WorldWideScience

Sample records for advanced solid rocket

  1. Radiation from advanced solid rocket motor plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Richard C.; Smith, Sheldon D.; Myruski, Brian L.

    1994-01-01

    The overall objective of this study was to develop an understanding of solid rocket motor (SRM) plumes in sufficient detail to accurately explain the majority of plume radiation test data. Improved flowfield and radiation analysis codes were developed to accurately and efficiently account for all the factors which effect radiation heating from rocket plumes. These codes were verified by comparing predicted plume behavior with measured NASA/MSFC ASRM test data. Upon conducting a thorough review of the current state-of-the-art of SRM plume flowfield and radiation prediction methodology and the pertinent data base, the following analyses were developed for future design use. The NOZZRAD code was developed for preliminary base heating design and Al2O3 particle optical property data evaluation using a generalized two-flux solution to the radiative transfer equation. The IDARAD code was developed for rapid evaluation of plume radiation effects using the spherical harmonics method of differential approximation to the radiative transfer equation. The FDNS CFD code with fully coupled Euler-Lagrange particle tracking was validated by comparison to predictions made with the industry standard RAMP code for SRM nozzle flowfield analysis. The FDNS code provides the ability to analyze not only rocket nozzle flow, but also axisymmetric and three-dimensional plume flowfields with state-of-the-art CFD methodology. Procedures for conducting meaningful thermo-vision camera studies were developed.

  2. Solid rocket technology advancements for space tug and IUS applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    In order for the shuttle tug or interim upper stage (IUS) to capture all the missions in the current mission model for the tug and the IUS, an auxiliary or kick stage, using a solid propellant rocket motor, is required. Two solid propellant rocket motor technology concepts are described. One concept, called the 'advanced propulsion module' motor, is an 1800-kg, high-mass-fraction motor, which is single-burn and contains Class 2 propellent. The other concept, called the high energy upper stage restartable solid, is a two-burn (stop-restartable on command) motor which at present contains 1400 kg of Class 7 propellant. The details and status of the motor design and component and motor test results to date are presented, along with the schedule for future work.

  3. Overview of the manufacturing sequence of the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, John S.; Nix, Michael B.

    1992-01-01

    The manufacturing sequence of NASA's new Advanced Solid Rocket Motor, developed as a replacement of the Space Shuttle's existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor, is overviewed. Special attention is given to the case preparation, the propellant mix/cast, the nondestructuve evaluation, the motor finishing, and the refurbishment. The fabrication sequences of the case, the nozzle, and the igniter are described.

  4. Solid rocket technology advancement for Space Tug and IUS applications. [Interim Upper Stage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ascher, W.; Bailey, R. L.; Behm, J. W.; Gin, W.

    1975-01-01

    Two-burn restartable solid propellant rocket motors for the kick stage (auxiliary stage) of the Shuttle Tug, or Interim Upper Stage, are described, with details on features and test results of the ignition and quench (thrust termination) systems and procedures, fabrication of propellant and insulation, explosion hazards of propellants, and comparative data on present and future motor design. These rocket motor systems are designed for upper stage augmentation of launch vehicles and possible service in Shuttle-launched outer planet spacecraft.

  5. Solid Rocket Motor Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Shown is a test of the TEM-13 Solid Rocket Motor in support of the Ares/CLV first stage at ATK, Utah . Constellaton/Ares project. This image is extracted from a high definition video file and is the highest resolution available.

  6. Advanced multi-phase flow CFD model development for solid rocket motor flowfield analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1995-03-01

    A Navier-Stokes code, finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), is used to analyze the complicated internal flowfield of the SRM (solid rocket motor) to explore the impacts due to the effects of chemical reaction, particle dynamics, and slag accumulation on the solid rocket motor (SRM). The particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, and agglomeration models are included in present study to obtain a better understanding of the SRM design. Finite rate chemistry model is applied to simulate the chemical reaction effects. Hermsen correlation model is used for the combustion simulation. The evaporation model introduced by Spalding is utilized to include the heat transfer from the particulate phase to the gase phase due to the evaporation of the particles. A correlation of the minimum particle size for breakup expressed in terms of the Al/Al2O3 surface tension and shear force was employed to simulate the breakup of particles. It is assumed that the breakup occurs when the Weber number exceeds 6. A simple L agglomeration model is used to investigate the particle agglomeration. However, due to the large computer memory requirements for the agglomeration model, only 2D cases are tested with the agglomeration model. The VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is employed to simulate the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the turbulent dispersion effect of the particles. The flowfield analysis obtained using the FDNS code in the present research with finite rate chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, agglomeration, and VOG models will provide a design guide for the potential improvement of the SRM including the use of materials and the shape of nozzle geometry such that a better performance of the SRM can be achieved. The simulation of the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity can assist the designer to improve the design of

  7. Advanced Multi-phase Flow CFD Model Development for Solid Rocket Motor Flowfield Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Paul; Chen, Yen-Sen

    1995-01-01

    A Navier-Stokes code, finite difference Navier-Stokes (FDNS), is used to analyze the complicated internal flowfield of the SRM (solid rocket motor) to explore the impacts due to the effects of chemical reaction, particle dynamics, and slag accumulation on the solid rocket motor (SRM). The particulate multi-phase flowfield with chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, and agglomeration models are included in present study to obtain a better understanding of the SRM design. Finite rate chemistry model is applied to simulate the chemical reaction effects. Hermsen correlation model is used for the combustion simulation. The evaporation model introduced by Spalding is utilized to include the heat transfer from the particulate phase to the gase phase due to the evaporation of the particles. A correlation of the minimum particle size for breakup expressed in terms of the Al/Al2O3 surface tension and shear force was employed to simulate the breakup of particles. It is assumed that the breakup occurs when the Weber number exceeds 6. A simple L agglomeration model is used to investigate the particle agglomeration. However, due to the large computer memory requirements for the agglomeration model, only 2D cases are tested with the agglomeration model. The VOF (Volume of Fluid) method is employed to simulate the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity of the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM). Monte Carlo method is employed to calculate the turbulent dispersion effect of the particles. The flowfield analysis obtained using the FDNS code in the present research with finite rate chemical reaction, particle evaporation, combustion, breakup, agglomeration, and VOG models will provide a design guide for the potential improvement of the SRM including the use of materials and the shape of nozzle geometry such that a better performance of the SRM can be achieved. The simulation of the slag buildup in the aft-end cavity can assist the designer to improve the design of

  8. Some typical solid propellant rocket motors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandbergen, B.T.C.

    2013-01-01

    Typical Solid Propellant Rocket Motors (shortly referred to as Solid Rocket Motors; SRM's) are described with the purpose to form a database, which allows for comparative analysis and applications in practical SRM engineering.

  9. Nanoparticles for solid rocket propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characterization of several differently sized aluminium powders, by BET (specific surface), EM (electron microscopy), XRD (x-ray diffraction), and XPS (x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy), was performed in order to evaluate their application in solid rocket propellant compositions. These aluminium powders were used in manufacturing several laboratory composite solid rocket propellants, based on ammonium perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and hydroxil-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was an AP/HTPB/Al composition with 68/17/15% mass fractions respectively. The ballistic characterization of the propellants, in terms of steady burning rates, shows better performance for propellant compositions employing nano-aluminium when compared to micro-aluminium. Results obtained in the pressure range 1-70 bar show that by increasing the nano-Al mass fraction or decreasing the nano-Al size, larger steady burning rates are measured with essentially the same pressure sensitivity

  10. Advanced Flow Analysis Tools for Transient Solid Rocket Motor Simulations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The challenges of designing, developing, and fielding man-rated propulsion systems continue to increase as NASA's mission moves forward with evolving solid...

  11. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  12. Acoustic Measurements of Small Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda B.; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2010-01-01

    Rocket acoustic noise can induce loads and vibration on the vehicle as well as the surrounding structures. Models have been developed to predict these acoustic loads based on scaling existing solid rocket motor data. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center acoustics team has measured several small solid rocket motors (thrust below 150,000 lbf) to anchor prediction models. This data will provide NASA the capability to predict the acoustic environments and consequent vibro-acoustic response of larger rockets (thrust above 1,000,000 lbf) such as those planned for the NASA Constellation program. This paper presents the methods used to measure acoustic data during the static firing of small solid rocket motors and the trends found in the data.

  13. Infrared Imagery of Solid Rocket Exhaust Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Robert P.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test program consisted of a series of 18 solid rocket motor static firings, simulating the liftoff conditions of the Ares I five-segment Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Vehicle. Primary test objectives included acquiring acoustic and pressure data which will be used to validate analytical models for the prediction of Ares 1 liftoff acoustics and ignition overpressure environments. The test article consisted of a 5% scale Ares I vehicle and launch tower mounted on the Mobile Launch Pad. The testing also incorporated several Water Sound Suppression Systems. Infrared imagery was employed during the solid rocket testing to support the validation or improvement of analytical models, and identify corollaries between rocket plume size or shape and the accompanying measured level of noise suppression obtained by water sound suppression systems.

  14. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Orbital Technologies Corporation (ORBITEC) proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a highly-reliable, low-cost and...

  15. Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop a unique Advanced Vortex Hybrid Rocket Engine (AVHRE) to achieve a safe, highly-reliable, low-cost and uniquely versatile propulsion...

  16. Hydrodynamic Stability Analysis of Particle-Laden Solid Rocket Motors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluid-wall interactions within solid rocket motors can result in parietal vortex shedding giving rise to hydrodynamic instabilities, or unsteady waves, that translate into pressure oscillations. The oscillations can result in vibrations observed by the rocket, rocket subsystems, or payload, which can lead to changes in flight characteristics, design failure, or other undesirable effects. For many years particles have been embedded in solid rocket propellants with the understanding that their presence increases specific impulse and suppresses fluctuations in the flowfield. This study utilizes a two dimensional framework to understand and quantify the aforementioned two-phase flowfield inside a motor case with a cylindrical grain perforation. This is accomplished through the use of linearized Navier-Stokes equations with the Stokes drag equation and application of the biglobal ansatz. Obtaining the biglobal equations for analysis requires quantification of the mean flowfield within the solid rocket motor. To that end, the extended Taylor-Culick form will be utilized to represent the gaseous phase of the mean flowfield while the self-similar form will be employed for the particle phase. Advancing the mean flowfield by quantifying the particle mass concentration with a semi-analytical solution the finalized mean flowfield is combined with the biglobal equations resulting in a system of eight partial differential equations. This system is solved using an eigensolver within the framework yielding the entire spectrum of eigenvalues, frequency and growth rate components, at once. This work will detail the parametric analysis performed to demonstrate the stabilizing and destabilizing effects of particles within solid rocket combustion

  17. Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Dennis; Phelps, Jack; Perkins, Fred

    2010-01-01

    RSRM is a highly reliable human-rated Solid Rocket Motor: a) Largest diameter SRM to achieve flight status; b) Only human-rated SRM. RSRM reliability achieved by: a)Applying special attention to Process Control, Testing, and Postflight; b) Communicating often; c) Identifying and addressing issues in a disciplined approach; d) Identifying and fully dispositioning "out-of-family" conditions; e) Addressing minority opinions; and f) Learning our lessons.

  18. Characterization of Shear Strengths and Microstructures for Solid Rocket Motor Insulation Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Kyriakides, Steven Alan

    2007-01-01

    As advances in solid rocket technology push rocket motors to more extreme operating speeds and temperatures, it becomes increasingly important to have well-designed material systems capable of surviving these harsh conditions. One common component in these systems is the use of a fiber- and particle-reinforced EPDM insulation layer between the motor casing and the solid fuel to shield the casing from the temperatures of the burning fuel and from the high velocity of gas particles traveling w...

  19. Ocean recovery of Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junker, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Cost effective recovery of the expended Space-Shuttle Solid Rocket Boosters (SRB) from the ocean will result in significant overall cost savings to the Space Shuttle Program. The ocean recovery mission begins with the dispatching of the recovery team to the predicted splashdown area. The SRBs, drogue parachutes and main parachutes must be tracked, located, retrieved, and transported to land where they will be refurbished and recycled for reuse. Trade studies to be conducted will consider the recovery mission requirements and weigh the advantages, disadvantages and costs of various candidate recovery systems. Major parameters effecting the selection of the final system will ensure that the system will meet overall objectives. Large- and small-scale SRB model testing has been conducted to establish characteristics of SRBs during water entry, floating free and under tow.

  20. Solid Rocket Motor Design Using Hybrid Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Albarado

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A particle swarm/pattern search hybrid optimizer was used to drive a solid rocket motor modeling code to an optimal solution. The solid motor code models tapered motor geometries using analytical burn back methods by slicing the grain into thin sections along the axial direction. Grains with circular perforated stars, wagon wheels, and dog bones can be considered and multiple tapered sections can be constructed. The hybrid approach to optimization is capable of exploring large areas of the solution space through particle swarming, but is also able to climb “hills” of optimality through gradient based pattern searching. A preliminary method for designing tapered internal geometry as well as tapered outer mold-line geometry is presented. A total of four optimization cases were performed. The first two case studies examines designing motors to match a given regressive-progressive-regressive burn profile. The third case study studies designing a neutrally burning right circular perforated grain (utilizing inner and external geometry tapering. The final case study studies designing a linearly regressive burning profile for right circular perforated (tapered grains.

  1. Technical Overview of Plume Radiation from a Solid Rocket Motor

    OpenAIRE

    SAKURAI, Yasushi; Kimura, Hiroshi

    1986-01-01

    Current technology for calculation of plume radiation from a solid rocket motor is overviewed and a useful engineering model is reviewed and recommended for design purpose. A solid rocket motor plume is a conical cloud which contains cold scattering particles and hot emitting-absorbing particles. Radiation to aft-end equipment of spacecraft is a major concern of thermal design engineers. Radiative properties of the plume totally depends on the particle behaviors in the flow field and the anal...

  2. Rocket Engine Innovations Advance Clean Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    During launch countdown, at approximately T-7 seconds, the Space Shuttle Main Engines (SSMEs) roar to life. When the controllers indicate normal operation, the solid rocket boosters ignite and the shuttle blasts off. Initially, the SSMEs throttle down to reduce stress during the period of maximum dynamic pressure, but soon after, they throttle up to propel the orbiter to 17,500 miles per hour. In just under 9 minutes, the three SSMEs burn over 1.6 million pounds of propellant, and temperatures inside the main combustion chamber reach 6,000 F. To cool the engines, liquid hydrogen circulates through miles of tubing at -423 F. From 1981to 2011, the Space Shuttle fleet carried crew and cargo into orbit to perform a myriad of unprecedented tasks. After 30 years and 135 missions, the feat of engineering known as the SSME boasted a 100-percent flight success rate.

  3. An apparatus for sizing particulate matter in solid rocket motors.

    OpenAIRE

    Harris, Robert Kelly

    1984-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A light scattering apparatus to measure particle size (D₃₂) in a solid rocket motor was improved. Multiple consecutive scans of two photodiode arrays were accomplished with a pacing circuit and added memory. The device was calibrated using various suspended particle samples and found to make accurate measurements. Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory F04611-84-X-0009 http://archive.org/details/apparatusforsizi00h...

  4. Manufacturing Advanced Channel Wall Rocket Liners Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR will adapt and demonstrate a low cost flexible method of manufacturing channel wall liquid rocket nozzles and combustors, while providing developers a...

  5. Model based IVHM system for the solid rocket booster

    CERN Document Server

    Luchinsky, D G; Smelyanskiy, V N; Timucin, D A; Uckun, S

    2008-01-01

    We report progress in the development of a model-based hybrid probabilistic approach to an on-board IVHM for solid rocket boosters (SRBs) that can accommodate the abrupt changes of the model parameters in various nonlinear dynamical off-nominal regimes. The work is related to the ORION mission program. Specifically, a case breach fault for SRBs is considered that takes into account burning a hole through the rocket case, as well as ablation of the nozzle throat under the action of hot gas flow. A high-fidelity model (HFM) of the fault is developed in FLUENT in cylindrical symmetry. The results of the FLUENT simulations are shown to be in good agreement with quasi-stationary approximation and analytical solution of a system of one-dimensional partial differential equations (PDEs) for the gas flow in the combustion chamber and in the hole through the rocket case.

  6. Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Instability Modeling in COMSOL Multiphysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability modeling of Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) remains a topic of active research. Many rockets display violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process, acoustics, and steady-state gas dynamics. Recent advances in defining the energy transport of disturbances within steady flow-fields have been applied by combustion stability modelers to improve the analysis framework [1, 2, 3]. Employing this more accurate global energy balance requires a higher fidelity model of the SRM flow-field and acoustic mode shapes. The current industry standard analysis tool utilizes a one dimensional analysis of the time dependent fluid dynamics along with a quasi-three dimensional propellant grain regression model to determine the SRM ballistics. The code then couples with another application that calculates the eigenvalues of the one dimensional homogenous wave equation. The mean flow parameters and acoustic normal modes are coupled to evaluate the stability theory developed and popularized by Culick [4, 5]. The assumption of a linear, non-dissipative wave in a quiescent fluid remains valid while acoustic amplitudes are small and local gas velocities stay below Mach 0.2. The current study employs the COMSOL multiphysics finite element framework to model the steady flow-field parameters and acoustic normal modes of a generic SRM. The study requires one way coupling of the CFD High Mach Number Flow (HMNF) and mathematics module. The HMNF module evaluates the gas flow inside of a SRM using St. Robert's law to model the solid propellant burn rate, no slip boundary conditions, and the hybrid outflow condition. Results from the HMNF model are verified by comparing the pertinent ballistics parameters with the industry standard code outputs (i.e. pressure drop, thrust, ect.). These results are then used by the coefficient form of the mathematics module to determine the complex eigenvalues of the

  7. Star 48 solid rocket motor nozzle analyses and instrumented firings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The analyses and testing performed by NASA in support of an expanded and improved nozzle design data base for use by the U.S. solid rocket motor industry is presented. A production nozzle with a history of one ground failure and two flight failures was selected for analyses and testing. The stress analysis was performed with the Champion computer code developed by the U.S. Navy. Several improvements were made to the code. Strain predictions were made and compared to test data. Two short duration motor firings were conducted with highly instrumented nozzles. The first nozzle had 58 thermocouples, 66 strain gages, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. The second nozzle had 59 thermocouples, 68 strain measurements, and 8 bondline pressure measurements. Most of this instrumentation was on the nonmetallic parts, and provided significantly more thermal and strain data on the nonmetallic components of a nozzle than has been accumulated in a solid rocket motor test to date.

  8. Internal ballistics simulation of a solid propellant rocket motor

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Marc Faria

    2013-01-01

    In the design and development of solid propellant rocket motors, the use of numerical tools able to simulate, predict and reconstruct the behaviour of a given motor in all its operative conditions is particularly important in order to decrease all the planning and costs. This study is devoted to present an approach to the numerical simulation of a given SPRM internal ballistics, NAWC no. 13, during the quasi steady state by means of a commercial numerical tool, ANSYS FLUENT....

  9. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-01-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  10. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-11-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  11. Solid rocket booster thermal radiation model, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, G. H.; Lee, A. L.

    1976-01-01

    A solid rocket booster (SRB) thermal radiation model, capable of defining the influence of the plume flowfield structure on the magnitude and distribution of thermal radiation leaving the plume, was prepared and documented. Radiant heating rates may be calculated for a single SRB plume or for the dual SRB plumes astride the space shuttle. The plumes may be gimbaled in the yaw and pitch planes. Space shuttle surface geometries are simulated with combinations of quadric surfaces. The effect of surface shading is included. The computer program also has the capability to calculate view factors between the SRB plumes and space shuttle surfaces as well as surface-to-surface view factors.

  12. Modeling and Numerical Simulation of Solid Rocket Motors Internal Ballistics

    OpenAIRE

    CAVALLINI, ENRICO

    2010-01-01

    In the design and development of solid propellant rocket motors, the use of numerical tools able to simulate, predict and reconstruct the behavior of a given motor in all its operative conditions is particularly important in order to decrease all the planning times and costs. This work is devoted to present an approach to the numerical simulation of SRM internal ballistic during the entire combustion time (ignition transient, quasi steady state and tail-off) by means of a Q1D unsteady nume...

  13. Magnetic bearings: A key technology for advanced rocket engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girault, J. PH.

    1992-01-01

    For several years, active magnetic bearings (AMB) have demonstrated their capabilities in many fields, from industrial compressors to control wheel suspension for spacecraft. Despite this broad area, no significant advance has been observed in rocket propulsion turbomachinery, where size, efficiency, and cost are crucial design criteria. To this respect, Societe Europeenne de Propulsion (SEP) had funded for several years significant efforts to delineate the advantages and drawbacks of AMB applied to rocket propulsion systems. Objectives of this work, relative technological basis, and improvements are described and illustrated by advanced turbopump layouts. Profiting from the advantages of compact design in cryogenic environments, the designs show considerable improvements in engine life, performances, and reliability. However, these conclusions should still be tempered by high recurrent costs, mainly due to the space-rated electronics. Development work focused on this point and evolution of electronics show the possibility to decrease production costs by an order of magnitude.

  14. Demonstration of a sterilizable solid rocket motor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastrolia, E. J.; Santerre, G. M.; Lambert, W. L.

    1975-01-01

    A solid propellant rocket motor containing 60.9 Kg (134-lb) of propellant was successfully static fired after being subjected to eight heat sterilization cycles (three 54-hour cycles plus five 40-hour cycles) at 125 C (257 F). The test motor, a modified SVM-3 chamber, incorporated a flexible grain retention system of EPR rubber to relieve thermal shrinkage stresses. The propellant used in the motor was ANB-3438, and 84 wt% solids system (18 wt% aluminum) containing 66 wt% stabilized ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and a saturated hydroxylterminated polybutadiene binder. Bonding of the propellant to the EPR insulation (GenGard V-4030) was provided by the use of SD-886, an epoxy urethane restriction.

  15. A Review of Large Solid Rocket Motor Free Field Acoustics, Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Kenny, Robert Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    At the ATK facility in Utah, large full scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five segment version of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, which is for use on future launch vehicles. Since 2006, Acoustic measurements have been taken on large solid rocket motors at ATK. Both the four segment RSRM and the five segment RSRMV have been instrumented. Measurements are used to update acoustic prediction models and to correlate against vibration responses of the motor. Presentation focuses on two major sections: Part I) Unique challenges associated with measuring rocket acoustics Part II) Acoustic measurements summary over past five years

  16. Solid rocket booster internal flow analysis by highly accurate adaptive computational methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, C. Y.; Tworzydlo, W.; Oden, J. T.; Bass, J. M.; Cullen, C.; Vadaketh, S.

    1991-01-01

    The primary objective of this project was to develop an adaptive finite element flow solver for simulating internal flows in the solid rocket booster. Described here is a unique flow simulator code for analyzing highly complex flow phenomena in the solid rocket booster. New methodologies and features incorporated into this analysis tool are described.

  17. Analytical evaluation of the solid rocket motor nozzle surface recession by the alumina-carbon reaction

    OpenAIRE

    Matsukawa, Yutaka; Sato, Yutaka; 松川 豊; 佐藤 裕

    2008-01-01

    A theoretical model describing the chemical ablation of a solid rocket motor nozzle ablator by the alumina-carbon reaction is presented. An application of it to a typical solid rocket motor with a graphite nozzle ablator indicates a large influence of the reaction on the nozzle surface recession.

  18. Powder metallurgy bearings for advanced rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J. N.; Killman, B. J.; Munson, H.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional ingot metallurgy was pushed to the limit for many demanding applications including antifriction bearings. New systems require corrosion resistance, better fatigue resistance, and higher toughness. With conventional processing, increasing the alloying level to achieve corrosion resistance results in a decrease in other properties such as toughness. Advanced powder metallurgy affords a viable solution to this problem. During powder manufacture, the individual particle solidifies very rapidly; as a consequence, the primary carbides are very small and uniformly distributed. When properly consolidated, this uniform structure is preserved while generating a fully dense product. Element tests including rolling contact fatigue, hot hardness, wear, fracture toughness, and corrosion resistance are underway on eleven candidate P/M bearing alloys and results are compared with those for wrought 440C steel, the current SSME bearing material. Several materials which offer the promise of a significant improvement in performance were identified.

  19. Solid rocket motor conceptual design - The development of a design optimization expert system with a hypertext user interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clegern, James B.

    1993-06-01

    Solid rocket motor (SRM) design prototypes can be rapidly formulated and evaluated by the use of advanced computer-based methodologies that apply expert system and artificial intelligence software to the SRM design optimization processes. The research program that was carried out, and is reported in this paper, was to formulate a computer-based SRM expert system for motor design and optimization, with the assistance of a hypertext software algorithm that provides a user-friendly interface. With this interface for parameter input, the design engineer can quickly obtain rocket motor designs that satisfy the performance mission of the SRM, as well as meet criteria for optimized (minimum) motor mass. The computer-based software has been designated as the Solid Rocket Motor Conceptual Design Optimization System (SRMCDOS). The main purpose of this SRM design system is to aid the SRM design engineer in making the best initial design selections and thereby reducing the overall 'design cycle time' of a project.

  20. Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Karmarkar

    1952-09-01

    Full Text Available The rockets of World War II represented, not the invention of a new weapon, but the modernization of a very old one. As early as 1232 A.D, the Chinese launched rockets against the Mongols. About a hundred years later the knowledge of ledge of rockets was quite widespread and they were used to set fire to buildings and to terrorize the enemy. But as cannon developed, rockets declined in warfare. However rockets were used occasionally as weapons till about 1530 A.D. About this time improvements in artillery-rifled gun barrel and mechanism to absorb recoil-established a standard of efficiency with which rockets could not compare until World War II brought pew conditions

  1. Internal Flow Simulation of High-Performance Solid Rockets using a k-ωTurbulence Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    V.R. SANAL KUMAR; H.D. KIM; B.N. RAGHUNANDAN; T. SETOGUCHI; S. RAGHUNATHAN

    2005-01-01

    @@ For technological reasons many high-performance solid rocket motors are made from segmented propellant grains with non-uniform port geometry. In this paper parametric studies have been carried out to examine the geometric dependence of transient flow features in solid rockets with non-uniform ports. Numerical computations have been carried out in an inert simulator of solid propellant rocket motor with the aid of a standard k-ω turbulence model. It was seen that the damping of the temperature fluctuation is faster in solid rocket with convergent port than with divergent port geometry. We inferred that the damping of the flow fluctuations using the port geometry is a meaningful objective for the suppression and control of the instability and/or pressure/thrust oscillations during the starting transient of solid rockets.

  2. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quing, Xinlin; Beard, Shawn; Zhang, Chang

    2011-01-01

    Concepts of an autonomous and automated space-compliant diagnostic system were developed for conditioned-based maintenance (CBM) of rocket motors for space exploration vehicles. The diagnostic system will provide real-time information on the integrity of critical structures on launch vehicles, improve their performance, and greatly increase crew safety while decreasing inspection costs. Using the SMART Layer technology as a basis, detailed procedures and calibration techniques for implementation of the diagnostic system were developed. The diagnostic system is a distributed system, which consists of a sensor network, local data loggers, and a host central processor. The system detects external impact to the structure. The major functions of the system include an estimate of impact location, estimate of impact force at impacted location, and estimate of the structure damage at impacted location. This system consists of a large-area sensor network, dedicated multiple local data loggers with signal processing and data analysis software to allow for real-time, in situ monitoring, and longterm tracking of structural integrity of solid rocket motors. Specifically, the system could provide easy installation of large sensor networks, onboard operation under harsh environments and loading, inspection of inaccessible areas without disassembly, detection of impact events and impact damage in real-time, and monitoring of a large area with local data processing to reduce wiring.

  3. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - Accomplishment, Lessons, and a Culture of Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, D. R.; Phelps, W. J.

    2011-01-01

    The Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) represents the largest solid rocket motor (SRM) ever flown and the only human-rated solid motor. High reliability of the RSRM has been the result of challenges addressed and lessons learned. Advancements have resulted by applying attention to process control, testing, and postflight through timely and thorough communication in dealing with all issues. A structured and disciplined approach was taken to identify and disposition all concerns. Careful consideration and application of alternate opinions was embraced. Focus was placed on process control, ground test programs, and postflight assessment. Process control is mandatory for an SRM, because an acceptance test of the delivered product is not feasible. The RSRM maintained both full-scale and subscale test articles, which enabled continuous improvement of design and evaluation of process control and material behavior. Additionally RSRM reliability was achieved through attention to detail in post flight assessment to observe any shift in performance. The postflight analysis and inspections provided invaluable reliability data as it enables observation of actual flight performance, most of which would not be available if the motors were not recovered. RSRM reusability offered unique opportunities to learn about the hardware. NASA is moving forward with the Space Launch System that incorporates propulsion systems that takes advantage of the heritage Shuttle and Ares solid motor programs. These unique challenges, features of the RSRM, materials and manufacturing issues, and design improvements will be discussed in the paper.

  4. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Nozzle Joint 5 Redesign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lui, R. C.; Stratton, T. C.; LaMont, D. T.

    2003-01-01

    Torque tension testing of a newly designed Reusable Solid Rocket Motor nozzle bolted assembly was successfully completed. Test results showed that the 3-sigma preload variation was as expected at the required input torque level and the preload relaxation were within the engineering limits. A shim installation technique was demonstrated as a simple process to fill a shear lip gap between nozzle housings in the joint region. A new automated torque system was successfully demonstrated in this test. This torque control tool was found to be very precise and accurate. The bolted assembly performance was further evaluated using the Nozzle Structural Test Bed. Both current socket head cap screw and proposed multiphase alloy bolt configurations were tested. Results indicated that joint skip and bolt bending were significantly reduced with the new multiphase alloy bolt design. This paper summarizes all the test results completed to date.

  5. Scale Effects on Solid Rocket Combustion Instability Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Greatrix

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to understand and predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. A numerical model incorporating pertinent elements, such as a representative transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of scale effects (motor size, i.e., grain length and internal port diameter on influencing instability-related behaviour in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the motor’s size has a significant influence on transient pressure wave magnitude and structure, and on the appearance and magnitude of an associated base pressure rise.

  6. Ecological effects and environmental fate of solid rocket exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nimmo, B.; Stout, I. J.; Mickus, J.; Vickers, D.; Madsen, B.

    1974-01-01

    Specific target processes were classified as to the chemical, chemical-physical, and biological reactions and toxic effects of solid rocket emissions within selected ecosystems at Kennedy Space Center. Exposure of Citris seedlings, English peas, and bush beans to SRM exhaust under laboratory conditions demonstrated reduced growth rates, but at very high concentrations. Field studies of natural plant populations in three diverse ecosystems failed to reveal any structural damage at the concentration levels tested. Background information on elemental composition of selected woody plants from two terrestrial ecosystems is reported. LD sub 50 for a native mouse (peromysous gossypinus) exposed to SRM exhaust was determined to be 50 ppm/g body weight. Results strongly indicate that other components of the SRM exhaust act synergically to enhance the toxic effects of HCl gas when inhaled. A brief summary is given regarding the work on SRM exhaust and its possible impact on hatchability of incubating bird eggs.

  7. Tools for advanced simulations to nuclear propulsion systems in rockets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres Sepulveda, A.; Perez Vara, R.

    2004-07-01

    While chemical propulsion rockets have dominated space exploration, other forms of rocket propulsion based on nuclear power, electrostatic and magnetic drive, and other principles besides chemical reactions, have been considered from the earliest days of the field. The goal of most of these advanced rocket propulsion schemes is improved efficiency through higher exhaust velocities, in order to reduce the amount of fuel the rocket vehicle needs to carry, though generally at the expense of high thrust. Nuclear propulsion seems to be the most promising short term technology to plan realistic interplanetary missions. The development of a nuclear electric propulsion spacecraft shall require the development of models to analyse the mission and to understand the interaction between the related subsystems (nuclear reactor, electrical converter, power management and distribution, and electric propulsion) during the different phases of the mission. This paper explores the modelling of a nuclear electric propulsion (NEP) spacecraft type using EcosimPro simulation software. This software is a multi-disciplinary simulation tool with a powerful object-oriented simulation language and state-of-the-art solvers. EcosimPro is the recommended ESA simulation tool for environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) and has been used successfully within the framework of the European activities of the International Space Station programme. Furthermore, propulsion libraries for chemical and electrical propulsion are currently being developed under ESA contracts to set this tool as standard usage in the propulsion community. At present, there is not any workable NEP spacecraft, but a standardized-modular, multi-purpose interplanetary spacecraft for post-2000 missions, called ISC-2000, has been proposed in reference. The simulation model presented on this paper is based on the preliminary designs for this spacecraft. (Author)

  8. Thermodynamic cycle analysis of solid propellant air-turbo-rocket

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Xiang; CHEN Yu-chun; TU Qiu-ye; ZHANG Hong; CAI Yuan-hu

    2009-01-01

    Solid propellant air-turbo-rocket (SPATR) is an air-breathing propulsion system. A numerical model of performance and characteristics analysis for SPATR was presented and the corresponding computer program was written according to the operation characteristics of SPATR. The influence on the SPATR performance at design point caused by the gas generator exit parameters and compressor pressure ratio had been computed and analyzed in detail. The off-design perform-ance of SPATR at sea level and high altitude had also been computed. The performance of thrust and specific impulse for SPATR with different solid propellant had been compared at off-design points, and the off-design performance comparison had been made between fuel-rich and oxygen-rich. The computation results indicated that SPATR operates within wide range of Maeh number (0 ~3) and altitude (0~12 km), and SPATR possesses high specific thrust (1 200 N/(kg/s)) and high specific impulse (7000 N/ (kg/s)) when fuel-air ratio of combustor equals fuel-air ratio.

  9. Variations of Solid Rocket Motor Preliminary Design for Small TSTO launcher

    OpenAIRE

    Dumont, Etienne

    2012-01-01

    Several combinations of solid rocket motors and ignition strategies have been considered for a small Two Stage to Orbit (TSTO) launch vehicle based on a big solid rocket motor first stage and cryogenic upper stage propelled by the Vinci engine. In order to reach the target payload performance of about 1400 kg into GTO for the clean version and 2700 to 3000 kg for the boosted version, the influence of the selected solid rocket motors on the upper stage structure has been studied. Preliminary s...

  10. Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) Flight System Integration at Its Best

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, T. David; Kanner, Howard S.; Freeland, Donna M.; Olson, Derek T.

    2011-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) element integrates all the subsystems needed for ascent flight, entry, and recovery of the combined Booster and Motor system. These include the structures, avionics, thrust vector control, pyrotechnic, range safety, deceleration, thermal protection, and retrieval systems. This represents the only human-rated, recoverable and refurbishable solid rocket ever developed and flown. Challenges included subsystem integration, thermal environments and severe loads (including water impact), sometimes resulting in hardware attrition. Several of the subsystems evolved during the program through design changes. These included the thermal protection system, range safety system, parachute/recovery system, and others. Because the system was recovered, the SRB was ideal for data and imagery acquisition, which proved essential for understanding loads, environments and system response. The three main parachutes that lower the SRBs to the ocean are the largest parachutes ever designed, and the SRBs are the largest structures ever to be lowered by parachutes. SRB recovery from the ocean was a unique process and represented a significant operational challenge; requiring personnel, facilities, transportation, and ground support equipment. The SRB element achieved reliability via extensive system testing and checkout, redundancy management, and a thorough postflight assessment process. However, the in-flight data and postflight assessment process revealed the hardware was affected much more strongly than originally anticipated. Assembly and integration of the booster subsystems required acceptance testing of reused hardware components for each build. Extensive testing was done to assure hardware functionality at each level of stage integration. Because the booster element is recoverable, subsystems were available for inspection and testing postflight, unique to the Shuttle launch vehicle. Problems were noted and corrective actions were implemented as needed

  11. Maturation of Structural Health Management Systems for Solid Rocket Motors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solid rocket motor cases are subject to a variety of external environmental and loading conditions from cradle-to-grave. These conditions can significantly impact...

  12. Solid Rocket Booster Hydraulic Pump Port Cap Joint Load Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamwell, W. R.; Murphy, N. C.

    2004-01-01

    The solid rocket booster uses hydraulic pumps fabricated from cast C355 aluminum alloy, with 17-4 PH stainless steel pump port caps. Corrosion-resistant steel, MS51830 CA204L self-locking screw thread inserts are installed into C355 pump housings, with A286 stainless steel fasteners installed into the insert to secure the pump port cap to the housing. In the past, pump port cap fasteners were installed to a torque of 33 Nm (300 in-lb). However, the structural analyses used a significantly higher nut factor than indicated during tests conducted by Boeing Space Systems. When the torque values were reassessed using Boeing's nut factor, the fastener preload had a factor of safety of less than 1, with potential for overloading the joint. This paper describes how behavior was determined for a preloaded joint with a steel bolt threaded into steel inserts in aluminum parts. Finite element models were compared with test results. For all initial bolt preloads, bolt loads increased as external applied loads increased. For higher initial bolt preloads, less load was transferred into the bolt, due to external applied loading. Lower torque limits were established for pump port cap fasteners and additional limits were placed on insert axial deformation under operating conditions after seating the insert with an initial preload.

  13. Lidar measurements of solid rocket propellant fire particle plumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David M; Brown, Andrea M; Willitsford, Adam H; Dinello-Fass, Ryan; Airola, Marc B; Siegrist, Karen M; Thomas, Michael E; Chang, Yale

    2016-06-10

    This paper presents the first, to our knowledge, direct measurement of aerosol produced by an aluminized solid rocket propellant (SRP) fire on the ground. Such fires produce aluminum oxide particles small enough to loft high into the atmosphere and disperse over a wide area. These results can be applied to spacecraft launchpad accidents that expose spacecraft to such fires; during these fires, there is concern that some of the plutonium from the spacecraft power system will be carried with the aerosols. Accident-related lofting of this material would be the net result of many contributing processes that are currently being evaluated. To resolve the complexity of fire processes, a self-consistent model of the ground-level and upper-level parts of the plume was determined by merging ground-level optical measurements of the fire with lidar measurements of the aerosol plume at height during a series of SRP fire tests that simulated propellant fire accident scenarios. On the basis of the measurements and model results, the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) team was able to estimate the amount of aluminum oxide (alumina) lofted into the atmosphere above the fire. The quantification of this ratio is critical for a complete understanding of accident scenarios, because contaminants are transported through the plume. This paper provides an estimate for the mass of alumina lofted into the air. PMID:27409023

  14. Effects of Slag Ejection on Solid Rocket Motor Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesides, R. Harold; Purinton, David C.; Hengel, John E.; Skelley, Stephen E.

    1995-01-01

    In past firings of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) both static test and flight motors have shown small pressure perturbations occurring primarily between 65 and 80 seconds. A joint NASA/Thiokol team investigation concluded that the cause of the pressure perturbations was the periodic ingestion and ejection of molten aluminum oxide slag from the cavity around the submerged nozzle nose which tends to trap and collect individual aluminum oxide droplets from the approach flow. The conclusions of the team were supported by numerous data and observations from special tests including high speed photographic films, real time radiography, plume calorimeters, accelerometers, strain gauges, nozzle TVC system force gauges, and motor pressure and thrust data. A simplistic slag ballistics model was formulated to relate a given pressure perturbation to a required slag quantity. Also, a cold flow model using air and water was developed to provide data on the relationship between the slag flow rate and the chamber pressure increase. Both the motor and the cold flow model exhibited low frequency oscillations in conjunction with periods of slag ejection. Motor and model frequencies were related to scaling parameters. The data indicate that there is a periodicity to the slag entrainment and ejection phenomena which is possibly related to organized oscillations from instabilities in the dividing streamline shear layer which impinges on the underneath surface of the nozzle.

  15. Viscoelastic Modelling of Solid Rocket Propellants using Maxwell Fluid Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Maxwell fluid model consisting of a spring and a dashpot in series is applied for viscoelastic characterisation of solid rocket propellants. Suitable values of spring constant and damping coefficient wereemployed by least square variation of errors for generation of complete stress-strain curve in uniaxial tensile mode for case-bonded solid propellant formulations. Propellants from the same lot were tested at different strain rates. It was observed that change in spring constant, representing elastic part was very small with strain rate but damping constant varies significantly with variation in strain rate. For a typical propellant formulation, when strain rate was raised from 0.00037/s to 0.185/s, spring constant K changed from 5.5 MPato 7.9 MPa, but damping coefficient D was reduced from 1400 MPa-s to 4 MPa-s. For all strain rates, stress-strain curve was generated using Maxwell model and close matching with actual test curve was observed.This indicates validity of Maxwell fluid model for uniaxial tensile testing curves of case-bonded solid propellant formulations. It was established that at higher strain rate, damping coefficient becomes negligible as compared to spring constant. It was also observed that variation of spring constant is logarithmic with strain rate and that of damping coefficient follows power law. The correlation coefficients were introduced to ascertain spring constants and damping coefficients at any strain rate from that at a reference strain rate. Correlationfor spring constant needs a coefficient H, which is function of propellant formulation alone and not of test conditions and the equation developeds K2 = K1 + H ´ ln{(de2/dt/(de1/dt}. Similarly for damping coefficient D also another constant S is introduced and prediction formula is given by D2 = D1 ´ {(de2/dt/(de1/dt}S.Evaluating constants H and S at different strain rates validate this mathematical formulation for differentpropellant formulations

  16. Numerical Study on Similarity of Plume’s Infrared Radiation from Reduced Scaling Solid Rocket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoying Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Similarity of plume radiation between reduced scaling solid rocket models and full scale ones in ground conditions has been taken for investigation. Flow and radiation of plume from solid rockets with scaling ratio from 0.1 to 1 have been computed. The radiative transfer equation (RTE is solved by the finite volume method (FVM in infrared band 2~6 μm. The spectral characteristics of plume gases have been calculated with the weighted-sum-of-gray-gas (WSGG model, and those of the Al2O3 particles have been solved by the Mie scattering model. Our research shows that, with the decreasing scaling ratio of the rocket engine, the radiation intensity of the plume decreases with 1.5~2.5 power of the scaling ratio. The infrared radiation of the plume gases shows a strong spectral dependency, while that of the Al2O3 particles shows grey property. Spectral radiation intensity of the high temperature core of the solid rocket plume increases greatly in the peak absorption spectrum of plume gases. Al2O3 particle is the major radiation composition in the rocket plume, whose scattering coefficient is much larger than its absorption coefficient. There is good similarity between spectral variations of plumes from different scaling solid rockets. The directional plume radiation rises with the increasing azimuth angle.

  17. Advanced small rocket chambers. Option 3: 110 1bf Ir-Re rocket, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassowski, Donald M.; Schoenman, Leonard

    1995-02-01

    This report describes the AJ10-221, a high performance Iridium-coated Rhenium (Ir-Re) 110 lbf (490N) welded rocket chamber with 286:1 area ratio nozzle. This engine was designed, built, and hot fired for over 6 hours on this program. It demonstrated an I(s) of 321.8 sec, which is 10 sec higher than conventional 110 lbf silicide coated Cb chambers now in use. The approach used in this portion of the program was to demonstrate the performance improvement that can be made by the elimination of fuel film cooling and the use of a high temperature (4000F) (2200C) iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) rocket chamber. Detailed thermal, performance, mechanical, and dynamic design analyses of the full engine were conducted by Aerojet. Two Ir-Re chambers were built to the Aerojet design by Ultramet, using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Incorporation of a secondary mixing device or Boundary Layer Trip (BLT) within the combustion chamber (Aerojet Patents 4882904 and 4936091) results in improvement in flow uniformity, and a significant life and performance increase. The 110 lbf engine design was verified in bolt-up hardware tests at sea level and altitude. The effects of injector design on performance were studied. Two duplicate injectors were fabricated matching the preferred design and were demonstrated to be interchangeable in operation. One of these units was fabricated matching the preferred design and was demonstrated to be interchangeable in operation. One of these units was welded into a flight type thruster which was tested for an accumulated duration of 22,590 sec in 93 firings, one of which was a continuous burn of two hours. A design deficiency in the C-103 nozzle near the Re-Cb transition joint was discovered, studied and corrected design has been prepared. Workhardening studies have been conducted to investigate methods for increasing the low yield strength of the Re in the annealed conditions. An advanced 490N high performance engine has been demonstrated

  18. Advanced small rocket chambers. Option 3: 110 1bf Ir-Re rocket, volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassowski, Donald M.; Schoenman, Leonard

    1995-02-01

    This is the second part of a two-part report that describes the AJ10-221, a high performance iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) 110 lbf (490N) welded rocket chamber with 286:1 area ratio nozzle. This engine was designed, built, and hot fired for over 6 hours on this program. It demonstrated an I(s) of 321.8 sec, which is 10 sec higher than conventional 110 lbf silicide coated Cb chambers now in use. The approach used in this portion of the program was to demonstrate the performance improvement that can be made by the elimination of fuel film cooling and the use of a high temperature (4000 F) (2200 C) iridium-coated rhenium (Ir-Re) rocket chamber. Detailed thermal, performance, mechanical, and dynamic design analyses of the full engine were conducted by Aerojet. Two Ir-Re chambers were built to the Aerojet design by Ultramet, using the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. Incorporation of a secondary mixing device or Boundary Layer Trip (BLT) within the combustion chamber (Aerojet Patents 4882904 and 4936091) results in improvement in flow uniformity, and a significant life and performance increase. The 110 lbf engine design was verified in bolt-up hardware tests at sea level and altitude. The effects of injector design on performance were studied. Two duplicate injectors were fabricated matching the preferred design and were demonstrated to be interchangeable in operation. One of these units were welded into a flight type thruster which was tested for an accumulated duration of 22,590 sec in 93 firings, one of which was a continuous burn of two hours. A design deficiency in the C-103 nozzle near the Re-Cb transition joint was discovered, studied and corrected design has been prepared. Workhardening studies have been conducted to investigate methods for increasing the low yield strength of the Re in the annealed conditions. An advanced 490N high performance engine has been demonstrated which, when proven to be capable of withstanding launch vibration, is ready for

  19. Combustion and Magnetohydrodynamic Processes in Advanced Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, Lord Kahil

    2012-01-01

    A number of promising alternative rocket propulsion concepts have been developed over the past two decades that take advantage of unsteady combustion waves in order to produce thrust. These concepts include the Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine (PDRE), in which repetitive ignition, propagation, and reflection of detonations and shocks can create a high pressure chamber from which gases may be exhausted in a controlled manner. The Pulse Detonation Rocket Induced Magnetohydrodynamic Ejector (PDRIM...

  20. Mathematical Modelling of In-Chamber Processes in Hydrocombined Propellant Solid Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolai A. Obukhov

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available The special conditions of employment of commercial rockets in the sea environment has opened up new possibilities of improving motor performance. The interesting method suggests supplying water into the running motor. This paper reports the calculations and experiments carried out with solid propellant model setups. The results prove the validity of the proposed method and allow the refinement of calculation techniques for the prediction of solid rocket motor performance characteristics. The serviceability of the solid propellant charges working in combination with water is demonstrated. A mathematical model is proposed for the operation of a hydrocombined propellant motor with water and powdered additives applied to the combustion chamber."

  1. Advanced mechanics of solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bruhns, Otto T

    2003-01-01

    Mechanics, and in particular, the mechanics of solids, forms the basis of all engi­ neering sciences. It provides the essential foundations for understanding the action of forces on bodies, and the effects of these forces on the straining of the body on the one hand, and on the deformation and motion of the body on the other. Thus, it provides the solutions of many problems with which the would-be engineer is going to be confronted with on a daily basis. In addition, in engineering studies, mechanics has a more vital importance, which many students appreciate only much later. Because of its clear, and analyt­ ical setup, it aids the student to a great extent in acquiring the necessary degree of abstraction ability, and logical thinking, skills without which no engineer in the practice today would succeed. Many graduates have confirmed to me that learning mechanics is generally per­ ceived as difficult. On the other hand, they always also declared that the preoccu­ pation with mechanics made an essential c...

  2. Advanced research and technology program for advanced high pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  3. Advanced research and technology programs for advanced high-pressure oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, S. J.; Morea, S. F.

    1985-01-01

    A research and technology program for advanced high pressure, oxygen-hydrogen rocket propulsion technology is presently being pursued by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) to establish the basic discipline technologies, develop the analytical tools, and establish the data base necessary for an orderly evolution of the staged combustion reusable rocket engine. The need for the program is based on the premise that the USA will depend on the Shuttle and its derivative versions as its principal Earth-to-orbit transportation system for the next 20 to 30 yr. The program is focused in three principal areas of enhancement: (1) life extension, (2) performance, and (3) operations and diagnosis. Within the technological disciplines the efforts include: rotordynamics, structural dynamics, fluid and gas dynamics, materials fatigue/fracture/life, turbomachinery fluid mechanics, ignition/combustion processes, manufacturing/producibility/nondestructive evaluation methods and materials development/evaluation. An overview of the Advanced High Pressure Oxygen-Hydrogen Rocket Propulsion Technology Program Structure and Working Groups objectives are presented with highlights of several significant achievements.

  4. Combustion diagnosis for analysis of solid propellant rocket abort hazards: Role of spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid rocket propellant plume temperatures have been measured using spectroscopic methods as part of an ongoing effort to specify the thermal-chemical-physical environment in and around a burning fragment of an exploded solid rocket at atmospheric pressures. Such specification is needed for launch safety studies where hazardous payloads become involved with large fragments of burning propellant. The propellant burns in an off-design condition producing a hot gas flame loaded with burning metal droplets. Each component of the flame (soot, droplets and gas) has a characteristic temperature, and it is only through the use of spectroscopy that their temperature can be independently identified

  5. Solid rocket combustion simulator technology using the hybrid rocket for simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, Kumar

    1994-01-01

    The hybrid rocket is reexamined in light of several important unanswered questions regarding its performance. The well-known heat transfer limited burning rate equation is quoted, and its limitations are pointed out. Several inconsistencies in the burning rate determination through fuel depolymerization are explicitly discussed. The resolution appears to be through the postulate of (surface) oxidative degradation of the fuel. Experiments are initiated to study the fuel degradation in mixtures of nitrogen/oxygen in the 99.9 percent/0.1 percent to 98 percent/2 percent range. The overall hybrid combustion behavior is studied in a 2 in-diameter rocket motor, where a PMMA tube is used as the fuel. The results include detailed, real-time infrared video images of the combustion zone. Space- and time-averaged images give a broad indication of the temperature reached in the gases. A brief outline is shown of future work, which will specifically concentrate on the exploration of the role of the oxidizer transport to the fuel surface, and the role of the unburned fuel that is reported to escape below the classical time-averaged boundary layer flame.

  6. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Rolf

    2007-01-01

    The present volume 46 of Advances in Solid State Physics contains the written versions of selected invited lectures from the spring meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft which was held from 27 to 31 March 2006 in Dresden, Germany. Many topical talks given at the numerous symposia are included. Most of these were organized collaboratively by several of the divisions of the Arbeitskreis. The topis range from zero-dimensional physics in quantum dots, molecules and nanoparticles over one-dimensional physics in nanowires and 1d systems to more applied subjects like optoelectronics and materials science in thin films. The contributions span the whole width of solid-state physics from truly basic science to applications.

  7. Seismic tests at the HDR facility using explosives and solid propellant rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In blast tests the HDR reactor building and its mechanical equipment were subjected to earthquake-type excitations through the soil and the foundation. A series of six tests was carried out, two tests being made with HDR facility under operating conditions (BWR conditions, 2850C, 70 bar). The charges were placed in boreholes at a depth of 4 to 10 m and a distance of 16 to 25 m from the reactor building. The tests with solid propellant rockets were made in order to try a new excitation technique. The rockets used in these tests were of compact design and had a short combustion period (500 ms) at high constant thrust (100 kN per combustion chamber). These rockets were fixed to the concrete dome of the building in such a way that the thrust generated during the combustion of the propellant resulted in an impulsive load acting on the building. This type of excitation was selected with a view to investigating the global effects of the load case 'aircraft impact' on the building and the mechanical equipment. In the four tests made so far, up to four rockets were ignited simultaneously, so that the maximum impulse was 2 x 105 Ns. The excitation level can be markedly increased by adding further rockets. This excitation technique was characterised by excellent reproducibility of the load parameters. (orig./HP)

  8. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Rolf

    2008-01-01

    The present volume 47 of the Advances in Solid State Physics contains the written version of a large number of the invited talks of the 2007 Spring Meeting of the Arbeitskreis Festkörperphysik which was held in Regensburg, Germany, from March 26 to 30, 2007 in conjunction with the 71st Annual Meeting of the Deutsche Physikalische Gesellschaft.It gives an overview of the present status of solid state physics where low-dimensional systems such as quantum dots and quantum wires are dominating. The importance of magnetic materials is reflected by the large number of contributions in the part dealing with ferromagnetic films and particles. One of the most exciting achievements of the last couple of years is the successful application of electrical contacts to and the investigation of single layers of graphene. This exciting physics is covered in Part IV of this book. Terahertz physics is another rapidly moving field which is presented here by five contributions. Achievements in solid state physics are only rarely...

