model knowledge controller and a self-tuning controller are implemented and the control system performance is illustrated through the presentation of experimental results.

  14. Flexible System Integration and Advanced Hierarchical Control Architectures in the Microgrid Research Laboratory of Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meng, Lexuan; Hernández, Adriana Carolina Luna; Diaz, Enrique Rodriguez

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the system integration and hierarchical control implementation in an inverter-based microgrid research laboratory (MGRL) in Aalborg University, Denmark. MGRL aims to provide a flexible experimental platform for comprehensive studies of microgrids. The structure of the laboratory...... system supervision, advanced secondary and tertiary management are realized in a microgrid central controller. The software and hardware schemes are described. Several example case studies are introduced and performed in order to achieve power quality regulation, energy management and flywheel energy...

  15. Advanced numerical study of the three-axis magnetic attitude control and determination with uncertainties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, D. S.; Ovchinnikov, M. Yu.; Penkov, V. I.; Roldugin, D. S.; Doronin, D. M.; Ovchinnikov, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    Attitude motion of a satellite equipped with magnetic control system is considered. System comprises of three magnetorquers and one three-axis magnetometer. Satellite is stabilized in orbital reference frame using PD controller and extended Kalman filter. Three-axis attitude is analyzed numerically with advanced assumptions: inertia tensor uncertainty, disturbances of unknown nature, magnetometer errors are taken into account. Stabilization and determination accuracy dependence on orbit inclination is studied.

  16. A Discuss of Sulfur Dioxide Emission Control of China's Oil and Gas Industry%石油天然气行业SO2总量控制思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范巍; 李兴春; 龙飞

    2011-01-01

    指出了石油天然气行业是国家在“十二五”期间SO2减排的重点控制行业,调查了我国石油天然气的生产和消费情况,以“十一五”前3年为基础,对行业“十二五”SO2排放进行了预测。分析了行业SO2减排的技术经济可行性,提出了行业SO2减排的主要控制途径和新增总量的控制措施。%Oil and gas industry is the key industry of sulfur dioxide emission control during the "Twelve five --year" period of China. This paperinvestigates the situation of China's oil and gas production and consumption and predicts the sulfur dioxide emissions during the "Twelve five-year" period based on the first three years of the "Eleventh Five Year" period. Besides, it also analyses the technical and economic feasibility of the controlling of sulfur dioxide emissions in oil and gas industry and puts forward the main control means.

  17. Advancing Control for Shield Tunneling Machine by Backstepping Design with LuGre Friction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haibo Xie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Shield tunneling machine is widely applied for underground tunnel construction. The shield machine is a complex machine with large momentum and ultralow advancing speed. The working condition underground is rather complicated and unpredictable, and brings big trouble in controlling the advancing speed. This paper focused on the advancing motion control on desired tunnel axis. A three-state dynamic model was established with considering unknown front face earth pressure force and unknown friction force. LuGre friction model was introduced to describe the friction force. Backstepping design was then proposed to make tracking error converge to zero. To have a comparison study, controller without LuGre model was designed. Tracking simulations of speed regulations and simulations when front face earth pressure changed were carried out to show the transient performances of the proposed controller. The results indicated that the controller had good tracking performance even under changing geological conditions. Experiments of speed regulations were carried out to have validations of the controllers.

  18. Sulfur Confined in Sub-Nanometer-Sized 2 D Graphene Interlayers and Its Electrochemical Behavior in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Juan; Yin, Ya-Xia; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

    2016-10-06

    Microspace-confined sulfur molecules as cathodes for lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries have shown great significance in both scientific and technical aspects. A study of different microspace-confined sulfur will not only promote the advancement of Li-S batteries but also arouse a wide interest in sulfur chemistry and related applications. Herein, we choose two-dimensional (2D) graphene interlayer as host and construct 2D space-confined sulfur model systems by simple intercalation chemistry of graphite oxide. Two routes, including solvothermal method and interlamellar reaction approach, are developed, and sulfur can be easily intercalated into sub-nanometer-sized graphene interlayers, forming a graphene confined sulfur structure. The 2D space-confined sulfur can work well in a carbonate-based electrolyte and show similar electrochemical behaviors of small sulfur molecules, indicating the special molecular form of sulfur in graphene layers. The 2D space-confined sulfur concept will be helpful for further understanding the electrochemical character of confined sulfur molecules and designing a high-performance sulfur cathode.

  19. SpaceWire- Based Control System Architecture for the Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator [LARAD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rucinski, Marek; Coates, Adam; Montano, Giuseppe; Allouis, Elie; Jameux, David

    2015-09-01

    The Lightweight Advanced Robotic Arm Demonstrator (LARAD) is a state-of-the-art, two-meter long robotic arm for planetary surface exploration currently being developed by a UK consortium led by Airbus Defence and Space Ltd under contract to the UK Space Agency (CREST-2 programme). LARAD has a modular design, which allows for experimentation with different electronics and control software. The control system architecture includes the on-board computer, control software and firmware, and the communication infrastructure (e.g. data links, switches) connecting on-board computer(s), sensors, actuators and the end-effector. The purpose of the control system is to operate the arm according to pre-defined performance requirements, monitoring its behaviour in real-time and performing safing/recovery actions in case of faults. This paper reports on the results of a recent study about the feasibility of the development and integration of a novel control system architecture for LARAD fully based on the SpaceWire protocol. The current control system architecture is based on the combination of two communication protocols, Ethernet and CAN. The new SpaceWire-based control system will allow for improved monitoring and telecommanding performance thanks to higher communication data rate, allowing for the adoption of advanced control schemes, potentially based on multiple vision sensors, and for the handling of sophisticated end-effectors that require fine control, such as science payloads or robotic hands.

  20. Two-step rapid sulfur capture. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-04-01

    The primary goal of this program was to test the technical and economic feasibility of a novel dry sorbent injection process called the Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process for several advanced coal utilization systems. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process consists of limestone activation in a high temperature auxiliary burner for short times followed by sorbent quenching in a lower temperature sulfur containing coal combustion gas. The Two-Step Rapid Sulfur Capture process is based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture process developed by the Energy Technology Office of Textron Defense Systems (ETO/TDS). Based on the Non-Equilibrium Sulfur Capture studies the range of conditions for optimum sorbent activation were thought to be: activation temperature > 2,200 K for activation times in the range of 10--30 ms. Therefore, the aim of the Two-Step process is to create a very active sorbent (under conditions similar to the bomb reactor) and complete the sulfur reaction under thermodynamically favorable conditions. A flow facility was designed and assembled to simulate the temperature, time, stoichiometry, and sulfur gas concentration prevalent in the advanced coal utilization systems such as gasifiers, fluidized bed combustors, mixed-metal oxide desulfurization systems, diesel engines, and gas turbines.

  1. Nonlinear Output Feedback Control of Underwater Vehicle Propellers using Advance Speed Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fossen, T.I.; Blanke, M.

    1999-01-01

    More accurate propeller shaft speed controllers can be designed by using nonlinear control theory. In this paper, an output feedback controller reconstructing the advance speed (speed of water going into the propeller) from vehicle speed measurements is derived. For this purpose a three-state model...... of propeller shaft speed, forward (surge) speed of the vehicle and axial inlet flow of the propeller is applied. A nonlinear observer in combination with an output feedback integral controller are derived by applying Lyapunov stability theory and exponential stability is proven. The output feedback controller...... minimizes thruster losses due to variations in propeller axial inlet flow which is a major problem when applying conventional vehicle-propeller control systems. The proposed controller is simulated for an underwater vehicle equipped with a single propeller. From the simulations it can be concluded...

  2. PERFORMANCE STUDIES OF INTEGRATED FUZZY LOGIC CONTROLLER FOR BRUSHLESS DC MOTOR DRIVES USING ADVANCED SIMULATION MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Subba Rami Reddy

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces an Integrated fuzzy logic controller (IFLC for brushless dc (BLDC motor drives using advanced simulation model and presents a comparative study of performances of PID controller and IFLC. The dynamic characteristics of speed and torque are effectively monitored and analyzed using the proposed model. The aim of IFLC is to obtain improved performance in terms of disturbance rejection or parameter variation than obtained using PID controller. The IFLC is constructed by using Fuzzy logic controller (FLC and PID controller. A performance comparison of the controllers is also given based on the integral of the absolute value of the error (IAE, the integral of the squared error (ISE, the integral of the time-weighted absolute error (ITAE and the integral of the time-weighted squared error (ITSE. The results show the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  3. The effects of speech controls on performance in advanced helicopters in a double stimulation paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortolussi, Michael R.; Vidulich, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    The potential benefit of speech as a control modality has been investigated with mixed results. Earlier studies suggests that speech controls can reduce the potential of manual control overloads and improve time-sharing performance. However, these benefits were not without costs. Pilots reported higher workload levels associated with the use of speech controls. To further investigate these previous findings, an experiment was conducted in a simulation of an advanced single-pilot, scout/attack helicopter at NASA-Ames' ICAB (interchangeable cab) facility. Objective performance data suggested that speech control modality was effective in reducing interference of discrete, time-shared responses during continuous flight control activity. Subjective ratings, however, indicated that the speech control modality increased workload. Post-flight debriefing indicated that these results were mainly due to the increased effort to speak precisely to a less than perfect voice recognition system.

  4. Quality Control Review of BDO USA, LLP FY 2013 Single Audit of Advanced Technology International

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-03

    foundation for uniform audit requirements of non-Federal entities administering Federal awards. Entities that expend $500,000 or more in a year are subject...Report No. DODIG-2015-027 N o v e m b e r 3 , 2 0 1 4 Quality Control Review of BDO USA, LLP FY 2013 Single Audit of Advanced Technology...Single Audit of Advanced Technology International 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  5. Dynamics and Control of Orbiting Space Structures NASA Advanced Design Program (ADP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    The report summarizes the advanced design program in the mechanical engineering department at Vanderbilt University for the academic years 1994-1995 and 1995-1996. Approximately 100 students participated in the two years of the subject grant funding. The NASA-oriented design projects that were selected included lightweight hydrogen propellant tank for the reusable launch vehicle, a thermal barrier coating test facility, a piezoelectric motor for space antenna control, and a lightweight satellite for automated materials processing. The NASA supported advanced design program (ADP) has been a success and a number of graduates are working in aerospace and are doing design.

  6. Cytoplasmic sulfur trafficking in sulfur-oxidizing prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Christiane

    2015-04-01

    Persulfide groups are chemically versatile and participate in a wide array of biochemical pathways. Although it is well documented that persulfurated proteins supply a number of important and elaborate biosynthetic pathways with sulfane sulfur, it is far less acknowledged that the enzymatic generation of persulfidic sulfur, the successive transfer of sulfur as a persulfide between multiple proteins, and the oxidation of sulfane sulfur in protein-bound form are also essential steps during dissimilatory sulfur oxidation in bacteria and archaea. Here, the currently available information on sulfur trafficking in sulfur oxidizing prokaryotes is reviewed, and the idea is discussed that sulfur is always presented to cytoplasmic oxidizing enzymes in a protein-bound form, thus preventing the occurrence of free sulfide inside of the prokaryotic cell. Thus, sulfur trafficking emerges as a central element in sulfur-oxidizing pathways, and TusA homologous proteins appear to be central and common elements in these processes.

  7. Biological technologies for the removal of sulfur containing compounds from waste streams: bioreactors and microbial characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lin; Zhang, Jingying; Lin, Jian; Liu, Junxin

    2015-10-01

    Waste gases containing sulfur compounds, such as hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide, thioethers, and mercaptan, produced and emitted from industrial processes, wastewater treatment, and landfill waste may cause undesirable issues in adjacent areas and contribute to atmospheric pollution. Their control has been an area of concern and research for many years. As alternative to conventional physicochemical air pollution control technologies, biological treatment processes which can transform sulfur compounds to harmless products by microbial activity, have gained in popularity due to their efficiency, cost-effectiveness and environmental acceptability. This paper provides an overview of the current biological techniques used for the treatment of air streams contaminated with sulfur compounds as well as the advances made in the past year. The discussion focuses on bioreactor configuration and design, mechanism of operation, insights into the overall biological treatment process, and the characterization of the microbial species present in bioreactors, their populations and their interactions with the environment. Some bioreactor case studies are also introduced. Finally, the perspectives on future research and development needs in this research area were also highlighted.

  8. Development of a Power Electronics Controller for the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leland, Douglas K.; Priest, Joel F.; Keiter, Douglas E.; Schreiber, Jeffrey G.

    2008-01-01

    Under a U.S. Department of Energy program for radioisotope power systems, Lockheed Martin is developing an Engineering Unit of the Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG). This is an advanced version of the previously reported SRG110 generator. The ASRG uses Advanced Stirling Convertors (ASCs) developed by Sunpower Incorporated under a NASA Research Announcement contract. The ASRG makes use of a Stirling controller based on power electronics that eliminates the tuning capacitors. The power electronics controller synchronizes dual-opposed convertors and maintains a fixed frequency operating point. The controller is single-fault tolerant and uses high-frequency pulse width modulation to create the sinusoidal currents that are nearly in phase with the piston velocity, eliminating the need for large series tuning capacitors. Sunpower supports this effort through an extension of their controller development intended for other applications. Glenn Research Center (GRC) supports this effort through system dynamic modeling, analysis and test support. The ASRG design arrived at a new baseline based on a system-level trade study and extensive feedback from mission planners on the necessity of single-fault tolerance. This paper presents the baseline design with an emphasis on the power electronics controller detailed design concept that will meet space mission requirements including single fault tolerance.

  9. Advanced Adaptive Particle Swarm Optimization based SVC Controller for Power System Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poonam Singhal

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The interconnected systems is continually increasing in size and extending over whole geographical regions, it is becoming increasingly more difficult to maintain synchronism between various parts of the power system. This paper work presents an advanced adaptive Particle swarm optimization technique to optimize the SVC controller parameters for enhancement of the steady state stability & overcoming the premature convergence & stagnation problems as in basic PSO algorithm & Particle swarm optimization with shrinkage factor & inertia weight approach (PSO-SFIWA. In this paper SMIB system along with PID damped SVC controller is considered for study. The generator speed deviation is used as an auxiliary signal to SVC, to generate the desired damping. This controller improves the dynamic performance of power system by reducing the steady-state error. The controller parameters are optimized using basic PSO, PSO-SFIWA & Advanced Adaptive PSO. Computational results show that Advanced Adaptive based SVC controller is able to find better quality solution as compare to conventional PSO & PSO-SFIWA Techniques.

  10. Pro Telerik ASPNET and Silverlight Controls Master Telerik Controls for Advanced ASPNET and Silverlight Projects

    CERN Document Server

    Paz, J Guay

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a complete guide to implementing Telerik's range of ASP.NET and Silverlight controls. Telerik controls are invaluable for ASP.NET and Silverlight developers because they provide a vast array of rich controls targeted for the presentation layer of web applications. Telerik offers you solutions for the reports, grids, charts, and text-editing controls that you need but don't want to build from scratch yourself - the options are endless for increasing the functionality of any of your web solutions. What you'll learn * Understand how to integrate the standard Telerik controls in

  11. Advanced electric drives analysis, control, and modeling using MATLAB/Simulink

    CERN Document Server

    Mohan, Ned

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Electric Drives utilizes a physics-based approach to explain the fundamental concepts of modern electric drive control and its operation under dynamic conditions. Gives readers a "physical" picture of electric machines and drives without resorting to mathematical transformations for easy visualization Confirms the physics-based analysis of electric drives mathematically Provides readers with an analysis of electric machines in a way that can be easily interfaced to common power electronic converters and controlled using any control scheme Makes the MATLAB/Simulink files used in exampl

  12. Advanced Control of Wind Electric Pumping System for Isolated Areas Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Barara

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The supply water in remote areas of windy region is one of most attractive application of wind energy conversion .This paper proposes an advanced controller suitable for wind-electric pump in isolated applications in order to have a desired debit from variation of reference speed of the pump also the control scheme of DC voltage of SIEG for feed the pump are presented under step change in wind speed. The simulation results showed a good performance of the global proposed control system.

  13. Advanced Interval Type-2 Fuzzy Sliding Mode Control for Robot Manipulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Hwan; Kang, Young-Chang

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, advanced interval type-2 fuzzy sliding mode control (AIT2FSMC) for robot manipulator is proposed. The proposed AIT2FSMC is a combination of interval type-2 fuzzy system and sliding mode control. For resembling a feedback linearization (FL) control law, interval type-2 fuzzy system is designed. For compensating the approximation error between the FL control law and interval type-2 fuzzy system, sliding mode controller is designed, respectively. The tuning algorithms are derived in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem. Two-link rigid robot manipulator with nonlinearity is used to test and the simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed method that can control unknown system well.

  14. Experiments in advanced control concepts for space robotics - An overview of the Stanford Aerospace Robotics Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollars, M. G.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.; Alexander, H. L.; Morse, D. F.

    1987-01-01

    The Stanford University Aerospace Robotics Laboratory is actively developing and experimentally testing advanced robot control strategies for space robotic applications. Early experiments focused on control of very lightweight one-link manipulators and other flexible structures. The results are being extended to position and force control of mini-manipulators attached to flexible manipulators and multilink manipulators with flexible drive trains. Experimental results show that end-point sensing and careful dynamic modeling or adaptive control are key to the success of these control strategies. Free-flying space robot simulators that operate on an air cushion table have been built to test control strategies in which the dynamics of the base of the robot and the payload are important.

  15. Status of the advanced photon source and its accelerator control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, W.; Knott, M.; Kraimer, M.

    1994-12-01

    This paper presents the current status of the Advanced Photon Source (APS), its control system and the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) tools being used to implement this control system. The status of the physical plant and each of the accelerators as well as detailed descriptions of the software tools used to build the accelerator control system are presented. The control system uses high-performance graphic workstations and the X-Windows graphical user interface (GUI) at the operator interface level. It connects to VME/VXI-based microprocessors at the field level, using TCP/IP protocols over high-performance networks. This strategy assures the flexibility and expansibility of the control system. A defined interface between the system components will allow the system to evolve with the direct addition of future, improved equipment and new capabilities.

  16. Enhanced electrochemical performance of a crosslinked polyaniline-coated graphene oxide-sulfur composite for rechargeable lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, San; Jung, Young Hwa; Kim, Do Kyung

    2015-10-01

    Due to the extraordinarily high theoretical capacity of sulfur (1675 mAh g-1), the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) battery has been considered a promising candidate for future high-energy battery applications. Li-S batteries, however, have suffered from limited cycle lives, mainly due to the formation of soluble polysulfides, which prevent the practical application of this attractive technology. The encapsulation of sulfur with various conductive materials has addressed this issue to some extent. Nevertheless, most approaches still present partial encapsulation of sulfur and moreover require a large quantity of conductive material (typically, >30 wt%), making the use of sulfur less desirable from the viewpoint of capacity. Here, we address these chronic issues of Li-S cells by developing a graphene oxide-sulfur composite with a thin crosslinked polyaniline (PANI) layer. Graphene oxide nanosheets with large surface area, high conductivity and a uniform conductive PANI layer, which are synthesized by a layer-by-layer method, have a synergetic interaction with a large portion of the sulfur in the active material. Furthermore, a simple crosslinking process efficiently prevents polysulfide dissolution, resulting in unprecedented electrochemical performance, even with a high sulfur content (∼75%): a high capacity retention of ∼80% is observed, in addition to 97.53% of the average Coulombic efficiency being retained after 500 cycles. The performance we demonstrate represents an advance in the field of lithium-sulfur batteries for applications such as power tools.

  17. In-line estimation of sulfur and nitrogen contents during hydrotreating of middle distillates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. E. Pacheco

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work is analyzing whether it is possible to develop an empirical correlation for in-line estimation of the sulfur and nitrogen contents of the middle distillates Hydrotreating (HDT products for control purposes. Correlations are based only on readily available in-line information of specific gravity variation between feedstock and products, without considering any piece of information about the kinetic behavior of the catalyst. Experimental data were obtained in pilot plants under operating conditions that are representative of refinery operations. Results indicate that the removal of nitrogen and sulfur compounds during middle distillates HDT can be monitored in-line in real time, based on the available measurements of specific gravity. This allows for development and implementation of advanced in-line procedures for monitoring and control of the HDT process in real time.

  18. Operational Strategy of CBPs for load balancing of Operators in Advanced Main Control Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Seunghwan; Kim, Yochan; Jung, Wondea [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    With the using of a computer-based control room in an APR1400 (Advanced Pressurized Reactor-1400), the operators' behaviors in the main control room had changed. However, though the working environment of operators has been changed a great deal, digitalized interfaces can also change the cognitive tasks or activities of operators. First, a shift supervisor (SS) can confirm/check the conduction of the procedures and the execution of actions of board operators (BOs) while confirming directly the operation variables without relying on the BOs. Second, all operators added to their work the use of a new CBP and Soft Controls, increasing their procedural workload. New operational control strategies of CBPs are necessary for load balancing of operator's task load in APR1400. In this paper, we compared the workloads of operators in an APR1400 who work with two different usages of the CBP. They are SS oriented usage and SS-BO collaborative usage. In this research, we evaluated the workloads of operators in an advanced main control room by the COCOA method. Two types of CBP usages were defined and the effects of these usages on the workloads were investigated. The obtained results showed that the workloads between operators in a control room can be balanced according to the CBP usages by assigning control authority to the operators.

  19. HYBRID SULFUR RECOVERY PROCESS FOR NATURAL GAS UPGRADING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dennis Dalrymple

    2004-06-01

    a portion of the inlet H{sub 2}S. Oxidation catalysts may also produce some elemental sulfur under these conditions, which can be removed and recovered prior to the CrystaSulf absorber. The CrystaSulf-DO process can utilize direct oxidation catalyst from many sources. Numerous direct oxidation catalysts are available from many suppliers worldwide. They have been used for H{sub 2}S oxidation to sulfur and/or SO{sub 2} for decades. It was believed at the outset of the project that TDA Research, Inc., a subcontractor, could develop a direct oxidation catalyst that would offer advantages over other commercially available catalysts for this CrystaSulf-DO process application. This project involved the development of several of TDA's candidate proprietary direct oxidation catalysts through laboratory bench-scale testing. These catalysts were shown to be effective for conversion of H{sub 2}S to SO{sub 2} and to elemental sulfur under certain operating conditions. One of these catalysts was subsequently tested on a commercial gas stream in a bench-scale reactor at CrystaTech's pilot plant site in west Texas with good results. However, commercial developments have precluded the use of TDA catalysts in the CrystaSulf-DO process. Nonetheless, this project has advanced direct oxidation catalyst technology for H{sub 2}S control in energy industries and led to several viable paths to commercialization. TDA is commercializing the use of its direct oxidation catalyst technology in conjunction with the SulfaTreat{reg_sign} solid scavenger for natural gas applications and in conjunction with ConocoPhillips and DOE for gasification applications using ConocoPhillips gasification technology. CrystaTech is commercializing its CrystaSulf-DO process in conjunction with Gas Technology Institute for natural gas applications (using direct oxidation catalysts from other commercial sources) and in conjunction with ChevronTexaco and DOE for gasification applications using Chevron

  20. Dynamics and Control of Switched Electronic Systems Advanced Perspectives for Modeling, Simulation and Control of Power Converters

    CERN Document Server

    Iannelli, Luigi

    2012-01-01

    The increased efficiency and quality constraints imposed on electrical energy systems have inspired a renewed research interest in the study of formal approaches to the analysis and control of power electronics converters. Switched systems represent a useful framework for modeling these converters and the peculiarities of their operating conditions and control goals justify the specific classification of “switched electronic systems”. Indeed, idealized switched models of power converters introduce problems not commonly encountered when analyzing generic switched models or non-switched electrical networks. In that sense the analysis of switched electronic systems represents a source for new ideas and benchmarks for switched and hybrid systems generally. Dynamics and Control of Switched Electronic Systems draws on the expertise of an international group of expert contributors to give an overview of recent advances in the modeling, simulation and control of switched electronic systems. The reader is provided...

  1. Modeling Human Error Mechanism for Soft Control in Advanced Control Rooms (ACRs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aljneibi, Hanan Salah Ali [Khalifa Univ., Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Ha, Jun Su; Kang, Seongkeun; Seong, Poong Hyun [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    To achieve the switch from conventional analog-based design to digital design in ACRs, a large number of manual operating controls and switches have to be replaced by a few common multi-function devices which is called soft control system. The soft controls in APR-1400 ACRs are classified into safety-grade and non-safety-grade soft controls; each was designed using different and independent input devices in ACRs. The operations using soft controls require operators to perform new tasks which were not necessary in conventional controls such as navigating computerized displays to monitor plant information and control devices. These kinds of computerized displays and soft controls may make operations more convenient but they might cause new types of human error. In this study the human error mechanism during the soft controls is studied and modeled to be used for analysis and enhancement of human performance (or human errors) during NPP operation. The developed model would contribute to a lot of applications to improve human performance (or reduce human errors), HMI designs, and operators' training program in ACRs. The developed model of human error mechanism for the soft control is based on assumptions that a human operator has certain amount of capacity in cognitive resources and if resources required by operating tasks are greater than resources invested by the operator, human error (or poor human performance) is likely to occur (especially in 'slip'); good HMI (Human-machine Interface) design decreases the required resources; operator's skillfulness decreases the required resources; and high vigilance increases the invested resources. In this study the human error mechanism during the soft controls is studied and modeled to be used for analysis and enhancement of human performance (or reduction of human errors) during NPP operation.

  2. Biosynthesis and functions of sulfur modifications in tRNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki eShigi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur is an essential element for a variety of cellular constituents in all living organisms. In tRNA molecules, there are many sulfur-containing nucleosides, such as the derivatives of 2‑thiouridine (s2U, 4-thiouridine (s4U, 2-thiocytidine (s2C, and 2-methylthioadenosine (ms2A. Earlier studies established the functions of these modifications for accurate and efficient translation, including proper recognition of the codons in mRNA or stabilization of tRNA structure. In many cases, the biosynthesis of these sulfur modifications starts with cysteine desulfurases, which catalyze the generation of persulfide (an activated form of sulfur from cysteine. Many sulfur-carrier proteins are responsible for delivering this activated sulfur to each biosynthesis pathway. Finally, specific modification enzymes activate target tRNAs and then incorporate sulfur atoms. Intriguingly, the biosynthesis of 2-thiouridine in all domains of life is functionally and evolutionarily related to the ubiquitin-like post-translational modification system of cellular proteins in eukaryotes. This review summarizes the recent characterization of the biosynthesis of sulfur modifications in tRNA and the novel roles of this modification in cellular functions in various model organisms, with a special emphasis on 2-thiouridine derivatives. Each biosynthesis pathway of sulfur-containing molecules is mutually modulated via sulfur trafficking, and 2-thiouridine and codon usage bias have been proposed to control the translation of specific genes.

  3. Biodesulfurization of refractory organic sulfur compounds in fossil fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Mehran; Bassi, Amarjeet; Margaritis, Argyrios

    2007-01-01

    The stringent new regulations to lower sulfur content in fossil fuels require new economic and efficient methods for desulfurization of recalcitrant organic sulfur. Hydrodesulfurization of such compounds is very costly and requires high operating temperature and pressure. Biodesulfurization is a non-invasive approach that can specifically remove sulfur from refractory hydrocarbons under mild conditions and it can be potentially used in industrial desulfurization. Intensive research has been conducted in microbiology and molecular biology of the competent strains to increase their desulfurization activity; however, even the highest activity obtained is still insufficient to fulfill the industrial requirements. To improve the biodesulfurization efficiency, more work is needed in areas such as increasing specific desulfurization activity, hydrocarbon phase tolerance, sulfur removal at higher temperature, and isolating new strains for desulfurizing a broader range of sulfur compounds. This article comprehensively reviews and discusses key issues, advances and challenges for a competitive biodesulfurization process.

  4. Profile control of advanced tokamak plasmas in view of continuous operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazon, D.

    2015-07-01

    The concept of the tokamak is a very good candidate to lead to a fusion reactor. In fact, certain regimes of functioning allow today the tokamaks to attain performances close to those requested by a reactor. Among the various scenarios of functioning nowadays considered for the reactor option, certain named 'advanced scenarios' are characterized by an improvement of the stability and confinement in the plasma core, as well as by a modification of the current profile, notably thank to an auto-generated 'bootstrap' current. The general frame of this paper treats the perspective of a real-time control of advanced regimes. Concrete examples will underline the impact of diagnostics on the identification of plasma models, from which the control algorithms are constructed. Several preliminary attempts will be described.

  5. Economic Benefits of Advanced Control Strategies in Biological Nutrient Removal Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, J.; Nielsen, M.K.; Harremoës, Poul

    1994-01-01

    Advances in on-line monitoring of nutrient salt concentrations and computer technology has created a large potential for the implementation of advanced and complex control strategies in biological nutrient removal systems. The majority of wastewater treatment plants today are operated with very...... strategies incorporating information from the grey box models are capable of reducing the total nitrogen discharge as well as energy costs. These results have a major impact on both existing and future plants. In fact, it is expected that future plants can be reduced with 10-20 per cent in size......, and that the complexity in reactor design of biological nutrient removal systems will be substituted by complexity in control in the future....

  6. Proposing a new advanced control technique for micro hydro power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanmandlu, M.; Goyal, Himani [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Hauz Khas, New Delhi 110016 (India)

    2008-05-15

    Micro hydropower plants are emerging as a major renewable energy resource today as they do not encounter the problems of population displacement and environmental problems associated with the large hydro power plants. However, they require control systems to limit the huge variation in input flows expected in rivulets over which these are established to produce a constant power supply. This paper proposes an electric servomotor as a governor for a micro hydro power plant especially those plants that are operated in isolated mode. An advanced controller is developed combining four control schemes for the control of the governor following the concept that the control action can be split up into linear and non-linear parts. The linear part of this controller contains an adaptive fast transversal filter (FTF) algorithm and normalized LMS (nLMS) algorithm. The non-linear part of the controller incorporates Fuzzy PI and a neural network. The concept behind splitting the control action is reasoned out and the conditions for stability of the controller are proved. The new controller has a superior performance compared to other control schemes. (author)

  7. Advanced flow measurement and active flow control of aircraft with MEMS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Chengyu; Deng Jinjun; Ma Binghe; Yuan Weizheng

    2012-01-01

    Advanced flow measurement and active flow control need the development of new type devices and systems. Micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technologies become the important and feasible approach for micro transducers fabrication. This paper introduces research works of MEMS/NEMS Lab in flow measurement sensors and active flow control actuators. Micro sensors include the flexible thermal sensor array, capacitive shear stress sensor and high sensitivity pressure sensor. Micro actuators are the balloon actuator and synthetic jet actuator respectively. Through wind tunnel test, these micro transducers achieve the goals of shear stress and pressure distribution measurement, boundary layer separation control, lift enhancement, etc. And unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) flight test verifies the ability of maneuver control of micro actuator. In the future work, micro sensor and actuator can be combined into a closed-loop control system to construct aerodynamic smart skin system for aircraft.

  8. DYNAMIC MODELLING AND ADVANCED PREDICTIVE CONTROL OF A CONTINUOUS PROCESS OF ENZYME PURIFICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dechechi E.C.

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A dynamic mathematical model, simulation and computer control of a Continuous Affinity Recycle Extraction (CARE process, a protein purification technique based on protein adsorption on solid-phase adsorbents is described in this work. This process, consisting of three reactors, is a multivariable process with considerable time delay in the on-line analyses of the controlled variable. An advanced predictive control configuration, specifically the Dynamic Matrix Control (DMC, was applied. The DMC algorithm was applied in process schemes where the aim was to maintain constant the enzyme concentration in the outlet of the third reactor. The performance of the DMC controller was analyzed in the feed-flow disturbances and the results are presented.

  9. Advanced Sensors and Controls for Building Applications: Market Assessment and Potential R&D Pathways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13

    Significant energy savings can be achieved in commercial building operation, along with increased comfort and control for occupants, through the implementation of advanced technologies. This document provides a market assessment of existing building sensors and controls and presents a range of technology pathways (R&D options) for pursuing advanced sensors and building control strategies. This paper is actually a synthesis of five other white papers: the first describes the market assessment including estimates of market potential and energy savings for sensors and control strategies currently on the market as well as a discussion of market barriers to these technologies. The other four cover technology pathways: (1) current applications and strategies for new applications, (2) sensors and controls, (3) networking, security, and protocols and standards, and (4) automated diagnostics, performance monitoring, commissioning, optimal control and tools. Each technology pathway chapter gives an overview of the technology or application. This is followed by a discussion of needs and the current status of the technology. Finally, a series of research topics is proposed.

  10. Glycated albumin is the preferred marker for assessing glycaemic control in advanced chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vos, Frederiek E; Schollum, John B; Walker, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common aetiology of end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). Strict glycaemic control reduces the development and progression of diabetes-related complications, and there is evidence that improved metabolic control improves outcomes in diabetic subjects with advanced chronic kidney disease (CKD). Glycaemic control in people with kidney disease is complex. Changes in glucose and insulin homeostasis may occur as a consequence of loss of kidney function and dialysis. The reliability of measures of long-term glycaemic control is affected by CKD and the accuracy of glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) in the setting of CKD and ESKD is questioned. Despite the altered character of diabetes in CKD, current guidelines for diabetes management are not specifically adjusted to this patient group. The validity of indicators of longer term glycaemic control has been the focus of increased recent research. This review discusses the current understanding of commonly used indicators of metabolic control (HbA1c, fructosamine, glycated albumin) in the setting of advanced CKD (Stages 4 and 5, glomerular filtration rate <30 mL/min/1.73m(2)).

  11. Genetic relationships between swamp microenvironment and sulfur distribution of the Late Paleozoic coals in North China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤达祯; 杨起; 周春光; 康西栋; 刘大锰; 黄文辉

    2001-01-01

    The genetic relationships between microenvironment of the Late Paleozoic peat-forming swamp and the sulfur contents of coal in North China have been studied by using coal-facies parameters involving gelification degree, tissue preservation index, vegetation index, transportation index, groundwater influence index, water medium indicator and swamp type index, etc. Among the various controlling factors of swamp microenvironment, swamp water medium elaborates a dominant action to sulfur accumulation in the marine-influenced coals; while coal-forming plant type, hydrodynamic state and water covering depth are more important to sulfur accumulation in the fresh water-influenced coals. Geological fractionation of sulfur isotopes reflects that sulfur accumulation experienced multi-stages evolution. Pyrite sulfurs formed earlier than organic sulfur and the sulfur isotopic d 34Sp shows lower values than organic sulfur isotopic d 34So. In the brine-influenced coals, sulfur accumulation processed relatively a long time span, the distribution of sulfur isotopes dispersed,and the coals are provided with high sulfur contents. In the fresh-water-influenced coals, sulfur accumulation occurred mainly at the syngenetic-penesyngenetic stage and the early diagenetic stage, and the total sulfur is lower and mainly composed of organic sulfur.

  12. Recent Advances in Biological Control of Pest Insects by Using Viruses in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-lian SUN; Hui-yin PENG

    2007-01-01

    Insect viruses are attractive as biological control agents and could be a feasible alternative to chemical insecticides in the management of insect infestations. This review describes recent advances in the development of wild-type and genetically modified viruses as insecticides. A new strategy of application of insect viruses in China is reviewed. Also, the assessment of biosafety of genetically modified Helicoverpa armigera Nucleopolyhedovirus (HearNPV) is emphasized as a case-study.

  13. Analisis Kinerja Metode Power Control untuk Manajemen Interferensi Sistem Komunikasi Uplink LTE-Advanced dengan Femtocell

    OpenAIRE

    Safirina Febryanti; Gamantyo Hendrantoro; Devy Kuswidiastuti

    2013-01-01

    Teknologi LTE-Advanced menghadirkan fitur baru bernama femtocell atau disebut juga Home Enhanced NodeB (HeNB) yang dapat meningkatkan area cakupan indoor. Di lain sisi HeNB menimbulkan interferensi baik uplink maupun downlink. Interferensi uplink terjadi antara user HeNB (HUE) dan user eNB (MUE) maupun sesama HUE. Interferensi ini mendegradasi kinerja sistem terutama dari sisi Signal to Interference plus Noise Ratio (SINR). Penelitian ini memberi penjelasan mengenai penerapan power control se...

  14. Advanced combustion, emission control, health impacts, and fuels merit review and peer evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2006-10-01

    This report is a summary and analysis of comments from the Advisory Panel at the FY 2006 DOE National Laboratory Advanced Combustion, Emission Control, Health Impacts, and Fuels Merit Review and Peer Evaluation, held May 15-18, 2006 at Argonne National Laboratory. The work evaluated in this document supports the FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. The results of this merit review and peer evaluation are major inputs used by DOE in making its funding decisions for the upcoming fiscal year.

  15. Development of advanced NO sub x control concepts for coal-fired utility boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newhall, J.; England, G.; Seeker, W.R.

    1991-12-23

    Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EER) is currently conducting a test program to develop an advanced NO{sub x} control method utilizing reburning, promoted selective noncatalytic agent injection. The study will consist of fundamental and process testing over a large enough range of operating parameters to significantly reduce the risk of a full scale demonstration project. The test plan for the fundamental testing phase of the program is presented here.

  16. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Fourth quarterly progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  17. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 4, April--June 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor, Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuel performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal.

  18. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 8, April--June, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-08-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U. S. coal.

  19. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. First and second quarterly technical progress reports, [January--June 1995]. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia (NH{sub 3}) into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor containing a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW nameplate capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of this project.

  20. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Third quarterly technical progress report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur, coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high-sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida.

  1. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. Coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and European gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries, and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The demonstration is being performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing al aspects of this project. 1 ref., 69 figs., 45 tabs.

  2. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, first and second quarters 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involve injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in a boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to form nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. The project is being conducted in the following three phases: permitting, environmental monitoring plan and preliminary engineering; detailed design engineering and construction; and operation, testing, disposition and final report. The project was in the operation and testing phase during this reporting period. Accomplishments for this period are described.