  9. Estimation of Pressure Index and Temperature Sensitivity Coefficient of Solid Rocket Propellants by Static Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Burning rate of a solid rocket propellant depends on pressure and temperature. Conventional strand burner and Crawford bomb test on propellant strands was conducted to assess these dependent parameters. However, behaviour of propellant in rocket motor is different from its behaviour in strand form. To overcome this anomaly, data from static evaluation of rocket motor was directly used for assessment of these burningrate controlling parameters. The conventional empirical power law (r=aoexp[p{T-To}]Pn was considered and a method was evolved for determination of pressure index (n and temperature sensitivity coefficient (p of burning rate for solid rocket propellants from static evaluation data. Effect of pressure index and temperature sensitivity coefficient on firing curve is also depicted. Propellant grain was fired in progressive mode to cover a very wide pressure range of 50 kg/cm2 to 250 kg/cm2 and propellant burning rate index was calculated to be 0.32 in the given pressure range. Propellant grain was fired at +35 °C and –20 °C temperatures and temperature sensitivity coefficient of burning rate was calculated to be 0.27 % per °C. Since both the values were evaluated from realised static evaluation curves, these are more realistic and accurate compared to data generated by conventional methods.Defence Science Journal, 2009, 59(6, pp.666-669, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.59.1573

  10. Transient simulation of chamber flowfield in a rod-and-tube configuration solid rocket motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, DRDC Valcartier of the Canadian Department of National Defence is designing a prototype rod-and-tube configuration solid propellant rocket motor that will propel a hypersonic velocity missile. This configuration will incorporate a very low port-to-throat area ratio, which in turn results in very high velocity propellant gas traveling across burning propellant surfaces, particularly near the nozzle end of the rocket. This causes an augmentation in the propellant burning rate. While numerical and lumped parameter models are available to design and analyze solid propellant rocket motors and nozzles, many of them provide solutions based on the assumption of quasi-steady flow. Due to the high pressure, high velocity and highly transient nature of the flows expected in the motor under design, it is believed that a CFD simulation will better model the time-dependent phenomena that occur during the functioning of a motor of this type. This simulation couples the fluid dynamics and heat transfer of the gas flowfield within the rocket port to the nozzle and the regression rate of the propellant. By incorporating the regression of the propellant surfaces into the model, the information provided by the resulting time-accurate solution will enable a much improved understanding of the flow phenomena within this rod-and-tube grain motor and a better prediction of the internal ballistics of the motor, which in turn will help in the design of both the motor and the nozzle. (author)

  11. Characterisation of Materials used in Flex Bearings of Large Solid Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CH.V. Ram Mohan

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Solid rocket motors are propulsion devices for both satellite launchers and missiles, which require guidance and steering to fly along a programmed trajectory and to compensate for flight disturbances. A typical solid rocket motor consists of motor case, solid propellant grain, motor insulation, igniter and nozzle. In most solid rocket motors, thrust vector control (TVC is required. One of the most efficient methods of TVC is by flex nozzle system. The flex nozzle consists of a flexible bearing made of an elastomeric material alternating with reinforcement rings of metallic or composite material. The material characterisation of AFNOR 15CDV6 steel and the natural rubber-based elastomer developed for use in flex nozzle are discussed. This includes testing, modelling of the material, selection of a material model suitable for analysis, and the validation of material model.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.264-269, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.52

  12. SIMULATION OF THE ACCIDENTAL POLLUTION AFTER THE EMERGENCY IN TO THE STORAGE OF ROCKET SOLID PROPELLANT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Development of the operational numerical model to compute contamination of the atmosphere over Pavlograd city in the case of solid rocket propellant ignition at the storage. Methodology. To simulate the toxic chemical dispersion (product of the solid rocket propellant firing the equation of convective-diffusion transfer is used. This equation takes into account the toxic chemical dispersion in the atmosphere by wind and the atmosphere diffusion. To calculate the process of the indoor contamination in the case of the contaminated air infiltration a balance model is used. This model takes into account the ventilation flow rate, volume of the room, concentration of toxic chemical in the inlet air. To compute the ventilation flow rate the empirical model was used. The implicit change–triangle difference scheme was used for the numerical integration of the governing equation. FORTRAN language was used to develop code on the basis of the created numerical model. On the basis of the developed numeral model numerical experiment was carried out which allowed to estimate the level of atmosphere contamination in Pavlograd city. Findings. The operational model allows predicting quickly the hitting zone dimensions. The developed model was used to estimate risk of people toxic hitting in the residential districts of Pavlograd city. Originality. A numeral model allows to estimate the risk of toxic hitting of people in Pavlograd city in the case of an accident at the of solid rocket propellant storage. Practical value. The developed numeral model can be used for the quick estimation of risk for people in the city after toxic chemical release at the solid propellant storage. The developed numerical model solves the problem to assess the consequences for the population at ignition of solid rocket propellant in storage.

  13. The Repair and Return to Flight of Solid Rocket Booster Forward Skirt Serial Number 20022

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, T. W.; Jones, C. S.; Honeycutt, J. H., Sr.

    2008-01-01

    On April 5, 1991, a solid rocket booster (SRB) forward skirt serial number (S/N) 20022 sustained buckling damage during water impact after the launch of Space Transportation System Flight 37 (STS-37). As of that date, five forward skirts had been lost during water impact. Repair attempts began with the least damaged skirt available (S/N 20022). Sp ecial hydraulic tooling was used to remove buckled areas of the skirt. Afterwards, its aft clevis pinholes were found to be out of alignment with the redesigned solid rocket motor (RSRM) check gauge, but weld passes were used to correct this condition. Meanwhile, USA Analytics generated mechanical property data for buckled and subsequently debuckled material. Their analysis suggested that structural integrity might be improved by adding stringer reinforcements, stiffeners, to the aft bay section of the skirt. This improvement was recommended as a fleet modification to be implemented on a case-by-case basis.

  14. A computer simulation of the afterburning processes occurring within solid rocket motor plumes in the troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomberg, R. I.; Stewart, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    As part of a continuing study of the environmental effects of solid rocket motor (SRM) operations in the troposphere, a numerical model was used to simulate the afterburning processes occurring in solid rocket motor plumes and to predict the quantities of potentially harmful chemical species which are created. The calculations include the effects of finite-rate chemistry and turbulent mixing. It is found that the amount of NO produced is much less than the amount of HCl present in the plume, that chlorine will appear predominantly in the form of HCl although some molecular chlorine is present, and that combustion is complete as is evident from the predominance of carbon dioxide over carbon monoxide.

  15. Discrimination for ablative control mechanism in solid-propellant rocket nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The ablation in solid-propellant rocket nozzle is a coupling process resulted by chemistry, heat and mass transfer. Based on the heat and mass transfer theory, the aero-thermo-dynamic, and thermo-chemical kinetics, the thermal-chemical ablation model is established. Simulations are completed on the heat flow field and chemical ablation in the nozzle with different concentrations, frequency factors and activation energy of H2. The calculation results show that the concentration and the activation energy of H2 can provoke the transformation of control mechanism, whereas the influence brought by the frequency factor of H2 is feeble under a high-temperature and high-pressure combustion circumstance. The discrimination for ablative control mechanism is dependent on both concentration and activation energy of H2. This study will be useful in handling ablation and thermal protection problem in the design of solid-propellant rocket.

  16. Reusable Rocket Engine Advanced Health Management System. Architecture and Technology Evaluation: Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettit, C. D.; Barkhoudarian, S.; Daumann, A. G., Jr.; Provan, G. M.; ElFattah, Y. M.; Glover, D. E.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we proposed an Advanced Health Management System (AHMS) functional architecture and conducted a technology assessment for liquid propellant rocket engine lifecycle health management. The purpose of the AHMS is to improve reusable rocket engine safety and to reduce between-flight maintenance. During the study, past and current reusable rocket engine health management-related projects were reviewed, data structures and health management processes of current rocket engine programs were assessed, and in-depth interviews with rocket engine lifecycle and system experts were conducted. A generic AHMS functional architecture, with primary focus on real-time health monitoring, was developed. Fourteen categories of technology tasks and development needs for implementation of the AHMS were identified, based on the functional architecture and our assessment of current rocket engine programs. Five key technology areas were recommended for immediate development, which (1) would provide immediate benefits to current engine programs, and (2) could be implemented with minimal impact on the current Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) and Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) engine controllers.

  17. Assessment of tbe Performance of Ablative Insulators Under Realistic Solid Rocket Motor Operating Conditions (a Doctoral Dissertation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Ablative insulators are used in the interior surfaces of solid rocket motors to prevent the mechanical structure of the rocket from failing due to intense heating by the high-temperature solid-propellant combustion products. The complexity of the ablation process underscores the need for ablative material response data procured from a realistic solid rocket motor environment, where all of the potential contributions to material degradation are present and in their appropriate proportions. For this purpose, the present study examines ablative material behavior in a laboratory-scale solid rocket motor. The test apparatus includes a planar, two-dimensional flow channel in which flat ablative material samples are installed downstream of an aluminized solid propellant grain and imaged via real-time X-ray radiography. In this way, the in-situ transient thermal response of an ablator to all of the thermal, chemical, and mechanical erosion mechanisms present in a solid rocket environment can be observed and recorded. The ablative material is instrumented with multiple micro-thermocouples, so that in-depth temperature histories are known. Both total heat flux and thermal radiation flux gauges have been designed, fabricated, and tested to characterize the thermal environment to which the ablative material samples are exposed. These tests not only allow different ablative materials to be compared in a realistic solid rocket motor environment but also improve the understanding of the mechanisms that influence the erosion behavior of a given ablative material.

  18. Initial Test Firing Results for Solid CO/GOX Cryogenic Hybrid Rocket Engine for Mars ISRU Propulsion Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Eric E.; St. Clair, Christopher P.; Chiaverini, Martin J.; Knuth, William H.; Gustafson, Robert J.; Gramer, Daniel J.

    1999-01-01

    ORBITEC is developing methods for producing, testing, and utilizing Mars-based ISRU fuel/oxidizer combinations to support low cost, planetary surface and flight propulsion and power systems. When humans explore Mars we will need to use in situ resources that are available, such as: energy (solar); gases or liquids for life support, ground transportation, and flight to and from other surface locations and Earth; and materials for shielding and building habitats and infrastructure. Probably the easiest use of Martian resources to reduce the cost of human exploration activities is the use of the carbon and oxygen readily available from the CO2 in the Mars atmosphere. ORBITEC has conducted preliminary R&D that will eventually allow us to reliably use these resources. ORBITEC is focusing on the innovative use of solid CO as a fuel. A new advanced cryogenic hybrid rocket propulsion system is suggested that will offer advantages over LCO/LOX propulsion, making it the best option for a Mars sample return vehicle and other flight vehicles. This technology could also greatly support logistics and base operations by providing a reliable and simple way to store solar or nuclear generated energy in the form of chemical energy that can be used for ground transportation (rovers/land vehicles) and planetary surface power generators. This paper describes the overall concept and the test results of the first ever solid carbon monoxide/oxygen rocket engine firing.

  19. Palynological Investigation of Post-Flight Solid Rocket Booster Foreign Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Linda; Jarzen, David

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of foreign material in a drain tube, from the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) of a recent Space Shuttle mission, was identified as pollen. The source of the pollen is from deposits made by bees, collecting pollen from plants found at the Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida. The pollen is determined to have been present in the frustum drain tubes before the shuttle flight. During the flight the pollen did not undergo thermal maturation.

  20. Scale Effects on Quasi-Steady Solid Rocket Internal Ballistic Behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    David R. Greatrix

    2010-01-01

    The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor’s performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simula...

  1. Study of plasticizer diffusion in a solid rocket motor´s bondline

    OpenAIRE

    Juliano Libardi; Sérgio P. Ravagnani; Ana Marlene F. Morais; Antonio Roque Cardoso

    2009-01-01

    This work aims to determine the diffusion coefficient of the plasticizers dibutyl phthalate (DBP), dioctyl phthalate (DOP) and dioctyl azelate (DOZ) on the internal insulating layer of solid rocket motors. These plasticizers are originally present in the layers of rubber, liner and propellant, respectively. This species are not chemically bonded and tend to diffuse from propellant to insulating and vice versa. A computer program based on the mathematical model of Fick’s second Law of diffusio...

  2. Ethylene-propylene Diene Rubber as a Futuristic Elastomer for Insulation of Solid Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Bhuvaneswari

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The study carried out so far on the application of ethylene-propylene diene rubber (EPDMin the field of insulation of case bonded solid rocket motors has been reviewed. The variousstudies by the authors (unpublished work have also been reported. All these findings bring outthe excellent potential of EPDM as insulator in view of its ageing resistance, low-temperatureflexibility, low erosion rate, and low specific gravity.

  3. Numerical Simulation of a Dual Pulse Solid Rocket Motor Flow Field

    OpenAIRE

    Afroz Javed; Manna, P; Debasis Chakraborty

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations are carried out for the internal flow field of a dual pulse solid rocket motor port to understand the flow behaviour. Three dimensional Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes equations are solved alongwith shear stress transport turbulence model using commercial code. The combustion gas is assumed as a mixture of alumina and gases and single phase flow calculations are done with the thermo chemical properties provided for the mixture. The simulation captures all the essential f...

  4. Ariane 5 solid rocket booster dynamic behavior with respect to pressure oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durin, G.; Bouvier, F.; Mastrangelo, G.; Robert, E.

    2011-10-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to simulate the dynamic behavior of the Ariane 5 Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) excited by internal pressure oscillations. These pressure oscillations have sliding frequencies close to acoustic natural frequencies and changing amplitudes. Because the modal behavior of the booster is also continuously changing during the flight due to propellant burning, predictions with finite-element (FE) modeling (modal analyses, harmonic and transient responses) are necessary to predict and understand the dynamic behavior of the booster.

  5. Advances in Solid State Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Haug, Rolf

    2009-01-01

    The present volume 48 of the Advances in Solid State Physics contains the written version of a large number of the invited talks of the 2008 Spring Meeting of the DPG section Condensed Matter Physics (Sektion kondensierte Materie der DPG) which was held in Berlin, Germany, and gives a nice overview of the present status of condensed matter physics. Low-dimensional systems are dominating the field and especially nanowires and quantum dots. In recent years one learned how to produce nanowires directly during a growth process. Therefore, a number of articles is related to such nanowires. In nanoparticles and quantum dots, the dimensionality is further reduced and we learn more and more how to produce such systems in a defined way and what effects result from the confinement in all three dimensions. Spin effects and magnetism is another important field of present-day research in solid state physics. The third chapter covers this physics. The growing interest into organic materials and biological systems is reflec...

  6. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-01-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  7. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion for Manned Deep Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterberg, F.

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion can there be refuelled. To obtain a high thrust with high specific impulse favours the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of a propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on Earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, making obsolete the ignition of deuterium-tritium with a laser, where 80% of the energy goes into neutrons, this would also mean a breakthrough in fusion research, and therefore would justify the large development costs.

  8. Advanced Deuterium Fusion Rocket Propulsion For Manned Deep Space Missions

    CERN Document Server

    Winterberg, Dr Friedwardt

    2009-01-01

    Excluding speculations about future breakthrough discoveries in physics, it is shown that with what is at present known, and also what is technically feasible, manned space flight to the limits of the solar system and beyond deep into the Oort cloud is quite well possible. Using deuterium as the rocket fuel of choice, abundantly available on the comets of the Oort cloud, rockets driven by deuterium fusion, can there be refueled. To obtain a high thrust with a high specific impulse, favors the propulsion by deuterium micro-bombs, and it is shown that the ignition of deuterium micro-bombs is possible by intense GeV proton beams, generated in space by using the entire spacecraft as a magnetically insulated billion volt capacitor. The cost to develop this kind of propulsion system in space would be very high, but it can also be developed on earth by a magnetically insulated Super Marx Generator. Since the ignition of deuterium is theoretically possible with the Super Marx Generator, rather than deuterium-tritium ...

  9. Advances for laser ignition of internal combustion and rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The scope of the PhD thesis presented here is the investigation of theoretical and practical aspects of laser-induced spark ignition and laser thermal ignition. Laser ignition systems are currently undergoing a rapidly development with growing intensity involving more and more research groups who mainly concentrate on the field of car and large combustion engines. This research is primarily driven by the engagement to meet the increasingly strict emission limits and by the intention to use the limited energy reserves more efficiently. For internal combustion engines, laser plasma-induced ignition will allow to combine the goals for legally required reductions of pollutant emissions and higher engine efficiencies. Also for rocket engines laser ignition turns out to be very attractive. A highly reliable ignition system like laser ignition would represent an option for introducing non-toxic propellants in order to replace highly toxic and carcinogenic hydrazine-based propellants commonly used in launch vehicle upper stages and satellites. The most important results on laser ignition and laser plasma generation, accomplished by the author and, in some respects, enriched by cooperation with colleagues are presented in the following. The emphasis of this thesis is placed on the following issues: - Two-color effects on laser plasma generation - Theoretical considerations about the focal volume concerning plasma generation - Plasma transmission experiments - Ignition experiments on laser-induced ignition - Ignition experiments on thermally-induced ignition - Feasibility study on laser ignition of rocket engines The purpose of the two-color laser plasma experiments is to investigate possible constructive interference effects of driving fields that are not monochromatic, but contain (second) harmonic radiation with respect to the goal of lowering the plasma generation threshold. Such effects have been found in a number of related processes, such as laser ablation or high

  10. Thermo-Structural Response Caused by Structure Gap and Gap Design for Solid Rocket Motor Nozzles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The thermo-structural response of solid rocket motor nozzles is widely investigated in the design of modern rockets, and many factors related to the material properties have been considered. However, little work has been done to evaluate the effects of structure gaps on the generation of flame leaks. In this paper, a numerical simulation was performed by the finite element method to study the thermo-structural response of a typical nozzle with consideration of the structure gap. Initial boundary conditions for thermo-structural simulation were defined by a quasi-1D model, and then coupled simulations of different gap size matching modes were conducted. It was found that frictional interface treatment could efficiently reduce the stress level. Based on the defined flame leak criteria, gap size optimization was carried out, and the best gap matching mode was determined for designing the nozzle. Testing experiment indicated that the simulation results from the proposed method agreed well with the experimental results. It is believed that the simulation method is effective for investigating thermo-structural responses, as well as designing proper gaps for solid rocket motor nozzles.

  11. Modal Survey of ETM-3, A 5-Segment Derivative of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, D.; Townsend, J.; Kappus, K.; Driskill, T.; Torres, I.; Parks, R.

    2005-01-01

    The complex interactions between internal motor generated pressure oscillations and motor structural vibration modes associated with the static test configuration of a Reusable Solid Rocket Motor have potential to generate significant dynamic thrust loads in the 5-segment configuration (Engineering Test Motor 3). Finite element model load predictions for worst-case conditions were generated based on extrapolation of a previously correlated 4-segment motor model. A modal survey was performed on the largest rocket motor to date, Engineering Test Motor #3 (ETM-3), to provide data for finite element model correlation and validation of model generated design loads. The modal survey preparation included pretest analyses to determine an efficient analysis set selection using the Effective Independence Method and test simulations to assure critical test stand component loads did not exceed design limits. Historical Reusable Solid Rocket Motor modal testing, ETM-3 test analysis model development and pre-test loads analyses, as well as test execution, and a comparison of results to pre-test predictions are discussed.

  12. Structural and mechanical design challenges of space shuttle solid rocket boosters separation and recovery subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodis, W. R.; Runkle, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    The design of the space shuttle solid rocket booster (SRB) subsystems for reuse posed some unique and challenging design considerations. The separation of the SRBs from the cluster (orbiter and external tank) at 150,000 ft when the orbiter engines are running at full thrust meant the two SRBs had to have positive separation forces pushing them away. At the same instant, the large attachments that had reacted launch loads of 7.5 million pounds thrust had to be servered. These design considerations dictated the design requirements for the pyrotechnics and separation rocket motors. The recovery and reuse of the two SRBs meant they had to be safely lowered to the ocean, remain afloat, and be owed back to shore. In general, both the pyrotechnic and recovery subsystems have met or exceeded design requirements. In twelve vehicles, there has only been one instance where the pyrotechnic system has failed to function properly.

  13. Introduction to rocket science and engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, Travis S

    2009-01-01

    What Are Rockets? The History of RocketsRockets of the Modern EraRocket Anatomy and NomenclatureWhy Are Rockets Needed? Missions and PayloadsTrajectoriesOrbitsOrbit Changes and ManeuversBallistic Missile TrajectoriesHow Do Rockets Work? ThrustSpecific ImpulseWeight Flow RateTsiolkovsky's Rocket EquationStagingRocket Dynamics, Guidance, and ControlHow Do Rocket Engines Work? The Basic Rocket EngineThermodynamic Expansion and the Rocket NozzleExit VelocityRocket Engine Area Ratio and LengthsRocket Engine Design ExampleAre All Rockets the Same? Solid Rocket EnginesLiquid Propellant Rocket Engines

  14. A Simplified Coupled Structural-Flowfield Analysis Of Solid Rocket Motors Ignition Transient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallini, E.; Favini, B.; Serraglia, F.; Di Giacinto, M.; Steelant, J.

    2011-05-01

    Ignition transient of a solid rocket motor can be characterized by strong unsteady phenomena such as waves propagation and pressure oscillations inside the combustion chamber. Depending on their frequencies and their amplitude, these oscillations can generate undesirable effects on the launcher, such as thrust fluctuations and transient loads on structures and-or payload equipments. This paper wants to present a simplified flow field/structural model based on a quasi-1D unsteady model of the ignition transient internal ballistics (SPIT) coupled with a simplified structural model, able to account for the radial dynamics of the grain and SRM casing, with the assumption of a standard linear elastic behavior of the structure. The parametric analysis performed with the coupled internal ballistics/structural model allows to show and evaluate some effects in the chamber pressurization rate, when reducing the elastic modulus of the grain propellant towards small values. Concerning the dynamics aspects of the fluid/structural coupled system, instead, a small but clear coupling between the acoustic flow field phenomena and structural dynamics is possible especially, as expected, when both fundamental oscillatory phenomena fall in the same range of frequency. The results and the parametric analysis with the fluid- structural model developed are shown for two solid rocket motors of the new European launcher VEGA: P80FW, first solid stage and Zefiro 9 old version of the third solid stage.

  15. Flight demonstration of flight termination system and solid rocket motor ignition using semiconductor laser initiated ordnance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Norman R.; Maxfield, B.; Boucher, C.

    1995-01-01

    Solid State Laser Initiated Ordnance (LIO) offers new technology having potential for enhanced safety, reduced costs, and improved operational efficiency. Concerns over the absence of programmatic applications of the technology, which has prevented acceptance by flight programs, should be abated since LIO has now been operationally implemented by the Laser Initiated Ordnance Sounding Rocket Demonstration (LOSRD) Program. The first launch of solid state laser diode LIO at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) occurred on March 15, 1995 with all mission objectives accomplished. This project, Phase 3 of a series of three NASA Headquarters LIO demonstration initiatives, accomplished its objective by the flight of a dedicated, all-LIO sounding rocket mission using a two-stage Nike-Orion launch vehicle. LIO flight hardware, made by The Ensign-Bickford Company under NASA's first Cooperative Agreement with Profit Making Organizations, safely initiated three demanding pyrotechnic sequence events, namely, solid rocket motor ignition from the ground and in flight, and flight termination, i.e., as a Flight Termination System (FTS). A flight LIO system was designed, built, tested, and flown to support the objectives of quickly and inexpensively putting LIO through ground and flight operational paces. The hardware was fully qualified for this mission, including component testing as well as a full-scale system test. The launch accomplished all mission objectives in less than 11 months from proposal receipt. This paper concentrates on accomplishments of the ordnance aspects of the program and on the program's implementation and results. While this program does not generically qualify LIO for all applications, it demonstrated the safety, technical, and operational feasibility of those two most demanding applications, using an all solid state safe and arm system in critical flight applications.

  16. Simulation of an advanced techniques of ion propulsion Rocket system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakkiyaraj, R.

    2016-07-01

    The ion propulsion rocket system is expected to become popular with the development of Deuterium,Argon gas and Hexagonal shape Magneto hydrodynamic(MHD) techniques because of the stimulation indirectly generated the power from ionization chamber,design of thrust range is 1.2 N with 40 KW of electric power and high efficiency.The proposed work is the study of MHD power generation through ionization level of Deuterium gas and combination of two gaseous ions(Deuterium gas ions + Argon gas ions) at acceleration stage.IPR consists of three parts 1.Hexagonal shape MHD based power generator through ionization chamber 2.ion accelerator 3.Exhaust of Nozzle.Initially the required energy around 1312 KJ/mol is carrying out the purpose of deuterium gas which is changed to ionization level.The ionized Deuterium gas comes out from RF ionization chamber to nozzle through MHD generator with enhanced velocity then after voltage is generated across the two pairs of electrode in MHD.it will produce thrust value with the help of mixing of Deuterium ion and Argon ion at acceleration position.The simulation of the IPR system has been carried out by MATLAB.By comparing the simulation results with the theoretical and previous results,if reaches that the proposed method is achieved of thrust value with 40KW power for simulating the IPR system.

  17. Dry-coupled Pulse Echo Ultrasonic Inspection Methodology for Solid Graphite Products of Rocket Boosters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.K. Ravindran

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available High modulus solid graphite products are used in nozzle throats of solid rocket boosters. Functionally, nozzle throats are critical and hence require to be inspected thoroughly. Ultrasonic method can be utilised for detecting tight defects/cracks and estimating material properties, such as elastic modulus, grain size, uniformity of structure, etc. For ultrasonic energy to pass to the material, a liquid coupling medium is used conventionally, and hence, commercially available transducers are meant for usage with a liquid couplant. Such a liquid couplant is harmful to graphite products and hence cannot be used. Replaceable solid couplant transducer faces have been developed that can be used on conventional probes for inspection of any product. Studies were conducted to understand various aspects of ultrasonic inspection for critical applications. This paper details the experimentation conducted and analysis done on signals collected for evolving an application methodology and a procedure.

  18. Filled Ethylene-propylene Diene Terpolymer Elastomer as ThermalInsulator for Case-bonded Solid Rocket Motors

    OpenAIRE

    C. M. Bhuvaneswari; S. D. Kakade; V. D. Deuskar; A. B. Dange; Manoj Gupta

    2008-01-01

    Ethylene-propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM)-based insulation system is being globallyused for case-bonded solid rocket motors. A study was undertaken using EPDM as base polymer,blended with hypalon and liquid EPDM and filled with fibrous and non-fibrous fillers. Theseformulations were evaluated as rocket motor insulation system. The basic objective of the studywas to develop an insulation system based on EPDM for case-bonded applications. A series ofrocket motor insulator compositions based on...

  19. Development of Displacement Gages Exposed to Solid Rocket Motor Internal Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, D. E.; Cook, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) has three non-vented segment-to-segment case field joints. These joints use an interference fit J-joint that is bonded at assembly with a Pressure Sensitive Adhesive (PSA) inboard of redundant O-ring seals. Full-scale motor and sub-scale test article experience has shown that the ability to preclude gas leakage past the J-joint is a function of PSA type, joint moisture from pre-assembly humidity exposure, and the magnitude of joint displacement during motor operation. To more accurately determine the axial displacements at the J-joints, two thermally durable displacement gages (one mechanical and one electrical) were designed and developed. The mechanical displacement gage concept was generated first as a non-electrical, self-contained gage to capture the maximum magnitude of the J-joint motion. When it became feasible, the electrical displacement gage concept was generated second as a real-time linear displacement gage. Both of these gages were refined in development testing that included hot internal solid rocket motor environments and simulated vibration environments. As a result of this gage development effort, joint motions have been measured in static fired RSRM J-joints where intentional venting was produced (Flight Support Motor #8, FSM-8) and nominal non-vented behavior occurred (FSM-9 and FSM-10). This data gives new insight into the nominal characteristics of the three case J-joint positions (forward, center and aft) and characteristics of some case J-joints that became vented during motor operation. The data supports previous structural model predictions. These gages will also be useful in evaluating J-joint motion differences in a five-segment Space Shuttle solid rocket motor.

  20. Coupled Fluid-Structure Interaction Analysis of Solid Rocket Motor with Flexible Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H. Q.; West, Jeff; Harris, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible inhibitors are generally used in solid rocket motors (SRMs) as a means to control the burning of propellant. Vortices generated by the flow of propellant around the flexible inhibitors have been identified as a driving source of instabilities that can lead to thrust oscillations in launch vehicles. Potential coupling between the SRM thrust oscillations and structural vibration modes is an important risk factor in launch vehicle design. As a means to predict and better understand these phenomena, a multidisciplinary simulation capability that couples the NASA production CFD code, Loci/CHEM, with CFDRC's structural finite element code, CoBi, has been developed. This capability is crucial to the development of NASA's new space launch system (SLS). This paper summarizes the efforts in applying the coupled software to demonstrate and investigate fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena between pressure waves and flexible inhibitors inside reusable solid rocket motors (RSRMs). The features of the fluid and structural solvers are described in detail, and the coupling methodology and interfacial continuity requirements are then presented in a general Eulerian-Lagrangian framework. The simulations presented herein utilize production level CFD with hybrid RANS/LES turbulence modeling and grid resolution in excess of 80 million cells. The fluid domain in the SRM is discretized using a general mixed polyhedral unstructured mesh, while full 3D shell elements are utilized in the structural domain for the flexible inhibitors. Verifications against analytical solutions for a structural model under a steady uniform pressure condition and under dynamic modal analysis show excellent agreement in terms of displacement distribution and eigenmode frequencies. The preliminary coupled results indicate that due to acoustic coupling, the dynamics of one of the more flexible inhibitors shift from its first modal frequency to the first acoustic frequency of the solid rocket motor

  1. Solid rocket booster thrust vector control V-2 off-nominal testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagan, B.

    1981-01-01

    The results of the V-2 off nominal test sequence performed on the space shuttle solid rocket booster thrust vector control (SRB TVC) system are reported. The TVC subsystem was subjected to 19 off nominal test conditions. The test sequence consisted of: 8 burp starts, 30 hot firings, 14 GN2 spin tests, and 3 servicing passive system tests. It is concluded that the TVC subsystem operated nominally in response to the given commands and test conditions. Test objectives, detail results, and data are included.

  2. Recession Curve Generation for the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Thermal Protection System Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Howard S.; Stuckey, C. Irvin; Davis, Darrell W.; Davis, Darrell (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ablatable Thermal Protection System (TPS) coatings are used on the Space Shuttle Vehicle Solid Rocket Boosters in order to protect the aluminum structure from experiencing excessive temperatures. The methodology used to characterize the recession of such materials is outlined. Details of the tests, including the facility, test articles and test article processing are also presented. The recession rates are collapsed into an empirical power-law relation. A design curve is defined using a 95-percentile student-t distribution. based on the nominal results. Actual test results are presented for the current acreage TPS material used.

  3. Characterization of large 2219 aluminum alloy hand forgings for the space shuttle solid rocket booster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennecke, M. W.

    1978-01-01

    The mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, and stress corrosion properties of four types of 2219-T852 aluminum alloy hand forgings are presented. Weight of the forgings varied between 450 and 3500 lb at the time of heat treatment and dimensions exceeded the maximum covered in existing specifications. The forgings were destructively tested to develop reliable mechanical property data to replace estimates employed in the design of the Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) and to establish minimum guaranteed properties for structural refinement and for entry into specification revisions. The report summarizes data required from the forgers and from the SRB Structures contractor.

  4. An automated approach to design of solid rockets utilizing a special internal ballistics model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    A pattern search technique is presented, which is utilized in a computer program that minimizes the sum of the squares of the differences, at various times, between a desired thrust-time trace and that calculated with a special mathematical internal ballistics model of a solid propellant rocket motor. The program is demonstrated by matching the thrust-time trace obtained from static tests of the first Space Shuttle SRM starting with input values of 10 variables which are, in general, 10% different from the as-built SRM. It is concluded that an excellent match is obtained.

  5. Advanced rocket propulsion technology assessment for future space transportation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhite, A. W.

    1982-01-01

    Single-stage and two-stage launch vehicles were evaluated for various levels of propulsion technology and payloads. The evaluation included tradeoffs between ascent flight performance and vehicle sizing that were driven by engine mass, specific impulse, and propellant requirements. Numerous mission, flight, and vehicle-related requirements and constraints were satisfied in the design process. The results showed that advanced technology had a large effect on reducing both single- and two-stage vehicle size. High-pressure hydrocarbon-fueled engines that were burned in parallel with two-position nozzle hydrogen-fueled engines reduced dry mass by 23% for the two-stage vehicle and 28% for the single-stage vehicle as compared to an all-hydrogen-fueled system. The dual-expander engine reduced single-stage vehicle dry mass by 41%. Using advanced technology, the single-stage vehicle became comparable in size and sensitivity to that of the two-stage vehicle for small payloads.

  6. To MARS and Beyond with Nuclear Power - Design Concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-05-15

    The President Park of ROK has also expressed support for space program promotion, praising the success of NARO as evidence of a positive outlook. These events hint a strong signal that ROK's space program will be accelerated by the national eager desire. In this national eager desire for space program, the policymakers and the aerospace engineers need to pay attention to the advanced nuclear technology of ROK that is set to a major world nuclear energy country, even exporting the technology. The space nuclear application is a very much attractive option because its energy density is the most enormous among available energy sources in space. This paper presents the design concept of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket (KANuTER) that is one of the advanced nuclear thermal rocket engine developing in Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) for space application. Solar system exploration relying on CRs suffers from long trip time and high cost. In this regard, nuclear propulsion is a very attractive option for that because of higher performance and already demonstrated technology. Although ROK was a late entrant into elite global space club, its prospect as a space racer is very bright because of the national eager desire and its advanced technology. Especially it is greatly meaningful that ROK has potential capability to launch its nuclear technology into space as a global nuclear energy leader and a soaring space adventurer. In this regard, KANuTER will be a kind of bridgehead for Korean space nuclear application.

  7. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Advanced engine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, C. M.

    1992-01-01

    In Task D.6 of the Advanced Engine Study, three primary subtasks were accomplished: (1) design of parametric data; (2) engine requirement variation studies; and (3) vehicle study/engine study coordination. Parametric data were generated for vacuum thrusts ranging from 7500 lbf to 50,000 lbf, nozzle expansion ratios from 600 to 1200, and engine mixture ratios from 5:1 to 7:1. Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) was used as a departure point for these parametric analyses. These data are intended to assist in definition and trade studies. In the Engine Requirements Variation Studies, the individual effects of increasing the throttling ratio from 10:1 to 20:1 and requiring the engine to operate at a maximum mixture ratio of 12:1 were determined. Off design engine balances were generated at these extreme conditions and individual component operating requirements analyzed in detail. Potential problems were identified and possible solutions generated. In the Vehicle Study/Engine Study coordination subtask, vehicle contractor support was provided as needed, addressing a variety of issues uncovered during vehicle trade studies. This support was primarily provided during Technical Interchange Meetings (TIM) in which Space Exploration Initiative (SEI) studies were addressed.

  8. Orbital transfer rocket engine technology: Advanced engine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, Warren R.

    1992-01-01

    An advanced LOX/LH2 engine study for the use of NASA and vehicle prime contractors in developing concepts for manned missions to the Moon, Mars, and Phobos is documented. Parametric design data was obtained at five engine thrusts from 7.5K lbf to 50K lbf. Also, a separate task evaluated engine throttling over a 20:1 range and operation at a mixture ratio of 12 plus or minus 1 versus the 6 plus or minus 1 nominal. Cost data was also generated for DDT&E, first unit production, and factors in other life cycle costs. The major limitation of the study was lack of contact with vehicle prime contractors to resolve the issues in vehicle/engine interfaces. The baseline Aerojet dual propellant expander cycle was shown capable of meeting all performance requirements with an expected long operational life due to the high thermal margins. The basic engine design readily accommodated the 20:1 throttling requirement and operation up to a mixture ratio of 10 without change. By using platinum for baffled injector construction the increased thermal margin allowed operation up to mixture ratio 13. An initial engine modeling with an Aerojet transient simulation code (named MLETS) indicates stable engine operation with the baseline control system. A throttle ratio of 4 to 5 seconds from 10 percent to 100 percent thrust is also predicted. Performance predictions are 483.1 sec at 7.5K lbf, 487.3 sec at 20K lbf, and 485.2 sec at 50K lbf with a mixture ratio of 6 and an area ratio of 1200. Engine envelopes varied from 120 in. length/53 in. exit diameter at 7.5K lbf to 305 in. length/136 in. exit diameter at 50 K lbf. Packaging will be an important consideration. Continued work is recommended to include more vehicle prime contractor/engine contractor joint assessment of the interface issues.

  9. Coupled Solid Rocket Motor Ballistics and Trajectory Modeling for Higher Fidelity Launch Vehicle Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Brett

    2014-01-01

    Multi-stage launch vehicles with solid rocket motors (SRMs) face design optimization challenges, especially when the mission scope changes frequently. Significant performance benefits can be realized if the solid rocket motors are optimized to the changing requirements. While SRMs represent a fixed performance at launch, rapid design iterations enable flexibility at design time, yielding significant performance gains. The streamlining and integration of SRM design and analysis can be achieved with improved analysis tools. While powerful and versatile, the Solid Performance Program (SPP) is not conducive to rapid design iteration. Performing a design iteration with SPP and a trajectory solver is a labor intensive process. To enable a better workflow, SPP, the Program to Optimize Simulated Trajectories (POST), and the interfaces between them have been improved and automated, and a graphical user interface (GUI) has been developed. The GUI enables real-time visual feedback of grain and nozzle design inputs, enforces parameter dependencies, removes redundancies, and simplifies manipulation of SPP and POST's numerous options. Automating the analysis also simplifies batch analyses and trade studies. Finally, the GUI provides post-processing, visualization, and comparison of results. Wrapping legacy high-fidelity analysis codes with modern software provides the improved interface necessary to enable rapid coupled SRM ballistics and vehicle trajectory analysis. Low cost trade studies demonstrate the sensitivities of flight performance metrics to propulsion characteristics. Incorporating high fidelity analysis from SPP into vehicle design reduces performance margins and improves reliability. By flying an SRM designed with the same assumptions as the rest of the vehicle, accurate comparisons can be made between competing architectures. In summary, this flexible workflow is a critical component to designing a versatile launch vehicle model that can accommodate a volatile

  10. Formulation and Testing of Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels Containing Energetic Additives for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs,Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth K.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Many approaches have been considered in an effort to improve the regression rate of solid fuels for hybrid rocket applications. One promising method is to use a fuel with a fast burning rate such as paraffin wax; however, additional performance increases to the fuel regression rate are necessary to make the fuel a viable candidate to replace current launch propulsion systems. The addition of energetic and/or nano-sized particles is one way to increase mass-burning rates of the solid fuels and increase the overall performance of the hybrid rocket motor.1,2 Several paraffin-based fuel grains with various energetic additives (e.g., lithium aluminum hydride (LiAlH4) have been cast in an attempt to improve regression rates. There are two major advantages to introducing LiAlH4 additive into the solid fuel matrix: 1) the increased characteristic velocity, 2) decreased dependency of Isp on oxidizer-to-fuel ratio. The testing and characterization of these solid-fuel grains have shown that continued work is necessary to eliminate unburned/unreacted fuel in downstream sections of the test apparatus.3 Changes to the fuel matrix include higher melting point wax and smaller energetic additive particles. The reduction in particle size through various methods can result in more homogeneous grain structure. The higher melting point wax can serve to reduce the melt-layer thickness, allowing the LiAlH4 particles to react closer to the burning surface, thus increasing the heat feedback rate and fuel regression rate. In addition to the formulation of LiAlH4 and paraffin wax solid-fuel grains, liquid additives of triethylaluminum and diisobutylaluminum hydride will be included in this study. Another promising fuel formulation consideration is to incorporate a small percentage of RDX as an additive to paraffin. A novel casting technique will be used by dissolving RDX in a solvent to crystallize the energetic additive. After dissolving the RDX in a solvent chosen for its compatibility

  11. Convective Heat Transfer in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor of the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This simulation involved a two-dimensional axisymmetric model of a full motor initial grain of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) of the Space Transportation System (STS). It was conducted with CFD (computational fluid dynamics) commercial code FLUENT. This analysis was performed to: a) maintain continuity with most related previous analyses, b) serve as a non-vectored baseline for any three-dimensional vectored nozzles, c) provide a relatively simple application and checkout for various CFD solution schemes, grid sensitivity studies, turbulence modeling and heat transfer, and d) calculate nozzle convective heat transfer coefficients. The accuracy of the present results and the selection of the numerical schemes and turbulence models were based on matching the rocket ballistic predictions of mass flow rate, head end pressure, vacuum thrust and specific impulse, and measured chamber pressure drop. Matching these ballistic predictions was found to be good. This study was limited to convective heat transfer and the results compared favorably with existing theory. On the other hand, qualitative comparison with backed-out data of the ratio of the convective heat transfer coefficient to the specific heat at constant pressure was made in a relative manner. This backed-out data was devised to match nozzle erosion that was a result of heat transfer (convective, radiative and conductive), chemical (transpirating), and mechanical (shear and particle impingement forces) effects combined.

  12. Numerical techniques for solving nonlinear instability problems in smokeless tactical solid rocket motors. [finite difference technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, J. D.; Levine, J. N.

    1980-01-01

    The selection of a satisfactory numerical method for calculating the propagation of steep fronted shock life waveforms in a solid rocket motor combustion chamber is discussed. A number of different numerical schemes were evaluated by comparing the results obtained for three problems: the shock tube problems; the linear wave equation, and nonlinear wave propagation in a closed tube. The most promising method--a combination of the Lax-Wendroff, Hybrid and Artificial Compression techniques, was incorporated into an existing nonlinear instability program. The capability of the modified program to treat steep fronted wave instabilities in low smoke tactical motors was verified by solving a number of motor test cases with disturbance amplitudes as high as 80% of the mean pressure.

  13. Solid rocket motor integration on the Atlas/Centaur launch vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnett, Stephen E.

    1993-06-01

    The structural design, development, and verification testing required to integrate solid rocket motors (SRM) on the Atlas IIAS launch vehicle is described. It is concluded that the next generation Atlas Centaur based on four strap-on Castor IVA SRMs and capable of lifting 7700 pounds to geosynchronous orbit has undergone a rigorous development program. A new system intended to mount and jettison the SRMs from the core vehicle is characterized by robustness and ease of installation. To insulate the aft end of the vehicle against increased SRM-induced heat fluxes and to seal against ingress of potentially hazardous base gases extensive measures were undertaken. They include nonporous engine boots and a thrust section compartment passive pressurization system.

  14. Verification of spatial and temporal pressure distributions in segmented solid rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salita, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A wide variety of analytical tools are in use today to predict the history and spatial distributions of pressure in the combustion chambers of solid rocket motors (SRMs). Experimental and analytical methods are presented here that allow the verification of many of these predictions. These methods are applied to the redesigned space shuttle booster (RSRM). Girth strain-gage data is compared to the predictions of various one-dimensional quasisteady analyses in order to verify the axial drop in motor static pressure during ignition transients as well as quasisteady motor operation. The results of previous modeling of radial flows in the bore, slots, and around grain overhangs are supported by approximate analytical and empirical techniques presented here. The predictions of circumferential flows induced by inhibitor asymmetries, nozzle vectoring, and propellant slump are compared to each other and to subscale cold air and water tunnel measurements to ascertain their validity.

  15. Multisized Inert Particle Loading for Solid Rocket Axial Combustion Instability Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Greatrix

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation, various factors and trends, related to the usage of two or more sets of inert particles comprised of the same material (nominally aluminum but at different diameters for the suppression of axial shock wave development, are numerically predicted for a composite-propellant cylindrical-grain solid rocket motor. The limit pressure wave magnitudes at a later reference time in a given pulsed firing simulation run are collected for a series of runs at different particle sizes and loading distributions and mapped onto corresponding attenuation trend charts. The inert particles’ presence in the central core flow is demonstrated to be an effective means of instability symptom suppression, in correlating with past experimental successes in the usage of particles. However, the predicted results of this study suggest that one needs to be careful when selecting more than one size of particle for a given motor application.

  16. Scale Effects on Quasi-Steady Solid Rocket Internal Ballistic Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Greatrix

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor’s performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size. The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor’s internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor’s internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale.

  17. New discrimination method for ablative control mechanism in solid-propellant rocket nozzle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    A reasonable discrimination method for ablative control mechanism in solid-propellant rocket nozzle can improve the calculation accuracy of ablation rate. Based on the different rate constants for reactions of C with H2O and CO2,a new discrimination method for ablative control mechanism,which comprehensively considers the influence of nozzle surface temperature and gas component concentration,is presented. Using this new discrimination method,calculations were performed to simulate the nozzle throat insert ablation. The numerical results showed that the calculated ablation rate,which was more close to the measured values,was less than the value calculated by diffusion control mechanisms or by double control mechanisms. And H2O was proved to be the most detrimental oxidizing species in nozzle ablation.

  18. Scale Effects on Quasi-Steady Solid Rocket Internal Ballistic Behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greatrix, David R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor’s performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size). The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor’s internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor’s internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale.

  19. Solid rocket booster performance evaluation model. Volume 3: Sample case. [propellant combustion simulation/internal ballistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The solid rocket booster performance evaluation model (SRB-11) is used to predict internal ballistics in a sample motor. This motor contains a five segmented grain. The first segment has a 14 pointed star configuration with a web which wraps partially around the forward dome. The other segments are circular in cross-section and are tapered along the interior burning surface. Two of the segments are inhibited on the forward face. The nozzle is not assumed to be submerged. The performance prediction is broken into two simulation parts: the delivered end item specific impulse and the propellant properties which are required as inputs for the internal ballistics module are determined; and the internal ballistics for the entire burn duration of the motor are simulated.

  20. Scale effects on quasi-steady solid rocket internal ballistic behaviour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greatrix, D. R. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5B2K3 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    The ability to predict with some accuracy a given solid rocket motor's performance before undertaking one or several costly experimental test firings is important. On the numerical prediction side, as various component models evolve, their incorporation into an overall internal ballistics simulation program allows for new motor firing simulations to take place, which in turn allows for updated comparisons to experimental firing data. In the present investigation, utilizing an updated simulation program, the focus is on quasi-steady performance analysis and scale effects (influence of motor size). The predicted effects of negative/positive erosive burning and propellant/casing deflection, as tied to motor size, on a reference cylindrical-grain motor's internal ballistics, are included in this evaluation. Propellant deflection has only a minor influence on the reference motor's internal ballistics, regardless of motor size. Erosive burning, on the other hand, is distinctly affected by motor scale. (author)

  1. Buckling Testing and Analysis of Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Motor Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidner, Thomas J.; Larsen, David V.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A series of full-scale buckling tests were performed on the space shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) cylinders. The tests were performed to determine the buckling capability of the cylinders and to provide data for analytical comparison. A nonlinear ANSYS Finite Element Analysis (FEA) model was used to represent and evaluate the testing. Analytical results demonstrated excellent correlation to test results, predicting the failure load within 5%. The analytical value was on the conservative side, predicting a lower failure load than was applied to the test. The resulting study and analysis indicated the important parameters for FEA to accurately predict buckling failure. The resulting method was subsequently used to establish the pre-launch buckling capability of the space shuttle system.

  2. Internal Flow Simulation of Enhanced Performance Solid Rocket Booster for the Space Transportation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Rashid A.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    An enhanced performance solid rocket booster concept for the space shuttle system has been proposed. The concept booster will have strong commonality with the existing, proven, reliable four-segment Space Shuttle Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRM) with individual component design (nozzle, insulator, etc.) optimized for a five-segment configuration. Increased performance is desirable to further enhance safety/reliability and/or increase payload capability. Performance increase will be achieved by adding a fifth propellant segment to the current four-segment booster and opening the throat to accommodate the increased mass flow while maintaining current pressure levels. One development concept under consideration is the static test of a "standard" RSRM with a fifth propellant segment inserted and appropriate minimum motor modifications. Feasibility studies are being conducted to assess the potential for any significant departure in component performance/loading from the well-characterized RSRM. An area of concern is the aft motor (submerged nozzle inlet, aft dome, etc.) where the altered internal flow resulting from the performance enhancing features (25% increase in mass flow rate, higher Mach numbers, modified subsonic nozzle contour) may result in increased component erosion and char. To assess this issue and to define the minimum design changes required to successfully static test a fifth segment RSRM engineering test motor, internal flow studies have been initiated. Internal aero-thermal environments were quantified in terms of conventional convective heating and discrete phase alumina particle impact/concentration and accretion calculations via Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation. Two sets of comparative CFD simulations of the RSRM and the five-segment (IBM) concept motor were conducted with CFD commercial code FLUENT. The first simulation involved a two-dimensional axi-symmetric model of the full motor, initial grain RSRM. The second set of analyses

  3. Preliminary design and optimization of slotted tube grain for solid rocket motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this paper,design and optimization technique of slotted tube grain for solid rocket motors has been discussed.In doing so,the design objectives and constraints have been set,geometric parameters identified,performance prediction parameters calculated,thereafter preliminary designs completed and finally optimal design reached.Geometric model for slotted tube grain configuration has been developed.Average thrust has been taken as the objective function with constraints of burning time,mass of propellant,fixed length and diameter of chamber case.Lumped parameter method has been used for calculating the performance prediction parameters.A set of preliminary designs has been completed and an analysis of these results conducted.Although all the preliminary results fulfill the design requirements in terms of objective function and constraints,however in order tO attain the optimal design,Sequen-tial quadratic programming optimization technique has been adopted.As the slotted tube grain ge-ometry is totally dependent upon various independent variables and each of these variables has a bearing on explicit characteristic of grain designing,hence affects of the independent variables on performance parameters have been examined,thus variation laws have been developed.Basing on the variation laws and the analysis of preliminary design results,upper and lower limits have been defined for the independent geometric variables and an initial guess provided for conducting optimi-zation.Resuhs attained exhibits that an optimal result has been attained and the value of objective function has been maximized.All the design constraint limits have also been met while ensuring sound values of volumetric loading fraction,web fraction and neutrality.This methodology of design and optimization of slotted tube grain for solid rocket motors can be used by engineers as a reference guide for actual design and engineering purposes.

  4. Advanced Computing Technologies for Rocket Engine Propulsion Systems: Object-Oriented Design with C++

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekele, Gete

    2002-01-01

    This document explores the use of advanced computer technologies with an emphasis on object-oriented design to be applied in the development of software for a rocket engine to improve vehicle safety and reliability. The primary focus is on phase one of this project, the smart start sequence module. The objectives are: 1) To use current sound software engineering practices, object-orientation; 2) To improve on software development time, maintenance, execution and management; 3) To provide an alternate design choice for control, implementation, and performance.

  5. Evaluation of Solid Rocket Motor Component Data Using a Commercially Available Statistical Software Package

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanski, Philip L.

    2015-01-01

    Commercially available software packages today allow users to quickly perform the routine evaluations of (1) descriptive statistics to numerically and graphically summarize both sample and population data, (2) inferential statistics that draws conclusions about a given population from samples taken of it, (3) probability determinations that can be used to generate estimates of reliability allowables, and finally (4) the setup of designed experiments and analysis of their data to identify significant material and process characteristics for application in both product manufacturing and performance enhancement. This paper presents examples of analysis and experimental design work that has been conducted using Statgraphics®(Registered Trademark) statistical software to obtain useful information with regard to solid rocket motor propellants and internal insulation material. Data were obtained from a number of programs (Shuttle, Constellation, and Space Launch System) and sources that include solid propellant burn rate strands, tensile specimens, sub-scale test motors, full-scale operational motors, rubber insulation specimens, and sub-scale rubber insulation analog samples. Besides facilitating the experimental design process to yield meaningful results, statistical software has demonstrated its ability to quickly perform complex data analyses and yield significant findings that might otherwise have gone unnoticed. One caveat to these successes is that useful results not only derive from the inherent power of the software package, but also from the skill and understanding of the data analyst.

  6. Solid-propellant rocket motor internal ballistic performance variation analysis, phase 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The Monte Carlo method was used to investigate thrust imbalance and its first time derivative throughtout the burning time of pairs of solid rocket motors firing in parallel. Results obtained compare favorably with Titan 3 C flight performance data. Statistical correlations of the thrust imbalance at various times with corresponding nominal trace slopes suggest several alternative methods of predicting thrust imbalance. The effect of circular-perforated grain deformation on internal ballistics is discussed, and a modified design analysis computer program which permits such an evaluation is presented. Comparisons with SRM firings indicate that grain deformation may account for a portion of the so-called scale factor on burning rate between large motors and strand burners or small ballistic test motors. Thermoelastic effects on burning rate are also investigated. Burning surface temperature is calculated by coupling the solid phase energy equation containing a strain rate term with a model of gas phase combustion zone using the Zeldovich-Novozhilov technique. Comparisons of solutions with and without the strain rate term indicate a small but possibly significant effect of the thermoelastic coupling.

  7. Launch Vehicles Based on Advanced Hybrid Rocket Motors: An Enabling Technology for the Commercial Small and Micro Satellite Planetary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karabeyoglu, Arif; Tuncer, Onur; Inalhan, Gokhan

    2016-07-01

    Mankind is relient on chemical propulsion systems for space access. Nevertheless, this has been a stagnant area in terms of technological development and the technology base has not changed much almost for the past forty years. This poses a vicious circle for launch applications such that high launch costs constrain the demand and low launch freqencies drive costs higher. This also has been a key limiting factor for small and micro satellites that are geared towards planetary science. Rather this be because of the launch frequencies or the costs, the access of small and micro satellites to orbit has been limited. With today's technology it is not possible to escape this circle. However the emergence of cost effective and high performance propulsion systems such as advanced hybrid rockets can decrease launch costs by almost an order or magnitude. This paper briefly introduces the timeline and research challenges that were overcome during the development of advanced hybrid LOX/paraffin based rockets. Experimental studies demonstrated effectiveness of these advanced hybrid rockets which incorporate fast burning parafin based fuels, advanced yet simple internal balistic design and carbon composite winding/fuel casting technology that enables the rocket motor to be built from inside out. A feasibility scenario is studied using these rocket motors as building blocks for a modular launch vehicle capable of delivering micro satellites into low earth orbit. In addition, the building block rocket motor can be used further solar system missions providing the ability to do standalone small and micro satellite missions to planets within the solar system. This enabling technology therefore offers a viable alternative in order to escape the viscous that has plagued the space launch industry and that has limited the small and micro satellite delivery for planetary science.

  8. Spectroscopy and multivariate analyses applications related to solid rocket nozzle bondline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendale, W. F.; Hatcher, Richard; Benson, Brian; Workman, Gary L.

    1991-01-01

    Chemical composition and molecular orientation define the properties of materials. Information related to chemical composition and molecular configuration is obtained by various forms of spectroscopy. Software algorithms developed for multivariate analyses, expert systems, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) are used to conduct repetitive operations. The techniques are believed to be of particular significance toward achieving TQM objectives. The objective was to obtain information related to the quality of the bondline in the solid rocket motor, SRM, nozzle. Hysol 934 NA, a room temperature curing epoxide resin, is used as the bonding agent. A good bond requires that the adhesive be placed on a properly prepared metal surface, the adhesives Part A and B be mixed in appropriate ratio from material within shelf life specifications. Spectroscopic data was obtained for surfaces prepared according to specifications, contaminated metal surfaces, samples of the epoxide adhesive at times that represent shelf aging from 3 months to 2 years, several mix ratio of A to B, and curing material. Temperature was found to be a significant factor. The study concentrated on pot life and mix ratio.

  9. Qualification Status of Non-Asbestos Internal Insulation in the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Louie

    2011-01-01

    This paper provides a status of the qualification efforts associated with NASA's RSRMV non-asbestos internal insulation program. For many years, NASA has been actively engaged in removal of asbestos from the shuttle RSRM motors due to occupation health concerns where technicians are working with an EPA banned material. Careful laboratory and subscale testing has lead to the downselect of a organic fiber known as Polybenzimidazol to replace the asbestos fiber filler in the existing synthetic rubber copolymer Nitrile Butadiene - now named PBI/NBR. Manufacturing, processing, and layup of the new material has been a challenge due to the differences in the baseline shuttle RSRM internal insulator properties and PBI/NBR material properties. For this study, data gathering and reduction procedures for thermal and chemical property characterization for the new candidate material are discussed. Difficulties with test procedures, implementation of properties into the Charring Material Ablator (CMA) codes, and results correlation with static motor fire data are provided. After two successful five segment motor firings using the PBI/NBR insulator, performance results for the new material look good and the material should eventually be qualified for man rated use in large solid rocket motor applications.

  10. Analysis of pressure blips in aft-finocyl solid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giacinto, M.; Favini, B.; Cavallini, E.

    2016-07-01

    Ballistic anomalies have frequently occurred during the firing of several solid rocket motors (SRMs) (Inertial Upper Stage, Space Shuttle Redesigned SRM (RSRM) and Titan IV SRM Upgrade (SRMU)), producing even relevant and unexpected variations of the SRM pressure trace from its nominal profile. This paper has the purpose to provide a numerical analysis of the following possible causes of ballistic anomalies in SRMs: an inert object discharge, a slag ejection, and an unexpected increase in the propellant burning rate or in the combustion surface. The SRM configuration under investigation is an aft-finocyl SRM with a first-stage/small booster design. The numerical simulations are performed with a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) unsteady model of the SRM internal ballistics, properly tailored to model each possible cause of the ballistic anomalies. The results have shown that a classification based on the head-end pressure (HEP) signature, relating each other the HEP shape and the ballistic anomaly cause, can be made. For each cause of ballistic anomalies, a deepened discussion of the parameters driving the HEP signatures is provided, as well as qualitative and quantitative assessments of the resultant pressure signals.