  3. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, October 1993--December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-06-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels; (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}; and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties are being explored by operating a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal.

  4. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO[sub x]) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO[sub x] to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur, coal-fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO[sub 2] and SO[sub 3] and (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small- scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high-sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida.

  5. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Volume 1. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-10-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO.) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO. to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe on gas-, oil-, and low-sulfur coal- fired boilers, there are several technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to U.S. coals. These uncertainties include: 1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in U.S. coals that are not present in other fuels. 2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of- plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3}. 3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacturer under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties were explored by operating nine small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur U.S. coal. In addition, the test facility operating experience provided a basis for an economic study investigating the implementation of SCR technology.

  6. Sulfur Containing Scaffolds in Drugs: Synthesis and Application in Medicinal Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Minghao; Tang, Bingqing; Liang, Steven H; Jiang, Xuefeng

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the development of sulfur therapeutics is instrumental to the evolution of the pharmaceutical industry. Sulfur-derived functional groups can be found in a broad range of pharmaceuticals and natural products. For centuries, sulfur continues to maintain its status as the dominating heteroatom integrated into a set of 362 sulfur-containing FDA approved drugs (besides oxygen or nitrogen) through the present. Sulfonamides, thioethers, sulfones and Penicillin are the most common scaffolds in sulfur containing drugs, which are well studied both on synthesis and application during the past decades. In this review, these four moieties in pharmaceuticals and recent advances in the synthesis of the corresponding core scaffolds are presented.

  7. A Novel Percutaneous Electrode Implant for Improving Robustness in Advanced Myoelectric Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Janne M; Farina, Dario; Jiang, Ning; Liebetanz, David

    2016-01-01

    Despite several decades of research, electrically powered hand and arm prostheses are still controlled with very simple algorithms that process the surface electromyogram (EMG) of remnant muscles to achieve control of one prosthetic function at a time. More advanced machine learning methods have shown promising results under laboratory conditions. However, limited robustness has largely prevented the transfer of these laboratory advances to clinical applications. In this paper, we introduce a novel percutaneous EMG electrode to be implanted chronically with the aim of improving the reliability of EMG detection in myoelectric control. The proposed electrode requires a minimally invasive procedure for its implantation, similar to a cosmetic micro-dermal implant. Moreover, being percutaneous, it does not require power and data telemetry modules. Four of these electrodes were chronically implanted in the forearm of an able-bodied human volunteer for testing their characteristics. The implants showed significantly lower impedance and greater robustness against mechanical interference than traditional surface EMG electrodes used for myoelectric control. Moreover, the EMG signals detected by the proposed systems allowed more stable control performance across sessions in different days than that achieved with classic EMG electrodes. In conclusion, the proposed implants may be a promising interface for clinically available prostheses.

  8. A Novel Percutaneous Electrode Implant for Improving Robustness in Advanced Myoelectric Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janne M. Hahne

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite several decades of research, electrically powered hand and arm prostheses are still controlled with very simple algorithms that process the surface electromyogram (EMG of remnant muscles to achieve control of one prosthetic function at a time. More advanced machine learning methods have shown promising results under laboratory conditions. However, limited robustness has largely prevented the transfer of these laboratory advances to clinical applications. In this paper, we introduce a novel percutaneous EMG electrode to be implanted chronically with the aim of improving the reliability of EMG detection in myoelectric control. The proposed electrode requires a minimally invasive procedure for its implantation, similar to a cosmetic micro-dermal implant. Moreover, being percutaneous, it does not require power and data telemetry modules. Four of these electrodes were chronically implanted in the forearm of an able-bodied human volunteer for testing their characteristics. The implants showed significantly lower impedance and greater robustness against mechanical interference than traditional surface EMG electrodes used for myoelectric control. Moreover, the EMG signals detected by the proposed systems allowed more stable control performance across sessions in different days than that achieved with classic EMG electrodes. In conclusion, the proposed implants may be a promising interface for clinically available prostheses.

  9. Implementation and benefits of advanced process control for lithography CD and overlay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavyalova, Lena; Fu, Chong-Cheng; Seligman, Gary S.; Tapp, Perry A.; Pol, Victor

    2003-05-01

    Due to the rapidly reduced imaging process windows and increasingly stingent device overlay requirements, sub-130 nm lithography processes are more severely impacted than ever by systamic fault. Limits on critical dimensions (CD) and overlay capability further challenge the operational effectiveness of a mix-and-match environment using multiple lithography tools, as such mode additionally consumes the available error budgets. Therefore, a focus on advanced process control (APC) methodologies is key to gaining control in the lithographic modules for critical device levels, which in turn translates to accelerated yield learning, achieving time-to-market lead, and ultimately a higher return on investment. This paper describes the implementation and unique challenges of a closed-loop CD and overlay control solution in high voume manufacturing of leading edge devices. A particular emphasis has been placed on developing a flexible APC application capable of managing a wide range of control aspects such as process and tool drifts, single and multiple lot excursions, referential overlay control, 'special lot' handling, advanced model hierarchy, and automatic model seeding. Specific integration cases, including the multiple-reticle complementary phase shift lithography process, are discussed. A continuous improvement in the overlay and CD Cpk performance as well as the rework rate has been observed through the implementation of this system, and the results are studied.

  10. Advances in quality control for dioxins monitoring and evaluation of measurement uncertainty from quality control data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppe, Gauthier; De Pauw, Edwin

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes an application of multivariate and multilevel quality control charts with the aim of improving the internal quality control (IQC) procedures for the monitoring of dioxins and dioxin-like PCBs analysis in food. Dioxin analysts have to use the toxic equivalent concept (TEQ) to assess the toxicity potential of a mixture of dioxin-like compounds. The TEQ approach requires quantifying individually 29 dioxin-like compounds. Monitoring the congeners separately on univariate QC charts is misleading owing to the increase of false alarm rate. We propose to subdivide the TEQ value into 3 sub-groups and to control simultaneously the 3 variables in a T(2) chart. When a T(2) exceeds the upper control limit, it acts as a warning to trigger additional investigations on individual congeners. We discuss the minimum number of runs required to reliably estimate the QC chart parameters and we suggest using data from multilevel QC charts to properly characterize the standard deviations and the correlation coefficients. Moreover, the univariate QC chart can be sensitised to detect systematic errors by using exponentially weighted moving average (EWMA) technique. The EWMA chart provides an additional guidance on setting appropriate criteria to control the method bias and to support trend analysis. Finally, we present an estimate of measurement uncertainty by computing the accuracy profile in a retrospective way with the QC data generated and we discuss assessment of compliance with regulatory maximum levels.

  11. Advanced overlay: sampling and modeling for optimized run-to-run control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramany, Lokesh; Chung, WoongJae; Samudrala, Pavan; Gao, Haiyong; Aung, Nyan; Gomez, Juan Manuel; Gutjahr, Karsten; Park, DongSuk; Snow, Patrick; Garcia-Medina, Miguel; Yap, Lipkong; Demirer, Onur Nihat; Pierson, Bill; Robinson, John C.

    2016-03-01

    In recent years overlay (OVL) control schemes have become more complicated in order to meet the ever shrinking margins of advanced technology nodes. As a result, this brings up new challenges to be addressed for effective run-to- run OVL control. This work addresses two of these challenges by new advanced analysis techniques: (1) sampling optimization for run-to-run control and (2) bias-variance tradeoff in modeling. The first challenge in a high order OVL control strategy is to optimize the number of measurements and the locations on the wafer, so that the "sample plan" of measurements provides high quality information about the OVL signature on the wafer with acceptable metrology throughput. We solve this tradeoff between accuracy and throughput by using a smart sampling scheme which utilizes various design-based and data-based metrics to increase model accuracy and reduce model uncertainty while avoiding wafer to wafer and within wafer measurement noise caused by metrology, scanner or process. This sort of sampling scheme, combined with an advanced field by field extrapolated modeling algorithm helps to maximize model stability and minimize on product overlay (OPO). Second, the use of higher order overlay models means more degrees of freedom, which enables increased capability to correct for complicated overlay signatures, but also increases sensitivity to process or metrology induced noise. This is also known as the bias-variance trade-off. A high order model that minimizes the bias between the modeled and raw overlay signature on a single wafer will also have a higher variation from wafer to wafer or lot to lot, that is unless an advanced modeling approach is used. In this paper, we characterize the bias-variance trade off to find the optimal scheme. The sampling and modeling solutions proposed in this study are validated by advanced process control (APC) simulations to estimate run-to-run performance, lot-to-lot and wafer-to- wafer model term monitoring to

  12. Introduction to the special issue on Advances in intelligent nonlinear control for robotic systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chee Khiang PANG; Huajin TANG; Qing Wei JIA

    2010-01-01

    @@ In the last two decades, robotic systems have achieved wide applications in every aspect of human society, including industrial manufacturing, automotive production, medical devices, and social lives. With the diversity of application do-mains, control techniques have pervaded from industrial robot manipulators, wheeled or legged mobile robots, unmanned autonomous aerial, ground, and underwater vehicles, to humanoid robots, and haptic devices, etc. The growing number of applications of robotics and increasing requirements for system stability, reliability, and safety, are posing new and challenging theoretical and technological problems for modeling and control of these highly nonlinear systems. Control of these complex systems is highly challenging due to the inherent nonlinear response and strong heterogeneity in dif-ferent parts as computers, sensors, hardware objects, etc. As such, novel nonlinear control strategies are essential to the advancement of robotic systems and corresponding technologies.

  13. Advanced nitrogen removal by pulsed sequencing batch reactors (SBR) with real-time control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Qing; PENG Yongzhen; YANG Anming; GUO Jianhua; LI Jianfeng

    2007-01-01

    The feasibility of pH and oxidation reduction potential (ORP) as on-line control parameters to advance nitrogen removal in pulsed sequencing batch reactors (SBR)was evaluated.The pulsed SBR,a novel operational mode of SBR,was utilized to treat real municipal wastewater accompanied with adding ethanol as external carbon source.It was observed that the bending-point (apex and knee) of pH and ORP profiles can be used to control denitrification process at a low influent C/N ratio while dpH/dt can be used to control the nitrification and denitrification process at a high influent C/N ratio.The experimental results demonstrated that the effluent total nitrogen can be reduced to lower than 2 mg/L,and the average total nitrogen (TN) removal efficiency was higher than 98% by using real-time controll strategy.

  14. Analysis and synthesis of networked control systems: A survey of recent advances and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dan; Shi, Peng; Wang, Qing-Guo; Yu, Li

    2017-01-01

    A networked control system (NCS) is a control system which involves a communication network. In NCSs, the continuous-time measurement is usually sampled and quantized before transmission. Then, the measurement is transmitted to the remote controller via the communication channel, during which the signal may be delayed, lost or even sometimes not allowed for transmission due to the communication or energy constraints. In recent years, the modeling, analysis and synthesis of networked control systems (NCSs) have received great attention, which leads to a large number of publications. This paper attempts to present an overview of recent advances and unify them in a framework of network-induced issues such as signal sampling, data quantization, communication delay, packet dropouts, medium access constraints, channel fading and power constraint, and present respective solution approaches to each of these issues. We draw some conclusions and highlight future research directions in end.

  15. DEMONSTRATION OF AN ADVANCED INTEGRATED CONTROL SYSTEM FOR SIMULTANEOUS EMISSIONS REDUCTION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzanne Shea; Randhir Sehgal; Ilga Celmins; Andrew Maxson

    2002-02-01

    The primary objective of the project titled ''Demonstration of an Advanced Integrated Control System for Simultaneous Emissions Reduction'' was to demonstrate at proof-of-concept scale the use of an online software package, the ''Plant Environmental and Cost Optimization System'' (PECOS), to optimize the operation of coal-fired power plants by economically controlling all emissions simultaneously. It combines physical models, neural networks, and fuzzy logic control to provide both optimal least-cost boiler setpoints to the boiler operators in the control room, as well as optimal coal blending recommendations designed to reduce fuel costs and fuel-related derates. The goal of the project was to demonstrate that use of PECOS would enable coal-fired power plants to make more economic use of U.S. coals while reducing emissions.

  16. Aircraft exhaust sulfur emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, R.C.; Anderson, M.R.; Miake-Lye, R.C.; Kolb, C.E. [Aerodyne Research, Inc., Billerica, MA (United States). Center for Chemical and Environmental Physics; Sorokin, A.A.; Buriko, Y.I. [Scientific Research Center `Ecolen`, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The extent to which fuel sulfur is converted to SO{sub 3} during combustion and the subsequent turbine flow in supersonic and subsonic aircraft engines is estimated numerically. The analysis is based on: a flamelet model with non-equilibrium sulfur chemistry for the combustor, and a one-dimensional, two-stream model with finite rate chemical kinetics for the turbine. The results indicate that between 2% and 10% of the fuel sulfur is emitted as SO{sub 3}. It is also shown that, for a high fuel sulfur mass loading, conversion in the turbine is limited by the level of atomic oxygen at the combustor exit, leading to higher SO{sub 2} oxidation efficiency at lower fuel sulfur loadings. While SO{sub 2} and SO{sub 3} are the primary oxidation products, the model results further indicate H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} levels on the order of 0.1 ppm for supersonic expansions through a divergent nozzle. This source of fully oxidized S(6) (SO{sub 3} + H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) exceeds previously calculated S(6) levels due to oxidation of SO{sub 2} by OH in the exhaust plume outside the engine nozzle. (author) 26 refs.

  17. Improvement of environmental aspects of thermal power plant operation by advanced control concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulandrić Robert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, as formulated in the Kyoto Protocol, imposes the need for improving environmental aspects of existing thermal power plants operation. Improvements can be reached either by efficiency increment or by implementation of emission reduction measures. Investments in refurbishment of existing plant components or in plant upgrading by flue gas desulphurization, by primary and secondary measures of nitrogen oxides reduction, or by biomass co-firing, are usually accompanied by modernisation of thermal power plant instrumentation and control system including sensors, equipment diagnostics and advanced controls. Impact of advanced control solutions implementation depends on technical characteristics and status of existing instrumentation and control systems as well as on design characteristics and actual conditions of installed plant components. Evaluation of adequacy of implementation of advanced control concepts is especially important in Western Balkan region where thermal power plants portfolio is rather diversified in terms of size, type and commissioning year and where generally poor maintenance and lack of investments in power generation sector resulted in high greenhouse gases emissions and low efficiency of plants in operation. This paper is intended to present possibilities of implementation of advanced control concepts, and particularly those based on artificial intelligence, in selected thermal power plants in order to increase plant efficiency and to lower pollutants emissions and to comply with environmental quality standards prescribed in large combustion plant directive. [Acknowledgements. This paper has been created within WBalkICT - Supporting Common RTD actions in WBCs for developing Low Cost and Low Risk ICT based solutions for TPPs Energy Efficiency increasing, SEE-ERA.NET plus project in cooperation among partners from IPA SA - Romania, University of Zagreb - Croatia and Vinca

  18. Corrosion-resistant sulfur concretes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBee, W. C.; Sullivan, T. A.; Jong, B. W.

    1983-04-01

    Sulfur concretes have been developed by the Bureau of Mines as construction materials with physical and mechanical properties that suit them for use in acid and salt corrosive environments where conventional concretes fail. Mixture design methods were established for preparing sulfur concretes using different types of aggregates and recently developed mixed-modified sulfur cements. Bench-scale testing of the sulfur concretes has shown their potential value. Corrosion resistance, strength, and durability of sulfur concrete are superior to those of conventional materials. Field in situ evaluation tests of the sulfur concretes as replacement for conventional concrete materials are in progress in corrosive areas of 24 commercial chemical, fertilizer, and metallurgical plants.

  19. Advanced control techniques for post-buckled precompressed (PBP) flight control actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, M.; Van Schravendijk, M.; Barrett, R.; Vos, R.

    2009-01-01

    The dynamic response of a new class of flight control actuators that rely on post-buckled recompressed (PBP) piezoelectric elements is investigated. While past research has proven that PBP actuators are capable of generating deflections three times higher than conventional bimorph actuators, this pa

  20. Advanced concept for damage control : A framework to simulate fire propagation and damage control effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gillis, M.P.W.; Keijer, W.; Smit, C.S.

    2003-01-01

    Current damage control procedures are developed on the basis of a long-standing experience. However there are reasons to believe that these procedures do not account for major weapon-induced calamities. Fire fighting after substantial blast and fragmentation damage, due to a weaponhit, is quite beyo

  1. Advanced nonlinear control: Robustness and stability with applications to aircraft flight control systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frye, Michael Takaichi

    This dissertation examines the problem of global decentralized control by output feedback for large-scale uncertain nonlinear systems whose subsystems are interconnected not only by their outputs but also by their unmeasurable states. Several innovative techniques will be developed to create decentralized output feedback controllers rendering the closed-loop systems globally asymptotically stable. This is accomplished by extending an output feedback domination design that requires only limited information about the nonlinear system. We will apply our design to lower, upper, and non-triangular nonlinear systems. A time-varying output feedback controller is also constructed for use with large-scale systems that have unknown parameters. Furthermore, a mixed large-scale system consisting of both lower and upper triangular systems is shown to be stabilizable by employing a combined high and low gain domination technique. The significance of our results is that we do not need to have prior information about the nonlinearities of the system. In addition, a new design technique was developed using homogeneous system theory, which allows for the design of nonsmooth controllers and observers to stabilize a class of feedforward system with uncontrollable and unobservable linearization. An example of a large-scale system is a group of autonomous airships performing the function of a temporary mobile cell phone network. An airship mobile cell phone network is a novel solution to the problem of maintaining communication during the advent of extensive damage to the communication infrastructure; be it from a flood, earthquake, hurricane, or terrorist attack. A first principle force-based dynamic model for the Tri-Turbofan Airship was developed and will be discussed in detail. The mathematical model was based on actual flight test data that has been collected at the Gait Analysis and Innovative Technologies Laboratory. This model was developed to research autonomous airship

  2. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  3. Simplified and advanced modelling of traction control systems of heavy-haul locomotives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiryagin, Maksym; Wolfs, Peter; Szanto, Frank; Cole, Colin

    2015-05-01

    Improving tractive effort is a very complex task in locomotive design. It requires the development of not only mechanical systems but also power systems, traction machines and traction algorithms. At the initial design stage, traction algorithms can be verified by means of a simulation approach. A simple single wheelset simulation approach is not sufficient because all locomotive dynamics are not fully taken into consideration. Given that many traction control strategies exist, the best solution is to use more advanced approaches for such studies. This paper describes the modelling of a locomotive with a bogie traction control strategy based on a co-simulation approach in order to deliver more accurate results. The simplified and advanced modelling approaches of a locomotive electric power system are compared in this paper in order to answer a fundamental question. What level of modelling complexity is necessary for the investigation of the dynamic behaviours of a heavy-haul locomotive running under traction? The simulation results obtained provide some recommendations on simulation processes and the further implementation of advanced and simplified modelling approaches.

  4. Software control of the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope enclosure PLC hardware using COTS software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrowman, Alastair J.; de Bilbao, Lander; Ariño, Javier; Murga, Gaizka; Goodrich, Bret; Hubbard, John R.; Greer, Alan; Mayer, Chris; Taylor, Philip

    2012-09-01

    As PLCs evolve from simple logic controllers into more capable Programmable Automation Controllers (PACs), observatories are increasingly using such devices to control complex mechanisms1, 2. This paper describes use of COTS software to control such hardware using the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope (ATST) Common Services Framework (CSF). We present the Enclosure Control System (ECS) under development in Spain and the UK. The paper details selection of the commercial PLC communication library PLCIO. Implemented in C and delivered with source code, the library separates the programmer from communication details through a simple API. Capable of communicating with many types of PLCs (including Allen-Bradley and Siemens) the API remains the same irrespective of PLC in use. The ECS is implemented in Java using the observatory's framework that provides common services for software components. We present a design following a connection-based approach where all components access the PLC through a single connection class. The link between Java and PLCIO C library is provided by a thin Java Native Interface (JNI) layer. Also presented is a software simulator of the PLC based upon the PLCIO Virtual PLC. This creates a simulator operating below the library's API and thus requires no change to ECS software. It also provides enhanced software testing capabilities prior to hardware becoming available. Results are presented in the form of communication timing test data, showing that the use of CSF, JNI and PLCIO provide a control system capable of controlling enclosure tracking mechanisms, that would be equally valid for telescope mount control.

  5. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 3, January--March 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  6. Innovative clean coal technology (ICCT): Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NOx) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NOx to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  7. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of Nitrogen Oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Technical progress report, third and fourth quarters 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from U.S., Japanese, and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur U.S. coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  8. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  9. Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT): Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. Quarterly report No. 2, October--December 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-02-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide NO{sub x} control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the ammonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor.

  10. Interim results of the study of control room crew staffing for advanced passive reactor plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, B.P.; Sebok, A.; Haugset, K. [OECD Halden Reactor Project (Norway)

    1996-03-01

    Differences in the ways in which vendors expect the operations staff to interact with advanced passive plants by vendors have led to a need for reconsideration of the minimum shift staffing requirements of licensed Reactor Operators and Senior Reactor Operators contained in current federal regulations (i.e., 10 CFR 50.54(m)). A research project is being carried out to evaluate the impact(s) of advanced passive plant design and staffing of control room crews on operator and team performance. The purpose of the project is to contribute to the understanding of potential safety issues and provide data to support the development of design review guidance. Two factors are being evaluated across a range of plant operating conditions: control room crew staffing; and characteristics of the operating facility itself, whether it employs conventional or advanced, passive features. This paper presents the results of the first phase of the study conducted at the Loviisa nuclear power station earlier this year. Loviisa served as the conventional plant in this study. Data collection from four crews were collected from a series of design basis scenarios, each crew serving in either a normal or minimum staffing configuration. Results of data analyses show that crews participating in the minimum shift staffing configuration experienced significantly higher workload, had lower situation awareness, demonstrated significantly less effective team performance, and performed more poorly as a crew than the crews participating in the normal shift staffing configuration. The baseline data on crew configurations from the conventional plant setting will be compared with similar data to be collected from the advanced plant setting, and a report prepared providing the results of the entire study.

  11. Mass-dependent sulfur isotope fractionation during reoxidative sulfur cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pellerin, André; Bui, Thi Hao; Rough, Mikaella

    2015-01-01

    of Mangrove Lake appears to include sulfide oxidation to elemental sulfur followed by the disproportionation of the elemental sulfur to sulfate and sulfide. This model also indicates that the reoxidative sulfur cycle of Mangrove Lake turns over from 50 to 80% of the sulfide produced by microbial sulfate...... that the two processes cannot be discriminated from each other....

  12. The Application of Advancements in Computer Technology to the Control and Safety System of CANDU Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, P. S. W. [AECL CANDU/Sheridan Park Research Community, Ontario (Canada)

    1992-04-15

    The present spatial control algorithm in CANDU reactors is based on flux synthesis from a set of parti-coloured harmonic flux modes. The design of the Rop system is also based on parti-coloured flux shapes, including both normal and abnormal reactor operating conditions. The dependency of the control and safety systems on parti-coloured data was necessitated by the slow CPU and by the scarcity of Ram which were available to the computer systems in the early seventies. Recent advancements in high speed microprocessors and high capacity Ram chips enable the development of the Pmfp computer code, which calculates reactor power distribution on-line, using diffusion theory and in-core self-powered flux detector readings as internal boundary conditions. The Pmfp based control and safety systems do not depend on parti-coloured flux shapes or preconceived reactor operating conditions.

  13. Advanced Transport Operating System (ATOPS) Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) software description

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolverton, David A.; Dickson, Richard W.; Clinedinst, Winston C.; Slominski, Christopher J.

    1993-01-01

    The flight software developed for the Flight Management/Flight Controls (FM/FC) MicroVAX computer used on the Transport Systems Research Vehicle for Advanced Transport Operating Systems (ATOPS) research is described. The FM/FC software computes navigation position estimates, guidance commands, and those commands issued to the control surfaces to direct the aircraft in flight. Various modes of flight are provided for, ranging from computer assisted manual modes to fully automatic modes including automatic landing. A high-level system overview as well as a description of each software module comprising the system is provided. Digital systems diagrams are included for each major flight control component and selected flight management functions.

  14. Euler Technology Assessment - SPLITFLOW Code Applications for Stability and Control Analysis on an Advanced Fighter Model Employing Innovative Control Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Keith J.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents results from the NASA-Langley sponsored Euler Technology Assessment Study conducted by Lockheed-Martin Tactical Aircraft Systems (LMTAS). The purpose of the study was to evaluate the ability of the SPLITFLOW code using viscous and inviscid flow models to predict aerodynamic stability and control of an advanced fighter model. The inviscid flow model was found to perform well at incidence angles below approximately 15 deg, but not as well at higher angles of attack. The results using a turbulent, viscous flow model matched the trends of the wind tunnel data, but did not show significant improvement over the Euler solutions. Overall, the predictions were found to be useful for stability and control design purposes.

  15. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to recover sulfur compounds from lunar soil using sorbents derived primarily from in-situ resources....

  16. Lunar Sulfur Capture System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Lunar Sulfur Capture System (LSCS) is an innovative method to capture greater than 90 percent of sulfur gases evolved during thermal treatment of lunar soils....

  17. Advanced Emergency Braking Controller Design for Pedestrian Protection Oriented Automotive Collision Avoidance System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo Lie

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Automotive collision avoidance system, which aims to enhance the active safety of the vehicle, has become a hot research topic in recent years. However, most of the current systems ignore the active protection of pedestrian and other vulnerable groups in the transportation system. An advanced emergency braking control system is studied by taking into account the pedestrians and the vehicles. Three typical braking scenarios are defined and the safety situations are assessed by comparing the current distance between the host vehicle and the obstacle with the critical braking distance. To reflect the nonlinear time-varying characteristics and control effect of the longitudinal dynamics, the vehicle longitudinal dynamics model is established in CarSim. Then the braking controller with the structure of upper and lower layers is designed based on sliding mode control and the single neuron PID control when confronting deceleration or emergency braking conditions. Cosimulations utilizing CarSim and Simulink are finally carried out on a CarSim intelligent vehicle model to explore the effectiveness of the proposed controller. Results display that the designed controller has a good response in preventing colliding with the front vehicle or pedestrian.

  18. Quality Control Methodologies for Advanced EMI Sensor Data Acquisition and Anomaly Classification - Former Southwestern Proving Ground, Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    DEMONSTRATION REPORT Quality Control Methodologies for Advanced EMI Sensor Data Acquisition and Anomaly Classification – Former Southwestern...concentrations. A total of 11.23 acres of dynamic surveys were conducted using MetalMapper advanced electromagnetic induction ( EMI ) sensor. A total of...Order Navigation Points ................................................................................13 5.2.3 Initial EMI Survey

  19. Zeolites Remove Sulfur From Fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voecks, Gerald E.; Sharma, Pramod K.

    1991-01-01

    Zeolites remove substantial amounts of sulfur compounds from diesel fuel under relatively mild conditions - atmospheric pressure below 300 degrees C. Extracts up to 60 percent of sulfur content of high-sulfur fuel. Applicable to petroleum refineries, natural-gas processors, electric powerplants, and chemical-processing plants. Method simpler and uses considerably lower pressure than current industrial method, hydro-desulfurization. Yields cleaner emissions from combustion of petroleum fuels, and protects catalysts from poisoning by sulfur.

  20. Effect of pravastatin on survival in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma. A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, S; Yamasaki, E; Nagase, T; Inui, Y; Ito, N; Matsuda, Y; Inada, M; Tamura, S; Noda, S; Imai, Y; Matsuzawa, Y

    2001-04-06

    Chemotherapy is not effective for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HMG-CoA redutase inhibitors have cytostatic activity for cancer cells, but their clinical usefulness is unknown. To investigate whether pravastatin, a potent HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor, prolongs survival in patients with advanced HCC, this randomized controlled trial was conducted between February 1990 and February 1998 at Osaka University Hospital. 91 consecutive patients <71 years old (mean age 62) with unresectable HCC were enroled in this study. 8 patients were withdrawn because of progressive liver dysfunction; 83 patients were randomized to standard treatment with or without pravastatin. All patients underwent transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) followed by oral 5-FU 200 mg(-1)d for 2 months. Patients were then randomly assigned to control (n = 42) and pravastatin (n = 41) groups. Pravastatin was administered at a daily dose of 40 mg. The effect of pravastatin on tumour growth was assessed by ultrasonography. Primary endpoint was death due to progression of HCC. The duration of pravastatin administration was 16.5 +/- 9.8 months (mean +/- SD). No patients in either group were lost to follow-up. Median survival was 18 months in the pravastatin group versus 9 months in controls (P = 0.006). The Cox proportional hazards model showed that pravastatin was a significant factor contributing to survival. Pravastatin prolonged the survival of patients with advanced HCC, suggesting its value for adjuvant treatment.

  1. Expanding Robust HCCI Operation with Advanced Valve and Fuel Control Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szybist, J. P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Confer, K. [Delphi Automotive Systems (United States)

    2012-09-11

    Delphi Automotive Systems and ORNL established this CRADA to advance the commercialization potential of the homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) advanced combustion strategy for gasoline engine platforms. HCCI combustion has been shown by others to produce high diesel-like efficiency on a gasoline engine platform while simultaneously producing low NOX and particulate matter emissions. However, the commercialization barriers that face HCCI combustion are significant, with requirements for a more active engine control system, likely with next-cycle closed-loop feedback control, and with advanced valve train technologies to enable negative valve overlap conditions. In the partnership between Delphi and ORNL, each organization brought a unique and complementary set of skills to the project. Delphi has made a number of breakthroughs with production-intent valve train technologies and controls in recent years to make a part time production-intent HCCI engine plausible. ORNL has extensive knowledge and expertise with HCCI combustion, and also has a versatile research engine with hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) that is useful for guiding production of a cam-based HCCI system. Partnering these knowledge bases and capabilities was essential towards making progress to better understand HCCI combustion and the commercialization barriers that it faces. ORNL and Delphi maintained strong collaboration throughout the project. Meetings were held regularly, with additional reports, presentations, and meetings as necessary to maintain progress. Delphi provided guidance to ORNL regarding operational strategies to investigate on their single-cylinder research engine with HVA and data from their experimental multi-cylinder engine for modeling. ORNL provided single-cylinder engine data and modeling results.

  2. System and method to control h2o2 level in advanced oxidation processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bio-electrochemical system (BES) and a method of in-situ production and removal of H2O2 using such a bio-electrochemical system (BES). Further, the invention relates to a method for in-situ control of H2O2 content in an aqueous system of advanced oxidation...... processes (AOPs) involving in-situ generation of hydroxyl radical (OH) by using such a bio-electrochemical system (BES) and to a method for treatment of wastewater and water disinfection. The bio-electrochemical system (BES) according to the invention comprises: - an aqueous cathode compartment comprising...

  3. Recombinant factor VIIa for variceal bleeding in patients with advanced cirrhosis: A randomized, controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bosch, Jaime; Thabut, Dominique; Albillos, Agustín;

    2008-01-01

    A beneficial effect of recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in Child-Pugh class B and C patients with cirrhosis who have variceal bleeding has been suggested. This randomized controlled trial assessed the efficacy and safety of rFVIIa in patients with advanced cirrhosis and active variceal...... events, were comparable between groups. CONCLUSION: Treatment with rFVIIa had no significant effect on the primary composite endpoint compared with placebo. Therefore, decision on the use of this hemostatic agent in acute variceal bleeding should be carefully considered, because results of this study do...

  4. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE PREPARATION OF MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED POLYMERS VIA CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION TECHNIQUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technique is a simple and efficient method for the preparation of polymer materials (i.e., molecularly imprinted polymers, MIPs) with tailor-made recognition sites for certain target molecules. The resulting MIPs have proven to be versatile synthetic receptors due to their high specific recognition ability, favorable mechanical, thermal and chemical stability, and ease of preparation. Recent years have witnessed significant progress in the synthesis and applications of MIPs. This review focus on the recent developments and advances in the preparation of MIPs via various controlled radical polymerization techniques.

  5. RECENT ADVANCES IN THE PREPARATION OF MOLECULARLY IMPRINTED POLYMERS VIA CONTROLLED RADICAL POLYMERIZATION TECHNIQUES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ying; ZHANG Huiqi

    2008-01-01

    Molecular imprinting technique is a simple and efficient method for the preparation of polymer materials (i.e., molecularly imprinted polymers, MIPs) with tailor-made recognition sites for certain target molecules.The resulting MIPs have proven to be versatile synthetic receptors due to their high specific recognition ability, favorable mechanical, thermal and chemical stability, and ease of preparation.Recent years have witnessed signifwant progress in the synthesis and applications of MIPs.This review focus on the recent developments and advances in the preparation of MIPs via various controlled radical polymerization techniques.

  6. An advanced plasma control system for the DIII-D tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferron, J.R.; Kellman, A.; McKee, E.; Osborne, T.; Petrach, P.; Taylor, T.S.; Wight, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Lazarus, E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1991-11-01

    An advanced plasma control system is being implemented for the DIII-D tokamak utilizing digital technology. This system will regulate the position and shape of tokamak discharges that range from elongated limiter to single-null divertor and double-null divertor with elongation as high as 2.6. Development of this system is expected to lead to control system technology appropriate for use on future tokamaks such as ITER and BPX. The digital system will allow for increased precision in shape control through real time adjustment of the control algorithm to changes in the shape and discharge parameters such as {beta}{sub p}, {ell}{sub i} and scrape-off layer current. The system will be used for research on real time optimization of discharge performance for disruption avoidance, current and pressure profile control, optimization of rf antenna loading, or feedback on heat deposition patterns through divertor strike point position control, for example. Shape control with this system is based on linearization near a target shape of the controlled parameters as a function of the magnetic diagnostic signals. This digital system is unique in that it is designed to have the speed necessary to control the unstable vertical motion of highly elongated tokamak discharges such as those produced in DIII-D and planned for BPX and ITER. a 40 MHz Intel i860 processor is interfaced to up to 112 channels of analog input signals. The commands to the poloidal field coils can be updated at 80 {mu}s intervals for the control of vertical position with a delay between sampling of the analog signal and update of the command of less than 80 {mu}s.

  7. Standards and the design of the Advanced Photon Source control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, W. P.; Knott, M. J.; Lenkszus, F. R.; Kraimer, M. R.; Daly, R. T.; Arnold, N. D.; Anderson, M. D.; Anderson, J. B.; Zieman, R. C.; Cha, Ben-Chin K.

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), now under construction at Argonne National Laboratory is a 7 GeV positron storage ring dedicated to research facilities using synchrotron radiation. This ring, along with its injection accelerators is to be controlled and monitored with a single, flexible, and expandable control system. In the conceptual stage the control system design group faced the challenges that face all control system designers: to force the machine designers to quantify and codify the system requirements, to protect the investment in hardware and software from rapid obsolescence, and to find methods of quickly incorporating new generations of equipment and replace of obsolete equipment without disrupting the exiting system. To solve these and related problems, the APS control system group made an early resolution to use standards in the design of the system. This paper will cover the present status of the APS control system as well as discuss the design decisions which led us to use industrial standards and collaborations with other laboratories whenever possible to develop a control system. It will explain the APS control system and illustrate how the use of standards has allowed APS to design a control system whose implementation addresses these issues. The system will use high performance graphic workstations using an X-Windows Graphical User Interface at the operator interface level. It connects to VME-based microprocessors at the field level using TCP/IP protocols over high performance networks. This strategy assures the flexibility and expansibility of the control system. A defined interface between the system components will allow the system to evolve with the direct addition of future, improved equipment and new capabilities.

  8. Advanced Control of Permanent Magnet Synchronous Generators for Variable Speed Wind Energy Conversion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostettler, Jacob

    Various environmental and economic factors have lead to increased global investment in alternative energy technologies such as solar and wind power. Although methodologies for synchronous generator control are well researched, wind turbines present control systems challenges not presented by traditional generation. The varying nature of wind makes achieving synchronism with the existing electrical power grid a greater challenge. Departing from early use of induction machines, permanent magnet synchronous generators have become the focus of power systems and control systems research into wind energy systems. This is due to their self excited nature, along with their high power density. The problem of grid synchronism is alleviated through the use of high performance power electronic converters. In achievement of the optimal levels of efficiency, advanced control systems techniques oer promise over more traditional approaches. Research into sliding mode control, and linear matrix inequalities with nite time boundedness and Hinfinity performance criteria, when applied to the dynamical models of the system, demonstrate the potential of these control methodologies as future avenues for achieving higher levels of performance and eciency in wind energy.

  9. Association between obesity and local control of advanced rectal cancer after combined surgery and radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Yun Seon; Park, Sung Kwang; Cho, Heung Lae; Ahn, Ki Jung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun Han [Dept. of Molecular Medicine, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The association between metabolism and cancer has been recently emphasized. This study aimed to find the prognostic significance of obesity in advanced stage rectal cancer patients treated with surgery and radiotherapy (RT). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 111 patients who were treated with combined surgery and RT for clinical stage 2–3 (T3 or N+) rectal cancer between 2008 and 2014. The prognostic significance of obesity (body mass index [BMI] ≥25 kg/m{sup 2}) in local control was evaluated. The median follow-up was 31.2 months (range, 4.1 to 85.7 months). Twenty-five patients (22.5%) were classified as obese. Treatment failure occurred in 33 patients (29.7%), including local failures in 13 patients (11.7%), regional lymph node failures in 5, and distant metastases in 24. The 3-year local control, recurrence-free survival, and overall survival rates were 88.7%, 73.6%, and 87.7%, respectively. Obesity (n = 25) significantly reduced the local control rate (p = 0.045; 3-year local control, 76.2%), especially in women (n = 37, p = 0.021). Segregation of local control was best achieved by BMI of 25.6 kg/m{sup 2} as a cutoff value. Obese rectal cancer patients showed poor local control after combined surgery and RT. More effective local treatment strategies for obese patients are warranted.