  11. Numerical Evaluation of the Use of Aluminum Particles for Enhancing Solid Rocket Motor Combustion Stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Greatrix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to predict the expected internal behaviour of a given solid-propellant rocket motor under transient conditions is important. Research towards predicting and quantifying undesirable transient axial combustion instability symptoms typically necessitates a comprehensive numerical model for internal ballistic simulation under dynamic flow and combustion conditions. On the mitigation side, one in practice sees the use of inert or reactive particles for the suppression of pressure wave development in the motor chamber flow. With the focus of the present study placed on reactive particles, a numerical internal ballistic model incorporating relevant elements, such as a transient, frequency-dependent combustion response to axial pressure wave activity above the burning propellant surface, is applied to the investigation of using aluminum particles within the central internal flow (particles whose surfaces nominally regress with time, as a function of current particle size, as they move downstream as a means of suppressing instability-related symptoms in a cylindrical-grain motor. The results of this investigation reveal that the loading percentage and starting size of the aluminum particles have a significant influence on reducing the resulting transient pressure wave magnitude.

  12. Study of plasticizer diffusion in a solid rocket motor´s bondline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliano Libardi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This work aims to determine the diffusion coefficient of the plasticizers dibutyl phthalate (DBP, dioctyl phthalate (DOP and dioctyl azelate (DOZ on the internal insulating layer of solid rocket motors. These plasticizers are originally present in the layers of rubber, liner and propellant, respectively. This species are not chemically bonded and tend to diffuse from propellant to insulating and vice versa. A computer program based on the mathematical model of Fick’s second Law of diffusion was developed to perform the calculus from the concentration data obtained by gas chromatographic (GC analyses. The samples were prepared with two different adhesive liners; one conventional (LHNA and the other with barrier properties (LHNT. A common feature of both liners was that they were synthesized by the reaction of hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB and diisocyanates. However, a bond promoter was used to increase the crosslink density of the LHNT liner and to improve its performance as barrier against the diffusion. The effects of the diffusion of the plasticizers were also investigated by hardness analyses, which were executed on samples aged at room temperature and at 80ºC. The results showed an increase trend for the samples aged at room temperature and an opposite behavior for the tests carried out at 80ºC.

  13. Reusable Solid Rocket Motor - V(RSRMV)Nozzle Forward Nose Ring Thermo-Structural Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, J. Louie

    2012-01-01

    During the developmental static fire program for NASAs Reusable Solid Rocket Motor-V (RSRMV), an anomalous erosion condition appeared on the nozzle Carbon Cloth Phenolic nose ring that had not been observed in the space shuttle RSRM program. There were regions of augmented erosion located on the bottom of the forward nose ring (FNR) that measured nine tenths of an inch deeper than the surrounding material. Estimates of heating conditions for the RSRMV nozzle based on limited char and erosion data indicate that the total heat loading into the FNR, for the new five segment motor, is about 40-50% higher than the baseline shuttle RSRM nozzle FNR. Fault tree analysis of the augmented erosion condition has lead to a focus on a thermomechanical response of the material that is outside the existing experience base of shuttle CCP materials for this application. This paper provides a sensitivity study of the CCP material thermo-structural response subject to the design constraints and heating conditions unique to the RSRMV Forward Nose Ring application. Modeling techniques are based on 1-D thermal and porous media calculations where in-depth interlaminar loading conditions are calculated and compared to known capabilities at elevated temperatures. Parameters such as heat rate, in-depth pressures and temperature, degree of char, associated with initiation of the mechanical removal process are quantified and compared to a baseline thermo-chemical material removal mode. Conclusions regarding postulated material loss mechanisms are offered.

  14. Computation of the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster nozzle start-up transient flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cline, M. C.; Wilmoth, R. G.

    1984-01-01

    The first NASA Space Shuttle flight (STS-1) produced an overpressure wave that exceeded preflight predictions by as much as 5 to 1. This second overpressure wave occurred just after the solid rocket booster (SRB) igniter wave. To understand this overpressure phenomenon, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken. Both the SRB static firing test and STS-1 geometries were studied for two-dimensional, inviscid and viscous flow. The inviscid calculations did not produce significant second overpressure waves. However, the viscous calculations did produce second overpressure waves that qualitatively agree with experiment. These overpressure waves were present in both the static firing test and STS-1 geometries. This second overpressure wave is generated by the motion of the boundary layer separation point and the subsequent radial motion of the exhaust jet during the start-up of the SRB nozzle flow. The presence of the mobile launch platform exhaust hole wale amplifies this wave, but does not appear to be the source of any additional overpressure waves. The lack of good quantitative agreement between theory and experiment indicates that other overpressure sources, not accounted for by this simulation, may be present.

  15. Design and optimization of solid rocket motor Finocyl grain using simulated annealing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ali Kamran; LIANG Guo-zhu

    2011-01-01

    The research effort outlined the application of a computer aided design (CAD)-centric technique to the design and optimization of solid rocket motor Finocyl (fin in cylinder) grain using simulated annealing.The proper method for constructing the grain configuration model, ballistic performance and optimizer integration for analysis was presented. Finoeyl is a complex grain configuration, requiring thirteen variables to define the geometry. The large number of variables not only complicates the geometrical construction but also optimization process. CAD representation encapsulates all of the geometric entities pertinent to the grain design in a parametric way, allowing manipulation of grain entity (web), performing regression and automating geometrical data calculations. Robustness to avoid local minima and efficient capacity to explore design space makes simulated annealing an attractive choice as optimizer. It is demonstrated with a constrained optimization of Finocyl grain geometry for homogeneous, isotropic propellant, uniform regression, and a quasi-steady, bulk mode internal ballistics model that maximizes average thrust for required deviations from neutrality.

  16. Correlation of Slag Expulsion with Ballistic Anomalies in Shuttle Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sambamurthi, Jay K.; Alvarado, Alexis; Mathias, Edward C.

    1996-01-01

    During the Shuttle launches, the solid rocket motors (SRM) occasionally experience pressure perturbations (8-13 psi) between 65-75 s into the motor burn time. The magnitudes of these perturbations are very small in comparison with the operating motor chamber pressure, which is over 600 psi during this time frame. These SRM pressure perturbations are believed to he caused primarily by the expulsion of slag (aluminum oxide). Two SRM static tests, TEM-11 and FSM-4, were instrumented extensively for the study of the phenomena associated with pressure perturbations. The test instrumentation used included nonintrusive optical and infrared diagnostics of the plume, such as high-speed photography, radiometers, and thermal image cameras. Results from all of these nonintrusive observations provide substantial circumstantial evidence to support the scenario that the pressure perturbation event in the Shuttle SRM is caused primarily by the expulsion of molten slag. In the static motor tests, the slag was also expelled preferentially near the bottom of the nozzle because of slag accumulation at the bottom of the aft end of the horizontally oriented motor.

  17. Solid propellant rocket motor internal ballistics performance variation analysis, phase 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Foster, W. A., Jr.; Murph, J. E.; Adams, G. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Results of research aimed at improving the predictability of off nominal internal ballistics performance of solid propellant rocket motors (SRMs) including thrust imbalance between two SRMs firing in parallel are reported. The potential effects of nozzle throat erosion on internal ballistic performance were studied and a propellant burning rate low postulated. The propellant burning rate model when coupled with the grain deformation model permits an excellent match between theoretical results and test data for the Titan IIIC, TU455.02, and the first Space Shuttle SRM (DM-1). Analysis of star grain deformation using an experimental model and a finite element model shows the star grain deformation effects for the Space Shuttle to be small in comparison to those of the circular perforated grain. An alternative technique was developed for predicting thrust imbalance without recourse to the Monte Carlo computer program. A scaling relationship used to relate theoretical results to test results may be applied to the alternative technique of predicting thrust imbalance or to the Monte Carlo evaluation. Extended investigation into the effect of strain rate on propellant burning rate leads to the conclusion that the thermoelastic effect is generally negligible for both steadily increasing pressure loads and oscillatory loads.

  18. Robust Low Cost Liquid Rocket Combustion Chamber by Advanced Vacuum Plasma Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Richard; Elam, Sandra; Ellis, David L.; McKechnie, Timothy; Hickman, Robert; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Next-generation, regeneratively cooled rocket engines will require materials that can withstand high temperatures while retaining high thermal conductivity. Fabrication techniques must be cost efficient so that engine components can be manufactured within the constraints of shrinking budgets. Three technologies have been combined to produce an advanced liquid rocket engine combustion chamber at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) using relatively low-cost, vacuum-plasma-spray (VPS) techniques. Copper alloy NARloy-Z was replaced with a new high performance Cu-8Cr-4Nb alloy developed by NASA-Glenn Research Center (GRC), which possesses excellent high-temperature strength, creep resistance, and low cycle fatigue behavior combined with exceptional thermal stability. Functional gradient technology, developed building composite cartridges for space furnaces was incorporated to add oxidation resistant and thermal barrier coatings as an integral part of the hot wall of the liner during the VPS process. NiCrAlY, utilized to produce durable protective coating for the space shuttle high pressure fuel turbopump (BPFTP) turbine blades, was used as the functional gradient material coating (FGM). The FGM not only serves as a protection from oxidation or blanching, the main cause of engine failure, but also serves as a thermal barrier because of its lower thermal conductivity, reducing the temperature of the combustion liner 200 F, from 1000 F to 800 F producing longer life. The objective of this program was to develop and demonstrate the technology to fabricate high-performance, robust, inexpensive combustion chambers for advanced propulsion systems (such as Lockheed-Martin's VentureStar and NASA's Reusable Launch Vehicle, RLV) using the low-cost VPS process. VPS formed combustion chamber test articles have been formed with the FGM hot wall built in and hot fire tested, demonstrating for the first time a coating that will remain intact through the hot firing test, and with

  19. Design and Fabrication of a 200N Thrust Rocket Motor Based on NH4ClO4+Al+HTPB as Solid Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahid, Mastura Ab; Ali, Wan Khairuddin Wan

    2010-06-01

    The development of rocket motor using potassium nitrate, carbon and sulphur mixture has successfully been developed by researchers and students from UTM and recently a new combination for solid propellant is being created. The new solid propellant will combine a composition of Ammonium perchlorate, NH4ClO4 with aluminium, Al and Hydroxyl Terminated Polybutadiene, HTPB as the binder. It is the aim of this research to design and fabricate a new rocket motor that will produce a thrust of 200N by using this new solid propellant. A static test is done to obtain the thrust produced by the rocket motor and analyses by observation and also calculation will be done. The experiment for the rocket motor is successful but the thrust did not achieve its required thrust.

  20. Advancing the State-of-the-Practice for Liquid Rocket Engine Injector Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, P. K.; Kenny, R. J.; Richardson, B. R.; Anderso, W. E.; Austin, B. J.; Schumaker, S. A.; Muss, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    Current shortcomings in both the overall injector design process and its underlying combustion stability assessment methodology are rooted in the use of empirically based or low fidelity representations of complex physical phenomena and geometry details that have first order effects on performance, thermal environments and combustion stability. The result is a design and analysis capability that is often inadequate to reliably arrive at a suitable injector design in an efficient manner. Specifically, combustion instability has been particularly difficult to predict and mitigate. Large hydrocarbon-fueled booster engines have been especially problematic in this regard. Where combustion instability has been a problem, costly and time-consuming redesign efforts have often been an unfortunate consequence. This paper presents an overview of a recently completed effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to advance the state-of-the-practice for liquid rocket engine injector design. Multiple perturbations of a gas-centered swirl coaxial (GCSC) element that burned gaseous oxygen and RP-1 were designed, assessed for combustion stability, and tested. Three designs, one stable, one marginally unstable and one unstable, were used to demonstrate both an enhanced overall injector design process and an improved combustion stability assessment process. High-fidelity results from state-of-the-art computational fluid dynamics CFD simulations were used to substantially augment and improve the injector design methodology. The CFD results were used to inform and guide the overall injector design process. They were also used to upgrade selected empirical or low-dimensional quantities in the ROCket Combustor Interactive Design (ROCCID) stability assessment tool. Hot fire single element injector testing was used to verify both the overall injector designs and the stability assessments. Testing was conducted at the Air Force Research Laboratory and at Purdue University. Companion papers

  1. An Internal Thermal Environment Model of an Aluminized Solid Rocket Motor with Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Heath T.

    2015-01-01

    Due to the severity of the internal solid rocket motor (SRM) environment, very few direct measurements of that environment exist; therefore, the appearance of such data provides a unique opportunity to assess current thermal/fluid modeling capabilities. As part of a previous study of SRM internal insulation performance, the internal thermal environment of a laboratory-scale SRM featuring aluminized propellant was characterized with two types of custom heat-flux calorimeters: one that measured the total heat flux to a graphite slab within the SRM chamber and another that measured the thermal radiation flux. Therefore, in the current study, a thermal/fluid model of this lab-scale SRM was constructed using ANSYS Fluent to predict not only the flow field structure within the SRM and the convective heat transfer to the interior walls, but also the resulting dispersion of alumina droplets and the radiative heat transfer to the interior walls. The dispersion of alumina droplets within the SRM chamber was determined by employing the Lagrangian discrete phase model that was fully coupled to the Eulerian gas-phase flow. The P1-approximation was engaged to model the radiative heat transfer through the SRM chamber where the radiative contributions of the gas phase were ignored and the aggregate radiative properties of the alumina dispersion were computed from the radiative properties of its individual constituent droplets, which were sourced from literature. The convective and radiative heat fluxes computed from the thermal/fluid model were then compared with those measured in the lab-scale SRM test firings and the modeling approach evaluated.

  2. Time-Accurate Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of a Pair of Moving Solid Rocket Boosters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutzenberg, Louise L.; Williams, Brandon R.

    2011-01-01

    Since the Columbia accident, the threat to the Shuttle launch vehicle from debris during the liftoff timeframe has been assessed by the Liftoff Debris Team at NASA/MSFC. In addition to engineering methods of analysis, CFD-generated flow fields during the liftoff timeframe have been used in conjunction with 3-DOF debris transport methods to predict the motion of liftoff debris. Early models made use of a quasi-steady flow field approximation with the vehicle positioned at a fixed location relative to the ground; however, a moving overset mesh capability has recently been developed for the Loci/CHEM CFD software which enables higher-fidelity simulation of the Shuttle transient plume startup and liftoff environment. The present work details the simulation of the launch pad and mobile launch platform (MLP) with truncated solid rocket boosters (SRBs) moving in a prescribed liftoff trajectory derived from Shuttle flight measurements. Using Loci/CHEM, time-accurate RANS and hybrid RANS/LES simulations were performed for the timeframe T0+0 to T0+3.5 seconds, which consists of SRB startup to a vehicle altitude of approximately 90 feet above the MLP. Analysis of the transient flowfield focuses on the evolution of the SRB plumes in the MLP plume holes and the flame trench, impingement on the flame deflector, and especially impingment on the MLP deck resulting in upward flow which is a transport mechanism for debris. The results show excellent qualitative agreement with the visual record from past Shuttle flights, and comparisons to pressure measurements in the flame trench and on the MLP provide confidence in these simulation capabilities.

  3. Solid-propellant rocket motor internal ballistics performance variation analysis, phase 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforzini, R. H.; Murph, J. E.

    1980-01-01

    The results of research aimed at improving the predictability of internal ballistics performance of solid-propellant rocket motors (SRM's) including thrust imbalance between two SRM's firing in parallel are presented. Static test data from the first six Space Shuttle SRM's is analyzed using a computer program previously developed for this purpose. The program permits intentional minor design biases affecting the imbalance between any two SMR's to be removed. Results for the last four of the six SRM's, with only the propellant bulk temperature as a non-random variable, are generally within limits predicted by theory. Extended studies of internal ballistic performance of single SRM's are presented based on an earlier developed mathematical model which includes an assessment of grain deformation. The erosive burning rate law used in the model is upgraded and made more general. Excellent results are obtained in predictions of the performances of five different SRM's of quite different sizes and configurations. These SRM's all employ PBAN type propellants with ammonium perchlorate oxidizer and 16 to 20% aluminum except one which uses carboxyl terminated butadiene binder. The only non-calculated parameters in the burning rate equations that are changed for the different SRM's are the zero crossflow velocity burning rate coefficients and exponents. The results, in general, confirm the importance of grain deformation. The improved internal ballistic model makes practical development of an effective computer program for application of an optimization technique to SRM design which is also demonstrated. The program uses a pattern search technique to minimize the difference between a desired thrust-time trace and one calculated based on the internal ballistic model.

  4. Rocket propulsion elements

    CERN Document Server

    Sutton, George P

    2011-01-01

    The definitive text on rocket propulsion-now revised to reflect advancements in the field For sixty years, Sutton's Rocket Propulsion Elements has been regarded as the single most authoritative sourcebook on rocket propulsion technology. As with the previous edition, coauthored with Oscar Biblarz, the Eighth Edition of Rocket Propulsion Elements offers a thorough introduction to basic principles of rocket propulsion for guided missiles, space flight, or satellite flight. It describes the physical mechanisms and designs for various types of rockets' and provides an unders

  5. Enhanced Large Solid Rocket Motor Understanding Through Performance Margin Testing: RSRM Five-Segment Engineering Test Motor (ETM-3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huppi, Hal; Tobias, Mark; Seiler, James

    2003-01-01

    The Five-Segment Engineering Test Motor (ETM-3) is an extended length reusable solid rocket motor (RSRM) intended to increase motor performance and internal environments above the current four-segment RSRM flight motor. The principal purpose of ETM-3 is to provide a test article for RSRM component margin testing. As the RSRM and Space Shuttle in general continue to age, replacing obsolete materials becomes an ever-increasing issue. Having a five-segment motor that provides environments in excess of normal opera- tion allows a mechanism to subject replacement materials to a more severe environment than experienced in flight. Additionally, ETM-3 offers a second design data point from which to develop and/or validate analytical models that currently have some level of empiricism associated with them. These enhanced models have the potential to further the understanding of RSRM motor performance and solid rocket motor (SRM) propulsion in general. Furthermore, these data could be leveraged to support a five-segment booster (FSB) development program should the Space Shuttle program choose to pursue this option for abort mode enhancements during the ascent phase. A tertiary goal of ETM-3 is to challenge both the ATK Thiokol Propulsion and NASA MSFC technical personnel through the design and analysis of a large solid rocket motor without the benefit of a well-established performance database such as the RSRM. The end result of this undertaking will be a more competent and experienced workforce for both organizations. Of particular interest are the motor design characteristics and the systems engineering approach used to conduct a complex yet successful large motor static test. These aspects of ETM-3 and more will be summarized.

  6. Filled Ethylene-propylene Diene Terpolymer Elastomer as ThermalInsulator for Case-bonded Solid Rocket Motors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Bhuvaneswari

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene-propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM-based insulation system is being globallyused for case-bonded solid rocket motors. A study was undertaken using EPDM as base polymer,blended with hypalon and liquid EPDM and filled with fibrous and non-fibrous fillers. Theseformulations were evaluated as rocket motor insulation system. The basic objective of the studywas to develop an insulation system based on EPDM for case-bonded applications. A series ofrocket motor insulator compositions based on EPDM, filled with particulate and fibrous fillerslike precipitated silica, fumed silica, aramid, and carbon fibres have been studied for mechanical,rheological, thermal, and interface properties. Compositions based on particulate fillers wereoptimised for the filler content. Comparatively, fumed silica was found to be superior as fillerin terms of mechanical and interface properties. Addition of fibrous filler (5 parts improved thepeel strength, and reduced the thermal conductivity and erosion rate. All the compositions wereevaluated for sulphur and peroxide curing. Superior mechanical properties were achieved forsulphur-cured products, whereas peroxide-cured products exhibited an excellent ageing resistance.Rocket motors were insulated with optimised composition and propellant cast, and the motorswere evaluated by conducting static test in end-burning mode.Defence Science Journal, 2008, 58(1, pp.94-102, DOI : http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.58.1628

  7. Numerical simulation of multi-phase combustion flow in solid rocket motors with metalized propellant%Nmerical simulation of multi-phase combustion flow in solid rocket motors with metalized propellant

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAFQAT Wahab; XIE Kan; LIU Yu

    2009-01-01

    Multi-phase flow field simulation has been performed on solid rocket motor and effect of multi-phases on the performance prediction of the solid rocket motor(SRM)is in- vestigation.During the combustion of aluminized propellant,the aluminum particles in the propellant melt and form liquid aluminum at the burning propellant surface.So the flow within the rocket motor is multi phase or two phase because it contains droplets and smoke particles of Al2O3.Flow simulations have been performed on a large scale motor,to observe the effect of the flowfield on the chamber and nozzle as well.Uniform particles diameters and Rosin-Rammler diameter distribution method that is based on the assumption that an expo- nential relationship exists between the droplet diameter,d and mass fraction of droplets with diameter greater than d have been used for the simulation of different distribution of Al2O3 droplets present in SRM.Particles sizes in the range of 1-1 00μm are used,as being the most common droplets.In this approach the complete range of particle sizes is divided into a set of discrete size ranges,each to be defined by single stream that is part of the group.Roe scheme-flux differencing splitting based on approximate Riemann problem has been used to simulate the effects of the multi-phase flowfeild.This is second order upwind scheme in which flux differencing splitting method is employed.To cater for the turbulence effect, Spalart-Allmaras model has been used.The results obtained show the great sensitivity of this diameters distribution and particles concentrations to the SRM flow dynamics,primarily at the motor chamber and nozzle exit.The results are shown with various sizes of the parti- cles concentrations and geometrical configurations including models for SRM and nozzle.The analysis also provides effect of multi-phase on performance prediction of solid rocket motor.

  8. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  9. An Evaluation Of Rocket Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. Beri

    1959-07-01

    Full Text Available The dependence of conventional parameters of internal ballistics of Solid Propellant Rockets using external burning cruciform charge, on the geometry of charge aad rocket motor is discussed and results applied in a special case.

  10. Real-Time X-ray Radiography Diagnostics of Components in Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortopassi, A. C.; Martin, H. T.; Boyer, E.; Kuo, K. K.

    2012-01-01

    Solid rocket motors (SRMs) typically use nozzle materials which are required to maintain their shape as well as insulate the underlying support structure during the motor operation. In addition, SRMs need internal insulation materials to protect the motor case from the harsh environment resulting from the combustion of solid propellant. In the nozzle, typical materials consist of high density graphite, carbon-carbon composites and carbon phenolic composites. Internal insulation of the motor cases is typically a composite material with carbon, asbestos, Kevlar, or silica fibers in an ablative matrix such as EPDM or NBR. For both nozzle and internal insulation materials, the charring process occurs when the hot combustion products heat the material intensely. The pyrolysis of the matrix material takes away a portion of the thermal energy near the wall surface and leaves behind a char layer. The fiber reinforcement retains the porous char layer which provides continued thermal protection from the hot combustion products. It is of great interest to characterize both the total erosion rates of the material and the char layer thickness. By better understanding of the erosion process for a particular ablative material in a specific flow environment, the required insulation material thickness can be properly selected. The recession rates of internal insulation and nozzle materials of SRMs are typically determined by testing in some sort of simulated environment; either arc-jet testing, flame torch testing, or subscale SRMs of different size. Material recession rates are deduced by comparison of pre- and post-test measurements and then averaging over the duration of the test. However, these averaging techniques cannot be used to determine the instantaneous recession rates of the material. Knowledge of the variation in recession rates in response to the instantaneous flow conditions during the motor operation is of great importance. For example, in many SRM configurations

  11. Technical report analysis and design: Study of solid rocket motors for a space shuttle booster, volume 2, book 1, supplement 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    An analysis and design effort was conducted as part of the study of solid rocket motor for a space shuttle booster. The 156-inch-diameter, parallel burn solid rocket motor was selected as its baseline because it is transportable and is the most cost-effective, reliable system that has been developed and demonstrated. The basic approach was to concentrate on the selected baseline design, and to draw from the baseline sufficient data to describe the alternate approaches also studied. The following conclusions were reached with respect to technical feasibility of the use of solid rocket booster motors for the space shuttle vehicle: (1) The 156-inch, parallel-burn baseline SRM design meets NASA's study requirements while incorporating conservative safety factors. (2) The solid rocket motor booster represents a cost-effective approach. (3) Baseline costs are conservative and are based on a demonstrated design. (4) Recovery and reuse are feasible and offer substantial cost savings. (5) Abort can be accomplished successfully. (6) Ecological effects are acceptable.

  12. Shear strength of fillet welds in aluminum alloy 2219. [for use on the solid rocket motor and external tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovoy, C. V.

    1978-01-01

    Fillet size is discussed in terms of theoretical or design dimensions versus as-welded dimensions, drawing attention to the inherent conservatism in the design load sustaining capabilities of fillet welds. Emphasis is placed on components for the solid rocket motor, external tank, and other aerospace applications. Problems associated with inspection of fillet welds are addresses and a comparison is drawn between defect counts obtained by radiographic inspection and by visual examination of the fracture plane. Fillet weld quality is related linearly to ultimate shear strength. Correlation coefficients are obtained by simple straight line regression analysis between the variables of ultimate shear strength and accumulative discontinuity summation. Shear strength allowables are found to be equivalent to 57 percent of butt weld A allowables (F sub tu.)

  13. Finite Element Simulation of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster Aft Skirt Splashdown Using an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melis, Matthew E.

    2003-01-01

    Explicit finite element techniques employing an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) methodology, within the transient dynamic code LS-DYNA, are used to predict splashdown loads on a proposed replacement/upgrade of the hydrazine tanks on the thrust vector control system housed within the aft skirt of a Space Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster. Two preliminary studies are performed prior to the full aft skirt analysis: An analysis of the proposed tank impacting water without supporting aft skirt structure, and an analysis of space capsule water drop tests conducted at NASA's Langley Research Center. Results from the preliminary studies provide confidence that useful predictions can be made by applying the ALE methodology to a detailed analysis of a 26-degree section of the skirt with proposed tank attached. Results for all three studies are presented and compared to limited experimental data. The challenges of using the LS-DYNA ALE capability for this type of analysis are discussed.

  14. Preliminary Thermo-hydraulic Core Design Analysis of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Lee, Jeong Ik; Chang, Soon Heung [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Nclear rockets improve the propellant efficiency more than twice compared to CRs and thus significantly reduce the propellant requirement. The superior efficiency of nuclear rockets is due to the combination of the huge energy density and a single low molecular weight propellant utilization. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTRs) are particularly suitable for manned missions to Mars because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high propellant efficiency. NTRs use thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat a single low molecular weight propellant, i. e., Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and then exhausted the extremely heated propellant through a thermodynamic nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (I{sub sp}) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the rate of propellant consumption. The difference of I{sub sp} makes over three times propellant savings of NTRs for a manned Mars mission compared to CRs. NTRs can also be configured to operate bimodally by converting the surplus nuclear energy to auxiliary electric power required for the operation of a spacecraft. Moreover, the concept and technology of NTRs are very simple, already proven, and safe. Thus, NTRs can be applied to various space missions such as solar system exploration, International Space Station (ISS) transport support, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) interception, etc. Nuclear propulsion is the most promising and viable option to achieve challenging deep space missions. Particularly, the attractions of a NTR include excellent thrust and propellant efficiency, bimodal capability, proven technology, and safe and reliable performance. The ROK has also begun the research for space nuclear systems as a volunteer of the international space race and a major world nuclear energy country. KANUTER is one of the advanced NTR engines currently under development at KAIST. This bimodal engine is operated in two modes of propulsion with 100 MW

  15. Preliminary Thermo-hydraulic Core Design Analysis of Korea Advanced Nuclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nclear rockets improve the propellant efficiency more than twice compared to CRs and thus significantly reduce the propellant requirement. The superior efficiency of nuclear rockets is due to the combination of the huge energy density and a single low molecular weight propellant utilization. Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTRs) are particularly suitable for manned missions to Mars because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high propellant efficiency. NTRs use thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat a single low molecular weight propellant, i. e., Hydrogen (H2) and then exhausted the extremely heated propellant through a thermodynamic nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (Isp) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the rate of propellant consumption. The difference of Isp makes over three times propellant savings of NTRs for a manned Mars mission compared to CRs. NTRs can also be configured to operate bimodally by converting the surplus nuclear energy to auxiliary electric power required for the operation of a spacecraft. Moreover, the concept and technology of NTRs are very simple, already proven, and safe. Thus, NTRs can be applied to various space missions such as solar system exploration, International Space Station (ISS) transport support, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) interception, etc. Nuclear propulsion is the most promising and viable option to achieve challenging deep space missions. Particularly, the attractions of a NTR include excellent thrust and propellant efficiency, bimodal capability, proven technology, and safe and reliable performance. The ROK has also begun the research for space nuclear systems as a volunteer of the international space race and a major world nuclear energy country. KANUTER is one of the advanced NTR engines currently under development at KAIST. This bimodal engine is operated in two modes of propulsion with 100 MWth power and

  16. ASAS = NASA's Advanced Solid-state Array Spectroradiometer: 1988 -2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) data collection contains data collected by the ASAS sensor flown aboard NASA aircraft. A fundamental use of...

  17. Advances in solid dosage form manufacturing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Gavin P

    2007-12-15

    Currently, the pharmaceutical and healthcare industries are moving through a period of unparalleled change. Major multinational pharmaceutical companies are restructuring, consolidating, merging and more importantly critically assessing their competitiveness to ensure constant growth in an ever-more demanding market where the cost of developing novel products is continuously increasing. The pharmaceutical manufacturing processes currently in existence for the production of solid oral dosage forms are associated with significant disadvantages and in many instances provide many processing problems. Therefore, it is well accepted that there is an increasing need for alternative processes to dramatically improve powder processing, and more importantly to ensure that acceptable, reproducible solid dosage forms can be manufactured. Consequently, pharmaceutical companies are beginning to invest in innovative processes capable of producing solid dosage forms that better meet the needs of the patient while providing efficient manufacturing operations. This article discusses two emerging solid dosage form manufacturing technologies, namely hot-melt extrusion and fluidized hot-melt granulation. PMID:17855217

  18. Fabrication of High Thermal Conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond Composite Combustion Chamber Liner for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Greene, Sandra E.; Singh, Jogender

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the process development for fabricating a high thermal conductivity NARloy-Z-Diamond composite (NARloy-Z-D) combustion chamber liner for application in advanced rocket engines. The fabrication process is challenging and this paper presents some details of these challenges and approaches used to address them. Prior research conducted at NASA-MSFC and Penn State had shown that NARloy-Z-40%D composite material has significantly higher thermal conductivity than the state of the art NARloy-Z alloy. Furthermore, NARloy-Z-40 %D is much lighter than NARloy-Z. These attributes help to improve the performance of the advanced rocket engines. Increased thermal conductivity will directly translate into increased turbopump power, increased chamber pressure for improved thrust and specific impulse. Early work on NARloy-Z-D composites used the Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST, Ref. 1, 2) for fabricating discs. NARloy-Z-D composites containing 10, 20 and 40vol% of high thermal conductivity diamond powder were investigated. Thermal conductivity (TC) data. TC increased with increasing diamond content and showed 50% improvement over pure copper at 40vol% diamond. This composition was selected for fabricating the combustion chamber liner using the FAST technique.

  19. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 4 covers articles on single crystal compound semiconductors and complex polycrystalline materials. The book discusses narrow gap semiconductors and solid state batteries. The text then describes the advantages of hot-pressed microcrystalline compacts of oxygen-octahedra ferroelectrics over single crystal materials, as well as heterostructure junction lasers. Solid state physicists, materials scientists, electrical engineers, and graduate students studying the subjects being discussed will find the book invaluable.

  20. Staged Combustion Cycle Rocket Engine Design Trade-Offs for Future Advanced Passenger Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Sippel, Martin; Yamashiro, Ryoma

    2012-01-01

    Staged combustion cycle rocket engines with a moderate nominal 16 MPa chamber pressure have been selected as the baseline propulsion system for the visionary intercontinental passenger transport SpaceLiner. Several technical engine design trade-offs are run by numerical simulations and results are pre-sented including: • Fuel rich vs. Full-flow cycle • Useful operational domain in MR • Regenerative cooling options of thrust chamber The engine operational domain is evaluated on ...

  1. Conjugate (solid/fluid) computational fluid dynamics analysis of the space shuttle solid rocket motor nozzle/case and case field joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, D.; Keeton, L. W.; Dionne, P. J.; Singhal, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    Three-dimensional, conjugate (solid/fluid) heat transfer analyses of new designs of the Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) nozzle/case and case field joints are described. The main focus was to predict the consequences of multiple rips (or debonds) in the ambient cure adhesive packed between the nozzle/case joint surfaces and the bond line between the mating field joint surfaces. The models calculate the transient temperature responses of the various materials neighboring postulated flow/leakpaths into, past, and out from the nozzle/case primary O-ring cavity and case field capture O-ring cavity. These results were used to assess if the design was failsafe (i.e., no potential O-ring erosion) and reusable (i.e., no excessive steel temperatures). The models are adaptions and extensions of the general purpose PHOENICS fluid dynamics code. A non-orthogonal coordinate system was employed and 11,592 control cells for the nozzle/case and 20,088 for the case field joints are used with non-uniform distribution. Physical properties of both fluid and solids are temperature dependent. A number of parametric studies were run for both joints with results showing temperature limits for reuse for the steel case on the nozzle joint being exceeded while the steel case temperatures for the field joint were not. O-ring temperatures for the nozzle joint predicted erosion while for the field joint they did not.

  2. Rocket Motor Microphone Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilkey, Debbie; Herrera, Eric; Gee, Kent L.; Giraud, Jerom H.; Young, Devin J.

    2010-01-01

    At ATK's facility in Utah, large full-scale solid rocket motors are tested. The largest is a five-segment version of the reusable solid rocket motor, which is for use on the Ares I launch vehicle. As a continuous improvement project, ATK and BYU investigated the use of microphones on these static tests, the vibration and temperature to which the instruments are subjected, and in particular the use of vent tubes and the effects these vents have at low frequencies.

  3. Thermohydraulic Design Analysis Modeling for Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Seung Hyun; Choi, Jae Young; Venneria, Paolo F.; Jeong, Yong Hoon; Chang, Soon Heung [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival, although the harsh space environment imposes lots of severe challenges to space pioneers. To date, almost all space programs have relied upon Chemical Rockets (CRs) rating superior thrust level to transit from the Earth's surface to its orbit. However, CRs inherently have insurmountable barrier to carry out deep space missions beyond Earth's orbit due to its low propellant efficiency, and ensuing enormous propellant requirement and launch costs. Meanwhile, nuclear rockets typically offer at least two times the propellant efficiency of a CR and thus notably reduce the propellant demand. Particularly, a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term manned missions to Mars and beyond because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high efficiency. The superior efficiency of NTRs is due to both high energy density of nuclear fuel and the low molecular weight propellant of Hydrogen (H{sub 2}) over the chemical reaction by-products. A NTR uses thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat the H{sub 2} propellant and then exhausted the highly heated propellant through a propelling nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (I{sub s}p) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the propellant consumption rate. If the average exhaust H{sub 2} temperature of a NTR is around 3,000 K, the I{sub s}p can be achieved as high as 1,000 s as compared with only 450 - 500 s of the best CRs. For this reason, NTRs are favored for various space applications such as orbital tugs, lunar transports, and manned missions to Mars and beyond. The best known NTR development effort was conducted from 1955 to1974 under the ROVER and NERVA programs in the USA. These programs had successfully designed and tested many different reactors and engines. After these projects, the researches on NERVA derived

  4. Thermohydraulic Design Analysis Modeling for Korea Advanced NUclear Thermal Engine Rocket for Space Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space exploration is a realistic and profitable goal for long-term humanity survival, although the harsh space environment imposes lots of severe challenges to space pioneers. To date, almost all space programs have relied upon Chemical Rockets (CRs) rating superior thrust level to transit from the Earth's surface to its orbit. However, CRs inherently have insurmountable barrier to carry out deep space missions beyond Earth's orbit due to its low propellant efficiency, and ensuing enormous propellant requirement and launch costs. Meanwhile, nuclear rockets typically offer at least two times the propellant efficiency of a CR and thus notably reduce the propellant demand. Particularly, a Nuclear Thermal Rocket (NTR) is a leading candidate for near-term manned missions to Mars and beyond because it satisfies a relatively high thrust as well as a high efficiency. The superior efficiency of NTRs is due to both high energy density of nuclear fuel and the low molecular weight propellant of Hydrogen (H2) over the chemical reaction by-products. A NTR uses thermal energy released from a nuclear fission reactor to heat the H2 propellant and then exhausted the highly heated propellant through a propelling nozzle to produce thrust. A propellant efficiency parameter of rocket engines is specific impulse (Isp) which represents the ratio of the thrust over the propellant consumption rate. If the average exhaust H2 temperature of a NTR is around 3,000 K, the Isp can be achieved as high as 1,000 s as compared with only 450 - 500 s of the best CRs. For this reason, NTRs are favored for various space applications such as orbital tugs, lunar transports, and manned missions to Mars and beyond. The best known NTR development effort was conducted from 1955 to1974 under the ROVER and NERVA programs in the USA. These programs had successfully designed and tested many different reactors and engines. After these projects, the researches on NERVA derived NTR engines have continued as

  5. CFD Modelling of a Quadrupole Vortex Inside a Cylindrical Channel for Research into Advanced Hybrid Rocket Designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study relies on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) tools to analyse a possible method for creating a stable quadrupole vortex within a simulated, circular-port, cylindrical rocket chamber. A model of the vortex generator is created in a SolidWorks CAD program and then the grid is generated using the Pointwise mesh generation software. The non-reactive flowfield is simulated using an open source computational program, Stanford University Unstructured (SU2). Subsequent analysis and visualization are performed using ParaView. The vortex generation approach that we employ consists of four tangentially injected monopole vortex generators that are arranged symmetrically with respect to the center of the chamber in such a way to produce a quadrupole vortex with a common downwash. The present investigation focuses on characterizing the flow dynamics so that future investigations can be undertaken with increasing levels of complexity. Our CFD simulations help to elucidate the onset of vortex filaments within the monopole tubes, and the evolution of quadrupole vortices downstream of the injection faceplate. Our results indicate that the quadrupole vortices produced using the present injection pattern can become quickly unstable to the extent of dissipating soon after being introduced into simulated rocket chamber. We conclude that a change in the geometrical configuration will be necessary to produce more stable quadrupoles

  6. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators. PMID:27484295

  7. Laser cooling in solids: advances and prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seletskiy, Denis V.; Epstein, Richard; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2016-09-01

    This review discusses the progress and ongoing efforts in optical refrigeration. Optical refrigeration is a process in which phonons are removed from a solid by anti-Stokes fluorescence. The review first summarizes the history of optical refrigeration, noting the success in cooling rare-earth-doped solids to cryogenic temperatures. It then examines in detail a four-level model of rare-earth-based optical refrigeration. This model elucidates the essential roles that the various material parameters, such as the spacing of the energy levels and the radiative quantum efficiency, play in the process of optical refrigeration. The review then describes the experimental techniques for cryogenic optical refrigeration of rare-earth-doped solids employing non-resonant and resonant optical cavities. It then examines the work on laser cooling of semiconductors, emphasizing the differences between optical refrigeration of semiconductors and rare-earth-doped solids and the new challenges and advantages of semiconductors. It then describes the significant experimental results including the observed optical refrigeration of CdS nanostructures. The review concludes by discussing the engineering challenges to the development of practical optical refrigerators, and the potential advantages and uses of these refrigerators.

  8. Common Cause Case Study: An Estimated Probability of Four Solid Rocket Booster Hold-Down Post Stud Hang-ups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Until Solid Rocket Motor ignition, the Space Shuttle is mated to the Mobil Launch Platform in part via eight (8) Solid Rocket Booster (SRB) hold-down bolts. The bolts are fractured using redundant pyrotechnics, and are designed to drop through a hold-down post on the Mobile Launch Platform before the Space Shuttle begins movement. The Space Shuttle program has experienced numerous failures where a bolt has hung up. That is, it did not clear the hold-down post before liftoff and was caught by the SRBs. This places an additional structural load on the vehicle that was not included in the original certification requirements. The Space Shuttle is currently being certified to withstand the loads induced by up to three (3) of eight (8) SRB hold-down experiencing a "hang-up". The results of loads analyses performed for (4) stud hang-ups indicate that the internal vehicle loads exceed current structural certification limits at several locations. To determine the risk to the vehicle from four (4) stud hang-ups, the likelihood of the scenario occurring must first be evaluated. Prior to the analysis discussed in this paper, the likelihood of occurrence had been estimated assuming that the stud hang-ups were completely independent events. That is, it was assumed that no common causes or factors existed between the individual stud hang-up events. A review of the data associated with the hang-up events, showed that a common factor (timing skew) was present. This paper summarizes a revised likelihood evaluation performed for the four (4) stud hang-ups case considering that there are common factors associated with the stud hang-ups. The results show that explicitly (i.e. not using standard common cause methodologies such as beta factor or Multiple Greek Letter modeling) taking into account the common factor of timing skew results in an increase in the estimated likelihood of four (4) stud hang-ups of an order of magnitude over the independent failure case.

  9. Advanced Small Rocket Chambers. Basic Program and Option 2: Fundamental Processes and Material Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassowski, Donald M.

    1993-01-01

    Propellants, chamber materials, and processes for fabrication of small high performance radiation cooled liquid rocket engines were evaluated to determine candidates for eventual demonstration in flight-type thrusters. Both storable and cryogenic propellant systems were considered. The storable propellant systems chosen for further study were nitrogen tetroxide oxidizer with either hydrazine or monomethylhydrazine as fuel. The cryogenic propellants chosen were oxygen with either hydrogen or methane as fuel. Chamber material candidates were chemical vapor deposition (CVD) rhenium protected from oxidation by CVD iridium for the chamber hot section, and film cooled wrought platinum-rhodium or regeneratively cooled stainless steel for the front end section exposed to partially reacted propellants. Laser diagnostics of the combustion products near the hot chamber surface and measurements at the surface layer were performed in a collaborative program at Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA. The Material Sample Test Apparatus, a laboratory system to simulate the combustion environment in terms of gas and material temperature, composition, and pressure up to 6 Atm, was developed for these studies. Rocket engine simulator studies were conducted to evaluate the materials under simulated combustor flow conditions, in the diagnostic test chamber. These tests used the exhaust species measurement system, a device developed to monitor optically species composition and concentration in the chamber and exhaust by emission and absorption measurements.

  10. 固体火箭发动机无损探伤方法%Method Research on the NDT for Solid Rocket Motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴昊; 董可海; 张旭东; 张春龙

    2014-01-01

    针对某型固体火箭发动机的具体结构,确定了发动机无损探伤的方法。对发动机燃烧室装药的应力情况进行了有限元计算,确定了燃烧室工业CT无损探伤的关键截面,为固体火箭发动机无损探伤的应用提供了参考。%The method of NDT is determined aimed at the structure of solid rocket motor. The combustion chamber is calculated using finite element method. The key parts of NDT for the combustion chamber have been identified by ICT. This research provides a reference for the application of NDT for solid rocket motor.

  11. Advanced high performance solid wall blanket concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    First wall and blanket (FW/blanket) design is a crucial element in the performance and acceptance of a fusion power plant. High temperature structural and breeding materials are needed for high thermal performance. A suitable combination of structural design with the selected materials is necessary for D-T fuel sufficiency. Whenever possible, low afterheat, low chemical reactivity and low activation materials are desired to achieve passive safety and minimize the amount of high-level waste. Of course the selected fusion FW/blanket design will have to match the operational scenarios of high performance plasma. The key characteristics of eight advanced high performance FW/blanket concepts are presented in this paper. Design configurations, performance characteristics, unique advantages and issues are summarized. All reviewed designs can satisfy most of the necessary design goals. For further development, in concert with the advancement in plasma control and scrape off layer physics, additional emphasis will be needed in the areas of first wall coating material selection, design of plasma stabilization coils, consideration of reactor startup and transient events. To validate the projected performance of the advanced FW/blanket concepts the critical element is the need for 14 MeV neutron irradiation facilities for the generation of necessary engineering design data and the prediction of FW/blanket components lifetime and availability

  12. Advanced materials for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Armstrong, T.R.; Stevenson, J.

    1995-08-01

    The purpose of this research is to improve the properties of the current state-of-the-art materials used for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The objectives are to: (1) develop materials based on modifications of the state-of-the-art materials; (2) minimize or eliminate stability problems in the cathode, anode, and interconnect; (3) Electrochemically evaluate (in reproducible and controlled laboratory tests) the current state-of-the-art air electrode materials and cathode/electrolyte interfacial properties; (4) Develop accelerated electrochemical test methods to evaluate the performance of SOFCs under controlled and reproducible conditions; and (5) Develop and test materials for use in low-temperature SOFCs. The goal is to modify and improve the current state-of-the-art materials and minimize the total number of cations in each material to avoid negative effects on the materials properties. Materials to reduce potential deleterious interactions, (3) improve thermal, electrical, and electrochemical properties, (4) develop methods to synthesize both state-of-the-art and alternative materials for the simultaneous fabricatoin and consolidation in air of the interconnections and electrodes with the solid electrolyte, and (5) understand electrochemical reactions at materials interfaces and the effects of component composition and processing on those reactions.

  13. Development and Validation of a Computational Model for Predicting the Behavior of Plumes from Large Solid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jason E.; Black, David L.; Taylor, Casey L.

    2013-01-01

    Exhaust plumes from large solid rocket motors fired at ATK's Promontory test site carry particulates to high altitudes and typically produce deposits that fall on regions downwind of the test area. As populations and communities near the test facility grow, ATK has become increasingly concerned about the impact of motor testing on those surrounding communities. To assess the potential impact of motor testing on the community and to identify feasible mitigation strategies, it is essential to have a tool capable of predicting plume behavior downrange of the test stand. A software package, called PlumeTracker, has been developed and validated at ATK for this purpose. The code is a point model that offers a time-dependent, physics-based description of plume transport and precipitation. The code can utilize either measured or forecasted weather data to generate plume predictions. Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) data and field observations from twenty-three historical motor test fires at Promontory were collected to test the predictive capability of PlumeTracker. Model predictions for plume trajectories and deposition fields were found to correlate well with the collected dataset.

  14. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 1 presents articles about junction electroluminescence; metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) physics; ion implantation in semiconductors; and electron transport through insulating thin films. The book describes the basic physics of carrier injection; energy transfer and recombination mechanisms; state of the art efficiencies; and future prospects for light emitting diodes. The text then discusses solid state spectroscopy, which is the pair spectra observed in gallium phosphide photoluminescence. The extensive studies

  15. Advanced methods of solid oxide fuel cell modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Milewski, Jaroslaw; Santarelli, Massimo; Leone, Pierluigi

    2011-01-01

    Fuel cells are widely regarded as the future of the power and transportation industries. Intensive research in this area now requires new methods of fuel cell operation modeling and cell design. Typical mathematical models are based on the physical process description of fuel cells and require a detailed knowledge of the microscopic properties that govern both chemical and electrochemical reactions. ""Advanced Methods of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Modeling"" proposes the alternative methodology of generalized artificial neural networks (ANN) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) modeling. ""Advanced Methods

  16. Measurement of Solid Rocket Propellant Burning Rate Using X-ray Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Matthew D.

    The burning rate of solid propellants can be difficult to measure for unusual burning surface geometries, but X-ray imaging can be used to measure burning rate. The objectives of this work were to measure the baseline burning rate of an electrically-controlled solid propellant (ESP) formulation with real-time X-ray radiography and to determine the uncertainty of the measurements. Two edge detection algorithms were written to track the burning surface in X-ray videos. The edge detection algorithms were informed by intensity profiles of simulated 2-D X-ray images. With a 95% confidence level, the burning rates measured by the Projected-Slope Intersection algorithm in the two combustion experiments conducted were 0.0839 in/s +/-2.86% at an average pressure of 407 psi +/-3.6% and 0.0882 in/s +/-3.04% at 410 psi +/-3.9%. The uncertainty percentages were based on the statistics of a Monte Carlo analysis on burning rate.

  17. Removing hydrochloric acid exhaust products from high performance solid rocket propellant using aluminum-lithium alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Brandon C; Sippel, Travis R; Pfeil, Mark A; Gunduz, I Emre; Son, Steven F

    2016-11-01

    Hydrochloric acid (HCl) pollution from perchlorate based propellants is well known for both launch site contamination, as well as the possible ozone layer depletion effects. Past efforts in developing environmentally cleaner solid propellants by scavenging the chlorine ion have focused on replacing a portion of the chorine-containing oxidant (i.e., ammonium perchlorate) with an alkali metal nitrate. The alkali metal (e.g., Li or Na) in the nitrate reacts with the chlorine ion to form an alkali metal chloride (i.e., a salt instead of HCl). While this technique can potentially reduce HCl formation, it also results in reduced ideal specific impulse (ISP). Here, we show using thermochemical calculations that using aluminum-lithium (Al-Li) alloy can reduce HCl formation by more than 95% (with lithium contents ≥15 mass%) and increase the ideal ISP by ∼7s compared to neat aluminum (using 80/20 mass% Al-Li alloy). Two solid propellants were formulated using 80/20 Al-Li alloy or neat aluminum as fuel additives. The halide scavenging effect of Al-Li propellants was verified using wet bomb combustion experiments (75.5±4.8% reduction in pH, ∝ [HCl], when compared to neat aluminum). Additionally, no measurable HCl evolution was detected using differential scanning calorimetry coupled with thermogravimetric analysis, mass spectrometry, and Fourier transform infrared absorption. PMID:27289269

  18. Design of Multi-Propellant Star Grains for Solid Propellant Rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Krishnan

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available A new approach to solve the geometry-problem of solid propellant star is presented. The basis of the approach is to take the web-thickness (a ballistic as well as a geometrical property as the characteristic length. The nondimensional characteristic parameters representing diameter, length, slenderness-ratio, and ignitor accommodation of the grain are all identified. Many particular cases of star configurations (from the configurations of single propellant to those of four different propellants can be analysed through the identified characteristic parameters. A better way of representing the single-propellant-star-performance in a design graph is explained. Two types of dual propellant grains are analysed in detail. The first type is characterised by its two distinct stages of burning (initially by single propellant burning and then by dual propellant burning; the second type has the dual propellant burning throughout. Suitability of the identified characteristic parameters to an optimisation study is demonstrated through examples.

  19. Advanced characterisation of municipal solid waste ashes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skytte Pedersen, Randi

    2002-12-15

    This report deals with characterisation of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) ashes from the Danish power plant Maebjergvaerket, Holstebro. MSW has been used as a fuel since the mid 1960's and since then, the MSW incineration plants have experienced operational problems due to deposit formation and corrosion. Inorganic elements tightly or loosely bound in the waste are the main cause of these problems. The tightly bound elements will mainly stay on the grate during combustion, whereas the loosely bound elements are volatilised and recondensed elsewhere in the furnace. Many of the heavy metals form volatile chlorides during the incineration, and the fly ash fraction thus show enrichment in these elements. Presence of chlorides and heavy metals in deposits may cause severe corrosion due to formation of low-melting eutectics. Chlorine gas in the flue gas is also of major concern with respect to corrosion, due to formation of volatile chlorides when chlorine comes in contact with the tube material. Four different ash fractions (bottom ash, super heater ash, economiser ash and fly ash) taken from Maebjergvaerket have been analysed with respect to particle sizes, structures, shapes and composition. The applied methods were scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray analyses (EDX) and mapping, which were used in order to determine sizes, chemical composition and structure of the particles. X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) was used to provide information about crystallography and mineral phases. Chemical analysis was also performed along with a particle size distribution for the fine-grained fractions (economiser and fly ash). The amount of silicates consisting of Ca, Al and Si, were found to decrease through the furnace, whereas the amount of alkali (Na, K) chlorides and heavy metals (Pb, Zn) increased. The bonding in the waste before incineration is the direct cause of this, since silicates are tightly bound and chlorides are loosely bound. There was a

  20. Copper Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Singh, Jogender; Rape, Aaron; Vohra, Yogesh; Thomas, Vinoy; Li, Deyu; Otte, Kyle

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  1. Copper-Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes and Copper-Diamond Composites for Advanced Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Ellis, Dave L.; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Foygel, Michael; Rape, Aaron; Singh, Jogender; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Thomas, Vinoy; Otte, Kyle G.; Li, Deyu

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on the research effort to improve the thermal conductivity of the copper-based alloy NARloy-Z (Cu-3 wt.%Ag-0.5 wt.% Zr), the state-of-the-art alloy used to make combustion chamber liners in regeneratively-cooled liquid rocket engines, using nanotechnology. The approach was to embed high thermal conductivity multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and diamond (D) particles in the NARloy-Z matrix using powder metallurgy techniques. The thermal conductivity of MWCNTs and D have been reported to be 5 to 10 times that of NARloy-Z. Hence, 10 to 20 vol. % MWCNT finely dispersed in NARloy-Z matrix could nearly double the thermal conductivity, provided there is a good thermal bond between MWCNTs and copper matrix. Quantum mechanics-based modeling showed that zirconium (Zr) in NARloy-Z should form ZrC at the MWCNT-Cu interface and provide a good thermal bond. In this study, NARloy-Z powder was blended with MWCNTs in a ball mill, and the resulting mixture was consolidated under high pressure and temperature using Field Assisted Sintering Technology (FAST). Microstructural analysis showed that the MWCNTs, which were provided as tangles of MWCNTs by the manufacturer, did not detangle well during blending and formed clumps at the prior particle boundaries. The composites made form these powders showed lower thermal conductivity than the base NARloy-Z. To eliminate the observed physical agglomeration, tangled multiwall MWCNTs were separated by acid treatment and electroless plated with a thin layer of chromium to keep them separated during further processing. Separately, the thermal conductivities of MWCNTs used in this work were measured, and the results showed very low values, a major factor in the low thermal conductivity of the composite. On the other hand, D particles embedded in NARloy-Z matrix showed much improved thermal conductivity. Elemental analysis showed migration of Zr to the NARloy-Z-D interface to form ZrC, which appeared to provide a low contact

  2. Recent advances in inorganic solid electrolytes for lithium batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Can eCao

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The review presents an overview of the recent advances in inorganic solid lithium ion conductors, which are of great interest as solid electrolytes in all-solid-state lithium batteries. It is focused on two major categories: crystalline electrolytes and glass-based electrolytes. Important systems such as thio-LISICON Li10SnP2S12, garnet Li7La3Zr2O12, perovskite Li3xLa(2/3-xTiO3, NASICON Li1.3Al0.3Ti1.7(PO43 and glass-ceramic xLi2S•(1-xP2S5 and their progress are described in great detail. Meanwhile, the review discusses different on-going strategies on enhancing conductivity, optimizing electrolyte/electrode interface and improving cell performance.