  10. Advanced gate CDU control in sub-28nm node using poly slot process by scatterometry metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzai, Wei-Jhe; Chen, Howard; Lin, Jun-Jin; Huang, Yu-Hao; Yu, Chun-Chi; Lin, Ching-Hung Bert; Yoo, Sungchul; Huang, Chien-Jen Eros; Mihardja, Lanny

    2013-04-01

    Scatterometry-based metrology is a well proven method to measure and monitor the critical dimensions of interest in advanced sub-28nm process development and high volume manufacturing [1][3][4][6][7]. In this paper, a proposed solution to control and achieve the optimal gate critical dimension uniformity (CDU) was explored. The proposed solution is named a novel scatterometry slot gate CDU control flow. High performance measurement and control during the slot gate step is critical as it directly controls the poly line cut profile to the active area which then directly impacts the final device performance. The proposed flow incorporates scatterometry-based CD (SCD) measurement feedback and feed forward to the Automation Process Control (APC) system, further process recipe fine tuning utilizing the data feedback and forward, and two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) scatterometry-based CD (SCD) measurement of gate after developer inspection (ADI) and after etch inspection (AEI) [1]. The methodologies and experiment results presented in this study started from the process development through the SCD model optimization of the DOE wafers, to the final implementation of the process control flow and measurement loop into the production line to evaluate its capability for long term in-line monitoring in high volume manufacturing environment. The result showed significant improvement in the gate CD uniformity that met the sub-28nm process manufacturing requirement.

  11. Aeroelastic Modelling and Comparison of Advanced Active Flap Control Concepts for Load Reduction on the Upwind 5MW Wind Turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barlas, A.; Van Kuik, G.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A newly developed comprehensive aeroelastic model is used to investigate active flap concepts on the Upwind 5MW reference wind turbine. The model is specially designed to facilitate distributed control concepts and advanced controller design. Different concepts of centralized and distributed control

  12. Aeroelastic modelling and comparison of advanced active flap control concepts for load reduction on the Upwind 5MW wind turbine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barlas, A.; van Kuik, G.A.M.

    2009-01-01

    A newly developed comprehensive aeroelastic model is used to investigate active flap concepts on the Upwind 5MW reference wind turbine. The model is specially designed to facilitate distributed control concepts and advanced controller design. Different concepts of centralized and distributed control

  13. Implementation of advanced feedback control algorithms for controlled resonant magnetic perturbation physics studies on EXTRAP T2R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassinetti, L.; Olofsson, K. E. J.; Brunsell, P. R.; Drake, J. R.

    2011-06-01

    The EXTRAP T2R feedback system (active coils, sensor coils and controller) is used to study and develop new tools for advanced control of the MHD instabilities in fusion plasmas. New feedback algorithms developed in EXTRAP T2R reversed-field pinch allow flexible and independent control of each magnetic harmonic. Methods developed in control theory and applied to EXTRAP T2R allow a closed-loop identification of the machine plant and of the resistive wall modes growth rates. The plant identification is the starting point for the development of output-tracking algorithms which enable the generation of external magnetic perturbations. These algorithms will then be used to study the effect of a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) on the tearing mode (TM) dynamics. It will be shown that the stationary RMP can induce oscillations in the amplitude and jumps in the phase of the rotating TM. It will be shown that the RMP strongly affects the magnetic island position.

  14. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Technical Program Plan for 2014

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-07-01

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals: (1) to ensure that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and (2) to implement digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II&C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security.

  15. Final Report - ADVANCED LASER-BASED SENSORS FOR INDUSTRIAL PROCESS CONTROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Manish; Baer, Douglas

    2013-09-30

    The objective of this work is to capture the potential of real-time monitoring and overcome the challenges of harsh industrial environments, Los Gatos Research (LGR) is fabricating, deploying, and commercializing advanced laser-based gas sensors for process control monitoring in industrial furnaces (e.g. electric arc furnaces). These sensors can achieve improvements in process control, leading to enhanced productivity, improved product quality, and reduced energy consumption and emissions. The first sensor will utilize both mid-infrared and near-infrared lasers to make rapid in-situ measurements of industrial gases and associated temperatures in the furnace off-gas. The second sensor will make extractive measurements of process gases. During the course of this DOE project, Los Gatos Research (LGR) fabricated, tested, and deployed both in-situ tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry (TDLAS) analyzers and extractive Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (Off-Axis ICOS) analyzers.

  16. A closed-loop photon beam control study for the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Portmann, G.; Bengtsson, J.

    1993-05-01

    The third generation Advanced Light Source (ALS) will produce extremely bright photon beams using undulators and wigglers. In order to position the photon beams accurate to the micron level, a closed-loop feedback system is being developed. Using photon position monitors and dipole corrector magnets, a closed-loop system can automatically compensate for modeling uncertainties and exogenous disturbances. The following paper will present a dynamics model for the perturbations of the closed orbit of the electron beam in the ALS storage ring including the vacuum chamber magnetic field penetration effects. Using this reference model, two closed-loop feedback algorithms will be compared -- a classical PI controller and a two degree-of-freedom approach. The two degree-of-freedom method provides superior disturbance rejection while maintaining the desired performance goals. Both methods will address the need to gain schedule the controller due to the time varying dynamics introduced by changing field strengths when scanning the insertion devices.

  17. Technology Reinvestment Program/Advanced ``Zero Emission'' Control Valve (Phase II)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Napoleon

    1998-12-01

    The objectives of this effort are to determine, develop and demonstrate the feasibility of significantly reducing the cost and expanding the applications for a family of Advanced Zero Emissions Control Valves that meets the fugitive emissions requirements of the 1990 Amendments to the Clean Air Act. This program is a direct technology spin-off from the valve technology that is critical to the US Navy's Nuclear Powered Fleet. These zero emissions valves will allow the Hydrocarbon and Chemical Processing Industries, etc., to maintain their competitiveness and still meet environmental and safety requirements. Phase 2 is directed at refining the basic technologies developed during Phase 1 so that they can be more readily selected and utilized by the target market. In addition to various necessary certifications, the project will develop a full featured digital controller with ``smart valve'' growth capability, expanding valve sizes/applications and identifying valve materials to permit applications in severe operational environments.

  18. High-resolution quadruple sulfur isotope analyses of 3.2 Ga pyrite from the Barberton Greenstone Belt in South Africa reveal distinct environmental controls on sulfide isotopic arrays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roerdink, D.L.; Mason, P.R.D.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Reimer, T.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sulfur isotopes in Paleoarchean pyrite record valuable information on atmospheric processes and emerging microbial activity in the early sulfur cycle. Here, we report quadruple sulfur isotope data (32S, 33S, 34S, 36S) analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry from pyrite in a 3.26–3.23 Ga

  19. Development of the Hybrid Sulfur Thermochemical Cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Summers, William A.; Steimke, John L

    2005-09-23

    The production of hydrogen via the thermochemical splitting of water is being considered as a primary means for utilizing the heat from advanced nuclear reactors to provide fuel for a hydrogen economy. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process is one of the baseline candidates identified by the U.S. Department of Energy [1] for this purpose. The HyS Process is a two-step hybrid thermochemical cycle that only involves sulfur, oxygen and hydrogen compounds. Recent work has resulted in an improved process design with a calculated overall thermal efficiency (nuclear heat to hydrogen, higher heating value basis) approaching 50%. Economic analyses indicate that a nuclear hydrogen plant employing the HyS Process in conjunction with an advanced gas-cooled nuclear reactor system can produce hydrogen at competitive prices. Experimental work has begun on the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer, the major developmental component in the cycle. Proof-of-concept tests have established proton-exchange-membrane cells (a state-of-the-art technology) as a viable approach for conducting this reaction. This is expected to lead to more efficient and economical cell designs than were previously available. Considerable development and scale-up issues remain to be resolved, but the development of a viable commercial-scale HyS Process should be feasible in time to meet the commercialization schedule for Generation IV gas-cooled nuclear reactors.

  20. Failure to Modulate Attentional Control in Advanced Aging Linked to White Matter Pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Koene R. A.; Shire, Emily H.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Buckner, Randy L.

    2012-01-01

    Advanced aging is associated with reduced attentional control and less flexible information processing. Here, the origins of these cognitive effects were explored using a functional magnetic resonance imaging task that systematically varied demands to shift attention and inhibit irrelevant information across task blocks. Prefrontal and parietal regions previously implicated in attentional control were recruited by the task and most so for the most demanding task configurations. A subset of older individuals did not modulate activity in frontal and parietal regions in response to changing task requirements. Older adults who did not dynamically modulate activity underperformed their peers and scored more poorly on neuropsychological measures of executive function and speed of processing. Examining 2 markers of preclinical pathology in older adults revealed that white matter hyperintensities (WMHs), but not high amyloid burden, were associated with failure to modulate activity in response to changing task demands. In contrast, high amyloid burden was associated with alterations in default network activity. These results suggest failure to modulate frontal and parietal activity reflects a disruptive process in advanced aging associated with specific neuropathologic processes. PMID:21765181

  1. Variable Torque Control of Offshore Wind Turbine on Spar Floating Platform Using Advanced RBF Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Offshore floating wind turbine (OFWT has been a challenging research spot because of the high-quality wind power and complex load environment. This paper focuses on the research of variable torque control of offshore wind turbine on Spar floating platform. The control objective in below-rated wind speed region is to optimize the output power by tracking the optimal tip-speed ratio and ideal power curve. Aiming at the external disturbances and nonlinear uncertain dynamic systems of OFWT because of the proximity to load centers and strong wave coupling, this paper proposes an advanced radial basis function (RBF neural network approach for torque control of OFWT system at speeds lower than rated wind speed. The robust RBF neural network weight adaptive rules are acquired based on the Lyapunov stability analysis. The proposed control approach is tested and compared with the NREL baseline controller using the “NREL offshore 5 MW wind turbine” model mounted on a Spar floating platform run on FAST and Matlab/Simulink, operating in the below-rated wind speed condition. The simulation results show a better performance in tracking the optimal output power curve, therefore, completing the maximum wind energy utilization.

  2. Advanced Grid-Friendly Controls Demonstration Project for Utility-Scale PV Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgian, Vahan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); O' Neill, Barbara [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-01-21

    A typical photovoltaic (PV) power plant consists of multiple power electronic inverters and can contribute to grid stability and reliability through sophisticated 'grid-friendly' controls. The availability and dissemination of actual test data showing the viability of advanced utility-scale PV controls among all industry stakeholders can leverage PV's value from being simply an energy resource to providing additional ancillary services that range from variability smoothing and frequency regulation to power quality. Strategically partnering with a selected utility and/or PV power plant operator is a key condition for a successful demonstration project. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Solar Energy Technologies Office selected the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to be a principal investigator in a two-year project with goals to (1) identify a potential partner(s), (2) develop a detailed scope of work and test plan for a field project to demonstrate the gird-friendly capabilities of utility-scale PV power plants, (3) facilitate conducting actual demonstration tests, and (4) disseminate test results among industry stakeholders via a joint NREL/DOE publication and participation in relevant technical conferences. The project implementation took place in FY 2014 and FY 2015. In FY14, NREL established collaborations with AES and First Solar Electric, LLC, to conduct demonstration testing on their utility-scale PV power plants in Puerto Rico and Texas, respectively, and developed test plans for each partner. Both Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas expressed interest in this project because of the importance of such advanced controls for the reliable operation of their power systems under high penetration levels of variable renewable generation. During FY15, testing was completed on both plants, and a large amount of test data was produced and analyzed that demonstrates the ability of

  3. Design and advanced control of switched reluctance motor; Design og avanceret styring af switched reluctance motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blaabjerg, F.; Jensen, F.; Kierkegaard, P.; Pedersen, J.K.; Rasmussen, P.O.; Simonsen, L.

    1999-03-01

    The aim of the project is to design, construct and optimise the control of Switched Reluctance Motors with and without permanent magnets. The expectation was an increased efficiency and a decreased material consumption. The project included originally three types of SR-motors, two with a nominal number of revolutions of 3.000 rpm and one motor with a nominal number of revolutions of 50.000 rpm. The project was changed to focus on one motor with a nominal number of revolutions of 6.000 rpm, one with a nominal number of revolutions of 50.000 rpm and one two-phased low-voltage motor with a nominal number of revolutions of 2.000 rpm. The motors had different outputs of 2,7 kW, 0,9 kW and 3 kW, respectively. For this purpose an advanced simulation programme for Switched Reluctance Motors is developed. The programme differs from other programmes by being able to simulate multi-disciplinary such as vibrations and acoustic noise. It is even possible to play the sound. In this connection completely new models are developed. It is also possible to simulate different grid connected converters. Input to the simulation programme is finite element calculations, geometry of the motor and calculations or data from an advanced characterisation system for Switched Reluctance Motors. New methods to control the current in Switched Reluctance Motors are developed, which particularly make quick dynamics possible in a digitally controlled current without use of special noise filters. The method will soon have industrial use. Other new methods have emerged, which secure that the system all the time works with the maximum efficiency irrespective of load. In some cases an efficiency improvement of 10 % is obtained compared to a classic control of the Switched Reluctance Motor. (EHS) EFP-94; EFP-95; EFP-98. 16 refs.

  4. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO sub x ) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the amonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO, and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company's Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project will be funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), and the Electric Power Research Institute.

  5. Demonstration of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology for the control of nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from high-sulfur coal-fired boilers: Innovative Clean Coal Technology (ICCT). Quarterly report No. 7, January--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-05-01

    The objective of this project is to demonstrate and evaluate commercially available Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) catalysts from US, Japanese and European catalyst suppliers on a high-sulfur US coal-fired boiler. SCR is a post-combustion nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) control technology that involves injecting ammonia into the flue gas generated from coal combustion in an electric utility boiler. The flue gas containing ammonia is then passed through a reactor that contains a specialized catalyst. In the presence of the catalyst, the amonia reacts with NO{sub x} to convert it to nitrogen and water vapor. Although SCR is widely practiced in Japan and Europe, there are numerous technical uncertainties associated with applying SCR to US coals. These uncertainties include: (1) potential catalyst deactivation due to poisoning by trace metal species present in US coals that are not present in other fuels. (2) performance of the technology and effects on the balance-of-plant equipment in the presence of high amounts of SO, and SO{sub 3}. (3) performance of a wide variety of SCR catalyst compositions, geometries and methods of manufacture under typical high-sulfur coal-fired utility operating conditions. These uncertainties will be explored by constructing a series of small-scale SCR reactors and simultaneously exposing different SCR catalysts to flue gas derived from the combustion of high sulfur US coal. The demonstration will be performed at Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit No. 5 (75 MW capacity) near Pensacola, Florida. The project will be funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS on behalf of the entire Southern electric system), and the Electric Power Research Institute.

  6. Demonstration of selective catalytic reduction technology for the control of nitrogen oxide emissions from high-sulfur, coal-fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinton, W.S.; Powell, C.A.; Maxwell, J.D.

    1993-11-01

    This paper describes the status of the Innovative Clean Coal Technology project to demonstrate SCR technology for reduction of NO{sub x} emissions from flue gas of utility boilers burning US high-sulfur coal. The funding participants are the US Department of Energy (DOE), Southern Company Services, Inc. (SCS), on behalf of the entire Southern Company, Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and Ontario Hydro. SCS is the participant responsible for managing all aspects of the project. The project is being conducted on Gulf Power Company`s Plant Crist Unit 5 (75-MW nominal capacity), located near Pensacola, Florida, on US coals that have a sulfur content near 3.0%. The SCR facility treats a 17,400 scfm slip-stream of flue gas and consists of three 2.5-MW (5000 scfm) and six 0.2-MW (400 scfm) SCR reactors. The reactors operate in parallel with commercially available SCR catalysts obtained from vendors throughout the world. The design engineering and construction have been completed, and the startup/shakedown was completed in June 1993. Long-term performance testing began in July 1993 and will be conducted for two years. Test facility description and test plans, as well as start-up issues and preliminary commissioning test results are reported in this paper.

  7. Oxidation of Elemental Sulfur in Selected Soils of China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    An incubation experiment was carried out in laboratory to study the effect of temperature, moisture,phosphorus, organic matter, cropping and previous elemental sulfur application on elemental sulfur oxidation in four selected soils, fluvo-aquic soil, black soil, yellow-brown soil and red soil. In all the soils tested, sulfur oxidation rate was influenced by temperature and the temperature coefficient (Q10) values at the range from 10to 30 ℃ were 4.41, 4.05, 6.19 and 3.71 for the four soils, respectively. The rate of sulfur oxidation was parabolically related to soil water content. The optimum moisture content for the maximum oxidation rate was different among soils. Phosphorus increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur by 57.7%, 33.1%, 21.7% and 26.4% for the above four soils, respectively, compared with the control (no phosphorus applied). Organic material of corn straw which was ground and passed through a 0.5-mm sieve also increased the oxidation rate of elemental sulfur in the four soils by 59.8%, 7.8%, 39.2% and 540.4%, respectively. Elemental sulfur which was applied previously to soils significantly enhanced the oxidation of elemental sulfur subsequently added and increased sulfur-oxidizing populations such as autotrophic elemental sulfur oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, autotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers with pH optimum 6.8, heterotrophic thiosulfate oxidizers and heterotrophic sulfate producers. Cropping had little effect on lemental sulfur-oxidizing potentiality of soils.

  8. Influence of sulfur physical properties in Claus unit operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larraz Mora, R.; Arvelo Alvarez, R. [Chemical Engineering Dept., Univ. of la Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2002-09-01

    The Claus process is an efficient way of removing H{sub 2}S from acid gas streams and it has been widely practiced in industries such as natural gas processing, oil refining and metal smelting. Increasingly strict pollution control regulations require maximum sulfur recovery and high stream factor from the Claus units in order to minimize sulfur-containing effluents. As has been widely reported Claus unit's damages mainly occur during start up and shutdown. These operations involve scheduled warm-up and cool-down of the unit, usually burning refinery fuel-gas, which if not properly made can produce severe pipe and equipment plugging as well as catalyst deactivation. Sulfur products remaining in the unit during a shutdown period can produce dramatic unit corrosion episodes diminishing sulfur recovery unit stream factor. In the present paper some guidelines are given based on sulfur physical properties singularities which help to improve start-up/shut-down procedures. (orig.)

  9. Breakthrough and future: nanoscale controls of compositions, morphologies, and mesochannel orientations toward advanced mesoporous materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Norihiro; Radhakrishnan, Logudurai; Wang, Liang

    2009-01-01

    Currently, ordered mesoporous materials prepared through the self-assembly of surfactants have attracted growing interests owing to their special properties, including uniform mesopores and a high specific surface area. Here we focus on fine controls of compositions, morphologies, mesochannel orientations which are important factors for design of mesoporous materials with new functionalities. This Review describes our recent progress toward advanced mesoporous materials. Mesoporous materials now include a variety of inorganic-based materials, for example, transition-metal oxides, carbons, inorganic-organic hybrid materials, polymers, and even metals. Mesoporous metals with metallic frameworks can be produced by using surfactant-based synthesis with electrochemical methods. Owing to their metallic frameworks, mesoporous metals with high electroconductivity and high surface areas hold promise for a wide range of potential applications, such as electronic devices, magnetic recording media, and metal catalysts. Fabrication of mesoporous materials with controllable morphologies is also one of the main subjects in this rapidly developing research field. Mesoporous materials in the form of films, spheres, fibers, and tubes have been obtained by various synthetic processes such as evaporation-mediated direct templating (EDIT), spray-dried techniques, and collaboration with hard-templates such as porous anodic alumina and polymer membranes. Furthermore, we have developed several approaches for orientation controls of 1D mesochannels. The macroscopic-scale controls of mesochannels are important for innovative applications such as molecular-scale devices and electrodes with enhanced diffusions of guest species.