  3. Mechanical and Combustion Performance of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as an Additive to Paraffin-Based Solid Fuels for Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel B.; Boyer, Eric; Wachs, Trevor; Kuo, Kenneth, K.; Koo, Joseph H.; Story, George

    2012-01-01

    Paraffin-based solid fuels for hybrid rocket motor applications are recognized as a fastburning alternative to other fuel binders such as HTPB, but efforts to further improve the burning rate and mechanical properties of paraffin are still necessary. One approach that is considered in this study is to use multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) as an additive to paraffin wax. Carbon nanotubes provide increased electrical and thermal conductivity to the solid-fuel grains to which they are added, which can improve the mass burning rate. Furthermore, the addition of ultra-fine aluminum particles to the paraffin/MWNT fuel grains can enhance regression rate of the solid fuel and the density impulse of the hybrid rocket. The multi-walled carbon nanotubes also present the possibility of greatly improving the mechanical properties (e.g., tensile strength) of the paraffin-based solid-fuel grains. For casting these solid-fuel grains, various percentages of MWNT and aluminum particles will be added to the paraffin wax. Previous work has been published about the dispersion and mixing of carbon nanotubes.1 Another manufacturing method has been used for mixing the MWNT with a phenolic resin for ablative applications, and the manufacturing and mixing processes are well-documented in the literature.2 The cost of MWNT is a small fraction of single-walled nanotubes. This is a scale-up advantage as future applications and projects will require low cost additives to maintain cost effectiveness. Testing of the solid-fuel grains will be conducted in several steps. Dog bone samples will be cast and prepared for tensile testing. The fuel samples will also be analyzed using thermogravimetric analysis and a high-resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). The SEM will allow for examination of the solid fuel grain for uniformity and consistency. The paraffin-based fuel grains will also be tested using two hybrid rocket test motors located at the Pennsylvania State University s High Pressure

  4. Enantioselective synthesis of aziridines using asymmetric transfer hydrogenation as a precursor for chiral derivatives used as bonding agent for rocket solid propellants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparecida M. Kawamoto

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, expedient and enantioselective method for the synthesis of beta-hydroxy amines and monosubstituted aziridines in up to 99% e.e., via asymmetric transfer hydrogenation of a-amino ketones and cyclisation through treatment with tosyl chloride and base, is described. (1R,2R-N-(para-toluenesulfonyl-1,2-ethylenediamine with formic acid has been utilised as a ligand for the Ruthenium (II catalysed enantioselective transfer hydrogenation of the ketones.The chiral 2-methyl aziridine, which is a potentially more efficient bonding agent for Rocket Solid Propellant has been successfully achieved.

  5. Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program: Advanced engine study, task D.1/D.3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A.; Erickson, C.; Hines, B.

    1986-01-01

    Concepts for space maintainability of OTV engines were examined. An engine design was developed which was driven by space maintenance requirements and by a failure mode and effects (FME) analysis. Modularity within the engine was shown to offer cost benefits and improved space maintenance capabilities. Space operable disconnects were conceptualized for both engine change-out and for module replacement. Through FME mitigation the modules were conceptualized to contain the least reliable and most often replaced engine components. A preliminary space maintenance plan was developed around a controls and condition monitoring system using advanced sensors, controls, and condition monitoring concepts. A complete engine layout was prepared satisfying current vehicle requirements and utilizing projected component advanced technologies. A technology plan for developing the required technology was assembled.

  6. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program. Phase 2: Advanced engine study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, C.; Martinez, A.; Hines, B.

    1987-01-01

    In Phase 2 of the Advanced Engine Study, the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) maintenance-driven engine design, preliminary maintenance plan, and concept for space operable disconnects generated in Phase 1 were further developed. Based on the results of the vehicle contractors Orbit Transfer Vehicle (OTV) Concept Definition and System Analysis Phase A studies, minor revisions to the engine design were made. Additional refinements in the engine design were identified through further engine concept studies. These included an updated engine balance incorporating experimental heat transfer data from the Enhanced Heat Load Thrust Chamber Study and a Rao optimum nozzle contour. The preliminary maintenance plan of Phase 1 was further developed through additional studies. These included a compilation of critical component lives and life limiters and a review of the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) operations and maintenance manual in order to begin outlining the overall maintenance procedures for the Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine and identifying technology requirements for streamlining space-based operations. Phase 2 efforts also provided further definition to the advanced fluid coupling devices including the selection and preliminary design of a preferred concept and a preliminary test plan for its further development.

  7. Advanced Materials and Manufacturing for Low-Cost, High-Performance Liquid Rocket Combustion Chambers, Phase II Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silicided niobium alloy (C103) combustion chambers have been used extensively in both NASA and DoD liquid rocket propulsion systems. Niobium alloys offer a good...

  8. Advanced Flow Analysis Tools for Transient Solid Rocket Motor Simulations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The goals of reducing total cost and increasing reliability and safety of access to space continue to be top priorities for NASA. The most immediate propulsion...

  9. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Sankaran Venugopal; K.K. Rajesh; V. Ramanujachari

    2011-01-01

    With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems. Classical hybrids can be throttled for thrust tailoring, perform in-flight motor shutdown and restart. In classical hybrids, the fuel is stored in the form of a solid grain, requiring only half the feed system hardware of liquid bipropellant engines. The commonly used fuels are benign, nonto...

  10. This "Is" Rocket Science!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keith, Wayne; Martin, Cynthia; Veltkamp, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Using model rockets to teach physics can be an effective way to engage students in learning. In this paper, we present a curriculum developed in response to an expressed need for helping high school students review physics equations in preparation for a state-mandated exam. This required a mode of teaching that was more advanced and analytical…

  11. Hybrid Rocket Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sankaran Venugopal

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available With their unique operational characteristics, hybrid rockets can potentially provide safer, lower-cost avenues for spacecraft and missiles than the current solid propellant and liquid propellant systems. Classical hybrids can be throttled for thrust tailoring, perform in-flight motor shutdown and restart. In classical hybrids, the fuel is stored in the form of a solid grain, requiring only half the feed system hardware of liquid bipropellant engines. The commonly used fuels are benign, nontoxic, and not hazardous to store and transport. Solid fuel grains are not highly susceptible to cracks, imperfections, and environmental temperature and are therefore safer to manufacture, store, transport, and use for launch. The status of development based on the experience of the last few decades indicating the maturity of the hybrid rocket technology is given in brief.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(3, pp.193-200, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.518

  12. Feasibility of using neutron radiography to inspect the Space Shuttle solid rocket booster aft skirt, forward skirt and frustum. Part 1: Summary report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. P.; Bader, J. W.; Brenizer, J. S.; Hosticka, B.

    1992-01-01

    The space shuttle's solid rocket boosters (SRB) include components made primarily of aluminum that are parachuted back for retrieval from the ocean and refurbished for repeated usage. Nondestructive inspection methods used on these aging parts to reduce the risk of unforeseen problems include x-ray, ultrasonics, and eddy current. Neutron radiography tests on segments of an SRB component show that entrapped moisture and naturally occurring aluminum corrosion can be revealed by neutron radiography even if present in only small amounts. Voids in sealant can also be evaluated. Three alternatives are suggested to follow-up this study: (1) take an SRB component to an existing neutron radiography system; (2) take an existing mobile neutron radiography system to the NASA site; or (3) plan a dedicated system custom designed for NASA applications.

  13. 固体火箭发动机不稳定燃烧研究进展%Progress of investigation on combustion instability of solid rocket motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁飞; 张峤; 李军伟; 苏万兴

    2011-01-01

    The present situation and progress of investigation on combustion instability of solid rocket motors were introduced both at home and abroad in details. This paper attempts to organize these theories and lessons by detail physical concepts? Prediction models, experimental methods and numerical simulations. The following viewpoints are proposed: (1) theoretical studies on energy transport mechanism between flow field and acoustic field, as well as the complex effect of aluminum, shall be emphasized; (2) experimental faculties for distributed combustion and pulsing triggering instability shall be established; (3) stability prediction program shall be developed. The analysis could provide a reference for research on combustion instability of solid rocket motors.%对固体火箭发动机不稳定燃烧的国内外研究现状和进展进行了详细综述.分别从物理概念、理论预估模型、实验研究、数值模拟等方面出发,论述了不稳定燃烧研究过程中的难点和一些经验教训.提出了应加强流场与声场能量交换、铝粉综合作用等机理的理论研究;开展分布燃烧、脉冲触发不稳定燃烧的实验研究;进一步开发稳定性预估软件等观点,为国内固体火箭发动机在该领域的研究提供参考.

  14. A review of recent advances in solid film lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1987-01-01

    Thin, adherent sputtered MoS2 and ion plated metallic (Au, Ag, Pb) lubricating films are primarily used in precision contacting triboelement surfaces where wear debris formation is critical and high reliability requirements have to be satisfied. Detailed structural and compositional characterization of solid film lubricants is of prime importance. It is this information from the nano-micro-macro level which is needed to interpret and improve the frictional behavior and assure long endurance lives. The purpose of this paper is to summarize in a concise review the solid lubricant film structure and morphology and their effects on the tribological properties of the lubricant systems. The tribological performance of thin lubricating films has significantly advanced through progressive understanding of the film parameters such as adhesion, cohesion, interface formation, nucleation and microstructural growth, critical film thickness and substrate finish, and temperature. Sputtered MoS2 and ion plated Au, Ag, and Pb films are separately discussed and evaluated in terms of the above film parameters to establish the most desirable film structures and thicknesses in order to achieve effective lubrication.

  15. Air-Breathing Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine prototype in the test bay at the General Applied Science Lab facility in Ronkonkoma, New York. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  16. Prediction of Acoustic Environments from Horizontal Rocket Firings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Giacomoni, Clothilde

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, advances in research and engineering have led to more powerful launch vehicles which yield acoustic environments potentially destructive to the vehicle or surrounding structures. Therefore, it has become increasingly important to be able to predict the acoustic environments created by these vehicles in order to avoid structural and/or component failure. The current industry standard technique for predicting launch-induced acoustic environments was developed by Eldred in the early 1970's. Recent work has shown Eldred's technique to be inaccurate for current state-of-the-art launch vehicles. Due to the high cost of full-scale and even sub-scale rocket experiments, very little rocket noise data is available. Much of the work thought to be applicable to rocket noise has been done with heated jets. A model to predict the acoustic environment due to a launch vehicle in the far-field was created. This was done using five sets of horizontally fired rocket data, obtained between 2008 and 2012. Through scaling analysis, it is shown that liquid and solid rocket motors exhibit similar spectra at similar amplitudes. This model is accurate for these five data sets within 5 dB of the measured data.

  17. Noncircular Orifice Holes and Advanced Fabrication Techniques for Liquid Rocket Injectors (Phases 1, 2, 3, and 4)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mchale, R. M.; Nurick, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive summary of the results of a cold-flow and hot-fire experimental study of the mixing and atomization characteristics of injector elements incorporating noncircular orifices is presented. Both liquid/liquid and gas/liquid element types are discussed. Unlike doublet and triplet elements (circular orifices only) were investigated for the liquid/liquid case while concentric tube elements were investigated for the gas/liquid case. It is concluded that noncircular shape can be employed to significant advantage in injector design for liquid rocket engines.

  18. Thermal Hydraulics Design and Analysis Methodology for a Solid-Core Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ten-See; Canabal, Francisco; Chen, Yen-Sen; Cheng, Gary; Ito, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear thermal propulsion is a leading candidate for in-space propulsion for human Mars missions. This chapter describes a thermal hydraulics design and analysis methodology developed at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, in support of the nuclear thermal propulsion development effort. The objective of this campaign is to bridge the design methods in the Rover/NERVA era, with a modern computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer methodology, to predict thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments of a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine the Small Engine, designed in the 1960s. The computational methodology is based on an unstructured-grid, pressure-based, all speeds, chemically reacting, computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer platform, while formulations of flow and heat transfer through porous and solid media were implemented to describe those of hydrogen flow channels inside the solid24 core. Design analyses of a single flow element and the entire solid-core thrust chamber of the Small Engine were performed and the results are presented herein

  19. Field study of disposed solid wastes from advanced coal processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radian Corporation and the North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) are funded to develop information to be used by private industry and government agencies for managing solid wastes produced by advanced coal combustion processes. This information will be developed by conducting several field studies on disposed wastes from these processes. Data will be collected to characterize these wastes and their interactions with the environments in which they are disposed. Three sites were selected for the field studies: Colorado Ute's fluidized bed combustion (FBC) unit in Nucla, Colorado; Ohio Edison's limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) retrofit in Lorain, Ohio; and Freeman United's mine site in central Illinois with wastes supplied by the nearby Midwest Grain FBC unit. During the past year, field monitoring and sampling of the four landfill test cases constructed in 1989 and 1991 has continued. Option 1 of the contract was approved last year to add financing for the fifth test case at the Freeman United site. The construction of the Test Case 5 cells is scheduled to begin in November, 1992. Work during this past year has focused on obtaining data on the physical and chemical properties of the landfilled wastes, and on developing a conceptual framework for interpreting this information. Results to date indicate that hydration reactions within the landfilled wastes have had a major impact on the physical and chemical properties of the materials but these reactions largely ceased after the first year, and physical properties have changed little since then. Conditions in Colorado remained dry and no porewater samples were collected. In Ohio, hydration reactions and increases in the moisture content of the waste tied up much of the water initially infiltrating the test cells

  20. Optimization of Tape Winding Process Parameters to Enhance the Performance of Solid Rocket Nozzle Throat Back Up Liners using Taguchi's Robust Design Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Nayani Kishore

    2016-06-01

    The throat back up liners is used to protect the nozzle structural members from the severe thermal environment in solid rocket nozzles. The throat back up liners is made with E-glass phenolic prepregs by tape winding process. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the optimization of process parameters of tape winding process to achieve better insulative resistance using Taguchi's robust design methodology. In this method four control factors machine speed, roller pressure, tape tension, tape temperature that were investigated for the tape winding process. The presented work was to study the cogency and acceptability of Taguchi's methodology in manufacturing of throat back up liners. The quality characteristic identified was Back wall temperature. Experiments carried out using L{9/'} (34) orthogonal array with three levels of four different control factors. The test results were analyzed using smaller the better criteria for Signal to Noise ratio in order to optimize the process. The experimental results were analyzed conformed and successfully used to achieve the minimum back wall temperature of the throat back up liners. The enhancement in performance of the throat back up liners was observed by carrying out the oxy-acetylene tests. The influence of back wall temperature on the performance of throat back up liners was verified by ground firing test.

  1. Sirius-5 experimental rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerstein, A.; Omersel, P.; Goljuf, L.; Zidaric, M.

    1981-09-01

    After giving a historical account of multistage rocket development in Yugoslavia, a status report is presented for the three-stage Sirius-5 program. The rocket is composed of: (1) a solid-propellant first stage, consisting of a cluster of eight standard motors yielding 220 kN thrust for 1.3 sec; (2) a mixed amines/inhibited red fuming nitric acid, bipropellant second stage generating 50 kN thrust; and (3) a third stage of the same design as the second but with only 62 kg of fuel, by contrast to 168 kg. Among the design principles adhered to are: minimization of the number of components, conservative design margins, and specifications for key subsystems based on demonstration programs. The primary use of this system is in amateur rocketry, being able to carry a 20 kg payload to 150 km.

  2. The four INTA-300 rocket prototypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calero, J. S.

    1985-03-01

    A development history and performance capability assessment is presented for the INTA-300 'Flamenco' sounding rocket prototype specimens. The Flamenco is a two-stage solid fuel rocket, based on British sounding rocket technology, that can lift 50 km payloads to altitudes of about 300 km. The flight of the first two prototypes, in 1974 and 1975, pointed to vibration problems which reduced the achievable apogee, and the third prototype's flight was marred by a premature detonation that destroyed the rocket. The fourth Flamenco flight, however, yielded much reliable data.

  3. SOLID LIPID NANOPARTICLES: AN ADVANCED DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghu Nandan Reddy* and Arshia Shariff

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid lipid nanoparticles are at the forefront of the rapidly developing field of nanotechnology with several potential applications in drug delivery, research and clinical medicine, as well as in other varied sciences. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN dispersions have been proposed as a new type of colloidal drug carrier system suitable for intravenous administration. Solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs technology represents a promising new approach to lipophilic drug delivery. Solid lipid nanoparticles are spherical lipid particles ranging in size from 1 to 1000 nm and are dispersed in water or in aqueous surfactant solution. It is identical to an oil-in-water emulsion, but the liquid lipid (oil of the emulsion has been replaced by a solid lipid, i.e., yielding Solid Lipid Nanoparticles. SLN are particles made from solid lipid or lipid blends produced by high pressure homogenization. The biodegradable and bioacceptable nature of SLNs makes them less toxic as compared to polymeric nanoparticles. SLNs can also be used to improve the bioavailability of drugs. In this present review this new approach is discussed in terms of their advantages, disadvantages, methods, characterization, pharmacokinetic studies, in-vivo studies, in-vitro studies, and special features

  4. Design Optimization of Solid Rocket Booster Based on Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization Algorithm for NSV%近空间飞行器固体火箭助推器/助推弹道总体设计优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡诗国; 方洋旺; 刘万俊

    2011-01-01

    To serve the nonlinear programming problem which has multi-variables with constrains of Design optimization of solid rocket booster for a Near Space Vehicle (NSV), a system analysis model including the thermodynamics analysis and calculating sub-model, the mass analysis and calculating submodel , the aerodynamics analysis and calculating sub-model, and the trajectory design and calculating submodel was establish under the precondition of given nozzle structural, propellant, shell materiel, adiabatic materiel and rocket motor grain structural. Than, a Hybrid Particle Swarm Optimization(HPSO)algorithm based on feasibility rule and simulated anneal was adopted to find the global best value. The result of the optimal program shows that HPSO is a ideal algorithm for the design optimization of solid rocket booster. HPSO method can improve design quality for solid rocket booster, and greatly reduce iterative times and shorten design period.%研究一种近空间飞行器的固体火箭助推器/助推弹道总体优化问题.在选定喷管构型、推进剂、壳体材料、绝热层材料及药柱结构的前提下,建立包含热力学分析与计算、质量分析与计算、气动力分析与计算和弹道设计与计算的系统分析模型,采用一种基于可行性规则与结合模拟退火的混合粒子群优化算法求解最优解.优化结果表明建立的系统分析模型和采用的优化算法能够很好地解决固体火箭助推器/助推弹道总体设计优化问题.

  5. 固体火箭发动机中铝粉燃烧研究概述%A survey of study on aluminum combustion in solid rocket motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王宁飞; 苏万兴; 李军伟; 张峤

    2011-01-01

    介绍了固体火箭发动机中单个铝颗粒燃烧模型的发展与铝颗粒的燃烧特性;阐述了铝粉分布燃烧现象、分布燃烧放热与声场的耦合关系及其对发动机稳定性的增益作用;总结了惰性颗粒的阻尼理论以及在表面旋涡脱落条件下惰性颗粒对压强振荡的放大作用;提出了应从复杂流场中全面考虑铝粉燃烧对发动机的增益与阻尼作用,建立其对发动机工作稳定性影响的综合判据的观点.%The development of single aluminum particle combustion models and its combustion characteristics are briefly and precisely introduced. Distributed combustion phenomenon is elaborated. The driving mechanism on combustion stability caused by the coupling between distributed combustion heat release and acoustic filed is explained. The inert particle damping effect along with the driving mechanism under vortex shedding are summarized. Based on the previous studies, future work on aluminum combustion is pointed out for further research: the driving and damping mechanism should be considered comprehensively for the purpose of modeling the integrated criteria of the aluminum combustion effect on the stability of solid rocket motors.

  6. Recent advances in the treatment of solid wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined approach towards sanitary and environmentally safe disposal of solid wastes together with resource recovery of raw material and energy is discussed. onal techniques of solid waste treatment such as sanitary landfilling (tipping), incineration and composting are described. This is followed by examination of various techniques aimed at recovery of resources such as comminution methods (crushing and shredding) as well as various separation techniques, namely gravity separation, aerodynamic separation and magnetic and electrostatic separations. Methods of recovery of individual components and constituents of solid wastes such as paper and cardboard, plastics, o.lass, ceramics, ferrous and non-ferrous metals are briefly discussed. Techniques such as pyrolyis and anaerobic digestion are also evaluated. The economic approach including both damage prevention and added value of recovered material of energy is emphasized. (author)

  7. Rocket flames

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. M. Vaidya

    1952-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the important parameters which characterize the rocket flames are the (1 velocity, (2 pressure, (3 temperature of the exhaust gases and (4 the nature of chemical reactions in the flame of such gases. For the determination of these quantities ordinary methods fail because the flow of exhaust gases is supersonic in character. An introduction of a probe or any foreign body will create such strong disturbances in the supersonic flow that the readings of observing instruments will have no value. Spectroscopic methods are therefore eminently suitable because observations can be taken on the flame under running conditions.

  8. Comparison of Suspended Solid Separation in Advanced Storm Overflow Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Torben; Sørensen, Morten Steen

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory investigation of the separation of suspended solids in a circular weir overflow and a vortex separator. The basic idea is to evaluate the efficiency of a vortical flow in the overflow chamber, and to compare these results with other overflow structures.......This paper describes a laboratory investigation of the separation of suspended solids in a circular weir overflow and a vortex separator. The basic idea is to evaluate the efficiency of a vortical flow in the overflow chamber, and to compare these results with other overflow structures....

  9. Preface: Special Topic Section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Special Topic section on Advanced Electronic Structure Methods for Solids and Surfaces contains a collection of research papers that showcase recent advances in the high accuracy prediction of materials and surface properties. It provides a timely snapshot of a growing field that is of broad importance to chemistry, physics, and materials science

  10. Solid state physics advances in research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Ehrenreich, Henry

    1994-01-01

    The latest volume in the world renowned Solid State Physics series marks the fruition of Founding Editor David Turnbull''s outstanding tenure as series editor. Volume 47 presents five articles written by leadingexperts on areas including crystal-melt interfacial tension, order-disorder transformation in alloys, brittle matrix composites, surfaces and interfaces, and magnetoresistance.

  11. Hybrid Rocket Propulsion for Sounding Rocket Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A discussion of the H-225K hybrid rocket motor, produced by the American Rocket Company, is given. The H-225K motor is presented in terms of the following topics: (1) hybrid rocket fundamentals; (2) hybrid characteristics; and (3) hybrid advantages.

  12. Recent anode advances in solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chunwen; Stimming, Ulrich

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical reactors that can directly convert the chemical energy of a fuel gas into electrical energy with high efficiency and in an environment-friendly way. The recent trends in the research of solid oxide fuel cells concern the use of available hydrocarbon fuels, such as natural gas. The most commonly used anode material Ni/YSZ cermet exhibits some disadvantages when hydrocarbons were used as fuels. Thus it is necessary to develop alternative anode materials which display mixed conductivity under fuel conditions. This article reviews the recent developments of anode in SOFCs with principal emphasis on the material aspects. In addition, the mechanism and kinetics of fuel oxidation reactions are also addressed. Various processes used for the cost-effective fabrication of anode have also been summarized. Finally, this review will be concluded with personal perspectives on the future research directions of this area.

  13. Everolimus and Vatalanib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-18

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Melanoma; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Advanced study in solid transport: Rheological behavior of dense suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roidt, R.W.; Burgman, H.A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Science and Technology Center); Kim, H.J.; Chen, J.L.S. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-07-02

    The objective of this program is to develop a basic understanding of the fundamental rheological properties of high solids concentration (50% to 100%) slurries and wet cake. This quarter models were developed to describe the effects of cell wall friction and glass beads on the actual normal load, to represent hear stress as a function of water saturation and normal stress, and shear tests were performed on Illinois No. 6 coal powder. 5 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs. (CBS)

  15. Saving Lives With Rocket Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Thiokol Propulsion uses NASA's surplus rocket fuel to produce a flare that can safely destroy land mines. Through a Memorandum of Agreement between Thiokol and Marshall Space Flight Center, Thiokol uses the scrap Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) propellant. The resulting Demining Device was developed by Thiokol with the help of DE Technologies. The Demining Device neutralizes land mines in the field without setting them off. The Demining Device flare is placed next to an uncovered land mine. Using a battery-triggered electric match, the flare is then ignited. Using the excess and now solidified rocket fuel, the flare burns a hole in the mine's case and ignites the explosive contents. Once the explosive material is burned away, the mine is disarmed and no longer dangerous.

  16. Advances in sputtered and ion plated solid film lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The glow discharge or ion assisted vacuum deposition techniques, primarily sputtering and ion plating, have rapidly emerged and offer great potential to deposit solid lubricants. The increased energizing of these deposition processes lead to improved adherence and coherence, favorable morphological growth, higher density, and reduced residual stresses in the film. These techniques are of invaluable importance where high precision machines tribo-components require very thin, uniform lubricating films (0.2 m), which do not interface with component tolerances. The performance of sputtered MoS2 films and ion plated Au and Pb films are described in terms of film thickness, coefficient of friction, and wear lives.

  17. Advances in solid-phase extraction disks for environmental chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, E.M.; Snavely, K.

    2000-01-01

    The development of solid-phase extraction (SPE) for environmental chemistry has progressed significantly over the last decade to include a number of new sorbents and new approaches to SPE. One SPE approach in particular, the SPE disk, has greatly reduced or eliminated the use of chlorinated solvents for the analysis of trace organic compounds. This article discusses the use and applicability of various SPE disks, including micro-sized disks, prior to gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of trace organic compounds in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  18. Solid State Ionics Advanced Materials for Emerging Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdari, B. V. R.; Careem, M. A.; Dissanayake, M. A. K. L.; Rajapakse, R. M. G.; Seneviratne, V. A.

    2006-06-01

    Keynote lecture. Challenges and opportunities of solid state ionic devices / W. Weppner -- pt. I. Ionically conducting inorganic solids. Invited papers. Multinuclear NMR studies of mass transport of phosphoric acid in water / J. R. P. Jayakody ... [et al.]. Crystalline glassy and polymeric electrolytes: similarities and differences in ionic transport mechanisms / J.-L. Souquet. 30 years of NMR/NQR experiments in solid electrolytes / D. Brinkmann. Analysis of conductivity and NMR measurements in Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] fast Li[symbol] ionic conductor: evidence for correlated Li[symbol] motion / O. Bohnké ... [et al.]. Transport pathways for ions in disordered solids from bond valence mismatch landscapes / S. Adams. Proton conductivity in condensed phases of water: implications on linear and ball lightning / K. Tennakone -- Contributed papers. Proton transport in nanocrystalline bioceramic materials: an investigative study of synthetic bone with that of natural bone / H. Jena, B. Rambabu. Synthesis and properties of the nanostructured fast ionic conductor Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol] / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Hydrogen production: ceramic materials for high temperature water electrolysis / A. Hammou. Influence of the sintering temperature on pH sensor ability of Li[symbol]La[symbol]TiO[symbol]. Relationship between potentiometric and impedance spectroscopy measurements / Q. N. Pham ... [et al.]. Microstructure chracterization and ionic conductivity of nano-sized CeO[symbol]-Sm[symbol]O[symbol] system (x=0.05 - 0.2) prepared by combustion route / K. Singh, S. A. Acharya, S. S. Bhoga. Red soil in Northern Sri Lanka is a natural magnetic ceramic / K. Ahilan ... [et al.]. Neutron scattering of LiNiO[symbol] / K. Basar ... [et al.]. Preparation and properties of LiFePO[symbol] nanorods / L. Q. Mai ... [et al.]. Structural and electrochemical properties of monoclinic and othorhombic MoO[symbol] phases / O. M. Hussain ... [et al.]. Preparation of Zircon (Zr

  19. Advanced study in solid transport: Rheological behavior of dense suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.J.; Chen, J.L.S. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering); Roidt, R.M.; Burgman, H.A. (Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (USA). Science and Technology Center)

    1990-10-23

    The objective of the present research is to develop a basic understanding of the fundamental rheological properties of high solids concentration slurries or wet cake. A dynamic shear cell test device has been constructed and operated to measure dynamic shear stress and determine the effects of experimental parameters upon the dynamic shear stress of the materials. The solids used are glass beads and coal powders. The experimental parameters investigated are: water fraction, normal stress, speed, gap height, size, and size distribution. A statistical method is adapted to evaluate the effects of the experimental parameters. The experiments with glass beads show that the dynamic shear stress is independent of shear rate, providing the gap height is larger than about 27 times the bead diameter, but is a functional of normal stress and water fraction. The dynamic friction coefficient increases sharply as the water fraction increases up to 10%, and decreases gradually for water fractions greater than 10%. Dynamic experiments with coal-water mixtures show that the coal-water mixtures behave like the glass beads when water fraction is lower than a certain value. However, as the water fraction increases beyond that value, the coal-water mixtures display the characteristics of thixotropic fluids with shear thinning. The flow index of the coal-water mixtures is independent of normal stress, but decreases as the water fraction decreases. 66 figs., 15 tabs.

  20. Solid state nuclear magnetic resonance investigations of advanced energy materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, George D.

    In order to better understand the physical electrochemical changes that take place in lithium ion batteries and asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been useful to probe and identify changes on the atomic and molecular level. NMR is used to characterize the local environment and investigate the dynamical properties of materials used in electrochemical storage devices (ESD). NMR investigations was used to better understand the chemical composition of the solid electrolyte interphase which form on the negative and positive electrodes of lithium batteries as well as identify the breakdown products that occur in the operation of the asymmetric hybrid supercapacitors. The use of nano-structured particles in the development of new materials causes changes in the electrical, structural and other material properties. NMR was used to investigate the affects of fluorinated and non fluorinated single wall nanotubes (SWNT). In this thesis three experiments were performed using solid state NMR samples to better characterize them. The electrochemical reactions of a lithium ion battery determine its operational profile. Numerous means have been employed to enhance battery cycle life and operating temperature range. One primary means is the choice and makeup of the electrolyte. This study focuses on the characteristics of the solid electrolyte interphase (SEI) that is formed on the electrodes surface during the charge discharge cycle. The electrolyte in this study was altered with several additives in order to determine the influence of the additives on SEI formation as well as the intercalation and de-intercalation of lithium ions in the electrodes. 7Li NMR studies where used to characterize the SEI and its composition. Solid state NMR studies of the carbon enriched acetonitrile electrolyte in a nonaqueous asymmetric hybrid supercapacitor were performed. Magic angle spinning (MAS) coupled with cross polarization NMR

  1. Rocket Science at the Nanoscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jinxing; Rozen, Isaac; Wang, Joseph

    2016-06-28

    Autonomous propulsion at the nanoscale represents one of the most challenging and demanding goals in nanotechnology. Over the past decade, numerous important advances in nanotechnology and material science have contributed to the creation of powerful self-propelled micro/nanomotors. In particular, micro- and nanoscale rockets (MNRs) offer impressive capabilities, including remarkable speeds, large cargo-towing forces, precise motion controls, and dynamic self-assembly, which have paved the way for designing multifunctional and intelligent nanoscale machines. These multipurpose nanoscale shuttles can propel and function in complex real-life media, actively transporting and releasing therapeutic payloads and remediation agents for diverse biomedical and environmental applications. This review discusses the challenges of designing efficient MNRs and presents an overview of their propulsion behavior, fabrication methods, potential rocket fuels, navigation strategies, practical applications, and the future prospects of rocket science and technology at the nanoscale. PMID:27219742

  2. Recent advances in monolithic solid oxide fuel cell development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Argonne Monolithic Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (MSOFC) is fabricated in a honey comb structure having alternate corrugated and flat layers similar to corrugated paperboard. This honeycomb structure, shown schematically in this paper is lightweight yet strong. The materials used to fabricate the MSOFC include yttria-stabilized zirconia as the electrolyte, alkaline earth-doped lanthanum chromite as the interconnection material (bipolar plate), strontium-doped lanthanum manganite as the cathode or air electrode, and yttria-stabilized zirconia-nickel cermet as the anode of fuel electrode. The high power densities of the MSOFC allow it to be used in many applications that would not be possible for other fuel cell designs. Some of these applications include lightweight, mobile power supplies as well as power sources for helicopters and aircraft, automobiles, space platforms, etc. The MSOFC is particularly suited for mobile power applications because of its ability to reform hydrocarbon fuels within the fuel channels

  3. Solid state physics advances in research and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Turnbull, David

    1991-01-01

    The explosion of the science of mesoscopic structures is having a great impact on physics and electrical engineering because of the possible applications of these structures in microelectronic and optoelectronic devices of the future. This volume of Solid State Physics consists of two comprehensive and authoritative articles that discuss most of the physical problems that have so far been identified as being of importance in semiconductor nanostructures. Much of the volume is tutorial in characture--while at the same time time presenting current and vital theoretical and experimental results and a copious reference list--so it will be essential reading to all those taking a part in the research and development of this emerging technology.

  4. Advanced impedance modeling of solid oxide electrochemical cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graves, Christopher R.; Hjelm, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Impedance spectroscopy is a powerful technique for detailed study of the electrochemical and transport processes that take place in fuel cells and electrolysis cells, including solid oxide cells (SOCs). Meaningful analysis of impedance measurements is nontrivial, however, because a large number of...... modeling parameters are fit to the many processes which often overlap in the same frequency ranges. Also, commonly used equivalent circuit (EC) models only provide zero-dimensional (0-D) approximations of the processes of the two electrodes, electrolyte and gas transport. Employing improved analytical...... electrode and 2-D gas transport models which have fewer unknown parameters for the same number of processes, (ii) use of a new model fitting algorithm, “multi-fitting”, in which multiple impedance spectra are fit simultaneously with parameters linked based on the variation of measurement conditions, (iii...

  5. Advances in Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrendt, Raymond; White, Peter; Offer, John

    2016-01-01

    Today, Fmoc SPPS is the method of choice for peptide synthesis. Very-high-quality Fmoc building blocks are available at low cost because of the economies of scale arising from current multiton production of therapeutic peptides by Fmoc SPPS. Many modified derivatives are commercially available as Fmoc building blocks, making synthetic access to a broad range of peptide derivatives straightforward. The number of synthetic peptides entering clinical trials has grown continuously over the last decade, and recent advances in the Fmoc SPPS technology are a response to the growing demand from medicinal chemistry and pharmacology. Improvements are being continually reported for peptide quality, synthesis time and novel synthetic targets. Topical peptide research has contributed to a continuous improvement and expansion of Fmoc SPPS applications. PMID:26785684

  6. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research 3

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 3 covers reviews that are directly related to the two devices which are the epitome of applied solid state science - the transistor and the laser. The book discusses the physics of multilayer-gate IGFET memories; the application of the transient charge technique in drift velocity; and trapping in semiconductors and in materials used in xerography, nuclear particle detectors, and space-charge-limited devices; as well as thin film transistors. The text describes the manipulation of laser beams in solids and discusses

  7. Impact and mitigation of stratospheric ozone depletion by chemical rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) conducted a workshop in conjunction with the 1991 AIAA Joint Propulsion Conference in Sacramento, California, to assess the impact of chemical rocket propulsion on the environment. The workshop included recognized experts from the fields of atmospheric physics and chemistry, solid rocket propulsion, liquid rocket propulsion, government, and environmental agencies, and representatives from several responsible environmental organizations. The conclusion from this workshop relative to stratospheric ozone depletion was that neither solid nor liquid rocket launchers have a significant impact on stratospheric ozone depletion, and that there is no real significant difference between the two

  8. Simulating Modulated Thermography of Cladding Debond in Solid Rockets%固体火箭包覆层脱粘调制红外热波检测法的数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭兴旺; 李苒笙; 丁蒙蒙

    2011-01-01

    调制红外热波无损检测是一种可以检测材料内部缺陷的先进技术,在固体火箭发动机包覆层脱粘的诊断中有一定的应用前景.以有限元法对固体火箭发动机包覆层脱粘的调制红外热波检测法进行数值模拟,研究加热条件和结构对可检测性的影响.得出可检信息参数(表面过余温度幅值、相位和相位差)随热波激励条件(调制频率、热流强度)和结构参数(材料、缺陷大小、深度、厚度等)变化的规律.针对典型材料和结构尺寸,给出最佳调制频率、盲频以及相位差的预测值.调制红外热波检测法可用于固体火箭发动机包覆层脱粘的无损检测,检测条件可通过计算机仿真来优化.%Modulated infrared thermal wave nondestructive testing (IR NDT) is an advanced technique of internal flaw inspection,and has certain application prospect in detecting cladding debond in solid rocket motors (SRM). The numerical simulation of modulated IR NDT for cladding debond in SRM is carried out by using finite element method, and the influences of heating condition and structure on the detectability are studied. The evolutions of informative parameters (i.e. the amplitude, phase and phase difference of surface excessive temperature) versus heating condition (i.e. the modulation frequency and heat flow intensity) and structural parameters (i.e. materials, defect size, depth and thickness) are obtained. The optimal modulation frequency, blind frequency and phase difference for typical material and structural size are predicted. Modulated thermography can be used in detecting cladding debond in SRM, and the test condition can be optimized through computer simulation.

  9. Air-breathing Rocket Engine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    This Quick Time movie depicts the Rocketdyne static test of an air-breathing rocket. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's advanced Transportation Program at the Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  10. Combustion Processes in Hybrid Rocket Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateswaran,S.; Merkle, C. L.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a resurgence of interest in the development of hybrid rocket engines for advanced launch vehicle applications. Hybrid propulsion systems use a solid fuel such as hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) along with a gaseous/liquid oxidizer. The performance of hybrid combustors depends on the convective and radiative heat fluxes to the fuel surface, the rate of pyrolysis in the solid phase, and the turbulent combustion processes in the gaseous phases. These processes in combination specify the regression rates of the fuel surface and thereby the utilization efficiency of the fuel. In this paper, we employ computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques in order to gain a quantitative understanding of the physical trends in hybrid rocket combustors. The computational modeling is tailored to ongoing experiments at Penn State that employ a two dimensional slab burner configuration. The coordinated computational/experimental effort enables model validation while providing an understanding of the experimental observations. Computations to date have included the full length geometry with and with the aft nozzle section as well as shorter length domains for extensive parametric characterization. HTPB is sed as the fuel with 1,3 butadiene being taken as the gaseous product of the pyrolysis. Pure gaseous oxygen is taken as the oxidizer. The fuel regression rate is specified using an Arrhenius rate reaction, which the fuel surface temperature is given by an energy balance involving gas-phase convection and radiation as well as thermal conduction in the solid-phase. For the gas-phase combustion, a two step global reaction is used. The standard kappa - epsilon model is used for turbulence closure. Radiation is presently treated using a simple diffusion approximation which is valid for large optical path lengths, representative of radiation from soot particles. Computational results are obtained to determine the trends in the fuel burning or

  11. National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems 2012 Annual Report: A Year of Progress and Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L. Dale; Doreswamy, Rajiv; Fry, Emma Kiele

    2013-01-01

    The National Institute for Rocket Propulsion Systems (NIRPS) maintains and advances U.S. leadership in all aspects of rocket propulsion for defense, civil, and commercial uses. The Institute's creation is in response to widely acknowledged concerns about the U.S. rocket propulsion base dating back more than a decade. U.S. leadership in rocket and missile propulsion is threatened by long-term industry downsizing, a shortage of new solid and liquid propulsion programs, limited ability to attract and retain fresh talent, and discretionary federal budget pressures. Numerous trade and independent studies cite erosion of this capability as a threat to national security and the U.S. economy resulting in a loss of global competitiveness for the U.S. propulsion industry. This report covers the period between May 2011 and December 2012, which includes the creation and transition to operations of NIRPS. All subsequent reports will be annual. The year 2012 has been an eventful one for NIRPS. In its first full year, the new team overcame many obstacles and explored opportunities to ensure the institute has a firm foundation for the future. NIRPS is now an active organization making contributions to the development, sustainment, and strategy of the rocket propulsion industry in the United States. This report describes the actions taken by the NIRPS team to determine the strategy, organizational structure, and goals of the Institute. It also highlights key accomplishments, collaborations with other organizations, and the strategic framework for the Institute.

  12. Recent advances in secondary ion mass spectrometry of solid acid catalysts : Large zeolite crystals under bombardment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofmann, Jan P.; Rohnke, Marcus; Weckhuysen, Bert M.

    2014-01-01

    This Perspective aims to inform the heterogeneous catalysis and materials science community about the recent advances in Time-of-Flight-Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) to characterize catalytic solids by taking large model H-ZSM-5 zeolite crystals as a showcase system. SIMS-based techniqu

  13. Solar Thermal Rocket Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sercel, J. C.

    1986-01-01

    Paper analyzes potential of solar thermal rockets as means of propulsion for planetary spacecraft. Solar thermal rocket uses concentrated Sunlight to heat working fluid expelled through nozzle to produce thrust.

  14. Castor Rocket Launch [video

    OpenAIRE

    Yakimenko, Oleg; Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)

    2010-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the AIAA Point Lobos section (PLS) entered three rockets into the 2010 AIAA Young Professionals Rocket Competition (YPRC). The event took place in the Mojave Desert on Koehn Dry lakebed July 17th 2010.

  15. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.W.

    1994-05-01

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development.

  16. Nuclear rockets: High-performance propulsion for Mars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new impetus to manned Mars exploration was introduced by President Bush in his Space Exploration Initiative. This has led, in turn, to a renewed interest in high-thrust nuclear thermal rocket propulsion (NTP). The purpose of this report is to give a brief tutorial introduction to NTP and provide a basic understanding of some of the technical issues in the realization of an operational NTP engine. Fundamental physical principles are outlined from which a variety of qualitative advantages of NTP over chemical propulsion systems derive, and quantitative performance comparisons are presented for illustrative Mars missions. Key technologies are described for a representative solid-core heat-exchanger class of engine, based on the extensive development work in the Rover and NERVA nuclear rocket programs (1955 to 1973). The most driving technology, fuel development, is discussed in some detail for these systems. Essential highlights are presented for the 19 full-scale reactor and engine tests performed in these programs. On the basis of these tests, the practicality of graphite-based nuclear rocket engines was established. Finally, several higher-performance advanced concepts are discussed. These have received considerable attention, but have not, as yet, developed enough credibility to receive large-scale development

  17. Rockets two classic papers

    CERN Document Server

    Goddard, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Rockets, in the primitive form of fireworks, have existed since the Chinese invented them around the thirteenth century. But it was the work of American Robert Hutchings Goddard (1882-1945) and his development of liquid-fueled rockets that first produced a controlled rocket flight. Fascinated by rocketry since boyhood, Goddard designed, built, and launched the world's first liquid-fueled rocket in 1926. Ridiculed by the press for suggesting that rockets could be flown to the moon, he continued his experiments, supported partly by the Smithsonian Institution and defended by Charles Lindbergh. T

  18. Mean Flow Augmented Acoustics in Rocket Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischbach, Sean R.

    2015-01-01

    Combustion instability in solid rocket motors and liquid engines is a complication that continues to plague designers and engineers. Many rocket systems experience violent fluctuations in pressure, velocity, and temperature originating from the complex interactions between the combustion process and gas dynamics. During sever cases of combustion instability fluctuation amplitudes can reach values equal to or greater than the average chamber pressure. Large amplitude oscillations lead to damaged injectors, loss of rocket performance, damaged payloads, and in some cases breach of case/loss of mission. Historic difficulties in modeling and predicting combustion instability has reduced most rocket systems experiencing instability into a costly fix through testing paradigm or to scrap the system entirely.

  19. Phase I study of afatinib combined with nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Bahleda, Rastislav; Hollebecque, Antoine; Varga, Andrea; Gazzah, Anas; Massard, Christophe; Deutsch, Eric; Amellal, Nadia; Farace, Françoise; Ould-Kaci, Mahmoud; Roux, Flavien; Marzin, Kristell; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background: This Phase I study evaluated continuous- and intermittent-dosing (every other week) of afatinib plus nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours. Methods: In the dose-escalation phase (n=45), maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) were determined for continuous/intermittent afatinib 10, 20, 30 or 40 mg once daily plus continuous nintedanib 150 or 200 mg twice daily. Secondary objectives included safety and efficacy. Clinical activity of continuous afatinib plus nintedanib at the MT...

  20. Effects of Ignition Process on the Internal Ballistics of Small-size Solid Rocket Motor%点火过程对小型固体火箭发动机内弹道影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘赟; 王浩; 陶如意; 朱德龙

    2013-01-01

    为了研究某小型固体火箭发动机点火过程对内弹道性能的影响,建立包含点火过程的小型固体火箭发动机的内弹道数值研究模型和试验验证方案,对点火药量为1.0g、0.8g、0.6g和0.4g的发动机进行了内弹道数值研究,试验研究了点火药量为1.0g和0.8g两种情况,数值计算结果与试验结果基本一致.研究结果表明:小型固体火箭发动机由于燃烧室体积小,点火过程对内弹道影响明显;点火药量越大,点火药装填密度越大,引起压力峰值越大,稳定工作时间越短;经验估算得到的1.0g点火药量产生了过高的压力,是稳定压力的三倍,0.8g的点火药量能够满足点火可靠性和总体设计要求,产生最大压力为27.08 MPa,稳定工作时长159 ms,建议该小型火箭发动机的点火药量为0.8g.%To study the effects of ignition process on interior ballistic performance of a small-size solid rocket motor,the model for interior ballistic calculation including ignition process of small-size solid rocket motor and verification plan were set up. The numerical calculations interior ballistic performance with 1.0 g,0.8 g,0,6 g and 0.4 g igniter masses were carried out. The tests of 1.0 g and 0.8 g igniter mass were done. The compute result and test data were basically consistent. The results indicated that; the effect of ignition process on interior ballistic about small-size solid rocket motor is obvious for the small combustion chamber volume. The igniting charge density and pressure peak increase .stable operating time of motor decreases as the igniter mass increases. The 1.0 g igniter mass is estimated by empirical formula,1.0 g igniter mass brings too high pressure to motor,the value of pressure reaches three times the stable pressure. 0.8 g igniter mass meets ignition reliability and general design requirements,and the maximum pressure is 27.08 MPa,and stable work time is 159 ms,and 0.8 g igniter mass is suggested for the

  1. Fundamentals of aircraft and rocket propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    El-Sayed, Ahmed F

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive basics-to-advanced course in an aero-thermal science vital to the design of engines for either type of craft. The text classifies engines powering aircraft and single/multi-stage rockets, and derives performance parameters for both from basic aerodynamics and thermodynamics laws. Each type of engine is analyzed for optimum performance goals, and mission-appropriate engines selection is explained. Fundamentals of Aircraft and Rocket Propulsion provides information about and analyses of: thermodynamic cycles of shaft engines (piston, turboprop, turboshaft and propfan); jet engines (pulsejet, pulse detonation engine, ramjet, scramjet, turbojet and turbofan); chemical and non-chemical rocket engines; conceptual design of modular rocket engines (combustor, nozzle and turbopumps); and conceptual design of different modules of aero-engines in their design and off-design state. Aimed at graduate and final-year undergraduate students, this textbook provides a thorough grounding in th...

  2. The flight of uncontrolled rockets

    CERN Document Server

    Gantmakher, F R; Dryden, H L

    1964-01-01

    International Series of Monographs on Aeronautics and Astronautics, Division VII, Volume 5: The Flight of Uncontrolled Rockets focuses on external ballistics of uncontrolled rockets. The book first discusses the equations of motion of rockets. The rocket as a system of changing composition; application of solidification principle to rockets; rotational motion of rockets; and equations of motion of the center of mass of rockets are described. The text looks at the calculation of trajectory of rockets and the fundamentals of rocket dispersion. The selection further focuses on the dispersion of f

  3. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Relativistic and Electron Correlation Effects in Molecules and Solids

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The NATO Advanced Study Institute (ASI) on "R@lativistic and Electron Correlation Effects in Molecules and Solids", co-sponsored by Simon Fraser University (SFU) and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) was held Aug 10- 21, 1992 at the University of British Columbia (UBC), Vancouver, Canada. A total of 90 lecturers and students with backgrounds in Chemistry, Physics, Mathematics and various interdisciplinary subjects attended the ASI. In my proposal submitted to NATO for financial support for this ASI, I pointed out that a NATO ASI on the effects of relativity in many-electron systems was held ten years ago, [See G.L. Malli, (ed) Relativistic Effects in Atoms, Molecules and Solids, Plenum Press, Vol B87, New York, 1983]. Moreover, at a NATO Advanced Research Workshop (ARW) on advanced methods for molecular electronic structure "an assessment of state-of­ the-art of Electron Correlation ... " was carried out [see C.E. Dykstra, (ed), Advanced Theories and Computational Approa...

  4. Impact of rocket exhaust plumes on atmospheric composition and climate – an overview

    OpenAIRE

    Voigt, Christiane; Schumann, Ulrich; Graf, Kaspar; Gottschaldt, Klaus-Dirk

    2013-01-01

    Rockets are the only direct anthropogenic emission sources into the upper atmosphere. Gaseous rocket emissions include CO, N2, H2, H2O, and CO2, while solid rocket motors (SRM) additionally inject significant amounts of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles and gaseous chlorine species into the atmosphere. These emissions strongly perturb local at- mospheric trace gas and aerosol distributions. Here, the previous aircraft measurements in various rocket exhaust plumes including several large spa...

  5. Eddie Rocket's Franchise

    OpenAIRE

    Vahter, Jenni

    2008-01-01

    Eddie Rocket's Franchise - Setting up a franchise restaurant in Helsinki. TIIVISTELMÄ: Eddie Rocket's on menestynyt amerikkalaistyylinen 1950-luvun ”diner” franchiseravintolaketju Irlannista. Ravintoloita on perustettu viimeisen 18 vuoden aikana 28 kappaletta Irlantiin ja Isoon Britanniaan sekä yksi Espanjaan. Tämän tutkimuksen tarkoitus on tutkia onko Eddie Rocket'silla potentiaalia menestyä Helsingissä, Suomessa. Tutkimuskysymystä on lähestytty toimiala-analyysin, markkinatutkimuksen j...

  6. Development of advanced version of ACTDOR software for determination of radioactivity content of solid radioactive waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is a mandatory requirement of regulatory authority to know the activity content of radioactive solid waste disposed to the environment, which include assorted solid wastes and spent resins used in ion-exchange columns of process systems. This involves assessment of radioactivity content and the specification of radionuclides in the waste package before it is disposed in Near Surface Disposal Facility (NSDF). In house methods were developed at different nuclear power stations in the country to estimate the activity of the radioactive waste being generated and disposed. ACTDOR software was implemented and used at some nuclear power stations. To bring uniformity in the method of activity estimation, it was recommended to use ACTDOR at all the nuclear power stations. A Graphical User Interface (GUI) based user friendly version of ACTDOR software with additional features has been developed recently. This paper presents the development and the various features of the advanced ACTDOR software. ACTDOR is a software developed to quantify the radioactivity of solid waste in cylindrical geometry by measuring its external gamma radiation. It works on gamma shielding principles. ACTDOR software is developed in FORTRAN and the software is functioning in TEXT USER INTERFACE MODE. The advanced version of ACTDOR works in GUI MODE and has been developed with Visual Basic as Front End and Microsoft Access as Back End

  7. Integrated municipal solid waste scenario model using advanced pretreatment and waste to energy processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Appropriate solution for MSW management in new and future EU countries. • Decrease of landfill disposal applying an Integrated MSW approach. • Technological impediments and environmental assessment. - Abstract: In this paper an Integrated Municipal Solid Waste scenario model (IMSW-SM) with a potential practical application in the waste management sector is analyzed. The model takes into account quantification and characterization of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) streams from different sources, selective collection (SC), advanced mechanical sorting, material recovery and advanced thermal treatment. The paper provides a unique chain of advanced waste pretreatment stages of fully commingled waste streams, leading to an original set of suggestions and future contributions to a sustainable IMSWS, taking into account real data and EU principles. The selection of the input data was made on MSW management real case studies from two European regions. Four scenarios were developed varying mainly SC strategies and thermal treatment options. The results offer useful directions for decision makers in order to calibrate modern strategies in different realities

  8. Advanced materials for solid state hydrogen storage: “Thermal engineering issues”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen has been widely recognized as the “Energy Carrier” of the future. Efficient, reliable, economical and safe storage and delivery of hydrogen form important aspects in achieving success of the “Hydrogen Economy”. Gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities become important when one considers portable and mobile applications of hydrogen. In the case of solid state hydrogen storage, the gas is reversibly embedded (by physisorption and/or chemisorption) in a solid matrix. A wide variety of materials such as intermetallics, physisorbents, complex hydrides/alanates, metal organic frameworks, etc. have been investigated as possible storage media. This paper discusses the feasibility of lithium– and sodium–aluminum hydrides with emphasis on their thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties. Drawbacks such as poor heat transfer characteristics and poor kinetics demand special attention to the thermal design of solid state storage devices. - Highlights: • Advanced materials suitable for solid state hydrogen storage are discussed. • Issues related to thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of hydriding materials are brought out. • Hydriding and dehydriding behavior including sorption kinetics of complex hydrides with emphasis on alanates are explained

  9. Radiation emitted from rocket plumes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deimling, L.; Liehmann, W.; Eisenreich, N.; Weindel, M.; Eckl, W. [Fraunhofer-Institut fuer Chemische Technologie (ICT), Pfinztal-Berghausen (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The signature of rocket plumes can be used for detection, identification and guidance of rockets. The objective was to investigate the signature of various types of solid rocket propellants by application of spectroscopic methods. The emission and transmission characteristics of plumes were studied experimentally, the results were analyzed based on molecular bands and continuum radiation. The model formulations include a nitramine propellant, a double-base propellant and a composite propellant. Applied were rapid-scanning filter wheel spectormeters for the wavelength region from 1.2 {mu}m to 14 {mu}m with a time resolution of 50 spectra/s and a wavelengths resolution of 1% of actual wavelength. The UV/VIS wavelengths region was recorded by an OMA system with wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm and 1 nm and time resolution of 10 spectra/s. Molecular bands of water and carbon dioxide dominate in the near infrared and infrared. Depending on composition, continuous radiation indicates particles in the rocket exhaust. A code was developed to calculate molecular bands and continuous rdiation using temperature and species distributions found by thermodynamic estimation to obtain the radiance of the plume. Comparison with experimental data delivered plume temperatures. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die Signatur von Raketenabgasstrahlen kann genutzt werden zur Detektion, Identifikation und Lenkung. Ziel der vorgestellten Arbeit war die Untersuchung der Signaturen unterschiedlicher Raketenfesttreibstoffe mittels spektroskopischer Verfahren. Die Emissions- und Transmissionscharakteristik wurde experimentell untersucht und die erhaltenen Daten auf der Basis kontinuierlicher und molekularer Strahlung analysiert. Die Modellformulierungen umfassten einen Nitramin - Treibstoff, eine Double-base - Formulierung und einen Composittreibstoff. Angewendet wurden Filterradspektrometer fuer den infraroten Spektralbereich und ein konventionelles Gitterspektrometer im Ultravioletten und Sichtbaren. Die

  10. NATO Advanced Research Workshop on Ionization of Solids by Heavy Particles

    CERN Document Server

    1993-01-01

    This book collects the papers presented at the NATO Advanced Research Workshop on "Ionization of Solids by Heavy Particles", held in Giardini-Naxos (Taormina), Italy, on June 1 -5, 1992. The meeting was the first to gather scientists to discuss the physics of electron emission and other ionization effects occurring during the interaction of heavy particles with condensed matter. The central problem in the field is how to use observations of electron emission and final radiation damage to understand what happens inside the solid, like excitation mechanisms, the propagation of the electronic excitation along different pathways, and surface effects. The ARW began with a brief survey of the field, stressing the unknowns. It was pointed out that ionization theories can only address the very particular case of weak perturbations. For this problem, this meant high speed, low-charged projectiles (a perturbation treatment of interactions with slow, highly charged ions was later presented). Only semi-empirical ...

  11. Air-Breathing Rocket Engine Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    This photograph depicts an air-breathing rocket engine that completed an hour or 3,600 seconds of testing at the General Applied Sciences Laboratory in Ronkonkoma, New York. Referred to as ARGO by its design team, the engine is named after the mythological Greek ship that bore Jason and the Argonauts on their epic voyage of discovery. Air-breathing engines, known as rocket based, combined-cycle engines, get their initial take-off power from specially designed rockets, called air-augmented rockets, that boost performance about 15 percent over conventional rockets. When the vehicle's velocity reaches twice the speed of sound, the rockets are turned off and the engine relies totally on oxygen in the atmosphere to burn hydrogen fuel, as opposed to a rocket that must carry its own oxygen, thus reducing weight and flight costs. Once the vehicle has accelerated to about 10 times the speed of sound, the engine converts to a conventional rocket-powered system to propel the craft into orbit or sustain it to suborbital flight speed. NASA's Advanced SpaceTransportation Program at Marshall Space Flight Center, along with several industry partners and collegiate forces, is developing this technology to make space transportation affordable for everyone from business travelers to tourists. The goal is to reduce launch costs from today's price tag of $10,000 per pound to only hundreds of dollars per pound. NASA's series of hypersonic flight demonstrators currently include three air-breathing vehicles: the X-43A, X-43B and X-43C.

  12. Rockets -- Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitner, Alfred

    1982-01-01

    If two rockets are identical except that one engine burns in one-tenth the time of the other (total impulse and initial fuel mass of the two engines being the same), which rocket will rise higher? Why? The answer to this question (part 1 response in v20 n6, p410, Sep 1982) is provided. (Author/JN)

  13. Development of an advanced bond coat for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, An-Chou; Chen, Yu-Ming; Liu, Chien-Kuo; Shong, Wei-Ja

    2015-11-01

    An advanced bond coat has been developed for solid oxide fuel cell interconnector applications; a low thermal expansion superalloy has been selected as the substrate, and the newly developed bond coat is applied between the substrate and the LSM top coat. The bond coat composition is designed to be near thermodynamic equilibrium with the substrate to minimize interdiffusion with the substrate while providing oxidation protection for the substrate. The bond coat exhibits good oxidation resistance, a low area specific resistance, and a low thermal expansion coefficient at 800 °C; experimental results indicate that interdiffusion between the bond coat and the substrate can be hindered.

  14. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research 2

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 2 covers topics about complex oxide materials such as the garnets, which dominate the field of magnetoelasticity and are among the most important laser hosts, and sodalite, which is one of the classic photochromic materials. The book discusses the physics of the interactions of electromagnetic, elastic, and spin waves in single crystal magnetic insulators. The text then describes the mechanism on which inorganic photochromic materials are based, as observed in a variety of materials in single crystal, powder, and gl

  15. Applied solid state science advances in materials and device research 6

    CERN Document Server

    Wolfe, Raymond

    2013-01-01

    Applied Solid State Science: Advances in Materials and Device Research, Volume 6 covers the application of composites in electronic systems. The book discusses different types of composite-composite materials consisting of finely dispersed mixtures of metals and insulators; composite devices in which two distinct semiconductor devices are combined in one package; and composite glass fibers with the core and cladding differing in their optical properties. The text describes articles dealing with properties that can be achieved in versatile materials; light-emitting diodes and photodetectors th

  16. Simulation of reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady flows in solid rocket motors: Efficient strategy using Eulerian Multi-Fluid methods

    OpenAIRE

    Sibra, Alaric; Dupays, Joel; MURRONE, Angelo; Laurent, Frédérique; Massot, Marc

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we tackle the issue of the accurate simulation of evaporating and reactive polydisperse sprays strongly coupled to unsteady gaseous flows. In solid propulsion, aluminum particles are included in the propellant to improve the global performances but the distributed combustion of these droplets in the chamber is suspected to be a driving mechanism of hydrodynamic and acoustic instabilities. The faithful prediction of two-phase interactions is a determining step for future solid r...

  17. Clinical Analysis of Bisphosphonates Treatment on Bone Metastases and Hypercalcemia of Malignancy in Advanced Solid Tumor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MING Shu-hong; SUN Tie-ying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and toleration of bisphosphonates therapy in patients with bone metastases and hypercalcemia of malignancy in advanced solid tumor. Methods: Patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed cancer and hypercalcemia with bone metastases were designed to open treatment with either 4mg zoledronic acid or 90mg pamidronate. The primary efficacy parameters were pain scores(NRS), Corrected serum calcium(CSC) and CSC effective rate. The vital signs, biochemical and hematological parameters were determined. Results: Twenty patients were enrolled in this study, twelve patients in zoledronic acid group and eight in pamidronate group. Zoledronic acid and pamidronate significantly palliated pain. Pain scores were significantly lower at end-point after Zoledronic acid or pamidronate infusion(5.92 vs 3.25,P<0.01;6.13 vs 4.38, P<0.01, respectively). The mean CSC level decreased significantly after Zoledronic acid or pamidronate infusion from 12.86 to 10.28mg/dl and 13.19 to 10.36mg/dl respectively. The CSC effective rate was about 90% at 14 days after infusion in two groups. There was no statistical significance for all primary efficacy parameters in zoledronic acid group compared with pamidronate group. An adverse reaction was mild fever after pamidronate infusion and then completely reversible. Conclusion: Zoledronic acid and pamidronate disodium were well tolerated and effective for bone metastases and hypercalcemia of malignancy in advanced solid tumor.

  18. Semi-Physical Simulation System for Flow Adjustable Gas Generator Of Solid Rocket Motor%固体火箭发动机流量调节半实物仿真系统

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    孙金锋; 聂聆聪; 卢二宝; 姚晓先

    2011-01-01

    A pressure sensitive propellant is used in the choked solid rocket ramjet gas generator. Then the gas production rate can be adjusted by changing the nozzle throat area. The control algorithm of gas generator pressure closed loop is complex as the time varying characteristic of controlled member. So it is necessary to debug controller repeated. But as the restriction of experiment condition, firing run can' t be done repeated. In order to design the controller effectively and complete the test of controller and driver, a semi-physical simulation system is designed. Through semi-physical simulation experiment, solid rocket ramjet gas generator pressure closed loop characteristic is tested. According to the result, pressure closed loop controller design method is analyzed.%壅塞式燃气发生器利用燃速对压力敏感的推进剂,通过调节喷管喉部面积来达到调节燃气流量生成率的目的.由于控制对象的时变性,燃气发生器压力闭环控制算法比较复杂,控制实际应用时需要反复调试,但是由于试验条件的限制,无法多次进行点火试验或在点火试验过程中进行调试.为了能够有效的实现控制器的设计、完成对流量可调燃气发生器驱动控制装置的测试、提高点火试验的安全性,提出一套半实物仿真方案,可以实现对流量可调燃气发生器驱动控制装置的冷调试验.在此基础上,对固体火箭发动机流量可调燃气发生器压力闭环控制系统进行了半实物仿真,并针对仿真结果给出了压力闭环控制器设计的方法.

  19. Development of nuclear rocket engine technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research sponsored by the Atomic Energy Commission, the USAF, and NASA (later on) in the area of nuclear rocket propulsion is discussed. It was found that a graphite reactor, loaded with highly concentrated Uranium 235, can be used to heat high pressure liquid hydrogen to temperatures of about 4500 R, and to expand the hydrogen through a high expansion ratio rocket nozzle assembly. The results of 20 reactor tests conducted at the Nevada Test Site between July 1959 and June 1969 are analyzed. On the basis of these results, the feasibility of solid graphite reactor/nuclear rocket engines is revealed. It is maintained that this technology will support future space propulsion requirements, using liquid hydrogen as the propellant, for thrust requirements ranging from 25,000 lbs to 250,000 lbs, with vacuum specific impulses of at least 850 sec and with full engine throttle capability. 12 refs

  20. Solid state fermentation for production of microbial cellulases: Recent advances and improvement strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behera, Sudhanshu S; Ray, Ramesh C

    2016-05-01

    Lignocellulose is the most plentiful non-food biomass and one of the most inexhaustible renewable resources on the planet, which is an alternative sustainable energy source for the production of second generation biofuels. Lignocelluloses are composed of cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, in which the sugar polymers account for a large portion of the biomass. Cellulases belong to the glycoside hydrolase family and catalyze the hydrolysis of glyosidic linkages depolymerizing cellulose to fermentable sugars. They are multi-enzymatic complex proteins and require the synergistic action of three key enzymes: endoglucanase (E.C. 3.2.1.4), exoglucanase (E.C. 3.2.1.176) (E.C. 3.2.1.91) and β-glucosidase (E.C. 3.2.1.21) for the depolymerization of cellulose to glucose. Solid state fermentation, which holds growth of microorganisms on moist solid substrates in the absence of free flowing water, has gained considerable attention of late due its several advantages over submerged fermentation. The review summarizes the critical analysis of recent literature covering production of cellulase in solid state fermentation using advance technologies such as consolidated bioprocessing, metabolic engineering and strain improvement, and circumscribes the strategies to improve the enzyme yield. PMID:26601764

  1. Indians Repulse British With Rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    During the early introduction of rockets to Europe, they were used only as weapons. Enemy troops in India repulsed the British with rockets. Later, in Britain, Sir William Congreve developed a rocket that could fire to about 9,000 feet. The British fired Congreve rockets against the United States in the War of 1812.

  2. The sky is falling II: Impact of deposition produced during the static testing of solid rocket motors on corn and alfalfa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doucette, William J; Mendenhall, Scout; McNeill, Laurie S; Heavilin, Justin

    2014-06-01

    Tests of horizontally restrained rocket motors at the ATK facility in Promontory, Utah, USA result in the deposition of an estimated 1.5million kg of entrained soil and combustion products (mainly aluminum oxide, gaseous hydrogen chloride and water) on the surrounding area. The deposition is referred to as test fire soil (TFS). Farmers observing TFS deposited on their crops expressed concerns regarding the impact of this material. To address these concerns, we exposed corn and alfalfa to TFS collected during a September 2009 test. The impact was evaluated by comparing the growth and tissue composition of controls relative to the treatments. Exposure to TFS, containing elevated levels of chloride (1000 times) and aluminum (2 times) relative to native soils, affected the germination, growth and tissue concentrations of various elements, depending on the type and level of exposure. Germination was inhibited by high concentrations of TFS in soil, but the impact was reduced if the TFS was pre-leached with water. Biomass production was reduced in the TFS amended soils and corn grown in TFS amended soils did not develop kernels. Chloride concentrations in corn and alfalfa grown in TFS amended soils were two orders of magnitude greater than controls. TFS exposed plants contained higher concentrations of several cations, although the concentrations were well below livestock feed recommendations. Foliar applications of TFS had no impact on biomass, but some differences in the elemental composition of leaves relative to controls were observed. Washing the TFS off the leaves lessened the impact. Results indicate that the TFS deposition could have an effect, depending on the amount and growth stage of the crops, but the impact could be mitigated with rainfall or the application of additional irrigation water. The high level of chloride associated with the TFS is the main cause of the observed impacts. PMID:24632062

  3. Development of advanced blanket materials for solid breeder blanket of fusion reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of advanced solid breeding blanket in the DEMO reactor requires the tritium breeder and neutron multiplier that can withstand the high temperature and high fluence, and the development of such as advanced blanket materials has been carried out by the cooperation activities among JAERI, universities and industries in Japan. The Li2TiO3 pebble fabricated by wet process is a reference material as a tritium breeder, but the stability on high temperature has to be improved for application to DEMO blanket. As one of such the improved materials, TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 pebbles were successfully fabricated and TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 has been studied. For the advanced neutron multiplier, the beryllides that have high melting point and good chemical stability have been studied. Some characterization of Be12Ti was conducted, and it became clear that Be12Ti had lower swelling and tritium inventory than that of beryllium metal. The pebble fabrication study for Be12Ti was also performed and Be12Ti pebbles were successfully fabricated. From these activities, the bright prospect was obtained to realize the DEMO blanket by the application of TiO2-doped Li2TiO3 and beryllides. (author)

  4. Study of solid oxide fuel cell interconnects, protective coatings and advanced physical vapor deposition techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, Paul Edward

    High energy conversion efficiency, decreased environmentally-sensitive emissions and fuel flexibility have attracted increasing attention toward solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems for stationary, transportation and portable power generation. Critical durability and cost issues, however, continue to impede wide-spread deployment. Many intermediate temperature (600-800°C) planar SOFC systems employ metallic alloy interconnect components, which physically connect individual fuel cells into electric series, facilitate gas distribution to appropriate SOFC electrode chambers (fuel/anode and oxidant[air]/cathode) and provide SOFC stack mechanical support. These demanding multifunctional requirements challenge commercially-available and inexpensive metallic alloys due to corrosion and related effects. Many ongoing investigations are aimed at enabling inexpensive metallic alloys (via bulk and/or surface modifications) as SOFC interconnects (SOFC(IC)s). In this study, two advanced physical vapor deposition (PVD) techniques: large area filtered vacuum arc deposition (LAFAD), and filtered arc plasma-assisted electron beam PVD (FA-EBPVD) were used to deposit a wide-variety of protective nanocomposite (amorphous/nanocrystalline) ceramic thin-film (1,000 hours); and, dramatically reduced Cr volatility (>30-fold). Analyses and discussions of SOFC(IC) corrosion, advanced PVD processes and protective coating behavior are intended to advance understanding and accelerate the development of durable and commercially-viable SOFC systems.

  5. Development of Kabila rocket: A radioisotope heated thermionic plasma rocket engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalomba Mboyi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of plasma rocket engine, the Kabila rocket, using a radioisotope heated thermionic heating chamber instead of a conventional combustion chamber or catalyst bed is introduced and it achieves specific impulses similar to the ones of conventional solid and bipropellant rockets. Curium-244 is chosen as a radioisotope heat source and a thermal reductive layer is also used to obtain precise thermionic emissions. The self-sufficiency principle is applied by simultaneously heating up the emitting material with the radioisotope decay heat and by powering the different valves of the plasma rocket engine with the same radioisotope decay heat using a radioisotope thermoelectric generator. This rocket engine is then benchmarked against a 1 N hydrazine thruster configuration operated on one of the Pleiades-HR-1 constellation spacecraft. A maximal specific impulse and power saving of respectively 529 s and 32% are achieved with helium as propellant. Its advantages are its power saving capability, high specific impulses and simultaneous ease of storage and restart. It can however be extremely voluminous and potentially hazardous. The Kabila rocket is found to bring great benefits to the existing spacecraft and further research should optimize its geometric characteristics and investigate the physical principals of its operation.

  6. Low thrust chemical rocket technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven J.

    1992-01-01

    An on-going technology program to improve the performance of low thrust chemical rockets for spacecraft on-board propulsion applications is reviewed. Improved performance and lifetime is sought by the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, introduction of high temperature materials and improved component designs to optimize performance, and use of higher performance propellants. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Predictions are based on both the RPLUS Navier-Stokes code with finite rate kinetics and the JANNAF methodology. Data were obtained with laser-based diagnostics along with global performance measurements. Results indicate that the modeling of the injector and the combustion process needs improvement in these codes and flow visualization with a technique such as 2-D laser induced fluorescence (LIF) would aid in resolving issues of flow symmetry and shear layer combustion processes. High temperature material fabrication processes are under development and small rockets are being designed, fabricated, and tested using these new materials. Rhenium coated with iridium for oxidation protection was produced by the Chemical Vapor Deposition (CVD) process and enabled an 800 K increase in rocket operating temperature. Performance gains with this material in rockets using Earth storable propellants (nitrogen tetroxide and monomethylhydrazine or hydrazine) were obtained through component redesign to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency while managing head end thermal soakback. Material interdiffusion and oxidation characteristics indicated that the requisite lifetimes of tens of hours were available for thruster applications. Rockets were designed, fabricated, and tested with thrusts of 22, 62, 440 and 550 N. Performance improvements of 10 to 20 seconds specific impulse were demonstrated. Higher

  7. Advanced multi-fuelled solid oxide fuel cells (ASOFCs) using functional nanocomposites for polygeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raza, Rizwan [Department of Physics, COMSATS Institute of Information Technology, Lahore (Pakistan); Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Qin, Haiying; Samavati, Mahrokh; Zhu, Bin [Department of Energy Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Liu, Qinghua [Tianjin Laboratory for Chemical Engineering (Tianjin University), School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, 300072 (China); Lima, Raquel B. [Department of Fiber and Polymer Technology, Royal Institute of Technology, KTH, 10044, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2011-11-15

    An advanced multifuelled solid oxide fuel cell (ASOFC) with a functional nanocomposite was developed and tested for use in a polygeneration system. Several different types of fuel, for example, gaseous (hydrogen and biogas) and liquid fuels (bio-ethanol and bio-methanol), were used in the experiments. Maximum power densities of 1000, 300, 600, 550 mW cm{sup -2} were achieved using hydrogen, bio-gas, bio-methanol, and bio-ethanol, respectively, in the ASOFC. Electrical and total efficiencies of 54% and 80% were achieved using the single cell with hydrogen fuel. These results show that the use of a multi-fuelled system for polygeneration is a promising means of generating sustainable power. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Recent Advances in the Use of Sodium Borohydride as a Solid State Hydrogen Store

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Mao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of new practical hydrogen storage materials with high volumetric and gravimetric hydrogen densities is necessary to implement fuel cell technology for both mobile and stationary applications. NaBH4, owing to its low cost and high hydrogen density (10.6 wt%, has received extensive attention as a promising hydrogen storage medium. However, its practical use is hampered by its high thermodynamic stability and slow hydrogen exchange kinetics. Recent developments have been made in promoting H2 release and tuning the thermodynamics of the thermal decomposition of solid NaBH4. These conceptual advances offer a positive outlook for using NaBH4-based materials as viable hydrogen storage carriers for mobile applications. This review summarizes contemporary progress in this field with a focus on the fundamental dehydrogenation and rehydrogenation pathways and properties and on material design strategies towards improved kinetics and thermodynamics such as catalytic doping, nano-engineering, additive destabilization and chemical modification.

  9. Solid Waste Management Requirements Definition for Advanced Life Support Missions: Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alazraki, Michael P.; Hogan, John; Levri, Julie; Fisher, John; Drysdale, Alan

    2002-01-01

    Prior to determining what Solid Waste Management (SWM) technologies should be researched and developed by the Advanced Life Support (ALS) Project for future missions, there is a need to define SWM requirements. Because future waste streams will be highly mission-dependent, missions need to be defined prior to developing SWM requirements. The SWM Working Group has used the mission architecture outlined in the System Integration, Modeling and Analysis (SIMA) Element Reference Missions Document (RMD) as a starting point in the requirement development process. The missions examined include the International Space Station (ISS), a Mars Dual Lander mission, and a Mars Base. The SWM Element has also identified common SWM functionalities needed for future missions. These functionalities include: acceptance, transport, processing, storage, monitoring and control, and disposal. Requirements in each of these six areas are currently being developed for the selected missions. This paper reviews the results of this ongoing effort and identifies mission-dependent resource recovery requirements.

  10. Advanced control approach for hybrid systems based on solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Advanced new control system for SOFC based hybrid plants. • Proportional–Integral approach with feed-forward technology. • Good control of fuel cell temperature. • All critical properties maintained inside safe conditions. - Abstract: This paper shows a new advanced control approach for operations in hybrid systems equipped with solid oxide fuel cell technology. This new tool, which combines feed-forward and standard proportional–integral techniques, controls the system during load changes avoiding failures and stress conditions detrimental to component life. This approach was selected to combine simplicity and good control performance. Moreover, the new approach presented in this paper eliminates the need for mass flow rate meters and other expensive probes, as usually required for a commercial plant. Compared to previous works, better performance is achieved in controlling fuel cell temperature (maximum gradient significantly lower than 3 K/min), reducing the pressure gap between cathode and anode sides (at least a 30% decrease during transient operations), and generating a higher safe margin (at least a 10% increase) for the Steam-to-Carbon Ratio. This new control system was developed and optimized using a hybrid system transient model implemented, validated and tested within previous works. The plant, comprising the coupling of a tubular solid oxide fuel cell stack with a microturbine, is equipped with a bypass valve able to connect the compressor outlet with the turbine inlet duct for rotational speed control. Following model development and tuning activities, several operative conditions were considered to show the new control system increased performance compared to previous tools (the same hybrid system model was used with the new control approach). Special attention was devoted to electrical load steps and ramps considering significant changes in ambient conditions

  11. Design and application of solid, dense backfill advanced mining technology with two pre-driving entries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Qiang; Zhang Jixiong; Guo Shuai; Gao Rui; Li Weikang

    2015-01-01

    New solid backfill mining technology provides unique technical advantages for‘three-under’ coal min-ing which refers to coal resources trapped under buildings, railways, and water bodies. This technology has a much higher recovery rate and can effectively control the surface subsidence. However, successful application of this technology depends heavily on geological conditions. To avoid the disadvantages asso-ciated with downward mining and overhead backfilling with this new technology, a new advanced solid backfill mining design with two pre-driving entries is proposed here to ensure the backfill effect. Taking Huayuan coal mine as an example, this paper tests the double gob-side entries retaining with no pillar left scheme and optimizes an integrated technology setup for backfill mining and gob-side entry retain-ing. Field applications show that the recovery rate increased from 40%for strip mining to 85%for backfill mining. Moreover, the new backfill technology allowed for better control over the surrounding rock deformation caused by the gob-side entry retaining effect and better control of ground subsidence as compared to strip mining.

  12. Requirements Development Issues for Advanced Life Support Systems: Solid Waste Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levri, Julie A.; Fisher, John W.; Alazraki, Michael P.; Hogan, John A.

    2002-01-01

    Long duration missions pose substantial new challenges for solid waste management in Advanced Life Support (ALS) systems. These possibly include storing large volumes of waste material in a safe manner, rendering wastes stable or sterilized for extended periods of time, and/or processing wastes for recovery of vital resources. This is further complicated because future missions remain ill-defined with respect to waste stream quantity, composition and generation schedule. Without definitive knowledge of this information, development of requirements is hampered. Additionally, even if waste streams were well characterized, other operational and processing needs require clarification (e.g. resource recovery requirements, planetary protection constraints). Therefore, the development of solid waste management (SWM) subsystem requirements for long duration space missions is an inherently uncertain, complex and iterative process. The intent of this paper is to address some of the difficulties in writing requirements for missions that are not completely defined. This paper discusses an approach and motivation for ALS SWM requirements development, the characteristics of effective requirements, and the presence of those characteristics in requirements that are developed for uncertain missions. Associated drivers for life support system technological capability are also presented. A general means of requirements forecasting is discussed, including successive modification of requirements and the need to consider requirements integration among subsystems.

  13. Phase I study of afatinib combined with nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahleda, Rastislav; Hollebecque, Antoine; Varga, Andrea; Gazzah, Anas; Massard, Christophe; Deutsch, Eric; Amellal, Nadia; Farace, Françoise; Ould-Kaci, Mahmoud; Roux, Flavien; Marzin, Kristell; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-01-01

    Background: This Phase I study evaluated continuous- and intermittent-dosing (every other week) of afatinib plus nintedanib in patients with advanced solid tumours. Methods: In the dose-escalation phase (n=45), maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) were determined for continuous/intermittent afatinib 10, 20, 30 or 40 mg once daily plus continuous nintedanib 150 or 200 mg twice daily. Secondary objectives included safety and efficacy. Clinical activity of continuous afatinib plus nintedanib at the MTD was further evaluated in an expansion phase (n=25). Results: The most frequent dose-limiting toxicities were diarrhoea (11%) and transaminase elevations (7%). Maximum tolerated doses were afatinib 30 mg continuously plus nintedanib 150 mg, and afatinib 40 mg intermittently plus nintedanib 150 mg. Treatment-related adverse events (mostly Grade ⩽3) included diarrhoea (98%), asthenia (64%), nausea (62%) and vomiting (60%). In the dose-escalation phase, two patients had partial responses (PRs) and 27 (60%) had stable disease (SD). In the expansion phase, one complete response and three PRs were observed (all non-small cell lung cancer), with SD in 13 (52%) patients. No pharmacokinetic interactions were observed. Conclusions: MTDs of continuous or intermittent afatinib plus nintedanib demonstrated a manageable safety profile with proactive management of diarrhoea. Antitumour activity was observed in patients with solid tumours. PMID:26512876

  14. Advanced 2-micron Solid-state Laser for Wind and CO2 Lidar Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo C.; Petros, Mulugeta; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Koch, Grady J.; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Significant advancements in the 2-micron laser development have been made recently. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. The world record 2-micron laser energy is demonstrated with an oscillator and two amplifiers system. It generates more than one joule per pulse energy with excellent beam quality. Based on the successful demonstration of a fully conductive cooled oscillator by using heat pipe technology, an improved fully conductively cooled 2-micron amplifier was designed, manufactured and integrated. It virtually eliminates the running coolant to increase the overall system efficiency and reliability. In addition to technology development and demonstration, a compact and engineering hardened 2-micron laser is under development. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser is expected to be integrated to a lidar system and take field measurements. The recent achievements push forward the readiness of such a laser system for space lidar applications. This paper will review the developments of the state-of-the-art solid-state 2-micron laser.

  15. US Rocket Propulsion Industrial Base Health Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    The number of active liquid rocket engine and solid rocket motor development programs has severely declined since the "space race" of the 1950s and 1960s center dot This downward trend has been exacerbated by the retirement of the Space Shuttle, transition from the Constellation Program to the Space launch System (SLS) and similar activity in DoD programs center dot In addition with consolidation in the industry, the rocket propulsion industrial base is under stress. To Improve the "health" of the RPIB, we need to understand - The current condition of the RPIB - How this compares to past history - The trend of RPIB health center dot This drives the need for a concise set of "metrics" - Analogous to the basic data a physician uses to determine the state of health of his patients - Easy to measure and collect - The trend is often more useful than the actual data point - Can be used to focus on problem areas and develop preventative measures The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs. center dot The RPIB encompasses US government, academic, and commercial (including industry primes and their supplier base) research, development, test, evaluation, and manufacturing capabilities and facilities. center dot The RPIB includes the skilled workforce, related intellectual property, engineering and support services, and supply chain operations and management. This definition touches the five main segments of the U.S. RPIB as categorized by the USG: defense, intelligence community, civil government, academia, and commercial sector. The nation's capability to conceive, design, develop, manufacture, test, and support missions using liquid rocket engines and solid rocket motors that are critical to its national security, economic health and growth, and future scientific needs

  16. Advances in solid-catalytic and non-catalytic technologies for biodiesel production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The recent technologies for promoting biodiesel synthesis were elucidated. • The design of catalyst consideration of biodiesel production was proposed. • The recent advances and remaining difficulties in biodiesel synthesis were outlined. • The future research trend in biodiesel synthesis was highlighted. - Abstract: The insecure supply of fossil fuel coerces the scientific society to keep a vision to boost investments in the renewable energy sector. Among the many renewable fuels currently available around the world, biodiesel offers an immediate impact in our energy. In fact, a huge interest in related research indicates a promising future for the biodiesel technology. Heterogeneous catalyzed production of biodiesel has emerged as a preferred route as it is environmentally benign needs no water washing and product separation is much easier. The number of well-defined catalyst complexes that are able to catalyze transesterification reactions efficiently has been significantly expanded in recent years. The activity of catalysts, specifically in application to solid acid/base catalyst in transesterification reaction depends on their structure, strength of basicity/acidity, surface area as well as the stability of catalyst. There are various process intensification technologies based on the use of alternate energy sources such as ultrasound and microwave. The latest advances in research and development related to biodiesel production is represented by non-catalytic supercritical method and focussed exclusively on these processes as forthcoming transesterification processes. The latest developments in this field featuring highly active catalyst complexes are outlined in this review. The knowledge of more extensive research on advances in biofuels will allow a deeper insight into the mechanism of these technologies toward meeting the critical energy challenges in future

  17. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Cândido Magno de Souza; Luiz Carlos Sandoval Góes; Dimas Donizeti da Silveira; Rogério Pirk; Carlos d’Andrade Souto

    2010-01-01

    Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion...

  18. High Energy Density Additives for Hybrid Fuel Rockets to Improve Performance and Enhance Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2014-01-01

    We propose a conceptual study of prototype strained hydrocarbon molecules as high energy density additives for hybrid rocket fuels to boost the performance of these rockets without compromising safety and reliability. Use of these additives could extend the range of applications for which hybrid rockets become an attractive alternative to conventional solid or liquid fuel rockets. The objectives of the study were to confirm and quantify the high enthalpy of these strained molecules and to assess improvement in rocket performance that would be expected if these additives were blended with conventional fuels. We confirmed the chemical properties (including enthalpy) of these additives. However, the predicted improvement in rocket performance was too small to make this a useful strategy for boosting hybrid rocket performance.

  19. Point Lobos Rocket Launch [video

    OpenAIRE

    Yakimenko, Oleg; Naval Postgraduate School (U.S.)

    2010-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) and the AIAA Point Lobos section (PLS) entered three rockets into the 2010 AIAA Young Professionals Rocket Competition (YPRC). The event took place in the Mojave Desert on Koehn Dry lakebed July 17th 2010.

  20. Multi-objective Optimization for Waterjet Cleaning Process of Solid Rocket Motor%固体火箭发动机水射流清理工艺的多目标优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱左明; 高鑫; 王煊军; 韩启龙

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a balance among safety,efficiency and environment-friendliness of waterjet cleaning process of solid rocket motor,on the basis of waterjet cleaning experiments and wastewater collection experiments,a multi-objective optimization meth-od for waterjet cleaning process of solid rocket motor was established with propellant massloss rate and wastewater generation rate as the optimization objectives,and waterjet pressure,target distance,nozzle diameter and single cleaning time as the variables with constrained conditions. The calculation models of propellant massloss rate and wastewater generation rate were established with agent modeling technology,and Pareto optimal solution set was obtained by the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm (NSGA-Ⅱ). Results show that the optimal solution set can offer a variety of programs for the matching between propellant mass-loss rate and wastewater generation rate in waterjet cleaning process design under different conditions. With the best matching between them,the wastewater production caused by HTPB propellant′s unit massloss is only 14. 25 mL·g -1 .%为兼顾固体火箭发动机水射流清理工艺的安全性、高效性、环保性,在水射流清理实验和废水收集实验的基础上,以清理作业中推进剂质量损失速率、废水产生速率为优化目标,以射流压力、靶距、喷嘴直径、单次清理时间为变量并加以约束条件,建立了固体火箭发动机水射流清理工艺的多目标优化方法。利用代理模型技术建立了推进剂质量损失速率的代理计算模型和废水产生速率的理论计算模型,使用非支配排序遗传算法( NSGA-Ⅱ)求得了 Pareto 优化解集。该优化解集可为不同情况下的水射流清理工艺设计中推进剂质量损失速率和废水产生速率的匹配提供多种方案。用推进剂质量损失速率和废水产生速率的最佳匹配,由HTPB 推进剂单位质量损失所造

  1. 基于SHMSRM系统传感器分布优化的损伤识别技术%Damage identification based on sensor optimal placement for structural health monitoring system of solid rocket motor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐廷学; 陈海建; 滕克难; 卢洪义; 顾钧元

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of sensor placement in structural health monitoring of solid rocket motor(SHMSRM) was put forward u-sing genetic algorithm. The strain analysis and modal analysis of grain finite element model were performed/by using ANSYS,and the primary selection for sensor placement was accomplished. Then,an optimal sensor placement was worked out based on the genetic algorithm. The damage identification principle of the system was discussed. Based on the data collected by the sensors, change ratio of strain modal was determined as damage identification index,and damage identification for grain was put forward using strain modal analysis. The simulation results show that the proposed methods can efficiently solve the problem of sensor optimal placement and damage identification,%针对固体火箭发动机结构健康监测(SHMSRM)系统的传感器合理布置问题,提出了基于遗传算法的传感器分布优化.利用ANSYS软件对药柱有限元模型进行了应变分析和模态分析,得到了传感器优化布局初选点,再基于遗传算法对初选点进行优化排序.阐述了该系统的损伤识别原理,基于应变传感器所收集的信息,确定了以应变模态变化率作为损伤识别指标,提出了应用应变模态分析解决药柱的损伤识别问题.算例证明了此方法的可行性和有效性.

  2. Analytical solution of combustion chamber flow field for rotating solid rocket motor%旋转固体火箭发动机燃烧室内流场分析解

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘平安; 王革; 郜冶

    2012-01-01

    对带壁面质量注入的旋转通道(具有柱形装药旋转固体火箭发动机通道)内流场进行了研究.通过解析方法求解简化后的欧拉方程,获得了无粘情况下的旋转通道解析解.在此基础上,运用摄动法中的渐进展开匹配法求解引入粘性修正的切向动量方程,并获得解析解,表明切向速度分布解具有组合涡特征.分析了涡核半径与注入雷诺数及旋转转数的关系,得到了可压缩修正条件下的组合涡规律.%The flow field of rotating channel which is a cylindrical combustion of rotating solid rocket motor with mass injection from wall surface was investigated. Simplified Euler Equation was solved using analytic methods. Analytical solution of the rotating channel was obtained without considering viscosity. On the basis of this, the tangential momentum equation considering viscosity modification was solved using matched asymptotic expansions of perturbation method, and the analytical solution was obtained. The result shows that tangential velocity distribution has the characteristics of combination vortex. The relationship among vortex core radius and injection Reynolds number and rotation revolution was analyzed. The regularity of the combination vortex was obtained under the condition of compressible modification.

  3. Pharmacokinetic characteristics of vincristine sulfate liposomes in patients with advanced solid tumors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao YAN; Zhong-ling ZHU; Zheng-zi QIAN; Ge HU; Hua-qing WANG; Wan-hui LIU; Guang CHENG

    2012-01-01

    Aim:To evaluate the single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics of vincristine sulfate liposomes (VSLI) in patients with advanced solid tumors.Methods:In single-dose pharmacokinetic study,16 patients were administered VSLI (1.5,2.0,or 2.3 mg.m-2) through intravenous infusion.Another 6 patients receiving vincristine sulfate (VCR,2.0 mg) were taken as the control.In multiple-dose pharmacokinetic study,12 patients were administered VSLI (1.5 or 1.8 mg.m-2) through intravenous infusion weekly for 4 consecutive weeks.The plasma concentration of VSLI was determined using the liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method.Results:After intravenous infusion of the single dose of VSLI,the plasma concentrations were characterized by bi-exponential decline curves.No statistically significant differences were observed between the main pharmacokinetic parameters in the 3 dose groups.Compared with the patients receiving VCR,the patients treated with VSLI displayed an increase in the area under the plasma concentration vs time curve (AUC),and a decrease in plasma clearance rates.On the 4th cycle in the multiple-dose study,the plasma concentration of VCR in all subjects prior to the weekly administration was below the lower limit of quantification (LLOQ).The calculated pharmacokinetic parameters from the subjects in the multiple-and single-dose (1.5 mgm-2) groups had no significant differences.Although the administration of liposomal VCR may significantly elevate the plasma concentration of VCR,VSLI-associated adverse events were similar to those associated with conventional VCR.Conclusion:VSLI exhibits a lower clearance and a higher AUC compared with conventional VCR.No accumulation was observed in patients exposed to VSLI for 4 consecutive weeks.VSLI was generally tolerated in the subjects.The phase Ⅱ dose of VSLI may be recommended as 4 doses of 1.5 mg·m-2 for treatment of patients with advanced solid tumors.

  4. Big Science on a Small Budget: A University Sounding Rocket

    OpenAIRE

    Riddle, Ellen; Owens, Jennifer

    1997-01-01

    The High-altitude Ozone Measuring and Educational Rocket (HOMER), a pilot for the NASA Student Launch Program, was a suborbital rocket investigation conducted by the Colorado Space Grant Consortium (CSGC). The HOMER mission provided: a unique educational opportunity for hands-on involvement by students in colleges and universities throughout Colorado; measurements of ozone and atmospheric constituents which affect ozone in the Earth's atmosphere; a demonstration of advanced and low-cost techn...

  5. Rocket Flight Path

    OpenAIRE

    Jamie Waters

    2014-01-01

    This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Fl...

  6. Rocket Flight Path

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamie Waters

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project uses Newton’s Second Law of Motion, Euler’s method, basic physics, and basic calculus to model the flight path of a rocket. From this, one can find the height and velocity at any point from launch to the maximum altitude, or apogee. This can then be compared to the actual values to see if the method of estimation is a plausible. The rocket used for this project is modeled after Bullistic-1 which was launched by the Society of Aeronautics and Rocketry at the University of South Florida.

  7. Baking Soda and Vinegar Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claycomb, James R.; Zachary, Christopher; Tran, Quoc

    2009-01-01

    Rocket experiments demonstrating conservation of momentum will never fail to generate enthusiasm in undergraduate physics laboratories. In this paper, we describe tests on rockets from two vendors that combine baking soda and vinegar for propulsion. The experiment compared two analytical approximations for the maximum rocket height to the…

  8. Antithermal shield for rockets with heat evacuation by infrared radiation reflection

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan RUSU

    2010-01-01

    At high speed, the friction between the air mass and the rocket surface causes a localheating of over 1000 Celsius degrees. For the heat protection of the rocket, on its outside surfacethermal shields are installed.Studying the Coanda effect, the fluid flow on solids surface, respectively, the author Ioan Rusuhas discovered by simply researches that the Coanda effect could be /extended also to the fluid flowon discontinuous solids, namely, on solids provided with orifices. This phenomenon was...

  9. Improved airbreathing launch vehicle performance with the use of rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, H. G.; Grandhi, R. V.; Hankey, W. L.; Belcher, P. J.

    1991-04-01

    An efficient performance analysis method is developed to evaluate potential airbreathing/rocket propulsion systems for advanced technology single-stage-to-orbit launch vehicles. Evaluated are tradeoffs between airbreathing, rocket, and concurrent airbreathing/rocket propulsion in maximizing payload delivery to orbit for a given ascent flight trajectory. With the analysis method, several modes of airbreathing/rocket propulsion are compared to a baseline 'airbreather alone' propulsion system in terms of fuel/propellant required to attain orbital velocity. Concurrent airbreathing/rocket propulsion shows a reduction in fuel/propellant consumption over straight airbreather to rocket propulsion transition. The optimal switch point (staging) is identified for the transition from airbreathing to rocket propulsion.

  10. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangsoo Lee

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  11. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sangsoo [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Son, Yong-Hoon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Kihyun; Shin, Yoo Gyun [Semiconductor R and D Center, Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd., Hwasung 445-701 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Euijoon, E-mail: eyoon@snu.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Energy Semiconductor Research Center, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Seoul National University, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-07-01

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics.

  12. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Laser Interactions with Atoms, Solids,and Plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    1994-01-01

    The aim of this NATO Advanced Study Institute was to bring together scientists and students working in the field of laser matter interactions in order to review and stimulate developmentoffundamental science with ultra-short pulse lasers. New techniques of pulse compression and colliding-pulse mode-locking have made possible the construction of lasers with pulse lengths in the femtosecond range. Such lasers are now in operation at several research laboratories in Europe and the United States. These laser facilities present a new and exciting research direction with both pure and applied science components. In this ASI the emphasis is on fundamental processes occurring in the interaction of short laser pulses with atoms, molecules, solids, and plasmas. In the case of laser-atom (molecule) interactions, high power lasers provide the first access to extreme high-intensity conditions above 10'8 Watts/em', a new frontier for nonlinear interaction of photons with atoms and molecules. New phenomena observed include ...

  13. Advanced Si solid phase crystallization for vertical channel in vertical NANDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced solid phase crystallization (SPC) method using the SiGe/Si bi-layer structure is proposed to obtain high-mobility poly-Si thin-film transistors in next generation vertical NAND (VNAND) devices. During the SPC process, the top SiGe thin film acts as a selective nucleation layer to induce surface nucleation and equiaxial microstructure. Subsequently, this SiGe thin film microstructure is propagated to the underlying Si thin film by epitaxy-like growth. The initial nucleation at the SiGe surface was clearly observed by in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) when heating up to 600 °C. The equiaxial microstructures of both SiGe nucleation and Si channel layers were shown in the crystallized bi-layer plan-view TEM measurements. Based on these experimental results, the large-grained and less-defective Si microstructure is expected to form near the channel region of each VNAND cell transistor, which may improve the electrical characteristics

  14. Bortezomib in combination with celecoxib in patients with advanced solid tumors: a phase I trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salzer Shanta

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background COX-2 inhibitors, such as celecoxib, and ubiquitin-proteasome pathway inhibitors, such as bortezomib, can down-regulate NF-κB, a transcription factor implicated in tumor growth. The objective of this study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicities of bortezomib in combination with celecoxib in patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods Patients received escalating doses of bortezomib either on a weekly schedule (days 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29 repeated every 42 days or on a twice-weekly administration schedule (days 1, 4, 8, and 11 repeated every 21 days, in combination with escalating doses of celecoxib twice daily throughout the study period from 200 mg to 400 mg twice daily. Results No dose-limiting toxicity was observed during the study period. Two patients had stable disease lasting for four and five months each, and sixteen patients developed progressive disease. Conclusion The combination of bortezomib and celecoxib was well tolerated, without dose limiting toxicities observed throughout the dosing ranges tested, and will be studied further at the highest dose levels investigated. Trial registration number NCT00290680.

  15. Low toxicity rocket propellants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrazine (N2H4) and its hypergolic mate nitrogen tetroxide (N2O4) are used on virtually all spacecraft and on a large number of launch vehicles. In recent years however, there has been an effort in identifying and developing alternatives to replace hydrazine as a rocket propellant.

  16. Rocketing to the Skies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    ONE sunny morning,we startedfor Yanqi Lake,Huairou District,Beijing,to try“rocket bungy”,so farthe only facility for this sport inChina.On the way there,wequestioned our courage and heartendurance. Entering the gate we saw,towering over a banner saying,

  17. Recent advances and challenges for diode-pumped solid-state lasers as an inertial fusion energy driver candidate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss how solid-state laser technology can serve in the interests of fusion energy beyond the goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), which is now being constructed to ignite a deuterium-tritium target to fusion conditions in the laboratory for the first time. We think that advanced solid-state laser technology can offer the repetition-rate and efficiency needed to drive a fusion power plant, in contrast to the single-shot character of NIF. As discuss below, we propose that a gas-cooled, diode-pumped Yb:S-FAP laser can provide a new paradigm for fusion laser technology leading into the next century

  18. Water rocket - Electrolysis propulsion and fuel cell power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Water Rocket is the collective name for an integrated set of technologies that offer new options for spacecraft propulsion, power, energy storage, and structure. Low pressure water stored on the spacecraft is electrolyzed to generate, separate, and pressurize gaseous hydrogen and oxygen. These gases, stored in lightweight pressure tanks, can be burned to generate thrust or recombined to produce electric power. As a rocket propulsion system, Water Rocket provides the highest feasible chemical specific impulse (-400 seconds). Even higher specific impulse propulsion can be achieved by combining Water Rocket with other advanced propulsion technologies, such as arcjet or electric thrusters. With innovative pressure tank technology, Water Rocket's specific energy[Wh/kg] can exceed that of the best foreseeable batteries by an order of magnitude, and the tanks can often serve as vehicle structural elements. For pulsed power applications, Water Rocket propellants can be used to drive very high power density generators, such as MHD devices or detonation-driven pulse generators. A space vehicle using Water Rocket propulsion can be totally inert and non-hazardous during assembly and launch. These features are particularly important for the timely development and flight qualification of new classes of spacecraft, such as microsats, nanosats, and refuelable spacecraft

  19. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  20. Phase I study of olaratumab in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshihiko; Ma, Yan; Dontabhaktuni, Aruna; Nippgen, Cornelia; Nippgen, Johannes; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2014-07-01

    Olaratumab (IMC-3G3) is a fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibody that selectively binds the external domain of human platelet-derived growth factor receptor-α with high affinity and blocks ligand binding. This was a single-center, dose-escalation, phase I trial of olaratumab in Japanese patients with advanced/refractory solid malignancies. Three to six patients were enrolled into each of three cohorts: Patients received i.v. olaratumab: 10 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks (cohort 1); 20 mg/kg every 2 weeks (cohort 2); and 15 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks (cohort 3). Doses were escalated from cohort 1 through cohort 3. The primary objective was to establish the safety and pharmacokinetic profile of olaratumab. Sixteen patients were treated across three cohorts. There were no dose-limiting toxicities, so the maximum tolerated dose was not reached. The most common olaratumab-related treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) were proteinuria (25.0%) and elevated aspartate transaminase (12.5%). One patient (cohort 2) had two olaratumab-related Grade 3 TEAEs (increased aspartate aminotransferase and tumor hemorrhage); otherwise, olaratumab-related TEAEs were Grade 1/2. Seven patients (43.8%) had a best response of stable disease. Based on the pharmacokinetic concentration profile of olaratumab, the trough concentrations following single and multiple doses at 15 mg/kg on days 1 and 8 every 3 weeks (cohort 3) and multiple doses at 20 mg/kg every 2 weeks (cohort 2) were above the 155 μg/mL target. Thus, these two doses could represent an acceptable schedule for future trials in Japanese patients. Olaratumab had an acceptable safety profile and was well tolerated. PMID:24816152

  1. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Swain, Sandra M; Brian P. Monahan; Grem, Jean L.; Marc R Blackman; Laura Lee Johnson; Jamie Stagl; Sannes, Timothy S.; Dawn B. Wallerstedt; Mansky, Patrick J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts (mistletoe) are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM) and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC) evaluated: (1) safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD), (2) absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery, (3) formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab), (4) cytokine plasma concentrations, (5) clinical response, and (6) pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistlet...

  2. Numerical simulation of two-phase combustion for Al/Mg-contained propellant solid rocket ramjet%铝镁推进剂固冲发动机两相燃烧数值模拟

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯喜平; 周晓斯; 郑亚; 李进贤

    2011-01-01

    针对铝镁推进剂中心进气固冲发动机,湍流模型采用Reynolds应力方程模型,气相燃烧采用涡耗散模型,两相流采用颗粒随机轨道模型,铝颗粒燃烧采用Brooks燃烧模型,对二次燃烧和流动进行了三维、两相和化学反应流场数值模拟,对比和分析了冲压空气与一次燃气无旋、同向及反向旋转3种工况下补燃室燃烧流动特性及燃烧效率,并对不同工况下的发动机比冲进行了计算分析.研究表明,有旋工况下的铝颗粒燃烧效率均高于无旋工况,采用同向旋转可使补燃室出口总燃烧效率提高约10.02%,颗粒滞留时间可延长约0.699 ms,有旋工况下的发动机比冲均低于无旋工况.%Three dimension, two phase and chemical-reaction flow field of secondary combustion and flow for the aluminiummagnesium propellant solid rocket ramjet with central inlet were numerically simulated by Reynolds stress equation model, eddy-dissipation gas combustion model,particle stochastic trajectory model and Brooks aluminium particle combustion model.The characteristics of secondary combustion and flow, as well as the combustion efficiency under three inlet cases were analyzed comparatively, I. E. Non-swirl, co-swirl and counter-swirl case. The specific impulses of ramjet under different cases were also calculated. The results show that combustion efficiency of aluminium particle with swirling cases are higher than that the one with no swirling case. The total combustion efficiency of secondary combustion chambers outlet can increase about 10.02% and the residence time of particle can prolong about 0.699 ms in the inlet case of counter-swirl. The specific impulse of ramjet with swirling cases are lower than that the one with no swirling case.

  3. Microfabricated Liquid Rocket Motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Alan H.; Joppin, C.; Kerrebrock, J. L.; Schneider, Steven J. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Under NASA Glenn Research Center sponsorship, MIT has developed the concept of micromachined, bipropellant, liquid rocket engines. This is potentially a breakthrough technology changing the cost-performance tradeoffs for small propulsion systems, enabling new applications, and redefining the meaning of the term low-cost-access-to-space. With this NASA support, a liquid-cooled, gaseous propellant version of the thrust chamber and nozzle was designed, built, and tested as a first step. DARPA is currently funding MIT to demonstrate turbopumps and controls. The work performed herein was the second year of a proposed three-year effort to develop the technology and demonstrate very high power density, regeneratively cooled, liquid bipropellant rocket engine thrust chamber and nozzles. When combined with the DARPA turbopumps and controls, this work would enable the design and demonstration of a complete rocket propulsion system. The original MIT-NASA concept used liquid oxygen-ethanol propellants. The military applications important to DARPA imply that storable liquid propellants are needed. Thus, MIT examined various storable propellant combinations including N2O4 and hydrazine, and H2O2 and various hydrocarbons. The latter are preferred since they do not have the toxicity of N2O4 and hydrazine. In reflection of the newfound interest in H2O2, it is once again in production and available commercially. A critical issue for the microrocket engine concept is cooling of the walls in a regenerative design. This is even more important at microscale than for large engines due to cube-square scaling considerations. Furthermore, the coolant behavior of rocket propellants has not been characterized at microscale. Therefore, MIT designed and constructed an apparatus expressly for this purpose. The report details measurements of two candidate microrocket fuels, JP-7 and JP-10.

  4. The relativistic rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antippa, Adel F [Departement de Physique, Universite du Quebec a Trois-Rivieres, Trois-Rivieres, Quebec G9A 5H7 (Canada)

    2009-05-15

    We solve the problem of the relativistic rocket by making use of the relation between Lorentzian and Galilean velocities, as well as the laws of superposition of successive collinear Lorentz boosts in the limit of infinitesimal boosts. The solution is conceptually simple, and technically straightforward, and provides an example of a powerful method that can be applied to a wide range of special relativistic problems of linear acceleration.

  5. A Half Century of Sounding Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, J.

    2015-09-01

    One of the earliest and most successful sounding rocket activities in Europe, was the development of the Skylark system. The requirement for high altitude space research and the approaching International Geophysical Year in 1957-58, motivated the British to develop a sounding rocket system. After considerable investigation of the requirements for the propulsion system, the Raven motor and the necessary basic components and instrumentation of a payload system were developed. The first Skylark was launched on the 13th of February, 1957. This paper describes the development of the Skylark system, the advances in technology of its payload systems and their application in solar and stellar astronomy, upper atmosphere and microgravity research and technological proving of space systems.

  6. Guidance and control of an earth to orbit vehicle with optimum transition from airbreathing to concurrent airbreathing/rocket propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, H. G.; Grandhi, R. V.; Hankey, W. L.; Belcher, P. J.

    1990-07-01

    An efficient performance analysis method (suitable for PC operation) is developed to evaluate potential airbreathing/rocket propulsion systems for advanced technology single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) launch vehicles. Evaluated are tradeoffs between airbreathing (AB), rocket, and concurrent airbreathing/rocket propulsion in minimizing fuel consumption for a given ascent flight trajectory. Many mission, flight, and vehicle related requirements and constraints are satisfied in the process. With the analysis method, several modes of airbreathing/rocket propulsion are compared to a baseline 'airbreather alone' propulsion system in terms of fuel required to attain orbital velocity. The optimal switch point (staging) is identified for the transition from airbreathing to rocket propulsion.

  7. A study on nuclear propulsion using gas-solid two-phase flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyato, Naoaki; Kataoka, Isao; Serizawa, Akimi [Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-05-01

    A solid core nuclear rocket has been considered a candidate for the first manned mission to Mars. The reason is that the solid core nuclear rocket has higher specific impulse than a chemical rocket. But its engine thrust is as much as that of the chemical rocket. We have thought of use of gas-solid two-phase flow for higher engine thrust on nuclear thermal propulsion and examined the effect of gas-solid two-phase flow on the engine thrust and the specific impulse of the solid core nuclear rocket. (author)

  8. Rocket Assembly and Checkout Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Integrates, tests, and calibrates scientific instruments flown on sounding rocket payloads. The scientific instruments are assembled on an optical bench;...

  9. Structural Dynamics of Filament-Wound Booster Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, F. M.

    1987-01-01

    Report summarizes program of measurements and calculations of vibrations in filament-wound composite models of Space Shuttle solid-rocket boosters. Vibrational behavior predicted by finite-element computer model of structural dynamics correlates well with data from tests on full- and quarter-scale models. Computer model developed with NASTRAN general-purpose structural-analysis computer code.

  10. Rocket-Powered Parachutes Rescue Entire Planes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts with Langley Research Center helped BRS Aerospace, of Saint Paul, Minnesota, to develop technology that has saved 246 lives to date. The company s whole aircraft parachute systems deploy in less than 1 second thanks to solid rocket motors and are capable of arresting the descent of a small aircraft, lowering it safely to the ground. BRS has sold more than 30,000 systems worldwide, and the technology is now standard equipment on many of the world s top-selling aircraft. Parachutes for larger airplanes are in the works.

  11. Sunitinib Malate and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Kidney Cancer or Advanced Solid Malignancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Clear Cell Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Stage I Renal Cell Cancer; Stage II Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  12. Recent Advances in Lipid Nanoparticle Formulations with Solid Matrix for Oral Drug Delivery

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Surajit; Chaudhury, Anumita

    2010-01-01

    Lipid nanoparticles based on solid matrix have emerged as potential drug carriers to improve gastrointestinal (GI) absorption and oral bioavailability of several drugs, especially lipophilic compounds. These formulations may also be used for sustained drug release. Solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN) and the newer generation lipid nanoparticle, nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC), have been studied for their capability as oral drug carriers. Biodegradable, biocompatible, and physiological lipids ar...

  13. A very acid rocket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benoit Browaeys, D.

    1996-04-01

    The french rocket Ariane is the cause of environmental pollution. These effects are discussed in this article. Chloric acid and aluminium are in question: chloric acid is responsible of leaves necrosis and pulmonary diseases among the rats. For the man, the danger would be that drinking water could be contaminated by aluminium, which is neuro toxic with serious chronic effects. It is implicated in Alzheimer disease. But no studies has been made to search aluminium in drinking water of Sinnamary and Kourou. (N.C.). 8 refs., 2 figs.

  14. What fuel for a rocket?

    OpenAIRE

    Miranda, E. N.

    2012-01-01

    Elementary concepts from general physics and thermodynamics have been used to analyze rocket propulsion. Making some reasonable assumptions, an expression for the exit velocity of the gases is found. From that expression one can conclude what are the desired properties for a rocket fuel.

  15. Chemical structures of swine-manure chars produced under different carbonization conditions investigated by advanced solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two types of swine manure chars, hydrothermally-produced hydrochar and slow-pyrolysis pyrochar, and their raw swine manure solid were characterized using advanced 13C solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Compared with the parent raw swine manure, both hydrochars and pyrochar di...

  16. Turbo Pump Fed Micro-Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotti, P.; Tajmar, M.; Seco, F.; Guraya, C.; Perennes, F.; Soldati, A.; Lang, M.