  10. Final LDRD report human interaction with complex systems: advances in hybrid reachability and control.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oishi, Meeko M.

    2006-08-01

    This document describes new advances in hybrid reachability techniques accomplished during the course of a one-year Truman Postdoctoral Fellowship. These techniques provide guarantees of safety in complex systems, which is especially important in high-risk, expensive, or safety-critical systems. My work focused on new approaches to two specific problems motivated by real-world issues in complex systems: (1) multi-objective controller synthesis, and (2) control for recovery from error. Regarding the first problem, a novel application of reachability analysis allowed controller synthesis in a single step to achieve (a) safety, (b) stability, and (c) prevent input saturation. By extending the state to include the input parameters, constraints for stability, saturation, and envelope protection are incorporated into a single reachability analysis. Regarding the second problem, a new approach to the problem of recovery provides (a) states from which recovery is possible, and (b) controllers to guide the system during a recovery maneuver from an error state to a safe state in minimal time. Results are computed in both problems on nonlinear models of single longitudinal aircraft dynamics and two-aircraft lateral collision avoidance dynamics.

  11. Building highly available control system applications with Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture and open standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Artem; Furukawa, Kazuro

    2010-11-01

    Requirements for modern and future control systems for large projects like International Linear Collider demand high availability for control system components. Recently telecom industry came up with a great open hardware specification - Advanced Telecom Computing Architecture (ATCA). This specification is aimed for better reliability, availability and serviceability. Since its first market appearance in 2004, ATCA platform has shown tremendous growth and proved to be stable and well represented by a number of vendors. ATCA is an industry standard for highly available systems. On the other hand Service Availability Forum, a consortium of leading communications and computing companies, describes interaction between hardware and software. SAF defines a set of specifications such as Hardware Platform Interface, Application Interface Specification. SAF specifications provide extensive description of highly available systems, services and their interfaces. Originally aimed for telecom applications, these specifications can be used for accelerator controls software as well. This study describes benefits of using these specifications and their possible adoption to accelerator control systems. It is demonstrated how EPICS Redundant IOC was extended using Hardware Platform Interface specification, which made it possible to utilize benefits of the ATCA platform.

  12. Advanced sensing and control techniques to facilitate semi-autonomous decommissioning. 1998 annual progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalkoff, R.J.; Geist, R.M.; Dawson, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    'This research is intended to advance the technology of semi-autonomous teleoperated robotics as applied to Decontamination and Decommissioning (D and D) tasks. Specifically, research leading to a prototype dual-manipulator mobile work cell is underway. This cell is supported and enhanced by computer vision, virtual reality and advanced robotics technology. This report summarizes work after approximately 1.5 years of a 3-year project. The autonomous, non-contact creation of a virtual environment from an existing, real environment (virtualization) is an integral part of the workcell functionality. This requires that the virtual world be geometrically correct. To this end, the authors have encountered severe sensitivity in quadric estimation. As a result, alternative procedures for geometric rendering, iterative correction approaches, new calibration methods and associated hardware, and calibration quality examination software have been developed. Following geometric rendering, the authors have focused on improving the color and texture recognition components of the system. In particular, the authors have moved beyond first-order illumination modeling to include higher order diffuse effects. This allows us to combine the surface geometric information, obtained from the laser projection and surface recognition components of the system, with a stereo camera image. Low-level controllers for Puma 560 robotic arms were designed and implemented using QNX. The resulting QNX/PC based low-level robot control system is called QRobot. A high-level trajectory generator and application programming interface (API) as well as a new, flexible robot control API was required. Force/torque sensors and interface hardware have been identified and ordered. A simple 3-D OpenGL-based graphical Puma 560 robot simulator was developed and interfaced with ARCL and RCCL to assist in the development of robot motion programs.'

  13. Accidents with sulfuric acid

    OpenAIRE

    Rajković Miloš B.

    2006-01-01

    Sulfuric acid is an important industrial and strategic raw material, the production of which is developing on all continents, in many factories in the world and with an annual production of over 160 million tons. On the other hand, the production, transport and usage are very dangerous and demand measures of precaution because the consequences could be catastrophic, and not only at the local level where the accident would happen. Accidents that have been publicly recorded during the last eigh...

  14. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-01-01

    A study conducted by Pittsburgh Energy Technology Center of sulfur emissions from about 1,300 United States coal-fired utility boilers indicated that half of the emissions were the result of burning coals having greater than 1.2 pounds of SO[sub 2] per million BTU. This was mainly attributed to the high pyritic sulfur content of the boiler fuel. A significant reduction in SO[sub 2] emissions could be accomplished by removing the pyrite from the coals by advanced physical fine coal cleaning. An engineering development project was prepared to build upon the basic research effort conducted under a solicitation for research into Fine Coal Surface Control. The engineering development project is intended to use general plant design knowledge and conceptualize a plant to utilize advanced froth flotation technology to process coal and produce a product having maximum practical pyritic sulfur reduction consistent with maximum practical BTU recovery.

  15. Sulfur Flow Analysis for New Generation Steel Manufacturing Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Chang-qing; ZHANG Chun-xia; HAN Xiao-wei; YIN Rui-yu

    2008-01-01

    Sulfur flow for new generation steel manufacturing process is analyzed by the method of material flow analysis,and measures for SO2 emission reduction are put forward as assessment and target intervention of the results.The results of sulfur flow analysis indicate that 90% of sulfur comes from fuels.Sulfur finally discharges from the steel manufacturing route in various steps,and the main point is BF and BOF slag desulfurization.In sintering process,the sulfur is removed by gasification,and sintering process is the main source of SO2 emission.The sulfur content of coke oven gas (COG) is an important factor affecting SO2 emission.Therefore,SO2 emission reduction should be started from the optimization and integration of steel manufacturing route,sulfur burden should be reduced through energy saving and consumption reduction,and the sulfur content of fuel should be controlled.At the same time,BF and BOF slag desulfurization should be optimized further and coke oven gas and sintering exhausted gas desulfurization should be adopted for SO2 emission reduction and reuse of resource,to achieve harmonic coordination of economic,social,and environmental effects for sustainable development.

  16. Improved Disturbance Observer (DOB) Based Advanced Feedback Control for Optimal Operation of a Mineral Grinding Process%Improved Disturbance Observer (DOB) Based Advanced Feedback Control for Optimal Operation of a Mineral Grinding Process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周平; 向波; 柴天佑

    2012-01-01

    Advanced feedback control for optimal operation of mineral grinding process is usually based on the model predictive control (MPC) dynamic optimization. Since the MPC does not handle disturbances directly by controller design, it cannot achieve satisfactory effects in controlling complex grinding processes in the presence of strong disturbances and large uncertainties. In this paper, an improved disturbance observer (DOB) based MPC advanced feedback control is proposed to control the multivariable grinding operation. The improved DOB is based on the optimal achievable H 2 performance and can deal with disturbance observation for the nonminimum-phase delay systems. In this DOB-MPC advanced feedback control, the higher-level optimizer computes the optimal operation points by maximize the profit function and passes them to the MPC level. The MPC acts as a presetting controller and is employed to generate proper pre-setpoint for the lower-level basic feedback control system. The DOB acts as a compensator and improves the operation performance by dynamically compensating the setpoints for the basic control system according to the observed various disturbances and plant uncertainties. Several simulations are performed to demonstrate the proposed control method for grinding process operation.

  17. Sulfur Fixation by Chemically Modified Red Mud Samples Containing Inorganic Additives: A Parametric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Liu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sulfur retention ability of Bayer red mud from alumina plant was investigated. Bayer red mud modified by fusel salt and waste mother liquor of sodium ferrocyanide as the main sulfur fixation agent and the calcium based natural mineral materials as servicing additives; the experimental results showed the following: (1 Through 10 wt% waste mother liquor of sodium ferrocyanide modifying Bayer red mud, sulfur fixation rate can increase by 13 wt%. (2 Magnesium oxide can obviously improve the sulfur fixation performance of Bayer red mud and up to a maximum sulfur fixation rate of 47 wt% at adding 1 wt% magnesium oxide. (3 Dolomite enhanced the sulfur fixation performances with the sulfur fixation rate of 68 wt% in optimized condition. (4 Vermiculite dust reduced sulfur dioxide during the fixed-sulfur process of modified Bayer red mud, and the desulphurization ration could reach up to a maximum 76 wt% at 950°C. (5 An advanced three-component sulfur fixation agent was investigated, in which the optimized mass ratio of modified Bayer red mud, dolomite, and vermiculite dust was 70 : 28 : 2 in order, and its sulfur fixation efficiency has reached to a maximum 87 wt% under its 20 wt% dosage in the coal.

  18. Control of harmful hydrocarbon species in the exhaust of modern advanced GDI engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, A. O.; Abu-jrai, A.; Turner, D.; Tsolakis, A.; Xu, H. M.; Golunski, S. E.; Herreros, J. M.

    2016-03-01

    A qualitative and quantitative analysis of toxic but currently non-regulated hydrocarbon compounds ranging from C5-C11, before and after a zoned three-way catalytic converter (TWC) in a modern gasoline direct injection (GDI) engine has been studied using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The GDI engine has been operated under conventional and advanced combustion modes, which result in better fuel economy and reduced levels of NOx with respect to standard SI operation. However, these fuel-efficient conditions are more challenging for the operation of a conventional TWC, and could lead to higher level of emissions released to the environment. Lean combustion leads to the reduction in pumping losses, fuel consumption and in-cylinder emission formation rates. However, lean HCCI will lead to high levels of unburnt HCs while the presence of oxygen will lower the TWC efficiency for NOx control. The effect on the catalytic conversion of the hydrocarbon species of the addition of hydrogen upstream the catalyst has been also investigated. The highest hydrocarbon engine-out emissions were produced for HCCI engine operation at low engine load operation. The catalyst was able to remove most of the hydrocarbon species to low levels (below the permissible exposure limits) for standard and most of the advanced combustion modes, except for naphthalene (classified as possibly carcinogenic to humans by the International Agency for Research on Cancer) and methyl-naphthalene (which has the potential to cause lung damage). However, when hydrogen was added upstream of the catalyst, the catalyst conversion efficiency in reducing methyl-naphthalene and naphthalene was increased by approximately 21%. This results in simultaneous fuel economy and environmental benefits from the effective combination of advanced combustion and novel aftertreatment systems.

  19. Overview of Modelling and Advanced Control Strategies for Wind Turbine Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio Simani

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The motivation for this paper comes from a real need to have an overview of the challenges of modelling and control for very demanding systems, such as wind turbine systems, which require reliability, availability, maintainability, and safety over power conversion efficiency. These issues have begun to stimulate research and development in the wide control community particularly for these installations that need a high degree of “sustainability”. Note that this represents a key point for offshore wind turbines, since they are characterised by expensive and/or safety critical maintenance work. In this case, a clear conflict exists between ensuring a high degree of availability and reducing maintenance times, which affect the final energy cost. On the other hand, wind turbines have highly nonlinear dynamics, with a stochastic and uncontrollable driving force as input in the form of wind speed, thus representing an interesting challenge also from the modelling point of view. Suitable control methods can provide a sustainable optimisation of the energy conversion efficiency over wider than normally expected working conditions. Moreover, a proper mathematical description of the wind turbine system should be able to capture the complete behaviour of the process under monitoring, thus providing an important impact on the control design itself. In this way, the control scheme could guarantee prescribed performance, whilst also giving a degree of “tolerance” to possible deviation of characteristic properties or system parameters from standard conditions, if properly included in the wind turbine model itself. The most important developments in advanced controllers for wind turbines are also briefly referenced, and open problems in the areas of modelling of wind turbines are finally outlined.

  20. Bridging the gap: adapting advanced display technologies for use in hybrid control rooms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokstad, Håkon [Inst. for Energy Technology, Halden (Norway); Boring, Ronald [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    recently assisted INL in establishing the technical infrastructure for implementation of HSI prototypes from HAMMLAB into the HSSL to demonstrate relevant control room replacement systems in support of the LWRS program. In March, 2014, IFE delivered the first HSI prototype utilizing this infrastructure — a large screen overview display for INL's simulator. The co-operation now continues by developing Procedure Support Displays targeted for operators in hybrid control room settings. These prototypes are being validated with U.S. reactor operators in the HSSL and optimized to enhance their performance. This research serves as a crucial stepping stone toward incorporation of advanced display technologies into conventional main control rooms.

  1. Effectiveness of porous covers for control of ammonia, reduced sulfur compounds, total hydrocarbons, selected volatile organic compounds, and odor from hog manure storage lagoons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Shekhar; Ongwandee, Maneerat; Morrison, Glenn; Fitch, Mark; Surampalli, Rao

    2007-06-01

    Anaerobic lagoons are a major source of odor at concentrated animal feeding operations. Seven different kinds of artificial (geotextile and polyethylene foam) and natural (straw and redwood) permeable lagoon covers were evaluated for their potential to reduce odorous emissions generated by anaerobic waste lagoons. A novel floating sampling raft was constructed and used to simultaneously evaluate the effectiveness of lagoon covers on an operating swine waste lagoon. The air collected from the raft was evaluated for odor, total reduced sulfur (TRS) compounds, ammonia, total hydrocarbons, dimethyldisulfide, and trimethylamine. The emission rates from the lagoon were highly variable both temporally and spatially. All of the lagoon covers substantially reduced TRS emissions and odor. Geotextile fabric and a recycled foam cover exhibited the greatest reduction in total hydrocarbon emissions; natural covers were less effective. Because of consistently low emission rates of ammonia, no statistically significant reduction of ammonia emissions were observed from any of the lagoon covers.

  2. Modeling of Broadband Liners Applied to the Advanced Noise Control Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nark, Douglas M.; Jones, Michael G.; Sutliff, Daniel L.

    2015-01-01

    The broadband component of fan noise has grown in relevance with an increase in bypass ratio and incorporation of advanced fan designs. Therefore, while the attenuation of fan tones remains a major factor in engine nacelle acoustic liner design, the simultaneous reduction of broadband fan noise levels has received increased interest. As such, a previous investigation focused on improvements to an established broadband acoustic liner optimization process using the Advanced Noise Control Fan (ANCF) rig as a demonstrator. Constant-depth, double-degree of freedom and variable-depth, multi-degree of freedom liner designs were carried through design, fabrication, and testing. This paper addresses a number of areas for further research identified in the initial assessment of the ANCF study. Specifically, incident source specification and uncertainty in some aspects of the predicted liner impedances are addressed. This information is incorporated in updated predictions of the liner performance and comparisons with measurement are greatly improved. Results illustrate the value of the design process in concurrently evaluating the relative costs/benefits of various liner designs. This study also provides further confidence in the integrated use of duct acoustic propagation/radiation and liner modeling tools in the design and evaluation of novel broadband liner concepts for complex engine configurations.

  3. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Y.; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán.; Wright, Heather; Vazquez, Jorge

    2016-08-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous "excess sulfur" problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the "petrologic estimate"), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of vapor

  4. Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

    2011-05-31

    Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus

  5. 77 FR 65840 - Section 610 Reviews of Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle Standards and Highway Diesel Fuel Sulfur...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-31

    ...-Duty Engine and Vehicle Standards and Highway Diesel Fuel Sulfur Control Requirements (Heavy-Duty 610... EPA's 610 Review related to Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle Standards and Highway Diesel Fuel Sulfur... Review of Heavy-Duty Engine and Vehicle Standards and Highway Diesel Fuel Sulfur Control Requirements...

  6. Examining the role of gender in career advancement at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhuo; Roy, Kakoli; Gotway Crawford, Carol A

    2010-03-01

    During the past decade, efforts to promote gender parity in the healing and public health professions have met with only partial success. We provide a critical update regarding the status of women in the public health profession by exploring gender-related differences in promotion rates at the nation's leading public health agency, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Using personnel data drawn from CDC, we found that the gender gap in promotion has diminished across time and that this reduction can be attributed to changes in individual characteristics (e.g., higher educational levels and more federal work experience). However, a substantial gap in promotion that cannot be explained by such characteristics has persisted, indicating continuing barriers in women's career advancement.

  7. Intelligent software system for the advanced control room of a nuclear power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Soon Heung; Choi, Seong Soo; Park, Jin Kyun; Heo, Gyung Young [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Han Gon [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    The intelligent software system for nuclear power plants (NPPs) has been conceptually designed in this study. Its design goals are to operate NPPs in an improved manner and to support operators` cognitive takes. It consists of six major modules such as {sup I}nformation Processing,{sup {sup A}}larm Processing,{sup {sup P}}rocedure Tracking,{sup {sup P}}erformance Diagnosis,{sup a}nd {sup E}vent Diagnosis{sup m}odules for operators and {sup M}alfunction Diagnosis{sup m}odule for maintenance personnel. Most of the modules have been developed for several years and the others are under development. After the completion of development, they will be combined into one system that would be main parts of advanced control rooms in NPPs. 5 refs., 4 figs. (Author)

  8. Medium Access Control for Thermal Energy Harvesting in Advanced Metering Infrastructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vithanage, Madava D.; Fafoutis, Xenofon; Andersen, Claus Bo

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the feasibility of powering wireless metering devices, namely heat cost allocators, by thermal energy harvested from radiators. The goal is to take a first step toward the realization of Energy-Harvesting Advanced Metering Infrastructures (EH-AMIs). While traditional...... battery-powered devices have a limited amount of energy, energy harvesting can potentially provide an infinite amount of energy for continuous operating lifetimes, thus reducing the cost involved in installation and maintenance. The contribution of this work is twofold. First, we experimentally identify...... the potential energy that can be harvested from Low Surface Temperature (LST) radiators. The experiments are based on a developed Energy-Harvesting Heat Cost Allocator (EH-HCA) prototype. On the basis of this measured power budget, we model and analytically compare the currently used Medium Access Control (MAC...

  9. The Chimera II Real-Time Operating System for advanced sensor-based control applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, David B.; Schmitz, Donald E.; Khosla, Pradeep K.

    1992-01-01

    Attention is given to the Chimera II Real-Time Operating System, which has been developed for advanced sensor-based control applications. The Chimera II provides a high-performance real-time kernel and a variety of IPC features. The hardware platform required to run Chimera II consists of commercially available hardware, and allows custom hardware to be easily integrated. The design allows it to be used with almost any type of VMEbus-based processors and devices. It allows radially differing hardware to be programmed using a common system, thus providing a first and necessary step towards the standardization of reconfigurable systems that results in a reduction of development time and cost.

  10. Overcoming the Pigou-Downs Paradox Using Advanced Traffic Signal Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowdur, S. C.; Rughooputh, S. D. D. V.

    2013-06-01

    Expansion of a road network has often been observed to cause more congestion and has led researchers to the formulation of traffic paradoxes such as the Pigou-Downs and the Braess paradoxes. In this paper, we present an application of advanced traffic signal control (ATSC) to overcome the Pigou-Downs paradox. Port Louis, the capital city of Mauritius is used to investigate the effect of using a harbor bridge to by-pass the city center. Using traffic cellular automata (TCA) simulations it has been shown how, if traffic is only gradually deviated along the by-pass, an overall longer travel time and decreased flux would result. By making use of ATSC, which involves traffic lights that sense the number of vehicles accumulated in the queue, better travel times and fluxes are achieved.

  11. Catalyst for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Y.; Yu, Q.; Chang, S.G.

    1996-02-27

    The inventive catalysts allow for the reduction of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur in smokestack scrubber environments. The catalysts have a very high sulfur yield of over 90% and space velocity of 10,000 h{sup {minus}1}. They also have the capacity to convert waste gases generated during the initial conversion into elemental sulfur. The catalysts have inexpensive components, and are inexpensive to produce. The net impact of the invention is to make this technology practically available to industrial applications. 21 figs.

  12. DOE Advanced Controls R&D Planning Workshop, June 11, 2003, Washington DC: Workshop Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brambley, Michael R.; Haves, Philip; McDonald, Sean C.; Torcellini, Paul; Hansen, David G.; Holmberg, David; Roth, Kurt

    2005-04-13

    On June 11, 2003, representatives from universities, federal and state government agencies, Department of Energy national laboratories, and the private sector attended a one-day workshop in Washington, DC. The objective of the workshop was to review and provide input into DOE's assessment of the market for advanced sensors and controls technology and potential R&D pathways to enhance their success in the buildings market place. The workshop consisted of two sessions. During the morning session, participants were given an overview on the following topics: market assessment, current applications and strategies for new applications, sensors and controls, networking, security, and protocols and standards, and automated diagnostics, performance measurement, commissioning and optimal control and tools. In the sessions, workshop participants were asked to review the potential R&D pathways, identify high priority activities, and outline a five year path for each of these activities. Priorities were as follows: largest and quickest impact; best use of finite resources; greatest likelihood for market penetration; and ability to replicate results. The participants identified several promising R&D opportunities.

  13. Janus Separator of Polypropylene-Supported Cellular Graphene Framework for Sulfur Cathodes with High Utilization in Lithium-Sulfur Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong-Jie; Wang, Dai-Wei; Huang, Jia-Qi; Cheng, Xin-Bing; Yuan, Zhe; Wei, Fei; Zhang, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the conversion chemistry of the sulfur cathode, the lithium-sulfur (Li-S) batteries exhibit high theoretical energy density. However, the intrinsic mobile redox centers during the sulfur/Li2S-to-lithium polysulfides solid-to-liquid phase transition induce low sulfur utilization and poor cycling life. Herein, the Janus separator of mesoporous cellular graphene framework (CGF)/polypropylene membrane to promote the utilization of sulfur cathode is introduced. The porous polypropylene membrane serves as an insulating substrate in contact with lithium anode while CGFs that possess high electrical conductivity of 100 S cm(-1), a large mesopore volume of 3.1 cm(3) g(-1), and a huge surface area of 2120 m(2) g(-1) are adhered on cathode side to reactivate the shuttling-back polysulfides and to preserve the ion channels. Therefore, the Li-S cell with the "two-face" CGF Janus separator exhibit a high initial capacity of 1109 mAh g(-1) and superior capacity preserved upon 800 mAh g(-1) after 250 cycles at 0.2 C, which is 40% higher on sulfur utilization efficiency than the corresponding results with routine polypropylene separators. There are significant improvements on capacity as well as electrochemical kinetics. A very high areal capacity of 5.5 mAh cm(-2) combined with high sulfur content of 80% and areal loading amount of 5.3 mg cm(-2) is achieved for such advanced configuration. The negative impact of shuttle mechanism on lowering the utilization of sulfur and overall energy density of a Li-S battery is well eliminated by applying CGF separators. Consequently, employing carbonaceous materials as Janus face of separators enlightens new opportunities for improving the utilization of active materials and energy density of devices that involve complex phase evolution and conversion electrochemistry.

  14. Janus Separator of Polypropylene‐Supported Cellular Graphene Framework for Sulfur Cathodes with High Utilization in Lithium–Sulfur Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong‐Jie; Wang, Dai‐Wei; Cheng, Xin‐Bing; Yuan, Zhe; Wei, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the conversion chemistry of the sulfur cathode, the lithium–sulfur (Li–S) batteries exhibit high theoretical energy density. However, the intrinsic mobile redox centers during the sulfur/Li2S‐to‐lithium polysulfides solid‐to‐liquid phase transition induce low sulfur utilization and poor cycling life. Herein, the Janus separator of mesoporous cellular graphene framework (CGF)/polypropylene membrane to promote the utilization of sulfur cathode is introduced. The porous polypropylene membrane serves as an insulating substrate in contact with lithium anode while CGFs that possess high electrical conductivity of 100 S cm−1, a large mesopore volume of 3.1 cm3 g−1, and a huge surface area of 2120 m2 g−1 are adhered on cathode side to reactivate the shuttling‐back polysulfides and to preserve the ion channels. Therefore, the Li–S cell with the “two‐face” CGF Janus separator exhibit a high initial capacity of 1109 mAh g−1 and superior capacity preserved upon 800 mAh g−1 after 250 cycles at 0.2 C, which is 40% higher on sulfur utilization efficiency than the corresponding results with routine polypropylene separators. There are significant improvements on capacity as well as electrochemical kinetics. A very high areal capacity of 5.5 mAh cm−2 combined with high sulfur content of 80% and areal loading amount of 5.3 mg cm−2 is achieved for such advanced configuration. The negative impact of shuttle mechanism on lowering the utilization of sulfur and overall energy density of a Li–S battery is well eliminated by applying CGF separators. Consequently, employing carbonaceous materials as Janus face of separators enlightens new opportunities for improving the utilization of active materials and energy density of devices that involve complex phase evolution and conversion electrochemistry.

  15. THE APPLICATION OF REVERSE FLOCCULATION METHOD IN HIGH SULFUR COAL DESULFURIZATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王力; 陈鹏; 张素清

    1999-01-01

    The reverse flocculation method for removing pyritic sulfur from high sulfur coals has been conceptually developed and investigated. The tentative tests on China high sulfur coals have shown that this advanced physical separation technique can be very efficient in coal desulfurization, provided the process parameters are properly optimized. Under the circumstances of acquiring high coal recovery, the total sulfur rejection with four kinds of coal samples normally falls in the range 5?% to 71% by one-step reverse flocculation, and within the range 40% to 59% by one-step normal flocculation process.

  16. Having a goal to stop action is associated with advance control of specific motor representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claffey, Michael P; Sheldon, Sarah; Stinear, Cathy M; Verbruggen, Frederick; Aron, Adam R

    2010-01-01

    An important aspect of cognitive control consists in the ability to stop oneself from making inappropriate responses. In an earlier study we demonstrated that there are different mechanisms for stopping: global and selective [Aron, A. R., Verbruggen, F. (2008). Stop the presses: Dissociating a selective from a global mechanism for stopping. Psychological Science, 19(11) 1146-1153]. We argued that participants are more likely to use a global mechanism when speed is of the essence, whereas they are more likely to use a selective mechanism when they have foreknowledge of which response tendency they may need to stop. Here we further investigate the relationship between foreknowledge and selective stopping. In Experiment 1 we adapted the earlier design to show that individual differences in recall accuracy for the stopping goal correlate with the selectivity of the stopping. This confirms that encoding and using a foreknowledge memory cue is a key enabler for a selective stopping mechanism. In Experiment 2, we used transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), to test the hypothesis that foreknowledge "sets up" a control set whereby control is applied onto the response representation that may need to be stopped in the future. We applied TMS to the left motor cortex and measured motor evoked potentials (MEPs) from the right hand while participants performed a similar behavioral paradigm as Experiment 1. In the foreknowledge period, MEPs were significantly reduced for trials where the right hand was the one that might need to be stopped relative to when it was not. This shows that having a goal of what response may need to be stopped in the future consists in applying advance control onto a specific motor representation.

  17. The role of crystallization-driven exsolution on the sulfur mass balance in volcanic arc magmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yanqing; Huber, Christian; Bachmann, Olivier; Zajacz, Zoltán; Wright, Heather M.; Vazquez, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    The release of large amounts of sulfur to the stratosphere during explosive eruptions affects the radiative balance in the atmosphere and consequentially impacts climate for up to several years after the event. Quantitative estimations of the processes that control the mass balance of sulfur between melt, crystals, and vapor bubbles is needed to better understand the potential sulfur yield of individual eruption events and the conditions that favor large sulfur outputs to the atmosphere. The processes that control sulfur partitioning in magmas are (1) exsolution of volatiles (dominantly H2O) during decompression (first boiling) and during isobaric crystallization (second boiling), (2) the crystallization and breakdown of sulfide or sulfate phases in the magma, and (3) the transport of sulfur-rich vapor (gas influx) from deeper unerupted regions of the magma reservoir. Vapor exsolution and the formation/breakdown of sulfur-rich phases can all be considered as closed-system processes where mass balance arguments are generally easier to constrain, whereas the contribution of sulfur by vapor transport (open system process) is more difficult to quantify. The ubiquitous “excess sulfur” problem, which refers to the much higher sulfur mass released during eruptions than what can be accounted for by amount of sulfur originally dissolved in erupted melt, as estimated from melt inclusion sulfur concentrations (the “petrologic estimate”), reflects the challenges in closing the sulfur mass balance between crystals, melt, and vapor before and during a volcanic eruption. In this work, we try to quantify the relative importance of closed- and open-system processes for silicic arc volcanoes using kinetic models of sulfur partitioning during exsolution. Our calculations show that crystallization-induced exsolution (second boiling) can generate a significant fraction of the excess sulfur observed in crystal-rich arc magmas. This result does not negate the important role of

  18. Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources at Detroit Edison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haukur Asgeirsson; Richard Seguin

    2004-01-31

    (Utility) led team, which also includes: DTE Energy Technology (DER provider & Aggregator), Electrical Distribution Design (Virginia Tech company supporting DEW); Systems Integration Specialists Company (real-time protocol integrator); and OSIsoft (software system for managing real-time information). This work was performed in anticipation of being selected for Phase II of the Advanced Communication and Control of Distributed Energy Resources project.

  19. Impact of radiation dose and standardized uptake value of (18)FDG PET on nodal control in locally advanced cervical cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramlov, Anne; Kroon, Petra S; Jürgenliemk-Schulz, Ina M;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Despite local control now exceeding 90% with image-guided adaptive brachytherapy (IGABT), regional and distant metastases continue to curb survival in locally advanced cervical cancer. As regional lymph nodes often represent first site of metastatic spread, improved nodal control could...... is a negative prognostic predictor for nodal control. Attention should be raised to administration of a complete schedule of concurrent chemotherapy as well as treatment of para-aortic nodes....

  20. Optical techniques for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrest, J. R.

    1985-03-01

    It is concluded that optical techniques offer some advantages for signal distribution and control in advanced radar and communication systems. They are clearly ideal for transporting microwave signals over considerable distances, as in remote positioning of radar receivers, provided high dynamic range is not required and an enclosed transmission path is essential. They are an elegant means of distributing low level r.f. or i.f. signals around an active phased array where these signals are of relatively constant amplitude (as in mixer local oscillator applications). However, there is currently a rather restrictive limit on the size of distribution network possible. Optical techniques are obviously suitable for distributing digital control signals to phased array modules and confer considerable immunity to interference. They are less suitable for high dynamic range signals, such as the received radar returns, either at r.f. or when downcovered to i.f. Future developments in coherent optics or in fast optical A/D technology could, however, influence this conclusion. Currently, the optimum applications for optical techniques appear to be i.f. beamformers for multibeam communication satellite systems and in calibration/monitoring systems for phased arrays.

  1. Advanced international training course on state systems of accounting for and control of nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-10-01

    This report incorporates all lectures and presentations at the Advanced International Training Course on State Systems of Accounting for and Control of Nuclear Material held April 27 through May 12, 1981 at Santa Fe and Los Alamos, New Mexico, and Richland, Washington, USA. Authorized by the US Nuclear Non-Proliferation Act and sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, the course was developed to provide practical training in the design, implementation, and operation of a state system of nuclear materials accountability and control that satisfies both national and international safeguards. Major emphasis for the 1981 course was placed on safeguards methods used at bulk-handling facilities, particularly low-enriched uranium conversion and fuel fabrication plants. The course was conducted by the University of California's Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratory, and Exxon Nuclear Company, Inc. Tours and demonstrations were arranged at both the Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico, and the Exxon Nuclear fuel fabrication plant, Richland, Washington.

  2. Production of potato minitubers using advanced environmental control technologies developed for growing plants in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britt, Robert G.

    1998-01-01

    Development of plant growth systems for use in outer space have been modified for use on earth as the backbone of a new system for rapid growth of potato minitubers. The automation of this new biotechnology provides for a fully controllable method of producing pathogen-free nuclear stock potato minitubers from tissue cultured clones of varieties of potato in a biomanufacturing facility. These minitubers are the beginning stage of seed potato production. Because the new system provides for pathogen-free minitubers by the tens-of-millions, rather than by the thousands which are currently produced in advanced seed potato systems, a new-dimension in seed potato development, breeding and multiplication has been achieved. The net advantage to earth-borne agricultural farming systems will be the elimination of several years of seed multiplication from the current system, higher quality potato production, and access to new potato varieties resistant to diseases and insects which will eliminate the need for chemical controls.

  3. Infrared spectroscopy for process control and fault detection of advanced semiconductor processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, P.; Aarts, W.; Bonanno, A.; Boning, D.; Charpenay, S.; Gower, A.; Richter, M.; Smith, T.; Solomon, P.; Spartz, M.; Nelson, C.; Waldhauer, A.; Xu, J.; Yakovlev, V.; Zhang, W.; Allen, L.; Cordts, B.; Brandt, M.; Mundt, R.; Perry, A.

    1998-11-01

    Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy has emerged as an attractive sensor for in-situ monitoring and control of semiconductor fabrication processes. New applications are being enabled by advances in FTIR hardware and software that provide for: compact size, fast measurements with exceptional stability and signal to noise, and intelligent model based algorithms for thin film and gas analysis. In previously reported work, FTIR instrumentation with automated spectral analysis software was demonstrated as a novel sensor for monitoring layer properties such as thickness, composition and temperature. Recent work has emphasized applications to practical problems in modern semiconductor manufacturing. In this paper we will report pioneering results on: 1) Run-to-run closed loop control of a single wafer epitaxial silicon process using integrated infrared thickness and doping profiling metrology, 2) Fault detection during cluster tool plasma etching using real-time infrared exhaust gas analysis, and 3) oxygen implantation process monitoring during the formation of silicon on insulator (SOI) wafers using infrared reflectometry.

  4. Advanced Communication and Control for Distributed Energy Resource Integration: Phase 2 Scientific Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BPL Global

    2008-09-30

    The objective of this research project is to demonstrate sensing, communication, information and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of multivendor distributed energy resource (DER) units at aggregation levels that meet individual user requirements for facility operations (residential, commercial, industrial, manufacturing, etc.) and further serve as resource options for electric and natural gas utilities. The fully demonstrated DER aggregation system with embodiment of communication and control technologies will lead to real-time, interactive, customer-managed service networks to achieve greater customer value. Work on this Advanced Communication and Control Project (ACCP) consists of a two-phase approach for an integrated demonstration of communication and control technologies to achieve a seamless integration of DER units to reach progressive levels of aggregated power output. Phase I involved design and proof-of-design, and Phase II involves real-world demonstration of the Phase I design architecture. The scope of work for Phase II of this ACCP involves demonstrating the Phase I design architecture in large scale real-world settings while integrating with the operations of one or more electricity supplier feeder lines. The communication and control architectures for integrated demonstration shall encompass combinations of software and hardware components, including: sensors, data acquisition and communication systems, remote monitoring systems, metering (interval revenue, real-time), local and wide area networks, Web-based systems, smart controls, energy management/information systems with control and automation of building energy loads, and demand-response management with integration of real-time market pricing. For Phase II, BPL Global shall demonstrate the Phase I design for integrating and controlling the operation of more than 10 DER units, dispersed at various locations in one or more Independent System Operator (ISO) Control Areas, at

  5. IEDA Thesaurus: A Controlled Vocabulary for IEDA Systems to Advance Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, P.; Lehnert, K. A.; Arko, R. A.; Song, L.; Hsu, L.; Carter, M. R.; Ferrini, V. L.; Ash, J.