    2004-10-01

    Micro-satellites (from 10kg up to 100kg) have mass, volume, and electrical power constraints due to their low dimensions. These limitations lead to the lack in currently available active orbit control systems in micro-satellites. Therefore, a micro-propulsion system with a high thrust to mass ratio is required to increase the potential functionality of small satellites. Mechatronic is presently working on a liquid bipropellant micro-rocket engine under contract with ESA (Contract No.16914/NL/Sfe - Micro-turbo-machinery Based Bipropellant System Using MNT). The advances in Mechatronic's project are to realise a micro-rocket engine with propellants pressurised by micro-pumps. The energy for driving the pumps would be extracted from a micro-turbine. Cooling channels around the nozzle would be also used in order to maintain the wall material below its maximum operating temperature. A mass budget comparison with more traditional pressure-fed micro-rockets shows a real benefit from this system in terms of mass reduction. In the paper, an overview of the project status in Mechatronic is presented.

  17. Rhenium Rocket Manufacturing Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center's On-Board Propulsion Branch has a research and technology program to develop high-temperature (2200 C), iridium-coated rhenium rocket chamber materials for radiation-cooled rockets in satellite propulsion systems. Although successful material demonstrations have gained much industry interest, acceptance of the technology has been hindered by a lack of demonstrated joining technologies and a sparse materials property data base. To alleviate these concerns, we fabricated rhenium to C-103 alloy joints by three methods: explosive bonding, diffusion bonding, and brazing. The joints were tested by simulating their incorporation into a structure by welding and by simulating high-temperature operation. Test results show that the shear strength of the joints degrades with welding and elevated temperature operation but that it is adequate for the application. Rhenium is known to form brittle intermetallics with a number of elements, and this phenomena is suspected to cause the strength degradation. Further bonding tests with a tantalum diffusion barrier between the rhenium and C-103 is planned to prevent the formation of brittle intermetallics.

  18. Conducting Reflective, Hands-On Research with Advanced Characterization Instruments: A High-Level Undergraduate Practical Exploring Solid-State Polymorphism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, S. J.; Mapp, L. K.

    2016-01-01

    An undergraduate practical exercise has been designed to provide hands-on, instrument-based experience of advanced characterization techniques. A research experience approach is taken, centered around the concept of solid-state polymorphism, which requires a detailed knowledge of molecular and crystal structure to be gained by advanced analytical…

  19. Low Erosion Ceramic Composite Liners for Improved Performance of Ablative Rocket Thrust Chambers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advanced liquid rocket propulsion systems must achieve longer burn times without performance degradation to allow the lowest cost per kilogram access to space....

  20. Temsirolimus, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-18

    Ovarian Sarcoma; Ovarian Stromal Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  1. Antithermal shield for rockets with heat evacuation by infrared radiation reflection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan RUSU

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available At high speed, the friction between the air mass and the rocket surface causes a localheating of over 1000 Celsius degrees. For the heat protection of the rocket, on its outside surfacethermal shields are installed.Studying the Coanda effect, the fluid flow on solids surface, respectively, the author Ioan Rusuhas discovered by simply researches that the Coanda effect could be /extended also to the fluid flowon discontinuous solids, namely, on solids provided with orifices. This phenomenon was named by theauthor, the expanded Coanda effect. Starting with this discovery, the author has invented a thermalshield, registered at The State Office for inventions and Trademarks OSIM, deposit F 2010 0153This thermal shield:- is built as a covering rocket sheet with many orifices installed with a minimum space fromthe rocket body- takes over the heat fluid generated by the frontal part of the rocket and avoids the directcontact between the heat fluid and the rocket body- ensures the evacuation of the infrared radiation, generated by the heat fluid flowing overthe shield because of the extended Coanda effect by reflection from the rocket bodysurface.

  2. Russian Meteorological and Geophysical Rockets of New Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yushkov, V.; Gvozdev, Yu.; Lykov, A.; Shershakov, V.; Ivanov, V.; Pozin, A.; Afanasenkov, A.; Savenkov, Yu.; Kuznetsov, V.

    2015-09-01

    To study the process in the middle and upper atmosphere, ionosphere and near-Earth space, as well as to monitor the geophysical environment in Russian Federal Service for Hydrology and Environmental Monitoring (ROSHYDROMET) the development of new generation of meteorological and geophysical rockets has been completed. The modern geophysical research rocket system MR-30 was created in Research and Production Association RPA "Typhoon". The basis of the complex MR-30 is a new geophysical sounding rocket MN-300 with solid propellant, Rocket launch takes place at an angle of 70º to 90º from the launcher, which is a farm with a guide rail type required for imparting initial rotation rocket. The Rocket is spin stabilized with a spin rate between 5 and 7 Hz. Launch weight is 1564 kg, and the mass of the payload of 50 to 150 kg. MR-300 is capable of lifting up to 300 km, while the area of dispersion points for booster falling is an ellipse with parameters 37x 60 km. The payload of the rocket MN-300 consists of two sections: a sealed, located below the instrument compartment, and not sealed, under the fairing. Block of scientific equipment is formed on the platform in a modular layout. This makes it possible to solve a wide range of tasks and conduct research and testing technologies using a unique environment of space, as well as to conduct technological experiments testing and research systems and spacecraft equipment. New Russian rocket system MERA (MEteorological Rocket for Atmospheric Research) belongs to so called "dart" technique that provide lifting of small scientific payload up to altitude 100 km and descending with parachute. It was developed at Central Aerological Observatory jointly with State Unitary Enterprise Instrument Design Bureau. The booster provides a very rapid acceleration to about Mach 5. After the burning phase of the buster the dart is separated and continues ballistic flight for about 2 minutes. The dart carries the instrument payload+ parachute

  3. Rocket plume temperature measurement by wire welded thermocouples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiang

    2006-05-01

    The plume of solid rocket motor is a high velocity flow with high temperature. Temperature distribution in the plume is of great interest for analyzing the compatibility of rocket weapon system. The high temperature exhausted flow field would cause damage on certain equipment and loading vehicles. An instantaneous temperature field with sharp step is established by the exhausted flow field of rocket motor. The increasing rate of the step depends on the flow velocity at cross section of nozzle exit. To perform an accurate measurement of temperature inside the flow field, a thermocouple must be sturdy enough to endure the flow impingement. In the meantime, the thermocouple must have a short time constant to trace the temperature fluctuation in flow field and a small size to avoid disturbing the flow field severely. The dynamic performance of the thermocouples used in exhausted flow temperature measurement must be evaluated before the experiment. The thermocouple which can be used in measuring the temperature distribution in rocket plume was presented in this paper. A NAMNAC (R) self-renew-erode thermocouples with a nominal time constant of 10 microseconds was used as a reference in a dynamic calibration test for this kind of thermocouple. The thermocouple could trace the temperature increase in the exhausted flow perfectly. This kind of thermocouples was used in several real tests of rocket motors, such as the temperature in free exhausted flow field of a stationary rocket motor test, the stagnate temperature in a shock flow field during the launching of a rocket, and the temperature in a launch tube.

  4. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Forecasting method is a normative forecasting technique that allows the designer to quantify the effects of adding new technologies on a given design. This method can be used to assess and identify the necessary technological improvements needed to close the gap that exists between the current design and one that satisfies all constraints imposed on the design. The TIF methodology allows for more design knowledge to be brought to the earlier phases of the design process, making use of tools such as Quality Function Deployments, Morphological Matrices, Response Surface Methodology, and Monte Carlo Simulations.2 This increased knowledge allows for more informed decisions to be made earlier in the design process, resulting in shortened design cycle time. This paper will investigate applying the TIF method, which has been widely used in aircraft applications, to the conceptual design of a hydrocarbon rocket engine. In order to reinstate a manned presence in space, the U.S. must develop an affordable and sustainable launch capability. Hydrocarbon-fueled rockets have drawn interest from numerous major government and commercial entities because they offer a low-cost heavy-lift option that would allow for frequent launches1. However, the development of effective new hydrocarbon rockets would likely require new technologies in order to overcome certain design constraints. The use of advanced design methods, such as the TIF method, enables the designer to identify key areas in need of improvement, allowing one to dial in a proposed technology and assess its impact on the system. Through analyses such as this one, a conceptual design for a hydrocarbon-fueled vehicle that meets all imposed requirements can be achieved.

  5. Nuclear Rocket Engine Reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lanin, Anatoly

    2013-01-01

    The development of a nuclear rocket engine reactor (NRER ) is presented in this book. The working capacity of an active zone NRER under mechanical and thermal load, intensive neutron fluxes, high energy generation (up to 30 MBT/l) in a working medium (hydrogen) at temperatures up to 3100 K is displayed. Design principles and bearing capacity of reactors area discussed on the basis of simulation experiments and test data of a prototype reactor. Property data of dense constructional, porous thermal insulating and fuel materials like carbide and uranium carbide compounds in the temperatures interval 300 - 3000 K are presented. Technological aspects of strength and thermal strength resistance of materials are considered. The design procedure of possible emergency processes in the NRER is developed and risks for their origination are evaluated. Prospects of the NRER development for pilotless space devices and piloted interplanetary ships are viewed.

  6. Rockets Sulfur, Sputnik and scramjets

    CERN Document Server

    Macinnis, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Our story starts around 700 BC when the Chinese used a form of gunpowder to fumigate their houses. The first real rockets were gunpowder filled sections of bamboo thrown under horses to scare them; the next development was to tie these to arrows. The Mongols took rockets from China to Europe where only some, including Admiral Nelson and the Crown Prince of Sweden, were impressed. The Royal Navy used them in all sorts of odd actions against ""restless natives"" in Tierra Del Fuego, Australia and New Zealand and the Russian and Austrian empires adopted rockets as alternatives to artillery in b

  7. NATO Advanced Study Institute on Hydrogen in Disordered and Amorphous Solids

    CERN Document Server

    Bowman, Robert

    1986-01-01

    This is the second volume in the NATO ASI series dealing with the topic of hydrogen in solids. The first (V. B76, Metal Hydrides) appeared five years ago and focussed primarily on crystalline phases of hydrided metallic systems. In the intervening period, the amorphous solid state has become an area of intense research activity, encompassing both metallic and non-metallic, e.g. semiconducting, systems. At the same time the problem of storage of hydrogen, which motivated the first ASI, continues to be important. In the case of metallic systems, there were early indications that metallic glasses and disordered alloys may be more corrosion resistant, less susceptible to embrittlement by hydrogen and have a higher hydrogen mobility than ordered metals or intermetallics. All of these properties are desirable for hydrogen storage. Subsequent research has shown that thermodynamic instability is a severe problem in many amorphous metal hydrides. The present ASI has provided an appropriate forum to focus on these issu...

  8. Advances in the Production of Planar and Micro-Tubular Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cologna, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Fuel cells are a very efficient way to transform the chemical energy of a fuel into electrical energy. Among the different kind of fuel cells, the solid oxide based ones (SOFC) are the most promising when cost is considered, since their high operative temperature allows the use of widely available non precious materials as catalysts. The worldwide research activity on SOFC is very active and many aspects are currently under investigation; nevertheless it is generally agreed that ...

  9. Advanced techniques of solid-state NMR spectroscopy probing local structural motifs in geopolymer systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brus, Jiří; Urbanová, Martina; Koloušek, D.

    Aveiro : European Clay Groups Association, Portuguese Clay Group, 2007 - (Rocha, F.; Terroso, D.; Quintela, A.). s. 108 ISBN 978-972-789-236-5. [European Clay Meeting Euroclay. 22.07.2007-27.07.2007, Aveiro] R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06120 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : solid-state NMR * geopolymers Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  10. Advances in research on thermal plasma treatment of low intermediate level solid radwastes from NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the disadvantages of existing treatment technologies for low intermediate level solid radwastes (LILSW) from nuclear power plants (NPPs), the mechanism and advantages of thermal plasma treatment of radwastes are introduced. The features and application of some famous systems for radwastes treatment are illustrated. The problems worthy of additional, technology difficulties as well as probable solutions to developing thermal plasma LILSW volume-reduction technology are discussed. (authors)

  11. NATO Advanced Study Institute on the Physics of Structurally Disordered Solids

    CERN Document Server

    1976-01-01

    Structurally disordered solids are characterized by their lack of spatial order that is evidenced by the great variety of ordered solids. The former class of materials is commonly termed amorphous or glassy, the latter crystalline. However, both classes share, many of the other physical properties of solids, e. g. , me­ chanical stability, resistance to shear stress, etc. The traditional macroscopic distinction between the crystalline and the glassy states is that while the former has a fixed melting point, the latter does not. However, with the availability and production of a large number of materials in both crystalline and amorphous states, and their easy inter-convertability, simple de­ finitions are not possible or at best imprecise. For the present purpose, it is sufficient to say that in contrast to the crystalline state, in which the posi­ tions of atoms are fixed into adefinite structure, ex­ cept for small thermal vibrations, the amorphous state of the same material displays varying degrees of ...

  12. World Data Center A (rockets and satellites) catalogue of data. Volume 1, part A: Sounding rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    1972-01-01

    A cumulative listing of all scientifically successful rockets that have been identified from various sources is presented. The listing starts with the V-2 rocket launched on 7 March 1947 and contains all rockets identified up to 31 December 1971.

  13. Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Alternate Propellant Thermal Rocket (APTR) is a novel concept for propulsion of space exploration or orbit transfer vehicles. APTR propulsion is provided by...

  14. Advanced liquid and solid extraction procedures for ultratrace determination of rhenium by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizera, J.; Kučera, J.; Řanda, Z.; Lučaníková, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level based on use of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and extraction chromatography (EXC) have been developed. Two different LLE procedures were used depending on the way of sample decomposition using either 2-butanone or tetraphenylarsonium chloride in CHCl3. EXC employed new solid extractant materials prepared by incorporation of the liquid trioctyl-methyl-ammonium chloride into an inert polyacrylonitrile matrix. The RNAA procedures presented have been compared and applied for Re determination in several biological and environmental reference materials.

  15. Advanced liquid and solid extraction procedures for ultratrace determination of rhenium by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiochemical neutron activation analysis (RNAA) procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level based on use of liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and extraction chromatography (EXC) have been developed. Two different LLE procedures were used depending on the way of sample decomposition using either 2-butanone or tetraphenylarsonium chloride in CHCl3. EXC employed new solid extractant materials prepared by incorporation of the liquid trialkyl-methylammonium chloride into an inert polyacrylonitrile matrix. The RNAA procedures presented have been compared and applied for Re determination in several biological and environmental reference materials. (author)

  16. Advances in Solid State Joining of Haynes 230 High Temperature Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jeff; Schneider, Judy; Walker, Bryant

    2010-01-01

    The J-2X engine is being designed for NASA s new class of crew and launch vehicles, the Ares I and Ares V. The J-2X is a LOX/Hydrogen upper stage engine with 294,000 lbs of thrust and a minimum Isp of 448 seconds. As part of the design criteria to meet the performance requirements a large film-cooled nozzle extension is being designed to further expand the hot gases and increases the specific impulse. The nozzle extension is designed using Haynes 230, a nickel-chromium-tungsten-molybdenum superalloy. The alloy was selected for its high strength at elevated temperatures and resistance to hydrogen embrittlement. The nozzle extension is manufactured from Haynes 230 plate spun-forged to form the contour and chemically-milled pockets for weight reduction. Currently fusion welding is being evaluated for joining the panels which are then mechanically etched and thinned to required dimensions for the nozzle extension blank. This blank is then spun formed into the parabolic geometry required for the nozzle. After forming the nozzle extension, weight reduction pockets are chemically milled into the nozzle. Fusion welding of Haynes results in columnar grains which are prone to hot cracking during forming processes. This restricts the ability to use spin forging to produce the nozzle contour. Solid state joining processes are being pursued as an alternative process to produce a structure more amenable to spin forming. Solid state processes have been shown to produce a refined grain structure within the joint regions as illustrated in Figure 1. Solid state joining processes include friction stir welding (FSW) and a patented modification termed thermal stir welding (TSW). The configuration of TSWing utilizes an induction coil to preheat the material minimizing the burden on the weld tool extending its life. This provides the ability to precisely select and control the temperature. The work presented in this presentation investigates the feasibility of joining the Haynes 230

  17. Veliparib, Oxaliplatin, and Capecitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas; Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach; BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ovarian Mucinous Cystadenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Colon Cancer; Recurrent Gastric Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Colon Cancer; Stage IV Gastric Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Rectal Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  18. Design manual for management of solid by-products from advanced coal technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-10-01

    Developing coal conversion technologies face major obstacles in byproduct management. This project has developed several management strategies based on field trials of small-scale landfills in an earlier phase of the project, as well as on published/unpublished sources detailing regulatory issues, current industry practice, and reuse opportunities. Field testing, which forms the basis for several of the disposal alternatives presented in this design manual, was limited to byproducts from Ca-based dry SO{sub 2} control technologies, circulating fluidized bed combustion ash, and bubbling bed fluidized bed combustion ash. Data on byproducts from other advanced coal technologies and on reuse opportunities are drawn from other sources (citations following Chapter 3). Field results from the 5 test cases examined under this project, together with results from other ongoing research, provide a basis for predictive modeling of long-term performance of some advanced coal byproducts on exposure to ambient environment. This manual is intended to provide a reference database and development plan for designing, permitting, and operating facilities where advanced coal technology byproducts are managed.

  19. Advanced broad-band solid-state supermirror polarizers for cold neutrons

    CERN Document Server

    Petukhov, A K; Bigault, T; Courtois, P; Jullien, D; Soldner, T

    2016-01-01

    An ideal solid-state supermirror (SM) neutron polarizer assumes total reflection of neutrons from the SM coating for one spin-component and total absorption for the other, thus providing a perfectly polarized neutron beam at the exit. However, in practice, the substrate's neutron-nucleai optical potential does not match perfectly that for spin-down neutrons in the SM. For a positive step in the optical potential (as in a Fe/SiN(x) SM on Si substrate), this mismatch results in spin-independent total reflection for neutrons with small momentum transfer Q, limiting the useful neutron bandwidth in the low-Q region. To overcome this limitation, we propose to replace Si single-crystal substrates by media with higher optical potential than that for spin-down neutrons in the SM ferromagnetic layers. We found single-crystal sapphire and single-crystal quartz as good candidates for solid-state Fe/SiN(x) SM polarizers. To verify this idea, we coated a thick plate of single-crystal sapphire with a m=2.4 Fe/SiN(x) SM. At ...

  20. 一种对基于耗尽关机多级固体火箭概念设计的改进方法%An Improved Method for Conceptual Design of Multi-stage Solid Rockets Based on Depleted Shutdown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何麟书; Murad.Y

    2005-01-01

    Solid propellant rocket motors are preferred for most ballistic missiles because they need simple maintenance and can be launched quickly.But the conventional thrust termination devices limit the depletion of every stage's grain and increase some extra-weight.An improved method for designing a multi-stage solid rocket based depleted shutdown was provided.In order to solve the problem of lack of thrust termination devices,a device to adjust the burnout angle will match the final burnout velocity and satisfy the desired range.The method can also limit the detection from anti-ballistic missile system.%由于维护简单和发射快速,弹道导弹多用固体火箭发动机,但繁杂的推力终止装置使各级装药不能耗尽并让结构增重.提出了一种对基于耗尽关机多级固体火箭概念设计的改进方法,此方法满足导弹系统主要的战技要求.为解决无推力终止装置的末速不准问题,可在末级发动机采用姿态调整装置,对射角进行调整,配合末速以满足射程要求.本方法还可抑制敌方反导探测.

  1. Impact of rocket exhaust plumes on atmospheric composition and climate ― an overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Ch.; Schumann, U.; Graf, K.; Gottschaldt, K.-D.

    2013-03-01

    Rockets are the only direct anthropogenic emission sources into the upper atmosphere. Gaseous rocket emissions include CO, N2, H2, H2O, and CO2, while solid rocket motors (SRM) additionally inject significant amounts of aluminum oxide (Al2O3) particles and gaseous chlorine species into the atmosphere. These emissions strongly perturb local atmospheric trace gas and aerosol distributions. Here, previous aircraft measurements in various rocket exhaust plumes including several large space shuttle launch vehicles are compiled. The observed changes of the lower stratospheric composition in the near field are summarized. The injection of chlorine species and particles into the stratosphere can lead to ozone loss in rocket exhaust plumes. Local observations are compared with global model simulations of the effects of rocket emissions on stratospheric ozone concentrations. Large uncertainties remain concerning individual ozone loss reaction rates and the impact of small-scale plume effects on global chemistry. Further, remote sensing data from satellite indicate that rocket exhaust plumes regionally increase iron and water vapor concentrations in the mesosphere potentially leading to the formation of mesospheric clouds at 80- to 90-kilometer altitude. These satellite observations are summarized and the rocket emission inventory is compared with other natural and anthropogenic sources to the stratosphere such as volcanism, meteoritic material, and aviation.

  2. Thirteenth Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. W. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    This conference publication includes various abstracts and presentations given at the 13th Workshop for Computational Fluid Dynamic Applications in Rocket Propulsion and Launch Vehicle Technology held at the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center April 25-27 1995. The purpose of the workshop was to discuss experimental and computational fluid dynamic activities in rocket propulsion and launch vehicles. The workshop was an open meeting for government, industry, and academia. A broad number of topics were discussed including computational fluid dynamic methodology, liquid and solid rocket propulsion, turbomachinery, combustion, heat transfer, and grid generation.

  3. Processing of solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides for advanced space nuclear power and propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Travis Warren

    Nuclear thermal propulsion (NTP) and space nuclear power are two enabling technologies for the manned exploration of space and the development of research outposts in space and on other planets such as Mars. Advanced carbide nuclear fuels have been proposed for application in space nuclear power and propulsion systems. This study examined the processing technologies and optimal parameters necessary to fabricate samples of single phase, solid solution, mixed uranium/refractory metal carbides. In particular, the pseudo-ternary carbide, UC-ZrC-NbC, system was examined with uranium metal mole fractions of 5% and 10% and corresponding uranium densities of 0.8 to 1.8 gU/cc. Efforts were directed to those methods that could produce simple geometry fuel elements or wafers such as those used to fabricate a Square Lattice Honeycomb (SLHC) fuel element and reactor core. Methods of cold uniaxial pressing, sintering by induction heating, and hot pressing by self-resistance heating were investigated. Solid solution, high density (low porosity) samples greater than 95% TD were processed by cold pressing at 150 MPa and sintering above 2600 K for times longer than 90 min. Some impurity oxide phases were noted in some samples attributed to residual gases in the furnace during processing. Also, some samples noted secondary phases of carbon and UC2 due to some hyperstoichiometric powder mixtures having carbon-to-metal ratios greater than one. In all, 33 mixed carbide samples were processed and analyzed with half bearing uranium as ternary carbides of UC-ZrC-NbC. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and density measurements were used to characterize samples. Samples were processed from powders of the refractory mono-carbides and UC/UC 2 or from powders of uranium hydride (UH3), graphite, and refractory metal carbides to produce hypostoichiometric mixed carbides. Samples processed from the constituent carbide powders and sintered at temperatures above the melting point of UC

  4. An open-label study to investigate the cardiac safety profile of cabazitaxel in patients with advanced solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maison-Blanche, Pierre; Dakhil, Shaker; Baron, Ari;

    2014-01-01

    : Patients with advanced solid tumors were treated with cabazitaxel 25 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks. Digital ECG recordings were obtained during Cycle 1 over 24 h after dosing. The primary end point was effect of cabazitaxel on QT interval corrected by the Fridericia formula (QTcF). Secondary end points were...... additional ECG parameters (QT, PR and QRS intervals, and heart rate), plasma pharmacokinetics of cabazitaxel and overall clinical safety. RESULTS: The pharmacodynamic (ECG) population included 94 patients. In 63 patients with a full 24-h ECG evaluation, the maximum upper bound of 90 % confidence interval (CI......PURPOSE: This study assessed the cardiovascular safety of cabazitaxel, based on thorough evaluation of QT and non-QT variables, and the relationship between pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic electrocardiographic (ECG) profiles and the occurrence of Grade ≥3 cardiovascular adverse events. METHODS...

  5. Advances in room-temperature solid-state gamma-ray spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a review and analysis of different concepts of gamma-ray spectrometry using room-temperature solid-state detectors. The classical approach involving the use of a charge-sensitive preamplifier and attempting to collect all the ionization charge produced by the gamma ray is analyzed and discussed in terms of the charge transport parameters of the most promising compound semiconductor materials. It is concluded that compound semiconductor detector materials having a large disparity between the μ tau products for electrons and holes (such as HgI2 and CdTe) will have rather poor energy resolution if the classical method of spectrometry requiring full charge collection is employed. 30 references

  6. Advanced Test Method of Solid Oxide Cells in a Plug-Flow Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard; Hauch, Anne; Hendriksen, Peter Vang;

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a case study of two electrolysis tests of solid oxide cells [Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-YSZ-lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM)/YSZ] tested in a plug-flow setup. An extensively instrumented cell test setup was used, and the tests involved measurements of the cell...... impedance at open-circuit voltage and under current load, the cell voltage, and the in-plane voltage in the electrodes. From the cell-voltage measurements it was evident that a significant passivation of the cells occurred over the first similar to 10 days. Thereafter, the cells reactivated at constant......-circuit voltage before and after electrolysis testing at various gas compositions were used to show that the Ni electrode was affected by the electrolysis operation, whereas the LSM electrode was not....

  7. Advanced methods for incineration of solid, burnable LLW and melting for recycling of scrap metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioactive contaminated waste is a great cost factor for nuclear power plants and other nuclear industry. On the deregulated electricity market the price on produced kWh is an important competition tool. Therefore the waste minimisation and volume reduction has given highest priority by many power producers in the process to achieve savings and hence low production cost. Studsvik RadWaste AB in Nykoeping, Sweden, is a company specialised in volume reduction of LLW, as solid combustible waste and as scrap metal for melting and recycling. The treatment facility in Sweden offers this kind of services - together with segmentation and decontamination when necessary - for several customers from Europe, Japan and USA. In addition to these treatment services a whole spectrum of services like transportation, measurement and safeguard, site assistance, industrial cleaning and decontamination in connection with demolition at site is offered from the Studsvik company. (orig.)

  8. Clinical Benefit in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors Treated with Modified Citrus Pectin: A Prospective Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Azémar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: We conducted a pilot trial to assess the tolerability, clinical benefit and antitumoral efficacy of modified (hydrolysed citrus pectin (MCP in 49 patients with various solid tumors in an advanced state of progression. MCP are hydrolysed from polysaccharide pectin fi bers, derived from citrus fruits and acting as a ligand for Galectin-3. Preclinical investigations revealed an efficient inhibition of tumor development and metastasis in various tumor models.Patients and Methods: The treatment consisted of the oral intake of 5 g MCP three times a day. One cycle of therapy was defined as 4 weeks of treatment. Objectives were clinical benefi t (pain, functional performance, weight change, safety, tumor response (RESIST criteria and quality of life (EORTC QLQ30.Results: 49 patients were enrolled, 29 patients were able to be evaluated for clinical benefit after 2 cycles of treatment. All patients tolerated the therapy well without any severe therapy-related adverse events. After 2 cycles of oral intake of MCP, 6/29 patients (20.7% had an overall clinical benefit response associated with a stabilization or improvement of life quality.On an intent to treat basis 11/49 patients (22,5% showed a stable disease (SD after 2 cycles and 6/49 patients (12,3% had a SD for a period longer than 24 weeks. One patient suffering from metastasized prostate carcinoma showed a 50% decrease in serum PSA level after 16 weeks of treatment associated with a significant increase of clinical benefit, quality of life and decrease in pain.Conclusion: MCP seems to have positive impacts especially regarding clinical benefit and life quality for patients with far advanced solid tumors. The presented preliminary data encourage us to further investigate the role of MCP in cancer prevention and treatment.

  9. Phase 1 study of pembrolizumab (MK-3475; anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody) in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Toshio; Seto, Takashi; Hirai, Fumihiko; Takenoyama, Mitsuhiro; Nosaki, Kaname; Tsurutani, Junji; Kaneda, Hiroyasu; Iwasa, Tsutomu; Kawakami, Hisato; Noguchi, Kazuo; Shimamoto, Takashi; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2016-06-01

    Background This phase I study evaluated the safety and tolerability, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity, and antitumor activity of pembrolizumab in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors. Methods Following an initial dose and a 28-day rest (cycle 1), pembrolizumab was administered as an intravenous infusion at escalating doses (2 or 10 mg/kg) every 2 weeks (Q2W) until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Adverse events (AEs) were assessed using CTCAE v4.0, and tumor response was assessed using both RECIST v1.1 and immune-related response criteria (irRC). Full pharmacokinetic sampling was performed during cycle 1. Results Three patients received pembrolizumab at 2.0 mg/kg and seven at 10 mg/kg. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed during cycle 1. Eighty percent of patients experienced drug-related AEs (mostly grade 1 or 2); the most common drug-related AEs were nausea, malaise, pyrexia, and aspartate aminotransferase/alanine transaminase (AST/ALT) elevations (n = 2 each). No drug-related grade 4 or 5 AEs occurred. Immune-related AEs comprised grade 3 ALT elevation (n = 1), grade 3 AST elevation (n = 1), grade 1 pneumonitis (n = 1), and grade 1 thyroid-stimulating hormone elevation (n = 1). The safety and pharmacokinetic profiles of Japanese patients were similar to those previously reported for Caucasian patients. A partial tumor response was observed in one patient with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and in one patient with melanoma. Conclusions Pembrolizumab at both 2 and 10 mg/kg Q2W was well tolerated in Japanese patients with advanced solid tumors and showed encouraging anti-tumor activity against melanoma and NSCLC. PMID:27000274

  10. 炼厂固废处理技术进展%Advances on Treating Technique for Solid Waste in Refinery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张一; 丛晓强; 姜毅; 王海燕

    2012-01-01

    石油炼制工业产生的固体废物主要来自于生产工艺本身以及污水处理设施,成分复杂,应对其进行无害化处理或综合利用。本文主要介绍了对于炼厂固废中废碱渣、废白土以及废催化剂处理技术的研究及应用进展,并提出了今后的发展方向和建议。%Solid waste from refinery, produced mostly in production process and sewage treatment facilities, was one of major wastes. They should be treated harmlessly or utilized comprehensively. The advanced treatment technology of solid wastes which included waste alkaline residue, waste clay and waste catalyst was summarized. In addition, the development trend and suggestion were put forward.

  11. Rocket Science 101 Interactive Educational Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Dennis; Funkhouse, Deborah; DiMarzio, Donald

    2007-01-01

    To better educate the public on the basic design of NASA s current mission rockets, Rocket Science 101 software has been developed as an interactive program designed to retain a user s attention and to teach about basic rocket parts. This program also has helped to expand NASA's presence on the Web regarding educating the public about the Agency s goals and accomplishments. The software was designed using Macromedia s Flash 8. It allows the user to select which type of rocket they want to learn about, interact with the basic parts, assemble the parts to create the whole rocket, and then review the basic flight profile of the rocket they have built.

  12. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design

  13. Advanced conceptual design report solid waste retrieval facility, phase I, project W-113

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, K.E.

    1994-03-21

    Project W-113 will provide the equipment and facilities necessary to retrieve suspect transuranic (TRU) waste from Trench 04 of the 218W-4C burial ground. As part of the retrieval process, waste drums will be assayed, overpacked, vented, head-gas sampled, and x-rayed prior to shipment to the Phase V storage facility in preparation for receipt at the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP). Advanced Conceptual Design (ACD) studies focused on project items warranting further definition prior to Title I design and areas where the potential for cost savings existed. This ACD Report documents the studies performed during FY93 to optimize the equipment and facilities provided in relation to other SWOC facilities and to provide additional design information for Definitive Design.

  14. Advances in adsorption of surfactants and their mixtures at solid/solution interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Somasundaran, P

    2006-11-16

    Surfactants and their mixtures can drastically change the interfacial properties and hence are used in many industrial processes such as dispersion/flocculation, flotation, emulsification, corrosion inhibition, cosmetics, drug delivery, chemical mechanical polishing, enhanced oil recovery, and nanolithography. A review of studies on adsorption of single surfactant as well as mixtures of various types (anionic-cationic, anionic-nonionic, cationic-nonionic, cationic-zwitterionic and nonionic-nonionic) is presented here along with mechanisms involved. Results obtained using techniques such as zeta potential, flotation, AFM, specular neutron reflectivity, small angle neutron scattering, fluorescence, ESR, Raman spectroscopy, ellipsometry, HPLC and ATR-IR are reviewed along with those from traditional techniques to elucidate the mechanisms of adsorption and particularly to understand synergistic/antagonistic interactions at solution/liquid interfaces and nanostructures of surface aggregates. In addition, adsorption of several mixed surfactant systems is considered due to their industrial relevance. Finally an attempt is made to derive structure-property relationships to provide a solid foundation for the design and use of surfactant formulations for industrial applications. PMID:17052678

  15. Gamma-Secretase Inhibitor RO4929097 and Cediranib Maleate in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-22

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Solid Neoplasm; Male Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Adult Brain Neoplasm; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Colon Carcinoma; Recurrent Melanoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Carcinoma; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pancreatic Carcinoma; Recurrent Rectal Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Pancreatic Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma; Stage IVA Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Rectal Cancer; Stage IVB Colon Cancer; Stage IVB Rectal Cancer

  16. Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies Program Material Development Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.; Stropki, M.; Cleyrat, D.; Stucke, B.; Phillips, S.; Reed, B.

    2001-01-01

    In this viewgraph presentation, IMWG (IHPRPT Materials Working Group) government and industry members, together with the IHPRPT (Integrated High Payoff Rocket Propulsion Technologies Program Material Development Plan) National Component Leads, have developed a materials plan to address the critical needs of the IHPRPT community: (1) liquids boost and orbit transfer; (2) solids boost and orbit transfer; (3) tactical propulsion; and (4) spacecraft propulsion. Criticality of materials' role in achieving IHPRPT goals is evidenced by the significant investment over the next five years.

  17. Orbital transfer rocket engine technology 7.5K-LB thrust rocket engine preliminary design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harmon, T. J.; Roschak, E.

    1993-01-01

    A preliminary design of an advanced LOX/LH2 expander cycle rocket engine producing 7,500 lbf thrust for Orbital Transfer vehicle missions was completed. Engine system, component and turbomachinery analysis at both on design and off design conditions were completed. The preliminary design analysis results showed engine requirements and performance goals were met. Computer models are described and model outputs are presented. Engine system assembly layouts, component layouts and valve and control system analysis are presented. Major design technologies were identified and remaining issues and concerns were listed.

  18. Development of Advanced LED Phosphors by Spray-based Processes for Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabot Corporation

    2007-09-30

    The overarching goal of the project was to develop luminescent materials using aerosol processes for making improved LED devices for solid state lighting. In essence this means improving white light emitting phosphor based LEDs by improvement of the phosphor and phosphor layer. The structure of these types of light sources, displayed in Figure 1, comprises of a blue or UV LED under a phosphor layer that converts the blue or UV light to a broad visible (white) light. Traditionally, this is done with a blue emitting diode combined with a blue absorbing, broadly yellow emitting phosphor such as Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce (YAG). A similar result may be achieved by combining a UV emitting diode and at least three different UV absorbing phosphors: red, green, and blue emitting. These emitted colors mix to make white light. The efficiency of these LEDs is based on the combined efficiency of the LED, phosphor, and the interaction between the two. The Cabot SSL project attempted to improve the over all efficiency of the LED light source be improving the efficiency of the phosphor and the interaction between the LED light and the phosphor. Cabot's spray based process for producing phosphor powders is able to improve the brightness of the powder itself by increasing the activator (the species that emits the light) concentration without adverse quenching effects compared to conventional synthesis. This will allow less phosphor powder to be used, and will decrease the cost of the light source; thus lowering the barrier of entry to the lighting market. Cabot's process also allows for chemical flexibility of the phosphor particles, which may result in tunable emission spectra and so light sources with improved color rendering. Another benefit of Cabot's process is the resulting spherical morphology of the particles. Less light scattering results when spherical particles are used in the phosphor layer (Figure 1) compared to when conventional, irregular shaped

  19. Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

    2012-06-01

    A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

  20. Improvements in a tracer - encapsulated solid pellet and its injector for more advanced plasma diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although we are facing the age of the International Thermonuclear Experiment Reactor (ITER), many physics issues related to the confinement of magnetically-confined toroidal plasma still remain to be clarified. For example, under some conditions, impurities inside the magnetically-confined toroidal plasma tend to accumulate into the core region of the plasma. This will cause a dilution of fusion fuel. Moreover, a radiation loss from the core plasma will be enhanced due to the impurity accumulation, and then the temperature in the core region will be decreased dramatically. Consequently, fusion plasma performance will be degraded below the acceptable level. In order to develop strategy for obviating and suppressing the impurity accumulation, it is significantly important to gain a full understanding of the impurity transport in the magnetically-confined toroidal plasma. In consideration of such a situation, we have developed a Tracer-Encapsulated Solid Pellet (TESPEL) for promoting a precise study of the impurity transport. To put it plainly, the TESPEL is a double-layered impurity pellet. This form enables us to produce a both poloidally and toroidally localized 'tracer' impurity source in the plasma, and to specify the total amount of the tracer impurity deposited in the plasma precisely. In this contribution, we introduce new-type TESPELs, which are greatly improved in regard to the above-mentioned features. Owing to this improvement, we have achieved a shallower penetration of the TESPEL into the plasma with sufficient quantities of the tracer particles, which can be measured with the existing diagnostics. In addition, we also introduce a new TESPEL injector, which enables us to inject the TESPEL obliquely into the plasma. This injector can also contribute to a further shallower penetration of the TESPEL into the plasma. Moreover, we will discuss a future strategy of the TESPEL in the research of fusion plasma and plasma application. (author)

  1. A new class of solid oxide metal-air redox batteries for advanced stationary energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuan

    Cost-effective and large-scale energy storage technologies are a key enabler of grid modernization. Among energy storage technologies currently being researched, developed and deployed, rechargeable batteries are unique and important that can offer a myriad of advantages over the conventional large scale siting- and geography- constrained pumped-hydro and compressed-air energy storage systems. However, current rechargeable batteries still need many breakthroughs in material optimization and system design to become commercially viable for stationary energy storage. This PhD research project investigates the energy storage characteristics of a new class of rechargeable solid oxide metal-air redox batteries (SOMARBs) that combines a regenerative solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) and hydrogen chemical-looping component. The RSOFC serves as the "electrical functioning unit", alternating between the fuel cell and electrolysis mode to realize discharge and charge cycles, respectively, while the hydrogen chemical-looping component functions as an energy storage unit (ESU), performing electrical-chemical energy conversion in situ via a H2/H2O-mediated metal/metal oxide redox reaction. One of the distinctive features of the new battery from conventional storage batteries is the ESU that is physically separated from the electrodes of RSOFC, allowing it to freely expand and contract without impacting the mechanical integrity of the entire battery structure. This feature also allows an easy switch in the chemistry of this battery. The materials selection for ESU is critical to energy capacity, round-trip efficiency and cost effectiveness of the new battery. Me-MeOx redox couples with favorable thermodynamics and kinetics are highly preferable. The preliminary theoretical analysis suggests that Fe-based redox couples can be a promising candidate for operating at both high and low temperatures. Therefore, the Fe-based redox-couple systems have been selected as the baseline for this

  2. Additive Manufacturing a Liquid Hydrogen Rocket Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Carl P.; Robertson, Elizabeth H.; Koelbl, Mary Beth; Singer, Chris

    2016-01-01

    Space Propulsion is a 5 day event being held from 2nd May to the 6th May 2016 at the Rome Marriott Park Hotel in Rome, Italy. This event showcases products like Propulsion sub-systems and components, Production and manufacturing issues, Liquid, Solid, Hybrid and Air-breathing Propulsion Systems for Launcher and Upper Stages, Overview of current programmes, AIV issues and tools, Flight testing and experience, Technology building blocks for Future Space Transportation Propulsion Systems : Launchers, Exploration platforms & Space Tourism, Green Propulsion for Space Transportation, New propellants, Rocket propulsion & global environment, Cost related aspects of Space Transportation propulsion, Modelling, Pressure-Thrust oscillations issues, Impact of new requirements and regulations on design etc. in the Automotive, Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance industries.

  3. Principles, techniques and recent advances in fine particle aggregation for solid-liquid separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waste water discharged from various chemical and nuclear processing operations contains dissolved metal species that are highly toxic and, in some cases, radioactive. When the waste is acidic in nature, neutralization using reagents such as lime is commonly practiced to reduce both the acidity and the amount of waste (Kuyucak et al.). The sludge that results from the neutralization process contains metal oxide or hydroxide precipitates that are colloidal in nature and is highly stable. Destabilization of colloidal suspensions can be achieved by aggregation of fines into larger sized agglomerates. Aggregation of fines is a complex phenomenon involving a multitude of forces that control the interparticle interaction. In order to understand the colloidal behavior of suspensions a fundamental knowledge of physicochemical properties that determine the various forces is essential. In this review, a discussion of basic principles governing the aggregation of colloidal fines, various ways in which interparticle forces can be manipulated to achieve the desired aggregation response and recent advances in experimental techniques to probe the interfacial characteristics that control the flocculation behavior are discussed

  4. Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ORBITEC proposes to develop and demonstrate an Integrated Composite Rocket Nozzle Extension (ICRNE) for use in rocket thrust chambers. The ICRNE will utilize an...

  5. 3-AP and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    -cell Leukemia/Lymphoma; Stage IV Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Waldenström Macroglobulinemia

  6. Small rocket research and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Steven; Biaglow, James

    1993-01-01

    Small chemical rockets are used on nearly all space missions. The small rocket program provides propulsion technology for civil and government space systems. Small rocket concepts are developed for systems which encompass reaction control for launch and orbit transfer systems, as well as on-board propulsion for large space systems and earth orbit and planetary spacecraft. Major roles for on-board propulsion include apogee kick, delta-V, de-orbit, drag makeup, final insertions, north-south stationkeeping, orbit change/trim, perigee kick, and reboost. The program encompasses efforts on earth-storable, space storable, and cryogenic propellants. The earth-storable propellants include nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) as an oxidizer with monomethylhydrazine (MMH) or anhydrous hydrazine (AH) as fuels. The space storable propellants include liquid oxygen (LOX) as an oxidizer with hydrazine or hydrocarbons such as liquid methane, ethane, and ethanol as fuels. Cryogenic propellants are LOX or gaseous oxygen (GOX) as oxidizers and liquid or gaseous hydrogen as fuels. Improved performance and lifetime for small chemical rockets are sought through the development of new predictive tools to understand the combustion and flow physics, the introduction of high temperature materials to eliminate fuel film cooling and its associated combustion inefficiency, and improved component designs to optimize performance. Improved predictive technology is sought through the comparison of both local and global predictions with experimental data. Results indicate that modeling of the injector and combustion process in small rockets needs improvement. High temperature materials require the development of fabrication processes, a durability data base in both laboratory and rocket environments, and basic engineering property data such as strength, creep, fatigue, and work hardening properties at both room and elevated temperature. Promising materials under development include iridium-coated rhenium and a

  7. Rocket Locations for Minimum Time Interception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1971-07-01

    Full Text Available Interception of target rocket moving along a trajectory in a gravitational field by an interceptor rocket has been analysed to achieve interception in minimum time duration. Numerical values of the parameters of the intercepting trajectory and locations of the target rocket for launch and target orbits in Earth's gravitational field have been calculated for different impulsive velocity changes applied to the interceptor rocket.

  8. Effects of low-fat and high-fat meals on steady-state pharmacokinetics of lapatinib in patients with advanced solid tumours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Devriese, Lot A; Koch, Kevin M; Mergui-Roelvink, Marja; Matthys, Gemma M; Ma, Wen Wee; Robidoux, Andre; Stephenson, Joe J; Chu, Quincy S C; Orford, Keith W; Cartee, Leanne; Botbyl, Jeff; Arya, Nikita; Schellens, Jan H M

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To quantify the effect of food on the systemic exposure of lapatinib at steady state when administered 1 h before and after meals, and to observe the safety and tolerability of lapatinib under these conditions in patients with advanced solid tumours. METHODS: This was a three-treatment, randomi

  9. Implementation of microwave transmissions for rocket exhaust plume diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutu, Nicholas George

    Rocket-launched vehicles produce a trail of exhaust that contains ions, free electrons, and soot. The exhaust plume increases the effective conductor length of the rocket. A conductor in the presence of an electric field (e.g. near the electric charge stored within a cloud) can channel an electric discharge. The electrical conductivity of the exhaust plume is related to its concentration of free electrons. The risk of a lightning strike in-flight is a function of both the conductivity of the body and its effective length. This paper presents an approach that relates the electron number density of the exhaust plume to its propagation constant. Estimated values of the collision frequency and electron number density generated from a numerical simulation of a rocket plume are used to guide the design of the experimental apparatus. Test par meters are identified for the apparatus designed to transmit a signal sweep form 4 GHz to 7 GHz through the exhaust plume of a J-class solid rocket motor. Measurements of the scattering parameters imply that the transmission does not penetrate the plume, but instead diffracts around it. The electron density 20 cm downstream from the nozzle exit is estimated to be between 2.7x1014 m--3 and 5.6x10 15 m--3.

  10. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motors and plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, R. C.; Saladino, A. J.

    1993-01-01

    The three commonly used propellant systems - H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants - primarily radiate as molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles, and scattering larger particles, respectively. Present technology has accepted the uncoupling of the radiation analysis from that of the flowfield. This approximation becomes increasingly inaccurate as one considers plumes, interior rocket chambers, and nuclear rocket propulsion devices. This study will develop a hierarchy of methods which will address radiation/convection coupling in all of the aforementioned propulsion systems. The nature of the radiation/convection coupled problem is that the divergence of the radiative heat flux must be included in the energy equation and that the local, volume-averaged intensity of the radiation must be determined by a solution of the radiative transfer equation (RTE). The intensity is approximated by solving the RTE along several lines of sight (LOS) for each point in the flowfield. Such a procedure is extremely costly; therefore, further approximations are needed. Modified differential approximations are being developed for this purpose. It is not obvious which order of approximations are required for a given rocket motor analysis. Therefore, LOS calculations have been made for typical rocket motor operating conditions in order to select the type approximations required. The results of these radiation calculations, and the interpretation of these intensity predictions are presented herein.

  11. The Swedish Rocket Corps, 1833 - 1845

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoog, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    Rockets for pyrotechnic displays used in Sweden in the 19th century are examined in terms of their use in war situations. Work done by the Swedish chemist J. J. Berzelius, who analyzed and improved the propellants of such rockets, and the German engineer, Martin Westermaijer, who researched manufacturing techniques of these rockets is also included.

  12. Summarization on variable liquid thrust rocket engines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The technology actuality and development trend of variable thrust rocket engines at home and abroad are summarized. Key technologies of developing variable thrust rocket engines are analyzed. Development advices on developing variable thrust rocket engines that are adapted to the situation of our country are brought forward.

  13. A phase I pharmacokinetic study of ursolic acid nanoliposomes in healthy volunteers and patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying G

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Zhongling Zhu,1,4 Zhengzi Qian,2,4 Zhao Yan,1,4 Cuicui Zhao,2,4 Huaqing Wang,2,4 Guoguang Ying3,41Department of Clinical Pharmacology, 2Department of Lymphoma, 3Laboratory of Tumor Cell Biology, Tianjin Medical University Cancer Institute and Hospital, Tianjin, People's Republic of China; 4Key Laboratory of Cancer Prevention and Therapy, Tianjin, People’s Republic of ChinaBackground: Ursolic acid is a promising anticancer agent. The current study aims to evaluate the single- and multiple-dose pharmacokinetics (PK as well as the safety of ursolic acid nanoliposomes (UANL in healthy volunteers and in patients with advanced solid tumors.Methods: Twenty-four healthy volunteers in the single-dose PK study were divided into three different groups, which received 37, 74, and 98 mg/m2 of UANL. Eight patients in the multiple-dose PK study were administered with 74 mg/m2 of UANL daily for 14 days. The UA plasma concentrations were determined using ultra-performance liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry.Results: The plasma concentration profiles of all subjects were characterized by a biexponential decline after infusion. The mean peak plasma concentration (Cmax increased linearly as a function of the dose (r = 0.999. The mean area under the plasma concentration-time curve (AUC from 0 to 16 hours also increased proportionally with dose escalation (r = 0.998. However, the clearance was constant over the specific dose interval. In the multiple-dose PK study, the trough and average concentrations remained low. The mean AUC, half-life, Cmax, time to Cmax, and the volume of distribution on the first day were similar to those on the last day. All subjects tolerated the treatments well. Most UANL-associated adverse events varied from mild to moderate.Conclusions: UANL exhibits relatively linear PK behavior with dose levels from 37 mg/m2 to 98 mg/m2. No drug accumulation was observed with repeated doses of UANL. The intravenous infusion of UANL was well

  14. Analytical concepts for health management systems of liquid rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Richard; Tulpule, Sharayu; Hawman, Michael

    1990-01-01

    Substantial improvement in health management systems performance can be realized by implementing advanced analytical methods of processing existing liquid rocket engine sensor data. In this paper, such techniques ranging from time series analysis to multisensor pattern recognition to expert systems to fault isolation models are examined and contrasted. The performance of several of these methods is evaluated using data from test firings of the Space Shuttle main engines.

  15. Rocket Ignition Demonstrations Using Silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Sibtosh; Santoro, Robert; Watkins, William B.; Kincaid, Kevin

    1998-01-01

    Rocket ignition demonstration tests using silane were performed at the Penn State Combustion Research Laboratory. A heat sink combustor with one injection element was used with gaseous propellants. Mixtures of silane and hydrogen were used as fuel, and oxygen was used as oxidizer. Reliable ignition was demonstrated using fuel lead and and a swirl injection element.

  16. On pressure rise in rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Gupta

    1954-07-01

    Full Text Available The phenomenon of pressure rise in rockets has been discussed on the basis of r=CP/Sup/n as the law of burning. An explicit expression for the chamber pressure at any instant has been derived and illustrated by a table and a graph.

  17. Centrifugal pumps for rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, W. E.; Farquhar, J.

    1974-01-01

    The use of centrifugal pumps for rocket engines is described in terms of general requirements of operational and planned systems. Hydrodynamic and mechanical design considerations and techniques and test procedures are summarized. Some of the pump development experiences, in terms of both problems and solutions, are highlighted.

  18. Pegasus Rocket Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    A small, desk-top model of Orbital Sciences Corporation's Pegasus winged rocket booster. Pegasus is an air-launched space booster produced by Orbital Sciences Corporation and Hercules Aerospace Company (initially; later, Alliant Tech Systems) to provide small satellite users with a cost-effective, flexible, and reliable method for placing payloads into low earth orbit. Pegasus has been used to launch a number of satellites and the PHYSX experiment. That experiment consisted of a smooth glove installed on the first-stage delta wing of the Pegasus. The glove was used to gather data at speeds of up to Mach 8 and at altitudes approaching 200,000 feet. The flight took place on October 22, 1998. The PHYSX experiment focused on determining where boundary-layer transition occurs on the glove and on identifying the flow mechanism causing transition over the glove. Data from this flight-research effort included temperature, heat transfer, pressure measurements, airflow, and trajectory reconstruction. Hypersonic flight-research programs are an approach to validate design methods for hypersonic vehicles (those that fly more than five times the speed of sound, or Mach 5). Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards, California, provided overall management of the glove experiment, glove design, and buildup. Dryden also was responsible for conducting the flight tests. Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia, was responsible for the design of the aerodynamic glove as well as development of sensor and instrumentation systems for the glove. Other participating NASA centers included Ames Research Center, Mountain View, California; Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland; and Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Orbital Sciences Corporation, Dulles, Virginia, is the manufacturer of the Pegasus vehicle, while Vandenberg Air Force Base served as a pre-launch assembly facility for the launch that included the PHYSX experiment. NASA used data from Pegasus launches to obtain considerable

  19. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: Application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Meaghan E.; Brown, Leonid S.; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors.

  20. Advanced solid-state NMR techniques for characterization of membrane protein structure and dynamics: application to Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Meaghan E; Brown, Leonid S; Ladizhansky, Vladimir

    2015-04-01

    Studies of the structure, dynamics, and function of membrane proteins (MPs) have long been considered one of the main applications of solid-state NMR (SSNMR). Advances in instrumentation, and the plethora of new SSNMR methodologies developed over the past decade have resulted in a number of high-resolution structures and structural models of both bitopic and polytopic α-helical MPs. The necessity to retain lipids in the sample, the high proportion of one type of secondary structure, differential dynamics, and the possibility of local disorder in the loop regions all create challenges for structure determination. In this Perspective article we describe our recent efforts directed at determining the structure and functional dynamics of Anabaena Sensory Rhodopsin, a heptahelical transmembrane (7TM) protein. We review some of the established and emerging methods which can be utilized for SSNMR-based structure determination, with a particular focus on those used for ASR, a bacterial protein which shares its 7TM architecture with G-protein coupled receptors. PMID:25637099

  1. Attitude Dynamics of a Spinning Rocket with Internal Fluid Whirling Motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marius Ionut MARMUREANU

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper evaluates the impact that helical motion of fluid products of combustion within the combustion chamber of a rocket can have on the attitude dynamics of rocket systems. By developing the study presented by Sookgaew (2004, we determined the configuration of the Coriolis moment components, which catch the impact of the combustion product’s whirling motion, for the radial and centripetal propellant burn pattern specific to S-5M and S-5K solid rocket motors. We continue the investigation of the effects of internal whirling motion of fluid products of combustion on the attitude behavior of variable mass systems of the rocket type by examining the spin motion and transverse attitude motion of such systems. The results obtained show that internal fluid whirling motion can cause appreciable deviations in spin rate predictions, and also affects the frequencies of the transverse angular velocity components.

  2. Contrail formation in the tropopause region caused by emissions from an Ariane 5 rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, Ch.; Schumann, U.; Graf, K.

    2016-07-01

    Rockets directly inject water vapor and aerosol into the atmosphere, which promotes the formation of ice clouds in ice supersaturated layers of the atmosphere. Enhanced mesospheric cloud occurrence has frequently been detected near 80-kilometer altitude a few days after rocket launches. Here, unique evidence for cirrus formation in the tropopause region caused by ice nucleation in the exhaust plume from an Ariane 5-ECA rocket is presented. Meteorological reanalysis data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts show significant ice supersaturation at the 100-hectopascal level in the American tropical tropopause region on November 26, 2011. Near 17-kilometer altitudes, the temperatures are below the Schmidt-Appleman threshold temperature for rocket condensation trail formation on that day. Immediately after the launch from the Ariane 5-ECA at 18:39 UT (universal time) from Kourou, French Guiana, the formation of a rocket contrail is detected in the high resolution visible channel from the SEVIRI (Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager) on the METEOSAT9 satellite. The rocket contrail is transported to the south and its dispersion is followed in SEVIRI data for almost 2 h. The ice crystals predominantly nucleated on aluminum oxide particles emitted by the Ariane 5-ECA solid booster and further grow by uptake of water vapor emitted from the cryogenic main stage and entrained from the ice supersaturated ambient atmosphere. After rocket launches, the formation of rocket contrails can be a frequent phenomenon under ice supersaturated conditions. However, at present launch rates, the global climate impact from rocket contrail cirrus in the tropopause region is small.

  3. Development of high performance hybrid rocket fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaseck, Christopher R.

    In this document I discuss paraffin fuel combustion and investigate the effects of additives on paraffin entrainment and regression. In general, hybrid rockets offer an economical and safe alternative to standard liquid and solid rockets. However, slow polymeric fuel regression and low combustion efficiency have limited the commercial use of hybrid rockets. Paraffin is a fast burning fuel that has received significant attention in the 2000's and 2010's as a replacement for standard fuels. Paraffin regresses three to four times faster than polymeric fuels due to the entrainment of a surface melt layer. However, further regression rate enhancement over the base paraffin fuel is necessary for widespread hybrid rocket adoption. I use a small scale opposed flow burner to investigate the effect of additives on the combustion of paraffin. Standard additives such as aluminum combust above the flame zone where sufficient oxidizer levels are present. As a result no heat is generated below the flame itself. In small scale opposed burner experiments the effect of limited heat feedback is apparent. Aluminum in particular does not improve the regression of paraffin in the opposed burner. The lack of heat feedback from additive combustion limits the applicability of the opposed burner. In turn, the results obtained in the opposed burner with metal additive loaded hybrid fuels do not match results from hybrid rocket experiments. In addition, nano-scale aluminum increases melt layer viscosity and greatly slows the regression of paraffin in the opposed flow burner. However, the reactive additives improve the regression rate of paraffin in the opposed burner where standard metals do not. At 5 wt.% mechanically activated titanium and carbon (Ti-C) improves the regression rate of paraffin by 47% in the opposed burner. The mechanically activated Ti C likely reacts in or near the melt layer and provides heat feedback below the flame region that results in faster opposed burner regression

  4. The Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory at Caltech and the creation of the modern rocket motor (1936-1946): How the dynamics of rocket theory became reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibit, Benjamin Seth

    This thesis explores and unfolds the story of discovery in rocketry at The California Institute of Technology---specifically at Caltech's Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory---in the 1930s and 1940s. Caltech was home to a small group of engineering students and experimenters who, beginning in the winter of 1935--1936, formed a study and research team destined to change the face of rocket science in the United States. The group, known as the Guggenheim Aeronautics Laboratory (GALCIT, for short) Rocket Research Group, invented a new type of solid-rocket propellant, made distinct and influential discoveries in the theory of rocket combustion and design, founded the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and incorporated the first American industrial concern devoted entirely to rocket motor production: The Aerojet Corporation. The theoretical work of team members, Frank Malina, Hsueh-shen Tsien, Homer J. Stewart, and Mark Mills, is examined in this thesis in detail. The author scrutinizes Frank Malina's doctoral thesis (both its assumptions and its mathematics), and finds that, although Malina's key assertions, his formulae, hold, his work is shown to make key assumptions about rocket dynamics which only stand the test of validity if certain approximations, rather than exact measurements, are accepted. Malina studied the important connection between motor-nozzle design and thrust; in his Ph.D. thesis, he developed mathematical statements which more precisely defined the design/thrust relation. One of Malina's colleagues on the Rocket Research Team, John Whiteside Parsons, created a new type of solid propellant in the winter of 1941--1942. This propellant, known as a composite propellant (because it simply was a relatively inert amalgam of propellant and oxidizer in non-powder form), became the forerunner of all modern solid propellants, and has become one of the seminal discoveries in the field of Twentieth Century rocketry. The latter chapters of this dissertation discuss the

  5. Greenhouse gas accounting of the proposed landfill extension and advanced incineration facility for municipal solid waste management in Hong Kong

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The burgeoning of municipal solid waste (MSW) disposal issue and climate change have drawn massive attention from people. On the one hand, Hong Kong is facing a controversial debate over the implementation of proposed landfill extension (LFE) and advanced incineration facility (AIF) to curb the MSW disposal issue. On the other hand, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region Government is taking concerted efforts to reduce the carbon intensity in this region. This paper discusses the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from four proposed waste disposal scenarios, covering the proposed LFE and AIF within a defined system boundary. On the basis of the data collected, assumptions made, and system boundary defined in this study, the results indicate that AIF releases less GHG emissions than LFE. The GHG emissions from LFE are highly contributed by the landfill methane (CH4) emissions but offset by biogenic carbon storage, while the GHG emissions from AIF are mostly due to the stack discharge system but offset by the energy recovery system. Furthermore, parametric sensitivity analyses show that GHG emissions are strongly dependent on the landfill CH4 recovery rate, types of electricity displaced by energy recovery systems, and the heating value of MSW, altering the order of preferred waste disposal scenarios. This evaluation provides valuable insights into the applicability of a policy framework for MSW management practices in reducing GHG emissions. Highlights: • AIF is better than LFE with regard to GHG emissions in Hong Kong. • Major individual sub-processes of LFE and AIF for GHG emissions are investigated. • GHG emissions for LFE and AIF are strongly dependent on studied parametric sensitivity analyses. • Findings are valuable for sustainable MSW management and GHG reductions in waste sector

  6. Effect of food on the pharmacokinetics of TAS-102 and its efficacy and safety in patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Takayuki; Kojima, Takashi; Bando, Hideaki; Yamazaki, Tomoko; Naito, Yoichi; Mukai, Hirofumi; Fuse, Nozomu; Goto, Koichi; Ito, Yuko; Doi, Toshihiko; Ohtsu, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    TAS-102, a novel oral antitumor agent, consists of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride (molar ratio, 1:0.5). We investigated the effects of food on trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride. The efficacy and safety of TAS-102 were evaluated in patients with advanced solid tumors. We analyzed drug pharmacokinetics using a randomized, single-dose, two-treatment (fed versus fasting), two-period, two-sequence cross-over design, followed by repeated administration. Patients were given single doses of TAS-102 (35 mg/m(2) ) in the pharmacokinetic phase and received twice-daily doses of TAS-102 in 28-day cycles in the repeated administration phase for evaluating efficacy and safety. Food showed no effect on the area under the curve from 0 to 12 h or 0 h-infinity values of trifluridine following administration of TAS-102 under fasting and fed conditions, whereas those of tipiracil hydrochloride decreased by approximately 40%. Maximum concentrations of both drugs decreased by approximately 40%, indicating that food influenced the absorption and bioavailability of trifluridine and tipiracil hydrochloride, respectively. During the repeated administration, stable disease was observed in nine patients with rectal, small-cell lung, breast, thymic, duodenal, and prostate cancers. Major adverse events were neutropenia, leukopenia, anemia, and nausea. Postprandial administration was optimal for TAS-102 because trifluridine's area under the curve was not changed by food, indicating that its clinical efficacy would not be affected. Additionally, postprandial administration was reasonable because the maximum concentration of trifluridine decreased in neutrophils, which correlated with previous studies. These results suggest that TAS-102 would be an effective treatment for small-cell lung, thymic, and colorectal cancers. This trial is registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (no. JapicCTI-111482). PMID:26918279

  7. NCCAM/NCI Phase 1 Study of Mistletoe Extract and Gemcitabine in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J. Mansky

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. European Mistletoe (Viscum album L. extracts (mistletoe are commonly used for cancer treatment in Europe. This phase I study of gemcitabine (GEM and mistletoe in advanced solid cancers (ASC evaluated: (1 safety, toxicity, and maximum tolerated dose (MTD, (2 absolute neutrophil count (ANC recovery, (3 formation of mistletoe lectin antibodies (ML ab, (4 cytokine plasma concentrations, (5 clinical response, and (6 pharmacokinetics of GEM. Methods. Design: increasing mistletoe and fixed GEM dose in stage I and increasing doses of GEM with a fixed dose of mistletoe in stage II. Dose limiting toxicities (DLT were grade (G 3 nonhematologic and G4 hematologic events; MTD was reached with 2 DLTs in one dosage level. Response in stage IV ASC was assessed with descriptive statistics. Statistical analyses examined clinical response/survival and ANC recovery. Results. DLTs were G4 neutropenia, G4 thrombocytopenia, G4 acute renal failure, and G3 cellulitis, attributed to mistletoe. GEM 1380 mg/m2 and mistletoe 250 mg combined were the MTD. Of 44 patients, 24 developed nonneutropenic fever and flu-like syndrome. GEM pharmacokinetics were unaffected by mistletoe. All patients developed ML3 IgG antibodies. ANC showed a trend to increase between baseline and cycle 2 in stage I dose escalation. 6% of patients showed partial response, 42% stable disease. Median survival was 200 days. Compliance with mistletoe injections was high. Conclusion. GEM plus mistletoe is well tolerated. No botanical/drug interactions were observed. Clinical response is similar to GEM alone.

  8. Eltrombopag with gemcitabine-based chemotherapy in patients with advanced solid tumors: a randomized phase I study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preventing chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia could avoid chemotherapy dose reductions and delays. The safety and maximum tolerated dose of eltrombopag, an oral thrombopoietin receptor agonist, with gemcitabine-based therapy was evaluated. Patients with advanced solid tumors and platelets ≤300 × 109/L receiving gemcitabine plus cisplatin or carboplatin (Group A) or gemcitabine monotherapy (Group B) were randomized 3:1 to receive eltrombopag or placebo at a starting dose of 100 mg daily administered on days −5 to −1 and days 2–6 starting from cycle 2 of treatment. Nineteen patients (Group A, n = 9; Group B, n = 10) received eltrombopag 100 mg and seven (Group A, n = 3; Group B, n = 4) received matching placebo. Nine eltrombopag patients in Group A and eight in Group B had 38 and 54 occurrences of platelet counts ≥400 × 109/L, respectively. Mean platelet nadirs across cycles 2–6 were 115 × 109/L and 143 × 109/L for eltrombopag-treated patients versus 53 × 109/L and 103 × 109/L for placebo-treated patients in Groups A and B, respectively. No dose-limiting toxicities were reported for eltrombopag; however, due to several occurrences of thrombocytosis, a decision was made not to dose-escalate eltrombopag to >100 mg daily. In Groups A and B, 14% of eltrombopag versus 50% of placebo patients required chemotherapy dose reductions and/or delays for any reason across cycles 3–6. Eltrombopag 100 mg once daily administered 5 days before and after day 1 of chemotherapy was well tolerated with an acceptable safety profile, and will be further tested in a phase II trial. Fewer patients receiving eltrombopag required chemotherapy dose delays and/or reductions compared with those receiving placebo

  9. Modeling bidirectional radiance measurements collected by the advanced solid-state array spectroradiometer (ASAS) over Oregon transect conifer forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A geometric-optical model of the bidirectional reflectance of a forest canopy, developed by Li and Strahler, fits observed directional radiance measurements with good accuracy. This model treats the forest cover as a scene of discrete, three-dimensional objects (trees) that are illuminated and viewed from different positions in the hemisphere. The shapes of the objects, their count densities and patterns of placement, are the driving variables, and they condition the mixture of sunlit and shaded objects and background that are observed from a particular viewing direction, given a direction of illumination. This mixture, in turn, controls the brightness apparent to an observer or a radiometric instrument. The Advanced Solid-State Array Spectroradiometer (ASAS) was used to validate this model. This aircraft sensor presently acquires images in 29 spectral bands in the range (465–871 nm) and is pointable fore-and-aft, allowing directional measurements of radiance as a target is approached and imaged at view angles ranging ± 45° from nadir. Through atmospheric correction, ASAS radiances were reduced to bidirectional reflectance factors (BRFs). These were compared to corresponding BRF values computed from the Li-Strahler model using, wherever possible, ground measured component BRFs for calibration. The comparisons showed a good match between the modeled and measured reflectance factors for four of the five Oregon Transect Sites. Thus, the geometric-optical approach provides a realistic model for the bidirectional reflectance distribution function of such natural vegetation canopies. Further modifications are suggested to improve the predicted BRFs and yield still better results. (author)

  10. Nuclear Thermal Rocket - An Established Space Propulsion Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Milton

    2004-02-01

    From the late 1950s to the early 1970s a major program successfully developed the capability to conduct space exploration using the advanced technology of nuclear rocket propulsion. The program had two primary elements: pioneering and advanced technology work-Rover-at Los Alamos National Laboratory and its contractors provided the basic reactor design, fuel materials development, and reactor testing capability; and engine development-NERVA-by the industrial team of Aerojet and Westinghouse building on and extending the Los Alamos efforts to flight system development. This presentation describes the NERVA program, the engine system testing that demonstrated the space-practical operation capabilities of nuclear thermal rockets, and the mission studies that point the way to most effectively use the NTR capabilities. Together, the two programs established a technology base that includes proven NTR capabilities of (1) over twice the specific impulse of chemical propulsion systems, (2) thrust capabilities ranging from 44kN to 1112kN, and (3) practical thrust-to-weight ratios for future NASA space exploration missions, both manned payloads to Mars and unmanned payloads to the outer planets. The overall nuclear rocket program had a unique management structure that integrated the efforts of the two government agencies involved-NASA and the then-existing Atomic Energy Commission. The objective of this paper is to summarize and convey the technical and management lessons learned in this program as the nation considers the design of its future space exploration activities.

  11. Emissivity of rocket plume particulates.

    OpenAIRE

    Whisman, Curtis D.

    1992-01-01

    The optical properties of motor aluminum oxide are required inputs to current plume signature prediction codes, such as SIRRM. Accurate predictions are possible only if variations in the particle emissivity due to changes in particle size, contamination, and changing temperature, etc. , are known . This investigation demonstrated a simplified method for determination of the emissivity of rocket motor generated alumina. Plume particulate material was collected on ...

  12. Rocket Engine Altitude Simulation Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods, Jody L.; Lansaw, John

    2010-01-01

    John C. Stennis Space Center is embarking on a very ambitious era in its rocket engine propulsion test history. The first new large rocket engine test stand to be built at Stennis Space Center in over 40 years is under construction. The new A3 Test Stand is designed to test very large (294,000 Ibf thrust) cryogenic propellant rocket engines at a simulated altitude of 100,000 feet. A3 Test Stand will have an engine testing chamber where the engine will be fired after the air in the chamber has been evacuated to a pressure at the simulated altitude of less than 0.16 PSIA. This will result in a very unique environment with extremely low pressures inside a very large chamber and ambient pressures outside this chamber. The test chamber is evacuated of air using a 2-stage diffuser / ejector system powered by 5000 lb/sec of steam produced by 27 chemical steam generators. This large amount of power and flow during an engine test will result in a significant acoustic and vibrational environment in and around A3 Test Stand.

  13. Evaluating of scale-up methodologies of gas-solid spouted beds for coating TRISO nuclear fuel particles using advanced measurement techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Neven Y.

    The work focuses on implementing for the first time advanced non-invasive measurement techniques to evaluate the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity that has been reported in the literature based on matching dimensionless groups and the new mechanistic scale up methodology that has been developed in our laboratory based on matching the radial profile of gas holdup since the gas dynamics dictate the hydrodynamics of the gas-solid spouted beds. These techniques are gamma-ray computed tomography (CT) to measure the cross-sectional distribution of the phases' holdups and their radial profiles along the bed height and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) to measure in three-dimension (3D) solids velocity and their turbulent parameters. The measured local parameters and the analysis of the results obtained in this work validate our new methodology of scale up of gas-solid spouted beds by comparing for the similarity the phases' holdups and the dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters that are non-dimensionalized using the minimum spouting superficial gas velocity. However, the scale-up methodology of gas-solid spouted beds that is based on matching dimensionless groups has not been validated for hydrodynamics similarity with respect to the local parameters such as phases' holdups and dimensionless solids velocities and their turbulent parameters. Unfortunately, this method was validated in the literature by only measuring the global parameters. Thus, this work confirms that validation of the scale-up methods of gas-solid spouted beds for hydrodynamics similarity should reside on measuring and analyzing the local hydrodynamics parameters.

  14. A framework for the intelligent control of nuclear rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An intelligent control system architecture is proposed for nuclear rockets, and its various components are briefly described. The objective of the intelligent controller is the satisfaction of performance, robustness, fault-tolerance and reliability design specifications. The proposed hierarchical architecture consists of three levels: hardware, signal processing, and knowledge processing. The functionality of the intelligent controller is implemented utilizing advanced information processing technologies such as artificial neutral networks and fuzzy expert systems. The feasibility of a number of the controller architecture components have been independently validated using computer simulations. Preliminary results are presented demonstrating some of the signal processing capabilities of the intelligent nuclear rocket controller. Further work, currently in progress, is attempting to implement a number of the knowledge processing capabilities of the controller and their interface with the lower levels of the proposed architecture

  15. Miniature Autonomous Rocket Recovery System (MARRS)

    OpenAIRE

    Yakimenko, O.A.; Yingling, A.J.; Hewgley, C.W.; Seigenthaler, T.A.

    2011-01-01

    The article of record as published may be located at http://dx.doi.org/10.2514/6.2011-2597 Proceedings of the 21st AIAA Aerodynamic Decelerator Systems Technology Conference, Dublin, Ireland, May 23-26, 2011. This paper discusses the development and testing of the new-generation recovery system in highpowered rockets. It starts from the overall description of the rocket system, the requirements of the Miniature Autonomous Rocket Recovery System (MARRS) and is followed by a descrip...

  16. Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidian, Kenneth O.

    1997-01-01

    Work is being done at three universities to help today's NASA engineers use the knowledge and experience of their Apolloera predecessors in designing liquid rocket engines. Ground-breaking work is being done in important subject areas to create a prototype of the most important functions for the Rocket Engine Numerical Simulator (RENS). The goal of RENS is to develop an interactive, realtime application that engineers can utilize for comprehensive preliminary propulsion system design functions. RENS will employ computer science and artificial intelligence research in knowledge acquisition, computer code parallelization and objectification, expert system architecture design, and object-oriented programming. In 1995, a 3year grant from the NASA Lewis Research Center was awarded to Dr. Douglas Moreman and Dr. John Dyer of Southern University at Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to begin acquiring knowledge in liquid rocket propulsion systems. Resources of the University of West Florida in Pensacola were enlisted to begin the process of enlisting knowledge from senior NASA engineers who are recognized experts in liquid rocket engine propulsion systems. Dr. John Coffey of the University of West Florida is utilizing his expertise in interviewing and concept mapping techniques to encode, classify, and integrate information obtained through personal interviews. The expertise extracted from the NASA engineers has been put into concept maps with supporting textual, audio, graphic, and video material. A fundamental concept map was delivered by the end of the first year of work and the development of maps containing increasing amounts of information is continuing. Find out more information about this work at the Southern University/University of West Florida. In 1996, the Southern University/University of West Florida team conducted a 4day group interview with a panel of five experts to discuss failures of the RL10 rocket engine in conjunction with the Centaur launch vehicle. The

  17. Micro-actuation characteristics of rocket conical shell sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, W. K.; Han, Y.; Higuchi, K.; Tzou, H. S.

    2006-05-01

    Rocket fairings, load-carrying structures of solid rocket motor case, e.g., inter-stage joint, satellite-rocket joint, etc., usually take the shape of conical shell sections. This paper is to evaluate spatially distributed microscopic control characteristics of distributed actuator patches bonded on conical shell surfaces. The converse effect of piezoelectric materials has been recognized as one of the best electromechanical effects for precision distributed control applications. The resultant control forces and micro-control actions induced by the distributed actuators depend on applied voltages, geometrical (e.g., spatial segmentation and shape) and material (i.e., various actuator materials) properties. Mathematical models and modal domain governing equations of the conical shell section laminated with distributed actuator patches are presented first, followed by formulations of distributed control forces and micro-control actions which can be divided into longitudinal/circumferential membrane and bending control components. Spatially distributed electromechanical microscopic actuation characteristics and control effects resulting from various longitudinal/circumferential actions of actuator patches are evaluated.

  18. Star-grain rocket motor - nonsteady internal ballistics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loncaric, S.; Greatrix, D.R.; Fawaz, Z. [Ryerson University, Dept. of Aerospace Engineering, Toronto (Canada)

    2004-01-01

    The nonsteady internal ballistics of a star-grain solid-propellant rocket motor are investigated through a numerical simulation model that incorporates both the internal flow and surrounding structure. The effects of structural vibration on burning rate augmentation and wave development in nonsteady operation are demonstrated. The amount of damping plays a role in influencing the predicted axial combustion instability symptoms of the motor. The variation in oscillation frequencies about a given star grain section periphery, and along the grain with different levels of burn-back, also influences the means by which the local acceleration drives the combustion and flow behaviour. (authors)

  19. Uranium droplet core nuclear rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghaie, Samim

    1991-01-01

    Uranium droplet nuclear rocket is conceptually designed to utilize the broad temperature range ofthe liquid phase of metallic uranium in droplet configuration which maximizes the energy transfer area per unit fuel volume. In a baseline system dissociated hydrogen at 100 bar is heated to 6000 K, providing 2000 second of Isp. Fission fragments and intense radian field enhance the dissociation of molecular hydrogen beyond the equilibrium thermodynamic level. Uranium droplets in the core are confined and separated by an axisymmetric vortex flow generated by high velocity tangential injection of hydrogen in the mid-core regions. Droplet uranium flow to the core is controlled and adjusted by a twin flow nozzle injection system.

  20. Rotational flow in tapered slab rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saad, Tony; Sams, Oliver C.; Majdalani, Joseph

    2006-10-01

    Internal flow modeling is a requisite for obtaining critical parameters in the design and fabrication of modern solid rocket motors. In this work, the analytical formulation of internal flows particular to motors with tapered sidewalls is pursued. The analysis employs the vorticity-streamfunction approach to treat this problem assuming steady, incompressible, inviscid, and nonreactive flow conditions. The resulting solution is rotational following the analyses presented by Culick for a cylindrical motor. In an extension to Culick's work, Clayton has recently managed to incorporate the effect of tapered walls. Here, an approach similar to that of Clayton is applied to a slab motor in which the chamber is modeled as a rectangular channel with tapered sidewalls. The solutions are shown to be reducible, at leading order, to Taylor's inviscid profile in a porous channel. The analysis also captures the generation of vorticity at the surface of the propellant and its transport along the streamlines. It is from the axial pressure gradient that the proper form of the vorticity is ascertained. Regular perturbations are then used to solve the vorticity equation that prescribes the mean flow motion. Subsequently, numerical simulations via a finite volume solver are carried out to gain further confidence in the analytical approximations. In illustrating the effects of the taper on flow conditions, comparisons of total pressure and velocity profiles in tapered and nontapered chambers are entertained. Finally, a comparison with the axisymmetric flow analog is presented.

  1. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gustafson, N. B.; Harmon, T. J.

    1993-01-01

    An advanced near term (1990's) space-based Orbit Transfer Vehicle Engine (OTVE) system was designed, and the technologies applicable to its construction, maintenance, and operations were developed under Tasks A through F of the Orbit Transfer Rocket Engine Technology Program. Task A was a reporting task. In Task B, promising OTV turbomachinery technologies were explored: two stage partial admission turbines, high velocity ratio diffusing crossovers, soft wear ring seals, advanced bearing concepts, and a rotordynamic analysis. In Task C, a ribbed combustor design was developed. Possible rib and channel geometries were chosen analytically. Rib candidates were hot air tested and laser velocimeter boundary layer analyses were conducted. A channel geometry was also chosen on the basis of laser velocimeter data. To verify the predicted heat enhancement effects, a ribbed calorimeter spool was hot fire tested. Under Task D, the optimum expander cycle engine thrust, performance and envelope were established for a set of OTV missions. Optimal nozzle contours and quick disconnects for modularity were developed. Failure Modes and Effects Analyses, maintenance and reliability studies and component study results were incorporated into the engine system. Parametric trades on engine thrust, mixture ratio, and area ratio were also generated. A control system and the health monitoring and maintenance operations necessary for a space-based engine were outlined in Task E. In addition, combustor wall thickness measuring devices and a fiberoptic shaft monitor were developed. These monitoring devices were incorporated into preflight engine readiness checkout procedures. In Task F, the Integrated Component Evaluator (I.C.E.) was used to demonstrate performance and operational characteristics of an advanced expander cycle engine system and its component technologies. Sub-system checkouts and a system blowdown were performed. Short transitions were then made into main combustor ignition and

  2. Advanced manufacturing of intermediate temperature, direct methane oxidation membrane electrode assemblies for durable solid oxide fuel cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ITN proposes to create an innovative anode supported membrane electrode assembly (MEA) for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that is capable of long-term operation at...

  3. Advanced Manufacturing of Intermediate Temperature, Direct Methane Oxidation Membrane Electrode Assemblies for Durable Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation builds on the successes of the Phase I program by integrating our direct oxidation membrane electrode assembly (MEA) into a monolithic solid...

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell/Turbine Hybrid Power System for Advanced Aero-propulsion and Power Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC)/ gas turbine hybrid power systems (HPSs) have been recognized by federal agencies and other entities as having the potential to operate...

  5. A note on efficiency of rockets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Gupta

    1954-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the dependence of efficiency of a rocket on the expansion ratio and the ratio of the initial mass of the rocket and the mass of the propellant. The relation is illustrated by a table and two graphs.

  6. A Framework for Intelligent Rocket Test Facilities with Smart Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Fernando; Solano, Wanda; Morris, Jon; Mandayam, Shreekanth; Polikar, Robi

    2003-01-01

    A long-term center goal at the John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is the formulation and implementation of a framework for an Intelligent Rocket Test Facility (IRTF), which incorporates distributed smart sensor elements. The IRTF is to provide reliable, high-confident measurements. Specific objectives include: 1. Definition of a framework and architecture that supports implementation of highly autonomous methodologies founded on basic physical principles and embedded knowledge. 2. Modeling of autonomous sensors and processes as self-sufficient, evolutionary elements. 3. Development of appropriate communications protocols to enable the complex interactions that must take place to allow timely and high-quality flow of of information among all the autonomous elements of the system. 4. Development of lab-scale prototypes of key system elements. Though our application is next-generation rocket test facilities, applications for the approach are much wider and include monitoring of shuttle launch operations, air and spacecraft operations and health monitoring, and other large-scale industrial system operations such as found in processing and manufacturing plans. Elements of prototype IRTF have been implemented in preparation for advanced development and validation using rocket test stand facilities as SSC. This work has identified issues that are important to further development of complex network and should be of interest to other working with sensor networks.

  7. Hybrid Rocket Experiment Station for Capstone Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Edgar; Hull, Bethanne J.

    2012-01-01

    Portable hybrid rocket motors and test stands can be seen in many papers but none have been reported on the design or instrumentation at such a small magnitude. The design of this hybrid rocket and test stand is to be small and portable (suitcase size). This basic apparatus will be used for demonstrations in rocket propulsion. The design had to include all of the needed hardware to operate the hybrid rocket unit (with the exception of the external Oxygen tank). The design of this project includes making the correlation between the rocket's thrust and its size, the appropriate transducers (physical size, resolution, range, and cost), compatability with a laptop analog card, the ease of setup, and its portability.

  8. HESTIA Commodities Exchange Pallet and Sounding Rocket Test Stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro, Javier

    2013-01-01

    During my Spring 2016 internship, my two major contributions were the design of the Commodities Exchange Pallet and the design of a test stand for a 100 pounds-thrust sounding rocket. The Commodities Exchange Pallet is a prototype developed for the Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) program. Under the HESTIA initiative the Commodities Exchange Pallet was developed as a method for demonstrating multi-system integration thru the transportation of In-Situ Resource Utilization produced oxygen and water to a human habitat. Ultimately, this prototype's performance will allow for future evaluation of integration, which may lead to the development of a flight capable pallet for future deep-space exploration missions. For HESTIA, my main task was to design the Commodities Exchange Pallet system to be used for completing an integration demonstration. Under the guidance of my mentor, I designed, both, the structural frame and fluid delivery system for the commodities pallet. The fluid delivery system includes a liquid-oxygen to gaseous-oxygen system, a water delivery system, and a carbon-dioxide compressors system. The structural frame is designed to meet safety and transportation requirements, as well as the ability to interface with the ER division's Portable Utility Pallet. The commodities pallet structure also includes independent instrumentation oxygen/water panels for operation and system monitoring. My major accomplishments for the commodities exchange pallet were the completion of the fluid delivery systems and the structural frame designs. In addition, parts selection was completed in order to expedite construction of the prototype, scheduled to begin in May of 2016. Once the commodities pallet is assembled and tested it is expected to complete a fully integrated transfer demonstration with the ISRU unit and the Environmental Control and Life Support System test chamber in September of 2016. In addition to the development of

  9. Factors affecting the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of PEGylated liposomal irinotecan (IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu H

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Huali Wu,1 Jeffrey R Infante,2 Vicki L Keedy,3 Suzanne F Jones,2 Emily Chan,3 Johanna C Bendell,2 Wooin Lee,4 Whitney P Kirschbrown,1 Beth A Zamboni,5 Satoshi Ikeda,6 Hiroshi Kodaira,6 Mace L Rothenberg,3 Howard A Burris III,2 William C Zamboni1,7–9 1UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2Sarah Cannon Research Institute/Tennessee Oncology, PLLC, 3Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, 4Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 5Department of Mathematics, Carlow University, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 6Yakult Honsha Co., Ltd., Medical Development Department, Tokyo, Japan; 7UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 8UNC Institute for Pharmacogenomics and Individualized Therapy, 9Carolina Center for Cancer Nanotechology Excellence, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Abstract: IHL-305 is a PEGylated liposomal formulation of irinotecan (CPT-11. The objective of this study was to evaluate the factors associated with interpatient variability in the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of IHL-305 in patients with advanced solid tumors. IHL-305 was administered intravenously once every 4 weeks as part of a Phase I study. Pharmacokinetic studies of the liposomal sum total CPT-11, released CPT-11, SN-38, SN-38G, 7-ethyl-10-[4-N-(5-aminopentanoic acid-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin, and 7-ethyl-10-[4-amino-1-piperidino]-carbonyloxycamptothecin in plasma were performed. Noncompartmental and compartmental pharmacokinetic analyses were conducted using pharmacokinetic data for sum total CPT-11. The pharmacokinetic variability of IHL-305 is associated with linear and nonlinear clearance. Patients whose age and body composition (ratio of total body weight to ideal body weight [TBW/IBW] were greater than the median age and TBW/IBW of the study had a 1.7-fold to 2.6-fold higher ratio of released CPT-11 area under the concentration versus time

  10. Development of an image converter of radical design. [employing solid state electronics towards the production of an advanced engineering model camera system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, E. L.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    A long term investigation of thin film sensors, monolithic photo-field effect transistors, and epitaxially diffused phototransistors and photodiodes to meet requirements to produce acceptable all solid state, electronically scanned imaging system, led to the production of an advanced engineering model camera which employs a 200,000 element phototransistor array (organized in a matrix of 400 rows by 500 columns) to secure resolution comparable to commercial television. The full investigation is described for the period July 1962 through July 1972, and covers the following broad topics in detail: (1) sensor monoliths; (2) fabrication technology; (3) functional theory; (4) system methodology; and (5) deployment profile. A summary of the work and conclusions are given, along with extensive schematic diagrams of the final solid state imaging system product.

  11. Advanced transportation system studies. Alternate propulsion subsystem concepts: Propulsion database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levack, Daniel

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Transportation System Studies alternate propulsion subsystem concepts propulsion database interim report is presented. The objective of the database development task is to produce a propulsion database which is easy to use and modify while also being comprehensive in the level of detail available. The database is to be available on the Macintosh computer system. The task is to extend across all three years of the contract. Consequently, a significant fraction of the effort in this first year of the task was devoted to the development of the database structure to ensure a robust base for the following years' efforts. Nonetheless, significant point design propulsion system descriptions and parametric models were also produced. Each of the two propulsion databases, parametric propulsion database and propulsion system database, are described. The descriptions include a user's guide to each code, write-ups for models used, and sample output. The parametric database has models for LOX/H2 and LOX/RP liquid engines, solid rocket boosters using three different propellants, a hybrid rocket booster, and a NERVA derived nuclear thermal rocket engine.

  12. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Oxygen materials compatibility testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenman, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    Particle impact and frictional heating tests of metals in high pressure oxygen, are conducted in support of the design of an advanced rocket engine oxygen turbopump. Materials having a wide range of thermodynamic properties including heat of combustion and thermal diffusivity were compared in their resistance to ignition and sustained burning. Copper, nickel and their alloys were found superior to iron based and stainless steel alloys. Some materials became more difficult to ignite as oxygen pressure was increased from 7 to 21 MPa (1000 to 3000 psia).

  13. Fuel-Cell Power Source Based on Onboard Rocket Propellants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathi, Gani; Narayan, Sri

    2010-01-01

    The use of onboard rocket propellants (dense liquids at room temperature) in place of conventional cryogenic fuel-cell reactants (hydrogen and oxygen) eliminates the mass penalties associated with cryocooling and boil-off. The high energy content and density of the rocket propellants will also require no additional chemical processing. For a 30-day mission on the Moon that requires a continuous 100 watts of power, the reactant mass and volume would be reduced by 15 and 50 percent, respectively, even without accounting for boiloff losses. The savings increase further with increasing transit times. A high-temperature, solid oxide, electrolyte-based fuel-cell configuration, that can rapidly combine rocket propellants - both monopropellant system with hydrazine and bi-propellant systems such as monomethyl hydrazine/ unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine (MMH/UDMH) and nitrogen tetroxide (NTO) to produce electrical energy - overcomes the severe drawbacks of earlier attempts in 1963-1967 of using fuel reforming and aqueous media. The electrical energy available from such a fuel cell operating at 60-percent efficiency is estimated to be 1,500 Wh/kg of reactants. The proposed use of zirconia-based oxide electrolyte at 800-1,000 C will permit continuous operation, very high power densities, and substantially increased efficiency of conversion over any of the earlier attempts. The solid oxide fuel cell is also tolerant to a wide range of environmental temperatures. Such a system is built for easy refueling for exploration missions and for the ability to turn on after several years of transit. Specific examples of future missions are in-situ landers on Europa and Titan that will face extreme radiation and temperature environments, flyby missions to Saturn, and landed missions on the Moon with 14 day/night cycles.

  14. Geometric effects of fuel regression rate in hybrid rocket motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAI GuoBiao; ZHANG YuanJun; WANG PengFei; HUI Tian; ZHAO Sheng; YU NanJia

    2016-01-01

    The geometric configuration of the solid fuel is a key parameter affecting the fuel regression rate in hybrid rocket motors.In this paper,a semi-empirical regression rate model is developed to investigate the geometric effect on the fuel regression rate by incorporating the hydraulic diameter into the classical model.The semi-empirical model indicates that the fuel regression rate decreases with increasing hydraulic diameter and is proportional to dh-0.2 when convective heat transfer is dominant.Then a numerical model considering turbulence,combustion,solid fuel pyrolysis,and a solid-gas coupling model is established to further investigate the geometric effect.Eight motors with different solid fuel grains are simulated,and four methods of scaling the regression rate between different solid fuel grains are compared.The results indicate that the solid fuel regression rates are approximate the same when the hydraulic diameters are equal.The numerical results verify the accuracy of the semi-empirical model.

  15. Phase I and pharmacological study of the farnesyltransferase inhibitor tipifarnib (Zarnestra®, R115777) in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours

    OpenAIRE

    Siegel-Lakhai, W S; Crul, M; Zhang, S; Sparidans, R W; Pluim, D; Howes, A.; Solanki, B; Beijnen, J.H.; Schellens, J. H. M.

    2005-01-01

    This phase I trial was designed to determine the safety and maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of tipifarnib in combination with gemcitabine and cisplatin in patients with advanced solid tumours. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of each of these agents was evaluated. Patients were treated with tipifarnib b.i.d. on days 1–7 of each 21-day cycle. In addition, gemcitabine was given as a 30-min i.v. infusion on days 1 and 8 and cisplatin as a 3-h i.v. infusion on day 1. An interpatient dose-escalation...

  16. Advanced Electrodes for Solid Acid Fuel Cells by Platinum Deposition on CsH_(2)PO_4

    OpenAIRE

    Papandrew, Alexander B.; Chisholm, Calum R. I.; Elgammal, Ramez A.; Özer, Mustafa M.; Zecevic, Strahinja K.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate cathodes for solid acid fuel cells fabricated by vapor deposition of platinum from the metalorganic precursor Pt(acac)_2 on the solid acid CsH_(2)PO_4 at 210 °C. A network of platinum nanoparticles with diameters of 2−4 nm serves as both the oxygen reduction catalyst and the electronic conductor in the electrode. Electrodes with a platinum content of 1.75 mg/cm^2 are more active for oxygen reduction than previously reported electrodes with a platinum content of 7.5 mg/cm^2....

  17. Development of the KIVA-2 CFD code for rocket propulsion applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon, Robert V., Jr.; Murray, Alvin L.

    1992-07-01

    The KIVA-2 code, originally developed to solve computational fluid dynamics problems in internal combustion engines, has been developed to solve rocket propulsion type flows. The objective of the work was to develop a code such that both liquid and solid particle motion could be simulated for arbitrary geometry and high speed as well as low speed reacting flows. Modification to the original code include: incorporating independently specific supersonic and subsonic inflows and outflows; symmetric as well as periodic boundary conditions; and the capability to use generalized single or multi-specie thermodynamic data and transport coefficients allowing the user to specify arbitrary wall temperature/heat flux distributions. This code has been shown to successfully solve rocket propulsion flows as well as flows with entrained particles for several different rocket nozzles.

  18. RX LAPAN Rocket data Program With Dbase III Plus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The components data rocket RX LAPAN are taken from workshop product and assembling rocket RX. In this application software, the test data are organized into two data files, i.e. test file and rocket file. Besides [providing facilities to add, edit and delete data, this software provides also data manipulation facility to support analysis and identification of rocket RX failures and success

  19. Janus Solid-Liquid Interface Enabling Ultrahigh Charging and Discharging Rate for Advanced Lithium-Ion Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiaxin; Hou, Yuyang; Duan, Yandong; Song, Xiaohe; Wei, Yi; Liu, Tongchao; Hu, Jiangtao; Guo, Hua; Zhuo, Zengqing; Liu, Lili; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Xiaowei; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Fang, Yanyan; Lin, Yuan; Xu, Kang; Wang, Lin-Wang; Wu, Yuping; Pan, Feng

    2015-09-01

    LiFePO4 has long been held as one of the most promising battery cathode for its high energy storage capacity. Meanwhile, although extensive studies have been conducted on the interfacial chemistries in Li-ion batteries,1-3 little is known on the atomic level about the solid-liquid interface of LiFePO4/electrolyte. Here, we report battery cathode consisted with nanosized LiFePO4 particles in aqueous electrolyte with an high charging and discharging rate of 600 C (3600/600 = 6 s charge time, 1 C = 170 mAh g(-1)) reaching 72 mAh g(-1) energy storage (42% of the theoretical capacity). By contrast, the accessible capacity sharply decreases to 20 mAh g(-1) at 200 C in organic electrolyte. After a comprehensive electrochemistry tests and ab initio calculations of the LiFePO4-H2O and LiFePO4-EC (ethylene carbonate) systems, we identified the transient formation of a Janus hydrated interface in the LiFePO4-H2O system, where the truncated symmetry of solid LiFePO4 surface is compensated by the chemisorbed H2O molecules, forming a half-solid (LiFePO4) and half-liquid (H2O) amphiphilic coordination environment that eases the Li desolvation process near the surface, which makes a fast Li-ion transport across the solid/liquid interfaces possible. PMID:26305572

  20. Detection of Metallic Compounds in Rocket Plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Chris; Dunn, Dr. Robert

    1998-04-01

    Recent experiments using metal mixed in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB) fuel grains in small hybrid rocket indicates ion detectors may be effective in detection of metallic compounds in rocket plumes. We wanted to ascertain the extent to which the presence of metallic compounds in rocket plumes could be detected using ion probes and Gaussian rings. Charges that collide with or pass near the intruding probe are detected. Gaussian rings, short insulated cylindrical Gaussian surfaces, enclose the plume without intruding into the plume. Charges in the plume are detected by currents they induce in the cylinder.

  1. Early Spin-Stabilised Rockets - the Rockets of Bergrat Heinrich Gottlob Kuhn

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, H.-D.

    19th century's war rockets were at first stabilised by sticks, but these sticks produced a very uncertain flight path and it often happened that rockets changed their direction and even flew back to their firing position. So very many early inventors in Europe, America, and British-India tried to stabilise the rocket's flight in a better way. They tried fins and even rotation but they did not succeed. It is said in history that William Hale was the first who succeeded in constructing a spin stabilised (i.e. rotating) rocket which worked. But before him, in the thirties of that century, a German amateur rocket inventor succeeded as well and secretly proved his stickless rotating rockets in trials for Prussian officers and some years later officially for Saxon artillery officers. His invention was then bought by the kingdom of Saxony, but these were never use in the field because of lack of money.

  2. A six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor for a labscale hybrid rocket

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Ann M.; Wright, Andrew B.; Born, Traig; Strickland, Ryan

    2013-12-01

    A six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor was designed, constructed, calibrated, and tested using the labscale hybrid rocket at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. The system consisted of six independent legs: one parallel to the axis of symmetry of the rocket for main thrust measurement, two vertical legs near the nozzle end of the rocket, one vertical leg near the oxygen input end of the rocket, and two separated horizontal legs near the nozzle end. Each leg was composed of a rotational bearing, a load cell, and a universal joint above and below the load cell. The leg was designed to create point contact along only one direction and minimize the non-axial forces applied to the load cell. With this system, force in each direction and moments for roll, pitch, and yaw can be measured. The system was calibrated and tested using a labscale hybrid rocket using gaseous oxygen and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene solid fuel. The thrust stand proved to be stable during calibration tests. Thrust force vector components and roll, pitch, and yaw moments were calculated for test firings with an oxygen mass flow rate range of 0.0174-0.0348 kg s-1.

  3. A six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor for a labscale hybrid rocket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A six degree-of-freedom thrust sensor was designed, constructed, calibrated, and tested using the labscale hybrid rocket at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock. The system consisted of six independent legs: one parallel to the axis of symmetry of the rocket for main thrust measurement, two vertical legs near the nozzle end of the rocket, one vertical leg near the oxygen input end of the rocket, and two separated horizontal legs near the nozzle end. Each leg was composed of a rotational bearing, a load cell, and a universal joint above and below the load cell. The leg was designed to create point contact along only one direction and minimize the non-axial forces applied to the load cell. With this system, force in each direction and moments for roll, pitch, and yaw can be measured. The system was calibrated and tested using a labscale hybrid rocket using gaseous oxygen and hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene solid fuel. The thrust stand proved to be stable during calibration tests. Thrust force vector components and roll, pitch, and yaw moments were calculated for test firings with an oxygen mass flow rate range of 0.0174–0.0348 kg s−1. (paper)

  4. Bench-scale Development of an Advanced Solid Sorbent-based CO2 Capture Process for Coal-fired Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Thomas [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Kataria, Atish [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Soukri, Mustapha [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Farmer, Justin [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Mobley, Paul [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Tanthana, Jak [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Dongxiang [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Wang, Xiaoxing [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Song, Chunshan [Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Research Triangle Park, NC (United States)

    2015-12-31

    It is increasingly clear that CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) must play a critical role in curbing worldwide CO2 emissions to the atmosphere. Development of these technologies to cost-effectively remove CO2 from coal-fired power plants is very important to mitigating the impact these power plants have within the world’s power generation portfolio. Currently, conventional CO2 capture technologies, such as aqueous-monoethanolamine based solvent systems, are prohibitively expensive and if implemented could result in a 75 to 100% increase in the cost of electricity for consumers worldwide. Solid sorbent CO2 capture processes – such as RTI’s Advanced Solid Sorbent CO2, Capture Process – are promising alternatives to conventional, liquid solvents. Supported amine sorbents – of the nature RTI has developed – are particularly attractive due to their high CO2 loadings, low heat capacities, reduced corrosivity/volatility and the potential to reduce the regeneration energy needed to carry out CO2 capture. Previous work in this area has failed to adequately address various technology challenges such as sorbent stability and regenerability, sorbent scale-up, improved physical strength and attrition-resistance, proper heat management and temperature control, proper solids handling and circulation control, as well as the proper coupling of process engineering advancements that are tailored for a promising sorbent technology. The remaining challenges for these sorbent processes have provided the framework for the project team’s research and development and target for advancing the technology beyond lab- and bench-scale testing. Under a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy, and part of NETL’s CO2 Capture Program, RTI has led an effort to address and mitigate the challenges associated with solid sorbent CO2 capture. The overall objective

  5. OSA Proceedings on Advanced Solid-State Lasers. Vol. 10 - Proceedings of the Topical Meeting, Hilton Head, SC, Mar. 18-20, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dube, G.; Chase, L. (McDonnell Douglas Electonic Systems Co., Saint Louis, MO (United States) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on advanced solid-state lasers discusses Cr(3+), Cr(4+), short-pulse, titanium, F-center, mid-IR, and diode-pumped lasers, and nonlinear optics. Attention is given to the stabilization and a spectral characterization of an alexandrite laser for water vapor lidar measurements, crystal growth and spectroscopy of Cr:LiBaAlF6, a Q-switched tunable forsterite laser, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of chromium-doped forsterite. Topics addressed include efficient frequency doubling of a self-starting additive-pulse mode-locked diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser, recent advances in Ti:Al2O3 unstable-resonator lasers, all-solid-state operation of a CW Ti:Al2O3 laser, and upconversion studies of flashlamp-pumped Cr,T,Ho:YAG. Also discussed are the top output parameters of an Ho-laser, spectroscopy and the 3-micron laser potential of Er crystals, the pulsed operation of microchip lasers, and blue optical parametric generation in LiB3O5.

  6. Advances in High Energy Solid-State 2-micron Laser Transmitter Development for Ground and Airborne Wind and CO2 Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Kavaya, Michael J.; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul; Modlin, Edward A.; Koch, Grady; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Sustained research efforts at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) during last fifteen years have resulted in a significant advancement in 2-micron diode-pumped, solid-state laser transmitter for wind and carbon dioxide measurement from ground, air and space-borne platform. Solid-state 2-micron laser is a key subsystem for a coherent Doppler lidar that measures the horizontal and vertical wind velocities with high precision and resolution. The same laser, after a few modifications, can also be used in a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system for measuring atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center have developed a compact, flight capable, high energy, injection seeded, 2-micron laser transmitter for ground and airborne wind and carbon dioxide measurements. It is capable of producing 250 mJ at 10 Hz by an oscillator and one amplifier. This compact laser transmitter was integrated into a mobile trailer based coherent Doppler wind and CO2 DIAL system and was deployed during field measurement campaigns. This paper will give an overview of 2-micron solid-state laser technology development and discuss results from recent ground-based field measurements.

  7. Collaborative Sounding Rocket launch in Alaska and Development of Hybrid Rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Tomohisa; Tsutsumi, Akimasa; Ito, Toshiyuki; Kan, Yuji; Tohyama, Fumio; Nakashino, Kyouichi; Hawkins, Joseph

    Tokai University student rocket project (TSRP) was established in 1995 for a purpose of the space science and engineering hands-on education, consisting of two space programs; the one is sounding rocket experiment collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks and the other is development and launch of small hybrid rockets. In January of 2000 and March 2002, two collaborative sounding rockets were successfully launched at Poker Flat Research Range in Alaska. In 2001, the first Tokai hybrid rocket was successfully launched at Alaska. After that, 11 hybrid rockets were launched to the level of 180-1,000 m high at Hokkaido and Akita in Japan. Currently, Tokai students design and build all parts of the rockets. In addition, they are running the organization and development of the project under the tight budget control. This program has proven to be very effective in providing students with practical, real-engineering design experience and this program also allows students to participate in all phases of a sounding rocket mission. Also students learn scientific, engineering subjects, public affairs and system management through experiences of cooperative teamwork. In this report, we summarize the TSRP's hybrid rocket program and discuss the effectiveness of the program in terms of educational aspects.

  8. Estimation of Initial Disturbances for Rockets Based on Interactions of Rockets and Directional Tubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    In the range of the rockets/launcher system itself, the dynamic equations for rocket and directional tube during semi-constraint period have been constructed by using Newton-Euler method. Considering the interaction of rockets and directional tubes when clearances exist, the method of estimating initial disturbances for the rocket by using vibration data of the directional tube has been given. The estimated results have been compared with the simulation results computed by the dynamic simulating software ADAMS. Results computed by the two methods are basically consistent and the computing errors do not increase with the variation of the clearance. The validity of the proposed method has been proved.

  9. Numerical Simulation of Rocket Exhaust Interaction with Lunar Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liever, Peter; Tosh, Abhijit; Curtis, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    This technology development originated from the need to assess the debris threat resulting from soil material erosion induced by landing spacecraft rocket plume impingement on extraterrestrial planetary surfaces. The impact of soil debris was observed to be highly detrimental during NASA s Apollo lunar missions and will pose a threat for any future landings on the Moon, Mars, and other exploration targets. The innovation developed under this program provides a simulation tool that combines modeling of the diverse disciplines of rocket plume impingement gas dynamics, granular soil material liberation, and soil debris particle kinetics into one unified simulation system. The Unified Flow Solver (UFS) developed by CFDRC enabled the efficient, seamless simulation of mixed continuum and rarefied rocket plume flow utilizing a novel direct numerical simulation technique of the Boltzmann gas dynamics equation. The characteristics of the soil granular material response and modeling of the erosion and liberation processes were enabled through novel first principle-based granular mechanics models developed by the University of Florida specifically for the highly irregularly shaped and cohesive lunar regolith material. These tools were integrated into a unique simulation system that accounts for all relevant physics aspects: (1) Modeling of spacecraft rocket plume impingement flow under lunar vacuum environment resulting in a mixed continuum and rarefied flow; (2) Modeling of lunar soil characteristics to capture soil-specific effects of particle size and shape composition, soil layer cohesion and granular flow physics; and (3) Accurate tracking of soil-borne debris particles beginning with aerodynamically driven motion inside the plume to purely ballistic motion in lunar far field conditions. In the earlier project phase of this innovation, the capabilities of the UFS for mixed continuum and rarefied flow situations were validated and demonstrated for lunar lander rocket

  10. A multidisciplinary optimization methodology for rocket vehicle systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colonno, Michael Richard

    Rocket vehicles have traditionally been designed in an iterative fashion, beginning with system requirements before proceeding sequentially through requisite analytical disciplines until resources are exhausted. A sequentially designed system, while adequate, is not an optimum due to the approximations and loss of fidelity inherent in separating analytical disciplines which are, in fact, coupled. Recently, increased computational power and advances in algorithms have allowed multidisciplinary optimization (MDO) to emerge as a system-level design tool accessible to industry. To date, MDO has primarily been applied to some facets of aircraft systems and, to a lesser extent, rocket vehicles in literature but has not yet met with widespread industry use. To this end, four obstacles have been identified: (1) MDO efforts to date have focused on system-level parameters rather than physical dimensions and hence have not yielded a preliminary design which includes manufacturing, cost, and other constraints, (2) Prohibitive computational performance requirements associated with high-fidelity analyses such as computational fluid mechanics (CFD) and finite element analysis (FEA), (3) Lack of an integrated design environment which incorporates computational tools already widely used in industry while remaining accessible to individual users without high-level expertise in the individual tools, and (4) The widely-varying and tightly-coupled environments to which rocket vehicles are typically exposed, including analyses not required for aircraft applications. Here, an MDO method for rocket systems has been formulated which simultaneously overcomes the challenges listed above. First, a response surface-based approach to modeling computationally expensive analyses with arbitrary dimensionality and general constraints was developed. This method focused on an evenly-distributed representation of the entire feasible region at any fidelity level, including combinations of discrete and

  11. An Evaluation of the Functionality of Advanced Fuel Research Prototype Dry Pyrolyzer for Destruction of Solid Wastes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, John; Wignarajah, K.; Howard, Kevin; Serio, Mike; Kroo, Eric

    2004-01-01

    The prototype dry pyrolyser delivered to Ames Research Center is the end-product of a Phase I1 Small Business Initiative Research (SBIR) project. Some of the major advantages of pyrolysis for processing solid wastes are that it can process solid wastes, it permits elemental recycling while conserving oxygen use, and it can function as a pretreatment for combustion processes. One of the disadvantages of pyrolysis is the formation of tars. By controlling the rate of heating, tar formation can be minimized. This paper presents data on the pyrolysis of various space station wastes. The performance of the pyrolyser is also discussed and appropriate modifications suggested to improve the performance of the dry pyrolyzer.

  12. Recent advances and perspectives in analytical methodologies for monitoring the bioavailability of trace metals in environmental solid substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miró, Manuel; Hansen, Elo Harald

    2006-01-01

    In the last decades, researchers have realised that the impact of trace elements (TE) in environmental solid substrates on ecological systems and biota cannot be ascertained appropriately by means of total metal content measurements. Assessment of TE chemical forms, types of binding and reactivity...... of their associations with particulate forms has, thus, been commonly performed via batch-wise equilibrium-based sequential extraction fractionation methods able to discern TE bound to different soil-phase compartments. In this paper, novel analytical strategies for monitoring the mobility......, bioavailability and the eventual impact of anthropogenic TE in environmental solids are addressed. The potential of passive dosimeters based on microdialysis sampling for on-site, real-time monitoring of chemical contaminants in pore soil solution is thoroughly discussed and critically compared with active...

  13. Thermal Storage Advanced Thruster System (TSATS) Experimental Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, M. Frank; Lisano, Michael E., II

    1991-01-01

    The Thermal Storage Advanced Thruster System (TSATS) rocket test stand is completely assembled and operational. The first trial experimental runs of a low-energy TSATS prototype rocket was made using the test stand. The features of the rocket test stand and the calibration of the associated diagnostics are described and discussed. Design and construction of the TSATS prototype are discussed, and experimental objectives, procedures, and results are detailed.

  14. Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenfeld, Michael

    2009-01-01

    A detailed description of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) is presented. The contents include: 1) Design Requirements; 2) NTREES Layout; 3) Data Acquisition and Control System Schematics; 4) NTREES System Schematic; and 5) NTREES Setup.

  15. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — To address the need for non-intrusive sensors for rocket plume properties, we propose a laser-based velocity diagnostic that does not require seeding, works in high...

  16. Hydroxyl Tagging Velocimetry for Rocket Plumes Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A non-intrusive method for measuring velocities in a rocket exhaust is proposed in a joint effort by MetroLaser and Vanderbilt University. Hydroxyl Tagging...

  17. Magnesium Based Rockets for Martian Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop Mg rockets for Martian ascent vehicle applications. The propellant can be acquired in-situ from MgO in the Martian regolith (5.1% Mg by mass)...

  18. Magnesium Based Rockets for Martian Exploration Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In the proposed Phase II program, we will continue the development of Mg bipropellant rockets for Martian PAV applications. In Phase I, we proved the feasibility of...