    2014-12-01

    Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA) is a community-based facility that serves to support, sustain, and advance the geosciences by providing data services for observational geoscience data from the Ocean, Earth, and Polar Sciences. Many dedicated systems such as the Petrological Database (PetDB), Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS), System for Earth Sample Registration (SESAR), Data Coordination Center for the U.S. Antarctic Program (USAP-DCC), etc., under the umbrella of the IEDA framework, were developed to support the preservation, discovery, retrieval, and analysis of a wide range of observational field and analytical data types from diverse communities. However, it is currently difficult to maintain consistency of indexing content within IEDA schema, and perform unified or precise searching of the data in these diverse systems as each system maintains separate vocabularies, hierarchies, authority files, or sub taxonomies. We present here the IEDA Thesaurus, a system, which combines existing separate controlled vocabularies from the different systems under the IEDA schema into a single master controlled vocabulary, also introducing some new top facets for future long-term use. The IEDA thesaurus contains structured terminology for petrology, geochemistry, sedimentology, oceanography, geochronology, and volcanology, and other general metadata fields. 18 top facets (also called 'top categories') are defined, including equipment, geographic gazetteer, geologic ages, geologic units, materials, etc. The terms of the thesaurus are cross validated with others popular geoscience vocabularies such as GeoRef Thesaurus, U.S. Geological Survey Library Classification System, Global Change Master Directory (GCMD), and Semantic Web for Earth and Environmental Terminology (SWEET) ontologies. The thesaurus is organized along with the ANSI/NISO Z39.19-2005 Guidelines for the Construction, Format, and Management of Monolingual Controlled Vocabularies, and is published using

  6. An Advanced Electrospinning Method of Fabricating Nanofibrous Patterned Architectures with Controlled Deposition and Desired Alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasel, Sheikh Md

    We introduce a versatile advanced method of electrospinning for fabricating various kinds of nanofibrous patterns along with desired alignment, controlled amount of deposition and locally variable density into the architectures. In this method, we employed multiple electrodes whose potentials have been altered in milliseconds with the help of microprocessor based control system. Therefore, key success of this method was that the electrical field as well as charge carrying fibers could be switched shortly from one electrode's location to another, as a result, electrospun fibers could be deposited on the designated areas with desired alignment. A wide range of nanofibrous patterned architectures were constructed using proper arrangement of multiple electrodes. By controlling the concurrent activation time of two adjacent electrodes, we demonstrated that amount of fibers going into the pattern can be adjusted and desired alignment in electrospun fibers can be obtained. We also revealed that the deposition density of electrospun fibers in different areas of patterned architectures can be varied. We showed that by controlling the deposition time between two adjacent electrodes, a number of functionally graded patterns can be generated with uniaxial alignment. We also demonstrated that this handy method was capable of producing random, aligned, and multidirectional nanofibrous mats by engaging a number of electrodes and switching them in desired patterns. A comprehensive study using finite element method was carried out to understand the effects of electrical field. Simulation results revealed that electrical field strength alters shortly based on electrode control switch patterns. Nanofibrous polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds and its composite reinforced with wollastonite and wood flour were fabricated using rotating drum electrospinning technique. Morphological, mechanical, and thermal, properties were characterized on PVA/wollastonite and PVA/wood flour nanocomposites

  7. Sulfur plant start-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, Hank; Grigson, Susan [Ortloff Engineers Ltd. (United States)

    2002-02-01

    The authors discuss an Ortloff sulfur plant design concept using the Claus reaction that differs from accepted 'industry practice': cold reactor bed start-up. The process is designed to eliminate catalyst sulfation, heat damage and furnace overheating in sulfur recovery units. (UK)

  8. Controlled expression of nif and isc iron-sulfur protein maturation components reveals target specificity and limited functional replacement between the two systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Patricia C; Johnson, Deborah C; Ragle, Brook E; Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Dean, Dennis R

    2007-04-01

    The nitrogen-fixing organism Azotobacter vinelandii contains at least two systems that catalyze formation of [Fe-S] clusters. One of these systems is encoded by nif genes, whose products supply [Fe-S] clusters required for maturation of nitrogenase. The other system is encoded by isc genes, whose products are required for maturation of [Fe-S] proteins that participate in general metabolic processes. The two systems are similar in that they include an enzyme for the mobilization of sulfur (NifS or IscS) and an assembly scaffold (NifU or IscU) upon which [Fe-S] clusters are formed. Normal cellular levels of the Nif system, which supplies [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase, cannot also supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of other cellular [Fe-S] proteins. Conversely, when produced at the normal physiological levels, the Isc system cannot supply [Fe-S] clusters for the maturation of nitrogenase. In the present work we found that such target specificity for IscU can be overcome by elevated production of NifU. We also found that NifU, when expressed at normal levels, is able to partially replace the function of IscU if cells are cultured under low-oxygen-availability conditions. In contrast to the situation with IscU, we could not establish conditions in which the function of IscS could be replaced by NifS. We also found that elevated expression of the Isc components, as a result of deletion of the regulatory iscR gene, improved the capacity for nitrogen-fixing growth of strains deficient in either NifU or NifS.

  9. Advanced Instrumentation and Control Methods for Small and Medium Reactors with IRIS Demonstration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Wesley Hines; Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Michael Doster; Robert M. Edwards; Kenneth D. Lewis; Paul Turinsky; Jamie Coble

    2011-05-31

    Development and deployment of small-scale nuclear power reactors and their maintenance, monitoring, and control are part of the mission under the Small Modular Reactor (SMR) program. The objectives of this NERI-consortium research project are to investigate, develop, and validate advanced methods for sensing, controlling, monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis of these reactors, and to demonstrate the methods with application to one of the proposed integral pressurized water reactors (IPWR). For this project, the IPWR design by Westinghouse, the International Reactor Secure and Innovative (IRIS), has been used to demonstrate the techniques developed under this project. The research focuses on three topical areas with the following objectives. Objective 1 - Develop and apply simulation capabilities and sensitivity/uncertainty analysis methods to address sensor deployment analysis and small grid stability issues. Objective 2 - Develop and test an autonomous and fault-tolerant control architecture and apply to the IRIS system and an experimental flow control loop, with extensions to multiple reactor modules, nuclear desalination, and optimal sensor placement strategy. Objective 3 - Develop and test an integrated monitoring, diagnosis, and prognosis system for SMRs using the IRIS as a test platform, and integrate process and equipment monitoring (PEM) and process and equipment prognostics (PEP) toolboxes. The research tasks are focused on meeting the unique needs of reactors that may be deployed to remote locations or to developing countries with limited support infrastructure. These applications will require smaller, robust reactor designs with advanced technologies for sensors, instrumentation, and control. An excellent overview of SMRs is described in an article by Ingersoll (2009). The article refers to these as deliberately small reactors. Most of these have modular characteristics, with multiple units deployed at the same plant site. Additionally, the topics focus

  10. DOE Project: Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies "University Research in Advanced Combustion and Emissions Control" Office of FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitz, Rolf; Foster, D.; Ghandhi, J.; Rothamer, D.; Rutland, C.; Sanders, S.; Trujillo, M.

    2012-10-26

    The goal of the present technology development was to increase the efficiency of internal combustion engines while minimizing the energy penalty of meeting emissions regulations. This objective was achieved through experimentation and the development of advanced combustion regimes and emission control strategies, coupled with advanced petroleum and non-petroleum fuel formulations. To meet the goals of the project, it was necessary to improve the efficiency of expansion work extraction, and this required optimized combustion phasing and minimized in-cylinder heat transfer losses. To minimize fuel used for diesel particulate filter (DPF) regeneration, soot emissions were also minimized. Because of the complex nature of optimizing production engines for real-world variations in fuels, temperatures and pressures, the project applied high-fidelity computing and high-resolution engine experiments synergistically to create and apply advanced tools (i.e., fast, accurate predictive models) developed for low-emission, fuel-efficient engine designs. The companion experiments were conducted using representative single- and multi-cylinder automotive and truck diesel engines.

  11. Recent advance in nonlinear aeroelastic analysis and control of the aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Jinwu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A review on the recent advance in nonlinear aeroelasticity of the aircraft is presented in this paper. The nonlinear aeroelastic problems are divided into three types based on different research objects, namely the two dimensional airfoil, the wing, and the full aircraft. Different nonlinearities encountered in aeroelastic systems are discussed firstly, where the emphases is placed on new nonlinear model to describe tested nonlinear relationship. Research techniques, especially new theoretical methods and aeroelastic flutter control methods are investigated in detail. The route to chaos and the cause of chaotic motion of two-dimensional aeroelastic system are summarized. Various structural modeling methods for the high-aspect-ratio wing with geometric nonlinearity are discussed. Accordingly, aerodynamic modeling approaches have been developed for the aeroelastic modeling of nonlinear high-aspect-ratio wings. Nonlinear aeroelasticity about high-altitude long-endurance (HALE and fight aircrafts are studied separately. Finally, conclusions and the challenges of the development in nonlinear aeroelasticity are concluded. Nonlinear aeroelastic problems of morphing wing, energy harvesting, and flapping aircrafts are proposed as new directions in the future.

  12. Recent advance in nonlinear aeroelastic analysis and control of the aircraft

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiang Jinwu; Yan Yongju; Li Daochun

    2014-01-01

    A review on the recent advance in nonlinear aeroelasticity of the aircraft is presented in this paper. The nonlinear aeroelastic problems are divided into three types based on different research objects, namely the two dimensional airfoil, the wing, and the full aircraft. Different non-linearities encountered in aeroelastic systems are discussed firstly, where the emphases is placed on new nonlinear model to describe tested nonlinear relationship. Research techniques, especially new theoretical methods and aeroelastic flutter control methods are investigated in detail. The route to chaos and the cause of chaotic motion of two-dimensional aeroelastic system are summarized. Var-ious structural modeling methods for the high-aspect-ratio wing with geometric nonlinearity are dis-cussed. Accordingly, aerodynamic modeling approaches have been developed for the aeroelastic modeling of nonlinear high-aspect-ratio wings. Nonlinear aeroelasticity about high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) and fight aircrafts are studied separately. Finally, conclusions and the chal-lenges of the development in nonlinear aeroelasticity are concluded. Nonlinear aeroelastic problems of morphing wing, energy harvesting, and flapping aircrafts are proposed as new directions in the future.

  13. Bovine viral diarrhea virus infections: manifestations of infection and recent advances in understanding pathogenesis and control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodersen, B W

    2014-03-01

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) continues to be of economic significance to the livestock industry in terms of acute disease and fetal loss. Many of the lesions relating to BVDV infection have been well described previously. The virus is perpetuated in herds through the presence of calves that are persistently infected. Relationships between various species and biotypes of BVDV and host defenses are increasingly understood. Understanding of the host defense mechanisms of innate immunity and adaptive immunity continues to improve, and the effects of the virus on these immune mechanisms are being used to explain how persistent infection develops. The noncytopathic biotype of BVDV plays the major role in its effects on the host defenses by inhibiting various aspects of the innate immune system and creation of immunotolerance in the fetus during early gestation. Recent advances have allowed for development of affordable test strategies to identify and remove persistently infected animals. With these improved tests and removal strategies, the livestock industry can begin more widespread effective control programs.

  14. Point-of-care testing for sexually transmitted infections: recent advances and implications for disease control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Joseph D.; Bien, Cedric H.; Peeling, Rosanna W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Sexually transmitted infections (STIs) remain a major global public health issue, with more than 448 million incident bacterial infections each year. We review recent advances in STI point-of-care (POC) testing and implications for STI prevention and control. Recent findings Accurate immunochromatographic assays to detect HIV, hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis antibodies have made home or supervised self-testing possible. Several studies have demonstrated feasibility and excellent test characteristics for HIV, HCV and syphilis POC tests. Rapid oral HIV tests are now available for purchase at retail sites across the United States. Combined HIV and syphilis tests using a single finger prick blood sample are under evaluation. Summary Oral POC STI tests with comparable performance to blood-based POC tests are available for self-testing. POC tests can expand screening, improve syndromic management and reduce loss to follow up. POC STI tests have the potential to facilitate prompt treatment and partner services. POC STI tests create opportunities for new social and financial models of community-based testing services. Increasing equity and access to testing will create challenges in linkage to care, quality assurance, partner services and surveillance. These important developments warrant research to understand appropriate contexts for implementation. PMID:23242343

  15. Gas-phase advanced oxidation for effective, efficient in situ control of pollution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johnson, Matthew Stanley; Nilsson, Elna Johanna Kristina; Svensson, Erik Anders;

    2014-01-01

    for concentrations in the range of 0.4-6 ppm and exposure times up to 0.5 min. The laboratory prototype generated a OH * concentration derived from propane reaction of (2.5 ± 0.3) × 1010 cm-3 at a specific energy input of 3 kJ/m3, and the portable device generated (4.6 ± 0.4) × 109 cm-3 at 10 kJ/m3. Based......In this article, gas-phase advanced oxidation, a new method for pollution control building on the photo-oxidation and particle formation chemistry occurring in the atmosphere, is introduced and characterized. The process uses ozone and UV-C light to produce in situ radicals to oxidize pollution......, generating particles that are removed by a filter; ozone is removed using a MnO2 honeycomb catalyst. This combination of in situ processes removes a wide range of pollutants with a comparatively low specific energy input. Two proof-of-concept devices were built to test and optimize the process...

  16. Detecting method of subjects' 3D positions and experimental advanced camera control system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daiichiro; Abe, Kazuo; Ishikawa, Akio; Yamada, Mitsuho; Suzuki, Takahito; Kuwashima, Shigesumi

    1997-04-01

    Steady progress is being made in the development of an intelligent robot camera capable of automatically shooting pictures with a powerful sense of reality or tracking objects whose shooting requires advanced techniques. Currently, only experienced broadcasting cameramen can provide these pictures.TO develop an intelligent robot camera with these abilities, we need to clearly understand how a broadcasting cameraman assesses his shooting situation and how his camera is moved during shooting. We use a real- time analyzer to study a cameraman's work and his gaze movements at studios and during sports broadcasts. This time, we have developed a detecting method of subjects' 3D positions and an experimental camera control system to help us further understand the movements required for an intelligent robot camera. The features are as follows: (1) Two sensor cameras shoot a moving subject and detect colors, producing its 3D coordinates. (2) Capable of driving a camera based on camera movement data obtained by a real-time analyzer. 'Moving shoot' is the name we have given to the object position detection technology on which this system is based. We used it in a soccer game, producing computer graphics showing how players moved. These results will also be reported.

  17. CONTROL OF MHD STABILITY IN DIII-D ADVANCED TOKAMAK DISCHARGES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    STRAIT,EJ; BIALEK,J; CHANCE,MS; CHU,MS; EDGELL,DH; FERRON,JR; GREENFIELD,CM; GAROFALO,AM; HUMPHREYS,DA; JACKSON,GL; JAYAKUMAR,RJ; JERNIGAN,TC; KIM,JS; LA HAYE,RJ; LAO,LL; LUCE,TC; MAKOWSKI,MA; MURAKAMI,M; NAVRATIL,GA; OKABAYASHI,M; PETTY,CC; REIMERDES,H; SCOVILLE,JT; TURNBULL,AD; WADE,MR; WALKER,ML; WHYTE,DG; DIII-D TEAM

    2003-06-01

    OAK-B135 Advanced tokamak research in DIII-D seeks to optimize the tokamak approach for fusion energy production, leading to a compact, steady state power source. High power density implies operation at high toroidal beta, {beta}{sub T}=

    2{micro}{sub 0}/B{sub T}{sup 2}, since fusion power density increases roughly as the square of the plasma pressure. Steady-state operation with low recirculating power for current drive implies operation at high poloidal beta, {beta}{sub P} =

    2{micro}{sub 0}/{sup 2}, in order to maximize the fraction of self-generated bootstrap current. Together, these lead to a requirement of operation at high normalized beta, {beta}{sub N} = {beta}{sub T}(aB/I), since {beta}{sub P}{beta}{sub T} {approx} 25[(1+{kappa}{sup 2})/2] ({beta}{sub N}/100){sup 2}. Plasmas with high normalized beta are likely to operate near one or more stability limits, so control of MHD stability in such plasmas is crucial.

  18. Ex- and in-situ investigations of sulfur diffusion into Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, B.J., E-mail: bjm.mueller@web.de [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89081 Ulm (Germany); Mock, M.; Haug, V. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Hergert, F. [Bosch Solar CISTech GmbH, D-14772 Brandenburg (Germany); Koehler, T.; Zweigart, S. [Robert Bosch GmbH, Corporate Research and Advance Engineering, Advanced Functional Materials and Microsystems, D-70839 Gerlingen (Germany); Herr, U., E-mail: ulrich.herr@uni-ulm.de [Institute of Micro- and Nanomaterials, University of Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 47, D-89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    In this article we investigate the incorporation of sulfur into Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} thin films by controlled diffusion. For this purpose, the conventional stacked elemental layer process has been extended by a subsequent sulfur diffusion step. The sulfur gradient is desirable for achieving a graded band gap of the absorber layer which allows to optimize the absorption properties. The sulfur incorporation can be influenced by the sulfurization temperature, the sulfur supply (partial pressure) and the temperature of the Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} pre-treatment. The presence of binary selenides and small grains enhances the speed of sulfur incorporation. A combination of Raman spectroscopy and in-situ as well as ex-situ X-ray diffraction has been used in order to obtain detailed information about the diffusion process. The sulfur incorporation occurs at sulfurization temperatures in the range of 575 °C in step 1. By decreasing the selenization temperature in step 2 the amount of sulfur incorporation is enhanced. Furthermore an additional defect spinel phase CuIn{sub 5}S{sub 8} is obtained when sulfur is supplied in excess. - Highlights: • Controllable sulfur incorporation into Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} • Diffusion coefficients were determined with the help of in-situ XRD. • When providing sulfur in excess the defect spinel phase is formed.

  19. Understanding the role of different conductive polymers in improving the nanostructured sulfur cathode performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyang; Zhang, Qianfan; Zheng, Guangyuan; Seh, Zhi Wei; Yao, Hongbin; Cui, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Lithium sulfur batteries have brought significant advancement to the current state-of-art battery technologies because of their high theoretical specific energy, but their wide-scale implementation has been impeded by a series of challenges, especially the dissolution of intermediate polysulfides species into the electrolyte. Conductive polymers in combination with nanostructured sulfur have attracted great interest as promising matrices for the confinement of lithium polysulfides. However, the roles of different conductive polymers on the electrochemical performances of sulfur electrode remain elusive and poorly understood due to the vastly different structural configurations of conductive polymer-sulfur composites employed in previous studies. In this work, we systematically investigate the influence of different conductive polymers on the sulfur cathode based on conductive polymer-coated hollow sulfur nanospheres with high uniformity. Three of the most well-known conductive polymers, polyaniline (PANI), polypyrrole (PPY), and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT), were coated, respectively, onto monodisperse hollow sulfur nanopsheres through a facile, versatile, and scalable polymerization process. The sulfur cathodes made from these well-defined sulfur nanoparticles act as ideal platforms to study and compare how coating thickness, chemical bonding, and the conductivity of the polymers affected the sulfur cathode performances from both experimental observations and theoretical simulations. We found that the capability of these three polymers in improving long-term cycling stability and high-rate performance of the sulfur cathode decreased in the order of PEDOT > PPY > PANI. High specific capacities and excellent cycle life were demonstrated for sulfur cathodes made from these conductive polymer-coated hollow sulfur nanospheres.

  20. PREVENTING LITHOGRAPHY-INDUCED MAVERICK YIELD EVENTS WITH A DISPENSE SYSTEM ADVANCED EQUIPMENT CONTROL METHOD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jennifer Broggin

    2012-01-01

    As semiconductor manufacturers march to thedrum beat of Moore's Law there is very little roomfor yield maverieks, especially those that can beprevented. Critical process errors are costly andphotolithography is one of the few processes insemiconductor manufacturing where there is anopportunity to correct errors. Small changes inphotoresist-dispensed volume may have severeimpact on film thickness uniformity and can ulti-mately affect patterning It is important to monitorphoto dispense conditions to detect real-timeevents that may have a direct negative impact onprocess yield and be able to react to these eventsas quickly as possible.This paper presents an evaluation of the IntelliGen Mini, a photoresist dispense system manufacturedby Entegris, Inc. This system utilizes advancedequipment control software, known as dispenseconfirmation, to detect variations in photo dis-pense. These variations, caused by bubbles inthe dispense line, valve errors and accidentally-changed chemistries can all create maverick yieldevents that can go undetected until metrology,defeet inspection or wafer final testThe ability of an advanced dispense system todetect events and create alerts is a very powerfultool, but it can be most effective when that infor-mation is collected and analyzed by an automatedsystem. In a modern fabricator this is most likely astatistical process control chart that is monitoringa track's progress and is ready to stop the trackwhen a maverick event occurs or alert personnelto trends they may not otherwise catch with otherinline ntetrology data. Dispense confirmation,when Combined with networking capabilities,can meet this need.After a brief description of the pump, data from sim-ulated yield-affecting events will be examined toevaluate the IntelliGen Mini's ability to detect them.This discussion will eonclude with a brief analysisof the ultilnate time and cost savings of utilizingdispense confirmation with networking capabilitiesto detect and eliminate poorly