  19. Liquid rocket combustion chamber acoustic characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândido Magno de Souza

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Over the last 40 years, many solid and liquid rocket motors have experienced combustion instabilities. Among other causes, there is the interaction of acoustic modes with the combustion and/or fluid dynamic processes inside the combustion chamber. Studies have been showing that, even if less than 1% of the available energy is diverted to an acoustic mode, combustion instability can be generated. On one hand, this instability can lead to ballistic pressure changes, couple with other propulsion systems such as guidance or thrust vector control, and in the worst case, cause motor structural failure. In this case, measures, applying acoustic techniques, must be taken to correct/minimize these influences on the combustion. The combustion chamber acoustic behavior in operating conditions can be estimated by considering its behavior in room conditions. In this way, acoustic tests can be easily performed, thus identifying the cavity modes. This paper describes the procedures to characterize the acoustic behavior in the inner cavity of four different configurations of a combustion chamber. Simple analytical models are used to calculate the acoustic resonance frequencies and these results are compared with acoustic natural frequencies measured at room conditions. Some comments about the measurement procedures are done, as well as the next steps for the continuity of this research. The analytical and experimental procedures results showed good agreement. However, limitations on high frequency band as well as in the identification of specific kinds of modes indicate that numerical methods able to model the real cavity geometry and an acoustic experimental modal analysis may be necessary for a more complete analysis. Future works shall also consider the presence of passive acoustic devices such as baffles and resonators capable of introducing damping and avoiding or limiting acoustic instabilities.

  20. Rocket Rendezvous at Preassigned Destinations with Optimum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Srivastava

    1982-10-01

    Full Text Available The problem of rendezvous of an interceptor rocket vehicle through optimal exit path with a destination rocket vehicle at a preassigned location on the destination orbit has been investigated for non-coaxial coplanar elliptic launch and destination orbits in an inverse square gravitational field. The case, when launch and destination orbits are coplanar circular, is also discussed. In the end numerical results for rendezvous have been obtained taking Earth and Mars orbits as launch and destination orbits respectively.

  1. Burn-back Equations for High Volumetric Loading Single-grain Dual-thrust Rocket Propellant Configuration (Review Paper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Shekhar

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Dual-thrust mode is adopted in solid propellant rocket propulsion through tailoring of burning area, nozzle, rocket motor chamber, propellant type, multiple propellant blocks. In the present study, mathematical formulation has been evolved for generation of burning surface area with web burnt for a simple central blind hole in a solid cylindrical propellant geometry with proper partial inhibition on external and lateral surfaces. The burn-back equation has been validated by static firing and parametric study was conducted to understand effect of various control geometrical parameters. The system is utilised for high volumetric loading, single propellant, single composition, single-chamber, single nozzle dual-thrust mode of burning profiles in rocket application.Defence Science Journal, 2011, 61(2, pp.165-170, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.61.41

  2. Advances on the treatment of solid tumor by 131I labeled mouse-human chimeric tumor necrosis therapy monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    131I labeled mouse-human chimeric tumor necrosis therapy monoclonal antibody (131I-chTNT) is a kind of new drug targeting at degenerated or necrotic nuclei in the tumor necrosis zone,and may be applicable to the majority of human solid tumors, such as lung cancer, liver cancer,colon carcinoma and glioma, while conventional tumor cell monoclonal antibody can target only tumor cell surface antigen. Enhanced effects can be achieved by 131I-chTNT in combination with other therapies, such as radiotherapy,chemotherapy or radiofrequency ablation, which may increase tumor necrosis region and expose more combinative targets. (authors)

  3. A phase I dose-escalation and pharmacokinetic study of enzastaurin and erlotinib in patients with advanced solid tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Padda, Sukhmani K.; Krupitskaya, Yelena; Chhatwani, Laveena; Fisher, George A; Colevas, Alexander D.; San Pedro-Salcedo, Melanie; Decker, Rodney; Latz, Jane E.; Wakelee, Heather A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Enzastaurin, an oral serine/threonine kinase inhibitor, targets the protein kinase C and AKT pathways with anti-tumor and anti-angiogenic effects. Erlotinib, an oral epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor, has activity in solid tumors. Based on the promising combination of EGFR inhibitors and anti-angiogenic agents, this phase I trial was initiated. Methods This single-institution, open-label, non-randomized trial used a standard 3 + 3 dose-escalation model in patients with...

  4. In situ57Fe Moessbauer Investigation of Solid-State Redox Reactions of Lithium Insertion Electrodes for Advanced Batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel in situ electrochemical cell for 57Fe Moessbauer measurements was developed in order to clarify the mechanisms of solid-state redox reactions in lithium insertion materials containing iron. Our in situ Moessbauer technique was successfully applied to the determination as to which transition metal ion was a redox center in the insertion electrodes, such as LiFe0.5Mn1.5O4, LiFeTiO4, or LiFe0.25Ni0.75O2, for the lithium-ion batteries.

  5. Technology Requirements for Affordable Single-Stage Rocket Launch Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Douglas O.; Piland, William M.

    2004-01-01

    A number of manned Earth-to-orbit (ETO) vehicle options for replacing or complementing the current Space Transportation System are being examined under the Advanced Manned Launch System (AMLS) study. The introduction of a reusable single-stage vehicle (SSV) into the U.S. launch vehicle fleet early in the next century could greatly reduce ETO launch costs. As a part of the AMLS study, the conceptual design of an SSV using a wide variety of enhancing technologies has recently been completed and is described in this paper. This paper also identifies the major enabling and enhancing technologies for a reusable rocket-powered SSV and provides examples of the mission payoff potential of a variety of important technologies. This paper also discusses the impact of technology advancements on vehicle margins, complexity, and risk, all of which influence the total system cost.

  6. Rocket Sled Propelled Testing of a Supersonic Inflatable Aerodynamic Decelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Michael B.; Kennett, Andrew; Townsend, Derik J.; Marti, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Decelerators (IADs) have traditionally been tested in wind tunnels. As the limitations of these test facilities are reached, other avenues must be pursued. The IAD being tested is a Supersonic IAD (SIAD), which attaches just aft of the heatshield around the perimeter of an entry body. This 'attached torus' SIAD is meant to improve the accuracy of landing for robotic class missions to Mars and allow for potentially increased payloads. The SIAD Design Verification (SDV) test aims to qualify the SIAD by applying a targeted aerodynamic load to the vehicle. While many test architectures were researched, a rocket sled track was ultimately chosen to be the most cost effective way to achieve the desired dynamic pressures. The Supersonic Naval Ordnance Research Track (SNORT) at the Naval Air Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) China Lake is a four mile test track, traditionally used for warhead and ejection seat testing. Prior to SDV, inflatable drag bodies have been tested on this particular track. Teams at Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) and NAWCWD collaborate together to design and fabricate one of the largest sleds ever built. The SDV sled is comprised of three individual sleds: a Pusher Sled which holds the solid booster rockets, an Item Sled which supports the test vehicle, and a Camera Sled that is pushed in front for in-situ footage and measurements. The JPL-designed Test Vehicle has a full-scale heatshield shape and contains all instrumentation and inflation systems necessary to inflate and test a SIAD. The first campaign that is run at SNORT tested all hardware and instrumentation before the SIAD was ready to be tested. For each of the three tests in this campaign, the number of rockets and top speed was increased and the data analyzed to ensure the hardware is safe at the necessary accelerations and aerodynamic loads.

  7. 头部空腔对固体火箭发动机压强振荡抑制作用的数值研究%Numerical analysis on effect of head cavity on resonance damping characteristics in solid rocket motors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峤; 李军伟; 苏万兴; 张雁; 王宁飞

    2012-01-01

    为了揭示头部空腔对固体火箭发动机压强振荡的抑制原理,以VKI实验发动机为基础,使用大涡模拟方法,对障碍物旋涡脱落诱发的振荡流场开展了数值研究,获得了压强振荡的频率和幅值,并和实验数据进行了对比.通过在发动机头部加入空腔,发现压强振幅明显减弱,证实了瑞利准则用于指导头部装药抑振设计的有效性.研究结果表明,空腔体积、位置、形状对振幅的影响很大,改变装药结构本质上是质量抽取与注入之间的相互抗争过程.装药头端复杂流场对抑振基本无效,在声压波节处改变药型对抑振基本无效,在声压波腹处加入的质量通量越大,振幅增加越显著,空腔越靠近声压波腹,空腔对声能的阻尼效应越强.%In order to reveal the effect of head-end cavity on resonance damping characteristics in solid rocket motors,large-eddy simulations were carried out to study the oscillation flowfield induced by obstacle vortex shedding on the foundation of VKI experimental motor. Pressure oscillation frequencies and amplitudes were obtained,and compared with the experimental data. It is investigated that oscillation amplitudes reduce remarkably after adding a cavity at the head-end. It is proved that Rayleigh criterion is effective for design of resonance damping. The results indicate that cavity volume,location and configuration have great effect on the oscillation amplitude. The substance of altering grain configuration is a comprehensive process of adding and extracting mass. The damping effect is not caused by the complicated flowfield at the head-end. Also,it is neglected if altering grain configuration at the pressure node. It is concluded that large mass flux added at pressure antinode could result in significant amplitude; meanwhile, the damping effect of cavity is stronger if the cavity is nearer to pressure antinode.

  8. Solid waste management

    OpenAIRE

    Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Golomeova, Saska; Krsteva, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Waste is unwanted or useless materials from households, industry, agriculture, hospitals. Waste materials in solid state are classified as solid waste. Increasing of the amount of solid waste and the pressure what it has on the environment, impose the need to introduce sustainable solid waste management. Advanced sustainable solid waste management involves several activities at a higher level of final disposal of the waste management hierarchy. Minimal use of material and energy resources ...

  9. Metallised Fuel rich Propellants for Solid Rocket Ramjet: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. K. Athawale

    1994-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the research work carried out in the field of metallised fuel-rich propellants (FRP. Limitations and merits of various potential metals (Al, Mg, B, Be, or Zr as a component of FRP are discussed. The paper also includes a discussion on the combustion mechanism of metallised propellants, including problem areas and probable remedial measures. Zirconium and Ti appear to have potential to offer FRP with efficient combustion. Ideal performance is not achieved with current systems based on Al and B and further work is needed to develop FRP having all three desirable attributes, viz., ease of ignition, stable combustion and high specific impulse (I/sub sp/ in a single composition.

  10. Development of the Algol III solid rocket motor for SCOUT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, B. R.; Mcbride, N. M.

    1971-01-01

    The design and performance of a motor developed for the first stage of the NASA SCOUT-D and E launch vehicles are discussed. The motor delivers a 30% higher total impulse and a 35 to 45% higher payload mass capability than its predecessor, the Algol IIB. The motor is 45 in. in diameter, has a length-to-diameter ratio of 8:1 and delivers an average 100,000-lb thrust for an action time of 72 sec. The motor design features a very high volumetrically loaded internal-burning charge of 17% aluminized polybutadiene propellant, a plasma-welded and heat-treated steel alloy case, and an all-ablative plastic nose liner enclosed in a steel shell. The only significant development problem was the grain design tailoring to account for erosive burning effects which occurred in the high-subsonic-Mach-number port. The tests performed on the motor are described.

  11. Solid rocket propellant waste disposal/ingredient recovery study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcintosh, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    A comparison of facility and operating costs of alternate methods shows open burning to be the lowest cost incineration method of waste propellant disposal. The selection, development, and implementation of an acceptable alternate is recommended. The recovery of ingredients from waste propellant has the probability of being able to pay its way, and even show a profit, when large consistent quantities of composite propellant are available. Ingredients recovered from space shuttle waste propellant would be worth over $1.5 million. Open and controlled burning are both energy wasteful.

  12. NASA Space Rocket Logistics Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neeley, James R.; Jones, James V.; Watson, Michael D.; Bramon, Christopher J.; Inman, Sharon K.; Tuttle, Loraine

    2014-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) is the new NASA heavy lift launch vehicle and is scheduled for its first mission in 2017. The goal of the first mission, which will be uncrewed, is to demonstrate the integrated system performance of the SLS rocket and spacecraft before a crewed flight in 2021. SLS has many of the same logistics challenges as any other large scale program. Common logistics concerns for SLS include integration of discreet programs geographically separated, multiple prime contractors with distinct and different goals, schedule pressures and funding constraints. However, SLS also faces unique challenges. The new program is a confluence of new hardware and heritage, with heritage hardware constituting seventy-five percent of the program. This unique approach to design makes logistics concerns such as commonality especially problematic. Additionally, a very low manifest rate of one flight every four years makes logistics comparatively expensive. That, along with the SLS architecture being developed using a block upgrade evolutionary approach, exacerbates long-range planning for supportability considerations. These common and unique logistics challenges must be clearly identified and tackled to allow SLS to have a successful program. This paper will address the common and unique challenges facing the SLS programs, along with the analysis and decisions the NASA Logistics engineers are making to mitigate the threats posed by each.

  13. Spinning Rocket Simulator Turntable Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    Contained herein is the research and data acquired from the Turntable Design portion of the Spinning Rocket Simulator (SRS) project. The SRS Project studies and eliminates the effect of coning on thrust-propelled spacecraft. This design and construction of the turntable adds a structural support for the SRS model and two degrees of freedom. The two degrees of freedom, radial and circumferential, will help develop a simulated thrust force perpendicular to the plane of the spacecraft model while undergoing an unstable coning motion. The Turntable consists of a ten-foot linear track mounted to a sprocket and press-fit to a thrust bearing. A two-inch high column grounded by a Triangular Baseplate supports this bearing and houses the slip rings and pressurized, air-line swivel. The thrust bearing allows the entire system to rotate under the moment applied through the chain-driven sprocket producing a circumferential degree of freedom. The radial degree of freedom is given to the model through the helically threaded linear track. This track allows the Model Support and Counter Balance to simultaneously reposition according to the coning motion of the Model. Two design factors that hinder the linear track are bending and twist due to torsion. A Standard Aluminum "C" channel significantly reduces these two deflections. Safety considerations dictate the design of all the components involved in this project.

  14. First-in-Man Dose-Escalation Study of the Selective BRAF Inhibitor RG7256 in Patients with BRAF V600-Mutated Advanced Solid Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Lassen, Ulrik; Cebon, Jonathan;

    2016-01-01

    and thyroid cancer). At high dose levels (>1200 mg BID), 10 of 16 (63 %) patients had a partial response. A decrease in maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) on FDG-PET of ≥25 % was observed in 19 of 37 patients. On-treatment reductions in pERK were documented in eight of ten paired tumor samples...... V600-mutated advanced solid tumors. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Patients received RG7256 orally over 8 dose levels from 200 mg once a day (QD) to 2400 mg twice a day (BID) (50-, 100- and 150-mg tablets) using a classic 3 + 3 dose escalation design. RESULTS: In total, 45 patients were enrolled; most (87...

  15. Solid-State 2-Micron Laser Transmitter Advancement for Wind and Carbon Dioxide Measurements From Ground, Airborne, and Space-Based Lidar Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Koch, Grady; Yu, Jirong; Ismail, Syed

    2008-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center has been developing 2-micron lidar technologies over a decade for wind measurements, utilizing coherent Doppler wind lidar technique and carbon dioxide measurements, utilizing Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique. Significant advancements have been made towards developing state-of-the-art technologies towards laser transmitters, detectors, and receiver systems. These efforts have led to the development of solid-state lasers with high pulse energy, tunablility, wavelength-stability, and double-pulsed operation. This paper will present a review of these technological developments along with examples of high resolution wind and high precision CO2 DIAL measurements in the atmosphere. Plans for the development of compact high power lasers for applications in airborne and future space platforms for wind and regional to global scale measurement of atmospheric CO2 will also be discussed.

  16. Evaluation of Geopolymer Concrete for Rocket Test Facility Flame Deflectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allgood, Daniel C.; Montes, Carlos; Islam, Rashedul; Allouche, Erez

    2014-01-01

    The current paper presents results from a combined research effort by Louisiana Tech University (LTU) and NASA Stennis Space Center (SSC) to develop a new alumina-silicate based cementitious binder capable of acting as a high performance refractory material with low heat ablation rate and high early mechanical strength. Such a binder would represent a significant contribution to NASA's efforts to develop a new generation of refractory 'hot face' liners for liquid or solid rocket plume environments. This project was developed as a continuation of on-going collaborations between LTU and SSC, where test sections of a formulation of high temperature geopolymer binder were cast in the floor and walls of Test Stand E-1 Cell 3, an active rocket engine test stand flame trench. Additionally, geopolymer concrete panels were tested using the NASA-SSC Diagnostic Test Facility (DTF) thruster, where supersonic plume environments were generated on a 1ft wide x 2ft long x 6 inch deep refractory panel. The DTF operates on LOX/GH2 propellants producing a nominal thrust of 1,200 lbf and the combustion chamber conditions are Pc=625psig, O/F=6.0. Data collected included high speed video of plume/panel area and surface profiles (depth) of the test panels measured on a 1-inch by 1-inch giving localized erosion rates during the test. Louisiana Tech conducted a microstructure analysis of the geopolymer binder after the testing program to identify phase changes in the material.

  17. An implantable and controlled drug-release silk fibroin nanofibrous matrix to advance the treatment of solid tumour cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Maobin; Fan, Dejun; Chen, Yufeng; Zhao, Zheng; He, Xiaowen; Li, Gang; Chen, Aizheng; Wu, Xiaojian; Li, Jiashen; Li, Zhi; Hunt, John A; Li, Yi; Lan, Ping

    2016-10-01

    The development of more effective cancer therapeutic strategies are still critically required. The maximization of the therapeutic effect in combination with avoiding the severe side effects on normal tissues when using chemotherapy drugs is still an urgent problem that requires improvements urgently. Here we provide implantable and controllable drug-release that utilises silk fibroin (SF) as a nanofibrous drug delivery system (DDS) for cancer treatment. A nanofibrous structure with controllable fibre diameter (curcumin (CM)-SF nanofibrous matrix had a superior anti-cancer potential when the concentration was >5 μg/mL. The mechanism could be explained by the cell cycle being held in the S phase. The toxic effect on normal cells (NCM460) was minimized by using a treatment concentration range (5-20 μg/mL). Implantation of this DDS into the tumour site inhibited the growth of solid tumour; this offers an alternative approach for novel cancer therapy. PMID:27376557

  18. A phase I study of the human anti-activin receptor-like kinase 1 antibody PF-03446962 in Asian patients with advanced solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Toshihiko; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Tae-Min; Ohtsu, Atsushi; Kim, Tae Yong; Ikeda, Masafumi; Yoh, Kiyotaka; Gallo Stampino, Corrado; Hirohashi, Tomoko; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Fujii, Yosuke; Andrew Williams, James; Bang, Yung-Jue

    2016-07-01

    Preclinical studies suggest that ALK-1 signaling mediates a complementary angiogenesis pathway activated upon development of resistance to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-targeted therapies. Inhibition of ALK-1 signaling may lead to disruption of tumor angiogenesis and growth. We report findings from a multicenter, open-label, phase I study of the fully human anti-ALK-1 mAb PF-03446962 conducted in Japan and South Korea, in Asian patients with advanced solid tumors. The dose escalation Part 1 of the study was based on a standard 3 + 3 design (n = 16). In Part 2, patients were treated with PF-03446962 at 7 and 10 mg/kg (10/cohort), including patients with disease progression following prior VEGF receptor (R)-targeted therapy. Primary objectives were determination of the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and recommended phase II dose (RP2D). Secondary objectives included safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and antitumor activity of PF-03446962. No dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was noted in the 12 DLT-evaluable patients. Treatment was well tolerated. The MTD for biweekly intravenous administration was estimated to be 10 mg/kg and the RP2D 7 mg/kg. Treatment-related grades 1-3 thrombocytopenia was experienced by 27.8% patients. The most frequent nonhematologic treatment-related AEs were grades 1-2 pyrexia and epistaxis. Four patients (3/4 with hepatocellular carcinoma) developed telangiectasia suggesting vascular targeting and in vivo ALK-1 inhibition by PF-03446962. Stable disease for 12 weeks or more was observed in 25.7% of patients and in 44.4% of those with hepatocellular carcinoma. ALK-1 inhibition by PF-03446962 may represent a novel antiangiogenic strategy for patients with advanced solid malignancies complementary to current treatment with VEGF(R)-targeted inhibitors or chemotherapy. PMID:27075560

  19. Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-05-01

    This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

  20. Transient combustion responses of homogeneous propellants to acoustic oscillations in axisymmetric rocket motors

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, T. S.; Culick, F. E. C.

    1997-01-01

    A numerical analysis of unsteady motions in solid rocket motors has been conducted. The formulation considers a 2-D axisymmetric combustion chamber and a choke nozzle, and treats the complete conservation equations accounting for turbulence closure and finiterate chemical kinetics in the gas phase and subsurface reactions. A fully coupled implicit scheme based on a dual time-stepping integration algorithm has been adopted to solve the governing equations and associated...

  1. Final LDRD report : design and fabrication of advanced device structures for ultra high efficiency solid state lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koleske, Daniel David; Bogart, Katherine Huderle Andersen; Shul, Randy John; Wendt, Joel Robert; Crawford, Mary Hagerott; Allerman, Andrew Alan; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2005-04-01

    The goal of this one year LDRD was to improve the overall efficiency of InGaN LEDs by improving the extraction of light from the semiconductor chip. InGaN LEDs are currently the most promising technology for producing high efficiency blue and green semiconductor light emitters. Improving the efficiency of InGaN LEDs will enable a more rapid adoption of semiconductor based lighting. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop photonic structures to improve light extraction from nitride-based light emitting diodes (LEDs). While many advanced device geometries were considered for this work, we focused on the use of a photonic crystal for improved light extraction. Although resonant cavity LEDs and other advanced structures certainly have the potential to improve light extraction, the photonic crystal approach showed the most promise in the early stages of this short program. The photonic crystal (PX)-LED developed here incorporates a two dimensional photonic crystal, or photonic lattice, into a nitride-based LED. The dimensions of the photonic crystal are selected such that there are very few or no optical modes in the plane of the LED ('lateral' modes). This will reduce or eliminate any radiation in the lateral direction so that the majority of the LED radiation will be in vertical modes that escape the semiconductor, which will improve the light-extraction efficiency. PX-LEDs were fabricated using a range of hole diameters and lattice constants and compared to control LEDs without a photonic crystal. The far field patterns from the PX-LEDs were dramatically modified by the presence of the photonic crystal. An increase in LED brightness of 1.75X was observed for light measured into a 40 degree emission cone with a total increase in power of 1.5X for an unencapsulated LED.

  2. Advances In Vertical Solid-State Current Limiters For Individual Field Emitter Regulation In High-Density Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Frances A.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-12-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of improved solid-state elements intended for individual regulation of field emitters part of high-density arrays. We demonstrate a high-yield, CMOS compatible fabrication process of single-crystal, vertical, ungated, n-type silicon field-effect transistors (FETs); each device behaves as a current source when is biased at a voltage larger than its drain-source saturation voltage. An ungated FET in saturation connected in series to a field emitter can compensate for the wide variation in current-voltage characteristics of the field emitters due to the tip radii spread present in any field emitter array, which should result in emitter burn-out protection, larger array utilization, and smaller array emission non-uniformity. Using 1-2 Ωcm single-crystal n-Si wafers, we fabricated arrays of 25 μm tall vertical ungated FETs with 0.5 μm diameter that span two orders of magnitude of array size. Experimental characterization of the arrays demonstrates that the current is limited with > 3.5 V bias voltage to the same ∼6 μA (6 A.cm-2) per-FET value. Finite element simulations of the device predict a saturation voltage close to the experimental value and a saturation current within a factor of two of the experimental value.

  3. Investigating Zeolite Local Structure with Advanced Solid State NMR. As-Synthesized ZSM-5 and Fe-ZSM-5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pieterse, J.A.Z. [ECN Clean Fossil Fuels, Petten (Netherlands); Abraham, A.; Van Bokhoven, J. [Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, ETH Zurich ETH-Hoenggerberg, HCI CH-8093 Zurich (Switzerland); Van Eck, E.R.H.; Kentgens, A.P.M. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Solid State NMR, Institute for Molecules and Materials, Radboud University, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2005-08-01

    Zeolites are porous materials that have a major impact and use in the areas of catalysis (e.g. hydro-cracking), ion exchange (e.g. pollution remediation) and are extensively used as molecular sieves. Despite extensive research, some aspects of zeolites are still not well understood. Here some recent results obtained for a variety of zeolites are presented, illustrating the advantage of using higher field solid state NMR in this area of research. Different catalytic properties can be gained by exchanging the charge balancing protons for other ions or by loading the zeolite with metals in a variety of ways. Iron-exchanged zeolites are an important example, especially Fe-ZSM-5, and are being studied for use as DeNOx catalysts in lean-burn gasoline and diesel engines and also for N2O decomposition and reduction. In order to study the interaction between iron and the zeolite lattice, Fe-exchanged ZSM5 is investigated by {sup 27}Al MQMAS NMR in its dried and hydrated state. The results indicate that some of the aluminium associated with the Bronsted sites participate in the ion exchange while others are not. In as-synthesized ZSM-5 the interaction between the template molecule around which the zeolite lattice builds and aluminium located in the lattice is clearly illustrated with the TRAPDOR technique. It indicates that the aluminium and methyl carbons in one type of channel are much closer than in the other type of channel.

  4. Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Mesothelioma That Is Refractory to Cisplatin and Pemetrexed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-04

    Advanced Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Peritoneal Malignant Mesothelioma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Solid Neoplasm; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Ovarian Cancer; Stage IIIC Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma; Thymoma

  5. CANSAT: Design of a Small Autonomous Sounding Rocket Payload

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Joshua; Duda, Michael; Garnand-Royo, Jeff; Jones, Alexa; Pickering, Todd; Tutko, Samuel

    2009-01-01

    CanSat is an international student design-build-launch competition organized by the American Astronautical Society (AAS) and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA). The competition is also sponsored by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), AGI, Orbital Sciences Corporation, Praxis Incorporated, and SolidWorks. Specifically, the 2009 Virginia Tech CanSat Team is funded by BAE Systems, Incorporated of Manassas, Virginia. The objective of the 2009 CanSat competition is to complete remote sensing missions by designing a small autonomous sounding rocket payload. The payload designed will follow and perform to a specific set of mission requirements for the 2009 competition. The competition encompasses a complete life-cycle of one year which includes all phases of design, integration, testing, reviews, and launch.

  6. Rocket observations of energetic particles at the geomagnetic equator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. G.; Houshmand, B.

    1985-01-01

    Energetic particle detectors were included in the payloads of two rockets launched in Peru during the Condor campaign of 1983. These night-time flights reached altitudes of 587 and 535 km, respectively. The pitch-angle distribution is anisotropic with the maximum at 90 deg. Each payload included two solid-state detectors differing in the thickness of the aluminum coating. Comparison of the fluxes measured by the two detectors leads to the conclusion that, on both occasions, the energetic particles are predominantly helium ions. The flux is small below 200 km, increases linearly to 350 km, and then more slowly to apogee. The east-west asymmetry of flux, noted at 200 km in a previous equatorial launch, is not seen at greater altitudes, consistent with the flux profile and the large gyroradius of the ions.

  7. Nano-aluminum as energetic material for rocket propellants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meda, L. [Istituto G. Donegani, Polimeri Europa, 28100 Novara (Italy)], E-mail: laura.meda@polimerieuropa.com; Marra, G. [Istituto G. Donegani, Polimeri Europa, 28100 Novara (Italy); Galfetti, L.; Severini, F.; De Luca, L. [Politecnico di Milano, Solid Propulsion Laboratory (SP Lab), 20158 Milano (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    A characterization of differently sized aluminum powders, by using BET (specific surface measurements), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), was performed in order to evaluate their performance in solid propellant. These aluminum powders were used in manufacturing composite rocket propellants, that are based on Ammonium Perchlorate (AP) as oxidizer and Hydroxyl-Terminated-PolyButadiene (HTPB) as binder. The reference formulation was AP/HTPB/Al with 68/17/15 mass fractions, respectively. The ballistic characterization of studied propellants, made in terms of steady burning rates, showed how better is the performance of nano-aluminized compared to micro-aluminized propellants. Measurements of Al powder ignition time and temperature were also carried out.

  8. Radiation/convection coupling in rocket motor and plume analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saladino, A. J.; Farmer, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    A method for describing radiation/convection coupling to a flow field analysis was developed for rocket motors and plumes. The three commonly used propellant systems (H2/O2, RP-1/O2, and solid propellants) radiate primarily as: molecular emitters, non-scattering small particles (soot), and scattering larger particles (Al2O3), respectively. For the required solution, the divergence of the radiation heat flux was included in the energy equation, and the local, volume averaged intensity was determined by a solution to the radiative transfer equation. A rigorous solution to this problem is intractable, therefore, solution methods which use the ordinary and improved differential approximation were developed. This radiation model was being incorporated into the FDNS code, a Navier-Stokes flowfield solver for multiphase, turbulent combusting flows.

  9. A Sounding Rocket experiment to Validate Ultraviolet Remote Sensing of the Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, S.; Stephan, A. W.; Erickson, P. J.; Cook, T.; Mende, S. B.

    2009-12-01

    Despite decades of observations and interpretations of ultraviolet airglow, advancing the derivation of physical parameters of the ionosphere and atmosphere beyond the current successes presents difficult challenges due to the lack of comprehensive understanding of the fundamental detailed physics that surrounds the associated airglow emission process. The daytime thermosphere, while better characterized than the ionosphere, is still subject to uncertainties caused by the need for somewhat ad-hoc modeling using a multi-step process that creates the UV airglow emissions. The state of the field for the daytime ionosphere is currently based on only a few dozen profiles obtained from sounding rocket and satellite missions, none of which were designed to obtain the necessary comprehensive set of measurements. We have designed a sounding rocket experiment that will validate extreme and far ultraviolet (EUV/FUV) remote sensing of the ionosphere and thermosphere during day time. The sounding rocket data will be coordinated with simultaneous observations by an Incoherent Scatter Radar which will provide altitude profiles of daytime electron density, ion composition, electron and ion temperatures, and ion drifts due to winds and electric fields as well as neutral temperature profiles. The instruments aboard the sounding rocket will observe full-disk solar EUV and FUV irradiance measurements in the 2 - 131 nm band along with a high speed multi-wavelength photometer package that will provide altitude profiles of thermospheric neutral species along the rocket track. The dayglow instrument will cover 60 - 140 nm spectral range and observe the emissions in a direction perpendicular to the rocket axis, which will point towards the Sun. With these measurements, we hope to answer how well the EUV and FUV dayglow measurements can be used to provide a self-consistent measure of the day time ionosphere-thermosphere space environment.

  10. Fundamental rocket injector/spray programs at the Phillips Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talley, D. G.

    1993-11-01

    injectors, but can be a consideration in preburners, where the desire to keep turbine inlet temperatures as cool as possible can make it advantageous for the preburners to operate as far from stoichiometry as can be tolerated. costs. In fact, it can easily be argued that reducing engine development time and costs is essential to maintaining U.S. competitiveness in space. *The Propulsion Directorate of the Phillips Laboratory has invested in a number of programs to advance liquid rocket engine technology, and several of these are directed at improving design tools for liquid rocket injectors. -The purpose of the presentation will be to describe some of these latter programs.

  11. Hydrocarbon Rocket Engine Plume Imaging with Laser Induced Incandescence Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA/ Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) needs sensors that can be operated on rocket engine plume environments to improve NASA/SSC rocket engine performance. In...

  12. Cusp Alfven and Plasma Electrodynamics Rocket (CAPER) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Launch a single rocket from Andoya Rocket Range into an active cusp event. Observe electric and magnetic fields, HF waves, electron and ion distributions and...

  13. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyde, R.A.

    1983-09-27

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm/sup -1/, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs.

  14. Rocket studies of the lower ionosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowhill, Sidney A.

    1990-01-01

    The earth's ionosphere in the altitude range of 50 to 200 km was investigated by rocket-borne sensors, supplemented by ground-based measurement. The rocket payloads included mass spectrometers, energetic particle detectors, Langmuir probes and radio propagation experiments. Where possible, rocket flights were included in studies of specific phenomena, and the availability of data from other experiments greatly increased the significance of the results. The principal ionospheric phenomena studied were: winter anomaly in radiowave absorption, ozone and molecular oxygen densities, mid-latitude sporadic-E layers, energetic particle precipitation at middle and low latitudes, ionospheric instabilities and turbulence, and solar eclipse effects in the D and E regions. This document lists personnel who worked on the project, and provides a bibliography of resultant publications.

  15. Laser-fusion rocket for interplanetary propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rocket powered by fusion microexplosions is well suited for quick interplanetary travel. Fusion pellets are sequentially injected into a magnetic thrust chamber. There, focused energy from a fusion Driver is used to implode and ignite them. Upon exploding, the plasma debris expands into the surrounding magnetic field and is redirected by it, producing thrust. This paper discusses the desired features and operation of the fusion pellet, its Driver, and magnetic thrust chamber. A rocket design is presented which uses slightly tritium-enriched deuterium as the fusion fuel, a high temperature KrF laser as the Driver, and a thrust chamber consisting of a single superconducting current loop protected from the pellet by a radiation shield. This rocket can be operated with a power-to-mass ratio of 110 W gm-1, which permits missions ranging from occasional 9 day VIP service to Mars, to routine 1 year, 1500 ton, Plutonian cargo runs

  16. Metallic Hydrogen: A Game Changing Rocket Propellant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvera, Isaac F.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this research is to produce metallic hydrogen in the laboratory using an innovative approach, and to study its metastability properties. Current theoretical and experimental considerations expect that extremely high pressures of order 4-6 megabar are required to transform molecular hydrogen to the metallic phase. When metallic hydrogen is produced in the laboratory it will be extremely important to determine if it is metastable at modest temperatures, i.e. remains metallic when the pressure is released. Then it could be used as the most powerful chemical rocket fuel that exists and revolutionize rocketry, allowing single-stage rockets to enter orbit and chemically fueled rockets to explore our solar system.

  17. Solid waste treatment technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Golomeova, Saska; Srebrenkoska, Vineta; Krsteva, Silvana; Spasova, Sanja

    2013-01-01

    Environmental pollution is the major problem associated with rapid industrialization, urbanization and rise in living standards of people. Increasing of the amount of solid waste and the pressure what it has on the environment, impose the need to introduce advanced approach to effectively managing of solid waste. This advanced approach includes technologies for solid waste treatment, that fall into the category of "Renewable". This paper put emphasis on technologies for material and energy u...

  18. Trajectory Correction Flight Control System using Pulsejeton an Artillery Rocket

    OpenAIRE

    S. K. Gupta; Saxena, S; Ankur Singhal; Ghosh, A. K.

    2008-01-01

    A trajectory correction flight control system is small and durable, and consists of a lateralpulsejet ring mounted on the rocket body. The pulsejet ring consists of a finite number of individualpulsejets. Each pulsejet on the ring imparts a single, short-duration, large force to the rocket inthe plane normal to the rocket axis of symmetry. Lateral pulsejets are used by flight controlsystem to assist the rocket to follow a pre-specified (command) trajectory. The trajectory-trackingflight contr...

  19. Regression Rate Study in HTPB/GOX Hybrid Rocket Motors.

    OpenAIRE

    Philmon George; Krishnan, S; Lalitha Ramachandran; P. M. Varkey; Raveendran, M

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical and experimenIal studies on hybrid rocket motor combustion research are briefly reviewed and the need for a clear understanding of hybrid rocket fuel regression rate mechanism is brought out. A test facility established at the Indian Institute of Technology, Madras, for hybrid rocket motor research study is described.The results of an experimental study on hydroxyl terminated polybutadiene and gaseous oxygen hybrid rocket motor are presented. Fuel grains with ammonium perchlor...

  20. Permitting and solid waste management issues for the Bailly Station wet limestone Advanced Flue Gas Desulfurization (AFGD) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pure Air (a general partnership between Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries America, Inc.). is constructing a wet limestone co-current advanced flue gas desulfurization (AFGD) system that has technological and commercial advantages over conventional FGD systems in the United States. The AFGD system is being installed at the Northern Indiana Public Service Company's Bailly Generating Station near Gary, Indiana. The AFGD system is scheduled to be operational by the Summer, 1992. The AFGD system will remove at least 90 percent of the sulfur dioxide (SO2) in the flue gas from Boilers 7 and 8 at the Station while burning 3.2 percent sulfur coal. Also as part of testing the AFGD system, 95 percent removal of SO2 will be demonstrated on coals containing up to 4.5 percent sulfur. At the same time that SO2 is removed from the flue gas, a gypsum by-product will be produced which will be used for wallboard manufacturing. Since the AFGD system is a pollution control device, one would expect its installation to be received favorably by the public and regulatory agencies. Although the project was well received by regulatory agencies, on public group (Save the Dunes Council) was initially concerned since the project is located adjacent to the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore. The purpose of this paper is to describe the project team's experiences in obtaining permits/approvals from regulatory agencies and in dealing with the public. 1 ref., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  1. The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket: a stable LTD platform 30 seconds after rocket motor burnout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porter, F.S. E-mail: frederick.s.porter@gsfc.nasa.gov; Almy, R.; Apodaca, E.; Figueroa-Feliciano, E.; Galeazzi, M.; Kelley, R.; McCammon, D.; Stahle, C.K.; Szymkowiak, A.E.; Sanders, W.T

    2000-04-07

    The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket experiment is designed to provide a stable thermal environment for an LTD detector system within 30 s of the burnout of its second stage rocket motor. The detector system used for this instrument is a 36-pixel microcalorimeter array operated at 60 mK with a single-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR is mounted on a space-pumped liquid helium tank with vapor cooled shields which is vibration isolated from the rocket structure. We present here some of the design and performance details of this mature LTD instrument, which has just completed its third suborbital flight.

  2. The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket: a stable LTD platform 30 seconds after rocket motor burnout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The XQC microcalorimeter sounding rocket experiment is designed to provide a stable thermal environment for an LTD detector system within 30 s of the burnout of its second stage rocket motor. The detector system used for this instrument is a 36-pixel microcalorimeter array operated at 60 mK with a single-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator (ADR). The ADR is mounted on a space-pumped liquid helium tank with vapor cooled shields which is vibration isolated from the rocket structure. We present here some of the design and performance details of this mature LTD instrument, which has just completed its third suborbital flight

  3. Slag Prediction in Submerged Rocket Nozzle Through Two-Phase CFD Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Kumar Chaturvedi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A computational procedure has been established to predict the slag in a practical solid rocket motor with submerged nozzle. Both single-phase and two-phase flow analyses have been performed in the rocket motor port. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations along with SST turbulence model have been solved for gas-phase calculations. The effect of ejected alumina particles from the propellant geometry on the flow field has been simulated through Lagrangian tracking method. The computational methodology is firstly validated by comparing against other numerical results of rocket motors available in the literature before applying the same to predict the slag accumulation of a submerged rocket motor for strategic applications. Burn-back geometries at different instants have been simulated and parametric studies were performed to find out the effect of Al2O3 particle size. It was observed that the slag capture rate increases uniformly with A12O3 particle size. The predicted slag accumulation data match closely with the ground test data for the range of conditions simulated in the present work.Defence Science Journal, Vol. 65, No. 2, March 2015, pp.99-106, DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.14429/dsj.65.7147 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE

  4. Regression rate behaviors of HTPB-based propellant combinations for hybrid rocket motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xingliang; Tian, Hui; Li, Yuelong; Yu, Nanjia; Cai, Guobiao

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to characterize the regression rate behavior of hybrid rocket motor propellant combinations, using hydrogen peroxide (HP), gaseous oxygen (GOX), nitrous oxide (N2O) as the oxidizer and hydroxyl-terminated poly-butadiene (HTPB) as the based fuel. In order to complete this research by experiment and simulation, a hybrid rocket motor test system and a numerical simulation model are established. Series of hybrid rocket motor firing tests are conducted burning different propellant combinations, and several of those are used as references for numerical simulations. The numerical simulation model is developed by combining the Navies-Stokes equations with the turbulence model, one-step global reaction model, and solid-gas coupling model. The distribution of regression rate along the axis is determined by applying simulation mode to predict the combustion process and heat transfer inside the hybrid rocket motor. The time-space averaged regression rate has a good agreement between the numerical value and experimental data. The results indicate that the N2O/HTPB and GOX/HTPB propellant combinations have a higher regression rate, since the enhancement effect of latter is significant due to its higher flame temperature. Furthermore, the containing of aluminum (Al) and/or ammonium perchlorate(AP) in the grain does enhance the regression rate, mainly due to the more energy released inside the chamber and heat feedback to the grain surface by the aluminum combustion.

  5. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapline, G.; Matsuda, Y.

    1991-08-01

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: approximately twice the efficiency if the fission fragment energy can be directly converted into electricity; reduction of the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collection of the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem.

  6. Energy production using fission fragment rockets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fission fragment rockets are nuclear reactors with a core consisting of thin fibers in a vacuum, and which use magnetic fields to extract the fission fragments from the reactor core. As an alternative to ordinary nuclear reactors, fission fragment rockets would have the following advantages: Approximately twice as efficient if one can directly convert the fission fragment energy into electricity; by reducing the buildup of a fission fragment inventory in the reactor one could avoid a Chernobyl type disaster; and collecting the fission fragments outside the reactor could simplify the waste disposal problem. 6 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  7. AJ26 rocket engine testing news briefing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Operators at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center are completing modifications to the E-1 Test Stand to begin testing Aerojet AJ26 rocket engines in early summer of 2010. Modifications include construction of a 27-foot-deep flame deflector trench. The AJ26 rocket engines will be used to power Orbital Sciences Corp.'s Taurus II space vehicles to provide commercial cargo transportation missions to the International Space Station for NASA. Stennis has partnered with Orbital to test all engines for the transport missions.

  8. Rocket Propulsion Engineering Company Small Launch Vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Grote, James; Pavia, Tom

    2000-01-01

    Rocket Propulsion Engineering (RPe) is developing the first in a family of two low-cost, two stage, small rocket vehicles suitable for target, suborbital, and small-sat orbital applications. The first of these two launch vehicles, the Prospect LV-1 will have an orbital payload of 300-400 lb. The larger vehicle, the Prospect LV-2, uses about 80% of the components and technology of the LV-1 and will orbit payloads of 1500-1700 lb. Two engines are being developed. A first stage 30,000 lbf class ...

  9. Device and process for attachment of parts to rocket motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagla, Jon J.; Lowry, Robert W.; Mears, Otho L.

    1992-04-01

    An attachment platform positioned longitudinally on a rocket motor chamber and secured with laser welding techniques is described. Each attachment platform is continuously sealed longitudinally to the rocket motor chamber through the application of laser welding and optical seam tracking. Application of laser welding techniques allows for repair and installation of attachment platforms on rocket motors fully loaded with live propellant.

  10. Influence of Rocket Engine Characteristics on Shaft Sealing Technology Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keba, John E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents viewgraphs of The Influence of Rocket Engine Characteristics on Shaft Sealing Technology Needs. The topics include: 1) Rocket Turbomachinery Shaft Seals (Inter-Propellant-Seal (IPS) Systems, Lift-off Seal Systems, and Technology Development Needs); 2) Rocket Engine Characteristics (Engine cycles, propellants, missions, etc., Influence on shaft sealing requirements); and 3) Conclusions.

  11. Advanced liquid extraction and solid extractant procedures for ultratrace determination of rhenium by radiochemical neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two radiochemical procedures for determination of Re at the ultratrace level have been developed recently in our laboratories, one based on liquid extraction, the other one on a solid extractant (SEX). Decomposition of an irradiated sample prior to radiochemical separation is common to both procedures. Depending on sample character it is either microwave assisted digestion in concentrated HNO3 followed by evaporation with HF, H2O2 and HCl, or alkaline oxidative fusion with NaOH and Na2O2 at 900 deg C. For the liquid extraction of Re(VII), several agents were tested including tetraphenylarsonium chloride in chloroform, 2-butanone, and isoamylalcohol. The SEX procedure employs trialkyl-methylammonium chloride incorporated in modified polyacrylonitrile. The chemical yield of separation was determined using 188Re or 184,184mRe radiotracers, reactivation of the added Re inactive carrier was also an alternative. In both procedures, Au and Mo co-extract with Re, thus preliminary extraction with Zn(DDC)2 was applied in the liquid extraction, while a pre-separation mixed-bed column containing Zn(DDC)2 and polyantimonic acid (for 24Na retention), and additional masking of Au with thiourea was used in the SEX procedure. The 99Mo daughter, 99mTc, is not removed in the pre-separation due to close chemical properties of pertechnetate and perrhenate, and its 140.5 keV gamma line would interfere with the 137.1 keV line of 186Re. A lower redox potential of Re compared to Tc allows to reduce selectively the latter to a lower oxidation state which is not co-extracted with Re(VII). From several reducing agents tested, SnCl2 turned out to be most effective and selective enough under controlled conditions. Both RNAA procedures have been compared in terms of detection limits attainable (in the sub-ng g-1 range) and the ease of performance, and applied for Re determination in several biological and environmental reference materials

  12. Phase I and pharmacokinetic study of combined treatment with perifosine and radiation in patients with advanced solid tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Perifosine is an orally applicable, membrane-targeted alkylphosphocholine analogue with antitumour activity and radiosensitising properties in preclinical models. The purpose of this phase I study was to determine the feasibility and tolerability of concurrent daily perifosine and radiation in patients with advanced cancer. Patients and methods: Starting dose of perifosine was 50 mg/day; dose escalation was in steps of 50 mg. Daily administration commenced 2 days before radiotherapy and was continued throughout the radiation treatment. At least three patients were entered at each dose level; at the 150 mg/day level 10 patients were included. Pharmacokinetic sampling was performed weekly pre-dosing. Twenty-one patients were entered. Tumour types included NSCLC (n = 17), prostate, oesophageal, colon and bladder cancer. Most patients (16/21) had received prior chemotherapy; none radiotherapy. Median number of daily perifosine administrations was 31 (range 24-53). Mean radiation dose (BED1) was 59.8 Gy (range 50.7-87.5 Gy in 13-28 fractions). Results: Major drug-related toxicities according to CTC criteria were nausea in 57%, fatigue in 48%, vomiting in 38%, diarrhoea in 38% and anorexia in 19%. No bone marrow toxicity was observed. DLT (nausea/vomiting) was encountered in two of five patients at the 200 mg/day dose level. Dose-dependent steady-state plasma levels were reached after 1 week. Major radiotherapy-related acute toxicity consisted of dysphagia in 38% and pneumonitis in 29%. Conclusion: Perifosine can be safely combined with fractionated radiotherapy. A dosage of 150 mg/day, to be started at least 1 week prior to radiotherapy, is recommended for phase II evaluation

  13. Pegylated liposomal mitomycin C prodrug enhances tolerance of mitomycin C: a phase 1 study in advanced solid tumor patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitomycin C (MMC) has potent cytotoxicity but cumulative toxicity limits widespread use. In animals, pegylated liposomal mitomycin C lipid-based prodrug (PL-MLP) was well tolerated and more effective than free MMC. We evaluated PL-MLP in patients with advanced cancer. Twenty-seven patients were treated in escalating dose cohorts of 0.5–3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.15–1.03 mg/kg MMC) every 4 weeks for up to 12 cycles, unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Pharmacokinetics were assessed during cycles 1 and 3. Per protocol maximum tolerated dose was not reached at 3.5 mg/kg. However, prolonged thrombocytopenia developed after repeated doses of 3 mg/kg or cumulative doses of 10–12 mg/kg. Dose-related grade 3 or higher adverse events included fatigue, anemia, and decreased platelets. Cmax and AUC0-∞ increased linearly over the dose range 0.5–2.0 mg/kg, and greater than linearly from 2.5 to 3.5 mg/kg; there were no significant differences in clearance of MLP between cycles 1 and 3. Median t1/2 was 23 h among dose cohorts, with no trend by dose or cycle. One patient had a partial response. Stable disease was observed in 10 patients across all dose levels. PL-MLP has a long circulation time, was well tolerated, and can be administered to heavily pretreated patients at a single dose of 3.0 mg/kg and cumulative dose of 10–12 mg/kg before development of prolonged thrombocytopenia; this is nearly threefold the equivalent dose of MMC tolerated historically. This formulation may be active in a variety of tumor types and is better tolerated than free MMC

  14. Pharmacogenetics-Guided Phase I Study of Capecitabine on an Intermittent Schedule in Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soo, Ross Andrew; Syn, Nicholas; Lee, Soo-Chin; Wang, Lingzhi; Lim, Xn-Yii; Loh, Marie; Tan, Sing-Huang; Zee, Ying-Kiat; Wong, Andrea Li-Ann; Chuah, Benjamin; Chan, Daniel; Lim, Siew-Eng; Goh, Boon-Cher; Soong, Richie; Yong, Wei-Peng

    2016-01-01

    The FDA-approved starting dosage of capecitabine is 1,250 mg/m(2), and market research indicates that U.S. physicians routinely prescribe 1,000 mg/m(2). Retrospective analyses however report reduced toxicity and efficacy in a subset of patients with the 3R/3R genotype of the thymidylate synthase gene enhancer region (TSER). This study sought to develop TSER genotype-specific guidelines for capecitabine dosing. Capecitabine was dose-escalated in advanced and/or metastatic cancer patients with TSER 3R/3R (Group A; N = 18) or 2R/2R + 2R/3R (Group B; N = 5) from 1,250 to 1,625 mg/m(2) b.i.d., every 2 weeks on/1 week off for up to 8 cycles. Parent and metabolites pharmacokinetics, adverse events, and tumour response were assessed. The maximum tolerated and recommended doses in 3R/3R patients are 1,625 mg/m(2) and 1,500 mg/m(2). At 1,500 mg/m(2), one in nine 3R/3R patients experienced a dose-limiting toxicity. Dosing guidelines for 2R/2R + 2R/3R remain undetermined due to poor accrual. The results indicate that 3R/3R patients may be amenable to 1,500 mg/m(2) b.i.d. on an intermittent schedule, and is the first to prospectively validate the utility of TSER pharmacogenetic-testing before capecitabine treatment. PMID:27296624

  15. Pegylated liposomal mitomycin C prodrug enhances tolerance of mitomycin C: a phase 1 study in advanced solid tumor patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Grenader, Tal; Ohana, Patricia; Amitay, Yasmine; Shmeeda, Hilary; La-Beck, Ninh M; Tahover, Esther; Berger, Raanan; Gabizon, Alberto A

    2015-10-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) has potent cytotoxicity but cumulative toxicity limits widespread use. In animals, pegylated liposomal mitomycin C lipid-based prodrug (PL-MLP) was well tolerated and more effective than free MMC. We evaluated PL-MLP in patients with advanced cancer. Twenty-seven patients were treated in escalating dose cohorts of 0.5-3.5 mg/kg (equivalent to 0.15-1.03 mg/kg MMC) every 4 weeks for up to 12 cycles, unless disease progression or unacceptable toxicity occurred. Pharmacokinetics were assessed during cycles 1 and 3. Per protocol maximum tolerated dose was not reached at 3.5 mg/kg. However, prolonged thrombocytopenia developed after repeated doses of 3 mg/kg or cumulative doses of 10-12 mg/kg. Dose-related grade 3 or higher adverse events included fatigue, anemia, and decreased platelets. Cmax and AUC0-∞ increased linearly over the dose range 0.5-2.0 mg/kg, and greater than linearly from 2.5 to 3.5 mg/kg; there were no significant differences in clearance of MLP between cycles 1 and 3. Median t1/2 was 23 h among dose cohorts, with no trend by dose or cycle. One patient had a partial response. Stable disease was observed in 10 patients across all dose levels. PL-MLP has a long circulation time, was well tolerated, and can be administered to heavily pretreated patients at a single dose of 3.0 mg/kg and cumulative dose of 10-12 mg/kg before development of prolonged thrombocytopenia; this is nearly threefold the equivalent dose of MMC tolerated historically. This formulation may be active in a variety of tumor types and is better tolerated than free MMC. PMID:26172205

  16. Advanced Develpment of Solid Polymer Electrolytes Used in Lithium Batteries%锂离子电池用聚合物固体电解质的新进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    胡树文; 张正诚; 方世璧

    2001-01-01

    Advanced development of solid polymer electrolytes used inlithium batteries was reviewed since early 1980′s in this paper.The structure and property of polymer electrolytes are reviewed with 75 references.%综述了锂离子电池用聚合物固体电解质方面的进展。

  17. Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) Propulsion Technology Workshop. Tutorial session

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    The goal of this workshop was to illuminate the nation's space transportation and propulsion engineering community on the potential of hypersonic combined cycle (airbreathing/rocket) propulsion systems for future space transportation applications. Four general topics were examined: (1) selections from the expansive advanced propulsion archival resource; (2) related propulsion systems technical backgrounds; (3) RBCC engine multimode operations related subsystem background; and (4) focused review of propulsion aspects of current related programs.

  18. Rocketing into the future the history and technology of rocket planes

    CERN Document Server

    van Pelt, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Rocketing into the Future journeys into the exciting world of rocket planes, examining the exotic concepts and actual flying vehicles that have been devised over the last one hundred years. Lavishly illustrated with over 150 photographs, it recounts the history of rocket planes from the early pioneers who attached simple rockets on to their wooden glider airplanes to the modern world of high-tech research vehicles. The book then looks at the possibilities for the future. The technological and economic challenges of the Space Shuttle proved insurmountable, and thus the program was unable to fulfill its promise of low-cost access to space. However, the burgeoning market of suborbital space tourism may yet give the necessary boost to the development of a truly reusable spaceplane.

  19. PR-104 a bioreductive pre-prodrug combined with gemcitabine or docetaxel in a phase Ib study of patients with advanced solid tumours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKeage Mark J

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this phase Ib clinical trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD of PR-104 a bioreductive pre-prodrug given in combination with gemcitabine or docetaxel in patients with advanced solid tumours. Methods PR-104 was administered as a one-hour intravenous infusion combined with docetaxel 60 to 75 mg/m2 on day one given with or without granulocyte colony stimulating factor (G-CSF on day two or administrated with gemcitabine 800 mg/m2 on days one and eight, of a 21-day treatment cycle. Patients were assigned to one of ten PR-104 dose-levels ranging from 140 to 1100 mg/m2 and to one of four combination groups. Pharmacokinetic studies were scheduled for cycle one day one and 18F fluoromisonidazole (FMISO positron emission tomography hypoxia imaging at baseline and after two treatment cycles. Results Forty two patients (23 females and 19 males were enrolled with ages ranging from 27 to 85 years and a wide range of advanced solid tumours. The MTD of PR-104 was 140 mg/m2 when combined with gemcitabine, 200 mg/m2 when combined with docetaxel 60 mg/m2, 770 mg/m2 when combined with docetaxel 60 mg/m2 plus G-CSF and ≥770 mg/m2 when combined with docetaxel 75 mg/m2 plus G-CSF. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT across all four combination settings included thrombocytopenia, neutropenic fever and fatigue. Other common grade three or four toxicities included neutropenia, anaemia and leukopenia. Four patients had partial tumour response. Eleven of 17 patients undergoing FMISO scans showed tumour hypoxia at baseline. Plasma pharmacokinetics of PR-104, its metabolites (alcohol PR-104A, glucuronide PR-104G, hydroxylamine PR-104H, amine PR-104M and semi-mustard PR-104S1, docetaxel and gemcitabine were similar to that of their single agents. Conclusions Combination of PR-104 with docetaxel or gemcitabine caused dose-limiting and severe myelotoxicity, but prophylactic G-CSF allowed PR-104 dose escalation with docetaxel. Dose

  20. Rocket Combustor Validation Data for Advanced Combustion Models Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The pace and cost of developing an engine system for future explorations is strongly influenced by the inadequacies of design tools and the supporting databases....